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Sample records for mass transfer effect

  1. Multiscale computations of mass accumulation effect on mass transfer in bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-11-01

    Mass transfer in bubbly flow generally takes place on a much smaller length and time scale than the length and time scale of the momentum flow, resulting in a thin mass boundary layer around the bubbles. We developed a multiscale model to solve a boundary layer equation for the mass boundary layer next to the bubble interface, assuming zero mass concentration in the far field, which couples with the rest of domain using a source/sink term. Here, we extend our model to account for non-zero concentration next to the mass boundary layer. Comparison of simple case studies in 1D and 2D problems show good agreement between the fully resolved solution and the solution on a much coarser grid using our model. We study the effect of mass accumulation in a domain and also the effect of bubble moving into the wake of another bubble on the mass transfer. This study was funded by NSF Grant CBET-1132410.

  2. Hydromagnetic free convection flow with Hall effect and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) deals with the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an electromagnetic field, which has many applications in astrophysics, geophysics and engineering. Objective of the present study in this paper is to consider the effect of dissipation and Hall current on the MHD free convection flow with mass transfer in a porous vertical channel. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained by solving the complex variables. The effect of Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), and Concentration parameter (Sc) on the velocity and temperature of the fluid is studied. Simulation results show that the shear stress of primary and secondary velocity for the lower plate increases with increase in the strength of Hall parameter (m) and decreases with increase in Hartmann number (M) and concentration parameter (Sc).

  3. Mass transfer effects on the transmission of bubble screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Daniel; Bergamasco, Luca

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate, theoretically and numerically, the reflection and transmission properties of bubble screens excited by pressure wave pulses. We use modified expressions for the bubble resonance frequency and the damping factor in order to capture the influence of mass transfer on the reflection-transmission coefficients. In addition to the influence of variables such as the bubble radius and the averaged inter-bubble distance, the analysis reveals that in conditions close to the saturation line there exists a regime where the heat transport surrounding the bubble plays an important role on the bubble's response also influencing the reflection properties of the bubble screen. The linear analysis allows us to predict the critical vapor content beyond which liquid heat's transport controls the dynamic response of the bubbles. Numerical simulations show that these effects become especially relevant in the nonlinear regime. ANR Cachmap.

  4. Effect of vapor-phase mass transfer on aquifer restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.T.; Staes, E.G.

    1992-02-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOC) are a frequent source of groundwater contamination in North Carolina and throughout the United States and other developed countries. The work is considered a subset of the general multiphase flow and transport problem: fluid flow and contaminant transport in the gas phase of the unsaturated zone. The specific purpose of the work was to investigate gas-phase (VOC) transport phenomena at the field scale to assess the relative importance of operative transport phenomena. A field research site was established at an active fire training area on Pope Air Force Base. Monitoring of groundwater flow and gas-phase contaminant distributions was accomplished as a function of three spatial dimensions and time. These distributions are reported and interpreted with respect to the current level of understanding of gas-phase transport phenomena. Consideration is given to advective transport, diffusive transport, interphase mass transfer, and multicomponent effects. Numerical modeling is used to evaluate expected steady-state contaminant distributions in the unsaturated zone and to assess relative time scales of operative transport processes. Reasonable agreement is achieved between model simulations and observed concentration distributions in the field, with a dominant vertical transport component shown in both predicted and observed contaminant distributions.

  5. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  6. Mass Transfer and Light Time Effect Studies for AU Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    The orbital period changes of theWUMa eclipsing binary AU Ser are studied using the (O-C) method. We conclude that the period variation is due to mass transfer from the primary star to the secondary one at a very low and decreasing rate dP/dt = -8.872 × 10-8, superimposed on the sinusoidal variation due to a third body orbiting the binary with period 42.87 ± 3.16 years, orbital eccentricity e = 0.52±0.12 and a longitude of periastron passage ! = 133.7±15. On studying the magnetic activity, we have concluded that the Applegate mechanism failed to describe the cycling variation of the (O-C) diagram of AU Ser.

  7. Effect of water content on transient nonequilibrium NAPL-gas mass transfer during soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kim, Joong Hoon; Liljestrand, Howard M; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2002-01-01

    The effect of water content on the volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in unsaturated soils was characterized by one-dimensional venting experiments conducted to evaluate the lumped mass transfer coefficient. An empirical correlation based upon the modified Sherwood number, Peclet number, and normalized mean grain size was used to estimate initial lumped mass transfer coefficients over a range of water content. The effects of water content on the soil vapor extraction SVE process have been investigated through experimentation and mathematical modeling. The experimental results indicated that a rate-limited NAPL-gas mass transfer occurred in water-wet soils. A severe mass transfer limitation was observed at 61.0% water saturation where the normalized effluent gas concentrations fell below 1.0 almost immediately, declined exponentially from the initiation of venting, and showed long tailing. This result was attributed to the reduction of interfacial area between the NAPL and mobile gas phases due to the increased water content. A transient mathematical model describing the change of the lumped mass transfer coefficient was used. Simulations showed that the nonequilibrium mass transfer process could be characterized by the exponent beta, a parameter which described the reduction of the specific area available for NAPL volatilization. The nonequilibrium mass transfer limitations were controlled by the soil mean grain size and pore gas velocity, were well described by beta values below 1.0 at low water saturation, and were well predicted with beta values greater than 1.0 at high water saturation.

  8. Effect of electric fields on mass transfer to droplets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Budwig, R.

    1994-02-01

    During the six year funding period, the effects of a direct and alternating field upon single drop hydrodynamics and mass transfer were evaluated both experimentally and theoretically. Direct current field effects upon drop size, velocity and mass transfer rates were also observed for multiple drops formed in a three stage sieve tray column. Drop size, velocity, and mass transfer rates were measured experimentally and compared to simple models for direct current electric fields. Agreement between theory and experiment was found for drop charge, size, and velocity. Drop mass transfer coefficients were substantially larger than theoretical predictions while extraction efficiencies were moderately higher. Drop distortion and oscillation were observed and are thought to result in the experimentally observed higher values. For alternating current fields, drop flow streamlines and oscillations were measured and found to compare well with predictions from a solved mathematical model. In addition, equipment was constructed to determine mass transfer rates to oscillating drops. Concentration profiles in still and oscillating drops were measured and qualitatively compared to theoretical predictions.

  9. Effect of mass transfer resistance on the Lineweaver-Burk plots for flocculating microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ngian, K F; Lin, S H; Martin, W R

    1977-12-01

    It is shown that the mass transfer resistance can significantly distort the linearity of the Lineweaver-Burk plot of the kinetic data for a microbial culture which forms aggregates. For small flocs, the linearity of the Lineweaver-Burk plot is largely retained, but a different slope and intercept will be obtained compared with flocs free from mass transfer resistance. For large flocs, the Lineweaver-Burk plot shows pronounced curvature at high limiting substrate concentrations. Hence, if the true intrinsic kinetic parameters are to be extracted from a highly flocculating microbial culture, sufficient agitation has to be provided to remove the effect of mass transfer resistance. If the behavior of the flocculating microbial culture is to be explored, additional values for some physical parameters, such as the effective diffusion coefficient of the substrate in floc, the floc density, and the mean floc radius, are needed.

  10. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  11. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  12. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  13. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  14. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  15. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  16. Analysis of Effect of Gas-Liquid Interfacial Disturbance on Mass Transfer Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honda; Chung, Tsair-Wang

    In order to study the mass transfer phenomena for water vapor absorbed by triethylene glycol (TEG) solution and to elucidate effect of interfacial disturbance on absorption performance, the interfacial phenomena for water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution and mass transfer process were observed and operated in this study. Besides liquid and gas flow rates, the interfacial disturbance can also affect the mass transfer performance in the absorption system with continuous liquid phase, and the advanced mass transfer phenomena must be discussed from the interface of matter. Therefore, the surface tensions of desiccant solutions were measured to analyze the disturbed phenomena of water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution. Since the Marangoni-Index (MI) means the maximum surface tension difference on the surface of liquid layer, the values of MI were calculated and compared with the mass transfer performance of packed-bed absorber. Generally speaking, the interfacial disturbance, resulted from the surface tension difference, would promote the contacting area of gas and liquid phases. The observation of water drop instilling on surface of TEG solution found that the interfacial disturbance existed between water drop and TEG solution, and the interfacial instability was found in the peripheral region of the water drop. On the other hand, the values of MI were increased by the increased TEG concentrations, and it can be deduced that the surface tension effect should be significant in the higher concentration of TEG solution and the interfacial disturbance would be heavier above 95 wt.% TEG solutions. Finally, the absorption performance for 95 and 96 wt.% TEG solutions were much larger than that of 90 and 88.6 wt.% TEG solutions in the operation of packed-bed absorber.

  17. Effect of thermal radiation on unsteady stagnation-point flow with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md Ali, Fadzilah; Nazar, Roslinda; Md Arifin, Norihan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady stagnation-point flow of an incompressible viscous fluid with mass transfer is studied. The governing system of partial differential equations is first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation and is then solved numerically by the shooting method. It is found that the surface heat transfer rate reduces when the thermal radiation is applied and dual solutions exist only for negative unsteadiness parameter while positive unsteadiness parameter produces a unique solution.

  18. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  19. Ultrasound in gas-liquid systems: effects on solubility and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Laugier, F; Andriantsiferana, C; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2008-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the pseudo-solubility of nitrogen in water and on gas-liquid mass transfer kinetics has been investigated in an autoclave reactor equipped with a gas induced impeller. In order to use organic liquids and to investigate the effect of pressure, gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient was calculated from the evolution of autoclave pressure during gas absorption to avoid any side-effects of ultrasound on the concentrations measurements. Ultrasound effect on the apparent solubility is very low (below 12%). Conversely ultrasound greatly improves gas-liquid mass transfer, especially below gas induction speed, this improvement being boosted by pressure. In typical conditions of organic synthesis: 323 K, 1100 rpm, 10 bar, k(L).a is multiplied by 11 with ultrasound (20 kHz/62.6 W). The impact of sonication is much higher on gassing out than on gassing in. In the same conditions, this enhancement is at least five times higher for degassing.

  20. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  1. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  2. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    1989-08-21

    Mass transfer investigation experiments were performed to determine the controlling physical and chemical processes that limit Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbent utilization in flue gas desulfurization. A computer model has been established to estimate the relative contribution of gas- and liquid-phase mass transfer and inherent sorbent reactivity. Currently, the mass transfer investigation tests are on schedule and will be continued next year. More pilot-plant tests are planned to support field tests and mass transfer enhancement evaluations. 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  4. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and ""slight" nonuniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziale, M. L.

    The effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load was investigated measuring a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow A stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34% to 4.9%. The accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2%, a large improvement over similar methods. Identical flow conditions were used when the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions. Experiments were conducted in which a small amplitude periodic perturbation was superimposed on the mean flow by a woven wire grid. Spanwise traverses of the mean velocity and turbulence quantities and spanwise and circumferential traverses of the mass transfer rate on the cylinder were made. Although the perturbation was measured to be only .25% of the mean velocity and was buried in the stream's turbulence, disproportionately larger 15% variations in the spanwise transfer rate were observed.

  5. Mass transfer from a circular cylinder: Effects of flow unsteadiness and slight nonuniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziale, M. L.; Mayle, R. E.

    1984-09-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of periodic variations in the angle of the flow incident to a turbine blade on its leading edge heat load. To model this situation, measurements were made on a circular cylinder oscillating rotationally in a uniform steady flow. A naphthalene mass transfer technique was developed and used in the experiments and heat transfer rates are inferred from the results. The investigation consisted of two parts. In the first, a stationary cylinder was used and the transfer rate was measured for Re = 75,000 to 110,000 and turbulence levels from .34 percent to 4.9 percent. Comparisons with both theory and the results of others demonstrate that the accuracy and repeatability of the developed mass transfer technique is about + or - 2 percent, a large improvement over similar methods. In the second part identical flow conditions were used but the cylinder was oscillated. A Strouhal number range from .0071 to .1406 was covered. Comparisons of the unsteady and steady results indicate that the magnitude of the effect of oscillation is small and dependent on the incident turbulence conditions.

  6. Effects of fluid recirculation on mass transfer from the arterial surface to flowing blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Wen; Liu, Ying-Xi

    2012-06-01

    The effect of disturbed flow on the mass transfer from arterial surface to flowing blood was studied numerically, and the results were compared with that of our previous work. The arterial wall was assumed to be viscoelastic and the blood was assumed to be incompressible and non-Newtonian fluid, which is more close to human arterial system. Numerical results indicated that the mass transfer from the arterial surface to flowing blood in regions of disturbed flow is positively related with the wall shear rates and it is significantly enhanced in regions of disturbed flow with a local minimum around the reattachment point which is higher than the average value of the downstream. Therefore, it may be implied that the accumulation of cholesterol or lipids within atheromatous plaques is not caused by the reduced efflux of cholesterol or lipids, but by the infiltration of the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) from the flowing blood to the arterial wall.

  7. Wall mass transfer and pressure gradient effects on turbulent skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of mass injection and pressure gradients on the drag of surfaces were studied theoretically with the aid of boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes codes. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of spatially varying the injection in the case of flat-plate drag. Effects of suction and injection on wavy wall surfaces are also explored. Calculations were performed for 1.2 m long surfaces, one flat and the other sinusoidal with a wavelength of 30.5 cm. Attention is given to the study of the effect of various spatial blowing variations on flat-plate skin friction reduction, local skin friction coefficient calculated by finite difference boundary-layer code and Navier-Stokes code, and the effect of phase-shifting sinusoidal mass transfer on the drag of a sinusoidal surface.

  8. Predictive mathematical modeling of trickling bed biofilters for elucidating mass transfer and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.W.; Zhang, X.S.; Klasson, K.T.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-03-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have been proposed in the open literature for describing uptake of volatile organics in trickling bed biofilters. Many simpler descriptions yield relatively accurate solutions, but are limited as predictive tools by numerous assumptions which decrease the utility of the model. Trickle bed operation on the boundary between mass transfer and kinetic limitation regimes serves as one example in which these models may be insufficient. One-dimensional models may also fail to consider important effects/relationships in multiple directions, limiting their usefulness. This paper discusses the use of a predictive, two-dimensional mathematical model to describe microbial uptake, diffusion through a biofilm, and mass transfer of VOCs from gas to liquid. The model is validated by experimental data collected from operating trickle-bed bioreactors designed for removing sparingly soluble gaseous contaminants. Axial and radial (biofilm) concentration profiles are presented, along with validation results. Operation in regimes in which both mass transfer and kinetic factors play significant roles are discussed, along with predictive modeling implications.

  9. The effects of dual-domain mass transfer on the tritium-helium-3 dating method.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Labolle, Eric M; Harvey, Charles F

    2008-07-01

    Diffusion of tritiated water (referred to as tritium) and helium-3 between mobile and immobile regions in aquifers (mass transfer) can affect tritium and helium-3 concentrations and hence tritium-helium-3 (3H/3He) ages that are used to estimate aquifer recharge and groundwater residence times. Tritium and helium-3 chromatographically separate during transport because their molecular diffusion coefficients differ. Simulations of tritium and helium-3 transport and diffusive mass transfer along stream tubes show that mass transfer can shift the 3H/3He age of the tritium and helium-3 concentration ([3H + 3He]) peak to dates much younger than the 1963 peak in atmospheric tritium. Furthermore, diffusive mass-transfer can cause the 3H/3He age to become younger downstream along a stream tube, even as the mean water-age must increase. Simulated patterns of [3H + 3He] versus 3H/3He age using a mass transfer model appear consistent with a variety of field data. These results suggest that diffusive mass transfer should be considered, especially when the [3H + 3He] peak is not well defined or appears younger than the atmospheric peak. 3H/3He data provide information about upstream mass-transfer processes that could be used to constrain mass-transfer models; however, uncritical acceptance of 3H/3He dates from aquifers with immobile regions could be misleading.

  10. Blowing Effects on Heat and Mass Transfer for Different Geometrical Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    cylinder is addressed. BLOWING THROUGH A FLATE PLATE The blowing principles are presented in figure 1 : Mass, Heat and Momentum transfer Conduction ... Convection Hot Main Flow Convection + Radiative transfers Cold fluid (outlet) Cold fluid (exit) Convection + Radiative Transfers Porous Wall Boundary

  11. Anisotropy effects of EPR signals and mechanisms of mass transfer in tooth enamel and bones.

    PubMed

    Brik, A; Haskell, E; Brik, V; Scherbina, O; Atamanenko, O

    2000-05-01

    Peculiarities of the internal construction of tooth enamel and bones that cause anisotropy effects and mass transfer in these objects are described. It is shown that the composition of the mineral component of teeth and bones depends on a mechanical-electrical mechanism, which pumps ions into nanocrystals. Decrease in the efficiency of the mechanical-electrical mechanism results in demineralization of enamel and bones, which progresses most rapidly at a disease of the biomineral or under special conditions, such as in space flights. Effects of signal anisotropy in the practice of retrospective EPR dosimetry are discussed.

  12. Effect of mass-addition distribution and injectant on heat transfer and transition criteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Mccloskey, M. H.; Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Wright, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Surface pressures, heat-transfer rates, and transition locations for a sharp cone (whose semivertex angle is 12 deg) were obtained in a hypervelocity wind tunnel at a free-stream Mach number of 12 and a free-stream Re/ft range of 3,000,000 to 6,000,000. The effects of injecting either methane, nitrogen, or Freon-22 (at rates up to 2.1% of free-stream rate) were studied for a uniform injection-distribution and for a variable injection-distribution. Gaseous injection had little effect on the surface pressure measurements. For a given mass injection distribution, the laminar region heat-transfer decreases as the injection rate increases or as the molecular weight of the injectant decreases. For a given mass-injection rate (integrated over the surface of the entire cone), the transition location and heat-transfer rates were sensitive to the injection distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the local injection rate was constant over the surface of the cone.

  13. Slip effect on the magnetohydrodynamics channel flow in the presence of the across mass transfer phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijaz, S.; Saleem, N.; Munawar, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the slip effect on the across mass transfer (AMT) phenomenon in a three-dimensional flow of a hydromagnetic viscous fluid in a channel with a stretching lower wall. Both walls of the channel are considered to be porous so that the AMT phenomenon can be established. The governing equations are solved analytically. The accuracy of the series solution is proved by comparing the results with a numerical solution. The slip condition is observed to be helpful in reducing the viscous drag on the stretching sheet.

  14. Experimental and numerical study on effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation, based on fundamental fluid dynamics and mass transfer theory, carried out to obtain a general understanding of ammonia mass transfer from an emission surface. The effects of airflow and aqueous ammonium solution temperature on ammonia mass transfer are investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and by a mechanism modeling using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models based on the parameters measured in the experiments performed in a wind tunnel. The validated CFD model by experimental data is used to investigate the surface concentration distribution and mass transfer coefficient at different temperatures and velocities for which the Reynolds number is from 1.36 x 10(4) to 5.43 x 10(4) (based on wind tunnel length). The surface concentration increases as velocity decreases and varies greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related.

  15. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  16. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  17. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2011-07-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  18. Steady state model for evaluation of external and internal mass transfer effects in an immobilized biofilm.

    PubMed

    Mudliar, Sandeep; Banerjee, Saumita; Vaidya, Atul; Devotta, Sukumar

    2008-06-01

    A steady model for the evaluation of external liquid film diffusion and internal pore diffusion effects in an immobilized biofilm system under continuous mode of operation was developed. The model takes into account, substrate diffusion through external liquid film and biofilm. Average rate of substrate consumption in the biofilm was considered. The overall efficiency of the biofilm was mathematically represented by considering the combined effects of substrate penetration and substrate utilization in the biofilm. The model was illustrated using a case study of pyridine biodegradation in a rotating biological contactor immobilized with pyridine degrading microbial film. The model is able to effectively predict both internal and external mass transfer effects in an immobilized biofilm system.

  19. Limestone characterization to model damage from acidic precipitation: Effect of pore structure on mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, S.D.; Reddy, M.M.; Irez, W.F.; Heymans, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The pore structure of Salem limestone is investigated, and conclusions regarding the effect of the pore geometry on modeling moisture and contaminant transport are discussed based on thin section petrography, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and nitrogen adsorption analyses. These investigations are compared to and shown to compliment permeability and capillary pressure measurements for this common building stone. Salem limestone exhibits a bimodal pore size distribution in which the larger pores provide routes for convective mass transfer of contaminants into the material and the smaller pores lead to high surface area adsorption and reaction sites. Relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements of the air/water system indicate that Salem limestone exhibits high capillarity end low effective permeability to water. Based on stone characterization, aqueous diffusion and convection are believed to be the primary transport mechanisms for pollutants in this stone. The extent of contaminant accumulation in the stone depends on the mechanism of partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. The described characterization techniques and modeling approach can be applied to many systems of interest such as acidic damage to limestone, mass transfer of contaminants in concrete and other porous building materials, and modeling pollutant transport in subsurface moisture zones.

  20. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  1. Mass transfer effect of the stalk contraction-relaxation cycle of Vorticella convallaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiazhong; Admiraal, David; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Vorticella convallaria is a genus of protozoa living in freshwater. Its stalk contracts and coil pulling the cell body towards the substrate at a remarkable speed, and then relaxes to its extended state much more slowly than the contraction. However, the reason for Vorticella's stalk contraction is still unknown. It is presumed that water flow induced by the stalk contraction-relaxation cycle may augment mass transfer near the substrate. We investigated this hypothesis using an experimental model with particle tracking velocimetry and a computational fluid dynamics model. In both approaches, Vorticella was modeled as a solid sphere translating perpendicular to a solid surface in water. After having been validated by the experimental model and verified by grid convergence index test, the computational model simulated water flow during the cycle based on the measured time course of stalk length changes of Vorticella. Based on the simulated flow field, we calculated trajectories of particles near the model Vorticella, and then evaluated the mass transfer effect of Vorticella's stalk contraction based on the particles' motion. We acknowlege support from Laymann Seed Grant of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

  2. Specifics of heat and mass transfer in spherical dimples under the effect of external factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukin, A. V.; Il'inkov, A. V.; Takmovtsev, V. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The specifics are examined of heat transfer enhancement with spherical dimples under the effect of factors important for practice and characteristic of cooling systems of gas-turbine engines and power units. This experimental investigation deals with the effect of the following factors on the flow in a channel with hemispherical dimples: continuous air swirl in an annulus with dimples on its concave wall, dimples on the convex or concave wall of a curved rectangular channel, imposition of regular velocity fluctuations on the external flow in a straight rectangular channel, and adverse or favorable pressure gradient along the flow direction. The flow is turbulent. Reynolds numbers based on the channel hydraulic diameter are on the order of 104. Results of the investigation of a model of a two-cavity diffuser dimple proposed by the authors are presented. It has been found that results for channels with spherical dimples and for smooth channels differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Thus, if the effect of centrifugal mass forces on convex and concave surfaces with hemispherical dimples and in a smooth channel is almost the same (quantitative and qualitative indicators are identical), the pressure gradient in the flow direction brings about the drastically opposite results. At the same time, the quantitative contribution to a change in heat transfer in hemispherical dimples is different and depends on the impact type. The results are discussed with the use of physical models created on the basis of the results of flow visualization studies and data on the turbulence intensity, pressure coefficient, etc. Results of the investigations suggest that application of spherical dimples under nonstandard conditions requires the calculated heat transfer to be corrected to account for one or another effect.

  3. Analysis of mass transfer in unstirred batch ultrafiltration: Effect of variation of diffusivity in boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, C.; Datta, S.

    1999-08-01

    An unsteady-state mass transfer model has been developed which takes into account the variation of diffusivity with solute concentration in the boundary layer. The main aim of this model is to study the effect of variation of diffusivity on membrane surface concentration as well as on the concentration profile prevailing within the boundary layer. Experimental data generated in this study have been used to validate the model. The resulting complex nonlinear partial differential equation has been solved by a numerical technique. The developed model is also capable of simulating volumetric flux and the permeate volume collected at any time under specified operating conditions. The simulated results show excellent fitting of the present model with variable diffusivity consideration when compared with experimental data. On the other hand, prediction based on constant diffusivity deviates considerably, indicating the importance of consideration of variable diffusivity in unsteady-state batch ultrafiltration.

  4. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dronawat, S N; Svihla, C K; Hanley, T R

    1997-01-01

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively.

  5. Effect of Reynolds number on flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Ikarashi, Yuya; Yamagata, Takayuki; Taguchi, Syoichi

    2016-11-01

    The flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow was studied experimentally by using the mass transfer measurement by plaster dissolution method, the surface flow visualization by oil film method and stereo PIV measurement. The experiments are carried out in a water tunnel of a circular pipe of 56mm in diameter with a working fluid of water. The Reynolds number was varied from 30000 to 200000. The experimental result indicated the change of the mass transfer coefficient distribution in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds number. This phenomenon is further examined by the surface flow visualization and measurement of secondary flow pattern in the elbow, and the results showed the suggested change of the secondary flow pattern in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds numbers.

  6. Effect of NAPL Source Morphology on Mass Transfer in the Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Petri, Benjamin G; Fučík, Radek; Illangasekare, Tissa H; Smits, Kathleen M; Christ, John A; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Sauck, Carolyn C

    2015-01-01

    The generation of vapor-phase contaminant plumes within the vadose zone is of interest for contaminated site management. Therefore, it is important to understand vapor sources such as non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) and processes that govern their volatilization. The distribution of NAPL, gas, and water phases within a source zone is expected to influence the rate of volatilization. However, the effect of this distribution morphology on volatilization has not been thoroughly quantified. Because field quantification of NAPL volatilization is often infeasible, a controlled laboratory experiment was conducted in a two-dimensional tank (28 cm × 15.5 cm × 2.5 cm) with water-wet sandy media and an emplaced trichloroethylene (TCE) source. The source was emplaced in two configurations to represent morphologies encountered in field settings: (1) NAPL pools directly exposed to the air phase and (2) NAPLs trapped in water-saturated zones that were occluded from the air phase. Airflow was passed through the tank and effluent concentrations of TCE were quantified. Models were used to analyze results, which indicated that mass transfer from directly exposed NAPL was fast and controlled by advective-dispersive-diffusive transport in the gas phase. However, sources occluded by pore water showed strong rate limitations and slower effective mass transfer. This difference is explained by diffusional resistance within the aqueous phase. Results demonstrate that vapor generation rates from a NAPL source will be influenced by the soil water content distribution within the source. The implications of the NAPL morphology on volatilization in the context of a dynamic water table or climate are discussed. © 2014, National GroundWater Association.

  7. Determination of the effect of transfer between vacuum and air on mass standards of platinum-iridium and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports work undertaken to assess the change in the mass values of stainless steel and platinum-iridium weights transferred between air and vacuum and to determine the repeatability of this change. Sets of kilogram transfer standards, manufactured from stainless steel and platinum-iridium and with different surface areas, were used to determine the effect of transfer between air and vacuum on the values of the mass standards. The SI unit of mass is the only unit of the seven base SI quantities which is still defined in terms of an artefact rather than by relation to a fundamental physical constant. Work is underway to identify a means of deriving the SI unit of mass from fundamental constants and at present the two principal approaches are the International Avogadro Coordination and the watt balance projects. Both of these approaches involve realizing a kilogram in vacuum and therefore the traceability from a kilogram realized in vacuum to mass standards in air is crucial to the effective dissemination of the mass scale. The work reported here characterizes the changes in mass values of standards on transfer between air and vacuum and thus will enable traceability to be established for an in-air mass scale based on a definition of the unit in vacuum.

  8. The effect of microbubbles on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient and degradation rate of COD in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kangning; Chi, Yong; Wang, Fei; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    A commonly used aeration device at present has the disadvantages of low mass transfer rate because the generated bubbles are several millimeters in diameter which are much bigger than microbubbles. Therefore, the effect of a microbubble on gas-liquid mass transfer and wastewater treatment process was investigated. To evaluate the effect of each bubble type, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients for microbubbles and conventional bubbles were determined. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was 0.02905 s(-1) and 0.02191 s(-1) at a gas flow rate of 0.67 L min(-1) in tap water for microbubbles and conventional bubbles, respectively. The degradation rate of simulated municipal wastewater was also investigated, using aerobic activated sludge and ozone. Compared with the conventional bubble generator, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 2.04, 5.9, 3.26 times higher than those of the conventional bubble contactor at the same initial COD concentration of COD 200 mg L(-1), 400 mg L(-1), and 600 mg L(-1), while aerobic activated sludge was used. For the ozonation process, the rate of COD removal using microbubble generator was 2.38, 2.51, 2.89 times of those of the conventional bubble generator. Based on the results, the effect of initial COD concentration on the specific COD degradation rate were discussed in different systems. Thus, the results revealed that microbubbles could enhance mass transfer in wastewater treatment and be an effective method to improve the degradation of wastewater.

  9. Modifier mass transfer kinetic effect in the performance of solvent gradient simulated moving bed (SG-SMB) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Câmara, L. D. T.

    2015-09-01

    The solvent-gradient simulated moving bed process (SG-SMB) is the new tendency in the performance improvement if compared to the traditional isocratic solvent conditions. In such SG-SMB separation process the modulation of the solvent strength leads to significant increase in the purities and productivity followed by reduction in the solvent consumption. A stepwise modelling approach was utilized in the representation of the interconnected chromatographic columns of the system combined with lumped mass transfer models between the solid and liquid phase. The influence of the solvent modifier was considered applying the Abel model which takes into account the effect of modifier volume fraction over the partition coefficient. The modelling and simulations were carried out and compared to the experimental SG-SMB separation of the amino acids phenylalanine and tryptophan. A lumped mass transfer kinetic model was applied for both the modifier (ethanol) as well as the solutes. The simulation results showed that such simple and global mass transfer models are enough to represent all the mass transfer effect between the solid adsorbent and the liquid phase. The separation performance can be improved reducing the interaction or the mass transfer kinetic effect between the solid adsorbent phase and the modifier. The simulations showed great agreement fitting the experimental data of the amino acids concentrations both at the extract as well as at the raffinate.

  10. Biofilm plaque and hydrodynamic effects on mass transfer, fluoride delivery and caries.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, Paul; Wefel, James; Gieseke, Armin; Debeer, Dirk; von Ohle, Christiane

    2008-09-01

    The biofilm concept of dental plaque now is widely accepted in the dental clinic, particularly with respect to its importance to oral hygiene. A number of reviews have focused on the microbial ecology of biofilm with regard to oral health; however, there has been less focus on how the interaction of biofilms and hydrodynamics with mass transfer (the movement of molecules and particulates) and physiological processes may relate to caries. The authors reviewed reports in the microbiology and dental literature addressing microbiological, engineering and clinical aspects of biofilms with respect to mass transport and microbial physiology, with an emphasis on fluoride ions (F(-)). and Practical Implications. These data illustrate how dental plaque biofilms may affect the delivery of cariogenic agents, such as sucrose, or anticariogenic agents, such as F(-), into and out of the biofilm, with subsequent consequences for the development of physio-chemical microenvironments at the tooth surface. Increasing the flow rate in an overlying fluid (such as saliva or mouthrinse) increases transport from the fluid into and through biofilms. Increasing the delivery of anticariogenic agents such as F(-) into the plaque biofilm, by generating strong fluid flows, may be a useful strategy for enhancing the anticaries effects of F(-) in areas of the mouth where complete biofilm removal is not possible with routine daily cleaning techniques.

  11. Diffusive transfer to membranes as an effective interface between gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Mitchell, Charles; Stevenson, Tracy I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    1997-12-01

    Diffusive transfer was examined as a blotting method to transfer proteins from polyacrylamide gels to membranes for ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The method is well-suited for transfers from isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Spectra have been obtained for 11 pmol of 66 kDa albumin loaded onto an IEF gel and subsequently blotted to polyethylene. Similarly, masses of intact carbonic anhydrase and hemoglobin were obtained from 14 and 20 pmol loadings. This methodology is also compatible with blotting high molecular weight proteins, as seen for 6 pmol of the 150 kDa monoclonal antibody anti-[beta]-galactosidase transferred to Goretex. Polypropylene, Teflon, Nafion and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) also produced good spectra following diffusive transfer. Only analysis from PVDF required that the membrane be kept wet prior to application of matrix. Considerations in mass accuracy for analysis from large-area membranes with continuous extraction and delayed extraction were explored, as were remedies for surface charging. Vapor phase CNBr cleavage was applied to membrane-bound samples for peptide mapping.

  12. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  13. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  14. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  15. Evaluation of the mass transfer effect of the stalk contraction cycle of Vorticella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiazhong; Admiraal, David; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-03-01

    Vorticella is a protozoan with a contractile stalk that can contract pulling the cell body toward the substrate in less than 10 ms and return to the extended state in a few seconds. Although this stalk contraction is one of the fastest cellular motions, it is unknown why Vorticella contracts. Because the flow field induced by Vorticella shows different characteristics between contraction and relaxation, it has been suggested that Vorticella augments mass transfer near the substrate based on its stalk contraction-relaxation. We investigate this hypothesis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. In both approaches, Vorticella is modelled as a solid sphere that translates perpendicular to a solid surface in liquid based on the measured stalk length changes of Vorticella. Based on the computationally and experimentally simulated flow, we evaluate the mass transfer capability of Vorticella, for a possible application of the stalk contraction of Vorticella as a biomimetic model system for microfluidic mixers.

  16. Effect of protein molecular weight on the mass transfer in protein mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asad, Ahmed; Chai, Chuan; Wu, JiangTao

    2012-03-01

    The mixing of protein solutions with that of precipitating agents is very important in protein crystallization experiments. In this work, the interferometry images were recorded during the mixing of two proteins with different molecular weights: lysozyme of ˜14.6 kDa, trypsin of ˜23.3 kDa and pepsin of ˜34.8 kDa were placed in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The protein molecular weight dependence on the competition of the transport process and kinetics at the interface was studied. The concentration profiles of protein solutions were calculated to analyze the mass transfer during the mixing process. It was observed that the mass transfer process is more efficient during the mixing of proteins with higher molecular weights. In addition, the more rapid concentration changes above the interface suggest that convection may dominate the diffusion. The phenomenon of convection is higher in the protein solutions with higher molecular weight.

  17. Effects of mass addition on blunt-body boundary-layer transition and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The model bodies tested at Mach number 7.32 were hemispheres, blunt cones, and spherical segments. The mass addition consisted of air ejected through porous forward surfaces of the models. The experimental data consisted of heat transfer measurements from which boundary layer transitions were deduced. The data verified various applicable boundary layer codes in the laminar and transitional flow regimes. Empirical heating rate data correlations were developed for the laminar and turbulent flow regimes.

  18. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-24

    During the reporting of July 1 to September 30, 1990, bench- and pilot-scale experiments were conducted to measure mass transfer and kinetic rates under simulated duct-injection conditions. This report describes the results of stirred-tank modelling experiments; experiments with moist solids in a short-time differential reactor in order to study and compare SO{sub 2} conversions; an investigation of the agglomeration of damp Ca(OH)-based solids; and evaluation of speciality sorbents.

  19. Effect of temperature and cultivar on polyphenol retention and mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apples.

    PubMed

    Devic, Emilie; Guyot, Sylvain; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Bonazzi, Catherine

    2010-01-13

    Several cultivars of apples (Malus domestica) were chosen for their variable concentrations and compositions in phenolic compounds. Cubed samples (1 cm3) were subjected to osmotic dehydration, and the effect of temperature was studied at 45 and 60 degrees C. Water loss, sucrose impregnation, and the evolution of some natural components of the product were followed to quantify mass transfer. Ascorbic acid and polyphenols were quantified by HPLC for several osmotic dehydration times and regardless of the quantity of impregnated sugar. Changes in antioxidant components differed as a function of the nature of molecules. Their concentrations decreased in line with temperature, and few differences were observed between cultivars. Processing at a lower temperature (45 degrees C) caused a total loss in ascorbic acid but allowed the retention of between 74 and 85% of initial polyphenols, depending on the cultivar. Cultivars containing highly polymerized procyanidins (such as Guillevic) experienced less loss. Hydroxycinnamic acids and monomeric catechins displayed the most marked changes. Leaching with water into the soaking solution was the principal mechanism retained to explain these losses.

  20. Effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on the fixed-bed pyrolysis of sunflower bagasse

    SciTech Connect

    Putun, E.; Kockar, O.M.; Gercel, F.

    1994-12-31

    There are a number of waste and biomass sources being considered as potential sources of fuels and chemical feedstocks. The economics for biomass pyrolysis are generally considered to be most favourable for (1) plants which grow abundantly and require little cultivation in and lands and (2) wastes available in relatively large quantities from agricultural plants, for example, sunflower and hazel nuts. For the former, one such group of plants is Euphorbiaceae which are characterised by their ability to produce a milky latex, an emulsion of about 30% w/w terpenoids in water. One species in the family, Euphorbia Rigida from Southwestern Anatolia, Turkey is cultivated in close proximity to the sunflower growing regions and their oil extraction plants. The Turkish sunflower oil industry generates 800,000 tons of extraction residue (bagasse) per annum. Thus, both sunflower wastes and latex-producing plants are being considered as feedstocks for a future thermochemical demonstration unit in Turkey. Pyrolysis at relatively high hydrogen pressures (hydropyrolysis) has not been widely investigated for biomass. A potential advantage of hydropyrolysis is the ability to upgrade tar vapours over hydroprocessing catalysts. Fixed-bed pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis experiments have been conducted on sunflower bagasse to assess the effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on oil yield and quality.

  1. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dronawat, S.N.; Svihla, C.K.; Hanley, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W. . Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-29

    Removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal- burning power plants can be achieved by duct spray drying using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) slurries. A primary objective of this research was to discover the aspects of mass transfer into Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries which limit SO{sub 2} absorption. A bench- scale stirred tank reactor with a flat gas/liquid interface was used to simulate SO{sub 2} absorption in a slurry droplet. The absorption rate of SO{sub 2} from gas concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppm was measured at 55{degrees}C in clear solutions and slurries of Ca(OH){sub 2} up to 1.0 M (7 wt percent). Results are reported in terms of the enhancement factor, {O}. This research will allow prediction of conditions where the absorption of SO{sub 2} in Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries can be enhanced by changes to liquid phase constituents (under which SO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by liquid film mass transfer). Experiments in the stirred tank have shown that SO{sub 2} absorption in a 1.0 M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry was completely dominated by gas film mass transfer with a large excess of Ca(OH){sub 2} but becomes controlled by liquid film resistance at greater than 50 percent Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization. (VC)

  3. Effect of magnetic field in power-law fluid with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Amira Husni; Abdullah, Ilyani; Sabri, Izzati

    2017-08-01

    Study of non-Newtonian blood flow under the influence of magnetic field through a stenosed artery is carried out. Blood stream is modelled by power-law fluid since the rate of shear stress for blood and shear strain is not linear. Mass transfer refers to the movement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) between the blood flow and arterial wall. The process of LDL movement brings up to localization of stenosis in the arterial segment. Magnetic field is applied to decrease blood velocity and reduce the risk of stenosis ruptures. The governing equations of blood flow are coupled with convection-diffusion equation of mass transfer. Marker and Cell (MAC) method is used in solving the problem in order to obtain the quantities of the axial velocity (w), radial velocity (u), mass concentration (C) and pressure (p) are calculated at different locations. The results are presented in the graph and discussed in details. The application of magnetic field decreases the axial velocity and mass concentration profiles.

  4. Unsteady heat and mass transfer in MHD flow over an oscillatory stretching surface with Soret and Dufour effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lian-Cun; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Hong

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we study the unsteady coupled heat and mass transfer of two-dimensional MHD fluid over a moving oscillatory stretching surface with Soret and Dufour effects. Viscous dissipation effects are adopted in the energy equation. A uniform magnetic field is applied vertically to the flow direction. The governing equations are reduced to non-linear coupled partial differential equations and solved by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM). The effects of some physical parameters such as magnetic parameter, Dufour number, Soret number, the Prandtl number and the ratio of the oscillation frequency of the sheet to its stretching rate on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are illustrated and analyzed.

  5. Effects of partial slip boundary condition and radiation on the heat and mass transfer of MHD-nanofluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elazem, Nader Y.; Ebaid, Abdelhalim

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of partial slip boundary condition on the heat and mass transfer of the Cu-water and Ag-water nanofluids over a stretching sheet in the presence of magnetic field and radiation. Such partial slip boundary condition has attracted much attention due to its wide applications in industry and chemical engineering. The flow is basically governing by a system of partial differential equations which are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations. This system has been exactly solved, where exact analytical expression has been obtained for the fluid velocity in terms of exponential function, while the temperature distribution, and the nanoparticles concentration are expressed in terms of the generalized incomplete gamma function. In addition, explicit formulae are also derived from the rates of heat transfer and mass transfer. The effects of the permanent parameters on the skin friction, heat transfer coefficient, rate of mass transfer, velocity, the temperature profile, and concentration profile have been discussed through tables and graphs.

  6. The effect of arsenic chemical form and mixing regime on arsenic mass transfer from soil to magnetite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung; Kim, Byung-Chul; Nam, Kyoungphile; Choi, Yongju

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of chemical forms of arsenic (As) and soil-magnetite mixing regimes on As mass transfer in magnetite-amended soil. Two soil samples with different component ratios of As chemical forms were prepared. In the absence of magnetite, the amount of desorbable As was strongly dependent on the fraction of easily extractable As in soil. Contact of the soils with magnetite in a slurry phase significantly reduced soil As concentration for both soils. Changes in As concentrations in soil, magnetite, and water by the slurry phase contact were simulated using an As mass transfer model. The model parameters were determined independently for each process of As soil desorption and magnetite sorption. The experimentally measured As mass transfer from soil to magnetite was significantly greater than the simulation result. By sequential extraction, it was observed that the soil As concentration was significantly reduced not only for easily extractable As, but also for relatively strongly bound forms of As. Enclosing the magnetite in a dialysis bag substantially limited the As mass transfer from soil to magnetite. These results suggest that improving the mixture between Fe oxides and soils can facilitate the effectiveness of As stabilization using Fe oxides.

  7. Modeling of turbulence effects on the heat and mass transfer of evaporating sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhanabharatam, Balasubramanyam

    A large diversity of two-phase gas-liquid flows of both scientific and practical interest involves the evaporation of near spherical liquid droplets in high temperature turbulent environments. Current numerical modeling approaches are predominantly focused towards the effects of continuous phase (gas phase) turbulence on the evaporation rates of liquid fuel sprays during the evaporation process, failing to account for the inherent turbulence present in the dispersed phase (liquid phase), due to the injection of sprays at high velocities. Existing models accounting for internal turbulence effects use Direct Numerical Simulations and Large Eddy Simulations that are computationally intensive. This research provides an alternative phenomenological approach of modeling droplet internal turbulence effects through the mass and heat transfer between the droplet surface and the external gas phase within a thin film inside the droplet. This finite conductivity (F-C) model was based on the two-temperature film theory, where the turbulence characteristics of the droplet are used to estimate the effective thermal diffusivity (alphaeff) within the droplet phase. The alphaeff is estimated from the physical properties of the flow within the droplet rather than from a 'curve-fit' as done conventionally. The results of the one-way coupled study indicated that the equilibrium drop temperature predictions were higher than calculations by the infinite conductivity (I-C) model. The liquid internal turbulence has a considerable effect on the diffusivity in the primary atomization regime. The thermal boundary layer was found to be substantially thick initially, decreasing quickly to a small value, exhibiting a reasonable physical trend. The two-way coupled studies (CFD) indicated that the F-C model, slowed down the evaporation process, produced larger droplets and longer tip penetration lengths during the initial stages of injection. For a jet in a supersonic cross-flow, results indicated

  8. Mass transfer between binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.; Kondo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of mass from one component of a binary system to another by mass ejection is analyzed through a stellar wind mechanism, using a model which integrates the equations of motion, including the energy equation, with an initial static atmosphere and various temperature fluctuations imposed at the base of the star's corona. The model is applied to several situations and the energy flow is calculated along the line of centers between the two binary components, in the rotating frame of the system, thereby incorporating the centrifugal force. It is shown that relatively small disturbances in the lower chromosphere or photosphere can produce mass loss through a stellar wind mechanism, due to the amplification of the disturbance propagating into the thinner atmosphere. Since there are many possible sources of the disturbance, the model can be used to explain many mass ejection phenomena.

  9. Mass transfer in corrugated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronda, Ann Mclaughry

    Research on the chemical and physical structure of membranes has failed to overcome the inverse relationship between selectivity and permeability. While this permeability is partially responsible for the rate of separation, the geometry of the membrane contributes significantly to this rate. In this work, we focused on the system geometry by examining the effect of corrugations on the rate of membrane separations. We developed a theory to describe mass transport in corrugations and to predict the effectiveness of corrugated membranes. To verify this theory, membranes with millimeter-sized corrugations were made. Pervaporation experiments with highly permeable and less permeable solutes showed excellent agreement with the theory. Based on the membrane geometry and permeability, the effectiveness factor and the flux enhancement can be quantified by a modified Thiele analysis. We used this theory to examine the effect of small corrugations on the mass transfer of both liquids and gases across membranes, including the effects of free convection, membrane supports, and Knudsen diffusion. In systems with a liquid feed, corrugations are promising only for very impermeable solutes. In gases, corrugations are more effective, especially when supported by a porous structure. We attempted to make smaller corrugations in two ways. The more promising method is phase-inversion of diblock copolymers. These diblocks were dissolved in a solvent, made into a thin film, and immersed in a liquid that was a nonsolvent for the majority block and a solvent for the minority block. In this way, we attempted to draw the minority block to the surface of an undulating structure created by the phase inversion. Ideally, the minority block would be selective and the majority block would be highly permeable or porous. Scanning electron microscopy showed promising structures made from polystyrene-polyisoprene and polyacrylonitrile-polyethylene oxide. The other, less promising, attempt at making

  10. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  11. Effect of diffusional mass transfer on the performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in tropical climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Njau, K N; Gastory, L; Eshton, B; Katima, J H Y; Minja, R J A; Kimwaga, R; Shaaban, M

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mass transfer on the removal rate constants of BOD5, NH3, NO3 and TKN has been investigated in a Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites mauritianus. The plug flow model was assumed and the inlet and outlet concentrations were used to determine the observed removal rate constants. Mass transfer effects were studied by assessing the influence of interstitial velocity on pollutant removal rates in CW cells of different widths. The flow velocities varied between 3-46 m/d. Results indicate that the observed removal rate constants are highly influenced by the flow velocity. Correlation of dimensionless groups namely Reynolds Number (Re), Sherwood Number (Sh) and Schmidt Number (Sc) were applied and log-log plots of rate constants against velocity yielded straight lines with values beta = 0.87 for BOD5, 1.88 for NH3, 1.20 for NO3 and 0.94 for TKN. The correlation matched the expected for packed beds although the constant beta was higher than expected for low Reynolds numbers. These results indicate that the design values of rate constants used to size wetlands are influenced by flow velocity. This paper suggests the incorporation of mass transfer into CW design procedures in order to improve the performance of CW systems and reduce land requirements.

  12. PHREEQC. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  13. The effect of water temperature and flow on respiration in barnacles: patterns of mass transfer versus kinetic limitation.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Michael T; Carrington, Emily

    2014-06-15

    In aquatic systems, physiological processes such as respiration, photosynthesis and calcification are potentially limited by the exchange of dissolved materials between organisms and their environment. The nature and extent of physiological limitation is, therefore, likely to be dependent on environmental conditions. Here, we assessed the metabolic sensitivity of barnacles under a range of water temperatures and velocities, two factors that influence their distribution. Respiration rates increased in response to changes in temperature and flow, with an interaction where flow had less influence on respiration at low temperatures, and a much larger effect at high temperatures. Model analysis suggested that respiration is mass transfer limited under conditions of low velocity (<7.5 cm (-1)) and high temperature (20-25°C). In contrast, limitation by uptake reaction kinetics, when the biotic capacity of barnacles to absorb and process oxygen is slower than its physical delivery by mass transport, prevailed at high flows (40-150 cm s(-1)) and low temperatures (5-15°C). Moreover, there are intermediate flow-temperature conditions where both mass transfer and kinetic limitation are important. Behavioral monitoring revealed that barnacles fully extend their cirral appendages at low flows and display abbreviated 'testing' behaviors at high flows, suggesting some form of mechanical limitation. In low flow-high temperature treatments, however, barnacles displayed distinct 'pumping' behaviors that may serve to increase ventilation. Our results suggest that in slow-moving waters, respiration may become mass transfer limited as temperatures rise, whereas faster flows may serve to ameliorate the effects of elevated temperatures. Moreover, these results underscore the necessity for approaches that evaluate the combined effects of multiple environmental factors when examining physiological and behavioral performance.

  14. Effects of Convective Heat and Mass Transfer in Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Saeed, Yusra; Alsaedi, A.; Asad, Sadia

    2015-01-01

    The aim here is to investigate the effects of convective heat and mass transfer in the flow of Eyring-Powell fluid past an inclined exponential stretching surface. Mathematical formulation and analysis have been performed in the presence of Soret, Dufour and thermal radiation effects. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to a set of non-linear ordinary differential equations. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the series solutions. Interval of convergence is determined. Physical interpretation is seen for the embedded parameters of interest. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are numerically computed and examined. PMID:26327398

  15. Effects of Convective Heat and Mass Transfer in Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Exponentially Stretching Sheet.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Saeed, Yusra; Alsaedi, A; Asad, Sadia

    2015-01-01

    The aim here is to investigate the effects of convective heat and mass transfer in the flow of Eyring-Powell fluid past an inclined exponential stretching surface. Mathematical formulation and analysis have been performed in the presence of Soret, Dufour and thermal radiation effects. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to a set of non-linear ordinary differential equations. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the series solutions. Interval of convergence is determined. Physical interpretation is seen for the embedded parameters of interest. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are numerically computed and examined.

  16. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W. . Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-29

    This report presents the results of fundamental mass transfer testing for in-duct removal of SO{sub 2}. Following this initial part of an experimental program, it became clear that the amount of initial moisture on the sorbent strongly affected the extent of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion. Novel techniques aimed at increasing sorbent utilization were investigated and are described. Major novel technique investigated and reported on here was the reaction with SO{sub 2} of sorbents with initial free moisture (damp sorbents). The duct injection process using damp solids has the following steps: preparation of sorbent as a slurry, blending of the slurry with dry recycle materials to create damp solids, injection of the solids into the duct, reaction and drying of the solids with flue gas in the duct, collection in particulate control equipment, and finally recycle of dry solids with some bleed to disposal. The moisture content of the solids at each step affects system performance. Various factors favor high moisture whereas others favor low moisture. (VC)

  17. Effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammetry in a cylindrical-pore electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; Fedkiw, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    A means is presented to account for the effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammograms by modeling a pore in a porous matrix as a cylindrical-pore electrode, and solving the mass and charge conservation equations in the context of this geometry for the simply redox reaction O + ne(-) yield R where both O and R are soluble species. Both analytical and numerical techniques are used to solve the governing equations. The calculated peak currents and potentials are correlated by empirical formulas to the measurable parameters: sweep rate, concentration of the redox species, diffusion coefficient, conductivity of the electrolyte, and pore dimensions. Using the correlations, a methodology is established for determining if the redox reaction kinetics are irreversible or reversible (Nernstian). If the reaction is irreversible, it is shown how the standard rate constant and the transfer coefficient may be extracted from linear-sweep voltammetry data, or, if the reaction is reversible, how the number of electrons transferred may be deduced.

  18. Effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammetry in a cylindrical-pore electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; Fedkiw, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    A means is presented to account for the effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammograms by modeling a pore in a porous matrix as a cylindrical-pore electrode, and solving the mass and charge conservation equations in the context of this geometry for the simply redox reaction O + ne(-) yield R where both O and R are soluble species. Both analytical and numerical techniques are used to solve the governing equations. The calculated peak currents and potentials are correlated by empirical formulas to the measurable parameters: sweep rate, concentration of the redox species, diffusion coefficient, conductivity of the electrolyte, and pore dimensions. Using the correlations, a methodology is established for determining if the redox reaction kinetics are irreversible or reversible (Nernstian). If the reaction is irreversible, it is shown how the standard rate constant and the transfer coefficient may be extracted from linear-sweep voltammetry data, or, if the reaction is reversible, how the number of electrons transferred may be deduced.

  19. Combined effect of couple stresses and heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow with slip conditions in a tube.

    PubMed

    Sobh, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the influence of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in a uniform tube with slip conditions on the wall is studied. The problem can model the blood flow in living creatures. Under long wavelength approximation and zero Reynolds number, exact solutions for the axial velocity component, pressure gradient, and both temperature and concentration fields are derived. The pressure rise is computed numerically and explained graphically. Moreover, effects of various physical parameters of the problem on temperature distribution, concentration field, and trapping are studied and discussed graphically.

  20. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Yang, W.

    1991-05-30

    After the second annual progress report to DOE in July 1990, we continued the experimental work for another liquid system. The mathematical model was also improved to include secondary effects due to drop deformation and charge redistribution on the deformed drop surface. Originally, we planned to study a mass transfer process after the hydrodynamic modelling. Due to difficulty in measuring drop concentration during oscillations, we decided to study a heat transfer process instead. Using the analogy between the mass transfer and the heat transfer, we can easily extend the results for the heat transfer study to the mass transfer problem.

  1. Models for mass transfer effects in semi-fuel cells and for a silver-zinc battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatraman, Murali Sankar

    Semi-Fuel Cells (SFCs) and Silver-Zinc batteries have been recognized as batteries for high power applications. For channel flow between two parallel plates, featured in SFCs, obstacles may take the form of ordered asymmetrical porous nets. The net controls the spacing between the two electrode plates. The effect of the inert insulating net and its geometry on the heat and mass transfer characteristics in such a system is presented. The governing equations for momentum, continuity, and energy are solved in a three-dimensional domain using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software for fully developed flow with constant temperature boundary conditions. The local Nusselt number is calculated from the resulting temperature distribution. This net also affects the limiting current distribution in an SFC operating at limiting current because it disrupts the parabolic laminar flow velocity distribution. Hence, the current density distribution is obtained from the Nusselt number distribution through a heat and mass transfer analogy. The location, spacing, and number of the longitudinal and transverse ribs of the net are shown to affect the local and average current density distributions and Nusselt numbers on each of the two electrode plates. The results show that transverse ribs have a greater effect and that the enhancements of the average current density of 250% can be obtained for a spacing of 0.94 x 10-3 m with greater than 16 transverse ribs. A silver-zinc battery shows similar mass transfer limitations while discharged at moderate to high discharge rates. A one-dimensional mathematical model consisting of a negative (zinc) electrode, separator, and positive (silver) electrode, has been developed to study the performance and thermal behavior of the silver-zinc cell during discharge. The physical phenomena described here are reaction kinetics, mass transfer and heat generation. The analysis includes finite matrix conductivities (thermal and electrical

  2. Coke formation and its effect on internal mass transfer and selectivity in Pd-catalysed acetylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, S.

    1996-01-01

    Catalyst aging by coke formation has been studied for the selective hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of excess ethylene on supported palladium catalysts. Deposited coke was found to have a substantial influence on the effective diffusivity, which decreased about one order of magnitude during 100 h of operation. As has been observed previously the selectivity for the undesired ethane was higher on aged catalysts, while the activity for acetylene hydrogenation was almost constant. These effects, however, were strongly dependent on the catalyst particle size, although the behaviour of fresh catalysts was unaffected by mass transfer limitations. When the catalyst used was Pd/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} the change in selectivity with aging could be explained solely as a consequence of the increased diffusion resistance. The mass transfer effects were important also on Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but on this catalyst there was an additional increase in ethane selectivity that could not be attributed to diffusion limitations. Calculations and experimental tests showed that the observed phenomena are relevant also for the shell-type catalysts normally used industrially. The coke formation itself was about four to five times faster on Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compared to the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalyst. The coke was generally concentrated towards the pellet periphery showing the influence of diffusion resistance also on the coke-forming reactions. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  4. Simulation of solid oxide iron-air battery: Effects of heat and mass transfer on charge/discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A time-dependent 2-D numerical simulation was performed on a solid oxide iron-air battery (SOIAB) to reveal the fundamental characteristics of this new system. The SOIAB is a rechargeable battery consisting of a solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOEC) and iron as a redox metal. A simple battery configuration was employed assuming a system with a small capacity. A simulation model for a unit element was developed considering heat and mass transfer in the system, taking both electrochemical and redox reactions into account. The numerical results showed the spatial and temporal changes in the temperature field in the charge and discharge operations, which were due to the combined effects of heat generation/absorption by the electrochemical and redox reactions and heat exchange with the air supplied through convective heat transfer. As the reaction rates are functions of the local temperature, the predicted results show the importance of considering the heat transfer phenomena in this system. It was also found that the active reaction region in the redox metal evolves with time. The nonuniform distribution of iron utilization is affected by the effective gas diffusion coefficients in the porous redox metal, and consequently the change in the current density distribution in the SOEC.

  5. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  6. [The use of interactive medical data transfer to increase effectiveness of a mass screening program].

    PubMed

    Knapp, Paweł; Zbroch, Tomasz; Knapp, Piotr

    2004-11-01

    screening programme (1997-99) was 41.9%. It was really two times lower than in the same group who could used Internet and was estimated on 85.3%. Internet site--http://pkzr.ac.bialystok.pl seems to be a basic digital textbook about cervical and breast neoplastic disease and their prophylactic. It is also interactive transferring data source that could create healthy attitude to increase effectiveness of screening programmes.

  7. The effects of mass transfer rate limitations and NAPL access heterogeneity on nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests -- A field example

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, R.A.; Wilson, D.J.; Christians, G.L.; Williams, S.P.

    1999-07-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) tracer tests using combinations of nonpartitioning and partitioning tracers have proven to be an effective means of confirming, delineating, and, under appropriate conditions, quantifying the presence of nonaqueous phase liquids in the subsurface. Some factors that can confound the interpretation of these tests include heterogeneous porosity and permeability distributions, heterogeneous NAPL distributions, diffusion of the tracers into and from low-permeability materials, heterogeneous access to the NAPL by the tracers, and deviations from local equilibrium with respect to mass transfer of the tracers between the aqueous phase and the NAPL phase. NAPL tracer tests conducted with separate injection and extraction wells in an alluvial aquifer at a site near Fort Worth, Texas were affected by these factors with the most notable departures from ideal responses evidently attributable to rate limitations on mass transfer. Positive identification of NAPL presence was achieved by clear separation of the breakthrough curves for partitioning tracers from those of nonpartitioning tracers. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the observed responses. The model is similar to earlier models of tracer tests of this sort, but includes two significant innovations. First, the model takes into account the kinetics of transport by diffusion of partitioning tracers into and from the NAPL. Second, the model permits the inclusion of porous lenses of low permeability into and from which both partitioning and nonpartitioning tracers can move by diffusion. Visual matching of simulated breakthrough curves to the field data was used to semi-quantitatively estimate the mass of NAPL present. Reasonable but imperfect matches of the simulated breakthrough curves to the field data illustrated the significant effect of a heterogeneous distribution of access to the NAPL by the tracers.

  8. Effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction on unsteady heat and mass transfer flow of an oscillating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rubel; Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction parameters on the unsteady heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow past an oscillating cylinder is considered. The dimensionless momentum, energy and concentration equations are solved numerically by using explicit finite difference method with the help of a computer programming language Compaq visual FORTRAN 6.6a. The obtained results of this study have been discussed for different values of well-known parameters with different time steps. The effect of these parameters on the velocity field, temperature field and concentration field, skin-friction, Nusselt number, streamlines and isotherms has been studied and results are presented by graphically represented by the tabular form quantitatively. The stability and convergence analysis of the solution parameters that have been used in the mathematical model have been tested.

  9. The Effects of Mass Transfer and Angle of Attack on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    temperature was measured with a singly shielded thermocouple (tip height approximately 0.050"). This probe was calibrated in the free stream for several...thickness, (P u 9/ ) e e e r - radius measured from axis of symmetry; recovery factor s - wetted length along surface of body St - Stanton number, w /(Pu) e...experiment considered mass addition rates which cover the ablation gas range for current heat shield materials (simulated ablation via gaseous mass

  10. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  11. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  12. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  13. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc−0.5, and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking. PMID:27841325

  14. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-01

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc-0.5, and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  15. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-14

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc(-0.5), and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  16. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  17. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  18. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  19. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  20. Investigation into the effect of nozzle shape on the nozzle discharge coefficient and heat and mass transfer characteristics of impinging air jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemoglu, A. B.; Isman, M. K.; Can, M.

    2010-12-01

    High velocity impinging air jets are commonly used for heating, cooling and drying, etc. because of the high heat and mass transfer coefficients which are developed in the impingement region. In order to provide data for the designers of industrial equipment, a variety of slot nozzles were tested to determine the effect on heat transfer of both nozzle shape and slot width. A large multi-nozzle rig was also used to measure average heat and mass transfer characteristics under arrays of both slot nozzles and circular holes. As a necessary preliminary to the heat transfer investigation, the discharge coefficients of the nozzles were measured. Then, the experimental results are compared with the simplified flow model. A good agreement was found between the theoretical and experimental results. From the tests, it was also found that the heat transfer results from differently shaped nozzles could be satisfactorily correlated provided that the effective slot width or hole diameter was used to characterize the nozzle shapes.

  1. Analysis of heat and mass transfer with MHD and chemical reaction effects on viscoelastic fluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. R.; Pattnaik, P. K.; Bhatti, M. M.; Abbas, T.

    2017-05-01

    This article addresses the mass and heat transfer analysis over an electrically conducting viscoelastic (Walters B') fluid over a stretching surface in presence of transverse magnetic field. The impact of chemical reaction, as well as non-uniform heat source, are also taken into account. Similarity transformations are employed to model the equations. The governing equations comprises of momentum, energy, and concentration which are modified to a set of non-linear differential equations and then solved by applying confluent hypergeometric function known as "Kummer's function". The exact solution for heat equation is obtained for two cases i.e. (1) Prescribed surface temperature, (2) Prescribed wall heat flux. Physical behavior of all the sundry parameters are against concentration, temperature, and velocity profile are presented through graphs. The inclusion of magnetic field is counterproductive in diminishing the velocity distribution whereas reverse effect is encountered for concentration and temperature profiles.

  2. Analysis of heat and mass transfer with MHD and chemical reaction effects on viscoelastic fluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. R.; Pattnaik, P. K.; Bhatti, M. M.; Abbas, T.

    2017-10-01

    This article addresses the mass and heat transfer analysis over an electrically conducting viscoelastic (Walters B') fluid over a stretching surface in presence of transverse magnetic field. The impact of chemical reaction, as well as non-uniform heat source, are also taken into account. Similarity transformations are employed to model the equations. The governing equations comprises of momentum, energy, and concentration which are modified to a set of non-linear differential equations and then solved by applying confluent hypergeometric function known as " Kummer's function". The exact solution for heat equation is obtained for two cases i.e. (1) Prescribed surface temperature, (2) Prescribed wall heat flux. Physical behavior of all the sundry parameters are against concentration, temperature, and velocity profile are presented through graphs. The inclusion of magnetic field is counterproductive in diminishing the velocity distribution whereas reverse effect is encountered for concentration and temperature profiles.

  3. Tracer travel and residence time distributions in highly heterogeneous aquifers: Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2016-12-01

    The driving mechanism of tracer transport in aquifers is groundwater flow which is controlled by the heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. We show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer are coupled in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity field and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity.

  4. Mass Transfer Cooling Near The Stagnation Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    A simplified analysis is made of mass transfer cooling, that is, injection of a foreign gas, near the stagnation point for two-dimensional and axisymmetric bodies. The reduction in heat transfer is given in terms of the properties of the coolant gas and it is shown that the heat transfer may be reduced considerably by the introduction of a gas having appropriate thermal and diffusive properties. The mechanism by which heat transfer is reduced is discussed.

  5. Binary stars: Mass transfer and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that mass exchange (and mass loss) within a binary system should produce observable changes in the surface chemical composition of both the mass losing and mass gaining stars as a stellar interior exposed to nucleosyntheses is uncovered. Three topics relating mass exchange and/or mass loss to nucleosynthesis are sketched: the chemical composition of Algol systems; the accretion disk of a cataclysmic variable fed by mass from a dwarf secondary star; and the hypothesis that classical Ba II giants result from mass transfer from a more evolved companion now present as a white dwarf.

  6. Some effects of 8-12 micron radiant energy transfer on the mass and heat budgets of cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    In standard treatments of the mass and energy budget of cloud droplets, radiant energy transfer is neglected on the grounds that the temperature difference between the droplet and its surroundings is small. This paper includes the effect of radiant heating and cooling of droplets by using the Eddington approximation for the solution of the radiative transfer equation. Although the calculation assumes that the cloud is isothermal and has a constant size spectrum with altitude, the heating or cooling of droplets by radiation changes the growth rate of the droplets very significantly. At the top of a cloud with a base at 2500 m and a top at 3000 m, a droplet will grow from 9.5 to 10.5 microns in about 4 min, assuming a supersaturation ratio of 1.0013. Such a growth rate is more than 20 times the growth rate for condensation alone, and may be expected to have a significant impact on estimates of precipitation formation as well as on droplet spectrum calculations.

  7. Some effects of 8-12 micron radiant energy transfer on the mass and heat budgets of cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    In standard treatments of the mass and energy budget of cloud droplets, radiant energy transfer is neglected on the grounds that the temperature difference between the droplet and its surroundings is small. This paper includes the effect of radiant heating and cooling of droplets by using the Eddington approximation for the solution of the radiative transfer equation. Although the calculation assumes that the cloud is isothermal and has a constant size spectrum with altitude, the heating or cooling of droplets by radiation changes the growth rate of the droplets very significantly. At the top of a cloud with a base at 2500 m and a top at 3000 m, a droplet will grow from 9.5 to 10.5 microns in about 4 min, assuming a supersaturation ratio of 1.0013. Such a growth rate is more than 20 times the growth rate for condensation alone, and may be expected to have a significant impact on estimates of precipitation formation as well as on droplet spectrum calculations.

  8. The synergistic effect between effective mass and built-in electric field for the transfer of carriers in nonlinear optical materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Dai, Ying; Ma, Xiangchao; Li, Zhujie; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-07-21

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the typical nonlinear optical material K3B6O10Br can be an excellent photocatalyst under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. To understand the origin of the photocatalytic activity and further improve its photocatalytic efficiency to develop alternative photocatalysts, the built-in electric field and the electron effective mass and their synergistic effect on transfer and the separation of carriers in K3B6O10X (X = Br, Cl) were investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the built-in electric field and the smallest effective mass of holes in K3B6O10Br are both along the [001] direction. In contrast, the effective masses of electrons are isotropic because of the spherically symmetric s orbitals at the conduction band minimum (CBM). Therefore, the electric field can promote efficient transfer and separation of the photogenerated carriers along the [001] direction. As a consequence, the synergistic effect of built-in electric field and the isotropy of the electron effective mass results in the {001} surface, to which most of the carriers will accumulate, showing the highest photocatalytic activity. Similar results can also be obtained for a K3B6O10Cl crystal considering the analogous structure with that of K3B6O10Br. The present study may provide theoretical insight to develop the photocatalytic performance of nonlinear optical materials.

  9. Optimizing cell-free protein expression in CHO: Assessing small molecule mass transfer effects in various reactor configurations.

    PubMed

    Peñalber-Johnstone, Chariz; Ge, Xudong; Tran, Kevin; Selock, Nicholas; Sardesai, Neha; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Pilli, Manohar; Tolosa, Michael; Tolosa, Leah; Kostov, Yordan; Frey, Douglas D; Rao, Govind

    2017-07-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is an ideal platform for rapid and convenient protein production. However, bioreactor design remains a critical consideration in optimizing protein expression. Using turbo green fluorescent protein (tGFP) as a model, we tracked small molecule components in a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) CFPS system to optimize protein production. Here, three bioreactors in continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) format were characterized. A GFP optical sensor was built to monitor the product in real-time. Mass transfer of important substrate and by-product components such as nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), creatine, and inorganic phosphate (Pi) across a 10-kDa MWCO cellulose membrane was calculated. The highest efficiency measured by tGFP yields were found in a microdialysis device configuration; while a negative effect on yield was observed due to limited mass transfer of NTPs in a dialysis cup configuration. In 24-well plate high-throughput CECF format, addition of up to 40 mM creatine phosphate in the system increased yields by up to ∼60% relative to controls. Direct ATP addition, as opposed to creatine phosphate addition, negatively affected the expression. Pi addition of up to 30 mM to the expression significantly reduced yields by over ∼40% relative to controls. Overall, data presented in this report serves as a valuable reference to optimize the CHO CFPS system for next-generation bioprocessing. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1478-1486. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Global evaluation of mass transfer effects: In-duct injection flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.A.; Newton, G.H.; Kramlich, J.C.; Payne, R.

    1990-09-30

    Sorbent injection is a low capital cost, low operating cost approach to SO{sub 2} control targeted primarily at older boilers for which conventional fuel gas desulfurization is not economically viable. Duct injection is one variation of this concept in which the sorbent, either a dry powder or a slurry, is injected into the cooler regions of the boiler, generally downstream of the air heaters. The attractiveness of duct injection is tied to the fact that it avoids much of the boiler heat transfer equipment and thus has minimal impact of boiler performance. Both capital and operating cost are low. This program has as its objectives three performance related issues to address: (1) experimentally identify limits on sorbent performance. (2) identify and test sorbent performance enhancement strategies. (3) develop a compute model of the duct injection process. Two major tasks are described: a laboratory-scale global experiment and development of process model. Both are aimed at understanding and quantifying the rate-limiting processes which control SO{sub 2} capture by lime slurry during boiler duct injection. 29 refs., 35 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Effects of mass-transfer resistance on apparent stability and performance of fixed-bed immobilized enzyme reactors: theory and experiments with immobilized invertase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Harano, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Taking the hydrolysis of sucrose by invertase immobilized on anion-exchange resin as an example, the effects of mass-transfer resistance on the apparent stability of immobilized enzyme (IME) and the optimal policy for an IME reaction in a fixed-bed reactor have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The following results were obtained: 1) The effect of mass-transfer resistance on the effective deactivation rate of IME is summarized in two parameters concerning the intraparticle diffusion alphap and the interparticle alphaf. 2) At a constant processed amount of raw materials, there exists an optimal flow rate of reaction fluid to enhance the reactor performance while the mass-transfer resistance shifts the optimal point. 3) The intrinsic deactivation rate of IME has been estimated from the relationship between the fractional conversion at the reactor outlet and the operation time. (Refs. 12).

  12. On effect of wind surface waves on mass and momentum transfer in a stratified turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Sergeev, D.; Kandaurov, A.; Baidakov, G.; Vdovin, M.

    2012-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed. This is due to the fact that the transfer of the momentum wave disturbances, or form drag, increases with increasing wind speed, which is accompanied by broadening the wind wave spectrum. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CT on the wind speed is not well studieds and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is poorly understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. For example, the algorithm COARE 3.0 (see [1] indicates a slight increase in CT with increasing wind speed U10, a similar dependence was obtained in [2] and the laboratory experiment, [3], and in [4] a dependence of CT on the wind speed was not found. The weak dependence of the CT on U10 is confirmed by theoretical models [5], but the details of the dependence (growing or dropping) were sensitive to the choice of model. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of waves on the surface of the water on the exchange of momentum and mass to drive the boundary layer of air and from this point of view it largely follows [5]. The main difference is related to the used model of the marine atmospheric boundary layer, in which the perturbations induced by the waves on the water surface in the atmosphere are calculated. It is a generalization of the model developed for a homogeneous atmosphere in [6] to the case of a stratified marine atmospheric boundary layer. The model was recently verified by comparing with

  13. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively.

  14. Mass transfer and temperature effects on substrate utilization in brewery granules

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Hickey, R.F. |

    1995-06-05

    Liquid film and diffusional resistance of brewery granules during acetate, propionate, and ethanol utilization were investigated. Substrate utilization rate increased with decreased granule size. Effectiveness factors for acetate, propionate, and ethanol were calculated by comparing the maximum rates of substrate utilization of whole granules (1.8 to 3.0 mm) and fine flocs (20 to 75 {mu}m) derived by disrupting whole granules. For acetate, propionate, and ethanol, maximum specific substrate utilization rates (k{sub m}, g/g VS{center_dot}d) for the flocs, were 5.11, 6.25, and 5.49, respectively, and half-velocity coefficients (K{sub s}, mM) were 0.45, 0.40, and 3.37, respectively. Calculated effectiveness factors were 0.32, 0.41, and 0.75 for acetate, propionate, and ethanol, respectively. The effect of temperature on substrate utilization was examined at 26 C, 31 C, and 37 C using acetate as sole carbon source. Utilization rates increased with temperature. Flocs were most sensitive to temperature, and whole granules were least affected. The behavior of flocs was well described by the Van`t Hoff-Arrhenius equation. Effectiveness factors for acetate utilization by the granules were 0.36, 0.35, and 0.32 at 26 C, 31 C, and 37 C, respectively, indicating little effect of temperature. Based on these results, the authors conclude that both liquid film and diffusional resistances influenced the rate of substrate utilization in a UASB reactor with granular sludge. Temperature effects were much less important than diffusional limitations within the granules.

  15. Technical Note: A comparison of model and empirical measures of catchment scale effective energy and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.; Gallo, E. L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent work suggests that a coupled energy and mass transfer term (EEMT), that includes the energy associated with effective precipitation and primary production, may serve as a robust prediction parameter of critical zone structure and function. However, the models used to estimate EEMT have been solely based on long term climatological data with little validation using point to catchment scale empirical data. Here we compare catchment scale EEMT estimates generated using two distinct approaches: (1) EEMT modelled using the established methodology based on estimates of monthly effective precipitation and net primary production derived from climatological data, and (2) empirical catchment scale EEMT estimated using data from 86 catchments of the Model Parameterization Experiment (MOPEX) and MOD17A3 annual net primary production (NPP) product derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Results indicated positive and significant linear correspondence between model and empirical measures but with modelled EEMT values consistently greater than empirical measures of EEMT. Empirical catchment estimates of the energy associated with effective precipitation (EPPT) were calculated using a mass balance approach and base flow that accounts for water losses to quick surface runoff not accounted for in the climatologically modelled EPPT. Similarly, local controls on primary production such as solar radiation and nutrient limitation were not explicitly included in the climatologically based estimates of energy associated with primary production (EBIO) whereas these were captured in the remotely sensed MODIS NPP data. There was significant positive correlation between catchment aridity and the fraction of total energy partitioned into EBIO, where the EBIO increases as the average percentage catchment woody plant cover decreases. In summary, the data indicated strong correspondence between model and empirical measures of EEMT that agree well with catchment

  16. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction.

  17. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, Wojciech . Environmental Systems Div.); Rochelle, G.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-09-17

    Novel techniques designed for the enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization in dry-sorbent injection (DSI) and duct-spray drying (DSD) were investigated in the Long Time Differential Reactor (LTDR), Short Time Differential Reactor (STDR), and 50-cfm pilot plant. At 2000-ppm SO{sub 2} and 60 percent relative humidity, the presence of up to 30-percent initial free moisture significantly increased sorbent reactivity with SO{sub 2}, compared to sorbent with equilibrium amount of moisture. The conversion decreased when the initial free moisture increased beyond 30--50 percent. The initial free moisture content and corresponding level of maximum sorbent conversion with SO{sub 2} varied with the surface area of the sorbent. Sorbent moisture capacity tests indicated that agglomeration of damp calcium silicate sorbent was a function of sorbent pore volume. Critical moisture content was increasing with specific surface area. Very little improvement in SO{sub 2} removal was obtained by DSI recycle operation downstream of humidification. Significant enhancement was achieved by DSI recycle upstream of humidification. Grinding of DSI solids with and without fly ash resulted in significant increase of surface area and pore volume and resulting reactivity with SO{sub 2}. Organic buffer additives were tested as potential enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization during the DSD process. Bench-scale results suggested that organic acids should be effective additives to enhance SO{sub 2} in slurry if SO{sub 2} absorption was controlled significantly by liquid film resistance. Pilot-plant tests did not demonstrate significant enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion during spray drying as a result of buffer additives. Grinding of simulated DSD solids resulted in significant enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} reactivity with SO{sub 2}.

  18. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  19. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  20. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; Brooks, Paul D.; Troch, Peter A.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Craig

    2016-03-01

    The critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade-1, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.

  1. Homotopy analysis method for thermophoretic particle deposition effect on magnetohydrodynamic mixed convective heat and mass transfer past a porous wedge in the presence of suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.

    2010-03-01

    Homotopy analysis method is used to analyze the effect of thermophoretic particle deposition on magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection flow with heat and mass transfer over a porous wedge. An explicit analytical solution is obtained which is valid throughout the solution domain and is consistent with numerical results.

  2. Technical Note: A comparison of model and empirical measures of catchment-scale effective energy and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.; Gallo, E. L.

    2013-09-01

    Recent work suggests that a coupled effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) term, which includes the energy associated with effective precipitation and primary production, may serve as a robust prediction parameter of critical zone structure and function. However, the models used to estimate EEMT have been solely based on long-term climatological data with little validation using direct empirical measures of energy, water, and carbon balances. Here we compare catchment-scale EEMT estimates generated using two distinct approaches: (1) EEMT modeled using the established methodology based on estimates of monthly effective precipitation and net primary production derived from climatological data, and (2) empirical catchment-scale EEMT estimated using data from 86 catchments of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) and MOD17A3 annual net primary production (NPP) product derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Results indicated positive and significant linear correspondence (R2 = 0.75; P < 0.001) between model and empirical measures with an average root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.86 MJ m-2 yr-1. Modeled EEMT values were consistently greater than empirical measures of EEMT. Empirical catchment estimates of the energy associated with effective precipitation (EPPT) were calculated using a mass balance approach that accounts for water losses to quick surface runoff not accounted for in the climatologically modeled EPPT. Similarly, local controls on primary production such as solar radiation and nutrient limitation were not explicitly included in the climatologically based estimates of energy associated with primary production (EBIO), whereas these were captured in the remotely sensed MODIS NPP data. These differences likely explain the greater estimate of modeled EEMT relative to the empirical measures. There was significant positive correlation between catchment aridity and the fraction of EEMT partitioned into EBIO (FBIO), with

  3. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  4. Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures

    PubMed Central

    Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

  5. EFFECTS OF HOT HALO GAS ON STAR FORMATION AND MASS TRANSFER DURING DISTANT GALAXY–GALAXY ENCOUNTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jeong-Sun; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2015-06-01

    We use N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of encounters between an early-type galaxy (ETG) and a late-type galaxy (LTG) to study the effects of hot halo gas on the evolution for a case with the mass ratio of the ETG to LTG of 2:1 and the closest approach distance of ∼100 kpc. We find that the dynamics of the cold disk gas in the tidal bridge and the amount of the newly formed stars depend strongly on the existence of a gas halo. In the run of interacting galaxies not having a hot gas halo, the gas and stars accreted into the ETG do not include newly formed stars. However, in the run using the ETG with a gas halo and the LTG without a gas halo, a shock forms along the disk gas tidal bridge and induces star formation near the closest approach. The shock front is parallel to a channel along which the cold gas flows toward the center of the ETG. As a result, the ETG can accrete star-forming cold gas and newly born stars at and near its center. When both galaxies have hot gas halos, a shock is formed between the two gas halos somewhat before the closest approach. The shock hinders the growth of the cold gas bridge to the ETG and also ionizes it. Only some of the disk stars transfer through the stellar bridge. We conclude that the hot halo gas can give significant hydrodynamic effects during distant encounters.

  6. Mass transfer mechanism in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-08-09

    The mass transfer mechanism in HILIC was investigated in depth. The reduced heights equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) of five low molecular weigh compounds with retention factors of -0.05 (slight exclusion from the surface due to the presence of a water-rich layer in which naphthalene is insoluble) to 3.64 were measured at room temperature for a 4.6mm×100mm column packed with 3.5μm 140Å XBridge HILIC particles in a wide range of flow velocities. The mobile phase was a buffered acetonitrile-water mixture (92.5/7.5, v/v). Using a physically reliable model of effective diffusion in binary composite media (Torquato's model), the longitudinal diffusion and solid-liquid mass transfer resistance reduced HETP terms were measured. The reduced short-range eddy dispersion HETP was taken from the literature data. The long-range reduced HETP was directly measured from the subtraction of these HETP terms to the overall HETP measured from moment analysis. In contrast to RPLC, the plots of the reduced HETP versus the reduced velocity depend weakly on the retention factor, due to the constant, low intra-particle diffusivity observed in HILIC. So, the reduced longitudinal diffusion HETP is smaller and the reduced solid-liquid mass transfer resistance HETP is larger in HILIC than in RPLC. Whereas border effects can be concealed in RPLC for retained analytes due to fast radial equilibration across the column diameter, a residual long-range eddy dispersion term persists in 4.6mm I.D. HILIC columns, even at very slow flow rates. Experiments show that the minor differences in the long-range eddy dispersion term between analytes having different retention factors is directly correlated to the reciprocal of their bulk diffusion coefficient. The performance of HILIC columns packed with fine particles is then more sensitive to the inlet sample distribution and to the outlet sample collection than RPLC columns due to the relatively poor radial mixing controlled by lateral diffusion.

  7. Correlation of liquid-film cooling mass transfer data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gater, R. A.; L'Ecuyer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical correlation proposed by Gater and Ecuyer (1970) for liquid-film cooling mass transfer, accounting for film roughness and entrainment effects, is extended to include liquid films of arbitrary length. A favorable comparison between the predicted results and the experimental data of Kinney et al. (1952) and Emmons and Warner (1964) shows the utility of the mass transfer correlation for predictions over a wide range of experimental parameters.

  8. Mass transfer in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Developments in the following areas are reported: surface area and pore size distribution in electrolyte matrices, electron microscopy of electrolyte matrices, surface tension of KOH solutions, water transport in fuel cells, and effectiveness factors for fuel cell components.

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer in an L Shaped Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Azeem; Yunus Khan, T. M.

    2017-08-01

    This article is an extension to the heat transfer in L-shaped porous medium by including the mass diffusion. The heat and mass transfer in the porous domain is represented by three coupled partial differential equations representing the fluid movement, energy transport and mass transport. The equations are converted into algebraic form of equations by the application of finite element method that can be conveniently solved by matrix method. An iterative approach is adopted to solve the coupled equations by setting suitable convergence criterion. The results are discussed in terms of heat transfer characteristics influenced by physical parameters such as buoyancy ratio, Lewis number, Rayleigh number etc. It is found that these physical parameters have significant effect on heat and mass transfer behavior of L-shaped porous medium.

  10. Influence of pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F68 is one of the most used shear protecting additives in cell culture cultivations. It is well known from literature that such surface-active surfactants lower the surface tension at the gas-liquid interface, which influences the mass transfer. In this study, the effect of Pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer in aqueous solutions was examined. Therefore, the gassing in/gassing out method and bubble size measurements were used. At low concentrations of 0.02 g/L, a 50% reduction on mass transfer was observed for all tested spargers and working conditions. An explanation of the observed effects by means of Higbie's penetration or Dankwerts surface renewal theory was applied. It could be demonstrated that the suppressed movement of the bubble surface layer is the main cause for the significant drop down of the kL a-values. For Pluronic F68 concentrations above 0.1 g/L, it was observed that it comes to changes in bubble appearance and bubble size strongly dependent on the sparger type. By using the bubble size measurement data, it could be shown that only small changes in mass transfer coefficient (kL ) take place above the critical micelle concentration. Further changes on overall mass transfer at higher Pluronic F68 concentrations are mainly based on increasing of gas holdup and, more importantly, by increasing of the surface area available for mass transfer.

  11. An Entrance Region Mass Transfer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngquist, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to reveal the consequences of the development of a concentration boundary layer. The rate of a mass transfer limited electrochemical reaction is measured and used to obtain the dependence of average Sherwood number on Reynolds number and entrance length. (Author/BB)

  12. An Entrance Region Mass Transfer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngquist, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to reveal the consequences of the development of a concentration boundary layer. The rate of a mass transfer limited electrochemical reaction is measured and used to obtain the dependence of average Sherwood number on Reynolds number and entrance length. (Author/BB)

  13. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Locmore » al mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the whole width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  14. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes: Quarterly report No. 4, April 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tischer, R. E.

    1989-06-14

    This quarter, bench-scale experiments have been conducted to measure the mass transfer and kinetic rates at simulated duct injection conditions. Section 2 summarizes the tank reactor test results. The stirred tank reactor (Task 2.1) was designed to simulate the gas/liquid interface of a slurry droplet exposed to SO/sub 2/. The measurements of the gas and liquid mass transfer coefficients were completed. Preliminary tests were run with chemically inert solids present in the solution of hydrochloric acid. Section 3 reports results from a differential reactor (Task 2.2). Mississippi hydrated lime was prehumidified for 4 min prior to contract with synthetic flue gas in a packed bed reactor. The reaction times tested ranged from 10-7,200 s. The differential apparatus and method are being modified to determine the effect of initial after content on the solids reactivity. Solids containing varying amount of moisture will be investigated. Experimental results from a Short-Time Differential Reactor (STDR) (Task 2.3) are presented in Section 4. Gas phase mass transfer and chemical reaction steps could be excluded as rate limiting, leaving the solid phase diffusion as a rate limiting step in the reaction of dry Ca(OH)/sub 2/ with SO/sub 2/. Higher relative humidity promoted conversion of the sorbent. Sorbents with high surface area will be produced and used for future solid phase diffusion experiments. The progress of slurry injection computer modeling (Task 3.1) is presented in Section 5. The computer code was transferred from the VAX to a CRAY computer to reduce the computation time. Results are presented in Section 5 to illustrate the effects of CA(OH)/sub 2/ reactivity and concentration on relative gas/liquid mass transfer resistance. Results are also presented that desceibe gas film resistance as a function of SO/sub 2/. 13 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Effects of thermophoresis on hydromagnetic mixed convection and mass transfer flow past a vertical permeable plate with variable suction and thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. P.; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Atul Kumar; Agnihotri, Pratibha

    2011-06-01

    The present paper deals with the effect of surface mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow past a heated vertical flat permeable surface in the presence of thermophoresis, radiative heat flux and heat source/sink. Usual similarity transformations are introduced to obtain similarity solution, using regular perturbation technique. To observe physical insight and interesting aspects of the problem in the presence of thermophoresis, the non-dimensional velocity, temperature and concentration field are numerically studied and displayed graphically for pertinent parameters. It is observed that the thermophoresis has dominant effect on mass transfer mechanism in particle deposition process. The model finds applications in studying particulate deposition on turbine blades, removing small particles from gas streams and determining chemical vapor deposition rate in chemical industries.

  16. Effects of carbon dioxide hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on pH profile development during interfacial mass transfer of ammonia and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Sommer, Sven G.; Petersen, Valdemar; Markfoged, Rikke

    2017-04-01

    Interfacial mass transfer of {NH}_3 and {CO}_2 are important in processes as diverse as {NH}_3 emission from animal manure and gas scrubbing for removal of carbon dioxide. Predicting transfer rates is complicated by bidirectional interactions between solution pH and emission rates, which may be affected by physical, chemical, and biological processes. We studied the effects of {CO}_2 hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on the development of pH profiles in solutions undergoing simultaneous emission of {NH}_3 and {CO}_2. Profiles of pH were measured at a 0.1 mm resolution over 15 h, and interpreted using a reaction-transport model. Under high humidity, surface pH increased quickly (>0.2 units in 8 min) and an increase gradually extended to deeper depths. An increase in {CO}_2 hydration and carbonic acid dehydration rates by addition of carbonic anhydrase increased the elevation of surface pH and the depth to which an increase extended, due to an increase in {CO}_2 emission. Results show that unless carbonic anhydrase is present, the equilibrium approach typically used for modeling interfacial transport of {CO}_2 and {NH}_3 will be inaccurate. Evaporation and resulting convection greatly increased mass transfer rates below an apparent surface film about 1 mm thick. Emission or absorption of {CO}_2 can produce steep gradients in pH over small distances (<0.5 to >20 mm) in systems with and without convective mixing, and the resulting surface pH, in turn, strongly affects {NH}_3 transfer. Both convection and the rate of hydration/dehydration reactions are likely to affect pH profile development and rates of {NH}_3 and {CO}_2 transfer in many systems. Accurately predicting mass transfer rates for these systems will require an understanding of these processes in the systems.

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on pH profile development during interfacial mass transfer of ammonia and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Sommer, Sven G.; Petersen, Valdemar; Markfoged, Rikke

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial mass transfer of NH_3 and CO_2 are important in processes as diverse as NH_3 emission from animal manure and gas scrubbing for removal of carbon dioxide. Predicting transfer rates is complicated by bidirectional interactions between solution pH and emission rates, which may be affected by physical, chemical, and biological processes. We studied the effects of CO_2 hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on the development of pH profiles in solutions undergoing simultaneous emission of NH_3 and CO_2 . Profiles of pH were measured at a 0.1 mm resolution over 15 h, and interpreted using a reaction-transport model. Under high humidity, surface pH increased quickly (>0.2 units in 8 min) and an increase gradually extended to deeper depths. An increase in CO_2 hydration and carbonic acid dehydration rates by addition of carbonic anhydrase increased the elevation of surface pH and the depth to which an increase extended, due to an increase in CO_2 emission. Results show that unless carbonic anhydrase is present, the equilibrium approach typically used for modeling interfacial transport of CO_2 and NH_3 will be inaccurate. Evaporation and resulting convection greatly increased mass transfer rates below an apparent surface film about 1 mm thick. Emission or absorption of CO_2 can produce steep gradients in pH over small distances (<0.5 to >20 mm) in systems with and without convective mixing, and the resulting surface pH, in turn, strongly affects NH_3 transfer. Both convection and the rate of hydration/dehydration reactions are likely to affect pH profile development and rates of NH_3 and CO_2 transfer in many systems. Accurately predicting mass transfer rates for these systems will require an understanding of these processes in the systems.

  18. Mass Transfer and Rheology of Fiber Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghui

    Rheological and mass transfer properties of non-Brownian fiber suspensions are affected by fiber characteristics, fiber interactions, and processing conditions. In this thesis we develop several simulation methods to study the dynamics of single fibers in simple shear flow, as well as the rheology and mass transfer of fiber suspensions. Isolated, rigid, neutrally-buoyant, non-Brownian, slightly curved, nonchiral fibers in simple shear flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number can drift steadily in the gradient direction without external forces or torques. The average drift velocity and direction depend on the fiber aspect ratio, curvature and initial orientation. The drift results from the coupling of rotational and translational dynamics, and the combined effects of flipping, scooping, and spinning motions of the fiber. Irreversible fiber collisions in the suspensions cause shear-induced diffusion. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of dilute suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration and increasing static friction between contacts. The diffusivities in both the gradient and vorticity directions are larger for suspensions of curved fibers than for suspensions of straight fibers. For suspensions of curved fibers, significant enhancements in the diffusivity in the gradient direction are attributed to fiber drift in the gradient direction. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of concentrated suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration before fiber networks or flocs are formed, after which the diffusivity decreases with increasing concentration. The diffusivity increases with increasing fiber equilibrium bending angle, effective stiffness, coefficient of static friction, and rate of collisions. The specific viscosity of fiber suspensions increases with increasing fiber curvature, friction coefficient between mechanical contacts, and solids concentration. The specific viscosity increases linearly with

  19. The effect of ordered structure of turbulence on momentum, heat and mass transfer of impinging round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popiel, C. O.; Trass, O.

    The interaction of vortex structure of the round free jet with the plane solid surface has been investigated using the 'smoke wire' flow visualization and skin friction measurements. The more precise explanation of the mechanism of the influence of the large-scale ordered flow structure on the heat or mass convective processes in the transient region of the impinging round jet has been presented. It was observed that toroidal vortices are periodically generated at the edge of the nozzle and grow to produce the well ordered flow structure at the plate. A periodic appearance of ring-like wall eddies which are rolled up on the wall surface between the radially stretched large-scale toroidal vortices has been recorded. The radial distribution of the skin friction obtained with the thermoanemometry flush mounted probe appears to be generally consistent with the impingement heat transfer data with the exception of the strong acceleration zone in the stagnation point vicinity.

  20. Effects of thermophoresis particle deposition and of the thermal conductivity in a porous plate with dissipative heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, Joaquín; Anwar Bég, O.; López-Ochoa, L. M.

    2011-06-01

    Network simulation method (NSM) is used to solve the laminar heat and mass transfer of an electrically-conducting, heat generating/absorbing fluid past a perforated horizontal surface in the presence of viscous and Joule heating problem. The governing partial differential equations are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential similarity equations, in a single independent variable, η. The resulting coupled, nonlinear equations are solved under appropriate transformed boundary conditions. Computations are performed for a wide range of the governing flow parameters, viz Prandtl number, thermophoretic coefficient (a function of Knudsen number), thermal conductivity parameter, wall transpiration parameter and Schmidt number. The numerical details are discussed with relevant applications. The present problem finds applications in optical fiber fabrication, aerosol filter precipitators, particle deposition on hydronautical blades, semiconductor wafer design, thermo-electronics and problems including nuclear reactor safety.

  1. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  2. Thermophoresis and variable viscosity effects on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer past a porous wedge in the presence of chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Ramasamy; Muhaimin, I.; Khamis, Azme B.

    2009-04-01

    An analysis is presented to investigate the effects of thermophoresis and variable viscosity on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer of a viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluid past a porous wedge in the presence of chemical reaction. The wall of the wedge is embedded in a uniform porous medium in order to allow for possible fluid wall suction or injection. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity transformations. The transformed coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by using the R.K. Gill and shooting methods. Favorable comparison with previously published work is performed. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as for the skin friction, heat and mass transfer and deposition rate are obtained and displayed graphically for pertinent parameters to show interesting aspects of the solution.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in magneto-biofluid flow through a non-Darcian porous medium with Joule effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, B. K.; Mishra, A.; Gupta, S.

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, a mathematical model for the hydromagnetic non-Newtonian biofluid flow in the non-Darcy porous medium with Joule effect is proposed. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into linear ones which are solved numerically by applying the explicit finite difference method. The effects of various parameters, like Reynolds number and hydro-magnetic, Forchheimer, and Darcian parameters, Prandtl, Eckert, and Schmidt numbers, on the velocity, temperature, and concentration are presented graphically. The results of the study can find applications in surgical operations, industrial material processing, and various heat transfer processes.

  4. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  5. Internal mass transfer in hollow fiber supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiaga, A.M.; Irabien, J.A. )

    1993-03-01

    The study of mass transfer in hollow fiber supported liquid membranes is justified by a large number of separation processes. The analysis starts from the definition of an overall permeability coefficient which is a lumped parameter of a particular system and process conditions which gathers both mass transfer and operation parameters. By applying the film theory the contribution of the interfacial mass-transfer coefficient due to the inner boundary layer and the contribution of the supported liquid membrane permeability coefficient can be separated and analyzed. The study yields overall permeability coefficients that can be compared with those expected from hollow fiber design equations suggested earlier. The second approach considers the continuity mass conservation equation and the associated boundary conditions for the solute in the inner fluid. The analysis by means of the fundamental equations separates the effects of the operation variables such as the hydrodynamic conditions and length and diameter of the fibers from the mass-transfer properties of the system, described by the wall Sherwood number. The scope of the present work is to compare both methods of describing a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane module, analyzing the influence of the internal mass transfer on the design of such systems. In the experimental system under consideration, the simultaneous separation-concentration of phenol from aqueous solutions with hollow fiber supported liquid membrane modules is performed. The influence of the flow rate of the inner aqueous phase on the phenol separation rate has been studied.

  6. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  7. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  8. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  9. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  10. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  11. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  13. Mass Transfers during Serpentinization of Oceanic Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, M.; Godard, M.; Delacour, A.; Escartin, J.; Mevel, C.; Muñoz, M.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle peridotites represent at least 20% of (ultra-)slow spread oceanic lithosphere. They are serpentinized down to several km below seafloor, and the numerous ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems emphasize the importance of serpentinization as a mean of chemical exchange between the mantle and the ocean. Characterizing the chemical modifications of peridotites during oceanic serpentinization and associated reactions is thus determinant to estimate the chemical fluxes near the ridges axis and the resulting input budget in subduction zones. However, these chemical exchanges are still poorly constrained. They depend on the initial chemical budget of peridotites (melting), on fluid sources (seawater or hydrothermal fluids), on sinks of elements (mineralogy), and on the operating mass transfer mechanisms, all expected to vary from one site to another. In order to better constrain mechanisms, scale and timing of mass transfers during serpentinization of oceanic peridotites, we carried out a combined (micro)-structural, mineralogical and geochemical study of variably refertilized and serpentinized peridotites drilled at the MARK area (ODP Site 920, 23°N Mid-Atlantic Ridge). The petrostructural study indicates that serpentinization is accompanied by adundant veining of different generations, characteristic of different mechanisms of deformation and transfer during the progressive tectonic exhumation of peridotites. Two main serpentinization stages are distinguished and rough constraints on the depth at which they occurred are provided by regional seismic velocity data. A diffusion-dominated stage occurs below ~2 km in depth. It is followed by an advection-dominated stage at shallower levels. This model is completed by a geochemical investigation of serpentinites using bulk and punctual analyses of traces elements by LA-HR-ICPMS, and iron redox state by XANES at iron K-edge. Results indicate that most samples preserve the bulk peridotite primary trace element signature

  14. Agitating mass transfer with a warped disc's shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, H.

    2015-10-01

    For compact objects fed by Roche lobe overflow, accretion-generated X-rays irradiating the donor star can alter gas flow towards the Lagrange point thus varying mass transfer. The latest work specific to this topic consists of simple yet insightful two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations stressing the role of global flow. To explore how a time-varying disc shadow affects mass transfer, I generalize the geometry, employ a robust hydrodynamics solver, and use phase space analysis near the nozzle to include coriolis lift there. Without even exposing the nozzle, a warped disc's shadow can drive mass transfer cycles by shifting the equatorial edges of the irradiation patches in turns: drawing in denser ambient gas before sweeping it into the nozzle. Other important effects remain missing in two-dimensional models, which I discuss along with prospects for more detailed yet efficient models.

  15. Heat and Mass Transfer Analysis of MHD Nanofluid Flow with Radiative Heat Effects in the Presence of Spherical Au-Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M Zubair Akbar; Rubbab, Qammar; Irshad, Saadia; Ahmad, Salman; Aqeel, M

    2016-12-01

    Energy generation is currently a serious concern in the progress of human civilization. In this regard, solar energy is considered as a significant source of renewable energy. The purpose of the study is to establish a thermal energy model in the presence of spherical Au-metallic nanoparticles. It is numerical work which studies unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nanofluid flow through porous disks with heat and mass transfer aspects. Shaped factor of nanoparticles is investigated using small values of the permeable Reynolds number. In order to scrutinize variation of thermal radiation effects, a dimensionless Brinkman number is introduced. The results point out that heat transfer significantly escalates with the increase of Brinkman number. Partial differential equations that govern this study are reduced into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformations. Then using a shooting technique, a numerical solution of these equations is constructed. Radiative effects on temperature and mass concentration are quite opposite. Heat transfer increases in the presence of spherical Au-metallic nanoparticles.

  16. Heat and Mass Transfer Analysis of MHD Nanofluid Flow with Radiative Heat Effects in the Presence of Spherical Au-Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar; Rubbab, Qammar; Irshad, Saadia; Ahmad, Salman; Aqeel, M.

    2016-10-01

    Energy generation is currently a serious concern in the progress of human civilization. In this regard, solar energy is considered as a significant source of renewable energy. The purpose of the study is to establish a thermal energy model in the presence of spherical Au-metallic nanoparticles. It is numerical work which studies unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nanofluid flow through porous disks with heat and mass transfer aspects. Shaped factor of nanoparticles is investigated using small values of the permeable Reynolds number. In order to scrutinize variation of thermal radiation effects, a dimensionless Brinkman number is introduced. The results point out that heat transfer significantly escalates with the increase of Brinkman number. Partial differential equations that govern this study are reduced into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformations. Then using a shooting technique, a numerical solution of these equations is constructed. Radiative effects on temperature and mass concentration are quite opposite. Heat transfer increases in the presence of spherical Au-metallic nanoparticles.

  17. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  18. A mass transfer model of bauxite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, J.M.; Lasaga, A.C.

    1996-12-01

    The formation of bauxite due to weathering of a granitic protolith has been simulated by means of a one-dimensional flow and reaction model based on the mass transfer principle. The model couples mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, speciation in solution, and advective solute transport in a porous medium. A very important aspect of the modeling study is the use of mineral reaction rates determined experimentally in the laboratory. The important effects of solution saturation state and pH have been incorporated into the kinetic rate laws governing the heterogeneous reactions. The values of these parameters have been obtained from the scientific literature to guarantee that realistic reaction rates are used in the simulations. Albite and quartz are the minerals that make up the parent rock in the model. Gibbsite, kaolinite, and a Na-mica (as a surrogate for smectite) are the secondary minerals that have been taken into account. Long-term simulations (>1 Ma) have been run, and the formation of a bauxitic profile, with an upper gibbsite-rich and a lower kaolinite-rich zone, is predicted. In early stages of the process (up to a few hundreds of thousands of years), both gibbsite and kaolinite precipitate directly from solution as a consequence of albite dissolution. In later stages, the bulk of gibbsite precipitation derives from the incongruent dissolution of kaolinite, while kaolinite precipitation is still caused by the dissolution of albite. This is also reflected by the formation of two reaction fronts in the profile. These results are compared with weathering sequences from the Los Pijiguaos bauxite deposit, Venezuela. The overlap between the gibbsite and kaolinite zones and the replacement of kaolinite by gibbsite are consistent with model calculations. 59 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

  20. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-06

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate.

  1. Effects of mass transfer and light intensity on substrate biological degradation by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria within an annular fiber-illuminating biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zhiping; Jiao, Youzhou; Zhang, Quanguo

    2014-02-05

    In this work, effects of mass transfer and light intensity on performance of substrate biodegradation by cell-immobilized photosynthetic bacteria were investigated within an annular fiber-illuminating bioreactor (AFIBR). In AFIBR, stable biofilm of photosynthetic bacteria was generated on the surface of side-glowing optical fiber to provide sufficient light supply and uniform light distribution in cell-immobilized zone for continuous substrate biodegradation during hydrogen production process. To optimize operation parameters for substrate degradation, a two-dimensional mass transfer model based on experimental data to describe coupled processes of substrate transfer and biodegradation in biofilm with substrate diffusion and convection in bulk flow region was proposed. Investigations on influences of substrate concentration, flow rate and light intensity were carried out. It was showed that the optimum operational parameters for the substrate degradation in the AFIBR are: 10g/l substrate concentration, 100ml/h flow rate and 3.1W/m(2) light intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient combined heat and mass transfer across a rectangular cavity is performed by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. The physical parameters are selected to represent a range of possible crystal growth in solutions. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data to confirm the accuracy of the results. Good qualitative agreements are obtained for the average mass transfer rate across the cavity. Also, qualitative agreements are observed for the global development of thermal and solute fields. It is found that the thermal and solute fields become highly oscillatory when the thermal and solute Grashof numbers are large. Oscillations are probably caused by a number of different instability mechanisms. By reducing the gravity some of these instabilities were made to disappear at the lower Grashof numbers. Transient temperature and solute distribution near the crystal growing surface are highly non-uniform at the higher Grashof numbers. These non-uniformities are less severe in the reduced gravity environments but still exist. The effects of convection on the rate of average mass transfer are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of conduction in the range of Grashof numbers studied. Dependency of mass transfer rate on the Grashof number indicates that the convection effects many not be negligible even in the microgravity environments for the range of parameters investigated.

  3. 3-Chloro-1,2-propanediol biodegradation by Ca-alginate immobilized Pseudomonas putida DSM 437 cells applying different processes: mass transfer effects.

    PubMed

    Konti, Aikaterini; Mamma, Diomi; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitios G; Kekos, Dimitris

    2016-10-01

    3-Chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-CPD) biodegradation by Ca-alginate immobilized Pseudomonas putida cells was performed in batch system, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and packed-bed reactor (PBR). Batch system exhibited higher biodegradation rates and 3-CPD uptakes compared to CSTR and PBR. The two continuous systems (CSTR and PBR) when compared at 200 mg/L 3-CPD in the inlet exhibited the same removal of 3-CPD at steady state. External mass-transfer limitations are found negligible at all systems examined, since the observable modulus for external mass transfer Ω ≪ 1 and the Biot number Bi > 1. Intra-particle diffusion resistance had a significant effect on 3-CPD biodegradation in all systems studied, but to a different extent. Thiele modulus was in the range of 2.5 in batch system, but it was increased at 11 when increasing cell loading in the beads, thus lowering significantly the respective effectiveness factor. Comparing the systems at the same cell loading in the beads PBR was less affected by internal diffusional limitations compared to CSTR and batch system, and, as a result, exhibited the highest overall effectiveness factor.

  4. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  5. Identifying and overcoming the effect of mass transfer limitation on decreased yield in enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose at high solid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Cao, Yuan; Liu, Guodong; Zhao, Jian; Li, Xuezhi; Qu, Yinbo

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose conversion decreases significantly with increasing solid concentrations during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble lignocellulosic materials. Here, mass transfer limitation was identified as a significant determining factor of this decrease by studying the hydrolysis of delignified corncob residue in shake flask, the most used reaction vessel in bench scale. Two mass transfer efficiency-related factors, mixing speed and flask filling, were shown to correlate closely with cellulose conversion at solid loadings higher than 15% DM. The role of substrate characteristics in mass transfer performance was also significant, which was revealed by the saccharification of two corn stover substrates with different pretreatment methods at the same solid loading. Several approaches including premix, fed-batch operation, and particularly the use of horizontal rotating reactor were shown to be valid in facilitating cellulose conversion via improving mass transfer efficiency at solid concentrations higher than 15% DM.

  6. Analysis of heat and mass transfer enhancement in porous material subjected to electric fields (effects of particle sizes and layered arrangement)

    SciTech Connect

    Chaktranond, Chainarong; Rattanadecho, Phadungsak

    2010-11-15

    This research experimentally investigates the influences of electrical voltage, particle sizes and layer arrangement on the heat and mass transfer in porous packed bed subjected to electrohydrodynamic drying. The packed bed consists of a single and double layers of glass beads, water and air. Sizes of glass beads are 0.125 and 0.38 mm in diameter. Electric fields are applied in the range of 0-15 kV. Average velocity and temperature of hot airflow are controlled at 0.33 m/s and 60 C, respectively. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient and drying rate are enhanced considerably with a Corona wind. In the single-layered case, due to effects of porosity, the packed bed containing small beads has capillary pressure higher than that with big beads, resulting in higher removal rate of water and higher rate of heat transfer. Considering the effect of capillary pressure difference, temperature distribution and removal rate of moisture in the double-layered case appear to be different than those observed in the single-layered case. Moreover, in the double-layered case, the fine-coarse packed bed gives drying rate higher than that given by the coarse-fine packed bed. (author)

  7. LUT observations of the mass-transferring binary AI Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Ergang; Liu, Nianping

    2016-06-01

    Complete UV band light curve of the eclipsing binary AI Dra was observed with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) in October 2014. It is very useful to adopt this continuous and uninterrupted light curve to determine physical and orbital parameters of the binary system. Photometric solutions of the spot model are obtained by using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is confirmed that AI Dra is a semi-detached binary with secondary component filling its critical Roche lobe, which indicates that a mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one should happen. Orbital period analysis based on all available eclipse times suggests a secular period increase and two cyclic variations. The secular period increase was interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of 4.12 ×10^{-8}M_{⊙}/yr, which is in agreement with the photometric solutions. Two cyclic oscillations were due to light travel-time effect (LTTE) via the presence of two cool stellar companions in a near 2:1 mean-motion resonance. Both photometric solutions and orbital period analysis confirm that AI Dra is a mass-transferring binary, the massive primary is filling 69 % of its critical Roche lobe. After the primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration.

  8. Vaporization of Graphitic Materials at High Mass Transfer Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    graphite 2. Carbon sublimation 3. High temperature carbon response 4. Sublimation kinetics |ITR\\CT fCanllim an rararaa «14a II nacaaaair an« Htnlllr *r...8217»’» numbmi) iThe thermochemical sublimation response of ATJ-S graphite in both low and high mass transfer convective environments was studied... sublimation effects com- pared to JANAF equilibrium sublimation predictions. Extrapolation of the inferred kinetic sublimation effects to the high

  9. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Yang, W.

    1991-05-30

    After the second annual progress report to DOE in July 1990, we continued the experimental work for another liquid system. The mathematical model was also improved to include secondary effects due to drop deformation and charge redistribution on the deformed drop surface. Originally, we planned to study a mass transfer process after the hydrodynamic modelling. Due to difficulty in measuring drop concentration during oscillations, we decided to study a heat transfer process instead. Using the analogy between the mass transfer and the heat transfer, we can easily extend the results for the heat transfer study to the mass transfer problem.

  10. Thermal-diffusion and MHD for Soret and Dufour’s effects on Hiemenz flow and mass transfer of fluid flow through porous medium onto a stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Gamal M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the thermal-diffusion and magnetic field effects on a stagnation point flowing over a flat stretching surface have been obtained and studied numerically with the variation of the viscosity under the Soret and Dufour's effects. The governing continuity, momentum, energy and concentration equations are converted into a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. The resulting system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically. Numerical results were presented for velocity, temperature and concentration profiles for different parameters of the problem as radiation parameter, magnetic field parameter, porous medium parameter, endothermic chemical reaction, heat source parameter, stretching parameter, the Soret and Dufour number and other. Also the effects of the pertinent parameters on the skin friction, the rate of heat and mass transfer are obtained and discussed numerically and illustrated graphically.

  11. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  12. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  13. Mass transfer in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zavoshy, S.J.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1984-11-01

    A new analytical solution is presented that predicts the rate of dissolution of species from a waste package surrounded by a wet porous medium. By equating the rate of diffusive mass transfer into the porous rock to the rate of liquid-surface chemical reaction, an analytical solution for the time-dependent dissolution rate and the time-dependent concentration of dissolved species at the waste surface is obtained. From these results it is shown that for most of the important species in a package of radioactive waste the surface liquid quickly reaches near-saturation concentrations and the dissolution rate can be predicted by the simpler theory that assumes saturation concentrations in the surface liquid. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  15. Heat and mass transfer effects during displacement of deepwater methane hydrate to the surface of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexander V.; Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Rozhkov, Aleksey N.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in methane hydrate fragments during in situ displacement from the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) to the water surface of Lake Baikal. After being extracted from the methane hydrate deposit at the lakebed, hydrate fragments were placed into a container with transparent walls and a bottom grid. There were no changes in the hydrate fragments during ascent within the GHSZ. The water temperature in the container remained the same as that of the ambient water (~3.5 °C). However, as soon as the container crossed the upper border of the GHSZ, first signs of hydrate decomposition and transformation into free methane gas were observed. The gas filled the container and displaced water from it. At 300 m depth, the upper and lower thermometers in the container simultaneously recorded noticeable decreases of temperature. The temperature in the upper part of the container decreased to -0.25 °C at about 200 m depth, after which the temperature remained constant until the water surface was reached. The temperature at the bottom of the container reached -0.25 °C at about 100 m depth, after which it did not vary during further ascent. These observed effects could be explained by the formation of a gas phase in the container and an ice layer on the hydrate surface caused by heat consumption during hydrate decomposition (self-preservation effect). However, steady-state simulations suggest that the forming ice layer is too thin to sustain the hydrate internal pressure required to protect the hydrate from decomposition. Thus, the mechanism of self-preservation remains unclear.

  16. Homotopy analysis method for chemical reaction and thermophoresis effects on heat and mass transfer for mhd hiemenz flow over a porous wedge in the presence of heat radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.; Puvi Arasu, P.; Loganathan, P.

    2011-05-01

    An analytical technique, namely, the homotopy analysis method, is applied to analyze the effect of chemical reaction and thermophoresis particle deposition on the MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer for a Hiemenz flow over a porous wedge in the presence of heat radiation. The fluid is assumed to be viscous and incompressible. Analytical and numerical calculations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters, and an analysis of the results obtained shows that the flow field is influenced appreciably by the buoyancy ratio as well as by the thermal diffusion and suction/injection parameters. The effects of these parameters on the process characteristics are investigated methodically, and typical results are illustrated. An explicit, totally analytical, and uniformly valid solution is derived which agrees well with numerical results.

  17. Effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyuktha, N.; Ravindran, R.; Ganapathirao, M.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study the effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer. The governing boundary layer equations with boundary conditions are transformed into the dimensionless form by a group of nonsimilar transformations. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained numerically by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations using the quasi-linearization technique combined with an implicit finite difference scheme. The numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to display the distributions of the velocity, temperature, concentration, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, and local Sherwood number. The results obtained indicate that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers increase with nonuniform slot suction, but nonuniform slot injection produces the opposite effect. The local Nusselt number decreases with heat generation and increases with heat absorption.

  18. Simultaneous convective heat and mass transfer in impingement ink drying

    SciTech Connect

    Can, M.

    1998-08-01

    Effective and economical drying of thin ink films is essential in the printing, packaging and coating industries. In evaporative drying, high heat and mass transfer rates are commonly achieved by means of high velocity impinging air jets. To provide data for dryer design a program of research has been implemented to study the heat and mass transfer processes which underlie the drying of thin ink films. The heat transfer situation under impinging air jets is outlined and some experimental results are presented. Optimization of nozzle arrays for impinging air jets is analyzed for practical applications. A non-contact infra-red technique for continuously monitoring the ink drying process is described and drying curves for an ink based on a single solvent (4-Methyl-2-pentanol-MIBC) are presented. Heat and mass transfer theory has been used to predict drying times in the constant rate drying period. These predictions have been compared with experimentally determined drying times. This research has served to confirm the fundamental importance of the drying curve as a basis for dryer design.

  19. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  20. Methods and problems in heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotliar, Iakov Mikhailovich; Sovershennyi, Viacheslav Dmitrievich; Strizhenov, Dmitrii Sergeevich

    The book focuses on the mathematical methods used in heat and mass transfer problems. The theory, statement, and solution of some problems of practical importance in heat and mass transfer are presented, and methods are proposed for solving algebraic, transcendental, and differential equations. Examples of exact solutions to heat and mass transfer equations are given. The discussion also covers some aspects of the development of a mathematical model of turbulent flows.

  1. Mass Transfer via Low Velocity Impacts into Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmak, Stephanie; Colwell, Josh E.; Brisset, Julie; Dove, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    The study of low velocity collisions (<1 m/s) is essential to understand the growth and formation of aggregates in a number of environments in planetary systems. The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) and Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment (PRIME) experiments produced observations of mass transfer from regolith onto an impactor at these velocities in microgravity. We have subsequently carried out ground-based experiments in which a cm-scale sphere impacts and rebounds from a bed of granular material in 1-g laboratory conditions at low impact speeds with the aid of a spring. This allows impacts at v<1 m/s and ensures rebound of the impactor, with the spring providing enough force to overcome gravity. Preliminary results from an impact of a brass impactor into sand (200-500 μm) produced a monolayer of granular material onto the impactor, but the grains are not cohesive enough to allow a significant mass transfer under these conditions. Further experiments with a range of regolith properties, impactor composition and surface properties, impact velocities, and atmospheric conditions will be performed in the laboratory to study the effects of each of these properties on the contact transfer of regolith onto the impactor. Further microgravity experiments with PRIME and in a small drop tower are planned to then study bulk mass transfer with conditions informed by the ground-based experiments. Impacts with the COLLIDE and PRIME microgravity experiments showed mass transfer at speeds < 40 cm/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant and quartz sand targets. We will present the free-fall and laboratory results and implications for the collisional evolution of dust, pebbles and boulders in the protoplanetary disk as well as particles in planetary ring systems.

  2. Engineering correlations of variable-property effects on laminar forced convection mass transfer for dilute vapor species and small particles in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple engineering correlation scheme is developed to predict the variable property effects on dilute species laminar forced convection mass transfer applicable to all vapor molecules or Brownian diffusing small particle, covering the surface to mainstream temperature ratio of 0.25 T sub W/T sub e 4. The accuracy of the correlation is checked against rigorous numerical forced convection laminar boundary layer calculations of flat plate and stagnation point flows of air containing trace species of Na, NaCl, NaOH, Na2SO4, K, KCl, KOH, or K2SO4 vapor species or their clusters. For the cases reported here the correlation had an average absolute error of only 1 percent (maximum 13 percent) as compared to an average absolute error of 18 percent (maximum 54 percent) one would have made by using the constant-property results.

  3. On the Influence of Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a Vertical Channel with Constant Suction and Viscous Dissipation.

    PubMed

    Uwanta, Ime Jimmy; Usman, Halima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the combined effects of Soret and Dufour on free convective heat and mass transfer on the unsteady one-dimensional boundary layer flow over a vertical channel in the presence of viscous dissipation and constant suction. The governing partial differential equations are solved numerically using the implicit Crank-Nicolson method. The velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are discussed numerically and presented through graphs. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number at the plate are discussed numerically for various values of physical parameters and are presented through tables. It has been observed that the velocity and temperature increase with the increase in the viscous dissipation parameter and Dufour number, while an increase in Soret number causes a reduction in temperature and a rise in the velocity and concentration.

  4. Soret and dufour effects on MHD free convective heat and mass transfer with thermophoresis and chemical reaction over a porous stretching surface: Group theory transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siva Raman, N.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.; Kandasamy, R.

    2012-11-01

    The group theoretic method is applied for solving the problem of the combined influence of the thermal diffusion and diffusion thermoeffect on magnetohydrodynamic free convective heat and mass transfer over a porous stretching surface in the presence of thermophoresis particle deposition with variable stream conditions. The application of one-parameter groups reduces the number of independent variables by one; consequently, the system of governing partial differential equations with boundary conditions reduces to a system of ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. The equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill integration scheme with the shooting technique. The impact of the Soret and Dufour effects in the presence of thermophoresis particle deposition with a chemical reaction plays an important role on the flow field.

  5. On the Influence of Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a Vertical Channel with Constant Suction and Viscous Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanta, Ime Jimmy; Usman, Halima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the combined effects of Soret and Dufour on free convective heat and mass transfer on the unsteady one-dimensional boundary layer flow over a vertical channel in the presence of viscous dissipation and constant suction. The governing partial differential equations are solved numerically using the implicit Crank-Nicolson method. The velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are discussed numerically and presented through graphs. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number at the plate are discussed numerically for various values of physical parameters and are presented through tables. It has been observed that the velocity and temperature increase with the increase in the viscous dissipation parameter and Dufour number, while an increase in Soret number causes a reduction in temperature and a rise in the velocity and concentration. PMID:27419208

  6. Joule heating effects on unsteady natural convection flow near a moving semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari, Marneni; Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Nagarani, P.

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady MHD free convective boundary-layer flow along an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer have been investigated numerically. The effects of chemical reaction, thermal radiation and Joule heating are incorporated in the governing equations. Crank-Nicolson finite-difference method is used to solve the governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations. The influence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and Joule heating on flow characteristics are presented graphically and discussed in detailed. To validate the present numerical results, a comparison study has been performed with the previously published results and found that the results are in excellent agreement. It is found that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers decreases with the intensification of magnetic field and the local Sherwood number slightly decreases with the increase of radiation parameter.

  7. Effect of rib angle on local heat/mass transfer distribution in a two-pass rib-roughened channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.; Lau, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The naphthalene sublimation technique is used to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of turbulent air flow in a two-pass channel. A test section that resembles the internal cooling passages of gas turbine airfoils is employed. The local Sherwood numbers on the ribbed walls were found to be 1.5-6.5 times those for a fully developed flow in a smooth square duct. Depending on the rib angle-of-attack and the Reynolds number, the average ribbed-wall Sherwood numbers were 2.5-3.5 times higher than the fully developed values.

  8. Effect of rib angle on local heat/mass transfer distribution in a two-pass rib-roughened channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.; Lau, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The naphthalene sublimation technique is used to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of turbulent air flow in a two-pass channel. A test section that resembles the internal cooling passages of gas turbine airfoils is employed. The local Sherwood numbers on the ribbed walls were found to be 1.5-6.5 times those for a fully developed flow in a smooth square duct. Depending on the rib angle-of-attack and the Reynolds number, the average ribbed-wall Sherwood numbers were 2.5-3.5 times higher than the fully developed values.

  9. Mass-transfer in close binary and their companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Zhu, Liying; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    Secular and/or cyclical orbital period variations of close binaries can be derived by analyzing the (O-C) diagram. The secular variations are usually explained as mass transfer between components, while the most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes is the light-travel time effect (LTTE) through the presence of a third body. Mass transfer and additional companions in close binary systems are important for understanding the formation and evolution of the systems. Here, UV light curves of several close binaries based on the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) observations are presented and analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) method. Then, based on those light-curve solutions and new analysis of the orbital period variations, the multiplicity, geometrical structure and evolution state of targets are discussed.

  10. [Mass transfer of magnesium in hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Calzavara, P; Da Porto, A; Vianello, A; Gatti, P L; Maresca, M C; Caenaro, G

    1990-01-01

    The rate of mass-transfer (MT) of magnesium during hemodialysis was studied in thirty-five patients with hypermagnesemia (Mg = 3.75 +/- 0.72 mg/dl) undergoing chronic hemodialysis. The aim of the study was to verify which is the best dialytical approach to remove the excess of magnesium. The concentration of Mg in the dialysate was of 1.82 mg/dl for all patients. MT was -0.51 +/- 0.36 g and no statistical difference was found between patients treated with cuprophan hollow fibers dialyzers, PAN and cuprophan plates. Mg MT is not correlated with dialysis duration (r = -0.23; p:ns), urea clearance (r = -0.08; p:ns), KT/V index (r = -0.03; p:ns), blood flow (r = -0.15; p:ns). In conclusion from our data, in agreement with other Authors, reduction of serum Mg levels is more convenient by obtained by a decrease in Mg concentration in the dialysate under 1.82 mg/dl, in order to increase the blood-dialysate concentration gradient.

  11. Restrained Ion Population Transfer: A Novel Ion Transfer Method for Mass Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Skulason, Gunnar; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-06-30

    With modern Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometers, ions are created and accumulated exterior to the mass analyzer. The ion accumulation event takes place in a region of higher pressure which allows ions to be thermally cooled before being given kinetic energy and accelerated toward the ICR cell where they are to be decelerated and re-trapped. When gated trapping is used to collect ions in the ICR cell for analysis, mass discrimination can occur due to time-of-flight effects. Also, trapping ions with large axial kinetic energy can decrease the performance of the ICR instrument when compared to the analysis of thermally-cooled ions located at the trap center. Therefore, it is desirable to limit the energy imparted in the ions within the ICR cell as well as minimize time-of-flight effects. The approach presented here for ion transfer called restrained ion population transfer or RIPT provides complete axial control of an ion population throughout the entire transfer sequence from the accumulation region to the ICR cell. This is accomplished by utilization of a number of quadrupole segments arranged in series with independent control of the dc bias voltage applied to each segment of the quadrupole ion guide. This approach circumvents problems associated with time-of-flight effects and minimizes the energy imparted to the ions allowing transfer of the cooled ion packet from the ion accumulation region to the ICR cell. Initial data are presented to illustrate feasibility of restrained ion population transfer. RIPT was also modeled with SIMION 7.0 and simulation results that support our feasibility studies of the ions transfer process are presented.

  12. Mass transfer in white dwarf-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrick, Alexey; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.

    2017-05-01

    We perform hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binaries that contain a white dwarf and a neutron star (WD-NS binaries), and measure the specific angular momentum of material lost from the binary in disc winds. By incorporating our results within a long-term evolution model, we measure the long-term stability of mass transfer in these binaries. We find that only binaries containing helium white dwarfs (WDs) with masses less than a critical mass of MWD, crit = 0.2 M⊙ undergo stable mass transfer and evolve into ultracompact X-ray binaries. Systems with higher mass WDs experience unstable mass transfer, which leads to tidal disruption of the WD. Our low critical mass compared to the standard jet-only model of mass-loss arises from the efficient removal of angular momentum in the mechanical disc winds, which develop at highly super-Eddington mass-transfer rates. We find that the eccentricities expected for WD-NS binaries when they come into contact do not affect the loss of angular momentum, and can only affect the long-term evolution if they change on shorter time-scales than the mass-transfer rate. Our results are broadly consistent with the observed numbers of both ultracompact X-ray binaries and radio pulsars with WD companions. The observed calcium-rich gap transients are consistent with the merger rate of unstable systems with higher mass WDs.

  13. Hall Effects And Rotation Effects On MHD Flow Past An Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate With Combined Heat And Mass Transfer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhsudar, M.; Pandurangan, J.; Muthucumaraswamy, R.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical solution of flow past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate in the presence of Hall current and MHD relative to a rotating fluid with uniform temperature and mass diffusion is presented. The dimensionless equations are solved using the Laplace method. The axial and transverse velocity, temperature and concentration fields are studied for different parameters such as the Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), Rotation parameter (Ω), Schmidt number, Prandtl number, thermal Grashof number (Gr) and mass Grashof number (Gc). It has been observed that the temperature of the plate decreases with increasing values of the Prandtl number and the concentration near the plate increases with decreasing values of Schmidt number. It is also observed that both axial and transverse velocities increase with decreasing values of the magnetic field parameter or rotation parameter, but the trend gets reversed with respect to the Hall parameter. The effects of parameters m, M, Ω, Gr and Gc on the axial and transverse velocity profiles are shown graphically.

  14. Heat and mass transfer in volcano-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems re-distribute heat and mass derived from subsurface magma bodies over large temporal and spatial scales. Numerical models of fluid flow and heat transfer provide a quantitative basis for understanding the thermo-hydrological structure and transient behavior of volcano-hydrothermal systems. At the brittle-ductile transition around a magma body, the rate of conductive heat transfer from the impermeable intrusion is balanced by the rate of advective heat transfer by the fluid. Using the Complex Systems Modeling Platform (CSMP++) to model fluid flow up to near-magmatic conditions, we examine the effect of geologic factors such as host rock permeability, magma emplacement depth, the temperature conditions of the brittle-ductile transition, and rock/magma thermal conductivity on the rates of heat and mass transfer around magma bodies. Additionally, we investigate the role of these factors on the thermo-hydrological structure of the hydrothermal system, including patterns of phase separation, gravity-driven phase segregation, and fluid mixing. Passive tracers are included in the fluid flow models to simulate the input of magmatic volatiles into hydrothermal fluids and their fractionation between the liquid and vapor phases. Ultimately, we compare our model results against measured heat and gas fluxes from volcano-hydrothermal systems to help inform the interpreation of these measurements.

  15. Mass transfer ways of ultraviolet printing ink ingredients into foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Jung, T; Simat, T J; Altkofer, W

    2010-07-01

    The case of isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) showed conclusively that the ingredients of ultraviolet printing inks may migrate into packaged foodstuffs. For multilayered materials like beverage cartons, the only way that mass transfer can occur is by the so-called set-off effect. In contrast, in the case of rigid plastics like yoghurt cups, two other methods of mass transfer, permeation and gas phase, have to be considered. In cooperation with producers of ink, plastic cups and yoghurt, a project was conducted in order to elucidate the mass transfer of ink ingredients. In addition, the influence of storage time and the age of ultraviolet lamps on the migration level was examined. The suitability of 50% ethanol as a simulant for yoghurt was also tested. ITX was chosen as a model migrant, as it is easily detectable. Furthermore, the migration of two other substances, the photo-initiator 2-methyl-4'-(methylthio)-2-morpholinopropiophenone (MTMP) and the amine synergist ethyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDAB), which may be used in combination with ITX, was studied. Before being filled with yoghurt or 50% ethanol, the printed cups were stored under different contact conditions, with and without contact between the inner layer and the printed surfaces, in order to distinguish between the possible mass transfer ways. All analyses were performed by means of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection (HPLC-DAD/FLD). It was shown that contamination with ITX and EDAB occurs via set-off and that the degree of migration increases with lamp age and storage time of the unfilled cups. Migration of MTMP was not detectable. The results show that besides the careful selection of the appropriate raw materials for printing ink, a close monitoring of the process also plays a major role in migration control. In addition, the results proved that 50% ethanol is a suitable simulant for yoghurt.

  16. Instability of mass transfer in a planet-star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shi; Spruit, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the angular momentum exchange mechanism governing the evolution of mass-transferring binary stars does not apply to Roche lobe filling planets, because most of the angular momentum of the mass-transferring stream is absorbed by the host star. Apart from a correction for the difference in specific angular momentum of the stream and the centre of mass of the planet, the orbit does not expand much on Roche lobe overflow. We explore the conditions for dynamically unstable Roche lobe overflow as a function of planetary mass and mass and radius (age) of host star and equation of state of planet. For a Sun-like host, gas giant planets in a range of mass and entropy can undergo dynamical mass transfer. Examples of the evolution of the mass transfer process are given. Dynamic mass transfer of rocky planets depends somewhat sensitively on equation of state used. Silicate planets in the range 1 < Mp < 10 M⊕ typically go through a phase of dynamical mass transfer before settling to slow overflow when their mass drops to less than 1 M⊕.

  17. Effects of Acidic Peptide Size and Sequence on Trivalent Praseodymium Adduction and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2017-02-07

    Using the lanthanide ion praseodymium, Pr(III), metallated ion formation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) were studied for 25 biological and model acidic peptides. For chain lengths of seven or more residues, even highly acidic peptides that can be difficult to protonate by electrospray ionization will metallate and undergo abundant ETD fragmentation. Peptides composed of predominantly acidic residues form only the deprotonated ion, [M + Pr - H](2+) ; this ion yields near complete ETD sequence coverage for larger peptides. Peptides with a mixture of acidic and neutral residues, generate [M + Pr](3+) , which cleaves between every residue for many peptides. Acidic peptides that contain at least one residue with a basic side chain also produce the protonated ion, [M + Pr + H](4+) ; this ion undergoes the most extensive sequence coverage by ETD. Primarily metallated and non-metallated c- and z-ions form for all peptides investigated. Metal adducted product ions are only present when at least half of the peptide sequence can be incorporated into the ion; this suggests that the metal ion simultaneously attaches to more than one acidic site. The only site consistently lacking dissociation is at the N-terminal side of a proline residue. Increasing peptide chain length generates more backbone cleavage for metal-peptide complexes with the same charge state. For acidic peptides with the same length, increasing the precursor ion charge state from 2+ to 3+ also leads to more cleavage. The results of this study indicate that highly acidic peptides can be sequenced by ETD of complexes formed with Pr(III).

  18. Effect of bend separation distance on the mass transfer in back-to-back pipe bends arranged in a 180° configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Le, T.; Ewing, D.; Ching, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The mass transfer to turbulent flow through back-to-back pipe bends arranged in a 180° configuration with different lengths of pipe between the bends was measured using a dissolving gypsum test section in water. The measurements were performed for bends with a radius of curvature of 1.5 times the pipe diameter ( D) at a Reynolds numbers of 70,000 and Schmidt number of 1280. The maximum mass transfer in the bends decreased from approximately 1.8 times the mass transfer in the upstream pipe when there was no separation distance between the bends to 1.7 times when there was a 1 D or 5 D length of pipe between the bends. The location of the maximum mass transfer was on the inner sidewall downstream of the second bend when there was no separation distance between the bends. This location changed to the inner wall at the beginning of the second bend when there was a 1 D long pipe between the bends, and to the inner sidewall at the end of the first bend when there was a 5 D long pipe between the bends.

  19. Dufour and Soret effect on heat and mass transfer with radiative heat flux in a viscous liquid over a rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rehan Ali; Shuaib, Muhammad; Khan, Aamir

    2017-08-01

    Free surface flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a porous rotating disk with heat and mass transfer with radiative heat flux is studied. The effect of the natural parameters such as Dufour number, Soret number, Prandtl number, radiation parameter, Suction parameter and Schmidt number on the fluid properties are determined and shown graphically. The corresponding skin friction coefficient, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are also calculated and displayed in tables showing the effects of various parameters on velocity profile. Individual averaged square residual errors as well as optimal values of converges control parameterconvergence control parameters are also discussed in detail. It is found that Dufour and radiation effects cause reductions in the fluid temperature. The effect of suction decreases the velocities, temperature and concentration profiles significantly in boundary layer. The total averaged squared errors and average squared residual errors are further reduced as the order of approximation is increased. This analysis was performed by means of the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM) and for validity it is compared with the results of BVP4C numerical routine.

  20. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds (a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  1. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-07-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds ( a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  2. Effect of impeller type and mechanical agitation on the mass transfer and power consumption aspects of ASBR operation treating synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Michelan, Rogério; Zimmer, Thiago R; Rodrigues, José A D; Ratusznei, Suzana M; de Moraes, Deovaldo; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2009-03-01

    The effect of flow type and rotor speed was investigated in a round-bottom reactor with 5 L useful volume containing 2.0 L of granular biomass. The reactor treated 2.0 L of synthetic wastewater with a concentration of 800 mgCOD/L in 8-h cycles at 30 degrees C. Five impellers, commonly used in biological processes, have been employed to this end, namely: a turbine and a paddle impeller with six-vertical-flat-blades, a turbine and a paddle impeller with six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blades and a three-blade-helix impeller. Results showed that altering impeller type and rotor speed did not significantly affect system stability and performance. Average organic matter removal efficiency was about 84% for filtered samples, total volatile acids concentration was below 20 mgHAc/L and bicarbonate alkalinity a little less than 400 mgCaCO3/L for most of the investigated conditions. However, analysis of the first-order kinetic model constants showed that alteration in rotor speed resulted in an increase in the values of the kinetic constants (for instance, from 0.57 h(-1) at 50 rpm to 0.84 h(-1) at 75 rpm when the paddle impeller with six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blades was used) and that axial flow in mechanically stirred reactors is preferable over radial-flow when the vertical-flat-blade impeller is compared to the inclined-flat-blade impeller (for instance at 75 rpm, from 0.52 h(-1) with the six-flat-blade-paddle impeller to 0.84 h(-1) with the six-45 degrees -inclined-flat-blade-paddle impeller), demonstrating that there is a rotor speed and an impeller type that maximize solid-liquid mass transfer in the reaction medium. Furthermore, power consumption studies in this reduced reactor volume showed that no high power transfer is required to improve mass transfer (less than 0.6 kW/10(3)m3).

  3. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in swirling flows (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, A. I.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Popov, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Research results of Russian and foreign scientists of heat and mass transfer in whirling flows, swirling effect, superficial vortex generators, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscales, burning at swirl of the flow, and technologies and apparatuses with the use of whirling currents for industry and power generation were presented and discussed at the "Heat and Mass Transfer in Whirling Currents" 5th International Conference. The choice of rational forms of the equipment flow parts when using whirling and swirling flows to increase efficiency of the heat-power equipment and of flow regimes and burning on the basis of deep study of the flow and heat transfer local parameters was set as the main research prospect. In this regard, there is noticeable progress in research methods of whirling and swirling flows. The number of computational treatments of swirling flows' local parameters has been increased. Development and advancement of the up to date computing models and national productivity software are very important for this process. All experimental works are carried out with up to date research methods of the local thermoshydraulic parameters, which enable one to reveal physical mechanisms of processes: PIV and LIV visualization techniques, high-speed and infrared photography, high speed registration of parameters of high-speed processes, etc. There is a problem of improvement of researchers' professional skills in the field of fluid mechanics to set adequately mathematics and physics problems of aerohydrodynamics for whirling and swirling flows and numerical and pilot investigations. It has been pointed out that issues of improvement of the cooling system and thermal protection effectiveness of heat-power and heat-transfer equipment units are still actual. It can be solved successfully using whirling and swirling flows as simple low power consumption exposing on the flow method and heat transfer augmentation.

  4. Thermal radiation and mass transfer effects on unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical oscillating plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmed, Rubel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    Unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical porous plate in porous medium with radiation, diffusion thermo, thermal diffusion and heat source are analyzed. The governing non-linear, partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless by using non-dimensional quantities. Then the resultant dimensionless equations are solved numerically by applying an efficient, accurate and conditionally stable finite difference scheme of explicit type with the help of a computer programming language Compaq Visual Fortran. The stability and convergence analysis has been carried out to establish the effect of velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt number, Sherwood number, stream lines and isotherms line. Finally, the effects of various parameters are presented graphically and discussed qualitatively.

  5. Mass Transfer Model of Desulfurization in the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Dong, Yan-Wu; Li, Yang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Fu-Bin

    2017-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the slag on desulfurization during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process with a focus of developing a mass transfer model to understand the mechanism of desulfurization. Stainless steel 1Cr21Ni5Ti was used as the electrode and remelted with two different kinds of slags using a 50-kg ESR furnace. The contents of sulfur along the axial direction of product ingots were analyzed. It was found that the sulfur content of 350 ppm in the electrode is reduced to 71 to 95 ppm in the ingot by remelting with the slag containing 5 wt pct of CaO, and lowered more to 47 to 59 ppm with another slag having 20 wt pct CaO. On the basis of the penetration and film theories, the theoretical model developed in this work well elucidates the kinetics of desulfurization revealing the mechanism of sulfur transfer during the ESR process. The calculation results obtained from the model agree well with the experimental results. The model indicates that when sulfur content in electrode is given, there is a corresponding minimum value of sulfur content in the ingot due to the kinetics limit. This lowest sulfur content cannot be further reduced even with increasing L S (sulfur distribution coefficient between metal and slag phases) or decreasing sulfur content in the slag. Constant addition of extra amount of CaO to the molten slag with the increase of sulfur content in the slag during the remelting process can improve the macrosegregation of sulfur distributed along the axial direction of ESR ingots. Since the rate-determining steps of the sulfur mass transfer lie in the metal phase, adding calcium as deoxidizer can change mass transfer of sulfur and thus promote desulfurization further during the ESR process.

  6. Mass Transfer Model of Desulfurization in the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Dong, Yan-Wu; Li, Yang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Fu-Bin

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the slag on desulfurization during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process with a focus of developing a mass transfer model to understand the mechanism of desulfurization. Stainless steel 1Cr21Ni5Ti was used as the electrode and remelted with two different kinds of slags using a 50-kg ESR furnace. The contents of sulfur along the axial direction of product ingots were analyzed. It was found that the sulfur content of 350 ppm in the electrode is reduced to 71 to 95 ppm in the ingot by remelting with the slag containing 5 wt pct of CaO, and lowered more to 47 to 59 ppm with another slag having 20 wt pct CaO. On the basis of the penetration and film theories, the theoretical model developed in this work well elucidates the kinetics of desulfurization revealing the mechanism of sulfur transfer during the ESR process. The calculation results obtained from the model agree well with the experimental results. The model indicates that when sulfur content in electrode is given, there is a corresponding minimum value of sulfur content in the ingot due to the kinetics limit. This lowest sulfur content cannot be further reduced even with increasing L S (sulfur distribution coefficient between metal and slag phases) or decreasing sulfur content in the slag. Constant addition of extra amount of CaO to the molten slag with the increase of sulfur content in the slag during the remelting process can improve the macrosegregation of sulfur distributed along the axial direction of ESR ingots. Since the rate-determining steps of the sulfur mass transfer lie in the metal phase, adding calcium as deoxidizer can change mass transfer of sulfur and thus promote desulfurization further during the ESR process.

  7. Efficient Heat and Mass Transfer Formulations for Oil Shale Retorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; Zhang, F.

    2007-12-01

    A mathematical model for oil shale retorting is described that considers kerogen pyrolysis, oil coking, residual carbon gasification, carbonate mineral decomposition, water-gas shift, and phase equilibria reaction. Reaction rate temperature-dependence is described by Arrhenius kinetics. Fractured rock is modeled as a bi-continuum consisting of fracture porosity in which advective and dispersive gas and heat transport occur, and rock matrix in which diffusive mass transport and thermal conduction occur. Heat transfer between fracture and matrix regions is modeled either by a partial differential equation for spherical conduction or by a linear first-order heat transfer formulation. Mass transfer is modeled in an analogous manner or assuming local equilibrium. First-order mass and heat transfer coefficients are computed by a theoretical model from fundamental rock matrix properties. The governing equations are solved using a 3-D finite element formulation. Simulations of laboratory retort experiments and hypothetical problems indicated thermal disequilibrium to be the dominant factor controlling retort reactions. Simulation accuracy was unaffected by choice of mass transfer formulation. However, computational effort to explicitly simulate diffusive mass transfer in the rock matrix increased computational effort by more than an order of magnitude compared with first-order mass transfer or equilibrium analyses. A first-order heat transfer approximation of thermal conduction can be used without significant loss of accuracy if the block size and/or heating rate are not too large, as quantified by a proposed dimensionless heating rate.

  8. Some features of the effect the pH value and the physicochemical properties of boric acid have on mass transfer in a VVER reactor's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, A. V.; Kritskii, V. G.; Rodionov, Yu. A.; Berezina, I. G.

    2013-07-01

    Certain features of the effect of boric acid in the reactor coolant of nuclear power installations equipped with a VVER-440 reactor on mass transfer in the reactor core are considered. It is determined that formation of boric acid polyborate complexes begins under field conditions at a temperature of 300°C when the boric acid concentration is equal to around 0.065 mol/L (4 g/L). Operations for decontaminating the reactor coolant system entail a growth of corrosion product concentration in the coolant, which gives rise to formation of iron borates in the zones where subcooled boiling of coolant takes place and to the effect of axial offset anomalies. A model for simulating variation of pressure drop in a VVER-440 reactor's core that has invariable parameters during the entire fuel campaign is developed by additionally taking into account the concentrations of boric acid polyborate complexes and the quantity of corrosion products (Fe, Ni) represented by the ratio of their solubilities.

  9. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Topical report for Task 4, Novel techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, Wojciech; Rochelle, G.T.

    1991-09-17

    Novel techniques designed for the enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization in dry-sorbent injection (DSI) and duct-spray drying (DSD) were investigated in the Long Time Differential Reactor (LTDR), Short Time Differential Reactor (STDR), and 50-cfm pilot plant. At 2000-ppm SO{sub 2} and 60 percent relative humidity, the presence of up to 30-percent initial free moisture significantly increased sorbent reactivity with SO{sub 2}, compared to sorbent with equilibrium amount of moisture. The conversion decreased when the initial free moisture increased beyond 30--50 percent. The initial free moisture content and corresponding level of maximum sorbent conversion with SO{sub 2} varied with the surface area of the sorbent. Sorbent moisture capacity tests indicated that agglomeration of damp calcium silicate sorbent was a function of sorbent pore volume. Critical moisture content was increasing with specific surface area. Very little improvement in SO{sub 2} removal was obtained by DSI recycle operation downstream of humidification. Significant enhancement was achieved by DSI recycle upstream of humidification. Grinding of DSI solids with and without fly ash resulted in significant increase of surface area and pore volume and resulting reactivity with SO{sub 2}. Organic buffer additives were tested as potential enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization during the DSD process. Bench-scale results suggested that organic acids should be effective additives to enhance SO{sub 2} in slurry if SO{sub 2} absorption was controlled significantly by liquid film resistance. Pilot-plant tests did not demonstrate significant enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion during spray drying as a result of buffer additives. Grinding of simulated DSD solids resulted in significant enhancement of Ca(OH){sub 2} reactivity with SO{sub 2}.

  10. Observing Mass Transfer in a Neglected Interacting Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Phillip A.

    2011-05-01

    The eclipsing and interacting binary star R Arae is a very interesting system that has unfortunately been neglected. The few spectroscopic studies of the system report badly blended absorption lines that indicate mass transfer, but until now there has been no orbital period study to conclusively show a real period change resulting from mass transfer. In this study, new data are combined with those found in the available literature and in the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers to construct the first ephemeris curve for R Ara, which spans more than a century since its discovery in 1894. Average orbital period change and conservative mass transfer rates are presented.

  11. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  12. Stagnation point flow, heat transfer and species transfer over a shrinking sheet with coupled Stefan blowing effects from species transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-11-01

    The problem of stagnation-point flow and heat transfer with the effect of the blowing from species transfer over an impermeable shrinking sheet is studied. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into the ordinary differential equations using the similarity transformations which are then solved numerically using the bvp4c function in Matlab. The focus of this study is the effect of the blowing parameter to the velocity of the flow, the rate of heat transfer and the mass of species transfer over a flat surface of shrinking sheet. From the numerical results, it is found that the blowing parameter substantially affects the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics.

  13. Effects of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddeek, M. A.; Darwish, A. A.; Abdelmeguid, M. S.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media has been studied in the presence of radiation and magnetic field. The plate surface is embedded in a uniform Darcian porous medium in order to allow for possible fluid wall suction or blowing and has a power-law variation of both the wall temperature and concentration. The similarity solution is used to transform the system of partial differential equations, describing the problem under consideration, into a boundary value problem of coupled ordinary differential equations, and an efficient numerical technique is implemented to solve the reduced system. Numerical calculations are carried out, for various values of the dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include a variable viscosity, chemical reactions, radiation, magnetic field, porous medium and power index of the wall temperature parameters. Comparisons with previously published works are performed and excellent agreement between the results is obtained. The results are presented graphically and the conclusion is drawn that the flow field and other quantities of physical interest are significantly influenced by these parameters.

  14. The effect of aeration conditions, characterized by the volumetric mass transfer coefficient K(L)a, on the fermentation kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Mounsef, Jihane Rahbani; Salameh, Dominique; Louka, Nicolas; Brandam, Cedric; Lteif, Roger

    2015-09-20

    The aeration is a key factor for Bacillus thuringiensis growth, sporulation and δ-endotoxins production. The objective of our work was to study the effect of aeration on the fermentation kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki (Btk), cultivated in a cereal milling byproduct (CMB) mono-component medium, in order to improve the δ-endotoxins productivity. Aeration conditions were systematically characterized by the volumetric mass transfer coefficient KLa. In the 6% CMB culture medium, different values of the maximal specific oxygen uptake rate were obtained at different values of KLa. For KLa of 7.2 h(-1), the growth was inhibited and the sporulation was defective. There was a linear increase of the average specific growth rate and faster sporulation and liberation of spores and δ-endotoxins crystals when KLa was increased between 13.3 h(-1) and 65.5 h(-1). Similar kinetic was observed in cultures performed at KLa equal to 65.5 h(-1) and 106.2 h(-1). The highest toxins productivity of 96.1 mg L(-1) (h)-1 was obtained in the 9% CMB culture medium for KLa of 102 h(-1). It was possible to track the evolution of the bacterial cells between vegetative growth, sporulation and liberation of mature spores by following the variation of the CO2 percent in the effluent gas.

  15. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH₄, H₂and CO₂. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production uncertainty the most. This analysis is repeated for (i) different temperature regimes and (ii) different solids retention times (SRTs) in the anaerobic digester. Results show that both SRC and MS are good measures of sensitivity unless the anaerobic digester is operating at low SRT and mesophilic conditions. In the latter situation, and due to the intrinsic nonlinearities of the system, SRC fails in decomposing the variance of the model predictions (R² < 0.7) making MS a more reliable method. At high SRT, influent fractionations are the most influential parameters for predictions of CH₄and CO₂emissions. Nevertheless, when the anaerobic digester volume is decreased (for the same load), the role of acetate degraders gains more importance under mesophilic conditions, while lipids and fatty acid metabolism is more influential under thermophilic conditions. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the results and their implications during model calibration and validation exercises.

  16. Thermal radiation effect on mixed convection heat and mass transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid over a vertical surface embedded in a porous medium in the presence of thermal diffusion and diffusion-thermo effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. A. A.; Megahed, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal radiation, thermal diffusion, and diffusion-thermo effects on heat and mass transfer by mixed convection of non-Newtonian power-law fluids over a vertical permeable surface embedded in a saturated porous medium are investigated. The governing equations describing the problem are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a non-similar form. The transformed equations are solved by using the local non-similarity method combined with the shooting technique. The effects of the physical parameters of the problem on the fluid temperature and concentration are illustrated graphically and analyzed. Also, the effects of the pertinent parameters on the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number are presented.

  17. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Volume 2, Duct spray drying: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1992-01-29

    Removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal- burning power plants can be achieved by duct spray drying using calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}] slurries. A primary objective of this research was to discover the aspects of mass transfer into Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries which limit SO{sub 2} absorption. A bench- scale stirred tank reactor with a flat gas/liquid interface was used to simulate SO{sub 2} absorption in a slurry droplet. The absorption rate of SO{sub 2} from gas concentrations of 500 to 5000 ppm was measured at 55{degrees}C in clear solutions and slurries of Ca(OH){sub 2} up to 1.0 M (7 wt percent). Results are reported in terms of the enhancement factor, {O}. This research will allow prediction of conditions where the absorption of SO{sub 2} in Ca(OH){sub 2} slurries can be enhanced by changes to liquid phase constituents (under which SO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by liquid film mass transfer). Experiments in the stirred tank have shown that SO{sub 2} absorption in a 1.0 M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry was completely dominated by gas film mass transfer with a large excess of Ca(OH){sub 2} but becomes controlled by liquid film resistance at greater than 50 percent Ca(OH){sub 2} utilization. (VC)

  18. Mass transfer coefficients determination from linear gradient elution experiments.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-02

    A procedure to estimate mass transfer coefficients in linear gradient elution chromatography is presented and validated by comparison with experimental data. Mass transfer coefficients are traditionally estimated experimentally through the van Deemter plot, which represents the HETP as a function of the fluid velocity. Up to now, the HETP was obtained under isocratic elution conditions. Unfortunately, isocratic elution experiments are often not suitable for large biomolecules which suffer from severe mass transfer hindrances. Yamamoto et al. were the first to propose a semi-empirical equation to relate HETPs measured from linear gradient elution experiments to those obtained under isocratic conditions [7]. Based on his pioneering work, the approach presented in this work aims at providing an experimental procedure supported by simple equations to estimate reliable mass transfer parameters from linear gradient elution chromatographic experiments. From the resolution of the transport model, we derived a rigorous analytical expression for the HETP in linear gradient elution chromatography.

  19. Mass transfer in a 1370 C (2500 F) lithium thermal convection loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results from a test to evaluate interstitial element mass transfer effects on T-111, ASTAR 811C, and ASTAR 1211C after 5000 hours in flowing lithium at 1370 C (2500 F) are presented. No gross corrosion effects were observed. However, hafnium and nitrogen transfer to cooler regions within the loop were noted. Oxygen was in general removed from test specimens, but there was no evidence to indicate that it was a major factor in the mass transfer process. Carbon and hydrogen transfer were not detected.

  20. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  1. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  2. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  3. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jílková, Lucie; Hamers, Adrian S.; Hammer, Michael; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distribution in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new host star. The population of the transferred particles can be used to constrain the encounter through which it was delivered. We expect that many stars experienced transfer among their debris discs and planetary systems in their birth environment. This mechanism presents a formation channel for objects on wide orbits of arbitrary inclinations, typically having high eccentricity but possibly also close to circular (eccentricities of about 0.1). Depending on the geometry, such orbital elements can be distinct from those of the objects formed around the star.

  4. Effective Bayesian Transfer Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    and a shape-based object model. Andrew Ng, Stanford, successfully applied their convolutional deep belief network model to perform object...search for “deeper” transfer learning algorithms, that transfer higher-level knowledge between tasks. Applied the convolutional deep belief network ...Andrew Ng, Convolutional deep belief networks for scalable unsupervised learning of hierarchical representations , Proceedings of the 26th

  5. Numerical study on passive convective mass transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, G. P.; Muhammed Rafi, K. M.; Deepu, M.

    2017-04-01

    Passive mixing mechanisms are widely used for heat and mass transfer enhancement. Vortices generated in flowfield lead to gradients that favour convective mass transfer. Computations on enhancement of convective mass transfer of sublimating solid fuel by baroclinic torque generated vortices in the wake of a swept ramp placed in high speed flow is presented here. Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM) based computational scheme employed in the present study, to solve compressible turbulent flow field involving species transport, could capture the complex flow features resulted by vortex boundary layer and shock boundary layer interactions. Convective mass transfer is found to get improved in regions near boundary layer by horseshoe vortex and further transported to other regions by counter rotating vortex pair. Vortices resulted by flow expansion near aft wall of wedge and recompression wave-boundary layer interactions also promotes convective mass transport. Extensive computations have been carried out to reveal the role of vortices dominance at various lateral sweep angles in promotion of convective mass transfer in turbulent boundary layer.

  6. Effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann method for heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Like; AuYeung, Nick; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a systematic study on the effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for Dirichlet and Neumann problems in heat and mass transfer modeling. The second-order accurate boundary condition treatments for continuous Dirichlet and Neumann problems are directly implemented for the corresponding discontinuous boundary conditions. Results from three numerical tests, including both straight and curved boundaries, are presented to show the accuracy and order of convergence of the LBE computations. Detailed error assessments are conducted for the interior temperature or concentration (denoted as a scalar ϕ) and the interior derivatives of ϕ for both types of boundary conditions, for the boundary flux in the Dirichlet problem and for the boundary ϕ values in the Neumann problem. When the discontinuity point on the straight boundary is placed at the center of the unit lattice in the Dirichlet problem, it yields only first-order accuracy for the interior distribution of ϕ, first-order accuracy for the boundary flux, and zeroth-order accuracy for the interior derivatives compared with the second-order accuracy of all quantities of interest for continuous boundary conditions. On the lattice scale, the LBE solution for the interior derivatives near the singularity is largely independent of the resolution and correspondingly the local distribution of the absolute errors is almost invariant with the changing resolution. For Neumann problems, when the discontinuity is placed at the lattice center, second-order accuracy is preserved for the interior distribution of ϕ; and a "superlinear" convergence order of 1.5 for the boundary ϕ values and first-order accuracy for the interior derivatives are obtained. For straight boundaries with the discontinuity point arbitrarily placed within the lattice and curved boundaries, the boundary flux becomes zeroth-order accurate for Dirichlet problems

  7. The Experimental Analysis of Local Heat and Mass Transfer Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M.; Miller, W.A.

    1999-11-14

    In pure heat transfer, specifications of effectiveness, fluid properties, and flows enable calculation of the heat exchanger area. In the case of falling film absorption, a simultaneous heat and mass transfer governs the performance of the absorber. The exchange of mass across the liquid-vapor interface involves the generation of heat. The heat effects associated with the mass exchange increase the temperature, which affects the equilibrium state of the pressure and composition and in turn affects the mass. The falling film flow rate coupled to the physical properties of kinematic viscosity and surface tension govern the flow regime of a vertical falling film. Wavy-laminar, roll-wave laminar, and turbulent flows will develop convective contributions that can enhance the transfer of mass into the film. The combined interaction of all these factors makes the absorption process very difficult to analyze and predict. A study of simultaneous heat and mass transfer was therefore conduct ed on a vertical falling film absorber to better understand the mechanisms driving the heat and mass transfer processes. Falling films are characteristically unstable, and a wavy-laminar flow was observed during the experimental study. The wavy flow further complicates the problem; therefore, only limited information is known about the temperature and concentration profiles along the length of the absorber that describe the local heat and mass transfer rates.

  8. An insight into the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of eggshells hatching broiler chicks and its effects to the hatcher environment.

    PubMed

    Romanini, C E B; Exadaktylos, V; Hong, S W; Tong, Q; McGonnell, I; Demmers, T G M; Bergoug, H; Guinebretière, M; Eterradossi, N; Roulston, N; Verhelst, R; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D

    2015-02-01

    Thermodynamic study of incubated eggs is an important component in the optimisation of incubation processes. However, research on the interaction of heat and moisture transfer mechanisms in eggs is rather limited and does not focus on the hatching stage of incubation. During hatch, both the recently hatched chick and the broken eggshell add extra heat and moisture contents to the hatcher environment. In this study, we have proposed a novel way to estimate thermodynamically the amount of water evaporated from a broken eggshell during hatch. The hypothesis of this study considers that previously reported drops in eggshell temperature during hatching of chicks is the result remaining water content evaporating from the eggshell, released on the inner membrane by the recently hatched wet chick, just before hatch. To reproduce this process, water was sprayed on eggshells to mimic the water-fluid from the wet body of a chick. For each sample of eggshell, the shell geometry and weight, surface area and eggshell temperature were measured. Water evaporation losses and convection coefficient were calculated using a novel model approach considering the simultaneous heat and mass transfer profiles in an eggshell. The calculated average convective coefficient was 23.9 ± 7.5 W/m(2) °C, similar to previously reported coefficients in literature as a function of 0.5-1m/s air speed range. Comparison between measured and calculated values for the water evaporation showed 68% probability accuracy, associated to the use of an experimentally derived single heat transfer coefficient. The results support our proposed modelling approach of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, by estimating the amount of evaporated water in an eggshell post-hatch, air humidity levels inside the hatcher can be optimised to ensure wet chicks dry properly while not dehydrating early hatching chicks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Advective-diffusive mass transfer in fractured porous media with variable rock matrix block size.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2012-05-15

    Traditional dual porosity models do not take into account the effect of matrix block size distribution on the mass transfer between matrix and fracture. In this study, we introduce the matrix block size distributions into an advective-diffusive solute transport model of a divergent radial system to evaluate the mass transfer shape factor, which is considered as a first-order exchange coefficient between the fracture and matrix. The results obtained lead to a better understanding of the advective-diffusive mass transport in fractured porous media by identifying two early and late time periods of mass transfer. Results show that fractured rock matrix block size distribution has a great impact on mass transfer during early time period. In addition, two dimensionless shape factors are obtained for the late time, which depend on the injection flow rate and the distance of the rock matrix from the injection point. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of radiation on free convection heat and mass transfer flow through porous medium in a vertical channel with heat absorption/generation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavanya, B.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper analyses a solution for the transient free flow on a viscous and incompressible fluid between two vertical walls as a result of heta and mass transfer. The perturbation technique ahs been used to find the solutions for the velocity and temperature fields by solving the governing partial differential equations. The temperature of the one plate is assumed to be fluctuating. The effcets of the various parametrs entering into the problem, on the velocity and the temprature are depivted graphically. The impact of various parameters (Da, Rv, Pr, R and S) on velocity and temperature fields are shown graphically. The expressions for skin friction at both walls are also obtained.

  11. Unsteady Mass transfer Across the Sediment-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Alexander; Grant, Stanley; Stewardson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are of high ecological significance, as they promote biogeochemical processes that support benthic ecosystems within the hyporheic zone. The SWI marks a boundary between the turbulent water column (typically modelled by Navier Stokes equations) and the interstitial pore fluids in the sediment column, which are typically laminar (and modelled by Darcy's law). Although models of these two flow regimes are generally not coupled, flow in the turbulent boundary layer is affected by the sediment permeability and a slip velocity at the SWI, which decays exponentially into the streambed across a characteristic mixing length. Momentum is transferred across this region (known as the Brinkman layer) through the penetration of coherent structures and turbulent mixing, however, these turbulent structures also promote turbulent mass transfer. Mass transfer within the hyporheic zone can be conceptualised in terms of: (1) the downwelling of solutes from the stream; (2) retention of solutes in the sediment; and (3) the upwelling of solutes back into the stream. Recent work by the authors has shown that a mass transfer coefficient can be defined where a downwelling-upwelling unit cell exists across a concentration gradient. Such unit cells are generated at the SWI by pressure variation from: (1) steady-state influences, such as stream geometry and velocity variation; and (2) unsteady pressure waves produced by coherent turbulent structures. With this definition, mass transfer coefficients can be defined for: steady exchange, by adopting the Elliott and Brooks [1997] advective pumping model; and unsteady exchange, induced by streamwise propagation of upwelling-downwelling unit cells migrating downstream with a characteristic celerity associated with turbulent eddies. We hypothesize that beneath the Brinkman layer (where Laplace equation applies) these mass transfer coefficients can be summed to yield the total mass flux. Although, it

  12. Multicomponent NAPL source dissolution: evaluation of mass-transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael A; Widdowson, Mark A; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2012-09-18

    Mass transfer rate coefficients were quantified by employing an inverse modeling technique to high-resolution aqueous phase concentration data observed following an experimental release of a multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a field site. A solute transport model (SEAM3D) was employed to simulate advective-dispersive transport over time coupled to NAPL dissolution. Model calibration was demonstrated by accurately reproducing the observed breakthrough times and peak concentrations at multiple observation points, observed mass discharge at pumping wells, and the reported mass depletions for three soluble NAPL constituents. Vertically variable NAPL mass transfer coefficients were derived for each constituent using an optimized numerical solute transport model, ranging from 0.082 to 2.0 day(-1) across all constituents. Constituent-specific coefficients showed a positive correlation with liquid-phase diffusion coefficients. Application of a time-varying mass transfer coefficient as NAPL mass depleted showed limited sensitivity during which over 80% of the most soluble NAPL constituent dissolved from the source. Long-term simulation results, calibrated to the experimental data and rendered in terms of mass discharge versus source mass depletion, exhibited multistage behavior.

  13. Calculation of Post-Closure Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-03-16

    Natural convection heat and mass transfer under post-closure conditions has been calculated for Yucca Mountain drifts using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Calculations have been performed for 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 years after repository closure. Effective dispersion coefficients that can be used to calculate mass transfer in the drift have been evaluated as a function of time and boundary temperature tilt.

  14. Effects of temperature and gas–liquid mass transfer on the operation of small electrochemical cells for the quantitative evaluation of CO2 reduction electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lobaccaro, Peter; Singh, Meenesh R.; Clark, Ezra Lee; Kwon, Youngkook; Bell, Alexis T.; Ager, Joel W.

    2016-09-06

    In the last few years, there has been increased interest in electrochemical CO2 reduction (CO2R). Many experimental studies employ a membrane separated, electrochemical cell with a mini H-cell geometry to characterize CO2R catalysts in aqueous solution. This type of electrochemical cell is a mini-chemical reactor and it is important to monitor the reaction conditions within the reactor to ensure that they are constant throughout the study. Here we show that operating cells with high catalyst surface area to electrolyte volume ratios (S/V) at high current densities can have subtle consequences due to the complexity of the physical phenomena taking place on electrode surfaces during CO2R, particularly as they relate to the cell temperature and bulk electrolyte CO2 concentration. Both effects were evaluated quantitatively in high S/V cells using Cu electrodes and a bicarbonate buffer electrolyte. Electrolyte temperature is a function of the current/total voltage passed through the cell and the cell geometry. Even at a very high current density, 20 mA cm -2 , the temperature increase was less than 4 °C and a decrease of < 10% in the dissolved CO2 concentration is predicted. In contrast, limits on the CO2 gas-liquid mass transfer into the cells produce much larger effects. By using the pH in the cell to measure the CO2 concentration, significant undersaturation of CO2 is observed in the bulk electrolyte, even at more modest current densities of 10 mA cm -2 . Undersaturation of CO2 produces large changes in the faradaic efficiency observed on Cu electrodes, with H2 production becoming increasingly favored. Finally, we show that the size of the CO2 bubbles being introduced into the cell is critical for maintaining the equilibrium CO2 concentration in the electrolyte, and we have designed a high S/V cell that is able to maintain the near-equilibrium CO2

  15. Effects of temperature and gas–liquid mass transfer on the operation of small electrochemical cells for the quantitative evaluation of CO2 reduction electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Lobaccaro, Peter; Singh, Meenesh R.; Clark, Ezra Lee; ...

    2016-09-06

    In the last few years, there has been increased interest in electrochemical CO2 reduction (CO2R). Many experimental studies employ a membrane separated, electrochemical cell with a mini H-cell geometry to characterize CO2R catalysts in aqueous solution. This type of electrochemical cell is a mini-chemical reactor and it is important to monitor the reaction conditions within the reactor to ensure that they are constant throughout the study. Here we show that operating cells with high catalyst surface area to electrolyte volume ratios (S/V) at high current densities can have subtle consequences due to the complexity of the physical phenomena taking placemore » on electrode surfaces during CO2R, particularly as they relate to the cell temperature and bulk electrolyte CO2 concentration. Both effects were evaluated quantitatively in high S/V cells using Cu electrodes and a bicarbonate buffer electrolyte. Electrolyte temperature is a function of the current/total voltage passed through the cell and the cell geometry. Even at a very high current density, 20 mA cm -2 , the temperature increase was less than 4 °C and a decrease of < 10% in the dissolved CO2 concentration is predicted. In contrast, limits on the CO2 gas-liquid mass transfer into the cells produce much larger effects. By using the pH in the cell to measure the CO2 concentration, significant undersaturation of CO2 is observed in the bulk electrolyte, even at more modest current densities of 10 mA cm -2 . Undersaturation of CO2 produces large changes in the faradaic efficiency observed on Cu electrodes, with H2 production becoming increasingly favored. Finally, we show that the size of the CO2 bubbles being introduced into the cell is critical for maintaining the equilibrium CO2 concentration in the electrolyte, and we have designed a high S/V cell that is able to maintain the near-equilibrium CO2 concentration at current densities up to 15 mA cm-2.« less

  16. The non-mass-dependent oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 formed by O+CO: Anomalous isotope effects in the O+CO recombination reaction or transfer from ozone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estillore, A. D.; Wiegel, A. A.; Boering, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    A number of oxygen-containing atmospheric species are now known to have non-mass-dependent triple oxygen isotope compositions (i.e., non-mass-dependent relationships between 16O, 17O, and 18O), which in turn are now being broadly applied as probes of biogeochemical cycles and chemical reactivity or as climate proxies on a variety of timescales. For many species, their non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope compositions derive from chemical or O(1D)-mediated photochemical transfer from ozone, which is non-mass-dependently enriched in 17O and 18O due to large non-mass-dependent kinetic isotope effects in the ozone recombination reaction, O+O2+M. For other species, however, there may also be additional non-mass-dependent kinetic isotope effects involved beyond ozone formation. The distinction is important both with respect to the biogeochemical and climate applications and to obtaining a deeper fundamental understanding of non-mass-dependent isotope fractionation in general. In work to be presented here, we have used a photochemical kinetics model to understand the isotopic composition of CO2 formed by O+CO+M in a mixture of O2 and CO gases irradiated with UV light at several wavelengths. We compare our model results with experimental results from Bhattacharya and Thiemens [Z. Naturforsch. 44a, 435-444 (1989)] and Pandey and Bhattacharya [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234301 (2006)] in order to evaluate the extent to which the non-mass-dependent isotopic composition of CO2 derives from photochemical transfer from ozone formed during the experiment versus possible non-mass-dependent isotope effects in the CO2 recombination reaction.

  17. Curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2014-03-01

    Nucleation is often accompanied by heat transfer between the surroundings and a nucleus of a new phase. The interface between two phases gives an additional resistance to this transfer. For small nuclei the interfacial curvature is high, which affects not only equilibrium quantities such as surface tension, but also the transport properties. In particular, high curvature affects the interfacial resistance to heat and mass transfer. We develop a framework for determining the curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer resistances. We determine the interfacial resistances as a function of a curvature. The analysis is performed for a bubble of a one-component fluid and may be extended to various nuclei of multicomponent systems. The curvature dependence of the interfacial resistances is important in modeling transport processes in multiphase systems.

  18. Limiting current technique in the research of mass/heat transfer in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, J.; Grosicki, S.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper the authors focused on the application of the electrochemical limiting diffusion current technique to the study of mass transfer in nanofluid flow. As mass and heat transfer are analogical phenomena, analysing mass transfer helps understand heat transfer processes in nanofluids. The paper begins with a short review of the available literature on the subject followed by the authors' results of mass transfer coefficient measurements and the conclusions concerning mass/heat transfer enhancement in nanofluids.

  19. Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

  20. FEHM: finite element heat and mass transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1988-03-01

    The finite element heat and mass (FEHM) transfer code is a computer code developed to simulate geothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. It is also applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. It solves the equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media using the finite element method. The code also has provisions for a noncoupled tracer; that is, the tracer solutions do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. It can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model, the numerical solution procedure, and model verification and validation are provided in this report. A user's guide and sample problems are included in the appendices. 17 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  2. Mass transfer and disc formation in AGB binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We investigate mass transfer and the formation of discs in binary systems using a combination of numerical simulations and theory. We consider six models distinguished by binary separation, secondary mass and outflow mechanism. Each system consists of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and an accreting secondary. The AGB star loses its mass via a wind. In one of our six models, the AGB star incurs a short period of outburst. In all cases, the secondary accretes part of the ejected mass and also influences the mass-loss rate of the AGB star. The ejected mass may remain gravitationally bound to the binary system and form a circumbinary disc, or contribute to an accretion disc around the secondary. In other cases, the ejecta will escape the binary system. The accretion rate on to the secondary changes non-linearly with binary separation. In our closest binary simulations, our models exemplify the wind Roche lobe overflow while in our wide binary cases, the mass transfer exhibits Bondi-Hoyle accretion. The morphologies of the outflows in the binary systems are varied. The variety may provide clues to how the late AGB phase influences planetary nebula shaping. We employ the adaptive-mesh-refinement code astrobear for our simulations and include ray tracing, radiation transfer, cooling and dust formation. To attain the highest computational efficiency and the most stable results, all simulations are run in the corotating frame.

  3. Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

    1999-10-01

    The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

  4. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  5. A multiscale modeling study for the convective mass transfer in a subsurface aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jahrul M.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative and realistic computer simulations of mass transfer associated with disposal in subsurface aquifers is a challenging endeavor. This article has proposed a novel and efficient multiscale modeling framework, and has examined its potential to study the penetrative mass transfer in a plume that migrates in an aquifer. Numerical simulations indicate that the migration of the injected enhances the vorticity generation, and the dissolution of has a strong effect on the natural convection mass transfer. The vorticity decays with the increase of the porosity. The time scale of the vertical migration of a plume is strongly dependent on the rate of dissolution. Comparisons confirm the near optimal performance of the proposed multiscale model. These primary results with an idealized computational model of the migration in an aquifer brings the potential of the proposed multiscale model to the field of heat and mass transfer in the geoscience.

  6. Flow-Dependent Mass Transfer May Trigger Endothelial Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades. PMID:22558132

  7. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from a two-dimensional, partially liquid-covered surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.X.; Kaviany, M. )

    1991-11-01

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from partially liquid-covered surfaces is examined experimentally using a surface made of cylinders with the voids filled with liquid. The steady-state evaporation rate, surface temperature of the liquid and exposed solid, and location of meniscus are measured for various ambient air velocities and temperatures. Using these, the authors examine the effect of the extent to which the liquid covers the surface on the evaporation mass transfer rate resulting from the convective heat transfer from the ambient gas to this surface. The results show strong Bond and Reynolds number effects. For small Bond and Reynolds numbers, the presence of dry (exposed solid) surface does not influence the mass transfer rate. As the Bond or Reynolds number increases, a critical liquid coverage is found below which the mass transfer begins to decrease. Heat transfer from the exposed solid to the liquid is also examined using the measured surface temperature, a conduction model, and an estimate of the liquid and solid surface areas (using a static formation for the liquid meniscus). The results show that at the liquid surface an analogy between heat and mass transfer does not exist.

  8. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siang, H.

    1981-11-01

    Based upon the principle of irreversible thermodynamics, the macroscopic conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy, and equilibrium sorption of the porous concrete system, a set of basic equations for simultaneous mass and heat transfer is developed. An implicit finite difference technique is employed to solve this set of nonlinear partial differential equations. Numerical examples, using the theory developed, are illustrated to deepen the general understanding of the drying, thermal characteristics and related phenomena of hydrated concrete. The developed theoretical model is made nondimensional and an order of magnitude analysis is performed to elucidate the transport phenomenum of heat and mass occurring in a concrete body. In addition to diffusion, both the capillary and evaporation-condensation mechanisms, which are strongly affected by the topology of the porous concrete system, are important in the heat and mass transfer processes.

  9. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, Lynn

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  10. FEHM. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  11. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  12. Recovery efficiency of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) with mass transfer limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Du, Pengfei; Chen, Yiming; Luo, Jian

    2011-08-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an effective strategy for water resources management and has been widely used in many contaminated and saline aquifers. However, its recovery efficiency (RE) may be significantly affected by mass transfer limitations. A numerical model is developed to simulate ASR performance by combining the convergent and divergent dispersion models with a first-order mass transfer model. By analyzing the concentration history at the pumping well, we obtain simple and effective relationships for investigating ASR efficiency under various mass transfer parameters, including capacity ratio and mass transfer timescale, and operational parameters, including injection durations and well-pumping rates. On the basis of such relationships, one can conveniently determine whether a site with mass transfer limitations is appropriate or not for ASR and how many ASR cycles are required for achieving a positive RE. Results indicate that the immobile domain may function as a contaminant source or sink or both during the recovery phase and RE usually improves with well-flow rate, the decrease of capacity ratio, and the ASR cycles. However, RE is a nonmonotonic function of the mass transfer timescale and the injection duration. A critical timescale is given for quantifying this nonmonotonic behavior. When the injection period is greater than such a critical value, increasing injection period results in a higher RE. Contrarily, when the injection period is less than the critical value, increasing the injection period may even yield a lower RE.

  13. Combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The approach to theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in absorption systems is described. The two tranfer phenomena are strongly coupled here. The purpose of the analysis is to relate, quantitatively, the heat and mass transfer coefficients to the physical properties of the working fluids and to the geometry of the system. The preferred configuration is that of a falling film of liquid on a metallic surface which serves to transfer heat from the absorbent in contact with the vapor of the absorbate. The model developed may be solved for laminar, turbulent, or transition flow regimes. The results of the solution describe the development of the thermal and concentration boundary layers and the variation of the temperatures, concentrations, and heat and mass fluxes. These quantities in their normalized, dimensionless form depend on two characteristic parameters of the system: the Lewis number Le and the dimensionless heat of absorption lambda. The length in the direction of flow is normalized with respect to the Peclet number and the film thickness. Heat and mass transfer coefficients for the system were calculated. The Sherwood number for mass transfer from the vapor-liquid interface to the bulk of the film reaches a constant value of 3.63 with fully developed boundary layers for both the adiabatic and constant temperature wall. The Nusselt number for heat transfer from the interface to the bulk reaches under the same conditions values of 3.63 and 2.67 for the adiabatic and constant temperature wall, respectively. The Nusselt number for heat tranfer from the bulk to the wall reaches 1.60.

  14. N-body Simulation of Binary Star Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutyra, Taylor; Sumpter, William

    2017-01-01

    Over 70% of the stars in our galaxy are multiple star systems, many of which are two stars that orbit around a common center of mass. The masses of the individual stars can be found using Newton’s and Kepler’s Laws. This allows astronomers to use these systems as astrophysical laboratories to study properties and processes of stars and galaxies. Among the many types observed, the dynamics of contact systems are the most interesting because they exhibit mass transfer, which changes the composition and function of both stars. The process by which this mass exchange takes place is not well understood. The lack of extensive mass transfer analysis, inadequate theoretical models, and the large time scale of this process are reasons for our limited understanding. In this work, a model was made to give astronomers a method for gaining a deeper knowledge and visual intuition of how the mass transfer between binary stars takes place. We have built the foundations for a simulation of arbitrary systems, which we plan to elaborate on in the future to include thermodynamics and nuclear processes.

  15. Group analysis for the effects of the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and chemical reaction on free convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.; Bin Saim, Hashim

    2010-12-01

    A group analysis has been carried out to study heat and mass transfer characteristics of an incompressible Newtonian fluid having a temperature-dependent viscosity over a vertical stretching surface in the presence of thermal radiation and a chemical reaction. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The vertical surface is assumed to be permeable so as to allow for possible wall suction or injection. The governing differential equations are derived and transformed using the Lie group analysis. The transformed equations are solved numerically by applying the Runge—Kutta—Gill scheme with the shooting technique. Favorable comparisons with previously published works on various special cases of the problem are obtained

  16. TWIN BINARIES: STUDIES OF STABILITY, MASS TRANSFER, AND COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, J. C.; Holtzman, W.; Gearity, K.; Dooley, K. L.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F. A.

    2011-08-20

    Motivated by suggestions that binaries with almost equal-mass components ('twins') play an important role in the formation of double neutron stars and may be rather abundant among binaries, we study the stability of synchronized close and contact binaries with identical components in circular orbits. In particular, we investigate the dependency of the innermost stable circular orbit on the core mass, and we study the coalescence of the binary that occurs at smaller separations. For twin binaries composed of convective main-sequence stars, subgiants, or giants with low-mass cores (M{sub c} {approx}< 0.15M, where M is the mass of a component), a secular instability is reached during the contact phase, accompanied by a dynamical mass transfer instability at the same or at a slightly smaller orbital separation. Binaries that come inside this instability limit transfer mass gradually from one component to the other and then coalesce quickly as mass is lost through the outer Lagrangian points. For twin giant binaries with moderate to massive cores (M{sub c} {approx}> 0.15M), we find that stable contact configurations exist at all separations down to the Roche limit, when mass shedding through the outer Lagrangian points triggers a coalescence of the envelopes and leaves the cores orbiting in a central tight binary. In addition to the formation of binary neutron stars, we also discuss the implications of our results for the production of planetary nebulae with double degenerate central binaries.

  17. Kinetics and mass-transfer phenomena in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Seghezzo, L; Lettinga, G; Kleerebezem, R

    2001-04-20

    The kinetic properties of acetate-degrading methanogenic granular sludge of different mean diameters were assessed at different up-flow velocities (V(up)). Using this approach, the influence of internal and external mass transfer could be estimated. First, the apparent Monod constant (K(S)) for each data set was calculated by means of a curve-fitting procedure. The experimental results revealed that variations in the V(up) did not affect the apparent K(S)-value, indicating that external mass-transport resistance normally can be neglected. With regard to the granule size, a clear increase in K(S) was found at increasing granule diameters. The experimental data were further used to validate a dynamic mathematical biofilm model. The biofilm model was able to describe reaction-diffusion kinetics in anaerobic granules, using a single value for the effective diffusion coefficient in the granules. This suggests that biogas formation did not influence the diffusion-rates in the granular biomass. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    1985-07-01

    Numerical examples of the approach described in Part I of this series (Ghiorso, 1985) are presented in this paper. These examples include the calculation of the compositions and proportions of liquid and solid phases produced during (1) the equilibrium crystallization of a basaltic andesite at 1 bar, (2) the fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite at 1 bar and elevated pressures, (3) the fractional and equilibrium crystallization of an olivine boninite at 1 bar, and (4) the (a) isothermal and (b) isenthalpic assimilation of olivine (Fo90) into a liquid/solid assemblage of quartz dioritic composition at ˜1,125° C and 3 kbars. The numerical results on the crystallization of the basaltic andesite are verified by comparison with experimental data while those calculations performed using olivine tholeiitic and olivine boninitic compositions are favorably compared against whole rock and mineral analytical data and petrographic and field observations. In each of the examples presented, the heat effects associated with the modelled process are calculated (e.g. heat of crystallization, heat of assimilation), and free energies of crystallization are examined as a function of the degree of mineral supersaturation. The former quantities are on the order of 173 cal/grm for the cooling and fractional crystallization of an olivine tholeiite to a rhyolitic residuum (corresponding to a 400° C temperature interval). The latter represents an important petrological parameter, in that it quantifies the driving force for the rate of crystal growth and rate of nucleation in magmatic systems. Calculated free energies of crystallization are small (on the order of hundreds of calories per mole per 25° C of undercooling) which indicates that the kinetics of crystallization in magmatic systems are affinity controlled. Melt oxygen fugacity and the degree of oxygen metasomatism play a major role in controlling the fractionation trends produced from crystallizing basaltic liquids

  19. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in an Ejection Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kologrivov, M. M.; Buzovskii, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in an ejection apparatus during condensation of vapor-gas mixture components on cold brine droplets are presented. The local parameters of working flows were determined by solving a system of differential heat transfer equations with account for the hydrodynamic pattern. Calculations were carried out on the assumption that the liquid spray is directed horizontally. The Stefan formula has been derived with reference to a spherical coordinate system. The results of calculation of heat and mass transfer rates with and without regard for steam condensation jointly with hydrocarbon vapors are compared and analyzed. Estimation of the effect exerted by the apparatus and drip pan walls on the general process of heat and mass transfer was carried out. The results of simulation made it possible to quantitatively estimate the influence of the adopted thickness of the diffusional boundary layer on the vapor-air mixture cooling effect.

  20. Stability of coaxial jets confined in a tube with heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Lokanath; Cheung, Fan-Bill; Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2016-02-01

    A linear temporal stability of coaxial confined jets in a vertical tube involving heat and mass transfer at the interface is presented in this paper. A potential flow analysis that includes the effect of viscosity at the interface is performed in analyzing the stability of the system. Film boiling in a vertical tube gives rise to the flow configuration explored in this work. The effects of various non-dimensional parameters on the growth rate and the neutral curve are discussed. The heat transfer at the interface has been characterized by introducing a heat flux ratio between the conduction heat flux and the evaporation heat flux. Viscous forces and the heat and mass transfer at the interface are found to stabilize the flow both in the capillary instability region and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability region. Increasing heat and mass transfer at the interface stabilizes the flow to small as well as very large wave numbers.

  1. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  2. Atmospheric composition affects heat- and mass-transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    For environmental control system functions sensitive to atmospheric composition, components are test-operated in helium-oxygen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures, pure oxygen, and air. Transient heat- and mass-transfer tests are conducted for carbon dioxide adsorption on molecular sieve and for water vapor adsorption on silica gel.

  3. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  4. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient combined heat and mass transfer across a rectangular cavity is performed. The physical parameters are selected to represent a range of possible crystal growth in solutions. Good agreements with measurement data are observed. It is found that the thermal and solute fields become highly oscillatory when the thermal and solute Grashof numbers are large.

  5. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  6. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 μm and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets.

  7. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  8. Interphase mass transfer between fluids in subsurface formations: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Copty, Nadim K.; Scheytt, Traugott; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art on interphase mass transfer between immiscible fluids in porous media with focus on the factors that have significant influence on this process. In total close to 300 papers were reviewed focusing to a large extent on the literature relating to NAPL contamination of the subsurface. The large body of work available on this topic was organized according to the length scale of the conducted studies, namely the pore, meso and field scales. The interrelation of interphase mass transfer at these different scales is highlighted. To gain further insight into interphase mass transfer, published studies were discussed and evaluated in terms of the governing flow configurations defined in terms of the wettability and mobility of the different phases. Such organization of the existing literature enables the identification of the interfacial domains that would have significant impact on interphase mass transfer. Available modeling approaches at the various length scales are discussed with regard to current knowledge on the physics of this process. Future research directions are also suggested.

  9. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  10. Turbulent mass transfer in the furnace of high output boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Noskievic, P.; Kolat, P.; Novacek, A.

    1995-12-31

    The up-to-date identification methods for the evaluation of combustion process quality provide a picture of what is taking place in the furnace. The Energetics Department of VSB-TU Ostrava concentrates its attention on untraditional methods which proceed from an analysis of turbulent transfer phenomena, especially the transfer of mass in the furnace of pulverized boilers. Particularly in the region of burners, this mass transfer influences the quality of the combustion process as well as the formation of solid and gaseous emissions. Measurements of combustion aerodynamics in the furnace of high output boilers are part of the Czech Clean Coal Technology program. A complex approach to these problems could lead to a decrease of pollutants released.

  11. Heat and Mass Transfer Model in Freeze-Dried Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfat, Sayahdin; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    There are big problems in agriculture sector every year. One of the major problems is abundance of agricultural product during the peak of harvest season that is not matched by an increase in demand of agricultural product by consumers, this causes a wasted agricultural products. Alternative way was food preservation by freeze dried method. This method was already using heat transfer through conduction and convection to reduce water quality in the food. The main objective of this research was to design a model heat and mass transfer in freeze-dried medium. We had two steps in this research, the first step was design of medium as the heat injection site and the second was simulate heat and mass transfer of the product. During simulation process, we use physical property of some agriculture product. The result will show how temperature and moisture distribution every second. The method of research use finite element method (FEM) and will be illustrated in three dimensional.

  12. Modelling of heat and mass transfer processes in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Ginalski, Maciej K; Nowak, Andrzej J; Wrobel, Luiz C

    2008-09-01

    This paper reviews some of our recent applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model heat and mass transfer problems in neonatology and investigates the major heat and mass transfer mechanisms taking place in medical devices such as incubators and oxygen hoods. This includes novel mathematical developments giving rise to a supplementary model, entitled infant heat balance module, which has been fully integrated with the CFD solver and its graphical interface. The numerical simulations are validated through comparison tests with experimental results from the medical literature. It is shown that CFD simulations are very flexible tools that can take into account all modes of heat transfer in assisting neonatal care and the improved design of medical devices.

  13. The effect of mass transfer parameterization and ice retention on the scavenging and redistribution of SO2 by a deep convective cloud.

    PubMed

    Vučković, Vladan; Vujović, Dragana

    2017-02-01

    A chemistry module with the aqueous chemistry coupled with the complex 3D nonhydrostatic atmospheric model is used to investigate how the representation of gas-aqueous mass transfer and ice retention affect the SO2 redistribution in the presence of a convective cloud. Gas uptake to the liquid water is calculated using both Henry's law equilibrium (HE) and kinetic mass transport (KMT). The constant retention coefficients for SO2 (k ret = 0.46) and for H2O2 (k ret = 0.64) are used. It is shown that the amount of SO2 in the air at higher altitudes (10-12 km) is greater when partial retention (PR) is included. All values of k ret between 0 and 1 represented the partial retention (PR), while complete retention (CR) means the entire mass of the gas from the solution remained in the ice phase (k ret = 1). Total mass of SO2 in the air in the entire domain was greater in the case of PR than in the case when the CR was assumed (at the end of the integration time, 0.11% for HE and 0.61% for KMT) and in KMT than in the HE case (0.9% for CR and 1.4% for PR). The amount of SO2 in the ice phase was lower in the case of PR for both HE and KMT. The highest concentrations of S(IV) in rainwater were in the case of HE-CR, while the smallest values were in the case of KMT-PR. Total precipitation of S(IV) in PR exhibits 90% relative to CR, if HE was assumed. When KMT was used, PR gives 81.7% S(IV) relative to CR. Scavenging was the highest in the HE-CR case and the lowest in the KMT-PR case. If HE is assumed, averaged cumulative mass (ACM) of S(IV) precipitation per unit of domain surface for the CR case was 11.1% greater than in the PR case (if KMT was assumed, this difference was greater, 22.4%). Similarly, ACM for HE is 24.1% greater than KMT for the CR case and 36.8% for the PR case.

  14. Mass and heat transfer model of Tubular Solar Still

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Amimul; Fukuhara, Teruyuki

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, a new mass and heat transfer model of a Tubular Solar Still (TSS) was proposed incorporating various mass and heat transfer coefficients taking account of the humid air properties inside the still. The heat balance of the humid air and the mass balance of the water vapor in the humid air were formulized for the first time. As a result, the proposed model enabled to calculate the diurnal variations of the temperature, water vapor density and relative humidity of the humid air, and to predict the hourly condensation flux besides the temperatures of the water, cover and trough, and the hourly evaporation flux. The validity of the proposed model was verified using the field experimental results carried out in Fukui, Japan and Muscat, Oman in 2008. The diurnal variations of the calculated temperatures and water vapor densities had a good agreement with the observed ones. Furthermore, the proposed model can predict the daily and hourly production flux precisely. (author)

  15. V794 Aql: evolution at high mass transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2014-09-01

    V794 Aql, a VYScl or nova-like star in which a white dwarf, accretes at very high mass transfer rate mdot (~10(-8) solar masses) from a main sequence binary companion. Very few interacting white dwarf binaries show clear physical manifestation of such high mass transfer rate, which is very important to understand how recurrent novae and type I supernovae occur. Periodic "low states" at all wavelengths from optical to X-rays can be explained with a limit cycle that regulates the mdot through a physical mechanisms that could be due to a number of root causes: irradiation induced wind from the secondary and its periodic halt, spots on the secondary, the magnetic field of the WD. We propose to obtain a HETG spectrum that will clarify how these systems evolve.

  16. Fem Formulation for Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium can be modelled using three partial differential equations namely, momentum equation, energy equation and mass diffusion. These three equations are coupled to each other by some common terms that turn the whole phenomenon into a complex problem with inter-dependable variables. The current article describes the finite element formulation of heat and mass transfer in porous medium with respect to Cartesian coordinates. The problem under study is formulated into algebraic form of equations by using Galerkin's method with the help of two-node linear triangular element having three nodes. The domain is meshed with smaller sized elements near the wall region and bigger size away from walls.

  17. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  18. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  19. Heat and mass transfer prediction of binary refrigerant mixtures condensing in a horizontal microfin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Shigeru; Yu, Jian; Ishibashi, Akira

    1999-07-01

    In the face of the phase-out of HCFC22 for its effect on globe environment, the alternative refrigerant has been paid attention in the refrigeration and heat pump industry. In the present stage, it is found that any pure refrigerant is not a good substitute of HCFC22 for the system in use. The authors have to use binary or ternary refrigerant mixtures as the substitute to meet industrial requirement. But until now, although the heat transfer characteristics of the refrigerant mixtures can be measured in experiments and predicted in some degree, the mass transfer characteristics in condensation process, which is a main part in most systems, can not be clarified by both experimental and theoretical methods. In the present study a non-equilibrium model for condensation of binary refrigerant mixtures inside a horizontal microfin tube is proposed. In this model it is assumed that the phase equilibrium is only established at the vapor-liquid interface, while the bulk vapor and the bulk liquid are in non-equilibrium in the same cross section. The mass transfer characteristic in vapor core is obtained from the analogy between mass and momentum transfer. In the liquid layer, the mass fraction distribution is neglected, but the mass transfer coefficient is treated as infinite that can keep a finite value for the mass transfer rate in liquid phase. From the calculation results compared with the experimental ones for the condensation of HFC134a/HCFC123 and HCFC22/CFC114 mixtures, it is found that the calculated heat flux distribution along the tube axis is in good agreement with that of experiment, and the calculated values of condensing length agree well with the experimental ones. Using the present model, the local mass faction distribution, the diffusion mass transfer rate and the mass transfer characteristics in both vapor and liquid phase are demonstrated. From these results, the effect of mass transfer resistance on condensation heat transfer characteristics for binary

  20. Conjugate effects of heat and mass transfer on MHD free convection flow over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farhad; Khan, Ilyas; Samiulhaq; Shafie, Sharidan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present an exact analysis of combined effects of radiation and chemical reaction on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free convection flow of an electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium. The impulsively started plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion is considered. The dimensionless momentum equation coupled with the energy and mass diffusion equations are analytically solved using the Laplace transform method. Expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and can be reduced, as special cases, to some known solutions from the literature. Expressions for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also obtained. Finally, the effects of pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are graphically displayed whereas the variations in skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown through tables.

  1. Conjugate Effects of Heat and Mass Transfer on MHD Free Convection Flow over an Inclined Plate Embedded in a Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farhad; Khan, Ilyas; Samiulhaq; Shafie, Sharidan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present an exact analysis of combined effects of radiation and chemical reaction on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free convection flow of an electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium. The impulsively started plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion is considered. The dimensionless momentum equation coupled with the energy and mass diffusion equations are analytically solved using the Laplace transform method. Expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and can be reduced, as special cases, to some known solutions from the literature. Expressions for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also obtained. Finally, the effects of pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are graphically displayed whereas the variations in skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown through tables. PMID:23840321

  2. Influence of mass-transfer limitations on carbon isotope fractionation during microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Christoph; Berg, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A; Holliger, Christof; Schwarzenbach, René P; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2009-12-01

    Mass transfer of organic contaminants from nonaqueous phase liquids to the aqueous phase can significantly modulate the observable carbon isotope fractionation behavior associated with contaminant transformation. We evaluated the effects of kinetic interphase mass transfer between tetradecane and water on the observable (13)C enrichment factor, epsilon(obs), pertinent to the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by Sulfurospirillum sp. in laboratory batch model systems containing organic, aqueous and gaseous phases. We propose a conceptual model, which includes the kinetics of tetradecane-water and gas-water mass transfer, microbial growth, and isotope-sensitive parameters describing dehalorespiration, for quantifying variable (13)C enrichment factors. While the C isotope fractionation of TCE reduction to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) in the absence of phase-transfer effects can be characterized by a constant epsilon-value of -18.8 +/- 0.6 per thousand, mass-transfer limitations impede describing this process with a constant enrichment factor typically used in Rayleigh equations. Owing to the masking of kinetic isotope effects by the transfer of TCE from tetradecane to the aqueous phase, (obs)-values gradually changed from -18.4 per thousand to -5.9 per thousand. Such variations may complicate the interpretation of compound-specific isotope analysis in the assessment of chloroethene biodegradation in field applications.

  3. Stellar energy transfer by keV-mass scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    1989-08-01

    We investigate the effects of massive pseudoscalar particles χ on stellar evolution, focusing on the case where these new states interact only with electrons. If the effective fine-structure constant αx is sufficiently small, they escape freely and rob stellar interiors of energy; if it is so large that they scatter or decay in the star, they contribute to the radiative energy transfer. In this case, their thermal number density must be suppressed by a Boltzmann factor e-mx/T in order to avoid excessive heat transport. We derive general expressions for the energy transport by massive bosons and calculate all relevant contributions to the opacity in the limit mx>>T. In order to avoid either excessive energy loss or excessive energy transport in the Sun, we exclude the parameter range -19+0.32mx-4.5 lnmx<~lnαx<~2.3 -0.32mx+0.5 lnmx, where the particle mass mx is in units of keV. More restrictive constraints are derived from the observed properties of horizontal-branch stars. This excludes a recent suggestion that the presence of a γχ channel accounts for the anomalous decay width of orthopositronium. We stress the importance of numerical studies of both horizontal-branch stars and red giants.

  4. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  5. Evaporative mass transfer behavior of a complex immiscible liquid.

    PubMed

    McColl, Colleen M; Johnson, Gwynn R; Brusseau, Mark L

    2008-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult's law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium.

  6. Heat and mass transfer in porous cavity: Assisting flow

    SciTech Connect

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out. The governing partial differential equations are non-dimensionalised and solved using finite element method. The left vertical surface of the cavity is maintained at constant temperature and concentration which are higher than the ambient temperature and concentration applied at right vertical surface. The top and bottom walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Heat transfer is assumed to take place by natural convection and radiation. The investigation is carried out for assisting flow when buoyancy and gravity force act in same direction.

  7. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  8. Mass Transfer Limited Enhanced Bioremediation at Dnapl Source Zones: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The success of enhanced bioremediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) relies on accelerating contaminant mass transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, thus enhancing the depletion of DNAPL source zones compared to natural dissolution. This is achieved by promoting biological activity that reduces the contaminant's aqueous phase concentration. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated that high reaction rates are attainable by specialized microbial cultures in DNAPL source zones, field applications of the technology report lower reaction rates and prolonged remediation times. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the reaction rates are limited by the rate at which the contaminant partitions from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. In such cases, slow mass transfer to the aqueous phase reduces the bioavailability of the contaminant and consequently decreases the potential source zone depletion enhancement. In this work, the effect of rate limited mass transfer on bio-enhanced dissolution of DNAPL chlorinated ethenes is investigated through a numerical study. A multi-phase, multi-component groundwater transport model is employed to simulate DNAPL mass depletion for a range of source zone scenarios. Rate limited mass transfer is modeled by a linear driving force model, employing a thermodynamic approach for the calculation of the DNAPL - water interfacial area. Metabolic reductive dechlorination is modeled by Monod kinetics, considering microbial growth and self-inhibition. The model was utilized to identify conditions in which mass transfer, rather than reaction, is the limiting process, as indicated by the bioavailability number. In such cases, reaction is slower than expected, and further increase in the reaction rate does not enhance mass depletion. Mass transfer rate limitations were shown to affect both dechlorination and microbial growth kinetics. The complex dynamics between mass transfer, DNAPL transport and distribution, and

  9. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  10. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  11. Effect of boric acid mass transfer on the accumulation thereof in a fuel core under emergency modes at NPPs with WMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Sorokin, A. P.; Ragulin, S. V.; Pityk, A. V.; Sahipgareev, A. R.; Soshkina, A. S.; Shlepkin, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    Boric acid mass transfer processes in the reactor facilities with WMR are considered for the case of an emergency with breaking of the main circulation pipeline (MCP) and the operation of the passive safety systems, such as first-, second-, and third-stage accumulator tank systems, and a passive heat removal system (PHRS). Calculation results are presented for a change in the boric acid concentration in the fuel core (FC) of a water-moderated reactor (WMR) in the case of an emergency process. The calculations have been performed for different values of drop entrainment of boric acid from the reactor (0, 0.2, 2%). A substantial excess of the maximum concentration of boric acid has been found to occur 24 hours after an emergency event with a break of MCP. It is shown that increasing the droplet entrainment of boric acid causes the crystallization and accumulation thereof in the FC to become slower. The mass of boric acid deposits on the elements of internals is determined depending on the values of drop entrainment. These results allow one to draw a conclusion concerning the possibility of accumulation and crystallization of boric acid in the FC, because the latter event could lead to a blocking of the flow cross section and disturbance in the heat removal from fuel elements. A review of available literature data concerning the thermal properties of boric acid solution (density, viscosity, thermal conductivity) is presented. It is found that the available data are of quite a general character, but it does not cover the entire range of parameters (temperature, pressure, acid concentrations) inherent in a possible emergency situation at nuclear power plants with WMR. It is demonstrated that experimental study of boric acid drop entrainment at the parameters inherent in the emergency mode of WMR operation, as well as the studies of boric acid thermal properties in a wide range of concentrations, are required.

  12. Hall and radial magnetic field effects on radiative peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a channel with convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of present investigation is to study the Hall and MHD effects on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a convectively curved configuration. Thermal radiation, Soret and Dufour effects are also accounted. The channel walls comprised the no slip and compliant properties. Constitutive equations for mass, momentum, energy and concentration are first modeled in view of considered assumptions and then simplified under long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Solution of the resulting system of equations is carried out via a regular perturbation technique. Physical behaviors of velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are discussed with the help of graphical representation.

  13. Quantification of the Mass Transfer at Fluid Interfaces in Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismeth, Carina; Manhart, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Mass transfer rates at interfaces in a complex porous media are relevant in many environmental applications and control the functions of natural filter systems in subsurface environments. The mass transfer at fluid interfaces is associated with interface convection caused by local inhomogeneities in interface tension and hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface. If there is a surface tension gradient along the surface a shear stress jump is generated that results in fluid motion along the surface that is called Marangoni effect. These spontaneous convection currents can lead to an increased mass transfer of the transition component at the phase boundary and to an increased mixing of the phases. Therefore compensatory currents at the interface can have a significant influence on the subsurface transport of contaminants in the groundwater area, especially in the vadose zone. Using microfluidic channels and advanced experimental techniques it is possible to measure the fluid flow and mass transfer rates directly and to quantify the effect of the Marangoni convection on the mass transfer at interfaces between a non-aqueous liquid and water with high temporal and spatial resolution. The use of fluorescent particles as well as the recording and analysis of their trajectories is intended to visualize interfacial processes and to quantify the mass transfer at fluid phase boundaries. Concentration gradients at the interface are analysed by spectroscopic methods and allow an assessment of the enrichment and depletion at the phase boundaries. Extensive test series provide the experimental basis for quantifying and analysing the impact of the Marangoni effect on the mass transfer rates at interfaces in porous media in subsurface aquatic environments. Within this research project we concentrate on the effect of Marangoni convection on the mass transfer near an 1-octanol-water interface, which serves as a well defined proxy for non-aqueous phase liquids in porous media

  14. Analysis of turbulent heat transfer, mass transfer, and friction in smooth tubes at high Prandtl and Schmidt numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G

    1955-01-01

    The expression for eddy diffusivity from a previous analysis was modified in order to account for the effect of kinematic viscosity on the turbulence in the region close to a wall. By using the modified expression, good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results for heat and mass transfer at Prandtl and Schmidt numbers between 0.5 and 3000. The effects of length-to-diameter ratio and of variable viscosity were also investigated for a wide range of Prandtl numbers.

  15. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Volume 1, Dry sorbent injection: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1992-01-29

    This report presents the results of fundamental mass transfer testing for in-duct removal of SO{sub 2}. Following this initial part of an experimental program, it became clear that the amount of initial moisture on the sorbent strongly affected the extent of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion. Novel techniques aimed at increasing sorbent utilization were investigated and are described. Major novel technique investigated and reported on here was the reaction with SO{sub 2} of sorbents with initial free moisture (damp sorbents). The duct injection process using damp solids has the following steps: preparation of sorbent as a slurry, blending of the slurry with dry recycle materials to create damp solids, injection of the solids into the duct, reaction and drying of the solids with flue gas in the duct, collection in particulate control equipment, and finally recycle of dry solids with some bleed to disposal. The moisture content of the solids at each step affects system performance. Various factors favor high moisture whereas others favor low moisture. (VC)

  16. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  17. Lumen mass transfer in hollow-fiber membrane processes with constant external resistances

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.

    1997-08-01

    Membrane processes have recently become an accepted unit operation for a wide variety of separations in industry and in environmental applications. Hollow-fiber membrane processes with a constant external resistance having a constant or variable shell concentration resulting from an operational mode of cocurrent or countercurrent are studied. By solving numerically the continuity mass-conservation equation with the corresponding boundary conditions, the lumen laminar mass-transfer coefficients for both cases are correlated. The correlations greatly improve the calculating accuracy of the overall mass-transfer coefficient and can be used to obtain the lumen mixed-cup concentration by an algebraic equation substituting the partial differential equation. A separation factor m{prime} is introduced to characterize the effect of the operational mode. Calculation results demonstrate that the lumen mass-transfer coefficient is independent of the real lumen and shell concentrations, but it is greatly influenced by m{prime}. The countercurrent mode, compared to the cocurrent mode, provides not only a higher mean driving force, but a higher lumen mass-transfer coefficient. This conclusion is novel and valid for the tube-shell heat or mass-transfer processes and is supported by the experimental data in the literature and the authors` gas membrane separation experiments.

  18. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    DOE PAGES

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-17

    Here, magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  19. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  20. Blood flow and mass transfer regulation of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Neeves, Keith B.

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulates coagulation and fibrin formation by controlling the transport, or mass transfer, of zymogens, co-factors, enzymes, and inhibitors to, from, and within a growing thrombus. The rate of mass transfer of these solutes relative to their consumption or production by coagulation reactions determines, in part, the rate of thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and thrombi growth. Experimental studies on the influence of blood flow on specific coagulation reactions are reviewed here, along with a theoretical framework that predicts how flow influences surface-bound coagulation binding and enzymatic reactions. These flow-mediated transport mechanisms are also used to interpret the role of binding site densities and injury size on initiating coagulation and fibrin deposition. The importance of transport of coagulation proteins within the interstitial spaces of thrombi is shown to influence thrombi architecture, growth, and arrest. PMID:27133256

  1. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser.

  2. Geoelectrical inference of mass transfer parameters using temporal moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to infer mass transfer parameters based on (1) an analytical model that relates the temporal moments of mobile and bulk concentration and (2) a bicontinuum modification to Archie's law. Whereas conventional geochemical measurements preferentially sample from the mobile domain, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is sensitive to bulk electrical conductivity and, thus, electrolytic solute in both the mobile and immobile domains. We demonstrate the new approach, in which temporal moments of collocated mobile domain conductivity (i.e., conventional sampling) and ERT-estimated bulk conductivity are used to calculate heterogeneous mass transfer rate and immobile porosity fractions in a series of numerical column experiments. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Modelling mass transfer during venting/soil vapour extraction: Non-aqueous phase liquid/gas mass transfer coefficient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrael, D.; Kacem, M.; Benadda, B.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate how the simulation of the venting/soil vapour extraction (SVE) process is affected by the mass transfer coefficient, using a model comprising five partial differential equations describing gas flow and mass conservation of phases and including an expression accounting for soil saturation conditions. In doing so, we test five previously reported quations for estimating the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)/gas initial mass transfer coefficient and evaluate an expression that uses a reference NAPL saturation. Four venting/SVE experiments utilizing a sand column are performed with dry and non-saturated sand at low and high flow rates, and the obtained experimental results are subsequently simulated, revealing that hydrodynamic dispersion cannot be neglected in the estimation of the mass transfer coefficient, particularly in the case of low velocities. Among the tested models, only the analytical solution of a convection-dispersion equation and the equation proposed herein are suitable for correctly modelling the experimental results, with the developed model representing the best choice for correctly simulating the experimental results and the tailing part of the extracted gas concentration curve.

  4. Vortex boundary layer flow over a disk with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surma Devi, C. D.; Nath, G.

    The effects of rigid-body and potential-vortex flows at large distances on the steady laminar incompressible axisymmetric boundary-layer flow (with or without mass transfer) on a stationary disk of infinite extent are investigated analytically. A set of nonlinear partial differential equations with three independent variables is derived and solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference scheme using Newton linearization and full integration starting from the edge, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Radial flow is found to be in the direction of the axis in all cases; as the axis is approached, the boundary layer becomes rapidly thicker and appears to develop a double-scaled structure, the radial-direction wall shear remains approximately constant, the tangential-direction skin-friction parameter decreases, and the radial-direction skin-friction decreases at first and then increases. These results are considered to be of interest to the study of atmospheric phenomena such as hurricanes and tornados.

  5. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  6. Three-dimensional simulation of mass transfer in artificial kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ding, Weiping; Li, Weili; Sun, Sijie; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hardy, Peter A; Ahmad, Suhail; Gao, Dayong

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional velocity and concentration fields on both the blood and dialysate sides in an artificial kidney were simulated, taking into account the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures and the interaction between the flows of blood and dialysate. First, magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to validate the mathematical model. Second, the effects of the flow profiles induced by the blood and dialysate inlet and outlet geometrical structures on mass transfer were theoretically investigated. Third, the clearance of toxins was compared with the clearance value calculated by a simple model that is based on the ideal flow profiles on both the blood and dialysate sides. Our results show that as the blood flow rate increases, the flow field on the blood side becomes less uniform; however, as the dialysate flow rate increases, the flow field on the dialysate side becomes more uniform. The effect of the inlet and outlet geometrical structures of the dialysate side on the velocity and concentration fields is more significant than that of the blood side. Due to the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures, the true clearance of toxins is lower than the ideal clearance, especially when the dialysate flow rate is low or the blood flow rate is high. The results from this work are significant for the structural optimization of artificial kidneys and the accurate prediction of toxin clearance. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  8. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  9. Mass transfer controlled by fracturing in micritic carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, James; Coulon, Michel; Gaviglio, Patrick

    2002-05-01

    The fractured Coniacian chalk from the Omey area (Paris Basin, France) displays strong evidence of modifications controlled by brittle deformation. Fracturing is associated with important changes in pore space (decrease in total porosity and pore interconnection, change in distribution of pore access diameters and capillary characteristics), nannofacies (gradual evolution from a point-contact fabric to a welded, interlocked or coalescent fabric) and chemical composition (Sr concentration decrease). These modifications result from fluid-rock interaction that control significant mass transfer (percentage of secondary calcite >50%). Sr is a remarkable indicator of these mass transfers. Sr analyses allowed us to prove that the deformed zone (26.7 m) is wider than the fractured zone (11.3 m). They also indicate that the footwall block is less affected than the hanging wall block. A physicochemical model of the deformation mechanism is proposed. It shows that a cyclic process of fracturing controls the temporal evolution of the fluid saturation and fluid pressure and, consequently, the mass transfer.

  10. Predicting heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Emmanuel, S.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures are abundant in the subsurface and affect many relevant single- and multi-phase transport processes such as gas and oil extraction, contaminant transport, or geothermal reservoir engineering. However, making reliable predictions of heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media is an outstanding challenge due to its multi-scale nature and the orders-of-magnitude varations in transport rates. Direct high-resolution simulations provide fundamental insights into the local advective and diffusive transport processes in fractured porous media. However, this approach is intractable for inverse simulations because of its high computational requirements. Continuous Time Random Walks on the other hand are a viable alternative and general way to model heat and mass transfer in structurally complex and multi-scale geological media, particularly for inverse problems. But they do not offer the same insights into local transport processes as direct numerical simulations. Here we combine both approaches to simulate the detailed transport processes occurring during heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media and analyse how these affect the breakthrough curves used to calibrate the Continuous Time Random Walks. We show that heat transport in fractured porous media can be anomalous, i.e. characterised by early breakthrough and long tailing, like it is well known for solute transport. We also demonstrate that a careful analysis of the solute breakthrough curves can yield insights into the heterogeneity of the fracture pattern and the transport occurring between fracture and matrix as well as within the matrix and fractures.

  11. Laboratory-Scale Column Testing Using IONSIV IE-911 for Removing Cesium from Acidic Tank Waste Simulant. 2: Determination of Cesium Exchange Capacity and Effective Mass Transfer Coefficient from a 500-cm3 Column Experiement

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Tranter; R.D. Tillotson; T.A. Todd

    2005-04-01

    A semi-scale column test was performed using a commercial form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) for removing radio-cesium from a surrogate acidic tank solution, which represents liquid waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The engineered form of CST ion exchanger, known as IONSIVtmIE-911 (UOP, Mt. Laurel,NJ, USA), was tested in a 500-cm3 column to obtain a cesium breakthrough curve. The cesium exchange capacity of this column matched that obtained from previous testing with a 15-mc3 column. A numerical algorithm using implicit finite difference approximations was developed to solve the governing mass transport equations for the CST columns. An effective mass transfer coefficient was derived from solving these equations for previously reported 15 cm3 tests. The effective mass transfer coefficient was then used to predict the cesium breakthrough curve for the 500-cm3 column and compared to the experimental data reported in this paper. The calculated breakthrough curve showed excellent agreement with the data from the 500-cm3 column even though the interstitial velocity was a factor of two greater. Thus, this approach should provide a reasonable method for scale up to larger columns for treating actual tank waste.

  12. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  13. Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Thomas B

    2016-03-01

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) measures gas-phase compounds in ambient air and headspace samples before using chemical ionization to produce positively charged molecules, which are detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This ionization method uses a gentle proton transfer reaction method between the molecule of interest and protonated water, or hydronium ion (H3O+), to produce limited fragmentation of the parent molecule. The ions produced are primarily positively charged with the mass of the parent ion, plus an additional proton. Ion concentration is determined by adding the number of ions counted at the molecular ion’s mass-to-charge ratio to the number of air molecules in the reaction chamber, which can be identified according to the pressure levels in the reaction chamber. The PTRMS allows many volatile organic compounds in ambient air to be detected at levels from 10–100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The response time is 1 to 10 seconds.

  14. Mass transfer to blood flowing through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifuddin; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2009-03-01

    The present investigation deals with a mathematical model representing the mass transfer to blood streaming through the arteries under stenotic condition. The mass transport refers to the movement of atherogenic molecules, that is, blood-borne components, such as oxygen and low-density lipoproteins from flowing blood into the arterial walls or vice versa. The blood flowing through the artery is treated to be Newtonian and the arterial wall is considered to be rigid having differently shaped stenoses in its lumen arising from various types of abnormal growth or plaque formation. The nonlinear unsteady pulsatile flow phenomenon unaffected by concentration-field of the macromolecules is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations together with the equation of continuity while that of mass transfer is controlled by the convection-diffusion equation. The governing equations of motion accompanied by appropriate choice of the boundary conditions are solved numerically by MAC(Marker and Cell) method and checked numerical stability with desired degree of accuracy. The quantitative analysis carried out finally includes the respective profiles of the flow-field and concentration along with their distributions over the entire arterial segment as well. The key factors like the wall shear stress and Sherwood number are also examined for further qualitative insight into the flow and mass transport phenomena through arterial stenosis. The present results show quite consistency with several existing results in the literature which substantiate sufficiently to validate the applicability of the model under consideration.

  15. On the effectiveness of viscous dissipation and Joule heating on steady Magnetohydrodynamic heat and mass transfer flow over an inclined radiate isothermal permeable surface in the presence of thermophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Rahman, M. M.; Sattar, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    The combined effect of viscous dissipation and joule heating on steady Magnetohydrodynamic heat and mass transfer flow of viscous incompressible fluid over an inclined radiate isothermal permeable surface in the presence of thermophoresis is studied. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as the local skin-friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Stanton number are displayed graphically for various physical parameters. Comparisons with previously published work are performed and the results are found to be in very good agreement. Results show that rate of heat transfer is sensitive for increasing angle of inclination parameter for the case of fluid injection and it decreases with the increase of magnetic field parameter and Eckert number.

  16. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  17. Mass transfer of VOCs in laboratory-scale air sparging tank.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Ong, Say Kee; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2008-04-15

    Volatilization of VOCs was investigated using a 55-gal laboratory-scale model in which air sparging experiments were conducted with a vertical air injection well. In addition, X-ray imaging of an air sparging sand box showed air flows were in the form of air bubbles or channels depending on the size of the porous media. Air-water mass transfer was quantified using the air-water mass transfer coefficient which was determined by fitting the experimental data to a two-zone model. The two-zone model is a one-dimensional lumped model that accounts for the effects of air flow type and diffusion of VOCs in the aqueous phase. The experimental air-water mass transfer coefficients, KGa, obtained from this study ranged from 10(-2) to 10(-3)1/min. From a correlation analysis, the air-water mass transfer coefficient was found to be directly proportional to the air flow rate and the mean particle size of soil but inversely proportional to Henry's constant. The correlation results implied that the air-water mass transfer coefficient was strongly affected by the size of porous media and the air flow rates.

  18. Evaporation in relation to CO 2 concentration: Analysis of mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, C. S. P.; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Rao, Surampalli; Abd Elbasit, Mohamed A. M.; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the potential of mass transfer approach in estimating evaporation changes under different CO 2 levels are evaluated using data from controlled chamber experiments in which radiation and wind velocity were kept constant and temperature and relative humidity profiles were varied in different patterns along with CO 2 concentration. Currently, FAO procedure lists three approaches to compute air vapour pressure based on temperature and relative humidity profiles. In this study, the impact of using different procedures of estimating air vapour pressure is examined to assess the use of mass transfer approach for estimating evaporation. To achieve this, a part of the data is used to calibrate mass transfer coefficient which is subsequently used to project evaporation for future states. Accordingly, strategies are ranked for their potential in estimating evaporation. The effect of evaporation rate is compared at 400 ppm and 600 ppm CO 2 level. It has been observed that the evaporation rate is more pronounced at higher CO 2 level.

  19. Stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder.

    PubMed

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-02-26

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases.

  20. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  1. An approach to heat and mass transfer analysis during film condensation inside a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcioglu, I.; Gullapoglu, S. ); Uyarel, A.Y. ); Kaygusuz, K. ); Dincer, I. )

    1993-03-01

    An Investigation was conducted to determine the effects of non-condensing gas on vapor condensation. Experiments were carried out during condensation of a mixture of water vapor/non-condensing gas along the inner surface of a vertical tube. Air was used as non-condensing gas and the various profiles of the water vapor/non-condensing gas mixture were employed. A theoretical analysis to predict the heat and mass transfer is presented. The amount of the condensed water obtained by the experiments was found to be close to the theoretical results. The obtained heat and mass transfer results were in good agreement with earlier published results.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow and Mass Transfer of a Jeffery Fluid over a Nonlinear Stretching Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qasim, Muhammad; Abbas, Zaheer; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a Jeffery fluid induced by a nonlinearly stretching sheet with mass transfer. The relevant system of partial differential equations has been reduced into ordinary differential equations by employing the similarity transformation. Series solutions of velocity and concentration fields are developed by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Effects of the various parameters such as Hartman number, Schmidt number, and chemical reaction parameter on velocity and concentration fields are discussed by presenting graphs. Numerical values of the mass transfer coefficient are also tabulated and analyzed.

  3. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  4. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  5. Mathematical model of mass transfer at electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Sergey V.; Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Gromov, Victor E.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a model of convective mass transfer at electron beam treatment with beams in titanium alloys subjected to electro-explosion alloying by titanium diboride powder. The proposed model is based on the concept that treatment with concentrated flows of energy results in the initiation of vortices in the melted layer. The formation mechanism of these vortices rooted in the idea that the availability of temperature drop leads to the initiation of the thermo-capillary convection. For the melted layer of metal the equations of the convective heat transfer and boundary conditions in terms of the evaporated material are written. The finite element solution of these equations showed that electron-beam treatment results in the formation of multi-vortex structure that in developing captures all new areas of material. It leads to the fact that the strengthening particles are observed at the depth increasing many times the depth of their penetration according to the diffusion mechanism. The distribution of micro-hardness at depth and the thickness of strengthening zone determined from these data supported the view that proposed model of the convective mass transfer describes adequately the processes going on in the treatment with low-energy high-current electron beam.

  6. Influence of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lima Neto, Iran E; Parente, Priscila A B

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an integral model to evaluate the impact of gas transfer on the hydrodynamics of bubble plumes. The model is based on the Gaussian type self-similarity and functional relationships for the entrainment coefficient and factor of momentum amplification due to turbulence. The impact of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics is investigated considering different bubble sizes, gas flow rates and water depths. The results revealed a relevant impact when fine bubbles are considered, even for moderate water depths. Additionally, model simulations indicate that for weak bubble plumes (i.e., with relatively low flow rates and large depths and slip velocities), both dissolution and turbulence can affect plume hydrodynamics, which demonstrates the importance of taking the momentum amplification factor relationship into account. For deeper water conditions, simulations of bubble dissolution/decompression using the present model and classical models available in the literature resulted in a very good agreement for both aeration and oxygenation processes. Sensitivity analysis showed that the water depth, followed by the bubble size and the flow rate are the most important parameters that affect plume hydrodynamics. Lastly, dimensionless correlations are proposed to assess the impact of mass transfer on plume hydrodynamics, including both the aeration and oxygenation modes.

  7. The Size And Shape Of The Mass Transfer Nozzle In Eccentric Interacting Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Alyssa; Haggerty, C.; Sepinsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the amount of mass lost from a star which just fills its Roche Lobe, it is imperative to accurately calculate the size of the nozzle -- the area through which the mass flows. This is normally bounded by the equipotential surface where the density of the exponential atmosphere drops by one scale height. When the stars are in an eccentric orbit, Sepinsky et al. (2007) found that the equipotential surfaces defining the peanut-shaped shell ordinarily enclosing the two stars can "open up", no longer enclosing both stars. Furthermore, when attempting to calculate the orbit-variable mass transfer rate for eccentric systems, Haggerty and Sepinsky (2011) discovered that the equipotential surface defining the outer edge of the nozzle may "open up” -- and that this can occur closer to the donor star than its inner Lagrangian point (L1). In such a case, the nozzle is undefined at L1. Here, we develop a method for calculating the effective area of mass transfer by finding the area of the rings bounded at small radii by the Roche Lobe of the donor and at large radii by the equipotential surface. We calculate the area of the ring and its proximity to the L1 point as a function of eccentricity and the binary parameters. We then compare the mass transfer rate calculated for this area to other recent calculations of the mass transfer rate in eccentric binaries.

  8. Ortho-hydroxyl effect and proton transfer via ion-neutral complex: the fragmentation study of protonated imine resveratrol analogues in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lei; Li, Jing; Xie, Xiaodong; Guo, Cheng; Yin, Xinchi; Yin, Qi; Chen, Yinjuan; Pan, Yuanjiang; Ding, Chuanfan

    2016-07-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated imine resveratrol analogues in the gas-phase were investigated by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Benzyl cations were formed in the imine resveratrol analogues that had an ortho-hydroxyl group on the benzene ring A. The specific elimination of the quinomethane neutral, CH2  = C6 H4  = O, from the two isomeric ions [M1 + H](+) and [M3 + H](+) via the corresponding ion-neutral complexes was observed. The fragmentation pathway for the related meta-isomer, ion [M2 + H](+) and the other congeners was not observed. Accurate mass measurements and additional experiments carried out with a chlorinated analogue and the trideuterated isotopolog of M1 supported the overall interpretation of the fragmentation phenomena observed. It is very helpful for understanding the intriguing roles of ortho-hydroxyl effect and ion-neutral complexes in fragmentation reactions and enriching the knowledge of the gas-phase chemistry of the benzyl cation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modeling field-scale multiple tracer injection at a low-level waste disposal site in fractured rocks: effect of multiscale heterogeneity and source term uncertainty on conceptual understanding of mass transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Jin-Ping; Jardine, Philip M; Sanford, William E

    2005-03-01

    Multiple factors may affect the scale-up of laboratory multi-tracer injection into structured porous media to the field. Under transient flow conditions and with multiscale heterogeneities in the field, previous attempts to scale-up laboratory experiments have not answered definitely the questions about the governing mechanisms and the spatial extent of the influence of small-scale mass transfer processes such as matrix diffusion. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of multiscale heterogeneity, mechanistic and site model conceptualization, and source term density effect on elucidating and interpreting tracer movement in the field. Tracer release and monitoring information previously obtained in a field campaign of multiple, conservative tracer injection under natural hydraulic gradients at a low-level waste disposal site in eastern Tennessee, United States, is used for the research. A suite of two-pore-domain, or fracture-matrix, groundwater flow and transport models are calibrated and used to conduct model parameter and prediction uncertainty analyses. These efforts are facilitated by a novel nested Latin-hypercube sampling technique. Our results verify, at field scale, a multiple-pore-domain, multiscale mechanistic conceptual model that was used previously to interpret only laboratory observations. The results also suggest that, integrated over the entire field site, mass flux rates attributable to small-scale mass transfer are comparable to that of field-scale solute transport. The uncertainty analyses show that fracture spacing is the most important model parameter and model prediction uncertainty is relatively higher at the interface between the preferred flow path and its parent bedrock. The comparisons of site conceptual models indicate that the effect of matrix diffusion may be confined to the immediate neighborhood of the preferential flow path. Finally, because the relatively large amount of tracer needed for field studies, it is

  10. Optimizing SVE Remediation With Subsurface Flow and Mass Transfer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spansky, M. C.; Riha, B. D.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Dixon, K. L.; Nichols, R. L.

    2002-05-01

    The 5.9-acre A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) was created in the 1950s as a general disposal area. An aerial photograph from 1953 shows evidence of disposal activities; however, the exact materials disposed and dates of operation at ARP remain unknown. Within the larger ARP unit exists an approximately 2-acre T-shaped trench filled with ash debris to a depth of 10-14 feet. Soil sampling analysis of the ARP trench indicates the presence of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) trichloroethelyne (TCE) and tetrachloroetheylene (PCE). TCE and PCE contamination in the trench has the potential to migrate and poses a groundwater contamination risk. Several remediation options have been considered at ARP to date. The first, passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE), uses barometric pressure fluctuations to create a differential pressure between subsurface soil vapors and the atmosphere. Five wells were installed along the axes of the ARP trench. Differential pressure in the wells was monitored to determine the potential for PSVE. Results showed that the ash formation was too shallow and permeable to create pressure gradients sufficient for effective PSVE. The addition of a temporary cap over the formation did little to improve the differential pressure. Two pumping tests were subsequently conducted at the ARP trench. Air was pumped from two separate wells and drawdowns recorded at three observation wells. Data from the tests were used to model permeability of the ash unit and to estimate the zone of influence for the proposed active soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. Results indicate a high permeability for the ash. Contaminant concentrations were monitored with a portable infrared photoacoustic multigas monitor during continuous, pulsed, and variable flow rate scenarios. The concentration and flow data were used to evaluate mass transfer limitations of the system and to optimize the full-scale SVE remediation.

  11. Characterizing Mass Transfer at the Hanford 300 Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    Aquifer remediation efforts in the Hanford 300 Area in Washington have presented substantial challenges for the Department of Energy. Since the early 1940s, this site has been a receptacle for radiological and chemical wastes from nuclear weapons production, including high concentrations of uranium. Employing techniques to estimate and measure mass transfer in-situ will improve understanding of contaminant fate and transport at this site, and perhaps others. A field experiment was conducted with a combination of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ionic tracer tests through a double-ring infiltrometer to quantify multirate mass-transfer and other transport parameters in the 300 Area. The tests included a series of injections into an infiltrating column of water. After saturating the column with fresh water at a constant head, bromide tracer solution with initial known concentration was injected for a specified amount of hours. This was followed by a continual fresh water injection during which time fluid samples were taken at varying depths along the probe to observe the tailing of the breakthrough curve during this purge. Throughout the experiment, ERT data collected along the column as well as along a transect perpendicular to the vertical sampling ports. These experiments will result in a model of the local vadose zone which will be calibrated using field data and modeled using HYDRUS 2D and its sequential inverse modeling feature. This program numerically solves the Richards equation for variably saturated water flow and advection-dispersion (AD) type equations for solute transport. It also considers dual-porosity type flow in the mobile and immobile domain. Additionally, mass transfer parameters will be modeled using a code which utilizes the AD equation and numerically solves for concentrations using Laplace Transforms. Analysis on governing processes and calibration of this code using field data will be used for additional verification on

  12. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  13. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-10-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  14. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  15. Transient mass transfer at the rotating disk electrode.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanis, L.; Klein, I.

    1972-01-01

    Transient mass transfer at the rotating disk has been investigated theoretically and experimentally for cathodic reduction of ferricyanide in the redox system ferricyanide-ferrocyanide with potassium hydroxide supporting electrolyte. It has been shown that overpotential-time predictions for the rotating disk are fitted very well for decay (current interruption) but poorly for build-up following switching on of constant current. As an explanation for this behavior, attention is directed to the inadequacy of the assumption that a radially independent concentration profile exists at the disk surface just at the start of galvanostatic current passage.

  16. Mass and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuewen; Le, Guigao; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-08-01

    Mass conservation and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries have been active topics through the development of the lattice-Boltzmann method. In this paper, we review typical treatments to prevent net mass transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method, and argue that such efforts are in general not necessary and could lead to incorrect results. Carefully designed simulations are conducted to examine the effects of normal boundary movement, tangential density gradient, and lattice grid resolution. Our simulation results show that the global mass conservation can be well satisfied even with local unbalanced mass transfer at boundary nodes, while a local mass conservation constraint can produce incorrect flow and pressure fields. These simulations suggest that local mass conservation, at either a fluid or solid boundary node, is not only an unnecessary consequence to maintain the global mass conservation, but also harmful for meaningful simulation results. In addition, the concern on the momentum addition and reduction associated with status-changing nodes is also not technically necessary. Although including this momentum addition or reduction has no direct influence on flow and pressure fields, the incorrect fluid-particle interaction may affect simulation results of particulate suspensions.

  17. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mechanical surface aerators: Mass-transfer modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.M.; Chou, S.R.

    1999-08-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, many operation units such as equalization and aeration involve oxygen transfer between wastewater and air. While oxygen is transferred from air to wastewater, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are stripped from wastewater to air. Because of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, wastewater treatment operators have to do VOC inventory of their facilities. A new mass-transfer model has been developed to predict the VOC emission rates from batch and continuous aeration tanks with mechanical surface aerators. The model takes into consideration that the VOC mass transfer occurs in two separate mass-transfer zones instead of lumping the overall VOC transfer in the whole aeration tank as is done in the conventional ASCE-based model. The predictive capabilities of the two-zone and the ASCE-based models were examined by calculating the emission rates of 10 priority pollutants from aeration tanks. The effects of the hydraulic retention time, the Henry`s law constant, gas-phase resistance, and the water and air environmental conditions on the VOC emission rates were predicted by the two models.

  18. Mass transfer studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on rotating disk electrodes.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G. sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 µA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 µF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  19. Thermal compression waves. 2: Mass adjustment and vertical transfer of the total energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Melville E.; Pielke, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    A fully compressible model is used to simulate the mass adjustment that occurs in response to a prescribed heat source. Results illustrate the role that thermal compression waves have in this process. The vertical mass transport associated with compression waves decreases rapidly with height. Most of the mass transport occurs in the horizontal, with the vertical structure of the disturbance similar to that of a Lamb wave. The vertical transfer of total energy in a thermally driven mixed layer is also examined. It is shown that the upward transport of total energy is accomplished by a compression effect rather than by the exchange of warm and cold air by buoyant thermals. Model results are analyzed to determine budgets of total energy, mass and entropy. It is demonstrated that buoyant thermals are predominantly responsible for a transfer of entropy, rather than total energy. In the light of these results the notion of 'heat transport' in a fluid is discussed.

  20. Gas stream in Algol. [mass transfer in binary star systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cugier, H.; Chen, K.-Y.

    1977-01-01

    Additional absorption features in the red wings of the Mg II resonance lines near 2800 A are found in observations of Algol made from the Copernicus satellite. The absorption features were clearly seen only during a part of the primary eclipse, in the phase interval 0.90-0.03. The observations are interpreted as being produced by a stream of matter flowing from Algol B in the direction of Algol A. The measured Doppler shifts of the features give the value of 150 km/s as the characteristic velocity of matter in the stream. The mass transfer connected with the stream is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the -13th power solar mass per year.

  1. Application of Lattice Boltzmann Methods in Complex Mass Transfer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a novel computational fluid dynamics method that can easily handle complex and dynamic boundaries, couple local or interfacial interactions/reactions, and be easily parallelized allowing for simulation of large systems. While most of the current studies in LBM mainly focus on fluid dynamics, however, the inherent power of this method makes it an ideal candidate for the study of mass transfer systems involving complex/dynamic microstructures and local reactions. In this thesis, LBM is introduced to be an alternative computational method for the study of electrochemical energy storage systems (Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs)) and transdermal drug design on mesoscopic scale. Based on traditional LBM, the following in-depth studies have been carried out: (1) For EDLCs, the simulation of diffuse charge dynamics is carried out for both the charge and the discharge processes on 2D systems of complex random electrode geometries (pure random, random spheres and random fibers). Steric effect of concentrated solutions is considered by using modified Poisson-Nernst-Plank (MPNP) equations and compared with regular Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) systems. The effects of electrode microstructures (electrode density, electrode filler morphology, filler size, etc.) on the net charge distribution and charge/discharge time are studied in detail. The influence of applied potential during discharging process is also discussed. (2) For the study of dendrite formation on the anode of LIBs, it is shown that the Lattice Boltzmann model can capture all the experimentally observed features of microstructure evolution at the anode, from smooth to mossy to dendritic. The mechanism of dendrite formation process in mesoscopic scale is discussed in detail and compared with the traditional Sand's time theories. It shows that dendrite formation is closely related to the inhomogeneous reactively at the electrode-electrolyte interface

  2. Turbulent mass transfer through a flat shear-free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Calmet, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Mass transfer through the flat shear-free surface of a turbulent open-channel flow is investigated over a wide range of Schmidt number (1 ≤ Sc ≤ 200) by means of large-eddy simulations using a dynamic subgrid-scale model. In contrast with situations previously analysed using direct numerical simulation, the turbulent Reynolds number Re is high enough for the near-surface turbulence to be fairly close to isotropy and almost independent of the structure of the flow in the bottom region (the statistics of the velocity field are identical to those described by I. Calmet & J. Magnaudet J. Fluid Mech. vol. 474, 2003, p. 355). The main statistical features of the concentration field are analysed in connection with the structure of the turbulent motion below the free surface, characterized by a velocity macroscale u and an integral length scale L. All near-surface statistical profiles are found to be Sc-independent when plotted vs. the dimensionless coordinate Sc({1) / 2}yu/nu (y is the distance to the surface and nu is the kinematic viscosity). Mean concentration profiles are observed to be linear throughout an inner diffusive sublayer whose thickness is about one Batchelor microscale, i.e. LSc({) - 1 / 2 }Re({) - 3 / 4}. In contrast, the concentration fluctuations are found to reach their maximum near the edge of the outer diffusive layer which scales as LSc({) - 1 / 2}Re({) - 1 / 2}. Instantaneous views of the near-surface isovalues of the concentration and vertical velocity are used to reveal the influence of the Schmidt number. In particular, it is observed that at high Schmidt number, the tiny concentration fluctuations that subsist in the diffusive sublayer just mirror the divergence of the two-component surface velocity field. Co-spectra of concentration and vertical velocity fluctuations indicate that the main contribution to the turbulent mass flux is provided by eddies whose horizontal size is close to L, which strongly supports the view that the mass

  3. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  4. DETERMINATION OF THE MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERIZATION OF A CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE MEMBRANE IN THE PERVAPORATION MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the coating layer thickness on VOC extraction performance of a ceramic polymer composite membrane has been investigated. It was found, under experimental condiitons representing typical field operation, the overall mass transfer rates of feed components were control...

  5. DETERMINATION OF THE MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERIZATION OF A CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE MEMBRANE IN THE PERVAPORATION MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the coating layer thickness on VOC extraction performance of a ceramic polymer composite membrane has been investigated. It was found, under experimental condiitons representing typical field operation, the overall mass transfer rates of feed components were control...

  6. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    PubMed Central

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  7. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-22

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones.

  8. Analysis of ultrafiltration and mass transfer in a bioartificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Jaffrin, M Y; Reach, G; Notelet, D

    1988-02-01

    A bioartificial pancreas is an implantable device which contains insulin secreting cells (Langerhans islets), separated from the circulating blood by a semi-permeable membrane to avoid rejection. This paper describes the operation of such a device and evaluates the respective contributions of diffusion and ultrafiltration to the glucose and insulin mass transfer. It is shown that the pressure drop along the blood channel produces across the first half of the channel an ultrafiltration flux toward the islet compartment followed in the second half by an equal flux in reverse direction from islets to blood. The mass transfer analysis is carried out for an optimal geometry in which a U-shaped blood channel surrounds closely a very thin islet compartment formed by a folded flat membrane. A complete model of insulin release by this device is developed and is compared with in vitro data obtained with rats islets. Satisfactory kinetics is achieved with a polyacrylonitrile membrane used in hemodialysis. But the model shows that the membrane hydraulic permeability should be increased by a factor of 10 to significantly improve the performance.

  9. Parallel Mass Transfer Simulation of Nanoparticles Using Nonblocking Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantrapornchai (Phonpensri), Chantana; Dolwithayakul, Banpot; Gorlatch, Sergei

    This paper presents experiences and results obtained in optimizing parallelization of the mass transfer simulation in the High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) of nanoparticles using nonblocking communication techniques in the point-to-point and collective model. We study the dynamics of mass transfer statistically in terms of particle volume concentration and the continuity equation, which is solved numerically by using the finite-difference method to compute concentration distribution in the simulation domain at a given time. In the parallel simulation, total concentration data in the simulation domain are divided row-wise and distributed equally to a group of processes. We propose two parallel algorithms based on the row-wise partitioning: algorithms with nonblocking send/receive and nonblocking scatter/gather using the NBC library. We compare the performance of both versions by measuring their parallel speedup and efficiency. We also investigate the communication overhead in both versions. Our results show that the nonblocking collective communication can improve the performance of the simulation when the number of processes is large.

  10. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  11. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones.

  12. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  13. A numerical and experimental study of mass transfer in the artificial kidney.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijie; Poh, Churn K; Huang, Zhongping; Hardy, Peter A; Clark, William R; Gao, Dayong

    2003-08-01

    To develop a more efficient and optimal artificial kidney, many experimental approaches have been used to study mass transfer inside, outside, and cross hollow fiber membranes with different kinds of membranes, solutes, and flow rates as parameters. However, these experimental approaches are expensive and time consuming. Numerical calculation and computer simulation is an effective way to study mass transfer in the artificial kidney, which can save substantial time and reduce experimental cost. This paper presents a new model to simulate mass transfer in artificial kidney by coupling together shell-side, lumen-side, and transmembrane flows. Darcy's equations were employed to simulate shell-side flow, Navier-Stokes equations were employed to simulate lumen-side flow, and Kedem-Katchalsky equations were used to compute transmembrane flow. Numerical results agreed well with experimental results within 10% error. Numerical results showed the nonuniform distribution of flow and solute concentration in shell-side flow due to the entry/exit effect and Darcy permeability. In the shell side, the axial velocity in the periphery is higher than that in the center. This numerical model presented a clear insight view of mass transfer in an artificial kidney and may be used to help design an optimal artificial kidney and its operation conditions to improve hemodialysis.

  14. Mixing and mass transfer in a pilot scale U-loop bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Leander A H; Villadsen, John; Jørgensen, Sten B; Gernaey, Krist V

    2017-02-01

    A system capable of handling a large volumetric gas fraction while providing a high gas to liquid mass transfer is a necessity if the metanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus is to be used in single cell protein (SCP) production. In this study, mixing time and mass transfer coefficients were determined in a 0.15 m(3) forced flow U-loop fermenter of a novel construction. The effect on the impeller drawn power when a gas was introduced into the system was also studied. Mixing time decreased and mass transfer increased with increasing volumetric liquid flow rate and specific power input. This happened also for a large volume fraction of the gas, which was shown to have only minor effect on the power drawn from the pump impeller. Very large mass transfer coefficients, considerably higher than those obtainable in an STR and previous tubular loop reactors, could be achieved in the U-loop fermenter equipped with static mixers at modest volumetric liquid and gas flow rates. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 344-354. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of EHD on heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop during two-phase condensation of pure R-134a at high mass flux in a horizontal micro-fin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Laohalertdecha, Suriyan; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-07-15

    Effects of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) on the two-phase heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop of pure R-134a condensing inside a horizontal micro-fin tube are experimentally investigated. The test section is a 2.5m long counter flow tube-in-tube heat exchanger with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and cooling water flowing in the annulus. The inner tube is made from micro-fin horizontal copper tubing of 9.52mm outer diameter. The electrode is made from cylindrical stainless steel of 1.47mm diameter. Positive high voltage is supplied to the electrode wire, with the micro-fin tube grounded. In the presence of the electrode, a maximum heat transfer enhancement of 1.15 is obtained at a heat flux of 10kW/m{sup 2}, mass flux of 200kg/m{sup 2}s and saturation temperature of 40{sup o}C, while the application of an EHD voltage of 2.5kV only slightly increases the pressure drop. New correlations of the experimental data based on the data gathered during this work for predicting the condensation heat transfer coefficients are proposed for practical application. (author)

  16. Toward a universal mass-momentum transfer relationship for predicting nutrient uptake and metabolite exchange in benthic reef communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falter, James L.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Zhang, Zhenlin

    2016-09-01

    Here we synthesize data from previous field and laboratory studies describing how rates of nutrient uptake and metabolite exchange (mass transfer) are related to form drag and bottom stresses (momentum transfer). Reanalysis of this data shows that rates of mass transfer are highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.9) with the root of the bottom stress (τbot0.4) under both waves and currents and only slightly higher under waves (~10%). The amount of mass transfer that can occur per unit bottom stress (or form drag) is influenced by morphological features ranging anywhere from millimeters to meters in scale; however, surface-scale roughness (millimeters) appears to have little effect on actual nutrient uptake by living reef communities. Although field measurements of nutrient uptake by natural reef communities agree reasonably well with predictions based on existing mass-momentum transfer relationships, more work is needed to better constrain these relationships for more rugose and morphologically complex communities.

  17. Sales Training: Effects of Spaced Practice on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffeld, Simone; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The benefits of spaced training over massed training practice are well established in the laboratory setting. In a field study design with sales trainings, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of spaced compared with massed practice on transfer quantity and quality, sales competence, and key figures.…

  18. Sales Training: Effects of Spaced Practice on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffeld, Simone; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The benefits of spaced training over massed training practice are well established in the laboratory setting. In a field study design with sales trainings, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of spaced compared with massed practice on transfer quantity and quality, sales competence, and key figures.…

  19. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  20. Soil cleanup by in-situ surfactant flushing. VII. Determination of mass transfer coefficients for reclamation of surfactant for recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.L.; Debelak, K.A.; Wilson, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of soils and groundwater with volatile and/or nonvolatile organics from underground storage tanks, spills, and improper waste disposal presents a major remediation problem in the United States and other industrial nations. Mass transfer coefficients were determined for the extraction of naphthalene in 50 and 100 mM aqueous sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) solutions (the continuous phase) into hexane (dispersed phase). The effect of surfactant was explored in a series of single drop experiments. Mass transfer coefficients determined experimentally fall between the values predicted by correlations for circulating and noncirculating drops. The presence of SDS does appear to reduce the mass transfer coefficients as compared to those for pure water.

  1. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, X.; Brooks, P. D.; Troch, P. A.; McIntosh, J.; Rasmussen, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last three decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River Basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment scale discharge, and satellite derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Records from the two SNOTEL stations showed clear increasing trends in winter and annual temperatures (+1.0-1.3 °C decade-1; +1.2-1.4 °C decade-1, respectively), decreasing trends in winter and annual precipitation (-41.6-51.4 mm decade-1; -69.8-73.2 mm decade-1, respectively) and maximum Snow Water Equivalent (SWE; -33.1-34.7 mm decade-1). The water partitioning fluxes at the basin scale showed statistically significant decreasing trends in precipitation (-61.7 mm decade-1), discharge (-17.6 mm decade-1) and vaporization (-45.7 mm decade-1). Similarly Q50, an indicator of snowmelt timing, is occurring 4.3 days decade-1 earlier. Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in Precipitation) and EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). These changes in EEMT point towards a hotter, drier and less productive ecosystem which may alter critical zone processes in high elevation semi-arid systems.

  2. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  3. Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

  4. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  5. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    PubMed

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14.

  6. A rigorous analysis of simultaneous heat and mass transfer in the pasta drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veladat, Reza; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee; Rahmani, Mohammad

    2013-10-01

    This study presents a two dimensional analysis of coupled heat and mass transfer during the process of pasta drying. Velocity and temperature distributions of air flowing around the pasta are predicted in steady state condition. Using these profiles and the similarity between heat and mass boundary layers, local convective heat and mass transfer coefficients were determined on different points of pasta surface. By employing these values, the solution of coupled heat and mass transfer equations within the pasta object in unsteady state condition was obtained. Furthermore the effects of operating conditions such as velocity, temperature and relative humidity of air flow on drying rate of pasta were studied. Sensitivity analysis results show that the effects of air temperature and relative humidity on the rate of drying are more important than the effect of air velocity. Finally, the results obtained from this analysis were compared with the experimental data reported in the literatures and a good agreement was observed while, no adjustable parameter is used in the presented model.

  7. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  8. Energetic correlation of local mass transfer in swirling pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yapici, S.

    1999-04-01

    Mass transfer measurements in a decaying swirl flow in a pipe were carried out, using the electrochemical limiting diffusion current technique. The measurements were taken from local electrodes of 1 mm diameter without a developing concentration boundary layer around. Swirl was generated using short helical guide-vanes with vane angles between 15 and 60 at the outer edge of the vanes to the duct axis. The pressure drop measurements were also taken to perform an energy analysis. For a Reynolds number range of 1700--10,000, the overall energy correlation for a representative length of 36.5 diameter were evaluated to be Sh{sub s}(Sc){sup {minus}0.33} = 0.3705(1 + tan {theta}{sub o}){sup {minus}0.120} X{sup 0.236}, where {theta}{sub o} is the vane angle at the outer edge of the helical swirler and X is the energy dissipation parameter.

  9. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  10. Mass transfer in chromatographic columns studied by PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    Tallarek, U; van Dusschoten, D; Van As, H; Guiochon, G; Bayer, E

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied to study convective and diffusional transport in chromatographic columns packed with totally porous support particles. Here stagnant zones exist in the particle pores, and diffusional mass-transfer limitations between fluid molecules diffusing in the intraparticle pore network and flowing in the interparticle void space are detected quantitatively. Axial displacement probability distributions were measured for water over a range of Peclet numbers and observation times, with diffusion lengths between 0.15 and 0.91 times the average support particle diameter. The transition towards complete diffusional exchange is demonstrated, thereby also revealing the development of the classical convective dispersion process in a packed bed of (porous) particles.

  11. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  12. Diffusive heat and mass transfer in oscillatory pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Jalil, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    The enhancement of axial heat and mass transfer by laminar flow oscillation in pipes with axial gradients in temperature and concentration has been studied analytically for the cases of insulated and conducting walls. The axial diffusivity can exceed its molecular counterpart by many orders of magnitude, with a quadratic scaling on the pressure-gradient amplitude and the Prandtl or Schmidt number, and is a bimodal function of oscillatory frequency: quasi-steady behavior at low frequencies and a power-law decay at high frequencies. When the pipe wall is conductive and of sufficient thickness, and the flow oscillation is quasi-steady, the axial diffusivity may be enhanced by a further factor of about ten as a result of increased radial diffusion, for liquid and gas flows in pipes with walls with a wide range of thermal conductivities. Criteria for the wall thickness required to achieve this additional enhancement and for the limits placed on the validity of these solutions by viscous dissipation are also deduced. When the heat transfer per unit flow work achieved by oscillatory pipe flow is contrasted with that of a conventional parallel-flow heat exchanger, it is found to be of comparable size and the ratio of the two is shown to be a function only of the pipe geometry, heat-exchanger mean velocity, and fluid viscosity.

  13. Investigation of mass transfer intensification under power ultrasound irradiation using 3D computational simulation: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Asgharzadehahmadi, Seyedali; Asaithambi, Perumal; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of acoustic streaming induced by low-frequency (24kHz) ultrasound irradiation on mass transfer in a two-phase system. The main objective is to discuss the possible mass transfer improvements under ultrasound irradiation. Three analyses were conducted: i) experimental analysis of mass transfer under ultrasound irradiation; ii) comparative analysis between the results of the ultrasound assisted mass transfer with that obtained from mechanically stirring; and iii) computational analysis of the systems using 3D CFD simulation. In the experimental part, the interactive effects of liquid rheological properties, ultrasound power and superficial gas velocity on mass transfer were investigated in two different sonicators. The results were then compared with that of mechanical stirring. In the computational part, the results were illustrated as a function of acoustic streaming behaviour, fluid flow pattern, gas/liquid volume fraction and turbulence in the two-phase system and finally the mass transfer coefficient was specified. It was found that additional turbulence created by ultrasound played the most important role on intensifying the mass transfer phenomena compared to that in stirred vessel. Furthermore, long residence time which depends on geometrical parameters is another key for mass transfer. The results obtained in the present study would help researchers understand the role of ultrasound as an energy source and acoustic streaming as one of the most important of ultrasound waves on intensifying gas-liquid mass transfer in a two-phase system and can be a breakthrough in the design procedure as no similar studies were found in the existing literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A Numerical Analysis of the Transient Response of an Ablation System Including Effects of Thermal Nonequilibrium, Mass Transfer and Chemical Kinetics. Ph.D Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The differential equations governing the transient response of a one-dimensional ablative thermal protection system undergoing stagnation ablation are derived. These equations are for thermal nonequilibrium effects between the pyrolysis gases and the char layer and kinetically controlled chemical reactions and mass transfer between the pyrolysis gases and the char layer. The boundary conditions are written for the particular case of stagnation heating with surface removal by oxidation or sublimation and pyrolysis of the uncharred layer occurring in a plane. The governing equations and boundary conditions are solved numerically using the modified implicit method (Crank-Nicolson method). Numerical results are compared with exact solutions for a number of simplified cases. The comparison is favorable in each instance.

  15. About Mass Transfer in Capillaries of Biological Systems under Influence of Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, K.

    Vibrations accompany the flight of the manned spacecraft both at a stage of a orbital injection to an orbit, and during long flights (as noise), rendering undesirable physiological influence on crew, reducing serviceability and creating constant discomfort. The report represents attempt to predict a state of the cosmonaut in conditions of influence of vibrations for the period of start and stay in Space, being based on researches of mass transfer processes in capillary systems. For this purpose the original researches on heat and mass transfer processes with evaporation of liquids in capillary - porous structures in conditions of vibration actions and changes of a direction of action of gravitation are generalized. Report demonstrates the existence of modes at which increased or lowered mass transfer is achieved on border of separation "liquid - gas". The possible mechanism of influence of vibrations on evaporation of a liquid in capillaries is examined. The magnitudes of frequencies and amplitudes are submitted at which minimax characteristics are observed. The opportunity of application of the developed mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in capillary - porous structures to forecasting influence of vibrations for biological processes in capillaries of alive essences is analyzed. Such approach is justified on the mechanical nature of harmful influence of vibrations on an organism of the person. In addition the range of vibration frequencies which arise during space flights, corresponds to own resonant frequencies of a human body and his separate organs. Comparison of these resonant frequencies of a body of the person (5-80 Hertz) with vibration frequencies of optimum modes of heat and mass transfer in capillary - porous structures (20-40 Hertz) is shown their ranges of coverage. It gives the basis to assume existence of similar effects in capillaries of human body. It is supposed, that the difficulty of breath, change of a rhythm of breath, the subsequent

  16. Mass transfer to reactive boundaries from steady three-dimensional flows in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Joseph D.; McGraw, Gregory J.; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of transverse secondary flows on mass transfer to reactive boundaries in microchannels. The geometry considered is relevant to surface catalyzed reactions, fuel cells, biochemical sensors, and other microreactor applications. The 3D flows that we consider approximate flows that are experimentally achievable through topographical patterning of one wall of a microchannel, as in the Staggered Herringbone Mixer (SHM) and similar geometries. We simulate a mass transfer process using passive tracers to model reactive solute molecules in a Stokes flow (Reynolds number, Re =0) over a range of Péclet number, 102⩽Pe⩽105, with instantaneous kinetics at the reactive boundary. Our simulation allows for the evaluation of the local Sherwood number produced by a uniaxial Poiseuille flow and several chaotic and nonchaotic 3D flows. In chaotic flows, the local Sherwood number evolves in a simple manner that shares features with the classic Graetz solution for transfer from a uniaxial pipe flow: an entrance region with cube-root scaling in the Graetz number and a constant asymptotic value. This "Modified Graetz" behavior also differs in important ways from the standard case: the entrance length is Pe independent and the asymptotic rate of transfer is Pe dependent and potentially much greater than in the uniaxial case. We develop a theoretical model of the transfer process; the predictions of this model compare well with simulation results. We use our results to develop a correlation for the mass transfer in laminar channel flows, to elucidate the importance of chaos in defining transfer in these flows, and to provide design rules for microreactors with a single reactive wall.

  17. Impact of Porous Media and NAPL Spatial Variability at the Pore Scale on Interphase Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, N. K.; Agaoglu, B.; Scheytt, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sherwood number expressions are often used to model NAPL dissolution in porous media. Such expressions are generally derived from meso-scale experiments and expressed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative volume. In this work a pore network model is used to examine the influence of porous media and NAPL pore scale variability on interphase mass transfer. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity and (v) REV or domain size on the apparent interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. In other words, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the variability of the mass transfer coefficient. Moreover, grain size heterogeneity can also lead to a decrease in the interphase mass transfer. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is average influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer.

  18. Hydraulics and mass transfer efficiency of a commercial-scale membrane extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, A.F.; Py, X.; Mshewa, M.; Fair, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in utilizing microporous hollow fiber membranes for liquid-liquid extraction. The membrane extractor resembles the shell and tube heat exchanger with the tube section composed of 1,000-2,500 fibers/in{sup 2}. The diameter of each fiber is approximately 300 microns. In this process, the feed may be passed through the shell side, while the solvent is passed through the fiber side, or vice versa. Mass transfer occurs across the liquid-liquid interface formed in the pores of the fiber wall. The advantages of this technology are high throughput capacities, independence of density difference between the feed and solvent, and potentially high mass transfer areas. The mass transfer performance of an available commercial scale nonbaffled membrane extraction module was determined to be lower than expected from results obtained in smaller scale modules. Mass transfer studies of a commercial-scale membrane extraction module at the Separations Research Program have shown that a significant portion of the fibers are bypassed by the shell side fluid and consequently only a fraction of the total fiber surface area is utilized. A hydraulic study using a dye tracer technique verified this finding with an aqueous flow on the shell side. A model which incorporates mass transfer correlations reported by others has been developed and shown to have excellent agreement with the experimental data obtained. In this paper, the efficiency of the membrane extractor is compared with conventional spray, sieve tray, and packed columns; the effect of shell side bypassing is also presented.

  19. Pressure drop and mass transfer in two-pass ribbed channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    The combined effects of the sharp 180-deg turn and of the rib configuration on the pressure drop and mass transfer characteristics in a two-pass square channel with a pair of opposite rib-roughened walls (to simulate turbine airfoil cooling passages) were determined for a Reynolds number range of 10,000-60,000. Heat transfer enhancements were compared for the first pass and for the two-pass channel with the sharp 180-deg turn. Correlations for the fully-developed friction factors and loss coefficients were obtained.

  20. Mass transfer during the period of drop formation in presence of interfacial instability

    SciTech Connect

    Shatokhin, V.I.; Ermakov, A.A.; Maksimenko, M.Z.

    1985-04-20

    The authors propose to find a functional relationship that describes experimental kinetic data on mass transfer during the period of drop formation in presence of interfacial instability. They conduct their experiments in a thermostated glass column where the disperse phase is fed by a micropump through a movable capillary. They conclude that spontaneous interfacial convection has an enormous influence on the end effect. The degree of increase of the amount of substance transferred depends on the intensity of the interfacial convection arising during extraction of acids in various systems.

  1. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-04-01

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid-solid, gas-solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes.

  2. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid–solid, gas–solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes. PMID:28382972

  3. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-04-06

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid-solid, gas-solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes.

  4. Vadose Zone VOC Mass Transfer Testing At The SRS Miscellaneous Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B

    2005-10-30

    Active remedial activities have been ongoing since 1996 to address low levels of solvent contamination at the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin at SRS. Contaminant levels in the subsurface may be approaching levels where mass transfer limitations are impacting the efficiency of the remedial action. Rate limited mass transfer effects have been observed at other sites in the vadose zone at the SRS, however, detailed measurements and evaluation has not been undertaken. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the mass transfer rates are very slow from the fine grain sediments. This conclusion is based on the observation that measured soil gas concentrations tend to be low in permeable zones relative to the higher concentrations found in fine grain zones. Decreasing soil gas concentration with depth below the ''upland unit'' at several areas at SRS is also evidence of slow diffusion rates. In addition, due to the length of time since disposal ceased at the MCB, we hypothesize that mobile solvents have migrated downward, and the solvent remaining in the upper fine grain zone (''upland unit'') are trapped in fine grain material and are primarily released by gas diffusion (Riha and Rossabi 2004). Natural weathering and other chemical solutions disposed with the solvents can further enhance this effect by increasing the micro-porosity in the clays (kaolinite). This microporosity can result in increased entrapment of water and solvents by capillary forces (Powers, et. al., 2003). Also supporting this conclusion is the observation that active SVE has proven ineffective on VOC removal from the fine grain zones at the SRS. Adsorption and the very slow release phenomenon have been documented similarly in the literature especially for old solvent spills such as at the SRS (Pavlostathis and Mathavan 1992; Oostrom and Lenhard 2003). Mass transfer relationships need to be developed in order to optimize remediation activities and to determine actual loading rates to groundwater. These metrics

  5. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  6. Study on electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability with heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Srivastava, Vineet K

    2014-01-01

    The linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between two viscous and dielectric fluids in the presence of a tangential electric field has been carried out when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. In our earlier work, the viscous potential flow analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of tangential electric field was studied. Here, we use another irrotational theory in which the discontinuities in the irrotational tangential velocity and shear stress are eliminated in the global energy balance. Stability criterion is given by critical value of applied electric field as well as critical wave number. Various graphs have been drawn to show the effect of various physical parameters such as electric field, heat transfer coefficient, and vapour fraction on the stability of the system. It has been observed that heat transfer and electric field both have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system.

  7. Study on Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Heat and Mass Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Srivastava, Vineet K.

    2014-01-01

    The linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between two viscous and dielectric fluids in the presence of a tangential electric field has been carried out when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. In our earlier work, the viscous potential flow analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of tangential electric field was studied. Here, we use another irrotational theory in which the discontinuities in the irrotational tangential velocity and shear stress are eliminated in the global energy balance. Stability criterion is given by critical value of applied electric field as well as critical wave number. Various graphs have been drawn to show the effect of various physical parameters such as electric field, heat transfer coefficient, and vapour fraction on the stability of the system. It has been observed that heat transfer and electric field both have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system. PMID:24526897

  8. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor. PMID:23369581

  9. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Golbabaei, Farideh; Mehrnia, Momammad Reza; Neghab, Masoud; Mohammad, Kazem; Nikpey, Ahmad; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-07

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor.

  10. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  11. Estimation of mass transfer and kinetics in operating biofilters for removal of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.W.; Davison, B.H.; Gable, C.C.

    1997-11-18

    Long-term, stable operation of trickle-bed bioreactors remains desirable, but is difficult to achieve for industrial processes, which generate continuous streams of dilute gaseous hydrocarbons. Mass transfer and kinetic parameters are difficult to measure, complicating predictive estimates. Two methods are presented which were used to predict the importance of mass transfer versus kinetics limitations in operating trickle-bed biofilters. Both methods altered the overall kinetic activity of the biofilter and estimated the effective mass transfer coefficient (K{sub 1}a) by varying the VOC (volatile organic contaminant) loading rate and concentration. The first method, used with developing biofilters possessing low biomass, involved addition of cultured biomass to the recirculating liquid to effect an overall change in VOC removal capacity. The second method altered the total bed temperature of a well-established biofilter to effect a change. Results and modeling from these experiments are presented for a mixed culture biofilter which is capable of consuming sparingly soluble alkanes, such as pentane and isobutane. Methods to control overgrowth are discussed which were used to operate one reactor continuously for over 24 months with sustained degradation of VOC alkanes with a rate of 50 g/h/m{sup 3}.

  12. Direct Geoelectrical Evidence of Mass Transfer at the Lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Keating, K.; Binley, A.; Clifford, J.; Haggerty, R.

    2011-12-01

    At many field sites, anomalous tailing behavior-- a long, slow decrease of solute concentration in time-- is observed yet cannot be explained with the advection-dispersion model. One explanation for this commonly observed behavior is the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile domains; however, direct experimental observations of this controlling process remain elusive. Circumstantial evidence for a less-mobile phase is typically inferred from tailing behavior observed in fluid samples of the mobile phase. Electrical methods provide a measure of the total solutes in both the immobile and mobile domain and therefore have been hypothesized to provide, in combination with fluid sampling, direct experimental evidence for a less-mobile and mobile model, yet experimental evidence is needed to support this claim. Here, we conduct column solute tracer tests and measure both electrical resistivity and fluid conductivity on unconsolidated, well-sorted sand in addition to fine and coarse fractions of the porous zeolite clinoptilolite. We examine nearly co-located time-lapse standard fluid conductivity and bulk apparent resistivity measurements to identify solute exchange between multiple domains at the lab scale. Our results show extensive tailing behavior in both fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements in the zeolite but not in sand, providing evidence for a mobile-immobile framework. Transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the observed and simulated fluid conductivity in COMSOL Multiphysics. These best-fit parameters support our claims of mass transfer occurring in the zeolite columns and provide the first direct electrical evidence of dual-domain mass transport at the lab scale.

  13. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sutija, D.P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported: (1) Profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 {mu}m is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 {mu}m in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 {mu}m in height and spaced 250 {mu}m apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. (2) A novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H{sub 2} bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements. 168 refs., 96 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Heat and mass transfer at adiabatic evaporation of binary zeotropic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. S.; Makarova, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a laminar flow of three-component gas at adiabatic evaporation of binary solutions from a flat plate are presented. The studies were carried out for the perfect solution of ethanol/methanol and zeotrope solutions of water/acetone, benzene/acetone, and ethanol/acetone. The liquid-vapor equilibrium is described by the Raoult law for the ideal solution and Carlson-Colburn model for real solutions. The effect of gas temperature and liquid composition on the heat and diffusion flows, and temperature of vapor-gas mixture at the interface is analyzed. The formula for calculating the temperature of the evaporation surface for the binary liquid mixtures using the similarity of heat and mass transfer was proposed. Data of numerical simulations are in a good agreement with the results of calculations based on the proposed dependence for all examined liquid mixtures in the considered range of temperatures and pressures.

  15. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  16. Heat and mass transfer with evaporation cooling of a porous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, S. N.; Shibaev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the results of experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer with adiabatic evaporation of bicomponent water/ethanol fluid to an air flow are presented. An innovative test section for the wind tunnel with an active thermal stabilization system, maintaining the cuvette temperature equal to the evaporation surface temperature, is used to provide the evaporation adiabatic conditions. The wall temperature obtained experimentally shows the presence of expressed quasi-stationary evaporation area, qualitatively similar to sublimation curves of volatile organometallic compounds. A theoretical model based on the similarity of heat and mass transfer processes for each of the evaporating solution component is suggested. This model allows to determine evaporation surface temperature (sublimation temperature) accounting for radiation effect.

  17. Bioremediation of solid TNT particles in a soil slurry reactor: Mass transfer considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilcrease, P.C.; Murphy, V.G.; Reardon, K.F.

    1996-12-31

    The bioreduction of solid TNT by a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain was investigated in a stirred tank reactor. Experiments in which TNT beads were the only solids present indicated that the biodegradation mechanism is dissolution followed by degradation in bulk solution. Dissolution may limit the overall rate, in which case degradation can be enhanced through increased agitation. Since soil slurries may contain high concentrations of solids other than TNT, Teflon chips were added to investigate two separate effects on TNT dissolution in slurries. First, Teflon solids increase the viscosity of the slurry, resulting in lower solid-liquid mass transfer coefficients. Second, the agitated Teflon slurry can grind or comminute TNT particles, creating additional surface area for mass transfer. Enhanced dissolution rates were observed for TNT beads in a Teflon slurry at higher agitator speeds. This suggests that the biodegradation of solid TNT nuggets in a soil slurry bioreactor may be enhanced under conditions that promote particle attrition.

  18. HRD Effectiveness and Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) effectiveness and transfer of learning. "Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand" (Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean) discusses how the Learning Transfer System Inventory was validated in Thailand by administering it to 1,029 employers and…

  19. Investigation of mass transfer surface self-diffusion on palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beszeda, I.; Gontier-Moya, E. G.; Beke, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    Growth of voids in thin palladium layers (8-20 nm) on alumina and silica substrates has been investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Using the Brandon-Bradshaw's model, based on capillarity forces, the surface self-diffusion coefficients of palladium have been evaluated in the temperature range of 583-823 K. We have found that the results are independent of the substrate, in agreement with the assumption that the growth of voids is controlled by surface self-diffusion on the metal. The mass transfer surface self-diffusion coefficients are expressed by D s ( m2/ s)=1.1×10 -7exp[-97±13 ( kJ/mol) /RT] . These new results are compared with literature data. The experimental and theoretical values for intrinsic diffusion coefficients on oriented surfaces disclose much lower activation energies than that found in the present work, and the differences are related to the formation energy of the defects responsible for surface diffusion.

  20. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  1. Experimental study of the heat and mass transfer in a packed bed liquid desiccant air dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, V.; Goswami, D.Y.

    1998-11-01

    Desiccant cooling systems have the ability to provide efficient humidity and temperature control while reducing the electrical energy requirement for air conditioning as compared to a conventional system. Naturally, the desiccant air dehumidification process greatly influences the overall performance of the desiccant system. Therefore, the effects of variables such as air and desiccant flow rates, air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and the area available for heat and mass transfer are of great interest. Due to the complexity of the dehumidification process, theoretical modeling relies heavily upon experimental studies. However, a limited number of experimental studies are reported in the literature. This paper presents results from a detailed experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer between a liquid desiccant (triethylene glycol) and air in a packed bed absorption tower using high liquid flow rates. A high performance packing that combines good heat and mass transfer characteristics with low pressure drop is used. The rate of dehumidification, as well as the effectiveness of the dehumidification process are assessed based on the variables listed above. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental findings and predictions from finite difference modeling. In addition, a comparison between the findings in the present study and findings previously reported in the literature is made. The results obtained from this study make it possible to characterize the important variables which impact the system design.

  2. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer in closed-cycle adsorption cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A.

    1987-01-01

    A relationship for the solid-vapor adsorption equilibrium is proposed and proved to represent accurately the experimental data and to be convenient for numerical calculations. Formulas describing the process involved in closed-cycle cooling and heating systems are also derived. These formulas are first applied in a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator. A computer program was written to study the effect of the design parameters and operating conditions on the system performance. A second application concerns the simulation of the regenerative adsorption cooling systems which were recently introduced to increase the performance of adsorption machines. A computer program was developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of such systems. An analytical investigation of the vapor-liquid absorption is presented. Closed-form solution were obtained where the depth of the absorbing solution is taken into account. The effect of interfacial instability on heat and mass transfer is also modeled by introducing constant heat and mass transfer coefficients. An analysis of the fully developed natural convection heat and mass transfer between two inclined parallel plates is presented. Solvability conditions are determined and closed-form expressions for the temperature and concentration obtained.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in packed bed liquid desiccant regenerators -- An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, V.; Goswami, D.Y.

    1999-08-01

    Liquid desiccant cooling can provide control of temperature and humidity, while at the same time lowering the electrical energy requirement for air conditioning. Since the largest energy requirement associated with desiccant cooling is low temperature heat for desiccant regeneration, the regeneration process greatly influences the overall system performance. Therefore, the effects of variables such as air and desiccant flow rates, air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and the area available for heat and mass transfer on the regeneration process are of great interest. Due to the complexity of the regeneration process, which involves simultaneous heat and mass transfer, theoretical modeling must be verified by experimental studies. However, a limited number of experimental studies are reported in the literature. This paper presents results from a detailed experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer between a liquid desiccant (triethylene glycol) and air in a packed bed regenerator using high liquid flow rates. To regenerate the desiccant, it is heated to temperatures readily obtainable from flat-plate solar collectors. A high performance packing that combines good heat and mass transfer characteristics with low pressure drop is used. The rate of water evaporation, as well as the effectiveness of the regeneration process is assessed based on the variables listed above. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental findings and predictions from finite difference modeling. In addition, the findings in the present study are compared to findings previously reported in the literature. Also, the results presented here characterize the important variables that impact the system design.

  4. Particle dynamics and particle heat and mass transfer in thermal plasmas. Part I. The motion of a single particle without thermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Lee, Y.C.

    1985-09-01

    A particle injected into a thermal plasma will experience a number of effects which are not present in an ordinary gas. In this paper effects exerted on the motionof a particle will be reviewed and analyzed in the context of thermal plasma processing of materials. The primary purpose of this paper is an assessment of the relative importance of various effects on particle motion. Computer experiments are described, simulating motion of a spherical particle in a laminar, confined plasma jet or in a turbulent, free plasma jet. Particle sizes range from 5 to 50 ..mu.. and as sample materials alumina and tungsten are considered. The results indicate that (i) the correction term required for the viscous drag coefficient due to strongly varying properties is the most important factor; (ii) non-continum effects are important for particle sizes <10 ..mu.. at atmospheric pressure and these effects will be enhanced for smaller particles and/or reduced pressures; (iii) the Basset history term is negligible, unless relatively large and light particles are considered over long processing distances; (iv) thermophoresis is not crucial for the injection of particles into thermal plasma; (v) turbulent dispersion becomes important for particle <10 ..mu.. in diameter.

  5. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  6. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  7. Impact of NAPL architecture on interphase mass transfer: A pore network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-09-01

    Interphase mass transfer in porous media is commonly modeled using Sherwood number expressions that are developed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative elementary volume (REV). In this work the influence of sub-grid scale properties on interphase mass transfer was investigated using a two-dimensional pore network model. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity, (v) REV or domain size and (vi) pore scale heterogeneity of the porous media on interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. Hence, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the uncertainty of the mass transfer coefficient. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is defined influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer. It was also demonstrated that the spatial variability of pore scale parameters such as pore throat diameters may result in different rates of interphase mass transfer even for the same pore size distribution index.

  8. Numerical study of streamwise and cross flow in the presence of heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan-ul-Haq; Soomro, Feroz Ahmed; Khan, Z. H.; Al-Mdallal, Qasem M.

    2017-05-01

    The present model is devoted to investigate the streamwise and cross flow of a viscous fluid over a heated moving surface. Viscous dissipation effects are also considered with heat and mass transfer effects and these effects with cross flow have not been explored yet in the literature. Governing boundary layer equations consist in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Compatible transformations are applied to change such equations into ordinary differential equations which are further solved using the Runge-Kutta technique and shooting method. Linear stability analysis is also performed over the obtained solutions to validate the results and to determine the smallest eigenvalues. Three different kinds of fluids namely: acetone, water and ethaline glycol are investigated to analyse the heat transfer rate. The problem contains important physical parameters namely: Prandtl number, Eckert numbers and Lewis number. The obtained solutions are discussed in detail against each physical parameter using graphs and tables.

  9. Diffusion or advection? Mass transfer and complex boundary layer landscapes of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Nørregaard, Rasmus Dyrmose; Kühl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The role of hyaline hairs on the thallus of brown algae in the genus Fucus is long debated and several functions have been proposed. We used a novel motorized set-up for two-dimensional and three-dimensional mapping with O2 microsensors to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) and O2 flux around single and multiple tufts of hyaline hairs on the thallus of Fucus vesiculosus. Flow was a major determinant of DBL thickness, where higher flow decreased DBL thickness and increased O2 flux between the algal thallus and the surrounding seawater. However, the topography of the DBL varied and did not directly follow the contour of the underlying thallus. Areas around single tufts of hyaline hairs exhibited a more complex mass-transfer boundary layer, showing both increased and decreased thickness when compared with areas over smooth thallus surfaces. Over thallus areas with several hyaline hair tufts, the overall effect was an apparent increase in the boundary layer thickness. We also found indications for advective O2 transport driven by pressure gradients or vortex shedding downstream from dense tufts of hyaline hairs that could alleviate local mass-transfer resistances. Mass-transfer dynamics around hyaline hair tufts are thus more complex than hitherto assumed and may have important implications for algal physiology and plant-microbe interactions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nabil, M; Decuzzi, P; Zunino, P

    2015-10-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively.

  11. Enhancement of mass transfer by ultrasound: Application to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ye

    2016-07-01

    The physical mechanisms of heat and mass transfer enhancement by ultrasound have been identified by people. Basically, the effect of 'cavitation' induced by ultrasound is the main reason for the enhancement of heat and mass transfer in a liquid environment, and the acoustic streaming and vibration are the main reasons for that in a gaseous environment. The adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration are typical heat and mass transfer process, and the intensification of the two processes by ultrasound is of complete feasibility. This paper makes an overview on recent studies regarding applications of power ultrasound to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration. The concerned adsorbents include desiccant materials (typically like silica gel) for air dehumidification and other ones (typically active carbon and polymeric resin) for water treatment. The applications of ultrasound in the regeneration of these adsorbents have been proved to be energy saving. The concerned foods are mostly fruits and vegetables. Although the ultrasonic treatment may cause food degradation or nutrient loss, it can greatly reduce the food processing time and decrease drying temperature. From the literature, it can be seen that the ultrasonic conditions (i.e., acoustic frequency and power levels) are always focused on during the study of ultrasonic applications. The increasing number of relevant studies argues that ultrasound is a very promising technology applied to the adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Zunino, P.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively. PMID:26587251

  13. Numerical study of mass transfer of a material under intense flows of high-speed electrons and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyvi, A. Ya; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the mechanisms of mass transfer in a material under compressive plasma flows. The work contains numerical studies on mass loss from the surface of a sample treated by Compressive Plasma Flow, in the first case, and by High-Current Electron Beam, in the second case. The mass ablated from the material surface was computed with BETAIN software. The effects of plasma flow pressure on mass transfer of the material and processes of formation of the molten layer and erosion of mass from the material surface were investigated. It was revealed that plasma flow pressure formed a shock-compressed layer on the sample, and molten liquid was displaced from the center to peripheral regions. If sample size is less than the diameter of plasma spot, the melt is displaced out of the sample. This approach can explain experimental values of molten thickness and mass loss.

  14. Coupling of mass transfer and reactive transport for nonlinear reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, M.; Carrera, J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Silva, O.; Dentz, M.

    2010-07-01

    Fast chemical reactions are driven by mixing-induced chemical disequilibrium. Mixing is poorly represented by the advection-dispersion equation. Instead, effective dynamics models, such as multirate mass transfer (MRMT), have been successful in reproducing observed field-scale transport, notably, breakthrough curves (BTCs) of conservative solutes. The objective of this work is to test whether such effective models, derived from conservative transport observations, can be used to describe effective multicomponent reactive transport in heterogeneous media. We use a localized formulation of the MRMT model that allows us to solve general reactive transport problems. We test this formulation on a simple three-species mineral precipitation problem at equilibrium. We first simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of mineral precipitation rates in synthetic hydraulically heterogeneous aquifers. We then compare these reaction rates to those corresponding to an equivalent (i.e., same conservative BTC) homogenized medium with transport characterized by a nonlocal in time equation involving a memory function. We find an excellent agreement between the two models in terms of cumulative precipitated mass for a broad range of generally stationary heterogeneity structures. These results indicate that mass transfer models can be considered to represent quite accurately the large-scale effective dynamics of mixing controlled reactive transport at least for the cases tested here, where individual transport paths sample the full range of heterogeneities represented by the BTC.

  15. Coupling of Mass Transfer and Reactive Transport for Non-Linear Reactions in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, M.; Carrera Ramirez, J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Silva, O.; Dentz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Fast chemical reactions are driven by mixing-induced chemical disequilibrium. Mixing is poorly represented by the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE). Instead, effective dynamics models, such as Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) amongst others, have been successful in reproducing observed field scale transport, notably breakthrough curves (BTCs) of conservative solutes. The objective of this work is to test whether such effective models, derived from conservative transport observations, can be used to describe effective multicomponent reactive transport in heterogeneous media. We use a localized formulation of the MRMT model that allows us to solve general reactive transport problems. We test this formulation on a simple three species mineral precipitation problem at equilibrium. We first simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of mineral precipitation rates in synthetic hydraulically heterogeneous aquifers. We then compare these reaction rates to those corresponding to an equivalent (i.e. same conservative BTC) homogenized medium with transport characterized by a non-local in time equation involving a memory function. We find an excellent agreement between the two models in terms of cumulative precipitated mass for a broad range of generally stationary heterogeneity structures. These results indicate that mass transfer models can be considered to represent quite accurately the large scale effective dynamics of mixing controlled reactive transport.

  16. Heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire: an experimental and analytical study

    Treesearch

    J. A. Mardini; A. S. Lavine; V. K.. Dhir

    1996-01-01

    Abstract--An experimental and analytical study of heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire is presented in this paper. The goal of this study is to understand the processes of heat and mass transfer in wood during wildland fires. A mathematical model is developed to describe the processes of heating, drying and pyrolysis of wood until ignition...

  17. Development of a correlation for aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, Andrew; Imhoff, Paul T.; Miller, Cass T.

    1995-03-01

    In many situations vapor-phase extraction procedures (e.g., soil venting, air sparging, and bioventing) may be suitable methods for remediating porous media contaminated by volatile organic compounds. This has led to increased study of operative processes in these systems, including aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer. Past work has shown the importance of the flow regime on this process, but a quantitative estimate of mass-transfer coefficients is lacking, especially for systems not confounded by uncertainties involving interfacial area between the phases. An experimental investigation was conducted to isolate the resistance to aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer at the phase boundary, using an ideal porous medium system. Mass-transfer coefficients were measured for toluene for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. An empirical model was fit to the data in dimensionless form. The mass-transfer model was coupled with an available interfacial area model, yielding a dimensionless expression for the mass-transfer rate coefficient. This expression was used to compare results from this work to three other experimental studies reported in the literature. These comparisons showed that for experiments where infiltrating water flowed uniformly within the porous medium, the predicted mass-transfer coefficients were within a factor of 5 of the measured coefficients. Mass transfer was significantly slower than the rate predicted, using the results from this work, in experiments where infiltrating water flowed nonuniformly.

  18. Heat and mass transfer from a supercritical LOX spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegini, H.; Chaturvedi, S. K.; Kondic, N.

    1991-12-01

    The injection, evaporation and diffusion of liquid oxygen in a high pressure airstream in a parallel wall mixing channel is analyzed and computationally solved. The droplet evaporation in the supercritical environment is treated by a nonisothermal droplet heat transfer model which accounts for the finite thermal conductivity of oxygen droplets and the gas film. The nonideal gas effects in the gas phase are modeled by the Redlich-Kwong equation of state. The mixture density and enthalpy are determined by applying the ideal-solution limit which is shown to be valid for the prevailing conditions. The coupled dynamics of droplet and gas phases is calculated by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions. The turbulence effects are modeled by a two equation (k-epsilon) model. The results show that the nonideal gas behavior prevails over a large portion of the mixing channel. Furthermore, the injected liquid oxygen droplets achieve critical temperature very quickly, and as a result they evaporate in the vicinity of the injection point. The effects of injection angle on oxygen mixing characteristics is also investigated.

  19. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium for low volatility alkanes in BPL activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mahle, John J; Furtado, Amanda M B; Glover, T Grant; Buchanan, James H; Peterson, Gregory W; LeVan, M Douglas

    2013-03-05

    The structure of a molecule and its concentration can strongly influence diffusional properties for transport in nanoporous materials. We study mass transfer of alkanes in BPL activated carbon using the concentration-swing frequency response method, which can easily discriminate among mass transfer mechanisms. We measure concentration-dependent diffusion rates for n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, 2,7-dimethyloctane, and cyclodecane, which have different carbon numbers and geometries: straight chain, branched chain, and cyclic. Micropore diffusion is determined to be the controlling mass transfer resistance except at low relative saturation for n-decane, where an external mass transfer resistance also becomes important, showing that the controlling mass transfer mechanism can change with system concentration. Micropore diffusion coefficients are found to be strongly concentration dependent. Adsorption isotherm slopes obtained from measured isotherms, the concentration-swing frequency response method, and a predictive method show reasonably good agreement.

  20. Mechanisms for improving mass transfer in food with ultrasound technology: Describing the phenomena in two model cases.

    PubMed

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate how ultrasound mechanisms (direct and indirect effects) improve the mass transfer phenomena in food processing, and which part of the process they are more effective in. Two model cases were evaluated: the hydration of sorghum grain (with two water activities) and the influx of a pigment into melon cylinders. Different treatments enabled us to evaluate and discriminate both direct (inertial flow and "sponge effect") and indirect effects (micro channel formation), alternating pre-treatments and treatments using an ultrasonic bath (20 kHz of frequency and 28 W/L of volumetric power) and a traditional water-bath. It was demonstrated that both the effects of ultrasound technology are more effective in food with higher water activity, the micro channels only forming in moist food. Moreover, micro channel formation could also be observed using agar gel cylinders, verifying the random formation of these due to cavitation. The direct effects were shown to be important in mass transfer enhancement not only in moist food, but also in dry food, this being improved by the micro channels formed and the porosity of the food. In conclusion, the improvement in mass transfer due to direct and indirect effects was firstly discriminated and described. It was proven that both phenomena are important for mass transfer in moist foods, while only the direct effects are important for dry foods. Based on these results, better processing using ultrasound technology can be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  2. Heat and Mass Transfer with Condensation in Capillary Porous Bodies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study. PMID:24688366

  3. Heat and mass transfer with condensation in capillary porous bodies.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Salah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study.

  4. Ionic liquid matrix-enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry: the role of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Jennifer J; Walker, Amy V

    2013-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are effective matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). In this paper, we examine the role of proton transfer in the mechanism of secondary ion enhancement using IL matrices in SIMS. We employ hydrogenated and deuterated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) as analytes to investigate the origin of proton transfer. The data indicate that protons from the IL anion transfer to the analyte in solution leading to an increase in the secondary ion intensity of the protonated molecular ion. The chemical identity of the matrix cation also affects analyte signal intensities. Using deuterated DPPC we observe that protons (deuterium) from the DPPC tail group react with the cation of the IL liquid leading to an increase in (cation + D)(+) ion intensities. Further, the data suggest that the transfer kinetics of deuterium (hydrogen) is correlated with the secondary ion enhancements observed. The highest secondary ion enhancements are observed for the least sterically hindered cation. Neither the proton affinity nor the pKa of the IL cation have a large effect on the analyte ion intensities, suggesting that steric factors are important in determining the efficacy of IL matrices for a given analyte.

  5. Development of a model to determine mass transfer coefficient and oxygen solubility in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Johnny

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an experimentally validated mechanistic model to predict the oxygen transfer rate coefficient (Kla) in aeration tanks for different water temperatures. Using experimental data created by Hunter and Vogelaar, the formula precisely reproduces experimental results for the standardized Kla at 20 °C, comparatively better than the current model used by ASCE 2-06 based on the equation Kla20 = Kla. ([Formula: see text])((20-T)) where T is in °C. Currently, reported values for [Formula: see text] range from 1.008 to 1.047. Because it is a geometric function, large error can result if an incorrect value of [Formula: see text] is used. Establishment of such value for an aeration system can only be made by means of series of full scale testing over a range of temperatures required. The new model predicts oxygen transfer coefficients to within 1% error compared to observed measurements. This is a breakthrough since the correct prediction of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (Kla) is a crucial step in the design, operation and scale up of bioreactors including wastewater treatment plant aeration tanks, and the equation developed allows doing so without resorting to multiple full scale testing for each individual tank under the same testing condition for different temperatures. The effect of temperature on the transfer rate coefficient Kla is explored in this paper, and it is recommended to replace the current model by this new model given by: [Formula: see text] where T is in degree Kelvin, and the subscripts refer to degree Celsius; E, ρ, σ are properties of water. Furthermore, using data from published data on oxygen solubility in water, it was found that solubility bears a linear and inverse relationship with the mass transfer coefficient.

  6. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  7. Carbon monoxide mass transfer for syngas fermentation in a stirred tank reactor with dual impeller configurations.

    PubMed

    Ungerman, Andrew J; Heindel, Theodore J

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the power demand and gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient, kLa, in a stirred tank reactor (STR) (T = 0.211 m) using different impeller designs and schemes in a carbon monoxide-water system, which is applicable to synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation. Eleven different impeller schemes were tested over a range of operating conditions typically associated with the "after large cavity" region (ALC) of a Rushton-type turbine (D/T = 0.35). It is found that the dual Rushton-type impeller scheme exhibits the highest volumetric mass transfer rates for all operating conditions; however, it also displays the lowest mass transfer performance (defined as the volumetric mass transfer coefficient per unit power input) for all conditions due to its high power consumption. Dual impeller schemes with an axial flow impeller as the top impeller show improved mass transfer rates without dramatic increases in power draw. At high gas flow rates, dual impeller schemes with a lower concave impeller have kLa values similar to those of the Rushton-type dual impeller schemes but show improved mass transfer performance. It is believed that the mass transfer performance can be further enhanced for the bottom concave impeller schemes by operating at conditions beyond the ALC region defined for Rushton-type impellers because the concave impeller can handle higher gas flow rates prior to flooding.

  8. A Simplified Mass-Transfer Model for Visual Pigments in Amphibian Retinal-Cone Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Paul W.; Howle, Laurens E.; Murray, Mark M.; Corless, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    When radiolabeled precursors and autoradiography are used to investigate turnover of protein components in photoreceptive cone outer segments (COSs), the labeled components—primarily visual pigment molecules (opsins)—are diffusely distributed along the COS. To further assess this COS labeling pattern, we derive a simplified mass-transfer model for quantifying the contributions of advective and diffusive mechanisms to the distribution of opsins within COSs of the frog retina. Two opsin-containing regions of the COS are evaluated: the core axial array of disks and the plasmalemma. Numerical solutions of the mass-transfer model indicate three distinct stages of system evolution. In the first stage, plasmalemma diffusion is dominant. In the second stage, the plasmalemma density reaches a metastable state and transfer between the plasmalemma and disk region occurs, which is followed by an increase in density that is qualitatively similar for both regions. The final stage consists of both regions slowly evolving to the steady-state solution. Our results indicate that autoradiographic and cognate approaches for tracking labeled opsins in the COS cannot be effective methodologies for assessing new disk formation at the base of the COS. PMID:21281566

  9. Mass Transfer from Gas Bubbles to Impinging Flow of Biological Fluids with Chemical Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jei; Echigo, R.; Wotton, D. R.; Ou, J. W.; Hwang, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The rates of mass transfer from a gas bubble to an impinging flow of a biological fluid such as whole blood and plasma are investigated analytically and experimentally. Gases commonly found dissolved in body fluids are included. Consideration is given to the effects of the chemical reaction between the dissolved gas and the liquid on the rate of mass transfer. Through the application of boundary layer theory the over-all transfer is found to be Sh/(Re)1/2 = 0.845 Sc1/3 in the absence of chemical reaction, and Sh/(Re) 1/2 = F′ (0) in the presence of chemical reaction, where Sh, Re, and Sc are the Sherwood, Reynolds, and Schmidt numbers, respectively, and F′ (0) is a function of Sc and the dimensionless reaction rate constant. Analytical results are also obtained for the bubble lifetime and the bubble radius-time history. These results, which are not incompatible with experimental results, can be applied to predict the dissolution of the entrapped gas emboli in the circulatory system of the human body. PMID:4642218

  10. Solutions for a mass transfer process governed by fractional diffusion equations with reaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzi, E. K.; dos Santos, M. A. F.; Lenzi, M. K.; Menechini Neto, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the behavior of a mass transfer process governed by a set of fractional diffusion equations coupled by appropriate reaction terms. The presence of memory effects in the diffusive term is also considered. For this set of equations, we obtain solutions and analyze the influence of the reaction terms on the spreading of these solutions. Particularly, we observe that for reversible reaction processes the reaction terms play an important role for intermediate times and for long times the processes are essentially governed by the bulk equations. These results show a rich class of behaviors which can be connected to sub- or superdiffusive regime.

  11. MASS TRANSFER VARIATIONS IN UX MONOCEROTIS: EIGHT YEARS OF AUTOMATED PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edward C.; Henry, Gregory W.; ETZEL, PAUL B. E-mail: henry@schwab.tsuniv.edu

    2009-11-15

    We analyze eight years (1999-2007) of automated photometric observations of the active Algol binary UX Monocerotis to search for mass transfer bursts similar to those seen in U Cephei. The largest photometric anomaly is the mean gainer luminosity difference between the stream-impact hemisphere and the opposite hemisphere. We find an updated Wilson-Devinney solution for earlier six-color observations. The UX Mon donor star fills its Roche lobe and the gainer nearly fills its rotational lobe. Instead of isolated bursts of the U Cep type, we found nearly continuous brightness fluctuations likely produced by variable mass transfer. We discuss implications for mass transfer.

  12. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  13. Model of Mass Transfer in Liquid-Liquid Extraction in a Turbulent Forward Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Farakhov, T. M.; Dudarovskaya, O. G.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical description of the process of mass transfer in a continuous phase in the turbulent motion of two mutually insoluble liquids has been obtained on the basis of an assigned law of damping of turbulent pulsations in the boundary layer. The basic parameters of the model have been found in terms of the hydraulic resistance of a droplet in motion. Consideration has been given to the use of the mathematical mass-transfer model in apparatuses with mixing devices. Agreement has been shown between results of calculation of mass-transfer coefficients and experimental data.

  14. nTiO2 mass transfer and deposition behavior in an aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiuzhen; He, Junhui; Wang, Meng; Fang, Jinfeng; Chen, Jinyuan; Lv, Bosheng

    2016-12-01

    Nano-TiO2 (nTiO2) is widely used in industry, and some of it is inevitably released into natural aquatic environments. nTiO2 can be deposited on the streambed or transported along the stream and streambed, and it can also undergo exchange-transfer processes in these systems. The behavior of nTiO2 in rivers includes deposition-transfer processes in the stream and exchange-transfer processes between the stream and streambed. In this work, the deposition, mass transfer, exchange, and aggregation behavior of nTiO2 in a simulated river were studied as a function of the solution pH, stream velocity, and anionic, cationic, and neutral surfactant concentrations. In these experiments, a recirculating flume was used to simulate a natural stream. The nTiO2 deposition and aggregation phenomena in the river and streambed were characterized. Of the three surfactants studied, the anionic surfactant enhanced the nTiO2 stability in the river and limited its aggregation most effectively, resulting in slow nTiO2 deposition and nTiO2 transport over long distances. This study provides information about nanoparticle transport phenomena in simulated natural aquatic systems.

  15. Heat and mass transfer enhancement of nanofluids flow in the presence of metallic/metallic-oxides spherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar; Ali, Kashif; Iqbal, M. Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shazad

    2017-01-01

    The numerical study of heat and mass transfer for an incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid flow containing spherical shaped nanoparticles through a channel with moving porous walls is presented. Further, another endeavour is to study the effect of two types of fluids, namely the metallic nanofluid (Au + water) and metallic-oxides nanofluid (TiO2 + water) are studied. The phenomena of spherical metallic and metallic-oxides nanoparticles have been also mathematically modelled by using the Hamilton-Crosser model. The influence of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the problem is discussed. The outcome of the investigation may be beneficial to the application of biotechnology and industrial purposes. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analysed.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of autotrophic N removal by a granule based bioreactor: Influence of mass transfer versus microbial kinetics.

    PubMed

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist V; Smets, Barth F; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-11-01

    A comprehensive and global sensitivity analysis was conducted under a range of operating conditions. The relative importance of mass transfer resistance versus kinetic parameters was studied and found to depend on the operating regime as follows: Operating under the optimal loading ratio of 1.90(gO(2)/m(3)/d)/(gN/m(3)/d), the system was influenced by mass transfer (10% impact on nitrogen removal) and performance was limited by AOB activity (75% impact on nitrogen removal), while operating above, AnAOB activity was limiting (68% impact on nitrogen removal). The negative effect of oxygen mass transfer had an impact of 15% on nitrogen removal. Summarizing such quantitative analyses led to formulation of an optimal operation window, which serves a valuable tool for diagnosis of performance problems and identification of optimal solutions in nitritation/anammox applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in a vertical double passage channel filled with electrically conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umavathi, Jawali C.; Kumar, J. Prathap; Sheremet, Mikhail A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of first order chemical reaction in a vertical double passage channel in the presence of applied electric field. The wall and ambient medium are maintained at constant but different temperatures and concentrations and the heat and mass transfer occur from the wall to the medium. The channel is divided into two passages by means of a thin perfectly conducting baffle. The coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved analytically by using regular perturbation method (PM) valid for small values of Brinkman number. To understand the flow structure for large values of Brinkman number the governing equations are also solved by differential transform method (DTM) which is a semi-analytical method. The effects of thermal Grashof number (GrT = 1 , 5 , 10 , 15), mass Grashof number (GrC = 1 , 5 , 10 , 15), Brinkman number (Br = 0 , 0.1 , 0.5 , 1), first order chemical reaction parameter (α = 0.1 , 0.5 , 1 , 1.5), Hartmann number (M = 4 , 6 , 8 , 10) and electrical field load parameter (E = - 2 , - 1 , 0 , 1 , 2) on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles, volumetric flow rate, total heat rate, skin friction and Nusselt number are analyzed. It was found that the thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and Brinkman number enhances the flow whereas the Hartmann number and chemical reaction parameter suppresses the flow ​field. Also the obtained results have revealed that the heat transfer enhancement depends on the baffle position.

  18. Heat and mass transfer characteristics of absorption of R134a into DMAC in a horizontal tube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikrishnan, L.; Maiya, M. P.; Tiwari, S.; Wohlfeil, A.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a horizontal tube absorber for the mixture R134a/DMAC in terms of experimentally gained heat and mass transfer coefficients are presented. The heat transfer coefficient is mainly dependent on the solution’s mass flow rate. The mass transfer coefficient is strongly related to the subcooling of the solution. The data are compared to experimental absorption characteristics of water into aqueous lithium bromide in an absorption chiller. The mass transfer coefficients are of similar size whereas the heat transfer coefficients are about one order of magnitude smaller for R134a-DMAC.

  19. Electrochemical simulations of mass transfer from isolated wet spots and droplets on realistic fluttering leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Monique Y.; Schuepp, Peter H.; Thurtell, George W.

    1986-03-01

    This paper reports on forced-convection mass transfer from isolated discs on rectangular plates as well as hemispheres on realistic fluttering leaves. An electrochemical method was used where the convective transfer of ions to the test electrode (the droplet or the wet spot) in an electrolytic flow system was measured as a function of flow rates, sizes of discs and hemispheres. Measurements showed that the local transfer coefficient for uniformly transferring plates varied as expected while the transfer from isolated discs on plates was much less a function of the distance from the leading edge. An expression to describe the transfer coefficient for an isolated disc as a function of distance from the leading edge was determined. An expression describing the transfer from hemispherical drops on fluttering leaves was derived and compared with the predictions from transfer theory for a sphere in free space.

  20. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  1. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  2. Evaluation of the mass transfer process on thin layer drying of papaya seeds from the perspective of diffusive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotto, Guilherme Luiz; Meili, Lucas; Tanabe, Eduardo Hiromitsu; Chielle, Daniel Padoin; Moreira, Marcos Flávio Pinto

    2017-09-01

    The mass transfer process that occurs in the thin layer drying of papaya seeds was studied under different conditions. The external mass transfer resistance and the dependence of effective diffusivity (D EFF ) in relation to the moisture ratio ( \\overline{MR} ) and temperature (T) were investigated from the perspective of diffusive models. It was verified that the effective diffusivity was affected by the moisture content and temperature. A new correlation was proposed for drying of papaya seeds in order to describe these influences. Regarding the use of diffusive models, the results showed that, at conditions of low drying rates (T ≤ 70 °C), the external mass transfer resistance, as well as the dependence of the effective diffusivity with respect to the temperature and moisture content should be considered. At high drying rates (T > 90 °C), the dependence of the effective diffusivity with respect to the temperature and moisture content can be neglected, but the external mass transfer resistance was still considerable in the range of air velocities used in this work.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. W.; Pan, Z. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper investigates the transient heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions. Using local volumetric average approach, one-dimensional non-equilibrium heat and mass transfer models are developed to describe the humid air and liquid desiccant interaction at counter flow configuration. Using triethylene glycol solution as desiccant, some experimental studies are completed. Experimental results are used to justify the numerical models. Numerical results are then obtained to demonstrate process characteristics. The models include a transient desiccant flow model for initial liquid desiccant building-up process, empirical wetted specific surface ratio for mass transfer, and heat and mass transfer coefficients. The objective of this research is to develop a process analytical tool for liquid desiccant air-conditioner design.

  4. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  5. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  6. Spanwise mass transfer variations on a cylinder in 'nominally' uniform crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayle, R. E.; Marziale, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mass transfer experiments on a circular cylinder in a 'nominally' uniform crossflow are described. Experiments were conducted at the tunnel's turbulence level and with a woven-wire turbulence screen. In both cases spanwise and circumferential mass transfer measurements were made. Without the turbulence screen, the results were found to be spanwise independent and agreed quite well with both theory and the result of others. In addition to the mass transfer measurements, spanwise traverse measurements of the mean velocity and turbulence quantities in the incident flow were made and showed that the screen produced a small-amplitude spanwise periodic perturbation in the incident flow. Although this perturbation was only one quarter of a percent in the mean velocity and buried in the stream's turbulence, disproportionately large spanwise variations of 15 percent were found in the mass transfer rate.

  7. Fluid-dynamic and mass-transfer behavior of static mixers and regular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Cavatorta, O.N.; Boehm, U.; Chiappori de del Giorgio, A.M.

    1999-05-01

    The fluid dynamics and liquid-to-wall mass transfer for spaced and stacked regular packings were studied for forced convection and fluidized beds. The behavior of these configurations in bubble columns and under natural convection conditions is also presented. Flow parameters characterizing structured packings, presented in the literature, were used in the evaluation of results. General equations to predict pressure drop and mass transfer are discussed, as well as the relationship between energy dissipation and mass transfer. In the presence of fluidized particles, single-phase flow or natural convection conditions, the mass-transfer behavior of a packing element stacked between other packs or separated from the neighboring elements by liquid layers is almost the same, but differs in bubble columns.

  8. Mass transfer in countercurrent packed columns: Application to supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction of terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, P.C.; Matos, H.A.; Carmelo, P.J.; Gomes de Azevedo, E.; Nunes da Ponte, M. . Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia)

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an alternative separation method to more conventional processes such as liquid extraction and distillation. However, up to now, few works have been devoted to the investigation of the efficiency of countercurrent packed columns under supercritical conditions from a mass transfer point of view. Mass transfer in a countercurrent column, filled with structured gauze packing, was measured for the separation of a mixture of terpenes (d-limonene/1,8-cineole) by supercritical carbon dioxide, at 313 and 318 K and pressures up to 9 MPa. The extraction efficiency was determined in terms of the overall mass transfer coefficient. Operating lines for this process had an appreciable curvature due to a high miscibility of the two contacting phases. The real slope of these lines had to be estimated. Available mass transfer models for packed columns predicted efficiencies diverging to a great extent from the experimental results.

  9. Improving mass transfer to soften tissues by pulsed electric fields: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, E; Luengo, E; Álvarez, I; Raso, J

    2012-01-01

    The mass transfer phenomenon occurs in many operations of the food industry with the purpose of obtaining a given substance of interest, removing water from foods, or introducing a given substance into the food matrix. Pretreatments that modify the permeability of the cell membranes, such as grinding, heating, or enzymatic treatment, enhance the mass transfer. However, these techniques may require a significant amount of energy and can cause losses of valuable food compounds. Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology is a nonthermal processing method that causes permeabilization of cell membranes using low energy requirements and minimizing quality deterioration of the food compounds. Many practical applications of PEF for enhancing mass transfer in the food industry have been investigated. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the state of the art of application of PEF for improving mass transfer in the food industry.

  10. OVERALL MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM SMALL WATER POOLS UNDER SIMULATED INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small chamber tests were conducted to experimentally determine the overall mass transfer coefficient for pollutant emissions from still water under simulated indoor-residential or occupational-environmental conditions. Fourteen tests were conducted in small environmental chambers...

  11. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials.

  12. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials. PMID:28224986

  13. The response of a dwarf nova disc to real mass transfer variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hessman, F. V.

    2000-06-01

    We present simulations of dwarf nova outbursts taking into account realistic variations of the mass loss rate from the secondary. The mass transfer variation has been derived from 20 years of visual monitoring and from X-ray observations covering various accretion states of the discless cataclysmic variable AM Herculis. We find that the outburst behaviour of a fictitious dwarf nova with the same system parameters as AM Her is strongly influenced by these variations of the mass loss rate. Depending on the mass loss rate, the disc produces either long outbursts, a cycle of one long outburst followed by two short outbursts, or only short outbursts. The course of the transfer rate dominates the shape of the outbursts because the mass accreted during an outburst cycle roughly equals the mass transferred from the secondary over the outburst interval. Only for less than 10% of the simulated time, when the mass transfer rate is nearly constant, the disc is in a quasi-stationary state during which it periodically repeats the same cycle of outbursts. Consequently, assuming that the secondary stars in non-magnetic CV's do not differ from those in magnetic ones, our simulation indicates that probably all dwarf novae are rarely in a stationary state and are constantly adjusting to the prevailing value of the mass transfer rate from the secondary.

  14. Cold Model Study on Mass-Transfer Enhancement at Gas-Liquid Interfaces Exposed to Sound Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Sergey V.; Noriki, Naotaka; Osada, Katsuoki; Kuwabara, Mamoru; Sano, Masamichi

    2007-10-01

    Recent studies show that sonic or ultrasonic oscillations can provide an attractive tool in enhancing mass-transfer rates in fluid media. An especially significant enhancement can be obtained for the interface mass transfer due to the ability of acoustic energy to be transferred through homogeneous fluids with little energy loss and to be greatly dissipated at the interfaces. In pyrometallurgical processes, many chemical reactions proceed at the interface between gas and molten bath under gas- or liquid-phase mass-transfer control. In the present study, cold model experiments were performed to examine whether the sonic irradiation can be useful for the enhancement of such reactions. In the experiments, the rates of three gas-liquid absorption reactions were measured under different experimental conditions that include blowing of the gas onto the interface, exposing the interface to sound waves and agitating the bath with an impeller. The experimental results showed that the sound waves are able to enhance the rate of reaction if it is fully or partly controlled by the gas-phase mass transfer. Within the frequency range of 0.53 ˜15 kHz, sound waves of higher frequencies were more effective in enhancing the gas-phase mass transfer. Besides, the enhancement effect was found to be larger under resonant-like conditions. Additional experiments revealed that sound waves impose oscillations on gas flowing above the free surface that imparts turbulent-like characteristics to the gas flow even if it is originally laminar. It is assumed that these acoustically imposed oscillations play the key role in enhancing the effective diffusion coefficient at the gas-liquid interface.

  15. Modified supercritical antisolvent method with enhanced mass transfer to fabricate drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kakran, Mitali; Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Antipina, Maria N; Li, Lin

    2013-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to modify the supercritical antisolvent precipitation method to enhance the mass transfer in order to prepare smaller nanoparticles of drugs. The supercritical antisolvent apparatus was customized by introducing a titanium horn in the precipitation chamber for generation of the ultrasonic field for enhanced mass transfer and the method was called supercritical antisolvent with enhanced mass transfer (SAS-EM). The effects of flow rate, ultrasonic amplitude, drug concentration and flow time on the particle size were investigated. The results showed that increasing the flow rate, incrementing the ultrasonic power up to an optimum point, decreasing the drug concentration and reducing the flow time helped to achieve smaller quercetin particles in the range of 120-450 nm. It is also shown that there is a tradeoff between the particle size and the yield; therefore the process parameters can be selected based on the particle size requirement. DSC studies suggested that the crystallinity of SAS-EM prepared quercetin nanoparticles decreased as compared to original quercetin powder. The dissolution of SAS-EM prepared nanoparticles increased significantly in comparison with the original quercetin powder. However, there was no significant difference in the dissolution of various quercetin nanoparticles samples prepared by the SAS-EM process. The best dissolution percent achieved was 75% for the smallest size sample prepared at the flow rate of 5 ml/min, power supply of 200 W, drug concentration of 10mg/ml, and flow time of 4 min. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Assessment of advective porewater movement affecting mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants in marine intertidal sediment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Moffett, Kevan B; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Advective porewater movement and molecular diffusion are important factors affecting the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in marsh and mudflat sediments. This study assessed porewater movement in an intertidal mudflat in South Basin adjacent to Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA, where a pilot-scale test of sorbent amendment assessed the in situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To quantify advective porewater movement within the top 0-60 cm sediment layer, we used temperature as a tracer and conducted heat transport analysis using 14-day data from multidepth sediment temperature logging stations and one-dimensional heat transport simulations. The best-fit conditions gave an average Darcy velocity of 3.8cm/d in the downward vertical direction for sorbent-amended sediment with a plausible range of 0 cm/d to 8 cm/d. In a limiting case with no net advection, the best-fit depth-averaged mechanical dispersion coefficient was 2.2x10(-7) m2/s with a range of 0.9x10(-7) m2/s to 5.6x10(-7) m2/s. The Peclet number for PCB mobilization showed that molecular diffusion would control PCB mass transfer from sediment to sorbent particles for the case of uniform distribution of sorbent. However, the advective flow and mechanical dispersion in the test site would significantly benefit the stabilization effect of heterogeneously distributed sorbent by acting to smooth out the heterogeneities and homogenizing pollutant concentrations across the entire bioactive zone. These measurements and modeling techniques on intertidal sediment porewater transport could be useful for the development of more reliable mass transfer models for the prediction of contaminant release within the sediment bed, the movement of HOCs in the intertidal aquatic environment, and in situ sequestration by sorbent addition.

  17. Exposure chamber measurements of mass transfer and partitioning at the plant/air interface.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Randy L; McKone, Thomas E; Kado, Norman Y

    2002-08-15

    Dynamic measures of air and vegetation concentrations in an exposure chamber and a two-box mass balance model are used to quantify factors that control the rate and extent of chemical partitioning between vegetation and the atmosphere. A continuous stirred flow-through exposure chamber was used to investigate the gas-phase transfer of pollutants between air and plants. A probabilistic two-compartment mass balance model of plant/air exchange within the exposure chamber was developed and used with measured concentrations from the chamber to simultaneously evaluate partitioning (Kpa), overall mass transfer across the plant/air interface (Upa), and loss rates in the atmosphere (Ra) and aboveground vegetation (Rp). The approach is demonstrated using mature Capsicum annuum (bell pepper) plants exposed to phenanthrene (PH), anthracene (AN), fluoranthene (FL) and pyrene (PY). Measured values of log Kpa (V[air]/V[fresh plant]) were 5.7, 5.7, 6.0, and 6.2 for PH, AN, FL, and PY, respectively. Values of Upa (m d(-1)) under the conditions of this study ranged from 42 for PH to 119 for FL. After correcting for wall effects, the estimated reaction half-lives in air were 3, 9, and 25 h for AN, FL and PY. Reaction half-lives in the plant compartment were 17, 6, 17, and 5 d for PH, AN, FL, and PY, respectively. The combined use of exposure chamber measurements and models provides a robust tool for simultaneously measuring several different transfer factors that are important for modeling the uptake of pollutants into vegetation.

  18. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  19. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  20. Tube-side mass transfer for hollow fibre membrane contactors operated in the low Graetz range.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Mercer, E; Kamranvand, F; Williams, L; Kolios, A; Parker, A; Tyrrel, S; Cartmell, E; McAdam, E J

    2017-02-01

    Transformation of the tube-side mass transfer coefficient derived in hollow fibre membrane contactors (HFMC) of different characteristic length scales (equivalent diameter and fibre length) has been studied when operated in the low Graetz range (Gz<10). Within the low Gz range, mass transfer is generally described by the Graetz problem (Sh=3.67) which assumes that the concentration profile comprises a constant shape over the fibre radius. In this study, it is experimentally evidenced that this assumption over predicts mass transfer within the low Graetz range. Furthermore, within the low Gz range (below 2), a proportional relationship between the experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) and the Graetz number has been identified. For Gz numbers below 2, the experimental Sh number approached unity, which suggests that mass transfer is strongly dependent upon diffusion. However, within this diffusion controlled region of mass transfer, tube-side fluid velocity remained important. For Gz numbers above 2, Sh could be satisfactorily described by extension to the Lévêque solution, which can be ascribed to the constrained growth of the concentration boundary layer adjacent to the fibre wall. Importantly this study demonstrates that whilst mass transfer in the low Graetz range does not explicitly conform to either the Graetz problem or classical Lévêque solution, it is possible to transform the experimentally derived overall mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) between characteristic length scales (dh and L). T h is was corroborated by comparison of the empirical relationship determined in this study (Sh=0.36Gz) with previously published studies operated in the low Gz range. This analysis provides important insight for process design when slow tube-side flows, or low Schmidt numbers (coincident with gases) constrain operation of hollow fibre membrane contactors to the low Gz range.

  1. The evolution of the mass-transfer functions in liquid Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.

    2016-09-15

    The results of analytic and numerical investigation of mass-transfer processes in nonideal liquid systems are reported. Calculations are performed for extended 2D and 3D systems of particles that interact with a screened Yukawa-type Coulomb potential. The main attention is paid to 2D structures. A new analytic model is proposed for describing the evolution of mass-transfer functions in systems of interacting particles, including the transition between the ballistic and diffusion regimes of their motion.

  2. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions.

  3. Heat and mass transfer during the cryopreservation of a bioartificial liver device: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Saravana K; Coger, Robin N

    2005-01-01

    Bioartificial liver devices (BALs) have proven to be an effective bridge to transplantation for cases of acute liver failure. Enabling the long-term storage of these devices using a method such as cryopreservation will ensure their easy off the shelf availability. To date, cryopreservation of liver cells has been attempted for both single cells and sandwich cultures. This study presents the potential of using computational modeling to help develop a cryopreservation protocol for storing the three dimensional BAL: Hepatassist. The focus is upon determining the thermal and concentration profiles as the BAL is cooled from 37 degrees C-100 degrees C, and is completed in two steps: a cryoprotectant loading step and a phase change step. The results indicate that, for the loading step, mass transfer controls the duration of the protocol, whereas for the phase change step, when mass transfer is assumed negligible, the latent heat released during freezing is the control factor. The cryoprotocol that is ultimately proposed considers time, cooling rate, and the temperature gradients that the cellular space is exposed to during cooling. To our knowledge, this study is the first reported effort toward designing an effective protocol for the cryopreservation of a three-dimensional BAL device.

  4. Heat and Mass Transfer Measurements for Tray-Fermented Fungal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, R.-Y.; Lo, C.-T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, heat and mass transfer in static tray fermentation, which is widely used in solid-state fermentation (SSF) to produce fungal products, such as enzymes or koji, is investigated. Specifically, kinetic models of transport phenomena in the whole-tray chamber are emphasized. The effects of temperature, moisture, and humidity on microbial growth in large-scale static tray fermentation are essential to scale-up SSF and achieve uniform fermentation. In addition, heat and mass transfer of static tray fermentation of Trichoderma fungi with two tray setups—traditional linen coverings and stacks in a temperature-humidity chamber is examined. In both these setups, the following factors of fermentation were measured: air velocity, air temperature, illumination, pH, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, and substrate temperature, and the effects of bed height, moisture of substrate, and relative humidity of air are studied. A thin (1 cm) bed at 28 °C and 95 % relative humidity is found to be optimum. Furthermore, mixing was essential for achieving uniform fermentation of Trichoderma fungi. This study has important applications in large-scale static tray fermentation of fungi.

  5. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  6. Advanced heat transfer devices based on mass forces in coiled flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovich, Evgeny D.; Tarasevich, Sergei S.; Repnikova, Elena A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced heat transfer devices in the form of different channels where artificial mass forces influence on hydrodynamics stability in low gravity area and argumentation of heat transfer is considered. Experiments are fulfilled with large variety of geometrical forms of channels (inserts in straight tubes, fluted tubes, annular channels with rotation of flow, spiral coils, twisted tubes etc.) and different heat transfer media and their vapor (liquid metals, water, cryogenic liquids). .

  7. Determination of the external mass transfer coefficient and influence of mixing intensity in moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Bruno L; Pérez, Julio; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Secchi, Argimiro R; Dezotti, Márcia; Biscaia, Evaristo C

    2015-09-01

    In moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR), the removal of pollutants from wastewater is due to the substrate consumption by bacteria attached on suspended carriers. As a biofilm process, the substrates are transported from the bulk phase to the biofilm passing through a mass transfer resistance layer. This study proposes a methodology to determine the external mass transfer coefficient and identify the influence of the mixing intensity on the conversion process in-situ in MBBR systems. The method allows the determination of the external mass transfer coefficient in the reactor, which is a major advantage when compared to the previous methods that require mimicking hydrodynamics of the reactor in a flow chamber or in a separate vessel. The proposed methodology was evaluated in an aerobic lab-scale system operating with COD removal and nitrification. The impact of the mixing intensity on the conversion rates for ammonium and COD was tested individually. When comparing the effect of mixing intensity on the removal rates of COD and ammonium, a higher apparent external mass transfer resistance was found for ammonium. For the used aeration intensities, the external mass transfer coefficient for ammonium oxidation was ranging from 0.68 to 13.50 m d(-1) and for COD removal 2.9 to 22.4 m d(-1). The lower coefficient range for ammonium oxidation is likely related to the location of nitrifiers deeper in the biofilm. The measurement of external mass transfer rates in MBBR will help in better design and evaluation of MBBR system-based technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles stimulation to enhance liquid-liquid two-phase mass transfer under static and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Neda; Rahimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Rotating magnetic field (RMF) was applied on a micromixer to break the laminar flow and induce chaotic flow to enhance mass transfer between two-immiscible organic and aqueous phases. The results of RMF were compared to those of static magnetic field (SMF). For this purpose, experiments were carried out in a T-micromixer at equal volumetric flow rates of organic and aqueous phases. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation technique and they were dissolved in organic phase. Results obtained from RMF and SMF were compared in terms of overall volumetric mass transfer coefficient (KLa) and extraction efficiency (E) at various Reynolds numbers. Generally, RMF showed higher effect in mass transfer characteristics enhancement compared with SMF. The influence of rotational speeds of magnets (ω) in RMF was investigated, and measurable enhancements of KLa and E were observed. In RMF, the effect of magnetic field induction (B) was investigated. The results reveal that at constant concentration of nanoparticles, by increasing of B, mass transfer characteristics will be enhanced. The effect of various nanoparticles concentrations (ϕ) within 0.002-0.01 (w/v) on KLa and E at maximum induction of RMF (B=76 mT) was evaluated. Maximum values of KLa (2.1±0.001) and E (0.884±0.001) were achieved for the layout of RMF (B=76 mT), ω=16 rad/s and MNPs concentration of 0.008-0.01 (w/v).

  9. Interfacial mass transfer to a cylinder endwall during spin-up/spin-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrousse, Mark F.; Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The local rate of mass transfer to the bottom endwall of a large aspect ratio cylinder was measured during spin-up/spin-down. The local mass transfer rate was a strong function radial position along the endwall. At the center during spin-up from rest, the maximum enhancement in mass transfer occurred after the Ekman time scale and before the viscous time scale. At the center during spin-down to rest, a stagnation vortex formed, causing the mass transfer rate to decay and then increase back to the original value of the order of the viscous time scale. Away from the center a much more complicated pattern was observed, but spin-up and spin-down were similar. Two peaks in mass transfer rate occurred for an Ekman number over 0.0074. Alternating spin-up and spin-down with a short period caused the center of the endwall to experience a nearly sinusoidal variation in mass transfer with the frequency equal to the forcing frequency. Near the edge the frequency was twice the forcing frequency.

  10. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  11. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-11-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  12. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  13. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. II. Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Finite eccentricities in mass-transferring eccentric binary systems can be explained by taking into account the mass loss and mass transfer processes that often occur in these systems. These processes can be treated as perturbations of the general two-body problem. The time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity derived from perturbative methods are generally phase-dependent. The osculating semimajor axis and eccentricity change over the orbital timescale and are not easy to implement in binary evolution codes like MESA. However, the secular orbital element evolution equations can be simplified by averaging over the rapidly varying true anomalies. In this paper, we derive the secular time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity for various mass loss/transfer processes using either the adiabatic approximation or the assumption of delta-function mass loss/transfer at periastron. We begin with the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. We continue with conservative and non-conservative non-isotropic mass ejection/accretion (including Roche-Lobe-Overflow) for both point-masses and extended bodies. We conclude with the case of phase-dependent mass accretion. Comparison of the derived equations with similar work in the literature is included and an explanation of the existing discrepancies is provided.

  14. Model of neutrino effective masses

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh Nguyen Dinh; Nguyen Thi Hong Van; Nguyen Anh Ky; Phi Quang Van

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that an effective (nonrenormalizable) coupling of lepton multiplets to scalar triplets in the 331 model with sterile/exotic neutrinos, can be a good way for generating neutrino masses of different types. The method is simple and avoids radiative/loop calculations which, sometimes, are long and complicated. Basing on some astrophysical arguments it is also stated that the scale of SU(3){sub L} symmetry breaking is at TeV scale, in agreement with earlier investigations. Or equivalently, starting from this symmetry breaking scale we could have sterile/exotic neutrinos with mass of a few keV's which could be used to explain several astrophysical and cosmological puzzles, such as the dark matter, the fast motion of the observed pulsars, the re-ionization of the Universe, etc.

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Energetic Material Mass Transfer to Soil Pore Water - Project CP-1227 Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    PHELAN, JAMES M.; WEBB, STEPHEN W.; ROMERO, JOSEPH V.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; GRIFFIN, FAWN A.

    2003-01-01

    Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization projects have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g. weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. Experimental work to date with Composition B explosive has shown that column tests typically produce effluents near the temperature dependent solubility limits for RDX and TNT. The influence of water flow rate, temperature, porous media saturation and mass loading is documented. The mass transfer model formulation uses a mass transfer coefficient and surface area function and shows good agreement with the experimental data. Continued experimental work is necessary to evaluate solid phase particle size and 2-dimensional effects, and actual low order detonation debris. Simulation model improvements will continue leading to a capability to complete screening assessments of the impacts of military range operations on groundwater quality.

  16. Mass transfer of a neutral solute in porous microchannel under streaming potential.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2014-03-01

    The mass transport of a neutral solute in a porous wall, under the influence of streaming field, has been analyzed in this study. The effect of the induced streaming field on the electroviscous effect of the fluid for different flow geometries has been suitably quantified. The overall electroosmotic velocity profile and expression for streaming field have been obtained analytically using the Debye-Huckel approximation, and subsequently used in the analysis for the mass transport. The analysis shows that as the solution Debye length increases, the strength of the streaming field and, consequently, the electroviscous effect diminishes. The species transport equation has been coupled with Darcy's law for quantification of the permeation rate across the porous wall. The concentration profile inside the mass transfer boundary layer has been solved using the similarity transformation, and the Sherwood number has been calculated from the definition. In this study, the variation of the permeation rate and solute permeate concentration has been with the surface potential, wall retention factor and osmotic pressure coefficient has been demonstrated for both the circular as well as rectangular channel cross-section.

  17. Some Biological Hints on the Control of Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yoshimichi

    This review paper explores the possibilities of the control of heat and mass transfer associated with drought tolerance and freeze tolerance. The accumulation of some metabolites, such as proline and trehalose, are effective for drought tolerance. The special microstructures on the surfaces of some plants and insects in deserts are effective for collecting moisture in the air. Methods of preserving crops will be improved by the mimetic of the drought tolerance. Calcium ions and a protein are effective for the retrieval of damaged cell membrane due to ice formation. Ice crystal growth is inhibited by some substances such as antifreeze proteins. The cryopreservation of foods and organs will be improved by the mimetic of the freeze tolerance.

  18. Minimum-mass design of sandwich aerobrakes for a lunar transfer vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Riddick, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    A structural mass optimization study of a sandwich aerobrake for a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) was conducted. The proposed spherical aerobrake had a base diameter of 15.2 m and radius of 13.6 m. A hot thermal protection system (TPS) and cold structure were used in the design. Honeycomb sandwich aerobrake structures made up of four different materials - aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, graphite-epoxy, and graphite-polyimide - were considered. Cases of aerodynamic load, equivalent uniform pressure, and aerodynamic plus thermal load were analyzed. Both linear stress and buckling analyses were conducted for a range of skin and core thicknesses. A graphical optimization procedure was used to determine the skin and core thicknesses of a minimum-mass aerobrake. The design criteria used were material strength, global buckling, and TPS tile deformation. Among them, the TPS deformation criterion was the most critical. The graphite-epoxy aerobrake was the lightest among the four materials studied. Its total mass is about 12.3% of the LTV mass, for supports at 75% span. Equivalent uniform loading produced smaller deformations, stresses, and buckling loads than did the more realistic aerodynamic loading for the same aerobrake configuration. Thermally induced stresses countered the aerodynamically induced stresses and hence had a beneficial effect on the deformation and buckling of the aerobrake.

  19. Prelude to A Double Degenerate Merger: The Onset of Mass Transfer and Its Impact on Gravitational Waves and Surface Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Marius; Rosswog, Stephan; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2011-08-01

    calculating the gravitational wave foreground (although expected to be below Laser Interferometer Space Antenna's sensitivity at these high frequencies). We also show that the inclusion of the entropy increase associated with shock heating of the accreted material reduces the number of orbits a binary survives given the same initial conditions, although the effect is not as pronounced when using the appropriate initial conditions. The use of accurate initial conditions and a correct treatment of shock heating allows for a reliable time evolution of the temperature, density, and angular momentum, which are important when considering thermonuclear events that may occur during the mass transfer phase and/or after merger. Our treatment allows us to accurately identify when surface detonations may occur in the lead-up to the merger, as well as the properties of final merger products.

  20. Transfer regulations and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Posner, Eric A

    2003-12-01

    Recent scholarship on regulatory oversight has focused on cost-benefit analysis of prescriptive regulations--regulations that restrict behavior such as pollution--and their use to cure market failures, and has overlooked the vast number of transfer regulations. Transfer regulations are regulations that channel funds to beneficiaries. These regulations are authorized by statutes that establish entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security, pay one-time distributions to victims of misfortunes such as natural disasters and the 9/11 terrorist attack, and fund pork barrel spending. Cost-benefit analysis cannot be used to evaluate transfer regulations because all transfer regulations fail cost-benefit analysis; cost-effectiveness analysis, however, can be used to evaluate transfer regulations. Although executive orders appear to require agencies to use cost-effectiveness analysis to evaluate transfer regulations that have a large economic impact, the agencies' record is dismal. Most agencies fail to perform cost-effectiveness analysis, and other agencies perform cost-effectiveness analysis incorrectly. More vigorous Office of Management and Budget and, possibly, judicial review could improve the quality of distributive regulations.

  1. Experimental Investigations of Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Heat-Transfer Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The present work seeks to develop and investigate experimentally microchannel heat-exchange apparatuses of two designs: with porous elements manufactured from titanium and copper, and also based on the matrix of filamentary silicon single crystals under operating conditions with high heat loads, unsteadiness, and nonlinear flow of the coolant. For experimental investigations, the authors have developed and manufactured a unique test bench allowing tests of the developed heat-transfer elements in unsteady operating regimes. The performed experimental investigations have made it possible to obtain criterial dependences of the heat-transfer coefficient on the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and to refine the values of viscous and inertial coefficients. It has been established that microchannel heat-transfer elements based on silicon single crystals, which make it possible to remove a heat flux above 100 W/cm2, are the most efficient. For porous heat-transfer elements, the best result was attained for wedge-shaped copper samples. According to investigation results, the authors have considered the issues of optimization of thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the heat-transfer elements under study. In the work, the authors have given examples of practical use of the developed heat-transfer elements for cooling systems of radioelectronic equipment.

  2. Co-transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by motile microorganisms leads to enhanced mass transfer under diffusive conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Jakobsen, Hans H; Winding, Anne; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement with hydrophobicity indicated PAH co-transport with the motile organisms. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed such transport. The effective diffusivity of T. pyriformis, determined by video imaging microscopy, was found to exceed molecular diffusivities of the PAHs up to four-fold. Cell-bound PAH fractions were determined to range from 28% (naphthalene) to 92% (pyrene). Motile microorganisms can therefore function as effective carriers for HOCs under diffusive conditions and might significantly enhance mobility and availability of HOCs.

  3. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  4. Modeling and mass-transfer evaluation in vapor-phase bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wend, C.; Jones, W.

    1994-12-31

    Vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBRs) have been considered for treating gas streams contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A VPBR is a gas absorption column that employs a biofilm as a heterogeneous catalyst growing on an artificial porous medium. To aid in the design, scale-up and operation of a VPBR, a phenomenologically-based mathematical model has been developed to describe the steady-state operation of a VPBR. The present version tracks the electron-donor (VOC) and the electron-acceptor (oxygen) in the gas/liquid/biofilm phases within the bioreactor. The model uses a single species in the biofilm with reaction rates modeled by Monod kinetics for the electron acceptor and Haldane kinetics for the electron donor. Bench-scale VPBRs and the model show evidence of electron-acceptor limitation under certain operating conditions. Due to the effects of the inorganic salts and biomass on the apparent Henry`s law coefficients, these coefficients were experimentally determined using reactor effluent. The coefficients were found to be approximately 50% of the published values for the VOCs. Mass-transfer coefficients for the gas-liquid interface are predicted by Onda correlations. Literature shows these correlations to be within 20% of actual coefficients for abiotic systems. Bench-scale experiments using a non-reactive tracer showed that the Onda correlations can overestimate mass-transfer coefficients by as much as three times.

  5. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  6. An overview of challenges in modeling heat and mass transfer for living on Mars.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Yoji; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Goto, Eiji; Arai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Hirafuji, Masayuki; Omori, Katsunori; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Tani, Akira; Toki, Kyoichiro; Yokota, Hiroki; Fujita, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    Engineering a life-support system for living on Mars requires the modeling of heat and mass transfer. This report describes the analysis of heat and mass transfer phenomena in a greenhouse dome, which is being designed as a pressurized life-support system for agricultural production on Mars. In this Martian greenhouse, solar energy will be converted into chemical energy in plant biomass. Agricultural products will be harvested for food and plant cultivation, and waste materials will be processed in a composting microbial ecosystem. Transpired water from plants will be condensed and recycled. In our thermal design and analysis for the Martian greenhouse, we addressed the question of whether temperature and pressure would be maintained in the appropriate range for humans as well as plants. Energy flow and material circulation should be controlled to provide an artificial ecological system on Mars. In our analysis, we assumed that the greenhouse would be maintained at a subatmospheric pressure under 1/3-G gravitational force with 1/2 solar light intensity on Earth. Convection of atmospheric gases will be induced inside the greenhouse, primarily by heating from sunlight. Microclimate (thermal and gas species structure) could be generated locally around plant bodies, which would affect gas transport. Potential effects of those environmental factors are discussed on the phenomena including plant growth and plant physiology and focusing on transport processes. Fire safety is a crucial issue and we evaluate its impact on the total gas pressure in the greenhouse dome.

  7. On computational experiments in some inverse problems of heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of mathematical modeling of effective heat and mass transfer on hypersonic aircraft permeable surfaces are considered. The physic-chemical processes (the dissociation and the ionization) in laminar boundary layer of compressible gas are appreciated. Some algorithms of control restoration are suggested for the interpolation and approximation statements of heat and mass transfer inverse problems. The differences between the methods applied for the problem solutions search for these statements are discussed. Both the algorithms are realized as programs. Many computational experiments were accomplished with the use of these programs. The parameters of boundary layer obtained by means of the A.A.Dorodnicyn's generalized integral relations method from solving the direct problems have been used to obtain the inverse problems solutions. Two types of blowing laws restoration for the inverse problem in interpolation statement are presented as the examples. The influence of the temperature factor on the blowing restoration is investigated. The different character of sensitivity of controllable parameters (the local heat flow and local tangent friction) respectively to step (discrete) changing of control (the blowing) and the switching point position is studied.

  8. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  9. An Experiment to Introduce Mass Transfer Concepts Using a Commercial Hollow Fiber Blood Oxygenator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIver, Keith; Merrill, Thomas; Farrell, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    A commercial hollow fiber blood oxygenation laboratory experiment was used to introduce lower level engineering students to mass balances in a two-phase system. Using measured values of concentration and flow rate, students calculated the rate of mass transfer from the gas phase and into the liquid phase, and compared the two values to determine…

  10. Turbulent heat-and-mass transfer in channel flow at transcritical temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjin; Scalo, Carlo; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent heat and mass transfer at transcritical thermodynamic conditions is studied in turbulent channel flow using the high-fidelity DNS for solution to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the conservative form closed with the Peng-Robinson state equation. To isolate the real fluid effects on turbulent heat transfer, the bulk pressure is maintained at supercritical pb = 1 . 1pc and the isothermal walls are set to ΔT / 2 above and below the local pseudo-boiling temperature Tpb of the fluid (R-134a) where ΔT is 5K, 10K, and 20K. This setup allows the flow to reach a statistically-steady state while capturing the highest thermodynamic gradients, thus allowing a detailed study on thermodynamics of transcritical turbulent heat transfer. All thermodynamic and turbulent scales are fully resolved which is shown through a careful grid convergence analysis. The time-averaged density and compressibility factor are highly dependent on the temperature field and their large near-wall gradient causes thermodynamically-induced peaks in the RMS quantities resulting in strong turbulent mixing. The ejection of heavy pseudo-liquid blobs by near-wall turbulent structures into the channel core leads to a third RMS peak which is not observable in ideal gas simulations.

  11. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  12. Modeling of heat and mass transfer in lateritic building envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meukam, Pierre; Noumowe, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the behavior of building envelopes made of local lateritic soil bricks subjected to different climatic conditions. The building envelopes studied in this work consist of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. In order to describe coupled heat and moisture transfer in wet porous materials, the coupled equations were solved by the introduction of diffusion coefficients. A numerical model HMtrans, developed for prediction of heat and moisture transfer in multi-layered building components, was used to simulate the temperature, water content and relative humidity profiles within the building envelopes. The results allow the prediction of the duration of the exposed building walls to the local weather conditions. They show that the durability of building envelopes made of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust is not strongly affected by the climatic conditions in tropical and equatorial areas.

  13. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  14. Photo-induced mass transfer in metal nanocluster doped glasses under continuous wave laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovskii, Yu.; Rosenbluh, M.

    2011-04-15

    Mass transfer accompanying continuous wave optical recording in glasses with embedded silver nanoclusters has been studied using optical microscopy, STEM and AFM. Recording was carried out by two crossed laser beams (514 nm), which created a periodic intensity distribution on the illuminated surface of the glass-silver composites. The quality of the recorded gratings was found to be independent of the light polarization. It was determined that laser irradiation induces two mass transfer processes: diffusion coalescence of nanoclusters and redistribution of silver between illuminated and nonilluminated interference lines. The temperature profile under the illuminated surface has been calculated, as well as the kinetics of the mass redistribution.

  15. Determination of effective mass density and modulus for resonant metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongwon; Park, Buhm; Kim, Deokman; Park, Junhong

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a method to determine the effective dynamic properties of resonant metamaterials. The longitudinal vibration of a rod with periodically attached oscillators was predicted using wave propagation analysis. The effective mass density and modulus were determined from the transfer function of vibration responses. Predictions of these effective properties compared favorably with laboratory measurements. While the effective mass density showed significant frequency dependent variation near the natural frequency of the oscillators, the elastic modulus was largely unchanged for the setup considered in this study. The effective mass density became complex-numbered when the spring element of the oscillator was viscoelastic. As the real part of the effective mass density became negative, the propagating wavenumber components disappeared, and vibration transmission through the metamaterial was prohibited. The proposed method provides a consistent approach for evaluating the effective parameters of resonant metamaterials using a small number of vibration measurements.

  16. Ordered macroporous platinum electrode and enhanced mass transfer in fuel cells using inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Park, Hee-Young; Kim, Minhyoung; Lim, Ju Wan; Chung, Dong Young; Lee, Myeong Jae; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opal structures are attractive materials for various applications in electrochemical devices because of the benefits derived from their periodic structures: relatively large surface areas, large voidage, low tortuosity and interconnected macropores. However, a direct application of an inverse opal structure in membrane electrode assemblies has been considered impractical because of the limitations in fabrication routes including an unsuitable substrate. Here we report the demonstration of a single cell that maintains an inverse opal structure entirely within a membrane electrode assembly. Compared with the conventional catalyst slurry, an ink-based assembly, this modified assembly has a robust and integrated configuration of catalyst layers; therefore, the loss of catalyst particles can be minimized. Furthermore, the inverse-opal-structure electrode maintains an effective porosity, an enhanced performance, as well as an improved mass transfer and more effective water management, owing to its morphological advantages.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model