Science.gov

Sample records for mass transfer transiting

  1. Effects of mass addition on blunt-body boundary-layer transition and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The model bodies tested at Mach number 7.32 were hemispheres, blunt cones, and spherical segments. The mass addition consisted of air ejected through porous forward surfaces of the models. The experimental data consisted of heat transfer measurements from which boundary layer transitions were deduced. The data verified various applicable boundary layer codes in the laminar and transitional flow regimes. Empirical heating rate data correlations were developed for the laminar and turbulent flow regimes.

  2. MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

    1980-07-01

    Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

  3. Effect of mass-addition distribution and injectant on heat transfer and transition criteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Mccloskey, M. H.; Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Wright, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Surface pressures, heat-transfer rates, and transition locations for a sharp cone (whose semivertex angle is 12 deg) were obtained in a hypervelocity wind tunnel at a free-stream Mach number of 12 and a free-stream Re/ft range of 3,000,000 to 6,000,000. The effects of injecting either methane, nitrogen, or Freon-22 (at rates up to 2.1% of free-stream rate) were studied for a uniform injection-distribution and for a variable injection-distribution. Gaseous injection had little effect on the surface pressure measurements. For a given mass injection distribution, the laminar region heat-transfer decreases as the injection rate increases or as the molecular weight of the injectant decreases. For a given mass-injection rate (integrated over the surface of the entire cone), the transition location and heat-transfer rates were sensitive to the injection distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the local injection rate was constant over the surface of the cone.

  4. MASS TRANSFER, TRANSITING STREAM, AND MAGNETOPAUSE IN CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS TO WASP-12

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Dong; Helling, Ch.; Van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    2010-10-01

    We study mass transfer by Roche lobe overflow in close-in exoplanetary systems. The planet's atmospheric gas passes through the inner Lagrangian point and flows along a narrow stream, accelerating to 100-200 km s{sup -1} velocity before forming an accretion disk. We show that the cylinder-shaped accretion stream can have an area (projected in the plane of the sky) comparable to that of the planet and a significant optical depth to spectral line absorption. Such a 'transiting cylinder' may produce an earlier ingress of the planet transit, as suggested by recent Hubble Space Telescope observations of the WASP-12 system. The asymmetric disk produced by the accretion stream may also lead to time-dependent obscuration of the starlight and apparent earlier ingress. We also consider the interaction of the stellar wind with the planetary magnetosphere. Since the wind speed is subsonic/sub-Alfvenic and comparable to the orbital velocity of the planet, the head of the magnetopause lies eastward relative to the substellar line (the line joining the planet and the star). The gas around the magnetopause may, if sufficiently compressed, give rise to asymmetric ingress/egress during the planet transit, although more works are needed to evaluate this possibility.

  5. Is Mass Transit Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Mass transit is possible in the United States, but only if the form it takes offers americans the quality of ride--cheap, private and rapid--they now have in the automobile. If these criteria are not achieved, Americans will continue to drive. (BT)

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered. PMID:27739466

  7. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-14

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  9. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  10. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  11. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  12. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  13. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  14. Suicide and Mass Urban Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Presents case consultation in which consultants respond to issues of urban planning for mass transit (subway) system and how to maximize prevention of intentional injury within subway stations. Also asks what type of research study should be used and what type of data collected once system is operating. Case is discussed by Morton M. Silverman and…

  15. Mass transfer between binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.; Kondo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of mass from one component of a binary system to another by mass ejection is analyzed through a stellar wind mechanism, using a model which integrates the equations of motion, including the energy equation, with an initial static atmosphere and various temperature fluctuations imposed at the base of the star's corona. The model is applied to several situations and the energy flow is calculated along the line of centers between the two binary components, in the rotating frame of the system, thereby incorporating the centrifugal force. It is shown that relatively small disturbances in the lower chromosphere or photosphere can produce mass loss through a stellar wind mechanism, due to the amplification of the disturbance propagating into the thinner atmosphere. Since there are many possible sources of the disturbance, the model can be used to explain many mass ejection phenomena.

  16. PHREEQC. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  17. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Emmons, J. Bruce; Blessing, Leonard J.

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  18. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  19. Mass transfer in corrugated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronda, Ann Mclaughry

    Research on the chemical and physical structure of membranes has failed to overcome the inverse relationship between selectivity and permeability. While this permeability is partially responsible for the rate of separation, the geometry of the membrane contributes significantly to this rate. In this work, we focused on the system geometry by examining the effect of corrugations on the rate of membrane separations. We developed a theory to describe mass transport in corrugations and to predict the effectiveness of corrugated membranes. To verify this theory, membranes with millimeter-sized corrugations were made. Pervaporation experiments with highly permeable and less permeable solutes showed excellent agreement with the theory. Based on the membrane geometry and permeability, the effectiveness factor and the flux enhancement can be quantified by a modified Thiele analysis. We used this theory to examine the effect of small corrugations on the mass transfer of both liquids and gases across membranes, including the effects of free convection, membrane supports, and Knudsen diffusion. In systems with a liquid feed, corrugations are promising only for very impermeable solutes. In gases, corrugations are more effective, especially when supported by a porous structure. We attempted to make smaller corrugations in two ways. The more promising method is phase-inversion of diblock copolymers. These diblocks were dissolved in a solvent, made into a thin film, and immersed in a liquid that was a nonsolvent for the majority block and a solvent for the minority block. In this way, we attempted to draw the minority block to the surface of an undulating structure created by the phase inversion. Ideally, the minority block would be selective and the majority block would be highly permeable or porous. Scanning electron microscopy showed promising structures made from polystyrene-polyisoprene and polyacrylonitrile-polyethylene oxide. The other, less promising, attempt at making

  20. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  1. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  2. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  3. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  4. Mass Transfer Cooling Near The Stagnation Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    A simplified analysis is made of mass transfer cooling, that is, injection of a foreign gas, near the stagnation point for two-dimensional and axisymmetric bodies. The reduction in heat transfer is given in terms of the properties of the coolant gas and it is shown that the heat transfer may be reduced considerably by the introduction of a gas having appropriate thermal and diffusive properties. The mechanism by which heat transfer is reduced is discussed.

  5. Binary stars: Mass transfer and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that mass exchange (and mass loss) within a binary system should produce observable changes in the surface chemical composition of both the mass losing and mass gaining stars as a stellar interior exposed to nucleosyntheses is uncovered. Three topics relating mass exchange and/or mass loss to nucleosynthesis are sketched: the chemical composition of Algol systems; the accretion disk of a cataclysmic variable fed by mass from a dwarf secondary star; and the hypothesis that classical Ba II giants result from mass transfer from a more evolved companion now present as a white dwarf.

  6. 23 CFR 810.204 - Application by mass transit authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application by mass transit authority. 810.204 Section... MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.204 Application by mass transit authority. A publicly-owned mass transit authority...

  7. 23 CFR 810.204 - Application by mass transit authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application by mass transit authority. 810.204 Section... MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.204 Application by mass transit authority. A publicly-owned mass transit authority...

  8. 23 CFR 810.204 - Application by mass transit authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application by mass transit authority. 810.204 Section... MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.204 Application by mass transit authority. A publicly-owned mass transit authority...

  9. 23 CFR 810.204 - Application by mass transit authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application by mass transit authority. 810.204 Section... MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.204 Application by mass transit authority. A publicly-owned mass transit authority...

  10. 23 CFR 810.204 - Application by mass transit authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application by mass transit authority. 810.204 Section... MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.204 Application by mass transit authority. A publicly-owned mass transit authority...

  11. Transitions: Managing the Transfer of Security Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-05

    therefore coloured by wider organisational concerns. 37. These tensions also play out within organisations with those in the field being more...mandate individuals have and what their agendas and interest are. In many cases they will be naturally drawn to those that fit their stereotypes or...acquired prior to any transfer. Additionally tracking the level of willingness to transition might indicate where reporting is becoming coloured by

  12. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction.

  13. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  14. Heat Transfer in a Superelliptic Transition Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Hippensteele, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Local heat transfer measurements were experimentally mapped using a transient liquid-crystal heat transfer technique on the surface of a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The transition duct had a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.5 and an exit-plane aspect ratio of 3. The crosssectional geometry was defined by the equation of a superellipse. The cross-sectional area was the same at the inlet and exit but varied up to 15 percent higher through the transition. The duct was preheated to a uniform temperature (nominally 64 C) before allowing room temperature air to be suddenly drawn through it. As the surface cooled, the resulting isothermal contours on the duct surface were revealed using a surface coating of thermochromic liquid crystals that display distinctive colors at particular temperatures. A video record was made of the surface temperature and time data for all points on the duct surfaces during each test. Using this surface temperature-time data together with the temperature of the air flowing through the model and the initial temperature of the model wall, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated by employing the classic one-dimensional, semi-infinite wall heat transfer conduction model. Test results are reported for inlet diameter-based Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.4x106 to 2.4x106 and two grid-generated freestream turbulence intensities of about 1 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels, and up to 16 percent, which may be more typical of real engine conditions.

  15. Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures

    PubMed Central

    Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

  16. Mass transit infrastructure and urban health.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Rae

    2005-03-01

    Mass transit is a critical infrastructure of urban environments worldwide. The public uses it extensively, with roughly 9 billion mass transit trips occurring annually in the United States alone according to the U.S. Department of Transportation data. Its benefits per traveler include lower emissions of air pollutants and energy usage and high speeds and safety records relative to many other common modes of transportation that contribute to human health and safety. However, mass transit is vulnerable to intrusions that compromise its use and the realization of the important benefits it brings. These intrusions pertain to physical conditions, security, external environmental conditions, and equity. The state of the physical condition of transit facilities overall has been summarized in the low ratings the American Society of Civil Engineers gives to mass transit, and the large dollar estimates to maintain existing conditions as well as to bring on new improvements, which are, however, many times lower than investments estimated for roadways. Security has become a growing issue, and numerous incidents point to the potential for threats to security in the US. External environmental conditions, such as unexpected inundations of water and electric power outages also make transit vulnerable. Equity issues pose constraints on the use of transit by those who cannot access it. Transit has shown a remarkable ability to rebound after crises, most notably after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, due to a combination of design and operational features of the system. These experiences provide important lessons that must be captured to provide proactive approaches to managing and reducing the consequences of external factors that impinge negatively on transit.

  17. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  18. An Entrance Region Mass Transfer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngquist, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to reveal the consequences of the development of a concentration boundary layer. The rate of a mass transfer limited electrochemical reaction is measured and used to obtain the dependence of average Sherwood number on Reynolds number and entrance length. (Author/BB)

  19. An Entrance Region Mass Transfer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngquist, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to reveal the consequences of the development of a concentration boundary layer. The rate of a mass transfer limited electrochemical reaction is measured and used to obtain the dependence of average Sherwood number on Reynolds number and entrance length. (Author/BB)

  20. Mass-induced transition in fermion number

    SciTech Connect

    Aragao de Carvalho, C.; Pureza, J. M.

    1989-05-15

    We show that if we increase the mass of fermions in interaction with a topological (kink) scalar background in 1+1 dimensions, the fractional fermion number of the system will eventually vanish. The transition is sharp and corresponds to the disappearance of localized states from the spectrum of a Dirac operator which is exactly solvable. Possible applications to different physical systems are discussed.

  1. Information transfer during a transitive reasoning task.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Aneta; Kamiński, Maciej; Kamiński, Jan; Blinowska, Katarzyna

    2011-03-01

    For about two decades now, the localization of the brain regions involved in reasoning processes is being investigated through fMRI studies, and it is known that for a transitive form of reasoning the frontal and parietal regions are most active. In contrast, less is known about the information exchange during the performance of such complex tasks. In this study, the propagation of brain activity during a transitive reasoning task was investigated and compared to the propagation during a simple memory task. We studied EEG transmission patterns obtained for physiological indicators of brain activity and determined whether there are frequency bands specifically related to this type of cognitive operations. The analysis was performed by means of the directed transfer function. The transmission patterns were determined in the theta, alpha and gamma bands. The results show stronger transmissions in theta and alpha bands from frontal to parietal as well as within frontal regions in reasoning trials comparing to memory trials. The increase in theta and alpha transmissions was accompanied by flows in gamma band from right posterior to left posterior and anterior sites. These results are consistent with previous neuroimaging (fMRI) data concerning fronto-parietal regions involvement in reasoning and working memory processes and also provide new evidence for the executive role of frontal theta waves in organizing the cognition.

  2. Combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The approach to theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in absorption systems is described. The two tranfer phenomena are strongly coupled here. The purpose of the analysis is to relate, quantitatively, the heat and mass transfer coefficients to the physical properties of the working fluids and to the geometry of the system. The preferred configuration is that of a falling film of liquid on a metallic surface which serves to transfer heat from the absorbent in contact with the vapor of the absorbate. The model developed may be solved for laminar, turbulent, or transition flow regimes. The results of the solution describe the development of the thermal and concentration boundary layers and the variation of the temperatures, concentrations, and heat and mass fluxes. These quantities in their normalized, dimensionless form depend on two characteristic parameters of the system: the Lewis number Le and the dimensionless heat of absorption lambda. The length in the direction of flow is normalized with respect to the Peclet number and the film thickness. Heat and mass transfer coefficients for the system were calculated. The Sherwood number for mass transfer from the vapor-liquid interface to the bulk of the film reaches a constant value of 3.63 with fully developed boundary layers for both the adiabatic and constant temperature wall. The Nusselt number for heat transfer from the interface to the bulk reaches under the same conditions values of 3.63 and 2.67 for the adiabatic and constant temperature wall, respectively. The Nusselt number for heat tranfer from the bulk to the wall reaches 1.60.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in volcano-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems re-distribute heat and mass derived from subsurface magma bodies over large temporal and spatial scales. Numerical models of fluid flow and heat transfer provide a quantitative basis for understanding the thermo-hydrological structure and transient behavior of volcano-hydrothermal systems. At the brittle-ductile transition around a magma body, the rate of conductive heat transfer from the impermeable intrusion is balanced by the rate of advective heat transfer by the fluid. Using the Complex Systems Modeling Platform (CSMP++) to model fluid flow up to near-magmatic conditions, we examine the effect of geologic factors such as host rock permeability, magma emplacement depth, the temperature conditions of the brittle-ductile transition, and rock/magma thermal conductivity on the rates of heat and mass transfer around magma bodies. Additionally, we investigate the role of these factors on the thermo-hydrological structure of the hydrothermal system, including patterns of phase separation, gravity-driven phase segregation, and fluid mixing. Passive tracers are included in the fluid flow models to simulate the input of magmatic volatiles into hydrothermal fluids and their fractionation between the liquid and vapor phases. Ultimately, we compare our model results against measured heat and gas fluxes from volcano-hydrothermal systems to help inform the interpreation of these measurements.

  4. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  5. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  6. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  7. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the mass...

  8. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  10. Kinetic model of mass exchange with dynamic Arrhenius transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Muradova, Aliki

    2016-02-01

    We study a nonlinear kinetic model of mass exchange between interacting grains. The transition rates follow the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy that depends dynamically on the grain mass. We show that the activation parameter can be absorbed in the initial conditions for the grain masses, and that the total mass is conserved. We obtain numerical solutions of the coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations of mass exchange for the two-grain system, and we compare them with approximate theoretical solutions in specific neighborhoods of the phase space. Using phase plane methods, we determine that the system exhibits regimes of diffusive and growth-decay (reverse diffusion) kinetics. The equilibrium states are determined by the mass equipartition and separation nullcline curves. If the transfer rates are perturbed by white noise, numerical simulations show that the system maintains the diffusive and growth-decay regimes; however, the noise can reverse the sign of equilibrium mass difference. Finally, we present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of a system with many interacting grains. Diffusive and growth-decay regimes are established as well, but the approach to equilibrium is considerably slower. Potential applications of the mass exchange model involve coarse-graining during sintering and wealth exchange in econophysics.

  11. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  12. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  13. Mass transfer mechanism in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-08-09

    The mass transfer mechanism in HILIC was investigated in depth. The reduced heights equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) of five low molecular weigh compounds with retention factors of -0.05 (slight exclusion from the surface due to the presence of a water-rich layer in which naphthalene is insoluble) to 3.64 were measured at room temperature for a 4.6mm×100mm column packed with 3.5μm 140Å XBridge HILIC particles in a wide range of flow velocities. The mobile phase was a buffered acetonitrile-water mixture (92.5/7.5, v/v). Using a physically reliable model of effective diffusion in binary composite media (Torquato's model), the longitudinal diffusion and solid-liquid mass transfer resistance reduced HETP terms were measured. The reduced short-range eddy dispersion HETP was taken from the literature data. The long-range reduced HETP was directly measured from the subtraction of these HETP terms to the overall HETP measured from moment analysis. In contrast to RPLC, the plots of the reduced HETP versus the reduced velocity depend weakly on the retention factor, due to the constant, low intra-particle diffusivity observed in HILIC. So, the reduced longitudinal diffusion HETP is smaller and the reduced solid-liquid mass transfer resistance HETP is larger in HILIC than in RPLC. Whereas border effects can be concealed in RPLC for retained analytes due to fast radial equilibration across the column diameter, a residual long-range eddy dispersion term persists in 4.6mm I.D. HILIC columns, even at very slow flow rates. Experiments show that the minor differences in the long-range eddy dispersion term between analytes having different retention factors is directly correlated to the reciprocal of their bulk diffusion coefficient. The performance of HILIC columns packed with fine particles is then more sensitive to the inlet sample distribution and to the outlet sample collection than RPLC columns due to the relatively poor radial mixing controlled by lateral diffusion.

  14. The evolution of the mass-transfer functions in liquid Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.

    2016-09-15

    The results of analytic and numerical investigation of mass-transfer processes in nonideal liquid systems are reported. Calculations are performed for extended 2D and 3D systems of particles that interact with a screened Yukawa-type Coulomb potential. The main attention is paid to 2D structures. A new analytic model is proposed for describing the evolution of mass-transfer functions in systems of interacting particles, including the transition between the ballistic and diffusion regimes of their motion.

  15. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  16. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  17. Mass transfer in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zavoshy, S.J.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1984-11-01

    A new analytical solution is presented that predicts the rate of dissolution of species from a waste package surrounded by a wet porous medium. By equating the rate of diffusive mass transfer into the porous rock to the rate of liquid-surface chemical reaction, an analytical solution for the time-dependent dissolution rate and the time-dependent concentration of dissolved species at the waste surface is obtained. From these results it is shown that for most of the important species in a package of radioactive waste the surface liquid quickly reaches near-saturation concentrations and the dissolution rate can be predicted by the simpler theory that assumes saturation concentrations in the surface liquid. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Yang, W.

    1991-05-30

    After the second annual progress report to DOE in July 1990, we continued the experimental work for another liquid system. The mathematical model was also improved to include secondary effects due to drop deformation and charge redistribution on the deformed drop surface. Originally, we planned to study a mass transfer process after the hydrodynamic modelling. Due to difficulty in measuring drop concentration during oscillations, we decided to study a heat transfer process instead. Using the analogy between the mass transfer and the heat transfer, we can easily extend the results for the heat transfer study to the mass transfer problem.

  19. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  20. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  1. Transit: Radiative-transfer code for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joe; Rojo, Patricio; Foster, Austin J.; Stemm, Madison; Challener, Ryan; Foster, Andrew S. D.

    2017-04-01

    Transit calculates the transmission or emission spectrum of a planetary atmosphere with application to extrasolar-planet transit and eclipse observations, respectively. It computes the spectra by solving the one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer equation for an atmospheric model.

  2. Rethinking Transfer: Learning from CALL Teacher Education as Consequential Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Chin-chi

    2015-01-01

    Behind CALL teacher education (CTE) there is an unproblematized consensus of transfer, which suggests a positivist and tool-centered view of learning gains that differs from the sociocultural focus of recent teacher education research. Drawing on Beach's (2003) conceptualization of transfer as "consequential transition," this qualitative…

  3. Rethinking Transfer: Learning from CALL Teacher Education as Consequential Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Chin-chi

    2015-01-01

    Behind CALL teacher education (CTE) there is an unproblematized consensus of transfer, which suggests a positivist and tool-centered view of learning gains that differs from the sociocultural focus of recent teacher education research. Drawing on Beach's (2003) conceptualization of transfer as "consequential transition," this qualitative…

  4. Methods and problems in heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotliar, Iakov Mikhailovich; Sovershennyi, Viacheslav Dmitrievich; Strizhenov, Dmitrii Sergeevich

    The book focuses on the mathematical methods used in heat and mass transfer problems. The theory, statement, and solution of some problems of practical importance in heat and mass transfer are presented, and methods are proposed for solving algebraic, transcendental, and differential equations. Examples of exact solutions to heat and mass transfer equations are given. The discussion also covers some aspects of the development of a mathematical model of turbulent flows.

  5. Mass Transfer and Rheology of Fiber Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghui

    Rheological and mass transfer properties of non-Brownian fiber suspensions are affected by fiber characteristics, fiber interactions, and processing conditions. In this thesis we develop several simulation methods to study the dynamics of single fibers in simple shear flow, as well as the rheology and mass transfer of fiber suspensions. Isolated, rigid, neutrally-buoyant, non-Brownian, slightly curved, nonchiral fibers in simple shear flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number can drift steadily in the gradient direction without external forces or torques. The average drift velocity and direction depend on the fiber aspect ratio, curvature and initial orientation. The drift results from the coupling of rotational and translational dynamics, and the combined effects of flipping, scooping, and spinning motions of the fiber. Irreversible fiber collisions in the suspensions cause shear-induced diffusion. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of dilute suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration and increasing static friction between contacts. The diffusivities in both the gradient and vorticity directions are larger for suspensions of curved fibers than for suspensions of straight fibers. For suspensions of curved fibers, significant enhancements in the diffusivity in the gradient direction are attributed to fiber drift in the gradient direction. The shear-induced self-diffusivity of concentrated suspensions of fibers increases with increasing concentration before fiber networks or flocs are formed, after which the diffusivity decreases with increasing concentration. The diffusivity increases with increasing fiber equilibrium bending angle, effective stiffness, coefficient of static friction, and rate of collisions. The specific viscosity of fiber suspensions increases with increasing fiber curvature, friction coefficient between mechanical contacts, and solids concentration. The specific viscosity increases linearly with

  6. [Mass transfer of magnesium in hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Calzavara, P; Da Porto, A; Vianello, A; Gatti, P L; Maresca, M C; Caenaro, G

    1990-01-01

    The rate of mass-transfer (MT) of magnesium during hemodialysis was studied in thirty-five patients with hypermagnesemia (Mg = 3.75 +/- 0.72 mg/dl) undergoing chronic hemodialysis. The aim of the study was to verify which is the best dialytical approach to remove the excess of magnesium. The concentration of Mg in the dialysate was of 1.82 mg/dl for all patients. MT was -0.51 +/- 0.36 g and no statistical difference was found between patients treated with cuprophan hollow fibers dialyzers, PAN and cuprophan plates. Mg MT is not correlated with dialysis duration (r = -0.23; p:ns), urea clearance (r = -0.08; p:ns), KT/V index (r = -0.03; p:ns), blood flow (r = -0.15; p:ns). In conclusion from our data, in agreement with other Authors, reduction of serum Mg levels is more convenient by obtained by a decrease in Mg concentration in the dialysate under 1.82 mg/dl, in order to increase the blood-dialysate concentration gradient.

  7. Mass Transfers during Serpentinization of Oceanic Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, M.; Godard, M.; Delacour, A.; Escartin, J.; Mevel, C.; Muñoz, M.

    2011-12-01

    Mantle peridotites represent at least 20% of (ultra-)slow spread oceanic lithosphere. They are serpentinized down to several km below seafloor, and the numerous ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems emphasize the importance of serpentinization as a mean of chemical exchange between the mantle and the ocean. Characterizing the chemical modifications of peridotites during oceanic serpentinization and associated reactions is thus determinant to estimate the chemical fluxes near the ridges axis and the resulting input budget in subduction zones. However, these chemical exchanges are still poorly constrained. They depend on the initial chemical budget of peridotites (melting), on fluid sources (seawater or hydrothermal fluids), on sinks of elements (mineralogy), and on the operating mass transfer mechanisms, all expected to vary from one site to another. In order to better constrain mechanisms, scale and timing of mass transfers during serpentinization of oceanic peridotites, we carried out a combined (micro)-structural, mineralogical and geochemical study of variably refertilized and serpentinized peridotites drilled at the MARK area (ODP Site 920, 23°N Mid-Atlantic Ridge). The petrostructural study indicates that serpentinization is accompanied by adundant veining of different generations, characteristic of different mechanisms of deformation and transfer during the progressive tectonic exhumation of peridotites. Two main serpentinization stages are distinguished and rough constraints on the depth at which they occurred are provided by regional seismic velocity data. A diffusion-dominated stage occurs below ~2 km in depth. It is followed by an advection-dominated stage at shallower levels. This model is completed by a geochemical investigation of serpentinites using bulk and punctual analyses of traces elements by LA-HR-ICPMS, and iron redox state by XANES at iron K-edge. Results indicate that most samples preserve the bulk peridotite primary trace element signature

  8. Recovery Temperature, Transition, and Heat Transfer Measurements at Mach 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, Paul F.

    1961-01-01

    Schlieren, recovery temperature, and heat-transfer measurements were made on a hollow cylinder and a cone with axes alined parallel to the stream. Both the cone and cylinder were equipped with various bluntnesses, and the tests covered a Reynolds number range up to 20 x 10(exp 6) at a free-stream Mach number of 4.95 and wall to free-stream temperature ratios from 1.8 to 5.2 (adiabatic). A substantial transition delay due to bluntness was found for both the cylinder and the cone. For the present tests (Mach 4.95), transition was delayed by a factor of 3 on the cylinder and about 2 on the cone, these delays being somewhat larger than those observed in earlier tests at Mach 3.1. Heat-transfer tests on the cylinder showed only slight effects of wall temperature level on transition location; this is to be contrasted to the large transition delays observed on conical-type bodies at low surface temperatures at Mach 3.1. The schlieren and the peak-recovery-temperature methods of detecting transition were compared with the heat-transfer results. The comparison showed that the first two methods identified a transition point which occurred just beyond the end of the laminar run as seen in the heat-transfer data.

  9. Mass transfer in chromatographic columns studied by PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    Tallarek, U; van Dusschoten, D; Van As, H; Guiochon, G; Bayer, E

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied to study convective and diffusional transport in chromatographic columns packed with totally porous support particles. Here stagnant zones exist in the particle pores, and diffusional mass-transfer limitations between fluid molecules diffusing in the intraparticle pore network and flowing in the interparticle void space are detected quantitatively. Axial displacement probability distributions were measured for water over a range of Peclet numbers and observation times, with diffusion lengths between 0.15 and 0.91 times the average support particle diameter. The transition towards complete diffusional exchange is demonstrated, thereby also revealing the development of the classical convective dispersion process in a packed bed of (porous) particles.

  10. Mass transfer in white dwarf-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrick, Alexey; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.

    2017-05-01

    We perform hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binaries that contain a white dwarf and a neutron star (WD-NS binaries), and measure the specific angular momentum of material lost from the binary in disc winds. By incorporating our results within a long-term evolution model, we measure the long-term stability of mass transfer in these binaries. We find that only binaries containing helium white dwarfs (WDs) with masses less than a critical mass of MWD, crit = 0.2 M⊙ undergo stable mass transfer and evolve into ultracompact X-ray binaries. Systems with higher mass WDs experience unstable mass transfer, which leads to tidal disruption of the WD. Our low critical mass compared to the standard jet-only model of mass-loss arises from the efficient removal of angular momentum in the mechanical disc winds, which develop at highly super-Eddington mass-transfer rates. We find that the eccentricities expected for WD-NS binaries when they come into contact do not affect the loss of angular momentum, and can only affect the long-term evolution if they change on shorter time-scales than the mass-transfer rate. Our results are broadly consistent with the observed numbers of both ultracompact X-ray binaries and radio pulsars with WD companions. The observed calcium-rich gap transients are consistent with the merger rate of unstable systems with higher mass WDs.

  11. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  12. Instability of mass transfer in a planet-star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shi; Spruit, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the angular momentum exchange mechanism governing the evolution of mass-transferring binary stars does not apply to Roche lobe filling planets, because most of the angular momentum of the mass-transferring stream is absorbed by the host star. Apart from a correction for the difference in specific angular momentum of the stream and the centre of mass of the planet, the orbit does not expand much on Roche lobe overflow. We explore the conditions for dynamically unstable Roche lobe overflow as a function of planetary mass and mass and radius (age) of host star and equation of state of planet. For a Sun-like host, gas giant planets in a range of mass and entropy can undergo dynamical mass transfer. Examples of the evolution of the mass transfer process are given. Dynamic mass transfer of rocky planets depends somewhat sensitively on equation of state used. Silicate planets in the range 1 < Mp < 10 M⊕ typically go through a phase of dynamical mass transfer before settling to slow overflow when their mass drops to less than 1 M⊕.

  13. A mass transfer model of bauxite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, J.M.; Lasaga, A.C.

    1996-12-01

    The formation of bauxite due to weathering of a granitic protolith has been simulated by means of a one-dimensional flow and reaction model based on the mass transfer principle. The model couples mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, speciation in solution, and advective solute transport in a porous medium. A very important aspect of the modeling study is the use of mineral reaction rates determined experimentally in the laboratory. The important effects of solution saturation state and pH have been incorporated into the kinetic rate laws governing the heterogeneous reactions. The values of these parameters have been obtained from the scientific literature to guarantee that realistic reaction rates are used in the simulations. Albite and quartz are the minerals that make up the parent rock in the model. Gibbsite, kaolinite, and a Na-mica (as a surrogate for smectite) are the secondary minerals that have been taken into account. Long-term simulations (>1 Ma) have been run, and the formation of a bauxitic profile, with an upper gibbsite-rich and a lower kaolinite-rich zone, is predicted. In early stages of the process (up to a few hundreds of thousands of years), both gibbsite and kaolinite precipitate directly from solution as a consequence of albite dissolution. In later stages, the bulk of gibbsite precipitation derives from the incongruent dissolution of kaolinite, while kaolinite precipitation is still caused by the dissolution of albite. This is also reflected by the formation of two reaction fronts in the profile. These results are compared with weathering sequences from the Los Pijiguaos bauxite deposit, Venezuela. The overlap between the gibbsite and kaolinite zones and the replacement of kaolinite by gibbsite are consistent with model calculations. 59 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Optimized spin crossings and transition states for short-range electron transfer in transition metal dimers.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Marcus; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2005-05-26

    Electron-transfer reactions in eight mixed-valence manganese dimers are studied using B3LYP. One of the dimers is a model of the active site of manganese catalase, while another represents a basic building block of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. The adiabatic reactions are characterized by fully optimized transition states where the single imaginary frequency represents the electron-transfer coordinate. When there is antiferromagnetic coupling between different high-spin centers, electron transfer must be accompanied by a spin transition. Spin transitions are characterized by minimum-energy crossing points between spin surfaces. Three reaction mechanisms have been investigated. First, a single-step reaction where spin flip is concerted with electron transfer. Second, an initial transition to a center with intermediate spin that can be followed by electron transfer. Third, an initial transition to a ferromagnetic state from which the electron can be transferred adiabatically. The complexes prefer the third route with rate-determining barriers ranging from 5.7 kcal/mol to 17.2 kcal/mol for different complexes. The origins of these differences are discussed in terms of oxidation states and ligand environments. Many DFT functionals overestimate charge-transfer interactions, but for the present complexes, the error should be limited because of short Mn-Mn distances.

  15. The Role of "Creative Transfer" in Professional Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triantafyllaki, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "knowledge transfer" in terms of expansion of prior knowledge, creativity and approaches to generating new knowledge. It explores professional transitions in which knowledge restructuring and identity reformation are pathways into greater work flexibility and adjustment. Two studies, exploring…

  16. The Role of "Creative Transfer" in Professional Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triantafyllaki, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "knowledge transfer" in terms of expansion of prior knowledge, creativity and approaches to generating new knowledge. It explores professional transitions in which knowledge restructuring and identity reformation are pathways into greater work flexibility and adjustment. Two studies, exploring…

  17. Efficient Heat and Mass Transfer Formulations for Oil Shale Retorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; Zhang, F.

    2007-12-01

    A mathematical model for oil shale retorting is described that considers kerogen pyrolysis, oil coking, residual carbon gasification, carbonate mineral decomposition, water-gas shift, and phase equilibria reaction. Reaction rate temperature-dependence is described by Arrhenius kinetics. Fractured rock is modeled as a bi-continuum consisting of fracture porosity in which advective and dispersive gas and heat transport occur, and rock matrix in which diffusive mass transport and thermal conduction occur. Heat transfer between fracture and matrix regions is modeled either by a partial differential equation for spherical conduction or by a linear first-order heat transfer formulation. Mass transfer is modeled in an analogous manner or assuming local equilibrium. First-order mass and heat transfer coefficients are computed by a theoretical model from fundamental rock matrix properties. The governing equations are solved using a 3-D finite element formulation. Simulations of laboratory retort experiments and hypothetical problems indicated thermal disequilibrium to be the dominant factor controlling retort reactions. Simulation accuracy was unaffected by choice of mass transfer formulation. However, computational effort to explicitly simulate diffusive mass transfer in the rock matrix increased computational effort by more than an order of magnitude compared with first-order mass transfer or equilibrium analyses. A first-order heat transfer approximation of thermal conduction can be used without significant loss of accuracy if the block size and/or heating rate are not too large, as quantified by a proposed dimensionless heating rate.

  18. Early warning of atmospheric regime transitions using transfer operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantet, Alexis; Dijkstra, Henk

    2015-04-01

    The existence of persistent midlatitude atmospheric regimes, such as blocking events, with time scales larger than 5-10 days and indications of preferred transition paths between them motivates the development of early-warning indicators of regime transitions. Here, we use a barotropic model of the northern midlatitudes winter flow to study such meta-stable regimes. We look at estimates of transfer operators acting on densities evolving on a reduced phase space spanned by the first Empirical Orthogonal Functions of the streamfunction and develop an early-warning indicator of zonal to blocked flow transition. The study of the spectra of transfer operators estimated for different lags reveals a multi-level structure in the flow as well as the effect of memory on the reduced dynamics due to past interactions between the resolved and unresolved variables. The slowest motions in the reduced phase space are thereby found to have time scales larger than 8 days and to behave as Markovian for larger lags. These motions are associated with meta-stable regimes and their transitions and can be detected as almost-invariant sets of the transfer operator. The early-warning indicator is based on the action on an initial density of products of the transfer operators estimated for sufficiently long lags, making use of the semi-group property of these operators and shows relatively good Peirce skill score. From the energy budget of the model, we are able to explain the meta-stability of the regimes and the existence of preferred transition paths as the manifestation of barotropic instability. Finally, even though the model is highly simplified, the skill of the early warning indicator is promising, suggesting that the transfer operator approach can be used in parallel to an operational deterministic model for stochastic prediction or to assess forecast uncertainty.

  19. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  20. Observing Mass Transfer in a Neglected Interacting Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Phillip A.

    2011-05-01

    The eclipsing and interacting binary star R Arae is a very interesting system that has unfortunately been neglected. The few spectroscopic studies of the system report badly blended absorption lines that indicate mass transfer, but until now there has been no orbital period study to conclusively show a real period change resulting from mass transfer. In this study, new data are combined with those found in the available literature and in the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers to construct the first ephemeris curve for R Ara, which spans more than a century since its discovery in 1894. Average orbital period change and conservative mass transfer rates are presented.

  1. Noise Levels Associated With New York City's Mass Transit Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Robyn R. M.; Zeltser, Marina; Canton, Allison; Akram, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We measured noise levels associated with various forms of mass transit and compared them to exposure guidelines designed to protect against noise-induced hearing loss. Methods. We used noise dosimetry to measure time-integrated noise levels in a representative sample of New York City mass transit systems (subways, buses, ferries, tramway, and commuter railways) aboard transit vehicles and at vehicle boarding platforms or terminals during June and July 2007. Results. Of the transit types evaluated, subway cars and platforms had the highest associated equivalent continuous average (Leq) and maximum noise levels. All transit types had Leq levels appreciably above 70 A-weighted decibels, the threshold at which noise-induced hearing loss is considered possible. Conclusions. Mass transit noise exposure has the potential to exceed limits recommended by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency and thus cause noise-induced hearing loss among riders of all forms of mass transit given sufficient exposure durations. Environmental noise–control efforts in mass transit and, in cases in which controls are infeasible, the use of personal hearing protection would benefit the ridership's hearing health. PMID:19542046

  2. Noise levels associated with New York City's mass transit systems.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, Richard; Gershon, Robyn R M; Zeltser, Marina; Canton, Allison; Akram, Muhammad

    2009-08-01

    We measured noise levels associated with various forms of mass transit and compared them to exposure guidelines designed to protect against noise-induced hearing loss. We used noise dosimetry to measure time-integrated noise levels in a representative sample of New York City mass transit systems (subways, buses, ferries, tramway, and commuter railways) aboard transit vehicles and at vehicle boarding platforms or terminals during June and July 2007. Of the transit types evaluated, subway cars and platforms had the highest associated equivalent continuous average (L(eq)) and maximum noise levels. All transit types had L(eq) levels appreciably above 70 A-weighted decibels, the threshold at which noise-induced hearing loss is considered possible. Mass transit noise exposure has the potential to exceed limits recommended by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency and thus cause noise-induced hearing loss among riders of all forms of mass transit given sufficient exposure durations. Environmental noise-control efforts in mass transit and, in cases in which controls are infeasible, the use of personal hearing protection would benefit the ridership's hearing health.

  3. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary heat and mass transfer in disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, L. A.; Krasnoperov, S. Y.; Kalashnikov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The work describes mathematical model of non-stationary heat and mass transfer processes in dispersed environment, taking into account the phase transition; presents the results of numeric modelling for conditions of direct reduction in high-temperature reducing atmosphere, corresponding to the direct reduction in the jet-emulsion unit according to the principles of self-organization. The method was developed for calculation of heat and mass transfer of the aggregate of iron material particles in accordance with the given distribution law.

  4. Kinetics of diffusive decomposition in the case of several mass transfer mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical description of the final stage of diffusive decomposition leaning upon the Slezov theory is developed for several mass transfer mechanisms. The process of formation and relaxation of the crystal size distribution function from the initial ripening stage to its final state corresponding to the universal distribution is studied. The boundary points of a transition region responsible for the tails of the distribution functions on the right of the relevant stopping points are found analytically. The explicit time-dependent analytical expressions for the distribution function and particle growth rates are derived with allowance for the plausible mechanisms of mass transfer.

  5. Mass transfer coefficients determination from linear gradient elution experiments.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-02

    A procedure to estimate mass transfer coefficients in linear gradient elution chromatography is presented and validated by comparison with experimental data. Mass transfer coefficients are traditionally estimated experimentally through the van Deemter plot, which represents the HETP as a function of the fluid velocity. Up to now, the HETP was obtained under isocratic elution conditions. Unfortunately, isocratic elution experiments are often not suitable for large biomolecules which suffer from severe mass transfer hindrances. Yamamoto et al. were the first to propose a semi-empirical equation to relate HETPs measured from linear gradient elution experiments to those obtained under isocratic conditions [7]. Based on his pioneering work, the approach presented in this work aims at providing an experimental procedure supported by simple equations to estimate reliable mass transfer parameters from linear gradient elution chromatographic experiments. From the resolution of the transport model, we derived a rigorous analytical expression for the HETP in linear gradient elution chromatography.

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer in an L Shaped Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Azeem; Yunus Khan, T. M.

    2017-08-01

    This article is an extension to the heat transfer in L-shaped porous medium by including the mass diffusion. The heat and mass transfer in the porous domain is represented by three coupled partial differential equations representing the fluid movement, energy transport and mass transport. The equations are converted into algebraic form of equations by the application of finite element method that can be conveniently solved by matrix method. An iterative approach is adopted to solve the coupled equations by setting suitable convergence criterion. The results are discussed in terms of heat transfer characteristics influenced by physical parameters such as buoyancy ratio, Lewis number, Rayleigh number etc. It is found that these physical parameters have significant effect on heat and mass transfer behavior of L-shaped porous medium.

  7. Correlation of liquid-film cooling mass transfer data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gater, R. A.; L'Ecuyer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An empirical correlation proposed by Gater and Ecuyer (1970) for liquid-film cooling mass transfer, accounting for film roughness and entrainment effects, is extended to include liquid films of arbitrary length. A favorable comparison between the predicted results and the experimental data of Kinney et al. (1952) and Emmons and Warner (1964) shows the utility of the mass transfer correlation for predictions over a wide range of experimental parameters.

  8. GO RIO: Achieving Universal Access to Mass Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ted, Jr.; Castaneda-Calleros, Russell

    2009-01-01

    GO RIO is a universal access, mass-transit program that has been offered to all students who are registered full-time at Rio Hondo College. Through an agreement with five local transit agencies, full-time students can obtain a pass that provides full access seven days a week throughout the entire semester.

  9. GO RIO: Achieving Universal Access to Mass Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ted, Jr.; Castaneda-Calleros, Russell

    2009-01-01

    GO RIO is a universal access, mass-transit program that has been offered to all students who are registered full-time at Rio Hondo College. Through an agreement with five local transit agencies, full-time students can obtain a pass that provides full access seven days a week throughout the entire semester.

  10. Influence of pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F68 is one of the most used shear protecting additives in cell culture cultivations. It is well known from literature that such surface-active surfactants lower the surface tension at the gas-liquid interface, which influences the mass transfer. In this study, the effect of Pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer in aqueous solutions was examined. Therefore, the gassing in/gassing out method and bubble size measurements were used. At low concentrations of 0.02 g/L, a 50% reduction on mass transfer was observed for all tested spargers and working conditions. An explanation of the observed effects by means of Higbie's penetration or Dankwerts surface renewal theory was applied. It could be demonstrated that the suppressed movement of the bubble surface layer is the main cause for the significant drop down of the kL a-values. For Pluronic F68 concentrations above 0.1 g/L, it was observed that it comes to changes in bubble appearance and bubble size strongly dependent on the sparger type. By using the bubble size measurement data, it could be shown that only small changes in mass transfer coefficient (kL ) take place above the critical micelle concentration. Further changes on overall mass transfer at higher Pluronic F68 concentrations are mainly based on increasing of gas holdup and, more importantly, by increasing of the surface area available for mass transfer.

  11. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Locmore » al mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the whole width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  12. Heat Transfer in Conical Corner and Short Superelliptical Transition Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Hippensteele, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Local surface heat transfer measurements were experimentally mapped using a transient liquid-crystal heat-transfer technique on the surface of two circular-to-rectangular transition ducts. One has a transition cross section defined by conical corners (Duct 1) and the other by an elliptical equation with changing coefficients (Duct 2). Duct 1 has a length-to-diameter ratio of 0.75 and an exit plane aspect ratio of 1.5. Duct 2 has a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 and an exit plane aspect ratio of 2.9. Test results are reported for various inlet-diameter-based Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.45 106 to 2.39 106 and two freestream turbulence intensities of about 1 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels, and up to 16 percent, which may be more typical of real engine conditions.

  13. Charge transfer transitions within the octahedral uranate group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleijenberg, K. C.

    1980-07-01

    In this paper the excitation spectra of the luminescence of the octahedral uranate group (UO6-6) are presented for various uranium-doped compounds. The excitation bands have been assigned using the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the spectroscopic properties of uranium hexafluoride which is isoelectronic with the octahedral uranate group. Charge transfer transitions from orbitals having mainly oxygen 2p character to orbitals having mainly uranium 5f charcter have been observed in the region 2.24-˜4 eV. Charge transfer transitions to orbitals having mainly uranium 6d character have been observed at 4.4 eV and at 5.4 eV.

  14. Low-energy lunar transfers using spatial transit orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with natural and artificial low-energy lunar transfers in three-dimensional space. The main contribution of this paper is that the limitations of the planar manifold assumption, which is adopted in previous low-energy orbit design methods, are avoided by describing the transfer orbits with more realistic spatial transit and non-transit orbits. To start, the limitations of the previous design methods for the low-energy trajectories are highlighted, and the boundaries of the spatial transit orbits, which can enter into or escape from the potential well near the Moon through the L1 or L2 bottleneck regions of the zero velocity surface, are defined on a Poincaré section by using the necessary and sufficient condition of transition. Next, by considering the dominant gravity bodies in different orbit segments the motion near the Moon is analyzed in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP). For natural celestial bodies, the statistical characteristics of the lunar collision trajectories are studied. For the artificial celestial bodies, the investigation is focused on the achievable range of inclination and height of the low lunar orbit (LLO). Then, the motion between the Earth and the Moon is studied in the Earth-Moon based Sun-perturbed bicircular four-body problem (B4BP). For natural and artificial celestial bodies, the Earth-origin trajectories and the trajectories from the low Earth orbits are analyzed. Compared to the current planar manifold based design methods, the technique introduced in this paper can evaluate the lunar transfer orbits more accurately. Also, some lunar transfer trajectories which do not exist in the manifold based models can be found, and the heights and inclinations of the parking orbits around the Earth and the Moon can also be analyzed.

  15. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  16. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jílková, Lucie; Hamers, Adrian S.; Hammer, Michael; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distribution in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new host star. The population of the transferred particles can be used to constrain the encounter through which it was delivered. We expect that many stars experienced transfer among their debris discs and planetary systems in their birth environment. This mechanism presents a formation channel for objects on wide orbits of arbitrary inclinations, typically having high eccentricity but possibly also close to circular (eccentricities of about 0.1). Depending on the geometry, such orbital elements can be distinct from those of the objects formed around the star.

  17. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  18. Internal mass transfer in hollow fiber supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiaga, A.M.; Irabien, J.A. )

    1993-03-01

    The study of mass transfer in hollow fiber supported liquid membranes is justified by a large number of separation processes. The analysis starts from the definition of an overall permeability coefficient which is a lumped parameter of a particular system and process conditions which gathers both mass transfer and operation parameters. By applying the film theory the contribution of the interfacial mass-transfer coefficient due to the inner boundary layer and the contribution of the supported liquid membrane permeability coefficient can be separated and analyzed. The study yields overall permeability coefficients that can be compared with those expected from hollow fiber design equations suggested earlier. The second approach considers the continuity mass conservation equation and the associated boundary conditions for the solute in the inner fluid. The analysis by means of the fundamental equations separates the effects of the operation variables such as the hydrodynamic conditions and length and diameter of the fibers from the mass-transfer properties of the system, described by the wall Sherwood number. The scope of the present work is to compare both methods of describing a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane module, analyzing the influence of the internal mass transfer on the design of such systems. In the experimental system under consideration, the simultaneous separation-concentration of phenol from aqueous solutions with hollow fiber supported liquid membrane modules is performed. The influence of the flow rate of the inner aqueous phase on the phenol separation rate has been studied.

  19. Numerical study on passive convective mass transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, G. P.; Muhammed Rafi, K. M.; Deepu, M.

    2017-04-01

    Passive mixing mechanisms are widely used for heat and mass transfer enhancement. Vortices generated in flowfield lead to gradients that favour convective mass transfer. Computations on enhancement of convective mass transfer of sublimating solid fuel by baroclinic torque generated vortices in the wake of a swept ramp placed in high speed flow is presented here. Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM) based computational scheme employed in the present study, to solve compressible turbulent flow field involving species transport, could capture the complex flow features resulted by vortex boundary layer and shock boundary layer interactions. Convective mass transfer is found to get improved in regions near boundary layer by horseshoe vortex and further transported to other regions by counter rotating vortex pair. Vortices resulted by flow expansion near aft wall of wedge and recompression wave-boundary layer interactions also promotes convective mass transport. Extensive computations have been carried out to reveal the role of vortices dominance at various lateral sweep angles in promotion of convective mass transfer in turbulent boundary layer.

  20. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  1. Unsteady Mass transfer Across the Sediment-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Alexander; Grant, Stanley; Stewardson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes across the sediment-water interface (SWI) are of high ecological significance, as they promote biogeochemical processes that support benthic ecosystems within the hyporheic zone. The SWI marks a boundary between the turbulent water column (typically modelled by Navier Stokes equations) and the interstitial pore fluids in the sediment column, which are typically laminar (and modelled by Darcy's law). Although models of these two flow regimes are generally not coupled, flow in the turbulent boundary layer is affected by the sediment permeability and a slip velocity at the SWI, which decays exponentially into the streambed across a characteristic mixing length. Momentum is transferred across this region (known as the Brinkman layer) through the penetration of coherent structures and turbulent mixing, however, these turbulent structures also promote turbulent mass transfer. Mass transfer within the hyporheic zone can be conceptualised in terms of: (1) the downwelling of solutes from the stream; (2) retention of solutes in the sediment; and (3) the upwelling of solutes back into the stream. Recent work by the authors has shown that a mass transfer coefficient can be defined where a downwelling-upwelling unit cell exists across a concentration gradient. Such unit cells are generated at the SWI by pressure variation from: (1) steady-state influences, such as stream geometry and velocity variation; and (2) unsteady pressure waves produced by coherent turbulent structures. With this definition, mass transfer coefficients can be defined for: steady exchange, by adopting the Elliott and Brooks [1997] advective pumping model; and unsteady exchange, induced by streamwise propagation of upwelling-downwelling unit cells migrating downstream with a characteristic celerity associated with turbulent eddies. We hypothesize that beneath the Brinkman layer (where Laplace equation applies) these mass transfer coefficients can be summed to yield the total mass flux. Although, it

  2. Multicomponent NAPL source dissolution: evaluation of mass-transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael A; Widdowson, Mark A; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2012-09-18

    Mass transfer rate coefficients were quantified by employing an inverse modeling technique to high-resolution aqueous phase concentration data observed following an experimental release of a multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a field site. A solute transport model (SEAM3D) was employed to simulate advective-dispersive transport over time coupled to NAPL dissolution. Model calibration was demonstrated by accurately reproducing the observed breakthrough times and peak concentrations at multiple observation points, observed mass discharge at pumping wells, and the reported mass depletions for three soluble NAPL constituents. Vertically variable NAPL mass transfer coefficients were derived for each constituent using an optimized numerical solute transport model, ranging from 0.082 to 2.0 day(-1) across all constituents. Constituent-specific coefficients showed a positive correlation with liquid-phase diffusion coefficients. Application of a time-varying mass transfer coefficient as NAPL mass depleted showed limited sensitivity during which over 80% of the most soluble NAPL constituent dissolved from the source. Long-term simulation results, calibrated to the experimental data and rendered in terms of mass discharge versus source mass depletion, exhibited multistage behavior.

  3. Curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2014-03-01

    Nucleation is often accompanied by heat transfer between the surroundings and a nucleus of a new phase. The interface between two phases gives an additional resistance to this transfer. For small nuclei the interfacial curvature is high, which affects not only equilibrium quantities such as surface tension, but also the transport properties. In particular, high curvature affects the interfacial resistance to heat and mass transfer. We develop a framework for determining the curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer resistances. We determine the interfacial resistances as a function of a curvature. The analysis is performed for a bubble of a one-component fluid and may be extended to various nuclei of multicomponent systems. The curvature dependence of the interfacial resistances is important in modeling transport processes in multiphase systems.

  4. Limiting current technique in the research of mass/heat transfer in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, J.; Grosicki, S.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper the authors focused on the application of the electrochemical limiting diffusion current technique to the study of mass transfer in nanofluid flow. As mass and heat transfer are analogical phenomena, analysing mass transfer helps understand heat transfer processes in nanofluids. The paper begins with a short review of the available literature on the subject followed by the authors' results of mass transfer coefficient measurements and the conclusions concerning mass/heat transfer enhancement in nanofluids.

  5. Agitating mass transfer with a warped disc's shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, H.

    2015-10-01

    For compact objects fed by Roche lobe overflow, accretion-generated X-rays irradiating the donor star can alter gas flow towards the Lagrange point thus varying mass transfer. The latest work specific to this topic consists of simple yet insightful two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations stressing the role of global flow. To explore how a time-varying disc shadow affects mass transfer, I generalize the geometry, employ a robust hydrodynamics solver, and use phase space analysis near the nozzle to include coriolis lift there. Without even exposing the nozzle, a warped disc's shadow can drive mass transfer cycles by shifting the equatorial edges of the irradiation patches in turns: drawing in denser ambient gas before sweeping it into the nozzle. Other important effects remain missing in two-dimensional models, which I discuss along with prospects for more detailed yet efficient models.

  6. Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

  7. FEHM: finite element heat and mass transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1988-03-01

    The finite element heat and mass (FEHM) transfer code is a computer code developed to simulate geothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. It is also applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. It solves the equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media using the finite element method. The code also has provisions for a noncoupled tracer; that is, the tracer solutions do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. It can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model, the numerical solution procedure, and model verification and validation are provided in this report. A user's guide and sample problems are included in the appendices. 17 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  9. Improving the Transition of Care in Patients Transferred Through the Ochsner Medical Center Transfer Center

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Maronge, Genevieve F.; Pinsky, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. Methods We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. Results The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (P<0.0001). Conclusions By including residents in the transfer calls (a result of the kaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects. PMID:23267257

  10. Improving the transition of care in patients transferred through the ochsner medical center transfer center.

    PubMed

    Amedee, Ronald G; Maronge, Genevieve F; Pinsky, William W

    2012-01-01

    Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (P<0.0001). By including residents in the transfer calls (a result of the kaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects.

  11. Mass transfer and disc formation in AGB binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We investigate mass transfer and the formation of discs in binary systems using a combination of numerical simulations and theory. We consider six models distinguished by binary separation, secondary mass and outflow mechanism. Each system consists of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and an accreting secondary. The AGB star loses its mass via a wind. In one of our six models, the AGB star incurs a short period of outburst. In all cases, the secondary accretes part of the ejected mass and also influences the mass-loss rate of the AGB star. The ejected mass may remain gravitationally bound to the binary system and form a circumbinary disc, or contribute to an accretion disc around the secondary. In other cases, the ejecta will escape the binary system. The accretion rate on to the secondary changes non-linearly with binary separation. In our closest binary simulations, our models exemplify the wind Roche lobe overflow while in our wide binary cases, the mass transfer exhibits Bondi-Hoyle accretion. The morphologies of the outflows in the binary systems are varied. The variety may provide clues to how the late AGB phase influences planetary nebula shaping. We employ the adaptive-mesh-refinement code astrobear for our simulations and include ray tracing, radiation transfer, cooling and dust formation. To attain the highest computational efficiency and the most stable results, all simulations are run in the corotating frame.

  12. Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

    1999-10-01

    The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

  13. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  14. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  15. Flow-Dependent Mass Transfer May Trigger Endothelial Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades. PMID:22558132

  16. Earth-to-Moon low energy transfers targeting L1 hyperbolic transit orbits.

    PubMed

    Topputo, Francesco; Vasile, Massimiliano; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco

    2005-12-01

    In the frame of the lunar exploration, numerous future space missions will require maximization of payload mass, and simultaneously achieving reasonable transfer times. To fulfill this request, low energy non-Keplerian orbits could be used to reach the Moon instead of high energetic transfers. The low energy solutions can be separated into two main categories depending on the nature of the trajectory approaching the Moon: low energy transit orbits that approach the Moon from the interior equilibrium point L(1) and weak stability boundary transfers that reach the Moon after passing through L(2). This paper proposes an alternative way to exploit the opportunities offered by L(1) transit orbits for the design of Earth-Moon transfers. First, in a neighborhood of the L(1) point, the three-body dynamics is linearized and written in normal form; then the entire family of nonlinear transit orbits is obtained by selecting the appropriate nontrivial amplitudes associated with the hyperbolic part. The L(1)-Earth arc is close to a 5:2 resonant orbit with the Moon, whose perturbations cause the apogee to rise. In a second step, two selected low altitude parking orbits around the Earth and the Moon are linked with the transit orbit by means of two three-body Lambert arcs, solutions of two two-point boundary value problems. The resulting Earth-to-Moon trajectories prove to be very efficient in the Moon captured arc and save approximately 100 m/sec in Deltav cost when compared to the Hohmann transfer. Furthermore, such solutions demonstrate that Moon capture could be obtained in the frame of the Earth-Moon R3BP neglecting the presence of the Sun.

  17. Mass transfer studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on rotating disk electrodes.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G. sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 µA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 µF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  18. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siang, H.

    1981-11-01

    Based upon the principle of irreversible thermodynamics, the macroscopic conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy, and equilibrium sorption of the porous concrete system, a set of basic equations for simultaneous mass and heat transfer is developed. An implicit finite difference technique is employed to solve this set of nonlinear partial differential equations. Numerical examples, using the theory developed, are illustrated to deepen the general understanding of the drying, thermal characteristics and related phenomena of hydrated concrete. The developed theoretical model is made nondimensional and an order of magnitude analysis is performed to elucidate the transport phenomenum of heat and mass occurring in a concrete body. In addition to diffusion, both the capillary and evaporation-condensation mechanisms, which are strongly affected by the topology of the porous concrete system, are important in the heat and mass transfer processes.

  19. Transiting Sub-stellar companions of Intermediate-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Daniel; Guenther, Eike W.; Heber, Ulrich; Geier, Stephan; Grziwa, Sascha

    2015-09-01

    We use the CoRoT-survey to search for transiting close-in planets of intermediate-mass stars (M* = 1.3 - 2.1 M⊙). We present recent results of our survey. RV-surveys and direct imaging campaigns showed, that intermediate-mass main-sequence stars have more massive planets then solar-like stars. Even brown dwarfs have been found. In our study we concentrated on short-period planets for which a mass-determination is possible. The detection of close-in planets of intermediate-mass stars put strong constraints on the timescales of the formation and migration. We already have identified transiting Jupiter-like planet candidates with short orbital periods and observed these candidates with high-resolution echelle-spectrographs at various Telescopes.

  20. Quantification of the Mass Transfer at Fluid Interfaces in Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismeth, Carina; Manhart, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Mass transfer rates at interfaces in a complex porous media are relevant in many environmental applications and control the functions of natural filter systems in subsurface environments. The mass transfer at fluid interfaces is associated with interface convection caused by local inhomogeneities in interface tension and hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface. If there is a surface tension gradient along the surface a shear stress jump is generated that results in fluid motion along the surface that is called Marangoni effect. These spontaneous convection currents can lead to an increased mass transfer of the transition component at the phase boundary and to an increased mixing of the phases. Therefore compensatory currents at the interface can have a significant influence on the subsurface transport of contaminants in the groundwater area, especially in the vadose zone. Using microfluidic channels and advanced experimental techniques it is possible to measure the fluid flow and mass transfer rates directly and to quantify the effect of the Marangoni convection on the mass transfer at interfaces between a non-aqueous liquid and water with high temporal and spatial resolution. The use of fluorescent particles as well as the recording and analysis of their trajectories is intended to visualize interfacial processes and to quantify the mass transfer at fluid phase boundaries. Concentration gradients at the interface are analysed by spectroscopic methods and allow an assessment of the enrichment and depletion at the phase boundaries. Extensive test series provide the experimental basis for quantifying and analysing the impact of the Marangoni effect on the mass transfer rates at interfaces in porous media in subsurface aquatic environments. Within this research project we concentrate on the effect of Marangoni convection on the mass transfer near an 1-octanol-water interface, which serves as a well defined proxy for non-aqueous phase liquids in porous media

  1. N-body Simulation of Binary Star Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutyra, Taylor; Sumpter, William

    2017-01-01

    Over 70% of the stars in our galaxy are multiple star systems, many of which are two stars that orbit around a common center of mass. The masses of the individual stars can be found using Newton’s and Kepler’s Laws. This allows astronomers to use these systems as astrophysical laboratories to study properties and processes of stars and galaxies. Among the many types observed, the dynamics of contact systems are the most interesting because they exhibit mass transfer, which changes the composition and function of both stars. The process by which this mass exchange takes place is not well understood. The lack of extensive mass transfer analysis, inadequate theoretical models, and the large time scale of this process are reasons for our limited understanding. In this work, a model was made to give astronomers a method for gaining a deeper knowledge and visual intuition of how the mass transfer between binary stars takes place. We have built the foundations for a simulation of arbitrary systems, which we plan to elaborate on in the future to include thermodynamics and nuclear processes.

  2. 23 CFR 810.210 - Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. 810... TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.210 Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. (a) Upon being...

  3. 23 CFR 810.210 - Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. 810... TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.210 Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. (a) Upon being...

  4. 23 CFR 810.210 - Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. 810... TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.210 Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. (a) Upon being...

  5. 23 CFR 810.210 - Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. 810... TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.210 Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. (a) Upon being...

  6. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  7. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  8. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  9. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  10. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  11. 23 CFR 810.210 - Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. 810... TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Making Highway Rights-of-Way Available for Mass Transit Projects § 810.210 Authorization for use and occupancy by mass transit. (a) Upon being...

  12. TWIN BINARIES: STUDIES OF STABILITY, MASS TRANSFER, AND COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, J. C.; Holtzman, W.; Gearity, K.; Dooley, K. L.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F. A.

    2011-08-20

    Motivated by suggestions that binaries with almost equal-mass components ('twins') play an important role in the formation of double neutron stars and may be rather abundant among binaries, we study the stability of synchronized close and contact binaries with identical components in circular orbits. In particular, we investigate the dependency of the innermost stable circular orbit on the core mass, and we study the coalescence of the binary that occurs at smaller separations. For twin binaries composed of convective main-sequence stars, subgiants, or giants with low-mass cores (M{sub c} {approx}< 0.15M, where M is the mass of a component), a secular instability is reached during the contact phase, accompanied by a dynamical mass transfer instability at the same or at a slightly smaller orbital separation. Binaries that come inside this instability limit transfer mass gradually from one component to the other and then coalesce quickly as mass is lost through the outer Lagrangian points. For twin giant binaries with moderate to massive cores (M{sub c} {approx}> 0.15M), we find that stable contact configurations exist at all separations down to the Roche limit, when mass shedding through the outer Lagrangian points triggers a coalescence of the envelopes and leaves the cores orbiting in a central tight binary. In addition to the formation of binary neutron stars, we also discuss the implications of our results for the production of planetary nebulae with double degenerate central binaries.

  13. Multiscale computations of mass accumulation effect on mass transfer in bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-11-01

    Mass transfer in bubbly flow generally takes place on a much smaller length and time scale than the length and time scale of the momentum flow, resulting in a thin mass boundary layer around the bubbles. We developed a multiscale model to solve a boundary layer equation for the mass boundary layer next to the bubble interface, assuming zero mass concentration in the far field, which couples with the rest of domain using a source/sink term. Here, we extend our model to account for non-zero concentration next to the mass boundary layer. Comparison of simple case studies in 1D and 2D problems show good agreement between the fully resolved solution and the solution on a much coarser grid using our model. We study the effect of mass accumulation in a domain and also the effect of bubble moving into the wake of another bubble on the mass transfer. This study was funded by NSF Grant CBET-1132410.

  14. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  15. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  16. Atmospheric composition affects heat- and mass-transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    For environmental control system functions sensitive to atmospheric composition, components are test-operated in helium-oxygen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures, pure oxygen, and air. Transient heat- and mass-transfer tests are conducted for carbon dioxide adsorption on molecular sieve and for water vapor adsorption on silica gel.

  17. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient combined heat and mass transfer across a rectangular cavity is performed by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. The physical parameters are selected to represent a range of possible crystal growth in solutions. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data to confirm the accuracy of the results. Good qualitative agreements are obtained for the average mass transfer rate across the cavity. Also, qualitative agreements are observed for the global development of thermal and solute fields. It is found that the thermal and solute fields become highly oscillatory when the thermal and solute Grashof numbers are large. Oscillations are probably caused by a number of different instability mechanisms. By reducing the gravity some of these instabilities were made to disappear at the lower Grashof numbers. Transient temperature and solute distribution near the crystal growing surface are highly non-uniform at the higher Grashof numbers. These non-uniformities are less severe in the reduced gravity environments but still exist. The effects of convection on the rate of average mass transfer are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of conduction in the range of Grashof numbers studied. Dependency of mass transfer rate on the Grashof number indicates that the convection effects many not be negligible even in the microgravity environments for the range of parameters investigated.

  18. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  19. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient combined heat and mass transfer across a rectangular cavity is performed. The physical parameters are selected to represent a range of possible crystal growth in solutions. Good agreements with measurement data are observed. It is found that the thermal and solute fields become highly oscillatory when the thermal and solute Grashof numbers are large.

  20. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  1. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 μm and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets.

  2. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  3. Interphase mass transfer between fluids in subsurface formations: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Copty, Nadim K.; Scheytt, Traugott; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art on interphase mass transfer between immiscible fluids in porous media with focus on the factors that have significant influence on this process. In total close to 300 papers were reviewed focusing to a large extent on the literature relating to NAPL contamination of the subsurface. The large body of work available on this topic was organized according to the length scale of the conducted studies, namely the pore, meso and field scales. The interrelation of interphase mass transfer at these different scales is highlighted. To gain further insight into interphase mass transfer, published studies were discussed and evaluated in terms of the governing flow configurations defined in terms of the wettability and mobility of the different phases. Such organization of the existing literature enables the identification of the interfacial domains that would have significant impact on interphase mass transfer. Available modeling approaches at the various length scales are discussed with regard to current knowledge on the physics of this process. Future research directions are also suggested.

  4. LUT observations of the mass-transferring binary AI Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Ergang; Liu, Nianping

    2016-06-01

    Complete UV band light curve of the eclipsing binary AI Dra was observed with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) in October 2014. It is very useful to adopt this continuous and uninterrupted light curve to determine physical and orbital parameters of the binary system. Photometric solutions of the spot model are obtained by using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is confirmed that AI Dra is a semi-detached binary with secondary component filling its critical Roche lobe, which indicates that a mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one should happen. Orbital period analysis based on all available eclipse times suggests a secular period increase and two cyclic variations. The secular period increase was interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of 4.12 ×10^{-8}M_{⊙}/yr, which is in agreement with the photometric solutions. Two cyclic oscillations were due to light travel-time effect (LTTE) via the presence of two cool stellar companions in a near 2:1 mean-motion resonance. Both photometric solutions and orbital period analysis confirm that AI Dra is a mass-transferring binary, the massive primary is filling 69 % of its critical Roche lobe. After the primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration.

  5. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  6. Turbulent mass transfer in the furnace of high output boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Noskievic, P.; Kolat, P.; Novacek, A.

    1995-12-31

    The up-to-date identification methods for the evaluation of combustion process quality provide a picture of what is taking place in the furnace. The Energetics Department of VSB-TU Ostrava concentrates its attention on untraditional methods which proceed from an analysis of turbulent transfer phenomena, especially the transfer of mass in the furnace of pulverized boilers. Particularly in the region of burners, this mass transfer influences the quality of the combustion process as well as the formation of solid and gaseous emissions. Measurements of combustion aerodynamics in the furnace of high output boilers are part of the Czech Clean Coal Technology program. A complex approach to these problems could lead to a decrease of pollutants released.

  7. Heat and Mass Transfer Model in Freeze-Dried Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfat, Sayahdin; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    There are big problems in agriculture sector every year. One of the major problems is abundance of agricultural product during the peak of harvest season that is not matched by an increase in demand of agricultural product by consumers, this causes a wasted agricultural products. Alternative way was food preservation by freeze dried method. This method was already using heat transfer through conduction and convection to reduce water quality in the food. The main objective of this research was to design a model heat and mass transfer in freeze-dried medium. We had two steps in this research, the first step was design of medium as the heat injection site and the second was simulate heat and mass transfer of the product. During simulation process, we use physical property of some agriculture product. The result will show how temperature and moisture distribution every second. The method of research use finite element method (FEM) and will be illustrated in three dimensional.

  8. Modelling of heat and mass transfer processes in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Ginalski, Maciej K; Nowak, Andrzej J; Wrobel, Luiz C

    2008-09-01

    This paper reviews some of our recent applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model heat and mass transfer problems in neonatology and investigates the major heat and mass transfer mechanisms taking place in medical devices such as incubators and oxygen hoods. This includes novel mathematical developments giving rise to a supplementary model, entitled infant heat balance module, which has been fully integrated with the CFD solver and its graphical interface. The numerical simulations are validated through comparison tests with experimental results from the medical literature. It is shown that CFD simulations are very flexible tools that can take into account all modes of heat transfer in assisting neonatal care and the improved design of medical devices.

  9. Emittance growth due to negative-mass instability above transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1994-08-01

    Due to space-charge effect, there is a growth of bunch emittance across transition as a result of negative-mass instability. The models of growth at cutoff frequency and growth from high-frequency Schottky noise are reviewed. The difficulties of performing reliable simulations are discussed. An intuitive self-bunching model for estimating emittance growth is presented.

  10. Mass and heat transfer model of Tubular Solar Still

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Amimul; Fukuhara, Teruyuki

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, a new mass and heat transfer model of a Tubular Solar Still (TSS) was proposed incorporating various mass and heat transfer coefficients taking account of the humid air properties inside the still. The heat balance of the humid air and the mass balance of the water vapor in the humid air were formulized for the first time. As a result, the proposed model enabled to calculate the diurnal variations of the temperature, water vapor density and relative humidity of the humid air, and to predict the hourly condensation flux besides the temperatures of the water, cover and trough, and the hourly evaporation flux. The validity of the proposed model was verified using the field experimental results carried out in Fukui, Japan and Muscat, Oman in 2008. The diurnal variations of the calculated temperatures and water vapor densities had a good agreement with the observed ones. Furthermore, the proposed model can predict the daily and hourly production flux precisely. (author)

  11. V794 Aql: evolution at high mass transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2014-09-01

    V794 Aql, a VYScl or nova-like star in which a white dwarf, accretes at very high mass transfer rate mdot (~10(-8) solar masses) from a main sequence binary companion. Very few interacting white dwarf binaries show clear physical manifestation of such high mass transfer rate, which is very important to understand how recurrent novae and type I supernovae occur. Periodic "low states" at all wavelengths from optical to X-rays can be explained with a limit cycle that regulates the mdot through a physical mechanisms that could be due to a number of root causes: irradiation induced wind from the secondary and its periodic halt, spots on the secondary, the magnetic field of the WD. We propose to obtain a HETG spectrum that will clarify how these systems evolve.

  12. Fem Formulation for Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium can be modelled using three partial differential equations namely, momentum equation, energy equation and mass diffusion. These three equations are coupled to each other by some common terms that turn the whole phenomenon into a complex problem with inter-dependable variables. The current article describes the finite element formulation of heat and mass transfer in porous medium with respect to Cartesian coordinates. The problem under study is formulated into algebraic form of equations by using Galerkin's method with the help of two-node linear triangular element having three nodes. The domain is meshed with smaller sized elements near the wall region and bigger size away from walls.

  13. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  14. A transition mass in the local Tully-Fisher relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond C.; Kassin, Susan A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Janice C.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Peth, Michael; Tchernyshyov, Kirill

    2015-09-01

    We study the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation (TFR; stellar mass versus rotation velocity) for a morphologically blind selection of emission line galaxies in the field at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.375. Kinematics (σg, Vrot) are measured from emission lines in Keck/DEIMOS spectra and quantitative morphology is measured from V- and I-band Hubble images. We find a transition stellar mass in the TFR, log M*/M⊙ = 9.5. Above this mass, nearly all galaxies are rotation dominated, on average more morphologically disc-like according to quantitative morphology, and lie on a relatively tight TFR. Below this mass, the TFR has significant scatter to low rotation velocity and galaxies can either be rotation-dominated discs on the TFR or asymmetric or compact galaxies which scatter off. We refer to this transition mass as the `mass of disc formation', Mdf because above it all star-forming galaxies form discs (except for a small number of major mergers and highly star-forming systems), whereas below it a galaxy may or may not form a disc.

  15. Simultaneous convective heat and mass transfer in impingement ink drying

    SciTech Connect

    Can, M.

    1998-08-01

    Effective and economical drying of thin ink films is essential in the printing, packaging and coating industries. In evaporative drying, high heat and mass transfer rates are commonly achieved by means of high velocity impinging air jets. To provide data for dryer design a program of research has been implemented to study the heat and mass transfer processes which underlie the drying of thin ink films. The heat transfer situation under impinging air jets is outlined and some experimental results are presented. Optimization of nozzle arrays for impinging air jets is analyzed for practical applications. A non-contact infra-red technique for continuously monitoring the ink drying process is described and drying curves for an ink based on a single solvent (4-Methyl-2-pentanol-MIBC) are presented. Heat and mass transfer theory has been used to predict drying times in the constant rate drying period. These predictions have been compared with experimentally determined drying times. This research has served to confirm the fundamental importance of the drying curve as a basis for dryer design.

  16. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  17. Mass Transfer via Low Velocity Impacts into Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmak, Stephanie; Colwell, Josh E.; Brisset, Julie; Dove, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    The study of low velocity collisions (<1 m/s) is essential to understand the growth and formation of aggregates in a number of environments in planetary systems. The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) and Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment (PRIME) experiments produced observations of mass transfer from regolith onto an impactor at these velocities in microgravity. We have subsequently carried out ground-based experiments in which a cm-scale sphere impacts and rebounds from a bed of granular material in 1-g laboratory conditions at low impact speeds with the aid of a spring. This allows impacts at v<1 m/s and ensures rebound of the impactor, with the spring providing enough force to overcome gravity. Preliminary results from an impact of a brass impactor into sand (200-500 μm) produced a monolayer of granular material onto the impactor, but the grains are not cohesive enough to allow a significant mass transfer under these conditions. Further experiments with a range of regolith properties, impactor composition and surface properties, impact velocities, and atmospheric conditions will be performed in the laboratory to study the effects of each of these properties on the contact transfer of regolith onto the impactor. Further microgravity experiments with PRIME and in a small drop tower are planned to then study bulk mass transfer with conditions informed by the ground-based experiments. Impacts with the COLLIDE and PRIME microgravity experiments showed mass transfer at speeds < 40 cm/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant and quartz sand targets. We will present the free-fall and laboratory results and implications for the collisional evolution of dust, pebbles and boulders in the protoplanetary disk as well as particles in planetary ring systems.

  18. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  19. Evaporative mass transfer behavior of a complex immiscible liquid.

    PubMed

    McColl, Colleen M; Johnson, Gwynn R; Brusseau, Mark L

    2008-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult's law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium.

  20. Heat and mass transfer in porous cavity: Assisting flow

    SciTech Connect

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out. The governing partial differential equations are non-dimensionalised and solved using finite element method. The left vertical surface of the cavity is maintained at constant temperature and concentration which are higher than the ambient temperature and concentration applied at right vertical surface. The top and bottom walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Heat transfer is assumed to take place by natural convection and radiation. The investigation is carried out for assisting flow when buoyancy and gravity force act in same direction.

  1. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  2. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). It was found that the effective coupling is reduced compared to donor/acceptor pairs dissolved in simple liquids. In the 2nd half of thesis we have addressed the question of the dynamics of phase transitions. We have demonstrated the ability to use the fluorescent excitation-transfer technique to study the demixing of liquids specifically, kinetics of demixing water and 2,6-dimethylpyridine. These two liquids possess a low critical temperature point, which allowed us to use a temperature jump from a laser pulse to initiate the process of phase separation. It was found that Coumarin480 laser dye and HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid) fluorescent dye have significantly different solubilities in the components of the mixture. These dyes undergo excitation transfer from Coumarin480 to HPTS in the uniform state, but not in the phase-separated state. A system with a temperature jump pump and an excitation transfer probe measured the time scale of the initial step of the phase separation.

  3. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  4. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  5. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  6. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  7. Blood flow and mass transfer regulation of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Neeves, Keith B.

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulates coagulation and fibrin formation by controlling the transport, or mass transfer, of zymogens, co-factors, enzymes, and inhibitors to, from, and within a growing thrombus. The rate of mass transfer of these solutes relative to their consumption or production by coagulation reactions determines, in part, the rate of thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and thrombi growth. Experimental studies on the influence of blood flow on specific coagulation reactions are reviewed here, along with a theoretical framework that predicts how flow influences surface-bound coagulation binding and enzymatic reactions. These flow-mediated transport mechanisms are also used to interpret the role of binding site densities and injury size on initiating coagulation and fibrin deposition. The importance of transport of coagulation proteins within the interstitial spaces of thrombi is shown to influence thrombi architecture, growth, and arrest. PMID:27133256

  8. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser.

  9. Geoelectrical inference of mass transfer parameters using temporal moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to infer mass transfer parameters based on (1) an analytical model that relates the temporal moments of mobile and bulk concentration and (2) a bicontinuum modification to Archie's law. Whereas conventional geochemical measurements preferentially sample from the mobile domain, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is sensitive to bulk electrical conductivity and, thus, electrolytic solute in both the mobile and immobile domains. We demonstrate the new approach, in which temporal moments of collocated mobile domain conductivity (i.e., conventional sampling) and ERT-estimated bulk conductivity are used to calculate heterogeneous mass transfer rate and immobile porosity fractions in a series of numerical column experiments. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Mass-transfer in close binary and their companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Zhu, Liying; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    Secular and/or cyclical orbital period variations of close binaries can be derived by analyzing the (O-C) diagram. The secular variations are usually explained as mass transfer between components, while the most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes is the light-travel time effect (LTTE) through the presence of a third body. Mass transfer and additional companions in close binary systems are important for understanding the formation and evolution of the systems. Here, UV light curves of several close binaries based on the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) observations are presented and analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) method. Then, based on those light-curve solutions and new analysis of the orbital period variations, the multiplicity, geometrical structure and evolution state of targets are discussed.

  11. Modelling mass transfer during venting/soil vapour extraction: Non-aqueous phase liquid/gas mass transfer coefficient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrael, D.; Kacem, M.; Benadda, B.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate how the simulation of the venting/soil vapour extraction (SVE) process is affected by the mass transfer coefficient, using a model comprising five partial differential equations describing gas flow and mass conservation of phases and including an expression accounting for soil saturation conditions. In doing so, we test five previously reported quations for estimating the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)/gas initial mass transfer coefficient and evaluate an expression that uses a reference NAPL saturation. Four venting/SVE experiments utilizing a sand column are performed with dry and non-saturated sand at low and high flow rates, and the obtained experimental results are subsequently simulated, revealing that hydrodynamic dispersion cannot be neglected in the estimation of the mass transfer coefficient, particularly in the case of low velocities. Among the tested models, only the analytical solution of a convection-dispersion equation and the equation proposed herein are suitable for correctly modelling the experimental results, with the developed model representing the best choice for correctly simulating the experimental results and the tailing part of the extracted gas concentration curve.

  12. Vaporization of Graphitic Materials at High Mass Transfer Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    graphite 2. Carbon sublimation 3. High temperature carbon response 4. Sublimation kinetics |ITR\\CT fCanllim an rararaa «14a II nacaaaair an« Htnlllr *r...8217»’» numbmi) iThe thermochemical sublimation response of ATJ-S graphite in both low and high mass transfer convective environments was studied... sublimation effects com- pared to JANAF equilibrium sublimation predictions. Extrapolation of the inferred kinetic sublimation effects to the high

  13. Mass transfer ways of ultraviolet printing ink ingredients into foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Jung, T; Simat, T J; Altkofer, W

    2010-07-01

    The case of isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) showed conclusively that the ingredients of ultraviolet printing inks may migrate into packaged foodstuffs. For multilayered materials like beverage cartons, the only way that mass transfer can occur is by the so-called set-off effect. In contrast, in the case of rigid plastics like yoghurt cups, two other methods of mass transfer, permeation and gas phase, have to be considered. In cooperation with producers of ink, plastic cups and yoghurt, a project was conducted in order to elucidate the mass transfer of ink ingredients. In addition, the influence of storage time and the age of ultraviolet lamps on the migration level was examined. The suitability of 50% ethanol as a simulant for yoghurt was also tested. ITX was chosen as a model migrant, as it is easily detectable. Furthermore, the migration of two other substances, the photo-initiator 2-methyl-4'-(methylthio)-2-morpholinopropiophenone (MTMP) and the amine synergist ethyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDAB), which may be used in combination with ITX, was studied. Before being filled with yoghurt or 50% ethanol, the printed cups were stored under different contact conditions, with and without contact between the inner layer and the printed surfaces, in order to distinguish between the possible mass transfer ways. All analyses were performed by means of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection (HPLC-DAD/FLD). It was shown that contamination with ITX and EDAB occurs via set-off and that the degree of migration increases with lamp age and storage time of the unfilled cups. Migration of MTMP was not detectable. The results show that besides the careful selection of the appropriate raw materials for printing ink, a close monitoring of the process also plays a major role in migration control. In addition, the results proved that 50% ethanol is a suitable simulant for yoghurt.

  14. Predicting mass rapid transit noise levels on an elevated station.

    PubMed

    Pamanikabud, Pichai; Paoprayoon, Suwajchai

    2003-04-01

    This study developed a noise prediction model for elevated mass rapid transit (MRT) platforms. Relevant physical and operational parameters (e.g. cruise speed, acceleration and deceleration rates for trains, building façade setbacks and so on) were collected from the Bangkok mass transit system (BTS), the first elevated MRT system operated in Bangkok, Thailand. The equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (L(Aeq)) were collected from both sides of the MRT stations at the center of each platform. The relevant parameters were collected on both platforms and ground level, on both sides of MRT stations. These parameters were statistically tested to determine their correlation with MRT noise. The final model was built from highly correlated parameters using multiple regression analysis with a stepwise regression technique. Statistical evaluation showed a high degree of goodness-of-fit test for the model to the observed data. Therefore, it can be efficiently used for the projection of MRT noise in the affected areas.

  15. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  16. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  17. Mass transfer controlled by fracturing in micritic carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, James; Coulon, Michel; Gaviglio, Patrick

    2002-05-01

    The fractured Coniacian chalk from the Omey area (Paris Basin, France) displays strong evidence of modifications controlled by brittle deformation. Fracturing is associated with important changes in pore space (decrease in total porosity and pore interconnection, change in distribution of pore access diameters and capillary characteristics), nannofacies (gradual evolution from a point-contact fabric to a welded, interlocked or coalescent fabric) and chemical composition (Sr concentration decrease). These modifications result from fluid-rock interaction that control significant mass transfer (percentage of secondary calcite >50%). Sr is a remarkable indicator of these mass transfers. Sr analyses allowed us to prove that the deformed zone (26.7 m) is wider than the fractured zone (11.3 m). They also indicate that the footwall block is less affected than the hanging wall block. A physicochemical model of the deformation mechanism is proposed. It shows that a cyclic process of fracturing controls the temporal evolution of the fluid saturation and fluid pressure and, consequently, the mass transfer.

  18. Predicting heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Emmanuel, S.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures are abundant in the subsurface and affect many relevant single- and multi-phase transport processes such as gas and oil extraction, contaminant transport, or geothermal reservoir engineering. However, making reliable predictions of heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media is an outstanding challenge due to its multi-scale nature and the orders-of-magnitude varations in transport rates. Direct high-resolution simulations provide fundamental insights into the local advective and diffusive transport processes in fractured porous media. However, this approach is intractable for inverse simulations because of its high computational requirements. Continuous Time Random Walks on the other hand are a viable alternative and general way to model heat and mass transfer in structurally complex and multi-scale geological media, particularly for inverse problems. But they do not offer the same insights into local transport processes as direct numerical simulations. Here we combine both approaches to simulate the detailed transport processes occurring during heat and mass transfer in fractured porous media and analyse how these affect the breakthrough curves used to calibrate the Continuous Time Random Walks. We show that heat transport in fractured porous media can be anomalous, i.e. characterised by early breakthrough and long tailing, like it is well known for solute transport. We also demonstrate that a careful analysis of the solute breakthrough curves can yield insights into the heterogeneity of the fracture pattern and the transport occurring between fracture and matrix as well as within the matrix and fractures.

  19. Structure evolution and phase transition in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of level structures due to the unique parity orbitals g9 /2, h11 /2, and i13 /2 in odd-mass nuclei from Zn to Am is studied within a unified framework, by correlations between ratios of excitation energies in both odd-mass nuclei and their even-even core nuclei. These plots reveal regularities that can be understood in terms of the particle-plus-rotor model, as evolutions along its three limiting coupling schemes: weak coupling, decoupling, and strong coupling, and transitions between them. Peculiar transitions between the decoupling and strong coupling schemes are found in both i13 /2 structures of neutron-odd nuclei and h11 /2 structures of proton-odd nuclei, at neutron numbers around 90 and 70, respectively. These are correlated with the critical shape phase transitions from vibrator to rotor from the even-even nuclei in the same regions and are characterized as critical phase transitions too. This behavior is corroborated with a nonmonotonic behavior of the differential variation of the two-neutron separation energies in the same nuclear regions.

  20. Low-mass eclipsing binaries in the WFCAM Transit Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Patricia; Diaz, Marcos; Barrado, David; Birkby, Jayne

    2017-10-01

    The characterization of short-period detached low-mass binaries, by the determination of their physical and orbital parameters, reveal the most precise basic parameters of low-mass stars. Particularly, when photometric and spectroscopic data of eclipsing binaries (EBs) are combined. Recently, 16 new low-mass EBs were discovered by the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS), however, only three of them were fully characterized. Therefore, new spectroscopic data were already acquired with the objective to characterize five new detached low-mass EBs discovered in the WTS, with short periods between 0.59 and 1.72 days. A preliminary analysis of the radial velocity and light curves was performed, where we have derived orbital separations of 2.88 to 6.69 R ⊙, and considering both components, we have found stellar radii ranging from 0.40 to 0.80 R ⊙, and masses between 0.24 and 0.71 M ⊙. In addition to the determination of the orbital parameters of these systems, the relation between mass, radius and orbital period of these objects can be investigated in order to study the mass-radius relationship and the radius anomaly in the low main-sequence.

  1. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  2. Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Thomas B

    2016-03-01

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) measures gas-phase compounds in ambient air and headspace samples before using chemical ionization to produce positively charged molecules, which are detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This ionization method uses a gentle proton transfer reaction method between the molecule of interest and protonated water, or hydronium ion (H3O+), to produce limited fragmentation of the parent molecule. The ions produced are primarily positively charged with the mass of the parent ion, plus an additional proton. Ion concentration is determined by adding the number of ions counted at the molecular ion’s mass-to-charge ratio to the number of air molecules in the reaction chamber, which can be identified according to the pressure levels in the reaction chamber. The PTRMS allows many volatile organic compounds in ambient air to be detected at levels from 10–100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The response time is 1 to 10 seconds.

  3. Mass transfer to blood flowing through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifuddin; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2009-03-01

    The present investigation deals with a mathematical model representing the mass transfer to blood streaming through the arteries under stenotic condition. The mass transport refers to the movement of atherogenic molecules, that is, blood-borne components, such as oxygen and low-density lipoproteins from flowing blood into the arterial walls or vice versa. The blood flowing through the artery is treated to be Newtonian and the arterial wall is considered to be rigid having differently shaped stenoses in its lumen arising from various types of abnormal growth or plaque formation. The nonlinear unsteady pulsatile flow phenomenon unaffected by concentration-field of the macromolecules is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations together with the equation of continuity while that of mass transfer is controlled by the convection-diffusion equation. The governing equations of motion accompanied by appropriate choice of the boundary conditions are solved numerically by MAC(Marker and Cell) method and checked numerical stability with desired degree of accuracy. The quantitative analysis carried out finally includes the respective profiles of the flow-field and concentration along with their distributions over the entire arterial segment as well. The key factors like the wall shear stress and Sherwood number are also examined for further qualitative insight into the flow and mass transport phenomena through arterial stenosis. The present results show quite consistency with several existing results in the literature which substantiate sufficiently to validate the applicability of the model under consideration.

  4. Mass Transfer Model of Desulfurization in the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Dong, Yan-Wu; Li, Yang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Fu-Bin

    2017-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the slag on desulfurization during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process with a focus of developing a mass transfer model to understand the mechanism of desulfurization. Stainless steel 1Cr21Ni5Ti was used as the electrode and remelted with two different kinds of slags using a 50-kg ESR furnace. The contents of sulfur along the axial direction of product ingots were analyzed. It was found that the sulfur content of 350 ppm in the electrode is reduced to 71 to 95 ppm in the ingot by remelting with the slag containing 5 wt pct of CaO, and lowered more to 47 to 59 ppm with another slag having 20 wt pct CaO. On the basis of the penetration and film theories, the theoretical model developed in this work well elucidates the kinetics of desulfurization revealing the mechanism of sulfur transfer during the ESR process. The calculation results obtained from the model agree well with the experimental results. The model indicates that when sulfur content in electrode is given, there is a corresponding minimum value of sulfur content in the ingot due to the kinetics limit. This lowest sulfur content cannot be further reduced even with increasing L S (sulfur distribution coefficient between metal and slag phases) or decreasing sulfur content in the slag. Constant addition of extra amount of CaO to the molten slag with the increase of sulfur content in the slag during the remelting process can improve the macrosegregation of sulfur distributed along the axial direction of ESR ingots. Since the rate-determining steps of the sulfur mass transfer lie in the metal phase, adding calcium as deoxidizer can change mass transfer of sulfur and thus promote desulfurization further during the ESR process.

  5. Mass Transfer Model of Desulfurization in the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Dong, Yan-Wu; Li, Yang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Fu-Bin

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the slag on desulfurization during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process with a focus of developing a mass transfer model to understand the mechanism of desulfurization. Stainless steel 1Cr21Ni5Ti was used as the electrode and remelted with two different kinds of slags using a 50-kg ESR furnace. The contents of sulfur along the axial direction of product ingots were analyzed. It was found that the sulfur content of 350 ppm in the electrode is reduced to 71 to 95 ppm in the ingot by remelting with the slag containing 5 wt pct of CaO, and lowered more to 47 to 59 ppm with another slag having 20 wt pct CaO. On the basis of the penetration and film theories, the theoretical model developed in this work well elucidates the kinetics of desulfurization revealing the mechanism of sulfur transfer during the ESR process. The calculation results obtained from the model agree well with the experimental results. The model indicates that when sulfur content in electrode is given, there is a corresponding minimum value of sulfur content in the ingot due to the kinetics limit. This lowest sulfur content cannot be further reduced even with increasing L S (sulfur distribution coefficient between metal and slag phases) or decreasing sulfur content in the slag. Constant addition of extra amount of CaO to the molten slag with the increase of sulfur content in the slag during the remelting process can improve the macrosegregation of sulfur distributed along the axial direction of ESR ingots. Since the rate-determining steps of the sulfur mass transfer lie in the metal phase, adding calcium as deoxidizer can change mass transfer of sulfur and thus promote desulfurization further during the ESR process.

  6. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in swirling flows (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, A. I.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Popov, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Research results of Russian and foreign scientists of heat and mass transfer in whirling flows, swirling effect, superficial vortex generators, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscales, burning at swirl of the flow, and technologies and apparatuses with the use of whirling currents for industry and power generation were presented and discussed at the "Heat and Mass Transfer in Whirling Currents" 5th International Conference. The choice of rational forms of the equipment flow parts when using whirling and swirling flows to increase efficiency of the heat-power equipment and of flow regimes and burning on the basis of deep study of the flow and heat transfer local parameters was set as the main research prospect. In this regard, there is noticeable progress in research methods of whirling and swirling flows. The number of computational treatments of swirling flows' local parameters has been increased. Development and advancement of the up to date computing models and national productivity software are very important for this process. All experimental works are carried out with up to date research methods of the local thermoshydraulic parameters, which enable one to reveal physical mechanisms of processes: PIV and LIV visualization techniques, high-speed and infrared photography, high speed registration of parameters of high-speed processes, etc. There is a problem of improvement of researchers' professional skills in the field of fluid mechanics to set adequately mathematics and physics problems of aerohydrodynamics for whirling and swirling flows and numerical and pilot investigations. It has been pointed out that issues of improvement of the cooling system and thermal protection effectiveness of heat-power and heat-transfer equipment units are still actual. It can be solved successfully using whirling and swirling flows as simple low power consumption exposing on the flow method and heat transfer augmentation.

  7. Restrained Ion Population Transfer: A Novel Ion Transfer Method for Mass Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Skulason, Gunnar; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-06-30

    With modern Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometers, ions are created and accumulated exterior to the mass analyzer. The ion accumulation event takes place in a region of higher pressure which allows ions to be thermally cooled before being given kinetic energy and accelerated toward the ICR cell where they are to be decelerated and re-trapped. When gated trapping is used to collect ions in the ICR cell for analysis, mass discrimination can occur due to time-of-flight effects. Also, trapping ions with large axial kinetic energy can decrease the performance of the ICR instrument when compared to the analysis of thermally-cooled ions located at the trap center. Therefore, it is desirable to limit the energy imparted in the ions within the ICR cell as well as minimize time-of-flight effects. The approach presented here for ion transfer called restrained ion population transfer or RIPT provides complete axial control of an ion population throughout the entire transfer sequence from the accumulation region to the ICR cell. This is accomplished by utilization of a number of quadrupole segments arranged in series with independent control of the dc bias voltage applied to each segment of the quadrupole ion guide. This approach circumvents problems associated with time-of-flight effects and minimizes the energy imparted to the ions allowing transfer of the cooled ion packet from the ion accumulation region to the ICR cell. Initial data are presented to illustrate feasibility of restrained ion population transfer. RIPT was also modeled with SIMION 7.0 and simulation results that support our feasibility studies of the ions transfer process are presented.

  8. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  9. Mathematical model of mass transfer at electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Sergey V.; Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Kobzareva, Tatyana Yu.; Gromov, Victor E.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a model of convective mass transfer at electron beam treatment with beams in titanium alloys subjected to electro-explosion alloying by titanium diboride powder. The proposed model is based on the concept that treatment with concentrated flows of energy results in the initiation of vortices in the melted layer. The formation mechanism of these vortices rooted in the idea that the availability of temperature drop leads to the initiation of the thermo-capillary convection. For the melted layer of metal the equations of the convective heat transfer and boundary conditions in terms of the evaporated material are written. The finite element solution of these equations showed that electron-beam treatment results in the formation of multi-vortex structure that in developing captures all new areas of material. It leads to the fact that the strengthening particles are observed at the depth increasing many times the depth of their penetration according to the diffusion mechanism. The distribution of micro-hardness at depth and the thickness of strengthening zone determined from these data supported the view that proposed model of the convective mass transfer describes adequately the processes going on in the treatment with low-energy high-current electron beam.

  10. Influence of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lima Neto, Iran E; Parente, Priscila A B

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an integral model to evaluate the impact of gas transfer on the hydrodynamics of bubble plumes. The model is based on the Gaussian type self-similarity and functional relationships for the entrainment coefficient and factor of momentum amplification due to turbulence. The impact of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics is investigated considering different bubble sizes, gas flow rates and water depths. The results revealed a relevant impact when fine bubbles are considered, even for moderate water depths. Additionally, model simulations indicate that for weak bubble plumes (i.e., with relatively low flow rates and large depths and slip velocities), both dissolution and turbulence can affect plume hydrodynamics, which demonstrates the importance of taking the momentum amplification factor relationship into account. For deeper water conditions, simulations of bubble dissolution/decompression using the present model and classical models available in the literature resulted in a very good agreement for both aeration and oxygenation processes. Sensitivity analysis showed that the water depth, followed by the bubble size and the flow rate are the most important parameters that affect plume hydrodynamics. Lastly, dimensionless correlations are proposed to assess the impact of mass transfer on plume hydrodynamics, including both the aeration and oxygenation modes.

  11. Masses of Kepler-46b, c from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad-Olivera, Ximena; Nesvorný, David; Kipping, David M.; Roig, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    We use 16 quarters of the Kepler mission data to analyze the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the extrasolar planet Kepler-46b (KOI-872). Our dynamical fits confirm that the TTVs of this planet (period P={33.648}-0.005+0.004 days) are produced by a non-transiting planet Kepler-46c (P={57.325}-0.098+0.116 days). The Bayesian inference tool MultiNest is used to infer the dynamical parameters of Kepler-46b and Kepler-46c. We find that the two planets have nearly coplanar and circular orbits, with eccentricities ≃ 0.03 somewhat higher than previously estimated. The masses of the two planets are found to be {M}b={0.885}-0.343+0.374 and {M}c={0.362}-0.016+0.016 Jupiter masses, with M b being determined here from TTVs for the first time. Due to the precession of its orbital plane, Kepler-46c should start transiting its host star a few decades from now.

  12. Kepler Planet Masses and Eccentricities from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler mission’s census of transiting exoplanets has shown that planets between one and four times the radius of Earth with short orbital periods are extremely common. Given their small sizes, the properties of these planets can be difficult or impossible to constrain via radial velocity observations. Mutual gravitational interactions in multi-planet systems induce variations in the arrival times of planets’ transits. These variations can used to probe planets’ masses and eccentricities, which in turn constrain their compositions and formation histories. I will discuss the results of our analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of 145 Kepler planets from 55 multi-planet systems. Bulk densities inferred from TTVs imply that many of these planets are covered in gaseous envelopes ranging from a few percent to ~20% of their total mass. Eccentricities in these systems are small but in a many instances definitively non-zero. These results support theoretical predictions for super-Earth/sub-Neptune planets accreting their envelopes from a depleting proto-planetary disk.

  13. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  14. Reaction mechanism and isotope effects derived from centroid transition state theory in intramolecular proton transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimie, Radu; Schofield, Jeremy

    2001-10-01

    In this article the tautomerization reaction of the enol form of malonaldehyde is used to investigate the magnitude and origin of changes in centroid transition state theory proton transfer reaction rate predictions caused by the quantum dispersion of heavy nuclei. Using an empirical valence bond method to construct the potential energy surface, it is found that quantization of the nuclear degrees of freedom of the carbon atoms significantly influences the centroid potential of mean force used to describe the proton transfer reaction. In contrast, an ab initio simulation carried out using a recently developed molecular mechanics based importance sampling method [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 6763 (2001)] in combination with an accurate density functional theory evaluation of the electronic energies shows a substantially smaller influence of the quantum nuclear degrees of freedom of the secondary atoms on the centroid potential of mean force. A detailed analysis of the different influence of quantization of the nuclear degrees of freedom of secondary atoms observed in the ab initio and empirical valence bond centroid potential of mean force was carried out. It is shown that for the empirical valence bond potential, a significant decrease of the centroid potential of mean force arises through the quantum tunneling of carbon atoms in the molecular backbone. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that in molecular mechanics potentials aimed to describe intramolecular proton transfer reactions, the functional form of the potential energy terms coupling the primary and secondary atom motions as the reaction proceeds as well as the mass of the primary particle can significantly influence the centroid transition state theory predictions of secondary kinetic isotope effects. Finally, the dependence of the reaction rate predictions and isotope effects on the choice of reaction coordinate is investigated and the validity of calculating kinetic isotope effects using the centroid transition

  15. Characterizing Mass Transfer at the Hanford 300 Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    Aquifer remediation efforts in the Hanford 300 Area in Washington have presented substantial challenges for the Department of Energy. Since the early 1940s, this site has been a receptacle for radiological and chemical wastes from nuclear weapons production, including high concentrations of uranium. Employing techniques to estimate and measure mass transfer in-situ will improve understanding of contaminant fate and transport at this site, and perhaps others. A field experiment was conducted with a combination of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ionic tracer tests through a double-ring infiltrometer to quantify multirate mass-transfer and other transport parameters in the 300 Area. The tests included a series of injections into an infiltrating column of water. After saturating the column with fresh water at a constant head, bromide tracer solution with initial known concentration was injected for a specified amount of hours. This was followed by a continual fresh water injection during which time fluid samples were taken at varying depths along the probe to observe the tailing of the breakthrough curve during this purge. Throughout the experiment, ERT data collected along the column as well as along a transect perpendicular to the vertical sampling ports. These experiments will result in a model of the local vadose zone which will be calibrated using field data and modeled using HYDRUS 2D and its sequential inverse modeling feature. This program numerically solves the Richards equation for variably saturated water flow and advection-dispersion (AD) type equations for solute transport. It also considers dual-porosity type flow in the mobile and immobile domain. Additionally, mass transfer parameters will be modeled using a code which utilizes the AD equation and numerically solves for concentrations using Laplace Transforms. Analysis on governing processes and calibration of this code using field data will be used for additional verification on

  16. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  17. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-10-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  18. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  19. Transient mass transfer at the rotating disk electrode.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanis, L.; Klein, I.

    1972-01-01

    Transient mass transfer at the rotating disk has been investigated theoretically and experimentally for cathodic reduction of ferricyanide in the redox system ferricyanide-ferrocyanide with potassium hydroxide supporting electrolyte. It has been shown that overpotential-time predictions for the rotating disk are fitted very well for decay (current interruption) but poorly for build-up following switching on of constant current. As an explanation for this behavior, attention is directed to the inadequacy of the assumption that a radially independent concentration profile exists at the disk surface just at the start of galvanostatic current passage.

  20. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  1. Using mass transit public service advertising to market family planning.

    PubMed

    Blonna, R; McNally, K; Grasso, C

    1990-03-01

    To increase public awareness of family planning services in New Jersey, the Family Planning Program of the State Department of Health conducted an intermediary marketing campaign using free public service advertising on mass transit. In 1986, the year of the campaign, 237 calls were made to the advertised hotline, resulting in a like number of referrals to family planning service providers. Also, 2664 new patients examined in the state's family planning agencies in 1986 cited exposure to the media campaign as the reason for their visits. The results of the campaign and their implications for other public service agencies are discussed.

  2. Gas stream in Algol. [mass transfer in binary star systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cugier, H.; Chen, K.-Y.

    1977-01-01

    Additional absorption features in the red wings of the Mg II resonance lines near 2800 A are found in observations of Algol made from the Copernicus satellite. The absorption features were clearly seen only during a part of the primary eclipse, in the phase interval 0.90-0.03. The observations are interpreted as being produced by a stream of matter flowing from Algol B in the direction of Algol A. The measured Doppler shifts of the features give the value of 150 km/s as the characteristic velocity of matter in the stream. The mass transfer connected with the stream is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the -13th power solar mass per year.

  3. Supporting the Transition of Sophomores, Transfers, and Seniors: Opportunities for Residence Life Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranzow, Jeannine; Foote, Stephanie M.; Hinkle, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    College students transitioning to their sophomore year, those transferring to a new institution, and seniors transitioning out of higher education face various challenges and struggles. The literature on the transitions associated with these student populations indicates that they need sustained support in a few key areas that include student and…

  4. Supporting the Transition of Sophomores, Transfers, and Seniors: Opportunities for Residence Life Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranzow, Jeannine; Foote, Stephanie M.; Hinkle, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    College students transitioning to their sophomore year, those transferring to a new institution, and seniors transitioning out of higher education face various challenges and struggles. The literature on the transitions associated with these student populations indicates that they need sustained support in a few key areas that include student and…

  5. Understanding Transfer Students at the University of Delaware: Transition Experiences and Recommendations for Improving Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinci, Carolyn Eaton

    2012-01-01

    Transfer students comprise about ten percent of the student population in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at the University of Delaware. This research presents findings from a mixed methods study investigating the transition experiences of transfer students in the college. Demographic data were gathered on CAS transfer students admitted to…

  6. Turbulent mass transfer through a flat shear-free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Calmet, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Mass transfer through the flat shear-free surface of a turbulent open-channel flow is investigated over a wide range of Schmidt number (1 ≤ Sc ≤ 200) by means of large-eddy simulations using a dynamic subgrid-scale model. In contrast with situations previously analysed using direct numerical simulation, the turbulent Reynolds number Re is high enough for the near-surface turbulence to be fairly close to isotropy and almost independent of the structure of the flow in the bottom region (the statistics of the velocity field are identical to those described by I. Calmet & J. Magnaudet J. Fluid Mech. vol. 474, 2003, p. 355). The main statistical features of the concentration field are analysed in connection with the structure of the turbulent motion below the free surface, characterized by a velocity macroscale u and an integral length scale L. All near-surface statistical profiles are found to be Sc-independent when plotted vs. the dimensionless coordinate Sc({1) / 2}yu/nu (y is the distance to the surface and nu is the kinematic viscosity). Mean concentration profiles are observed to be linear throughout an inner diffusive sublayer whose thickness is about one Batchelor microscale, i.e. LSc({) - 1 / 2 }Re({) - 3 / 4}. In contrast, the concentration fluctuations are found to reach their maximum near the edge of the outer diffusive layer which scales as LSc({) - 1 / 2}Re({) - 1 / 2}. Instantaneous views of the near-surface isovalues of the concentration and vertical velocity are used to reveal the influence of the Schmidt number. In particular, it is observed that at high Schmidt number, the tiny concentration fluctuations that subsist in the diffusive sublayer just mirror the divergence of the two-component surface velocity field. Co-spectra of concentration and vertical velocity fluctuations indicate that the main contribution to the turbulent mass flux is provided by eddies whose horizontal size is close to L, which strongly supports the view that the mass

  7. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    PubMed Central

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  8. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-22

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones.

  9. Analysis of ultrafiltration and mass transfer in a bioartificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Jaffrin, M Y; Reach, G; Notelet, D

    1988-02-01

    A bioartificial pancreas is an implantable device which contains insulin secreting cells (Langerhans islets), separated from the circulating blood by a semi-permeable membrane to avoid rejection. This paper describes the operation of such a device and evaluates the respective contributions of diffusion and ultrafiltration to the glucose and insulin mass transfer. It is shown that the pressure drop along the blood channel produces across the first half of the channel an ultrafiltration flux toward the islet compartment followed in the second half by an equal flux in reverse direction from islets to blood. The mass transfer analysis is carried out for an optimal geometry in which a U-shaped blood channel surrounds closely a very thin islet compartment formed by a folded flat membrane. A complete model of insulin release by this device is developed and is compared with in vitro data obtained with rats islets. Satisfactory kinetics is achieved with a polyacrylonitrile membrane used in hemodialysis. But the model shows that the membrane hydraulic permeability should be increased by a factor of 10 to significantly improve the performance.

  10. Parallel Mass Transfer Simulation of Nanoparticles Using Nonblocking Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantrapornchai (Phonpensri), Chantana; Dolwithayakul, Banpot; Gorlatch, Sergei

    This paper presents experiences and results obtained in optimizing parallelization of the mass transfer simulation in the High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) of nanoparticles using nonblocking communication techniques in the point-to-point and collective model. We study the dynamics of mass transfer statistically in terms of particle volume concentration and the continuity equation, which is solved numerically by using the finite-difference method to compute concentration distribution in the simulation domain at a given time. In the parallel simulation, total concentration data in the simulation domain are divided row-wise and distributed equally to a group of processes. We propose two parallel algorithms based on the row-wise partitioning: algorithms with nonblocking send/receive and nonblocking scatter/gather using the NBC library. We compare the performance of both versions by measuring their parallel speedup and efficiency. We also investigate the communication overhead in both versions. Our results show that the nonblocking collective communication can improve the performance of the simulation when the number of processes is large.

  11. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  12. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  13. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones.

  14. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV.

  15. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  16. Signatures of shape phase transitions in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum phase transitions between competing ground-state shapes of atomic nuclei with an odd number of protons or neutrons are investigated in a microscopic framework based on nuclear energy density functional theory and the particle-plus-boson-core coupling scheme. The boson-core Hamiltonian, as well as the single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the unpaired nucleon, are completely determined by constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations for a specific choice of the energy density functional and paring interaction, and only the strength parameters of the particle-core coupling are adjusted to reproduce selected spectroscopic properties of the odd-mass system. We apply this method to odd-A Eu and Sm isotopes with neutron number N ≈90 , and explore the influence of the single unpaired fermion on the occurrence of a shape phase transition. Collective wave functions of low-energy states are used to compute quantities that can be related to quantum order parameters: deformations, excitation energies, E 2 transition rates, and separation energies, and their evolution with the control parameter (neutron number) is analyzed.

  17. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  18. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  19. Attitudes of rheumatology practitioners toward transition and transfer from pediatric to adult healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hilderson, Deborah; Moons, Philip; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine

    2012-12-01

    We explored the attitudes of rheumatology practitioners toward the transition and transfer of adolescents with a rheumatic disorder from pediatric to adult healthcare. Rheumatology practitioners attending the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society (PRES) Congress in 2010 were asked to complete the Questionnaire about Attitudes of Rheumatology Practitioners Toward Transfer and Transition (QUARTT), an instrument that was specifically devised for this study. Overall, 138 healthcare professionals participated (response rate, 55.2%). Participants believed that when patients with an active rheumatic disorder reach adulthood, they should receive medical follow-up from an adult rheumatologist (87%). Only 19% thought that patients should remain under the surveillance of a pediatric rheumatologist. Several initiating factors for transfer were marked as important: readiness of the patient according to the caregiver (62%), age (61%), and psychosocial maturity (49%). A transfer meeting with the patient (76%), a referral letter (73%), and a medical transfer file (64%) were the most preferred transfer communication methods. Joint outpatient clinics, phone calls, and transfer meetings without the patient were considered to be less useful. Pediatric (94%) or adult (83%) rheumatologists, parents (81%), and nurse specialists (74%) were stated as the most important active participants in the transition process. Responders favored essential transition components because young people should be assisted on how to become independent (96%), how to deal with fatigue (91%), and how to establish medication adherence (90%). In conclusion, this study emphasized the importance of transfer to specialized rheumatology care of adolescents with an active rheumatic disease and highlighted transfer initiators and transfer communication tools.

  20. Empirical Mass Determination for Transiting Brown Dwarfs and Very Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie; Aigrain, Suzanne; Hodgkin, Simon; Moraux, Estelle; Irwin, Jonothan; Irwin, Mike

    2005-08-01

    We are undertaking a large systematic time-resolved photometric study of a dozen nearby, young (pre-main sequence) and rich open clusters (the Monitor Project). We are using this study to search for young transiting planets and very low-mass eclipsing binary systems and browndwarfs. The goals are 1) to detect the first planets orbiting stars younger than 200 Myr, and measure their periods, mass (with RV follow-up observations) and number densities, and 2) to enable empirical mass determinations for very-low-mass pre-main sequence stars and brown dwarfs. We are targeting a large sample of young and rich open clusters of known age, distance and metallicity. In this proposal, we will use the CTIO-4m telescope with MosaicII to take high cadence photometry of the young open clusters M50 and NGC 2362. In these 2 clusters we will measure over 700 very low mass stars and brown dwarfs at the precisions needed to detect planetary and stellar/sub-stellar eclipses. We will take follow-up spectroscopy to confirm planet candidates and directly measure the component masses of the binaries. This will enable us to place constraints on planet formation and evolution scenarios for close- in planets, and to calibrate the mass-luminosity-radius relation at the bottom of the main sequence and into the brown dwarf regime.

  1. Environmental Energy and Mass Transfer: Key to Understanding Catchment Evolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Rasmussen, C.; Broxton, P. D.; Heidbuechel, I.

    2010-12-01

    While a lot is now known about catchment behavior of many study sites around the world, the ability to generalize these findings for predictions in unmonitored sites remains difficult. This is largely due to the fact that the link between climate, hydrologic response and how the landscape is structured is poorly understood. Notwithstanding, such understanding is fundamental to advancing new hydrological theory and useful model structures that can be used in ungauged sites. In this paper we will present a theoretical framework based on open systems thermodynamics to study catchment evolution. This framework is referred to as Environmental Energy and Mass Transfer (EEMT) and relates long-term energy and mass fluxes through the catchment to its internal structure and functioning. We will illustrate this concept using recent results from field investigations in two semi-arid environments in southwest USA:, the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) near Los Alamos, NM and the Santa Catalina Mountains (SCM) near Tucson, AZ. In VCNP we have designed an experiment that involves calculating transit times for a number of catchments that drain from a large dome called Redondo Peak. These catchments have different orientations and therefore receive different amounts of solar radiation. In general, we found that there was a correlation between mean transit times and aspect for these streams. At the same time, other topographic characteristics, which are typically considered as controls over catchment mean transit times, such as catchment area, elevation, and the ratio of flowpath length to slope gradient, exhibit limited predictive power with respect to mean transit times. The relationship between mean transit times and aspect suggests that in the Valles Caldera, transit times might be affected by a variety of features that are influenced by aspect, such as slope steepness, vegetation patterns, and soil depth. In SCM we have monitored the hydrological response in two

  2. An advanced model of heat and mass transfer in the protective clothing - verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łapka, P.; Furmański, P.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an advanced mathematical and numerical models of heat and mass transfer in the multi-layers protective clothing and in elements of the experimental stand subjected to either high surroundings temperature or high radiative heat flux emitted by hot objects. The model included conductive-radiative heat transfer in the hygroscopic porous fabrics and air gaps as well as conductive heat transfer in components of the stand. Additionally, water vapour diffusion in the pores and air spaces as well as phase transition of the bound water in the fabric fibres (sorption and desorption) were accounted for. The thermal radiation was treated in the rigorous way e.g.: semi-transparent absorbing, emitting and scattering fabrics were assumed a non-grey and all optical phenomena at internal or external walls were modelled. The air was assumed transparent. Complex energy and mass balance as well as optical conditions at internal or external interfaces were formulated in order to find exact values of temperatures, vapour densities and radiation intensities at these interfaces. The obtained highly non-linear coupled system of discrete equation was solve by the in-house iterative algorithm which was based on the Finite Volume Method. The model was then successfully partially verified against the results obtained from commercial software for simplified cases.

  3. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  4. Energetic correlation of local mass transfer in swirling pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yapici, S.

    1999-04-01

    Mass transfer measurements in a decaying swirl flow in a pipe were carried out, using the electrochemical limiting diffusion current technique. The measurements were taken from local electrodes of 1 mm diameter without a developing concentration boundary layer around. Swirl was generated using short helical guide-vanes with vane angles between 15 and 60 at the outer edge of the vanes to the duct axis. The pressure drop measurements were also taken to perform an energy analysis. For a Reynolds number range of 1700--10,000, the overall energy correlation for a representative length of 36.5 diameter were evaluated to be Sh{sub s}(Sc){sup {minus}0.33} = 0.3705(1 + tan {theta}{sub o}){sup {minus}0.120} X{sup 0.236}, where {theta}{sub o} is the vane angle at the outer edge of the helical swirler and X is the energy dissipation parameter.

  5. Hydromagnetic free convection flow with Hall effect and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) deals with the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an electromagnetic field, which has many applications in astrophysics, geophysics and engineering. Objective of the present study in this paper is to consider the effect of dissipation and Hall current on the MHD free convection flow with mass transfer in a porous vertical channel. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained by solving the complex variables. The effect of Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), and Concentration parameter (Sc) on the velocity and temperature of the fluid is studied. Simulation results show that the shear stress of primary and secondary velocity for the lower plate increases with increase in the strength of Hall parameter (m) and decreases with increase in Hartmann number (M) and concentration parameter (Sc).

  6. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  7. Mass transfer effects on the transmission of bubble screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Daniel; Bergamasco, Luca

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate, theoretically and numerically, the reflection and transmission properties of bubble screens excited by pressure wave pulses. We use modified expressions for the bubble resonance frequency and the damping factor in order to capture the influence of mass transfer on the reflection-transmission coefficients. In addition to the influence of variables such as the bubble radius and the averaged inter-bubble distance, the analysis reveals that in conditions close to the saturation line there exists a regime where the heat transport surrounding the bubble plays an important role on the bubble's response also influencing the reflection properties of the bubble screen. The linear analysis allows us to predict the critical vapor content beyond which liquid heat's transport controls the dynamic response of the bubbles. Numerical simulations show that these effects become especially relevant in the nonlinear regime. ANR Cachmap.

  8. Mass Transfer and Light Time Effect Studies for AU Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    The orbital period changes of theWUMa eclipsing binary AU Ser are studied using the (O-C) method. We conclude that the period variation is due to mass transfer from the primary star to the secondary one at a very low and decreasing rate dP/dt = -8.872 × 10-8, superimposed on the sinusoidal variation due to a third body orbiting the binary with period 42.87 ± 3.16 years, orbital eccentricity e = 0.52±0.12 and a longitude of periastron passage ! = 133.7±15. On studying the magnetic activity, we have concluded that the Applegate mechanism failed to describe the cycling variation of the (O-C) diagram of AU Ser.

  9. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  10. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Yang, W.

    1991-05-30

    After the second annual progress report to DOE in July 1990, we continued the experimental work for another liquid system. The mathematical model was also improved to include secondary effects due to drop deformation and charge redistribution on the deformed drop surface. Originally, we planned to study a mass transfer process after the hydrodynamic modelling. Due to difficulty in measuring drop concentration during oscillations, we decided to study a heat transfer process instead. Using the analogy between the mass transfer and the heat transfer, we can easily extend the results for the heat transfer study to the mass transfer problem.

  11. Diffusive heat and mass transfer in oscillatory pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Jalil, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    The enhancement of axial heat and mass transfer by laminar flow oscillation in pipes with axial gradients in temperature and concentration has been studied analytically for the cases of insulated and conducting walls. The axial diffusivity can exceed its molecular counterpart by many orders of magnitude, with a quadratic scaling on the pressure-gradient amplitude and the Prandtl or Schmidt number, and is a bimodal function of oscillatory frequency: quasi-steady behavior at low frequencies and a power-law decay at high frequencies. When the pipe wall is conductive and of sufficient thickness, and the flow oscillation is quasi-steady, the axial diffusivity may be enhanced by a further factor of about ten as a result of increased radial diffusion, for liquid and gas flows in pipes with walls with a wide range of thermal conductivities. Criteria for the wall thickness required to achieve this additional enhancement and for the limits placed on the validity of these solutions by viscous dissipation are also deduced. When the heat transfer per unit flow work achieved by oscillatory pipe flow is contrasted with that of a conventional parallel-flow heat exchanger, it is found to be of comparable size and the ratio of the two is shown to be a function only of the pipe geometry, heat-exchanger mean velocity, and fluid viscosity.

  12. Impact of Porous Media and NAPL Spatial Variability at the Pore Scale on Interphase Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copty, N. K.; Agaoglu, B.; Scheytt, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sherwood number expressions are often used to model NAPL dissolution in porous media. Such expressions are generally derived from meso-scale experiments and expressed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative volume. In this work a pore network model is used to examine the influence of porous media and NAPL pore scale variability on interphase mass transfer. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity and (v) REV or domain size on the apparent interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. In other words, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the variability of the mass transfer coefficient. Moreover, grain size heterogeneity can also lead to a decrease in the interphase mass transfer. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is average influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer.

  13. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  14. Kinetics and mass-transfer phenomena in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Seghezzo, L; Lettinga, G; Kleerebezem, R

    2001-04-20

    The kinetic properties of acetate-degrading methanogenic granular sludge of different mean diameters were assessed at different up-flow velocities (V(up)). Using this approach, the influence of internal and external mass transfer could be estimated. First, the apparent Monod constant (K(S)) for each data set was calculated by means of a curve-fitting procedure. The experimental results revealed that variations in the V(up) did not affect the apparent K(S)-value, indicating that external mass-transport resistance normally can be neglected. With regard to the granule size, a clear increase in K(S) was found at increasing granule diameters. The experimental data were further used to validate a dynamic mathematical biofilm model. The biofilm model was able to describe reaction-diffusion kinetics in anaerobic granules, using a single value for the effective diffusion coefficient in the granules. This suggests that biogas formation did not influence the diffusion-rates in the granular biomass. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-04-01

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid-solid, gas-solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes.

  16. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid–solid, gas–solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes. PMID:28382972

  17. Bio-inspired Murray materials for mass transfer and activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianfeng; Shen, Guofang; Wang, Chao; Li, Yu; Dunphy, Darren; Hasan, Tawfique; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-04-06

    Both plants and animals possess analogous tissues containing hierarchical networks of pores, with pore size ratios that have evolved to maximize mass transport and rates of reactions. The underlying physical principles of this optimized hierarchical design are embodied in Murray's law. However, we are yet to realize the benefit of mimicking nature's Murray networks in synthetic materials due to the challenges in fabricating vascularized structures. Here we emulate optimum natural systems following Murray's law using a bottom-up approach. Such bio-inspired materials, whose pore sizes decrease across multiple scales and finally terminate in size-invariant units like plant stems, leaf veins and vascular and respiratory systems provide hierarchical branching and precise diameter ratios for connecting multi-scale pores from macro to micro levels. Our Murray material mimics enable highly enhanced mass exchange and transfer in liquid-solid, gas-solid and electrochemical reactions and exhibit enhanced performance in photocatalysis, gas sensing and as Li-ion battery electrodes.

  18. Hypersonic heat-transfer and transition correlations for a roughened shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Stalmach, D. D.; Idar, E. S., III; Conley, D. B.; Goodrich, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of roughness on the heat transfer distributions and the transition criteria for the windward pitch plane of the shuttle orbiter at an angle of attack of 30 deg was studied using data obtained in hypersonic wind tunnels. The heat transfer distributions and the transition locations for the roughened models were compared with the corresponding data for smooth models. The data were correlated using theoretical solutions for a nonsimilar, laminar boundary layer subject to two different flow field models for the orbiter.

  19. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer in Transitional Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of elevated free-stream turbulence and streamwise acceleration on flow and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. The free-stream turbulence ranges from 0.5 to 6.4% and the streamwise acceleration ranges from K = 0 to 0.8 x 10(exp -6). The onset of transition, transition length and the turbulent spot formation rate are determined. The statistical results and conditionally sampled results of th streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stress and Reynolds heat fluxes are presented.

  20. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  1. Transitioning from Targeted to Comprehensive Mass Spectrometry Using Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Jacob D; Feeney, Caitlin M; Patel, Jinal; Lu, Xiaodong; Mani, D R

    2016-11-01

    Targeted proteomic assays are becoming increasingly popular because of their robust quantitative applications enabled by internal standardization, and they can be routinely executed on high performance mass spectrometry instrumentation. However, these assays are typically limited to 100s of analytes per experiment. Considerable time and effort are often expended in obtaining and preparing samples prior to targeted analyses. It would be highly desirable to detect and quantify 1000s of analytes in such samples using comprehensive mass spectrometry techniques (e.g., SWATH and DIA) while retaining a high degree of quantitative rigor for analytes with matched internal standards. Experimentally, it is facile to port a targeted assay to a comprehensive data acquisition technique. However, data analysis challenges arise from this strategy concerning agreement of results from the targeted and comprehensive approaches. Here, we present the use of genetic algorithms to overcome these challenges in order to configure hybrid targeted/comprehensive MS assays. The genetic algorithms are used to select precursor-to-fragment transitions that maximize the agreement in quantification between the targeted and the comprehensive methods. We find that the algorithm we used provided across-the-board improvement in the quantitative agreement between the targeted assay data and the hybrid comprehensive/targeted assay that we developed, as measured by parameters of linear models fitted to the results. We also found that the algorithm could perform at least as well as an independently-trained mass spectrometrist in accomplishing this task. We hope that this approach will be a useful tool in the development of quantitative approaches for comprehensive proteomics techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Transitioning from Targeted to Comprehensive Mass Spectrometry Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Jacob D.; Feeney, Caitlin M.; Patel, Jinal; Lu, Xiaodong; Mani, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    Targeted proteomic assays are becoming increasingly popular because of their robust quantitative applications enabled by internal standardization, and they can be routinely executed on high performance mass spectrometry instrumentation. However, these assays are typically limited to 100s of analytes per experiment. Considerable time and effort are often expended in obtaining and preparing samples prior to targeted analyses. It would be highly desirable to detect and quantify 1000s of analytes in such samples using comprehensive mass spectrometry techniques (e.g., SWATH and DIA) while retaining a high degree of quantitative rigor for analytes with matched internal standards. Experimentally, it is facile to port a targeted assay to a comprehensive data acquisition technique. However, data analysis challenges arise from this strategy concerning agreement of results from the targeted and comprehensive approaches. Here, we present the use of genetic algorithms to overcome these challenges in order to configure hybrid targeted/comprehensive MS assays. The genetic algorithms are used to select precursor-to-fragment transitions that maximize the agreement in quantification between the targeted and the comprehensive methods. We find that the algorithm we used provided across-the-board improvement in the quantitative agreement between the targeted assay data and the hybrid comprehensive/targeted assay that we developed, as measured by parameters of linear models fitted to the results. We also found that the algorithm could perform at least as well as an independently-trained mass spectrometrist in accomplishing this task. We hope that this approach will be a useful tool in the development of quantitative approaches for comprehensive proteomics techniques.

  3. Student Transitions Project: Mobility of Transfer Students Sub-Committee Terms of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Advanced Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Student Transitions Project Steering Committee's terms of reference allow it to appoint sub-committees to provide advice. Recently, the committee appointed a Mobility of Transfer Students Sub-Committee (formerly the Enrolment Planning Data Sub-Committee, a sub-committee of the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer). The…

  4. Charge-transfer gap closure in transition-metal halides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.L.; Yu, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Insulator-to-metal transition induced by pressure has been studied in three transition metal iodides: NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2} and FeI{sub 2} using optical absorption and resistivity measurements at room temperature. Comparisons between the results obtained by these two techniques suggested that the closure of the charge-transfer gap is the principal mechanism responsible for the insulator-to-metal transition in these materials.

  5. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans.

  6. Stark spectroscopy of charge-transfer transitions in catechol-sensitized TiO 2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2009-06-01

    Electronic excited states of catechol bound to titanium dioxide nanoparticles were investigated using electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectroscopy. The electronic transition at about 400 nm, characteristic for catechol bound to TiO 2 is associated with a change in permanent dipole moment by f · |Δ μ| = 15.7 D (where f is the local field correction factor), and a small negative change in the polarizability. Electron transfer distance points to the strong charge-transfer character of this transition. The electroabsorption spectra show also another electronic transition 7000 cm -1 higher energy, partially masked by the TiO 2 absorption.

  7. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    1989-08-21

    Mass transfer investigation experiments were performed to determine the controlling physical and chemical processes that limit Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbent utilization in flue gas desulfurization. A computer model has been established to estimate the relative contribution of gas- and liquid-phase mass transfer and inherent sorbent reactivity. Currently, the mass transfer investigation tests are on schedule and will be continued next year. More pilot-plant tests are planned to support field tests and mass transfer enhancement evaluations. 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  9. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  10. Direct Geoelectrical Evidence of Mass Transfer at the Lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Keating, K.; Binley, A.; Clifford, J.; Haggerty, R.

    2011-12-01

    At many field sites, anomalous tailing behavior-- a long, slow decrease of solute concentration in time-- is observed yet cannot be explained with the advection-dispersion model. One explanation for this commonly observed behavior is the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile domains; however, direct experimental observations of this controlling process remain elusive. Circumstantial evidence for a less-mobile phase is typically inferred from tailing behavior observed in fluid samples of the mobile phase. Electrical methods provide a measure of the total solutes in both the immobile and mobile domain and therefore have been hypothesized to provide, in combination with fluid sampling, direct experimental evidence for a less-mobile and mobile model, yet experimental evidence is needed to support this claim. Here, we conduct column solute tracer tests and measure both electrical resistivity and fluid conductivity on unconsolidated, well-sorted sand in addition to fine and coarse fractions of the porous zeolite clinoptilolite. We examine nearly co-located time-lapse standard fluid conductivity and bulk apparent resistivity measurements to identify solute exchange between multiple domains at the lab scale. Our results show extensive tailing behavior in both fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements in the zeolite but not in sand, providing evidence for a mobile-immobile framework. Transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the observed and simulated fluid conductivity in COMSOL Multiphysics. These best-fit parameters support our claims of mass transfer occurring in the zeolite columns and provide the first direct electrical evidence of dual-domain mass transport at the lab scale.

  11. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sutija, D.P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported: (1) Profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 {mu}m is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 {mu}m in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 {mu}m in height and spaced 250 {mu}m apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. (2) A novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H{sub 2} bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements. 168 refs., 96 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Stellar energy transfer by keV-mass scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    1989-08-01

    We investigate the effects of massive pseudoscalar particles χ on stellar evolution, focusing on the case where these new states interact only with electrons. If the effective fine-structure constant αx is sufficiently small, they escape freely and rob stellar interiors of energy; if it is so large that they scatter or decay in the star, they contribute to the radiative energy transfer. In this case, their thermal number density must be suppressed by a Boltzmann factor e-mx/T in order to avoid excessive heat transport. We derive general expressions for the energy transport by massive bosons and calculate all relevant contributions to the opacity in the limit mx>>T. In order to avoid either excessive energy loss or excessive energy transport in the Sun, we exclude the parameter range -19+0.32mx-4.5 lnmx<~lnαx<~2.3 -0.32mx+0.5 lnmx, where the particle mass mx is in units of keV. More restrictive constraints are derived from the observed properties of horizontal-branch stars. This excludes a recent suggestion that the presence of a γχ channel accounts for the anomalous decay width of orthopositronium. We stress the importance of numerical studies of both horizontal-branch stars and red giants.

  13. Vortex boundary layer flow over a disk with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surma Devi, C. D.; Nath, G.

    The effects of rigid-body and potential-vortex flows at large distances on the steady laminar incompressible axisymmetric boundary-layer flow (with or without mass transfer) on a stationary disk of infinite extent are investigated analytically. A set of nonlinear partial differential equations with three independent variables is derived and solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference scheme using Newton linearization and full integration starting from the edge, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Radial flow is found to be in the direction of the axis in all cases; as the axis is approached, the boundary layer becomes rapidly thicker and appears to develop a double-scaled structure, the radial-direction wall shear remains approximately constant, the tangential-direction skin-friction parameter decreases, and the radial-direction skin-friction decreases at first and then increases. These results are considered to be of interest to the study of atmospheric phenomena such as hurricanes and tornados.

  14. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  15. Investigation of mass transfer surface self-diffusion on palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beszeda, I.; Gontier-Moya, E. G.; Beke, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    Growth of voids in thin palladium layers (8-20 nm) on alumina and silica substrates has been investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Using the Brandon-Bradshaw's model, based on capillarity forces, the surface self-diffusion coefficients of palladium have been evaluated in the temperature range of 583-823 K. We have found that the results are independent of the substrate, in agreement with the assumption that the growth of voids is controlled by surface self-diffusion on the metal. The mass transfer surface self-diffusion coefficients are expressed by D s ( m2/ s)=1.1×10 -7exp[-97±13 ( kJ/mol) /RT] . These new results are compared with literature data. The experimental and theoretical values for intrinsic diffusion coefficients on oriented surfaces disclose much lower activation energies than that found in the present work, and the differences are related to the formation energy of the defects responsible for surface diffusion.

  16. Effect of vapor-phase mass transfer on aquifer restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.T.; Staes, E.G.

    1992-02-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOC) are a frequent source of groundwater contamination in North Carolina and throughout the United States and other developed countries. The work is considered a subset of the general multiphase flow and transport problem: fluid flow and contaminant transport in the gas phase of the unsaturated zone. The specific purpose of the work was to investigate gas-phase (VOC) transport phenomena at the field scale to assess the relative importance of operative transport phenomena. A field research site was established at an active fire training area on Pope Air Force Base. Monitoring of groundwater flow and gas-phase contaminant distributions was accomplished as a function of three spatial dimensions and time. These distributions are reported and interpreted with respect to the current level of understanding of gas-phase transport phenomena. Consideration is given to advective transport, diffusive transport, interphase mass transfer, and multicomponent effects. Numerical modeling is used to evaluate expected steady-state contaminant distributions in the unsaturated zone and to assess relative time scales of operative transport processes. Reasonable agreement is achieved between model simulations and observed concentration distributions in the field, with a dominant vertical transport component shown in both predicted and observed contaminant distributions.

  17. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  18. Shape-phase transitions in odd-mass γ -soft nuclei with mass A ≈130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum phase transitions between competing equilibrium shapes of nuclei with an odd number of nucleons are explored using a microscopic framework of nuclear energy density functionals and a fermion-boson coupling model. The boson Hamiltonian for the even-even core nucleus, as well as the spherical single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of unpaired nucleons, are completely determined by a constrained self-consistent mean-field calculation for a specific choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. Only the strength parameters of the particle-core coupling have to be adjusted to reproduce a few empirical low-energy spectroscopic properties of the corresponding odd-mass system. The model is applied to the odd-A Ba, Xe, La, and Cs isotopes with mass A ≈130 , for which the corresponding even-even Ba and Xe nuclei present a typical case of γ -soft nuclear potential. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental low-energy excitation spectra and electromagnetic properties, and confirm that a phase transition between nearly spherical and γ -soft nuclear shapes occurs also in the odd-A systems.

  19. On the theory of Ostwald ripening in the presence of different mass transfer mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical description of the concluding stage of Ostwald ripening based on the Slezov theory (Slezov, 1978) and recently developed approach (Alexandrov, 2015) is formulated. The present analysis focuses on the formation and relaxation of the particle size distribution function from the intermediate stage of ripening process to its final state, which is described by the universal distribution. The boundaries of the transition layer in the vicinity of a blocking point are found. The time-dependent corrections to the growth rates of crystals and the distribution functions are determined for different mass transfer mechanisms. The obtained analytical distributions are in good agreement with experimental data. All analytical results are presented in a form directly suitable for their use in applications.

  20. Heat and mass transfer in semiconductor melts during single-crystal growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi

    1995-03-01

    The quality of large semiconductor crystals grown from melts is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer in the melts. The current understanding of the phenomena, especially melt convection, is reviewed starting from the results of visualization using model fluids or silicon melt, and continuing to the detailed numerical calculations needed for quantitative modeling of processing with solidification. The characteristics of silicon flows are also reviewed by focusing on the Coriolis force in the rotating melt. Descriptions of flow instabilities are included that show the level of understanding of melt convection with a low Prandtl number. Based on hydrodynamics, the origin of the silicon flow structure is reviewed, and it is discussed whether silicon flow is completely turbulent or has an ordered structure. The phase transition from axisymmetric to nonaxisymmetric flow is discussed using different geometries. Additionally, surface-tension-driven flow is reviewed for Czochralski crystal growth systems.

  1. STATE TRANSITIONS IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Charles K.; Frank, Juhan

    2009-10-10

    We investigate the model of disk/coronal accretion into a black hole. We show that the inner regions of an accretion disk in X-ray binaries can transform from a cool standard disk to an advection-dominated flow through the known properties of Coulomb interaction in a two-temperature plasma, viscous heating, radiative processes, and thermal conduction. A hot, diffuse corona covering the disk is powered by accretion, but it exchanges mass with the underlying cold disk. If the accretion rate in the system is low enough, we show that the corona evaporates the disk away, leaving an advective flow to continue toward the hole. In the soft/hard transition commonly seen in X-ray binaries, we show that this advective flow can recondense back onto the underlying disk if the change in the system's accretion rate is slow enough due to thermal conduction. Unabsorbed spectra are produced to test against observations as well as prediction of the location of truncation radii of the accretion disk.

  2. Development of biobased sandwich structures for mass transit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munusamy, Sethu Raaj

    Efforts to increase the biobased content in sandwich composites are being investigated to reduce the dependence on synthetically produced or mined, energy-intensive materials for numerous composite applications. Vegetable oil-based polyurethane foams are gaining recognition as good substitutes for synthetic counter parts while utilizing bast fiber to replace fiberglass is also gaining credence. In this study, soy oil-based polyurethane foam was evaluated as a core in a sandwich construction with facesheets of hybridized kenaf and E-glass fibers in a vinyl ester resin matrix to replace traditionally used plywood sheeting on steel frame for mass transit bus flooring systems. As a first step towards implementation, the static performance of the biobased foam was compared to 100% synthetic foam. Secondly, biobased sandwich structures were processed and their static performance was compared to plywood. The biobased sandwich composites designed and processed were shown to hold promise towards replacing plywood for bus flooring applications by displaying an increase of 130% for flexural strength and 135% for flexural modulus plus better indentation values.

  3. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Matthew George; Adamic, Mary Louise; Olson, John Eric; Baeck, D. L.; Fox, R. V.; Hahn, P. A.; Jenson, D. D.; Lister, T. E.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  4. Impact of NAPL architecture on interphase mass transfer: A pore network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-09-01

    Interphase mass transfer in porous media is commonly modeled using Sherwood number expressions that are developed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative elementary volume (REV). In this work the influence of sub-grid scale properties on interphase mass transfer was investigated using a two-dimensional pore network model. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity, (v) REV or domain size and (vi) pore scale heterogeneity of the porous media on interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. Hence, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the uncertainty of the mass transfer coefficient. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is defined influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer. It was also demonstrated that the spatial variability of pore scale parameters such as pore throat diameters may result in different rates of interphase mass transfer even for the same pore size distribution index.

  5. Charge-Transfer Interactions between Transition Metal Hexafluorides and Xenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    HEXAFLUORIDES AND XENON’. by J. D./Webb M E. R./Bernstein\\ Prepared for Publication in the Journal of the American Chemical Society DTIE Department of...Metal Hexafluorides ar. Xenon" " 6. PERFORMIKG ORG REPk)RT NUMODE . CONTRACT OR GNANT NUMBLR(e) J. D. Webb and E. R. Bernstein N00014-75-C-1179 9...neceoswy and Idenifil by block numbet) charge transfer electron affinities Transitio Metal Hexafluorides Xencn electronegativities 4,AGSTRACT Coninue an

  6. Ballistic Missile Defense System Transition and Transfer Process from Missile Defense Agency to the Army - Innovative or Dysfunctional?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-14

    TRANSFER PROCESS FROM MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY TO THE ARMY– INNOVATIVE OR DYSFUNCTIONAL? BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL SCOTT C. ARMSTRONG United States Army...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Ballistic Missile Defense System Transition and Transfer Process from Missile Defense Agency to the Army – Innovative or...TRANSITION AND TRANSFER PROCESS FROM MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY TO THE ARMY— INNOVATIVE OR DYSFUNCTIONAL? by Lieutenant Colonel Scott C. Armstrong

  7. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  8. Optimizing SVE Remediation With Subsurface Flow and Mass Transfer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spansky, M. C.; Riha, B. D.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Dixon, K. L.; Nichols, R. L.

    2002-05-01

    The 5.9-acre A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) was created in the 1950s as a general disposal area. An aerial photograph from 1953 shows evidence of disposal activities; however, the exact materials disposed and dates of operation at ARP remain unknown. Within the larger ARP unit exists an approximately 2-acre T-shaped trench filled with ash debris to a depth of 10-14 feet. Soil sampling analysis of the ARP trench indicates the presence of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) trichloroethelyne (TCE) and tetrachloroetheylene (PCE). TCE and PCE contamination in the trench has the potential to migrate and poses a groundwater contamination risk. Several remediation options have been considered at ARP to date. The first, passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE), uses barometric pressure fluctuations to create a differential pressure between subsurface soil vapors and the atmosphere. Five wells were installed along the axes of the ARP trench. Differential pressure in the wells was monitored to determine the potential for PSVE. Results showed that the ash formation was too shallow and permeable to create pressure gradients sufficient for effective PSVE. The addition of a temporary cap over the formation did little to improve the differential pressure. Two pumping tests were subsequently conducted at the ARP trench. Air was pumped from two separate wells and drawdowns recorded at three observation wells. Data from the tests were used to model permeability of the ash unit and to estimate the zone of influence for the proposed active soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. Results indicate a high permeability for the ash. Contaminant concentrations were monitored with a portable infrared photoacoustic multigas monitor during continuous, pulsed, and variable flow rate scenarios. The concentration and flow data were used to evaluate mass transfer limitations of the system and to optimize the full-scale SVE remediation.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of mass transfer in artificial kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ding, Weiping; Li, Weili; Sun, Sijie; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hardy, Peter A; Ahmad, Suhail; Gao, Dayong

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional velocity and concentration fields on both the blood and dialysate sides in an artificial kidney were simulated, taking into account the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures and the interaction between the flows of blood and dialysate. First, magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to validate the mathematical model. Second, the effects of the flow profiles induced by the blood and dialysate inlet and outlet geometrical structures on mass transfer were theoretically investigated. Third, the clearance of toxins was compared with the clearance value calculated by a simple model that is based on the ideal flow profiles on both the blood and dialysate sides. Our results show that as the blood flow rate increases, the flow field on the blood side becomes less uniform; however, as the dialysate flow rate increases, the flow field on the dialysate side becomes more uniform. The effect of the inlet and outlet geometrical structures of the dialysate side on the velocity and concentration fields is more significant than that of the blood side. Due to the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures, the true clearance of toxins is lower than the ideal clearance, especially when the dialysate flow rate is low or the blood flow rate is high. The results from this work are significant for the structural optimization of artificial kidneys and the accurate prediction of toxin clearance. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire: an experimental and analytical study

    Treesearch

    J. A. Mardini; A. S. Lavine; V. K.. Dhir

    1996-01-01

    Abstract--An experimental and analytical study of heat and mass transfer in wooden dowels during a simulated fire is presented in this paper. The goal of this study is to understand the processes of heat and mass transfer in wood during wildland fires. A mathematical model is developed to describe the processes of heating, drying and pyrolysis of wood until ignition...

  11. The effects of dual-domain mass transfer on the tritium-helium-3 dating method.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Labolle, Eric M; Harvey, Charles F

    2008-07-01

    Diffusion of tritiated water (referred to as tritium) and helium-3 between mobile and immobile regions in aquifers (mass transfer) can affect tritium and helium-3 concentrations and hence tritium-helium-3 (3H/3He) ages that are used to estimate aquifer recharge and groundwater residence times. Tritium and helium-3 chromatographically separate during transport because their molecular diffusion coefficients differ. Simulations of tritium and helium-3 transport and diffusive mass transfer along stream tubes show that mass transfer can shift the 3H/3He age of the tritium and helium-3 concentration ([3H + 3He]) peak to dates much younger than the 1963 peak in atmospheric tritium. Furthermore, diffusive mass-transfer can cause the 3H/3He age to become younger downstream along a stream tube, even as the mean water-age must increase. Simulated patterns of [3H + 3He] versus 3H/3He age using a mass transfer model appear consistent with a variety of field data. These results suggest that diffusive mass transfer should be considered, especially when the [3H + 3He] peak is not well defined or appears younger than the atmospheric peak. 3H/3He data provide information about upstream mass-transfer processes that could be used to constrain mass-transfer models; however, uncritical acceptance of 3H/3He dates from aquifers with immobile regions could be misleading.

  12. Development of a correlation for aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, Andrew; Imhoff, Paul T.; Miller, Cass T.

    1995-03-01

    In many situations vapor-phase extraction procedures (e.g., soil venting, air sparging, and bioventing) may be suitable methods for remediating porous media contaminated by volatile organic compounds. This has led to increased study of operative processes in these systems, including aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer. Past work has shown the importance of the flow regime on this process, but a quantitative estimate of mass-transfer coefficients is lacking, especially for systems not confounded by uncertainties involving interfacial area between the phases. An experimental investigation was conducted to isolate the resistance to aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer at the phase boundary, using an ideal porous medium system. Mass-transfer coefficients were measured for toluene for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. An empirical model was fit to the data in dimensionless form. The mass-transfer model was coupled with an available interfacial area model, yielding a dimensionless expression for the mass-transfer rate coefficient. This expression was used to compare results from this work to three other experimental studies reported in the literature. These comparisons showed that for experiments where infiltrating water flowed uniformly within the porous medium, the predicted mass-transfer coefficients were within a factor of 5 of the measured coefficients. Mass transfer was significantly slower than the rate predicted, using the results from this work, in experiments where infiltrating water flowed nonuniformly.

  13. Application of Lattice Boltzmann Methods in Complex Mass Transfer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a novel computational fluid dynamics method that can easily handle complex and dynamic boundaries, couple local or interfacial interactions/reactions, and be easily parallelized allowing for simulation of large systems. While most of the current studies in LBM mainly focus on fluid dynamics, however, the inherent power of this method makes it an ideal candidate for the study of mass transfer systems involving complex/dynamic microstructures and local reactions. In this thesis, LBM is introduced to be an alternative computational method for the study of electrochemical energy storage systems (Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs)) and transdermal drug design on mesoscopic scale. Based on traditional LBM, the following in-depth studies have been carried out: (1) For EDLCs, the simulation of diffuse charge dynamics is carried out for both the charge and the discharge processes on 2D systems of complex random electrode geometries (pure random, random spheres and random fibers). Steric effect of concentrated solutions is considered by using modified Poisson-Nernst-Plank (MPNP) equations and compared with regular Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) systems. The effects of electrode microstructures (electrode density, electrode filler morphology, filler size, etc.) on the net charge distribution and charge/discharge time are studied in detail. The influence of applied potential during discharging process is also discussed. (2) For the study of dendrite formation on the anode of LIBs, it is shown that the Lattice Boltzmann model can capture all the experimentally observed features of microstructure evolution at the anode, from smooth to mossy to dendritic. The mechanism of dendrite formation process in mesoscopic scale is discussed in detail and compared with the traditional Sand's time theories. It shows that dendrite formation is closely related to the inhomogeneous reactively at the electrode-electrolyte interface

  14. Blowing Effects on Heat and Mass Transfer for Different Geometrical Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    cylinder is addressed. BLOWING THROUGH A FLATE PLATE The blowing principles are presented in figure 1 : Mass, Heat and Momentum transfer Conduction ... Convection Hot Main Flow Convection + Radiative transfers Cold fluid (outlet) Cold fluid (exit) Convection + Radiative Transfers Porous Wall Boundary

  15. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Adamic; J. E. Olson; D. D. Jenson; J. G. Eisenmenger; M. G. Watrous

    2012-09-01

    This NA 22 funded research project investigated the transition of iodine isotopic analyses from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. Previous work (Fiscal Year 2010) had demonstrated comparable data from TIMS and AMS. With AMS providing comparable data with improved background levels and vastly superior sample throughput, improvement in the sample extraction from environmental sample matrices was needed to bring sample preparation throughput closer to the operation level of the instrument. Previous research used an extraction chemistry that was not optimized for yield or refined for reduced labor to prove the principle. This research was done to find an extraction with better yield using less labor per sample to produce a sample ready for the AMS instrument. An extraction method using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was developed for removal of iodine species from high volume air filters. The TMAH with gentle heating was superior to the following three extraction methods: ammonium hydroxide aided by sonication, acidic and basic extraction aided by microwave, and ethanol mixed with sodium hydroxide. Taking the iodine from the extraction solvent to being ready for AMS analysis was accomplished by a direct precipitation, as well as, using silver wool to harvest the iodine from the TMAH. Portions of the same filters processed in FY 2010 were processed again with the improved extraction scheme followed by successful analysis by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The data favorably matched the data obtained in 2010. The time required for analysis has been reduced over the aqueous extraction/AMS approach developed in FY 2010. For a hypothetical batch of 30 samples, the AMS methodology is about 10 times faster than the traditional gas phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than TIMS. This results from the

  16. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Delmore

    2010-09-01

    Funding was received from NA-22 to investigate transitioning iodine isotopic analyses to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The present method uses gas-phase chemistry followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). It was anticipated that the AMS approach could provide comparable data, with improved background levels and superior sample throughput. An aqueous extraction method was developed for removal of iodine species from high-volume air filters. Ethanol and sodium hydroxide, plus heating and ultrasonic treatment, were used to successfully extract iodine from loaded high-volume air filters. Portions of the same filters were also processed in the traditional method and analyzed by TIMS for comparison. Aliquot parts of the aqueous extracts were analyzed by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel visited several AMS laboratories in the US, Spain, and Switzerland. Experience with AMS systems from several manufacturers was gained, and relationships were developed with key personnel at the laboratories. Three batches of samples were analyzed in Switzerland, and one in Spain. Results show that the INL extraction method successfully extracted enough iodine from high-volume air filters to allow AMS analysis. Comparison of the AMS and TIMS data is very encouraging; while the TIMS showed about forty percent more atoms of 129I, the 129/127 ratios tracked each other very well between the two methods. The time required for analysis is greatly reduced for the aqueous extraction/AMS approach. For a hypothetical batch of thirty samples, the AMS methodology is about five times faster than the traditional gas-phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than for TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and cleanup of molecular interferences. We showed that an aqueous extraction of high

  17. Modeling of the heat transfer in bypass transitional boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model and conditioned momentum, energy and turbulence equations were used to predict bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero pressure gradient. The use of conditioned equations was demonstrated to be an improvement over the use of the global-time-averaged equations for the calculation of velocity profiles and turbulence intensity profiles in the transition region of a boundary layer. The approach of conditioned equations is extended to include heat transfer and a modeling of transition events is used to predict transition onset and the extent of transition on a flat plate. The events, which describe the boundary layer at the leading edge, result in boundary-layer regions consisting of: (1) the laminar, (2) pseudolaminar, (3) transitional, and (4) turbulent boundary layers. The modeled transition events were incorporated into the TEXSTAN 2-D boundary-layer code which is used to numerically predict the heat transfer. The numerical predictions in general compared well with the experimental data and revealed areas where additional experimental information is needed.

  18. The use of transit timing to detect terrestrial-mass extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Murray, Norman W

    2005-02-25

    Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets are expected to detect hundreds of jovian-mass planets and tens of terrestrial-mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1 to 100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting) by their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The transit-time variations depend on the mass of the additional planet, and in some cases terrestrial-mass planets will produce a measurable effect. In systems where two planets are seen to transit, the density of both planets can be determined without radial-velocity observations.

  19. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium for low volatility alkanes in BPL activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mahle, John J; Furtado, Amanda M B; Glover, T Grant; Buchanan, James H; Peterson, Gregory W; LeVan, M Douglas

    2013-03-05

    The structure of a molecule and its concentration can strongly influence diffusional properties for transport in nanoporous materials. We study mass transfer of alkanes in BPL activated carbon using the concentration-swing frequency response method, which can easily discriminate among mass transfer mechanisms. We measure concentration-dependent diffusion rates for n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, 2,7-dimethyloctane, and cyclodecane, which have different carbon numbers and geometries: straight chain, branched chain, and cyclic. Micropore diffusion is determined to be the controlling mass transfer resistance except at low relative saturation for n-decane, where an external mass transfer resistance also becomes important, showing that the controlling mass transfer mechanism can change with system concentration. Micropore diffusion coefficients are found to be strongly concentration dependent. Adsorption isotherm slopes obtained from measured isotherms, the concentration-swing frequency response method, and a predictive method show reasonably good agreement.

  20. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  1. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  2. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  3. Energy Transfer between Post-Transition Elements & Rare Earths in Oxide & Chalcogenide Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-27

    narrow- 37 line excitation F. Optical transitions of Sm3+ in oxide glasses 41 G. Energy transfer from U i+ to Sm3+ in phosphate glass 45 H. Transition...probabilities of europium(III) in zirconium 50 and beryllium fluoride glasses, phosphate glass and pentaphosphate crystals I. Multiphonon relaxation in...in phosphate , borate, germa- nate and tellurite glasses. The level fluorescent lifetime was derived from these rates and from the calculated radiative

  4. Energy transfer enhancement by oxygen perturbation of spin-forbidden electronic transitions in aromatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguzzi, A.; Tubino, R.; Salamone, M. M.; Meinardi, F.

    2010-09-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in multicomponent organic systems is usually entirely ascribed to a Dexter-type mechanism involving only short-range donor/acceptor interactions. We demonstrate that the presence of molecular oxygen introduces a perturbation to the electronic structure of one of the involved moieties which can induce a large increase in the spin-forbidden transition oscillator strength so that the otherwise negligible Förster contribution dominates the overall energy transfer rate.

  5. Two-nucleon transfer reactions as a test of quantum phase transitions in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Iachello, F.

    2017-03-01

    A quantal and a semiclassical analysis of two-nucleon transfer intensities is done within the framework of the interacting boson model. The expected features of these quantities for the quantum phase transition (QPT) between spherical, U(5), and axially deformed, SU(3), shapes are discussed. Experimental data for (p ,t ) and (t ,p ) transfer reactions clearly show the occurrence of QPTs in Gd, Sm, and Nd.

  6. Phase-Transfer Activation of Transition Metal Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tuba, Robert; Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-11-02

    With metal-based catalysts, it is quite common that a ligand (L) must first dissociate from a catalyst precursor (L'n M-L) to activate the catalyst. The resulting coordinatively unsaturated active species (L'n M) can either back react with the ligand in a k-1 step, or combine with the substrate in a k2 step. When dissociation is not rate determining and k-1 [L] is greater than or comparable to k2 [substrate], this slows the rate of reaction. By introducing a phase label onto the ligand L and providing a suitable orthogonal liquid or solid phase, dramatic rate accelerations can be achieved. This phenomenon is termed "phase-transfer activation". In this Concept, some historical antecedents are reviewed, followed by successful applications involving fluorous/organic and aqueous/organic liquid/liquid biphasic catalysis, and liquid/solid biphasic catalysis. Variants that include a chemical trap for the phase-labeled ligands are also described. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  8. Metallization and charge-transfer gap closure of transition-metal iodides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. Li-Chung

    1993-05-01

    It is shown with resistivity and near-IR absorption measurements that NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2}, and FeI{sub 2} metallize under pressure by closure of the charge-transfer energy gap at pressures of 17, 10, and 23 GPa, respectively, which is close to the antiferromagnetic-diamagnetic transition in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}. Thus, the magnetic transitions probably are caused by the metallization; in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}, the insulator-metal transitions are first order. Moessbauer and XRD data were also collected. Figs, 46 refs.

  9. Coloration of tyrosine by organic-semiconductor interfacial charge-transfer transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Natsumi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-11-01

    L-tyrosine (Tyr) plays a crucial role as a proteinogenic amino acid and also as a precursor to several neurotransmitters and hormones. Here we demonstrate coloration of Tyr based on organic-semiconductor interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions. The ICT transitions from Tyr to TiO2 are induced by the chemisorption of Tyr on TiO2 surfaces via the hydroxy group of the phenol moiety. Because other amino acids possess no chemical group to induce ICT transitions, this coloration method enables to detect Tyr selectively without drastic structural change in contrast to the conventional coloration methods.

  10. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  11. Carbon monoxide mass transfer for syngas fermentation in a stirred tank reactor with dual impeller configurations.

    PubMed

    Ungerman, Andrew J; Heindel, Theodore J

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the power demand and gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient, kLa, in a stirred tank reactor (STR) (T = 0.211 m) using different impeller designs and schemes in a carbon monoxide-water system, which is applicable to synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation. Eleven different impeller schemes were tested over a range of operating conditions typically associated with the "after large cavity" region (ALC) of a Rushton-type turbine (D/T = 0.35). It is found that the dual Rushton-type impeller scheme exhibits the highest volumetric mass transfer rates for all operating conditions; however, it also displays the lowest mass transfer performance (defined as the volumetric mass transfer coefficient per unit power input) for all conditions due to its high power consumption. Dual impeller schemes with an axial flow impeller as the top impeller show improved mass transfer rates without dramatic increases in power draw. At high gas flow rates, dual impeller schemes with a lower concave impeller have kLa values similar to those of the Rushton-type dual impeller schemes but show improved mass transfer performance. It is believed that the mass transfer performance can be further enhanced for the bottom concave impeller schemes by operating at conditions beyond the ALC region defined for Rushton-type impellers because the concave impeller can handle higher gas flow rates prior to flooding.

  12. Effect of water content on transient nonequilibrium NAPL-gas mass transfer during soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kim, Joong Hoon; Liljestrand, Howard M; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2002-01-01

    The effect of water content on the volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in unsaturated soils was characterized by one-dimensional venting experiments conducted to evaluate the lumped mass transfer coefficient. An empirical correlation based upon the modified Sherwood number, Peclet number, and normalized mean grain size was used to estimate initial lumped mass transfer coefficients over a range of water content. The effects of water content on the soil vapor extraction SVE process have been investigated through experimentation and mathematical modeling. The experimental results indicated that a rate-limited NAPL-gas mass transfer occurred in water-wet soils. A severe mass transfer limitation was observed at 61.0% water saturation where the normalized effluent gas concentrations fell below 1.0 almost immediately, declined exponentially from the initiation of venting, and showed long tailing. This result was attributed to the reduction of interfacial area between the NAPL and mobile gas phases due to the increased water content. A transient mathematical model describing the change of the lumped mass transfer coefficient was used. Simulations showed that the nonequilibrium mass transfer process could be characterized by the exponent beta, a parameter which described the reduction of the specific area available for NAPL volatilization. The nonequilibrium mass transfer limitations were controlled by the soil mean grain size and pore gas velocity, were well described by beta values below 1.0 at low water saturation, and were well predicted with beta values greater than 1.0 at high water saturation.

  13. Energy transfer process between exciton and surface plasmon: Complete transition from Forster to surface energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arunandan; Tyagi, Priyanka; Srivastava, Ritu; Mehta, D. S.; Kamalasanan, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    The energy transfer process between surface plasmons and excitons was studied by varying the filling fraction of gold (Au) nano-clusters (NCs) and by placing a spacer of different thickness between Au NC and organic semiconductor layer. The intensity enhancement has occurred for 10%-50% filling fractions and 4-14 nm spacer thicknesses. Energy transfer mechanism was found to switch from Forster type to surface type by increase in filling fraction. Transverse electric field for Au NCs was simulated and we observed that for filling fraction <30%, Au NCs behave like 1-dimensional dipole and for >60%, they behave like 2-dimensional dipoles.

  14. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.; Buddhavarapu, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to document hydrodynamic and thermal development of flat-plate boundary layers undergoing natural transition. Local heat transfer coefficients, skin friction coefficients and profiles of velocity, temperature and Reynolds normal and shear stresses are presented. A case with no transition and transitional cases with 0.68% and 2.0% free-stream disturbance intensities were investigated. The locations of transition are consistent with earlier data. A late-laminar state with significant levels of turbulence is documented. In late-transitional and early-turbulent flows, turbulent Prandtl number and conduction layer thickness values exceed, and the Reynolds analogy factor is less than, values previously measured in fully turbulent flows.

  15. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.; Buddhavarapu, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to document hydrodynamic and thermal development of flat-plate boundary layers undergoing natural transition. Local heat transfer coefficients, skin friction coefficients and profiles of velocity, temperature and Reynolds normal and shear stresses are presented. A case with no transition and transitional cases with 0.68 percent and 2.0 percent free-stream disturbance intensities were investigated. The locations of transition are consistent with earlier data. A late-laminar state with significant levels of turbulence is documented. In late-transitional and early-turbulent flows, turbulent Prandtl number and conduction layer thickness values exceed, and the Reynolds analogy factor is less than, values previously measured in fully turbulent flows.

  16. Thermal and Quantum Peierls Transitions in Organic Charge-Transfer Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewick, Sharon; Soos, Zoltan

    2006-03-01

    The choice of donors (D) and acceptors (A) governs the charge-transfer ρ in organic CT salts with mixed one-dimensional DADA stacks. Strong D and A yield ρ ˜ 0.9 stacks of radical ions with thermally accessible spin and charge degrees of freedom whose Peierls transition can be described by a Hubbard model with site energies. The same microscopic model describes CT salts with smaller and variable ρ ˜ 0.5 in which neutral-ionic and/or Peierls transitions occur in the ground electronic state. Quantum transitions are driven by volume changes, with negligible thermal population of excite states. CT salts with thermal or quantum Peierls transitions are identified. Conflicting magnetic, vibrational and structural data in several CT salts are resolved in terms of mobile spin solitons, a dimerized ground state and a Peierls transition beyond the crystal's thermal stability.

  17. Estimating the glossiness transfer function induced by illumination change and testing its transitivity.

    PubMed

    Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Maloney, Laurence T

    2010-04-20

    The light reflected from a glossy surface depends on the reflectance properties of that surface as well as the flow of light in the scene, the light field. We asked four observers to compare the glossiness of pairs of surfaces under two different real-word light fields, and used this data to estimate a transfer function that captures how perceived glossiness is remapped in changing from one real-world light field to a second. We wished to determine the form of the transfer function and to test whether for any set of three light fields the transfer function from light field 1 to light field 2 and the transfer function from light field 2 to light field 3 could be used to predict the glossiness transfer function from light field 1 to light field 3. Observers' estimated glossiness transfer functions for three sets of light fields were best described by a linear model. The estimated transfer functions exhibited the expected transitivity pattern for three out of four observers. The failure of transitivity for one observer, while significant, was less than 12.5% of the gloss range.

  18. Advective-diffusive mass transfer in fractured porous media with variable rock matrix block size.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2012-05-15

    Traditional dual porosity models do not take into account the effect of matrix block size distribution on the mass transfer between matrix and fracture. In this study, we introduce the matrix block size distributions into an advective-diffusive solute transport model of a divergent radial system to evaluate the mass transfer shape factor, which is considered as a first-order exchange coefficient between the fracture and matrix. The results obtained lead to a better understanding of the advective-diffusive mass transport in fractured porous media by identifying two early and late time periods of mass transfer. Results show that fractured rock matrix block size distribution has a great impact on mass transfer during early time period. In addition, two dimensionless shape factors are obtained for the late time, which depend on the injection flow rate and the distance of the rock matrix from the injection point. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent excitation transfer as a tool for the phase transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    The use of the fluorescent resonant excitation transfer technique (FRET) to study the phase transition kinetics is demonstrated. The laser temperature jump is applied to the water/2,6-lutidine mixture and causes the demixing. Coumarin 480 and hydroxypyrene laser dyes form excitation transfer that interrogates the spatial structure of the system. Due to the differential solubility of these dyes in the components of the mixture, the excitation transfer ceases once the phase separation occurs. The spatial resolution of the method is determined by the Forster distance of the excitation transfer pair, and in this case is equal to 3 nm. The phase separation is completed within 1 microsecond. The rising edge of the fluorescence is consistent with polynomial growth of the phase separated domains, and not with Cahn-Hilliard fixed length instability. The theoretical model for the excitation transfer in a variety of systems such as separation of binary mixture, phase reorganization of membranes, formation of lamellar structure is developed.

  20. The Experimental Analysis of Local Heat and Mass Transfer Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M.; Miller, W.A.

    1999-11-14

    In pure heat transfer, specifications of effectiveness, fluid properties, and flows enable calculation of the heat exchanger area. In the case of falling film absorption, a simultaneous heat and mass transfer governs the performance of the absorber. The exchange of mass across the liquid-vapor interface involves the generation of heat. The heat effects associated with the mass exchange increase the temperature, which affects the equilibrium state of the pressure and composition and in turn affects the mass. The falling film flow rate coupled to the physical properties of kinematic viscosity and surface tension govern the flow regime of a vertical falling film. Wavy-laminar, roll-wave laminar, and turbulent flows will develop convective contributions that can enhance the transfer of mass into the film. The combined interaction of all these factors makes the absorption process very difficult to analyze and predict. A study of simultaneous heat and mass transfer was therefore conduct ed on a vertical falling film absorber to better understand the mechanisms driving the heat and mass transfer processes. Falling films are characteristically unstable, and a wavy-laminar flow was observed during the experimental study. The wavy flow further complicates the problem; therefore, only limited information is known about the temperature and concentration profiles along the length of the absorber that describe the local heat and mass transfer rates.

  1. Mass transfer in a 1370 C (2500 F) lithium thermal convection loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results from a test to evaluate interstitial element mass transfer effects on T-111, ASTAR 811C, and ASTAR 1211C after 5000 hours in flowing lithium at 1370 C (2500 F) are presented. No gross corrosion effects were observed. However, hafnium and nitrogen transfer to cooler regions within the loop were noted. Oxygen was in general removed from test specimens, but there was no evidence to indicate that it was a major factor in the mass transfer process. Carbon and hydrogen transfer were not detected.

  2. Transition Heat Transfer Modeling Based on the Characteristics of Turbulent Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Fred; Boyle, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While turbulence models are being developed which show promise for simulating the transition region on a turbine blade or vane, it is believed that the best approach with the greatest potential for practical use is the use of models which incorporate the physics of turbulent spots present in the transition region. This type of modeling results in the prediction of transition region intermittency which when incorporated in turbulence models give a good to excellent prediction of the transition region heat transfer. Some models are presented which show how turbulent spot characteristics and behavior can be employed to predict the effect of pressure gradient and Mach number on the transition region. The models predict the spot formation rate which is needed, in addition to the transition onset location, in the Narasimha concentrated breakdown intermittency equation. A simplified approach is taken for modeling turbulent spot growth and interaction in the transition region which utilizes the turbulent spot variables governing transition length and spot generation rate. The models are expressed in terms of spot spreading angle, dimensionless spot velocity, dimensionless spot area, disturbance frequency and Mach number. The models are used in conjunction with a computer code to predict the effects of pressure gradient and Mach number on the transition region and compared with VKI experimental turbine data.

  3. The Business School in Transition: New Opportunities in Management Development, Knowledge Transfer and Knowledge Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Denis; Kearney, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to consider the extent to which business school transition has created new opportunities in management development, knowledge transfer and knowledge creation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a critical review of knowledge exchange in a business school context with a particular focus on the "translation or…

  4. The Business School in Transition: New Opportunities in Management Development, Knowledge Transfer and Knowledge Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Denis; Kearney, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to consider the extent to which business school transition has created new opportunities in management development, knowledge transfer and knowledge creation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a critical review of knowledge exchange in a business school context with a particular focus on the "translation or…

  5. MASS TRANSFER VARIATIONS IN UX MONOCEROTIS: EIGHT YEARS OF AUTOMATED PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edward C.; Henry, Gregory W.; ETZEL, PAUL B. E-mail: henry@schwab.tsuniv.edu

    2009-11-15

    We analyze eight years (1999-2007) of automated photometric observations of the active Algol binary UX Monocerotis to search for mass transfer bursts similar to those seen in U Cephei. The largest photometric anomaly is the mean gainer luminosity difference between the stream-impact hemisphere and the opposite hemisphere. We find an updated Wilson-Devinney solution for earlier six-color observations. The UX Mon donor star fills its Roche lobe and the gainer nearly fills its rotational lobe. Instead of isolated bursts of the U Cep type, we found nearly continuous brightness fluctuations likely produced by variable mass transfer. We discuss implications for mass transfer.

  6. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  7. Model of Mass Transfer in Liquid-Liquid Extraction in a Turbulent Forward Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Farakhov, T. M.; Dudarovskaya, O. G.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical description of the process of mass transfer in a continuous phase in the turbulent motion of two mutually insoluble liquids has been obtained on the basis of an assigned law of damping of turbulent pulsations in the boundary layer. The basic parameters of the model have been found in terms of the hydraulic resistance of a droplet in motion. Consideration has been given to the use of the mathematical mass-transfer model in apparatuses with mixing devices. Agreement has been shown between results of calculation of mass-transfer coefficients and experimental data.

  8. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2016-12-05

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this paper, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10–100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces

  9. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes - scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 μm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints - are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. This finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of varying size are surrounded

  10. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; ...

    2016-12-05

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this paper, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pHmore » in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10–100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. Finally, this finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of

  11. Measuring the Masses and Radii of Sub-Neptunes with Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, J. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Fabrycky, D.

    2013-10-01

    The bounty of sub-Neptunes discovered by Kepler enables us to study a regime in planetary size and mass that is absent from the Solar System. This regime includes a transition from rocky planets to those with substantial amounts of volatiles-- in either ice mantles or deep atmospheres. Characterizing these worlds by their bulk densities can probe this transition, and this requires mass and radius determinations. Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass determinations. The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit lightcurves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Revisiting the six-planet system of Kepler-11, our dynamical fits to TTVs, alongside spectroscopic data on the host star, reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of

  12. Heat and mass transfer characteristics of absorption of R134a into DMAC in a horizontal tube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikrishnan, L.; Maiya, M. P.; Tiwari, S.; Wohlfeil, A.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a horizontal tube absorber for the mixture R134a/DMAC in terms of experimentally gained heat and mass transfer coefficients are presented. The heat transfer coefficient is mainly dependent on the solution’s mass flow rate. The mass transfer coefficient is strongly related to the subcooling of the solution. The data are compared to experimental absorption characteristics of water into aqueous lithium bromide in an absorption chiller. The mass transfer coefficients are of similar size whereas the heat transfer coefficients are about one order of magnitude smaller for R134a-DMAC.

  13. Electrochemical simulations of mass transfer from isolated wet spots and droplets on realistic fluttering leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Monique Y.; Schuepp, Peter H.; Thurtell, George W.

    1986-03-01

    This paper reports on forced-convection mass transfer from isolated discs on rectangular plates as well as hemispheres on realistic fluttering leaves. An electrochemical method was used where the convective transfer of ions to the test electrode (the droplet or the wet spot) in an electrolytic flow system was measured as a function of flow rates, sizes of discs and hemispheres. Measurements showed that the local transfer coefficient for uniformly transferring plates varied as expected while the transfer from isolated discs on plates was much less a function of the distance from the leading edge. An expression to describe the transfer coefficient for an isolated disc as a function of distance from the leading edge was determined. An expression describing the transfer from hemispherical drops on fluttering leaves was derived and compared with the predictions from transfer theory for a sphere in free space.

  14. The Mass-Radius-Eccentricity Distribution of Near-Resonant Transiting Exoplanet Pairs Detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the mass-radius-eccentricity distribution of transiting planets near first-order mean motion resonances using Transit Timing Variation (TTV) observations from NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler's precise measurements of transit times (Mazeh et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2015) constrain the planet-star mass ratio, eccentricity and pericenter directions for hundreds of planets. Strongly-interacting planetary systems allow TTVs to provide precise measurements of masses and orbital eccentricities separately (e.g., Kepler-36, Carter et al. 2012). In addition to these precisely characterized planetary systems, there are several systems harboring at least two planets near a mean motion resonance (MMR) for which TTVs provide a joint constraint on planet masses, eccentricities and pericenter directions (Hadden et al. 2015). Unfortunately, a near degeneracy between these parameters leads to a posterior probability density with highly correlated uncertainties. Nevertheless, the population encodes valuable information about the distribution of planet masses, orbital eccentricities and the planet mass-radius relationship. We characterize the distribution of masses and eccentricities for near-resonant transiting planets by combining a hierarchical Bayesian model with an analytic model for the TTV signatures of near-resonant planet pairs (Lithwick & Wu 2012). By developing a rigorous statistical framework for analyzing the TTV signatures of a population of planetary systems, we significantly improve upon previous analyses. For example, our analysis includes transit timing measurements of near-resonant transiting planet pairs regardless of whether there is a significant detection of TTVs, thereby avoiding biases due to only including TTV detections.

  15. Time scheduling of transit systems with transfer considerations using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Deb, K; Chakroborty, P

    1998-01-01

    Scheduling of a bus transit system must be formulated as an optimization problem, if the level of service to passengers is to be maximized within the available resources. In this paper, we present a formulation of a transit system scheduling problem with the objective of minimizing the overall waiting time of transferring and nontransferring passengers while satisfying a number of resource- and service-related constraints. It is observed that the number of variables and constraints for even a simple transit system (a single bus station with three routes) is too large to tackle using classical mixed-integer optimization techniques. The paper shows that genetic algorithms (GAs) are ideal for these problems, mainly because they (i) naturally handle binary variables, thereby taking care of transfer decision variables, which constitute the majority of the decision variables in the transit scheduling problem; and (ii) allow procedure-based declarations, thereby allowing complex algorithmic approaches (involving if then-else conditions) to be handled easily. The paper also shows how easily the same GA procedure with minimal modifications can handle a number of other more pragmatic extensions to the simple transit scheduling problem: buses with limited capacity, buses that do not arrive exactly as per scheduled times, and a multiple-station transit system having common routes among bus stations. Simulation results show the success of GAs in all these problems and suggest the application of GAs in more complex scheduling problems.

  16. Hydride Transfer in DHFR by Transition Path Sampling, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Heavy Enzyme Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is used to study fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. It remains controversial whether fast protein motions are coupled to the hydride transfer catalyzed by ecDHFR. Previous studies with heavy ecDHFR proteins labeled with 13C, 15N, and nonexchangeable 2H reported enzyme mass-dependent hydride transfer kinetics for ecDHFR. Here, we report refined experimental and computational studies to establish that hydride transfer is independent of protein mass. Instead, we found the rate constant for substrate dissociation to be faster for heavy DHFR. Previously reported kinetic differences between light and heavy DHFRs likely arise from kinetic steps other than the chemical step. This study confirms that fast (femtosecond to picosecond) protein motions in ecDHFR are not coupled to hydride transfer and provides an integrative computational and experimental approach to resolve fast dynamics coupled to chemical steps in enzyme catalysis. PMID:26652185

  17. Heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. W.; Pan, Z. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper investigates the transient heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions. Using local volumetric average approach, one-dimensional non-equilibrium heat and mass transfer models are developed to describe the humid air and liquid desiccant interaction at counter flow configuration. Using triethylene glycol solution as desiccant, some experimental studies are completed. Experimental results are used to justify the numerical models. Numerical results are then obtained to demonstrate process characteristics. The models include a transient desiccant flow model for initial liquid desiccant building-up process, empirical wetted specific surface ratio for mass transfer, and heat and mass transfer coefficients. The objective of this research is to develop a process analytical tool for liquid desiccant air-conditioner design.

  18. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  19. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  20. Spanwise mass transfer variations on a cylinder in 'nominally' uniform crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayle, R. E.; Marziale, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mass transfer experiments on a circular cylinder in a 'nominally' uniform crossflow are described. Experiments were conducted at the tunnel's turbulence level and with a woven-wire turbulence screen. In both cases spanwise and circumferential mass transfer measurements were made. Without the turbulence screen, the results were found to be spanwise independent and agreed quite well with both theory and the result of others. In addition to the mass transfer measurements, spanwise traverse measurements of the mean velocity and turbulence quantities in the incident flow were made and showed that the screen produced a small-amplitude spanwise periodic perturbation in the incident flow. Although this perturbation was only one quarter of a percent in the mean velocity and buried in the stream's turbulence, disproportionately large spanwise variations of 15 percent were found in the mass transfer rate.

  1. Fluid-dynamic and mass-transfer behavior of static mixers and regular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Cavatorta, O.N.; Boehm, U.; Chiappori de del Giorgio, A.M.

    1999-05-01

    The fluid dynamics and liquid-to-wall mass transfer for spaced and stacked regular packings were studied for forced convection and fluidized beds. The behavior of these configurations in bubble columns and under natural convection conditions is also presented. Flow parameters characterizing structured packings, presented in the literature, were used in the evaluation of results. General equations to predict pressure drop and mass transfer are discussed, as well as the relationship between energy dissipation and mass transfer. In the presence of fluidized particles, single-phase flow or natural convection conditions, the mass-transfer behavior of a packing element stacked between other packs or separated from the neighboring elements by liquid layers is almost the same, but differs in bubble columns.

  2. Mass transfer in countercurrent packed columns: Application to supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction of terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, P.C.; Matos, H.A.; Carmelo, P.J.; Gomes de Azevedo, E.; Nunes da Ponte, M. . Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia)

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an alternative separation method to more conventional processes such as liquid extraction and distillation. However, up to now, few works have been devoted to the investigation of the efficiency of countercurrent packed columns under supercritical conditions from a mass transfer point of view. Mass transfer in a countercurrent column, filled with structured gauze packing, was measured for the separation of a mixture of terpenes (d-limonene/1,8-cineole) by supercritical carbon dioxide, at 313 and 318 K and pressures up to 9 MPa. The extraction efficiency was determined in terms of the overall mass transfer coefficient. Operating lines for this process had an appreciable curvature due to a high miscibility of the two contacting phases. The real slope of these lines had to be estimated. Available mass transfer models for packed columns predicted efficiencies diverging to a great extent from the experimental results.

  3. A multiscale modeling study for the convective mass transfer in a subsurface aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jahrul M.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative and realistic computer simulations of mass transfer associated with disposal in subsurface aquifers is a challenging endeavor. This article has proposed a novel and efficient multiscale modeling framework, and has examined its potential to study the penetrative mass transfer in a plume that migrates in an aquifer. Numerical simulations indicate that the migration of the injected enhances the vorticity generation, and the dissolution of has a strong effect on the natural convection mass transfer. The vorticity decays with the increase of the porosity. The time scale of the vertical migration of a plume is strongly dependent on the rate of dissolution. Comparisons confirm the near optimal performance of the proposed multiscale model. These primary results with an idealized computational model of the migration in an aquifer brings the potential of the proposed multiscale model to the field of heat and mass transfer in the geoscience.

  4. Improving mass transfer to soften tissues by pulsed electric fields: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, E; Luengo, E; Álvarez, I; Raso, J

    2012-01-01

    The mass transfer phenomenon occurs in many operations of the food industry with the purpose of obtaining a given substance of interest, removing water from foods, or introducing a given substance into the food matrix. Pretreatments that modify the permeability of the cell membranes, such as grinding, heating, or enzymatic treatment, enhance the mass transfer. However, these techniques may require a significant amount of energy and can cause losses of valuable food compounds. Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology is a nonthermal processing method that causes permeabilization of cell membranes using low energy requirements and minimizing quality deterioration of the food compounds. Many practical applications of PEF for enhancing mass transfer in the food industry have been investigated. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the state of the art of application of PEF for improving mass transfer in the food industry.

  5. OVERALL MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM SMALL WATER POOLS UNDER SIMULATED INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small chamber tests were conducted to experimentally determine the overall mass transfer coefficient for pollutant emissions from still water under simulated indoor-residential or occupational-environmental conditions. Fourteen tests were conducted in small environmental chambers...

  6. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials.

  7. Mass spectrometric monitoring of interfacial photoelectron transfer and imaging of active crystalline facets of semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hongying; Zhang, Juan; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Li, Rui; Chen, Disong; Wang, Peng; Yuan, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in situ is important to understand the ET mechanism and designing efficient photocatalysts. We describe herein a mass spectrometric approach to investigate the ultrafast transfer of photoelectrons that are generated by ultraviolet irradiation on surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles or crystalline facets. The mass spectrometric approach can not only untargetedly detect various intermediates but also monitor their reactivity through associative or dissociative photoelectron capture dissociation, as well as electron detachment dissociation of adsorbed molecules. Proton-coupled electron transfer and proton-uncoupled electron transfer with radical initiated polymerization or hydroxyl radical abstraction have been unambiguously demonstrated with the mass spectrometric approach. Active crystalline facets of titanium dioxide for photocatalytic degradation of juglone and organochlorine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are visualized with mass spectrometry imaging based on ion scanning and spectral reconstruction. This work provides a new technique for studying photo-electric properties of various materials. PMID:28224986

  8. The response of a dwarf nova disc to real mass transfer variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hessman, F. V.

    2000-06-01

    We present simulations of dwarf nova outbursts taking into account realistic variations of the mass loss rate from the secondary. The mass transfer variation has been derived from 20 years of visual monitoring and from X-ray observations covering various accretion states of the discless cataclysmic variable AM Herculis. We find that the outburst behaviour of a fictitious dwarf nova with the same system parameters as AM Her is strongly influenced by these variations of the mass loss rate. Depending on the mass loss rate, the disc produces either long outbursts, a cycle of one long outburst followed by two short outbursts, or only short outbursts. The course of the transfer rate dominates the shape of the outbursts because the mass accreted during an outburst cycle roughly equals the mass transferred from the secondary over the outburst interval. Only for less than 10% of the simulated time, when the mass transfer rate is nearly constant, the disc is in a quasi-stationary state during which it periodically repeats the same cycle of outbursts. Consequently, assuming that the secondary stars in non-magnetic CV's do not differ from those in magnetic ones, our simulation indicates that probably all dwarf novae are rarely in a stationary state and are constantly adjusting to the prevailing value of the mass transfer rate from the secondary.

  9. Influence of boson mass on chiral phase transition in QED3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hong-tao; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Yu, Xin-hua; Zong, Hong-shi

    2016-08-01

    Based on the truncated Dyson-Schwinger equations for the fermion propagator with N fermion flavors at zero temperature, the chiral phase transition of quantum electrodynamics in 2 +1 dimensions (QED3 ) with boson mass—which is obtained via the Anderson-Higgs mechanism—is investigated. In the chiral limit, we find that the critical behavior of QED3 with a massless boson is different from that with a massive boson: the chiral phase transition in the presence of a nonzero boson mass reveals the typical second-order phase transition, at either the critical boson mass or a critical number of fermion flavors, while for a vanishing boson mass it exhibits a higher than second-order phase transition at the critical number of fermion flavors. Furthermore, it is shown that the system undergoes a crossover behavior from a small number of fermion flavors or boson mass to its larger one beyond the chiral limit.

  10. Tube-side mass transfer for hollow fibre membrane contactors operated in the low Graetz range.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Mercer, E; Kamranvand, F; Williams, L; Kolios, A; Parker, A; Tyrrel, S; Cartmell, E; McAdam, E J

    2017-02-01

    Transformation of the tube-side mass transfer coefficient derived in hollow fibre membrane contactors (HFMC) of different characteristic length scales (equivalent diameter and fibre length) has been studied when operated in the low Graetz range (Gz<10). Within the low Gz range, mass transfer is generally described by the Graetz problem (Sh=3.67) which assumes that the concentration profile comprises a constant shape over the fibre radius. In this study, it is experimentally evidenced that this assumption over predicts mass transfer within the low Graetz range. Furthermore, within the low Gz range (below 2), a proportional relationship between the experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) and the Graetz number has been identified. For Gz numbers below 2, the experimental Sh number approached unity, which suggests that mass transfer is strongly dependent upon diffusion. However, within this diffusion controlled region of mass transfer, tube-side fluid velocity remained important. For Gz numbers above 2, Sh could be satisfactorily described by extension to the Lévêque solution, which can be ascribed to the constrained growth of the concentration boundary layer adjacent to the fibre wall. Importantly this study demonstrates that whilst mass transfer in the low Graetz range does not explicitly conform to either the Graetz problem or classical Lévêque solution, it is possible to transform the experimentally derived overall mass transfer coefficient (Kov ) between characteristic length scales (dh and L). T h is was corroborated by comparison of the empirical relationship determined in this study (Sh=0.36Gz) with previously published studies operated in the low Gz range. This analysis provides important insight for process design when slow tube-side flows, or low Schmidt numbers (coincident with gases) constrain operation of hollow fibre membrane contactors to the low Gz range.

  11. Calculation of Post-Closure Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-03-16

    Natural convection heat and mass transfer under post-closure conditions has been calculated for Yucca Mountain drifts using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Calculations have been performed for 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 years after repository closure. Effective dispersion coefficients that can be used to calculate mass transfer in the drift have been evaluated as a function of time and boundary temperature tilt.

  12. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions.

  13. Advanced heat transfer devices based on mass forces in coiled flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovich, Evgeny D.; Tarasevich, Sergei S.; Repnikova, Elena A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced heat transfer devices in the form of different channels where artificial mass forces influence on hydrodynamics stability in low gravity area and argumentation of heat transfer is considered. Experiments are fulfilled with large variety of geometrical forms of channels (inserts in straight tubes, fluted tubes, annular channels with rotation of flow, spiral coils, twisted tubes etc.) and different heat transfer media and their vapor (liquid metals, water, cryogenic liquids). .

  14. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from a two-dimensional, partially liquid-covered surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.X.; Kaviany, M. )

    1991-11-01

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from partially liquid-covered surfaces is examined experimentally using a surface made of cylinders with the voids filled with liquid. The steady-state evaporation rate, surface temperature of the liquid and exposed solid, and location of meniscus are measured for various ambient air velocities and temperatures. Using these, the authors examine the effect of the extent to which the liquid covers the surface on the evaporation mass transfer rate resulting from the convective heat transfer from the ambient gas to this surface. The results show strong Bond and Reynolds number effects. For small Bond and Reynolds numbers, the presence of dry (exposed solid) surface does not influence the mass transfer rate. As the Bond or Reynolds number increases, a critical liquid coverage is found below which the mass transfer begins to decrease. Heat transfer from the exposed solid to the liquid is also examined using the measured surface temperature, a conduction model, and an estimate of the liquid and solid surface areas (using a static formation for the liquid meniscus). The results show that at the liquid surface an analogy between heat and mass transfer does not exist.

  15. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  16. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  17. Interfacial mass transfer to a cylinder endwall during spin-up/spin-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrousse, Mark F.; Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The local rate of mass transfer to the bottom endwall of a large aspect ratio cylinder was measured during spin-up/spin-down. The local mass transfer rate was a strong function radial position along the endwall. At the center during spin-up from rest, the maximum enhancement in mass transfer occurred after the Ekman time scale and before the viscous time scale. At the center during spin-down to rest, a stagnation vortex formed, causing the mass transfer rate to decay and then increase back to the original value of the order of the viscous time scale. Away from the center a much more complicated pattern was observed, but spin-up and spin-down were similar. Two peaks in mass transfer rate occurred for an Ekman number over 0.0074. Alternating spin-up and spin-down with a short period caused the center of the endwall to experience a nearly sinusoidal variation in mass transfer with the frequency equal to the forcing frequency. Near the edge the frequency was twice the forcing frequency.

  18. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  19. Recovery efficiency of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) with mass transfer limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Du, Pengfei; Chen, Yiming; Luo, Jian

    2011-08-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an effective strategy for water resources management and has been widely used in many contaminated and saline aquifers. However, its recovery efficiency (RE) may be significantly affected by mass transfer limitations. A numerical model is developed to simulate ASR performance by combining the convergent and divergent dispersion models with a first-order mass transfer model. By analyzing the concentration history at the pumping well, we obtain simple and effective relationships for investigating ASR efficiency under various mass transfer parameters, including capacity ratio and mass transfer timescale, and operational parameters, including injection durations and well-pumping rates. On the basis of such relationships, one can conveniently determine whether a site with mass transfer limitations is appropriate or not for ASR and how many ASR cycles are required for achieving a positive RE. Results indicate that the immobile domain may function as a contaminant source or sink or both during the recovery phase and RE usually improves with well-flow rate, the decrease of capacity ratio, and the ASR cycles. However, RE is a nonmonotonic function of the mass transfer timescale and the injection duration. A critical timescale is given for quantifying this nonmonotonic behavior. When the injection period is greater than such a critical value, increasing injection period results in a higher RE. Contrarily, when the injection period is less than the critical value, increasing the injection period may even yield a lower RE.

  20. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  1. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    PubMed

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  2. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  3. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-11-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  4. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  5. Transition to Turbulence in Rectangular Channels with Eddy Promoters: Implications to Heat Transfer Augmentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapat, Jayanta Sankar

    1991-02-01

    The work deals with experimental investigation of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a rectangular channel of aspect ratio 0.116 in the presence of periodic eddy promoters. The study is motivated by the role of transition in heat transfer enhancement schemes that employ flow destabilization strategies: specifically, for this type of augmentation systems, the most efficient performance (minimum pumping power per unit of heat removal) occurs in the transition region. Seven different geometries are tested: plain channel and six different arrangements of cylindrical eddy promoters. Placement of the eddy promoters in the channel, depending on the pattern, can significantly reduce Reynolds number values at transition: the critical Reynolds number (based on the average velocity and the channel height) ranges from 1500 (for a plain channel) to about 400 (for the most unstable configuration deployed). For all the cases tested, demarcation of transition can be correlated with the following expression, Re_tau = sqrt{ {| tau_{w,avoverrho }}} {H/2overnu} = 40 ~ 60,where | tau_{w,av} is the spatially averaged value of mean wall shear stress and H is the channel height. The above correlation extends to other geometries. The approximate invariance of Re_ tau at transition allows evaluation of heat transfer at transition point by using only the critical Reynolds number (Recrit). Based on Colburn analogy, Nu at transition for fluids with Pr > 0.6 can be calculated as Nu~ {10,000over Recrit} Pr^{1/3}.(Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  6. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. II. Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Finite eccentricities in mass-transferring eccentric binary systems can be explained by taking into account the mass loss and mass transfer processes that often occur in these systems. These processes can be treated as perturbations of the general two-body problem. The time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity derived from perturbative methods are generally phase-dependent. The osculating semimajor axis and eccentricity change over the orbital timescale and are not easy to implement in binary evolution codes like MESA. However, the secular orbital element evolution equations can be simplified by averaging over the rapidly varying true anomalies. In this paper, we derive the secular time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity for various mass loss/transfer processes using either the adiabatic approximation or the assumption of delta-function mass loss/transfer at periastron. We begin with the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. We continue with conservative and non-conservative non-isotropic mass ejection/accretion (including Roche-Lobe-Overflow) for both point-masses and extended bodies. We conclude with the case of phase-dependent mass accretion. Comparison of the derived equations with similar work in the literature is included and an explanation of the existing discrepancies is provided.

  7. Large impact of reorganization energy on photovoltaic conversion due to interfacial charge-transfer transitions.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-14

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions are expected to be a novel charge-separation mechanism for efficient photovoltaic conversion featuring one-step charge separation without energy loss. Photovoltaic conversion due to ICT transitions has been investigated using several TiO2-organic hybrid materials that show organic-to-inorganic ICT transitions in the visible region. In applications of ICT transitions to photovoltaic conversion, there is a significant problem that rapid carrier recombination is caused by organic-inorganic electronic coupling that is necessary for the ICT transitions. In order to solve this problem, in this work, I have theoretically studied light-to-current conversions due to the ICT transitions on the basis of the Marcus theory with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. An apparent correlation between the reported incident photon-to-current conversion efficiencies (IPCE) and calculated reorganization energies was clearly found, in which the IPCE increases with decreasing the reorganization energy consistent with the Marcus theory in the inverted region. This activation-energy dependence was systematically explained by the equation formulated by the Marcus theory based on a simple excited-state kinetic scheme. This result indicates that the reduction of the reorganization energy can suppress the carrier recombination and enhance the IPCE. The reorganization energy is predominantly governed by the structural change in the chemical-adsorption moiety between the ground and ICT excited states. This work provides crucial knowledge for efficient photovoltaic conversion due to ICT transitions.

  8. Heat and mass transfer in porous media phase separation at temperatures below the lambda-point of He-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1986-01-01

    Newtonian fluid motion, coupled to heat transfer via latent heat of phase transition, is well known from numerous studies of condensation and boiling. Considerably less knowledge is available for vapor-liquid phase separation in the absence of gravity effect on the transport phenomena. The present studies are focused on heat and mass transfer associated with vapor-liquid phase separation required for long-term storage of the cryogen liquid He II in space vessels. Though space conditions are the dominant mode of interest in advanced equipment, e.g. IR telescopes, the systems may be operated in principle during terrestrial conditions. The latter are considered in the present work. It emphasizes the linear regime including an extrapolation based on variable thermophysical properties. Data taken with a phase separation approach show departures from the linear regime prediction. They agree with a transport equation proposed for the nonlinear, turbulent regime.

  9. IR, 1H NMR, mass, XRD and TGA/DTA investigations on the ciprofloxacin/iodine charge-transfer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Moussa, Mohamed A. A.

    2011-05-01

    The charge-transfer complex (CTC) of ciprofloxacin drug (CIP) as a donor with iodine (I 2) as a sigma acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in CHCl 3. At maximum absorption bands, the stoichiometry of CIP:iodine system was found to be 1:1 ratio according to molar ratio method. The essential spectroscopic data like formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), standard free energy (Δ G°), oscillator strength ( f), transition dipole moment ( μ), resonance energy ( RN) and ionization potential ( ID) were estimated. The spectroscopic techniques such as IR, 1H NMR, mass and UV-vis spectra and elemental analyses (CHN) as well as TG-DTG and DTA investigations were used to characterize the chelating behavior of CIP/iodine charge-transfer complex. The iodine CT interaction was associated with a presence of intermolecular hydrogen bond. The X-ray investigation was carried out to investigate the iodine doping in the synthetic CT complex.

  10. Experimental Investigations of Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Heat-Transfer Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The present work seeks to develop and investigate experimentally microchannel heat-exchange apparatuses of two designs: with porous elements manufactured from titanium and copper, and also based on the matrix of filamentary silicon single crystals under operating conditions with high heat loads, unsteadiness, and nonlinear flow of the coolant. For experimental investigations, the authors have developed and manufactured a unique test bench allowing tests of the developed heat-transfer elements in unsteady operating regimes. The performed experimental investigations have made it possible to obtain criterial dependences of the heat-transfer coefficient on the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and to refine the values of viscous and inertial coefficients. It has been established that microchannel heat-transfer elements based on silicon single crystals, which make it possible to remove a heat flux above 100 W/cm2, are the most efficient. For porous heat-transfer elements, the best result was attained for wedge-shaped copper samples. According to investigation results, the authors have considered the issues of optimization of thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the heat-transfer elements under study. In the work, the authors have given examples of practical use of the developed heat-transfer elements for cooling systems of radioelectronic equipment.

  11. Investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media using numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Frippiat, C. C.; Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2007-12-01

    A significant body of knowledge exists on separates processes of thermal and mass transport in granular and fractured subsurface formations. However, the need to simulate these processes in a fully coupled way has become necessary to deal with problems associated with long-term-storage of nuclear waste, and the development of new technologies for subsurface remediation. Another emerging area for research is associated with the development of technologies for in situ extraction of underground resources. Numerical models that couple thermal and mass transport processes will play a crucial role in understanding the fundamental processes associated with these new technologies, as well as in making predictions on how complex subsurface systems are expected to behave. It is our hypothesis that heat transport will have a significant impact on distributions of solute concentration, through temperature-dependent dissolution and precipitation, and temperature-dependent rate-limited diffusive transfer of solutes in fractured or highly heterogeneous media. A number of issues related to the validity of existing numerical tools that capture these processes, and their application to field systems through up-scaling need to be investigated. With this overall goal in mind, in this preliminary study, we explore the effect of the variability of subsurface properties on heat and mass transport using simulations conducted using an existing multiphase model. The finite-element code FEHM (Finite-Element Heat and Mass transport code) used in this study was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This code allows for the coupled simulation of flow, heat and mass transport, accounting for density effects and dissolution and/or precipitation reactions. Our analysis is based on two- and three-dimensional simulations using synthetic data sets. Heterogeneous facies distributions are generated according to Markov Chain transition probability models. A distributed source of constant

  12. Heat and mass transfer prediction of binary refrigerant mixtures condensing in a horizontal microfin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Shigeru; Yu, Jian; Ishibashi, Akira

    1999-07-01

    In the face of the phase-out of HCFC22 for its effect on globe environment, the alternative refrigerant has been paid attention in the refrigeration and heat pump industry. In the present stage, it is found that any pure refrigerant is not a good substitute of HCFC22 for the system in use. The authors have to use binary or ternary refrigerant mixtures as the substitute to meet industrial requirement. But until now, although the heat transfer characteristics of the refrigerant mixtures can be measured in experiments and predicted in some degree, the mass transfer characteristics in condensation process, which is a main part in most systems, can not be clarified by both experimental and theoretical methods. In the present study a non-equilibrium model for condensation of binary refrigerant mixtures inside a horizontal microfin tube is proposed. In this model it is assumed that the phase equilibrium is only established at the vapor-liquid interface, while the bulk vapor and the bulk liquid are in non-equilibrium in the same cross section. The mass transfer characteristic in vapor core is obtained from the analogy between mass and momentum transfer. In the liquid layer, the mass fraction distribution is neglected, but the mass transfer coefficient is treated as infinite that can keep a finite value for the mass transfer rate in liquid phase. From the calculation results compared with the experimental ones for the condensation of HFC134a/HCFC123 and HCFC22/CFC114 mixtures, it is found that the calculated heat flux distribution along the tube axis is in good agreement with that of experiment, and the calculated values of condensing length agree well with the experimental ones. Using the present model, the local mass faction distribution, the diffusion mass transfer rate and the mass transfer characteristics in both vapor and liquid phase are demonstrated. From these results, the effect of mass transfer resistance on condensation heat transfer characteristics for binary

  13. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  14. Local Labor Negotiations and the Urban Mass Transit Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Examines the content of section 13-C of the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964, its role in labor negotiations at the local level, its impact on relations between local and national government, and the outcome of 13-C negotiations during the period 1975-77. (Author/IRT)

  15. An Experiment to Introduce Mass Transfer Concepts Using a Commercial Hollow Fiber Blood Oxygenator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIver, Keith; Merrill, Thomas; Farrell, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    A commercial hollow fiber blood oxygenation laboratory experiment was used to introduce lower level engineering students to mass balances in a two-phase system. Using measured values of concentration and flow rate, students calculated the rate of mass transfer from the gas phase and into the liquid phase, and compared the two values to determine…

  16. Direct evidence for a two-state protein unfolding transition from hydrogen-deuterium exchange, mass spectrometry, and NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Q.; Baker, D.

    1996-01-01

    We use mass spectrometry in conjunction with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and NMR to characterize the conformational dynamics of the 62-residue IgG binding domain of protein L under conditions in which the native state is marginally stable. Mass spectra of protein L after short incubations in D2O reveal the presence of two distinct populations containing different numbers of protected protons. NMR experiments indicate that protons in the hydrophobic core are protected in one population, whereas all protons are exchanged for deuterons in the other. As the exchange period is increased, molecules are transferred from the former population to the latter. The absence of molecules with a subset of the core protons protected suggests that exchange occurs in part via a highly concerted transition to an excited state in which all protons exchange rapidly with deuterons. A steady increase in the molecular weight of the population with protected protons, and variation in the exchange rates of the individual protected protons indicates the presence of an additional exchange mechanism. A simple model in which exchange results from rapid (> 10(5)/s) local fluctuations around the native state superimposed upon transitions to an unfolded excited state at approximately 0.06/s is supported by qualitative agreement between the observed mass spectra and the mass spectra simulated according to the model using NMR-derived estimates of the proton exchange rates. PMID:8762137

  17. Mass Transfer Limited Enhanced Bioremediation at Dnapl Source Zones: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The success of enhanced bioremediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) relies on accelerating contaminant mass transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, thus enhancing the depletion of DNAPL source zones compared to natural dissolution. This is achieved by promoting biological activity that reduces the contaminant's aqueous phase concentration. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated that high reaction rates are attainable by specialized microbial cultures in DNAPL source zones, field applications of the technology report lower reaction rates and prolonged remediation times. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the reaction rates are limited by the rate at which the contaminant partitions from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. In such cases, slow mass transfer to the aqueous phase reduces the bioavailability of the contaminant and consequently decreases the potential source zone depletion enhancement. In this work, the effect of rate limited mass transfer on bio-enhanced dissolution of DNAPL chlorinated ethenes is investigated through a numerical study. A multi-phase, multi-component groundwater transport model is employed to simulate DNAPL mass depletion for a range of source zone scenarios. Rate limited mass transfer is modeled by a linear driving force model, employing a thermodynamic approach for the calculation of the DNAPL - water interfacial area. Metabolic reductive dechlorination is modeled by Monod kinetics, considering microbial growth and self-inhibition. The model was utilized to identify conditions in which mass transfer, rather than reaction, is the limiting process, as indicated by the bioavailability number. In such cases, reaction is slower than expected, and further increase in the reaction rate does not enhance mass depletion. Mass transfer rate limitations were shown to affect both dechlorination and microbial growth kinetics. The complex dynamics between mass transfer, DNAPL transport and distribution, and

  18. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in an Ejection Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kologrivov, M. M.; Buzovskii, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in an ejection apparatus during condensation of vapor-gas mixture components on cold brine droplets are presented. The local parameters of working flows were determined by solving a system of differential heat transfer equations with account for the hydrodynamic pattern. Calculations were carried out on the assumption that the liquid spray is directed horizontally. The Stefan formula has been derived with reference to a spherical coordinate system. The results of calculation of heat and mass transfer rates with and without regard for steam condensation jointly with hydrocarbon vapors are compared and analyzed. Estimation of the effect exerted by the apparatus and drip pan walls on the general process of heat and mass transfer was carried out. The results of simulation made it possible to quantitatively estimate the influence of the adopted thickness of the diffusional boundary layer on the vapor-air mixture cooling effect.

  19. Stability of coaxial jets confined in a tube with heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Lokanath; Cheung, Fan-Bill; Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2016-02-01

    A linear temporal stability of coaxial confined jets in a vertical tube involving heat and mass transfer at the interface is presented in this paper. A potential flow analysis that includes the effect of viscosity at the interface is performed in analyzing the stability of the system. Film boiling in a vertical tube gives rise to the flow configuration explored in this work. The effects of various non-dimensional parameters on the growth rate and the neutral curve are discussed. The heat transfer at the interface has been characterized by introducing a heat flux ratio between the conduction heat flux and the evaporation heat flux. Viscous forces and the heat and mass transfer at the interface are found to stabilize the flow both in the capillary instability region and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability region. Increasing heat and mass transfer at the interface stabilizes the flow to small as well as very large wave numbers.

  20. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  1. Modeling of heat and mass transfer in lateritic building envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meukam, Pierre; Noumowe, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the behavior of building envelopes made of local lateritic soil bricks subjected to different climatic conditions. The building envelopes studied in this work consist of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. In order to describe coupled heat and moisture transfer in wet porous materials, the coupled equations were solved by the introduction of diffusion coefficients. A numerical model HMtrans, developed for prediction of heat and moisture transfer in multi-layered building components, was used to simulate the temperature, water content and relative humidity profiles within the building envelopes. The results allow the prediction of the duration of the exposed building walls to the local weather conditions. They show that the durability of building envelopes made of lateritic soil bricks with incorporation of natural pozzolan or sawdust is not strongly affected by the climatic conditions in tropical and equatorial areas.

  2. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  3. Charge transfer enhances two-photon absorption in transition metal porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Jonathan L; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2006-03-29

    Two-photon absorption processes were investigated in electropolymerized Fe(III), Mn(III), and Co(II) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-hydroxytetraphenyl)porphyrin films. Degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) spectroscopy with 100 fs pulses in the near-IR spectral region was used. Metalloporphyrins with strong charge transfer (CT) transitions in the linear absorption spectra also show enhanced two-photon absorption. (Metalloporphyrin two-photon absorption cross section, delta, increases >10 times over that for the metal free porphyrin.) This effect was attributed to a two-photon induced charge transfer between the metal ion's d orbitals and the pi-system of the porphyrin. Correlation of one- and two-photon absorption properties of transition metal porphyrins suggests a new and simple approach to improve organic materials for photonic applications.

  4. Photo-induced mass transfer in metal nanocluster doped glasses under continuous wave laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovskii, Yu.; Rosenbluh, M.

    2011-04-15

    Mass transfer accompanying continuous wave optical recording in glasses with embedded silver nanoclusters has been studied using optical microscopy, STEM and AFM. Recording was carried out by two crossed laser beams (514 nm), which created a periodic intensity distribution on the illuminated surface of the glass-silver composites. The quality of the recorded gratings was found to be independent of the light polarization. It was determined that laser irradiation induces two mass transfer processes: diffusion coalescence of nanoclusters and redistribution of silver between illuminated and nonilluminated interference lines. The temperature profile under the illuminated surface has been calculated, as well as the kinetics of the mass redistribution.

  5. Lumen mass transfer in hollow-fiber membrane processes with constant external resistances

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.

    1997-08-01

    Membrane processes have recently become an accepted unit operation for a wide variety of separations in industry and in environmental applications. Hollow-fiber membrane processes with a constant external resistance having a constant or variable shell concentration resulting from an operational mode of cocurrent or countercurrent are studied. By solving numerically the continuity mass-conservation equation with the corresponding boundary conditions, the lumen laminar mass-transfer coefficients for both cases are correlated. The correlations greatly improve the calculating accuracy of the overall mass-transfer coefficient and can be used to obtain the lumen mixed-cup concentration by an algebraic equation substituting the partial differential equation. A separation factor m{prime} is introduced to characterize the effect of the operational mode. Calculation results demonstrate that the lumen mass-transfer coefficient is independent of the real lumen and shell concentrations, but it is greatly influenced by m{prime}. The countercurrent mode, compared to the cocurrent mode, provides not only a higher mean driving force, but a higher lumen mass-transfer coefficient. This conclusion is novel and valid for the tube-shell heat or mass-transfer processes and is supported by the experimental data in the literature and the authors` gas membrane separation experiments.

  6. Would Current International Space Station (ISS) Recycling Life Support Systems Save Mass on a Mars Transit?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen and water are recycled on the International Space Station (ISS) to save the cost of launching their mass into orbit. Usually recycling systems are justified by showing that their launch mass would be much lower than the mass of the oxygen or water they produce. Short missions such as Apollo or space shuttle directly provide stored oxygen and water, since the needed total mass of oxygen and water is much less than that of there cycling equipment. Ten year or longer missions such as the ISS or a future moon base easily save mass by recycling while short missions of days or weeks do not. Mars transit and long Mars surface missions have an intermediate duration, typically one to one and a half years. Some of the current ISS recycling systems would save mass if used on a Mars transit but others would not.

  7. Modelling transport in media with heterogeneous advection properties and mass transfer with a Continuous Time Random Walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Moussey, Charlie; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in groundwater systems are strongly affected by the presence of heterogeneity. The heterogeneity leads to non-Fickian features, that manifest themselves in the heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, as well as in the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement and in the non-Gaussian plumes of solute particles. The causes of non-Fickian transport can be the heterogeneity in the flow fields and the processes of mass exchange between mobile and immobile phases, such as sorption/desorption reactions and diffusive mass transfer. Here, we present a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model that describes the transport of solutes in d-dimensional systems by taking into account both heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile mass transfer. In order to account for these processes in the CTRW, the heterogeneities are mapped onto a distribution of transition times, which can be decomposed into advective transition times and trapping times, the latter being treated as a compound Poisson process. While advective transition times are related to the Eulerian flow velocities and, thus, to the conductivity distribution, trapping times depend on the sorption/desorption time scale, in case of reactive problems, or on the distribution of diffusion times in the immobile zones. Since the trapping time scale is typically much larger than the advective time scale, we observe the existence of two temporal regimes. The pre-asymptotic regime is defined by a characteristic time scale at which the properties of transport are fully determined by the heterogeneity of the advective field. On the other hand, in the asymptotic regime both the heterogeneity and the mass exchange processes play a role in conditioning the behaviour of transport. We consider different scenarios to discuss the relative importance of the advective heterogeneity and the mass transfer for the occurrence of non-Fickian transport. For each case we calculate analytically the scalings of the breakthrough

  8. The Diversity of Low-mass Exoplanets Characterized via Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack. J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2016-10-01

    Transit timing variations (TTV) in multi-transiting systems enables precise characterizations of low-mass planets and their orbits. The range of orbital periods and incident fluxes with detailed TTV constraints complements the radial velocity sample for low-mass planets, pushing exoplanet characterization to the regime sub-Earth size planets and out to Mercury-like distances. This has revealed an astonishing diversity in the density of super-Earth mass planets. We summarize these and other contributions to exoplanet science from TTVs.

  9. Determination of the mass-transfer coefficient in liquid phase in a stream-bubble contact device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Dmitrieva, O. S.; Madyshev, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    One of the most effective energy saving technologies is the improvement of existing heat and mass exchange units. A stream-bubble contact device is designed to enhance the operation efficiency of heat and mass exchange units. The stages of the stream-bubble units that are proposed by the authors for the decarbonization process comprise contact devices with equivalent sizes, whose number is determined by the required performance of a unit. This approach to the structural design eliminates the problems that arise upon the transition from laboratory samples to industrial facilities and makes it possible to design the units of any required performance without a decrease in the effectiveness of mass exchange. To choose the optimal design that provides the maximum effectiveness of the mass-exchange processes in units and their intensification, the change of the mass-transfer coefficient is analyzed with the assumption of a number of parameters. The results of the study of the effect of various structural parameters of a stream-bubble contact device on the mass-transfer coefficient in the liquid phase are given. It is proven that the mass-transfer coefficient increases in the liquid phase, in the first place, with the growth of the level of liquid in the contact element, because the rate of the liquid run-off grows in this case and, consequently, the time of surface renewal is reduced; in the second place, with an increase in the slot diameter in the downpipe, because the jet diameter and, accordingly, their section perimeter and the area of the surface that is immersed in liquid increase; and, in the third place, with an increase in the number of slots in the downpipe, because the area of the surface that is immersed in the liquid of the contact element increases. Thus, in order to increase the mass-transfer coefficient in the liquid phase, it is necessary to design the contact elements with a minimum width and a large number of slots and their increased diameter; in

  10. The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission:. [Progress and Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Taylor, William J.; Ginty, Carol A.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Mission from formulation through Systems Requirements Review and into preparation for Preliminary Design Review. Accomplishments of the technology maturation phase of the project are included. The presentation then summarizes the transition, due to Agency budget constraints, of CPST from a flight project into a ground project titled evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo).

  11. The Binary Mass Transfer Origin of the Red Blue Straggler Sequence in M30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Y.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lu, P.; Deng, L.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Beccari, G.

    2015-03-01

    Two separated sequences of blue straggler stars (BSSs) have been revealed by Ferraro et al. in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the Milky Way globular cluster M30. Their presence has been suggested to be related to the two BSS formation channels (namely, collisions and mass transfer in close binaries) operating within the same stellar system. The blue sequence was indeed found to be well reproduced by collisional BSS models. In contrast, no specific models for mass-transfer BSSs were available for an old stellar system like M30. Here we present binary evolution models, including case-B mass transfer and binary merging, specifically calculated for this cluster. We discuss in detail the evolutionary track of a 0.9 + 0.5 M ⊙ binary, which spends approximately 4 Gyr in the BSS region of the CMD of a 13 Gyr old cluster. We also run Monte Carlo simulations to study the distribution of mass-transfer BSSs in the CMD and to compare it with the observational data. Our results show that (1) the color and magnitude distribution of synthetic mass-transfer BSSs defines a strip in the CMD that nicely matches the observed red-BSS sequence, thus providing strong support to the mass-transfer origin for these stars; (2) the CMD distribution of synthetic BSSs never attains the observed location of the blue-BSS sequence, thus reinforcing the hypothesis that the latter formed through a different channel (likely collisions); (3) most (~60%) of the synthetic BSSs are produced by mass-transfer models, while the remaining <40% requires the contribution from merger models.

  12. Flipping the thin film model: Mass transfer by hyporheic exchange in gaining and losing streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Alexander H.; Grant, Stanley B.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of mass between a stream and its hyporheic zone, or "hyporheic exchange," is central to many important ecosystem services. In this paper we show that mass transfer across the streambed by linear mechanisms of hyporheic exchange in a gaining or losing stream can be represented by a thin film model in which (a) the mass transfer coefficient is replaced with the average Darcy flux of water downwelling into the sediment and (b) the driving force for mass transfer is "flipped" from normal to the surface (concentration difference across a boundary layer) to parallel to the surface (concentration difference across downwelling and upwelling zones). Our analysis is consistent with previously published analytical, computational, and experimental studies of hyporheic exchange in the presence of stream-groundwater interactions, and links stream network, advection-dispersion, and stochastic descriptions of solute fate and transport in rivers.

  13. An immersed boundary method for mass transfer across permeable moving interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Gong, Zhaoxin; Huang, Huaxiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present an immersed boundary method for mass transfer across permeable deformable moving interfaces interacting with the surrounding fluids. One of the key features of our method is the introduction of the mass flux as an independent variable, governed by a non-standard vector transport equation. The flux equation, coupled with the mass transport and the fluid flow equations, allows for a natural implementation of an immersed boundary algorithm when the flux across the interfaces is proportional to the jump in concentration. As an example, the oxygen transfer from red blood cells in a capillary vessel is used to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. We show that our method is capable of handling multi-physics problems involving fluid-structure interaction with multiple deformable moving interfaces and (interfacial) mass transfer simultaneously.

  14. MASS TRANSIT: FTA Could Relieve New Starts Program Funding Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    1970s, the federal government has provided a large share of the nations capital investment in urban mass transportation . Much of this investment has come...projects throughout the country. The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), 1 enacted in 1998, authorized $6 billion in guaranteed...Democratic Member Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure House of Representatives Since the early 1970s, the federal government has provided a

  15. Facilitating transitions. Nursing support for parents during the transfer of preterm infants between neonatal nurseries.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jennifer; Jones, Liz

    2008-03-01

    Transfers between neonatal units are significant transitional experiences for parents of preterm infants. The study aimed to investigate practices that nurses identify as supportive to parents during preterm infants' transfers. It explored the influence of organisational context on practice and what strategies nurses perceive would help them to provide supportive care. Parents' experiences of neonatal nurseries, their stressors and needs have been well documented. The powerful position of nurses in influencing parenting experience is also recognised. However, nurses' understanding of the transfer process, their roles in supporting parents through this and the organisational context influencing practice have not been explored. A focus group design was used composed of registered nurses from two neonatal units who met for a series of group interviews. Eleven registered nurses participated. They explored and critiqued their current practices and then established aims and strategies for practice development. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Participants identified validation, empowerment and communication as critical to effective practice. They identified a range of organisational dynamics, from logistical issues to nursing authority and scope of practice, as these influenced practice. They presented strategies for practice development, including staff education and the development of nurse practitioner roles. This study explores nurses' understanding and insights into transitions for parents of preterm infants. It shows a congruence between nurses' perceptions of parents' experiences and needs and those reported by parents in previous studies. It articulates the way nurses practice in response to these perceptions, and the manner in which organisational dynamics influence their ability to facilitate transitions. The need to invest in transitions and invest in nurses to facilitate transitions is proposed, ultimately by increasing their clinical authority

  16. Measuring the masses, radii and orbital eccentricities of sub-Neptunes with transit timing variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-01

    Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modeling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations near first order mean motion resonances, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass constraints, and precise measures of small but non-zero eccentricity.The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit light curves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Alongside spectroscopic data, our dynamical fits to TTVs reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties at Kepler-11 and Kepler-79 to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of Kepler-79, planetary bulk densities are remarkably low given the planetary masses. Indeed, several multiplanet systems characterized by TTV show much lower planetary densities than typical RV determinations in the same mass range. While this reflects the detection biases of both techniques, it also represents a growing sample of characterized systems of

  17. Adolescents' and young adults' transition experiences when transferring from paediatric to adult care: a qualitative metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fegran, Liv; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Aagaard, Hanne; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to synthesize qualitative studies of how adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases experience the transition from paediatric to adult hospital care. The review is designed as a qualitative metasynthesis and is following Sandelowski and Barroso's guidelines for synthesizing qualitative research. Literature searches were conducted in the databases PubMed, Ovid, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ISI Web of Science, and Nordic and German databases covering the period from 1999 to November 2010. In addition, forward citation snowball searching was conducted in the databases Ovid, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar. Of the 1143 records screened, 18 studies were included. Inclusion criteria were qualitative studies in English, German or Nordic languages on adolescents' and young adults' transition experiences when transferring from paediatric to adult care. There was no age limit, provided the focus was on the actual transfer process and participants had a chronic somatic disease. The studies were appraised as suitable for inclusion using a published appraisal tool. Data were analyzed into metasummaries and a metasynthesis according to established guidelines for synthesis of qualitative research. Four themes illustrating experiences of loss of familiar surroundings and relationships combined with insecurity and a feeling of being unprepared for what was ahead were identified: facing changes in significant relationships, moving from a familiar to an unknown ward culture, being prepared for transfer and achieving responsibility. Young adults' transition experiences seem to be comparable across diagnoses. Feelings of not belonging and of being redundant during the transfer process are striking. Health care professionals' appreciation of young adults' need to be acknowledged and valued as competent collaborators in their own transfer is crucial, and may protect them from

  18. Characterizing Low-Mass Planets in Kepler's Multi-Planet Systems with Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of planets in a regime of mass and size that is absent from the Solar System. This includes systems of high multiplicity within 1 AU, where low-mass volatile-rich planets have been observed in compact orbital configurations. Smaller, rocky planets have also been observed in such systems. The existing sample of characterized planets on the mass-radius diagram shows no abrupt transition from rocky planets to those that must be volatile-rich, but characteristic trends are beginning to emerge. More precise characterizations of planets by mass, radius, and incident flux will aid in revealing fundamental properties of a common class of exoplanets. There is a small sample of exoplanets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can be used to measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling with Kepler data probes planetary masses over orbital periods ranging from ~5-100 days, complementing the sample of RV detections. Furthermore, in select cases, dynamical fits to observed TTVs can tightly constrain the orbital eccentricity vectors, which can, alongside the transit light curve, tightly constrain the density and radius of the host star, and hence reduce the uncertainty on planetary radius. TTV studies have revealed a class of low-mass low-density objects with a substantial mass fraction in the form of a voluminous H-rich atmosphere. To these we add precise mass measurements of the outer planets of Kepler-33, a compact system with five known transiting planets, three of which show detectable transit timing variations. These results will be placed

  19. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. I. Phase-dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Observations reveal that mass-transferring binary systems may have non-zero orbital eccentricities. The time evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity of mass-transferring eccentric binary systems is an important part of binary evolution theory and has been widely studied. However, various different approaches to and assumptions on the subject have made the literature difficult to comprehend and comparisons between different orbital element time evolution equations not easy to make. Consequently, no self-consistent treatment of this phase has ever been included in binary population synthesis codes. In this paper, we present a general formalism to derive the time evolution equations of the binary orbital elements, treating mass loss and mass transfer as perturbations of the general two-body problem. We present the self-consistent form of the perturbing acceleration and phase-dependent time evolution equations for the orbital elements under different mass loss/transfer processes. First, we study the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. Then, we proceed with non-isotropic ejection and accretion in a conservative as well as a non-conservative manner for both point masses and extended bodies. We compare the derived equations with similar work in the literature and explain the existing discrepancies.

  20. Fuel cell collector plates with improved mass transfer channels

    DOEpatents

    Gurau, Vladimir; Barbir, Frano; Neutzler, Jay K.

    2003-04-22

    A fuel cell collector plate can be provided with one or more various channel constructions for the transport of reactants to the gas diffusion layer and the removal of water therefrom. The outlet channel can be arranged to have a reduced volume compared to the inlet channel, in both interdigitated and discontinuous spiral applications. The land width between an inlet channel and outlet channel can be reduced to improved mass flow rate in regions of deleted reactant concentrations. Additionally or alternatively, the depth of the inlet channel can be reduced in the direction of flow to reduce the diffusion path as the concentration of reactant is reduced.

  1. Spirits and social reconstruction after mass violence: rethinking transitional justice.

    PubMed

    Baines, Erin

    2010-01-01

    A vibrant debate in the field of transitional justice concerns the relative ability of global, national, and local mechanisms to promote justice after violent conflict. Discussion largely focuses on more formal mechanisms of justice (courts, tribunals, or truth commissions), implying that state institutions and the law are solely responsible for shaping the process of social healing. This article suggests that scholars should take seriously more informal, socio-cultural processes outside the purview of the state, particularly for how they promote social reconstruction at the micro level. Examining the phenomena of spirit possession and ritual cleansing in northern Uganda, I illustrate how such efforts are expressions of injustice and reflect ordinary people’s attempts to seek moral renewal and social repair. This approach is particularly illustrative in cases where ‘intimate enemies’ exist - that is, settings where ordinary people who engaged in violence against one another must live together again.

  2. Health care providers' attitudes towards transfer and transition in young persons with long term illness- a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Berghammer, Malin; Moons, Philip; Bratt, Ewa-Lena

    2017-04-11

    Transition programs in health care for young persons with special health care needs aim to maximize lifelong functioning. Exploring health care professionals' perspective may increase the possibility of successful implementation of transition programs. The aim was to survey health care professionals' attitudes towards components and barriers on transition and transfer in young people with long-term medical conditions with special health care needs. A cross-sectional web-based survey was sent by e-mail to 529 physicians and nurses in Swedish pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. Response rate was 38% (n = 201). The survey consisted of 59 questions regarding different aspects of components and barriers on transition and transfer. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize demographic data and categorized responses. The Chi square test was used for comparison between proportions of categories. Most respondents agreed on the destinations of care for adolescents within their specialty. Age and psychosocial aspects such as maturity and family situations were considered the most important initiators for transfer. Joint meeting with the patient (82%); presence of a transition coordinator (76%) and a written individualized transfer plan (55%) were reported as important transition components. Pediatric care professionals found the absence of a transition coordinator to be more of a transition barrier than adult care professionals (p = 0.018) and also a more important transfer component (p = 0.017). Other barriers were lack of funding (45%) and limited clinical space (19%). Transition programs were more common in university hospitals than in regional hospitals (12% vs 2%, p = <0.001) as well as having a transition coordinator (12% vs 3%, p = 0.004). The findings highlight a willingness to work on new transition strategies and provide direction for improvement, taking local transition components as well as potential barriers into consideration when

  3. Measurement of Planet Masses with Transit Timing Variations Due to Synodic “Chopping” Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational interactions between planets in transiting exoplanetary systems lead to variations in the times of transit that are diagnostic of the planetary masses and the dynamical state of the system. Here we show that synodic “chopping” contributions to these transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used to uniquely measure the masses of planets without full dynamical analyses involving direct integration of the equations of motion. We present simple analytic formulae for the chopping signal, which are valid (generally \\lt 10% error) for modest eccentricities e≲ 0.1. Importantly, these formulae primarily depend on the mass of the perturbing planet, and therefore the chopping signal can be used to break the mass/free-eccentricity degeneracy, which can appear for systems near first-order mean motion resonances. Using a harmonic analysis, we apply these TTV formulae to a number of Kepler systems, which had been previously modeled with full dynamical analyses. We show that when chopping is measured, the masses of both planets can be determined uniquely, in agreement with previous results, but without the need for numerical orbit integrations. This demonstrates how mass measurements from TTVs may primarily arise from an observable chopping signal. The formula for chopping can also be used to predict the number of transits and timing precision required for future observations, such as those made by TESS or PLATO, in order to infer planetary masses through analysis of TTVs.

  4. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  5. Analysis of turbulent heat transfer, mass transfer, and friction in smooth tubes at high Prandtl and Schmidt numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G

    1955-01-01

    The expression for eddy diffusivity from a previous analysis was modified in order to account for the effect of kinematic viscosity on the turbulence in the region close to a wall. By using the modified expression, good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results for heat and mass transfer at Prandtl and Schmidt numbers between 0.5 and 3000. The effects of length-to-diameter ratio and of variable viscosity were also investigated for a wide range of Prandtl numbers.

  6. Influence of mass-transfer limitations on carbon isotope fractionation during microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Christoph; Berg, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A; Holliger, Christof; Schwarzenbach, René P; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2009-12-01

    Mass transfer of organic contaminants from nonaqueous phase liquids to the aqueous phase can significantly modulate the observable carbon isotope fractionation behavior associated with contaminant transformation. We evaluated the effects of kinetic interphase mass transfer between tetradecane and water on the observable (13)C enrichment factor, epsilon(obs), pertinent to the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by Sulfurospirillum sp. in laboratory batch model systems containing organic, aqueous and gaseous phases. We propose a conceptual model, which includes the kinetics of tetradecane-water and gas-water mass transfer, microbial growth, and isotope-sensitive parameters describing dehalorespiration, for quantifying variable (13)C enrichment factors. While the C isotope fractionation of TCE reduction to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) in the absence of phase-transfer effects can be characterized by a constant epsilon-value of -18.8 +/- 0.6 per thousand, mass-transfer limitations impede describing this process with a constant enrichment factor typically used in Rayleigh equations. Owing to the masking of kinetic isotope effects by the transfer of TCE from tetradecane to the aqueous phase, (obs)-values gradually changed from -18.4 per thousand to -5.9 per thousand. Such variations may complicate the interpretation of compound-specific isotope analysis in the assessment of chloroethene biodegradation in field applications.

  7. Ultrafast dynamics of a charge-transfer dimer as a model for the photoinduced phase transition of charge-transfer compounds.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2007-07-13

    By applying ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy with 15 fs temporal resolution to (TMTTF(+))(2) dimers we provide a full picture of the structural relaxation following photoexcitation of their CT transition. Both population and coherent phonon dynamics allow tracking wave packet motion onto the multidimensional excited state potential energy surface, as obtained by density functional theory calculations. We show that the vibrations that are strongly coupled to the charge-transfer transition of the dimer correspond to those driving the photoinduced phase transition occurring in charge-transfer crystalline solids.

  8. Mass transfer of VOCs in laboratory-scale air sparging tank.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Ong, Say Kee; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2008-04-15

    Volatilization of VOCs was investigated using a 55-gal laboratory-scale model in which air sparging experiments were conducted with a vertical air injection well. In addition, X-ray imaging of an air sparging sand box showed air flows were in the form of air bubbles or channels depending on the size of the porous media. Air-water mass transfer was quantified using the air-water mass transfer coefficient which was determined by fitting the experimental data to a two-zone model. The two-zone model is a one-dimensional lumped model that accounts for the effects of air flow type and diffusion of VOCs in the aqueous phase. The experimental air-water mass transfer coefficients, KGa, obtained from this study ranged from 10(-2) to 10(-3)1/min. From a correlation analysis, the air-water mass transfer coefficient was found to be directly proportional to the air flow rate and the mean particle size of soil but inversely proportional to Henry's constant. The correlation results implied that the air-water mass transfer coefficient was strongly affected by the size of porous media and the air flow rates.

  9. Effect of electric fields on mass transfer to droplets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Budwig, R.

    1994-02-01

    During the six year funding period, the effects of a direct and alternating field upon single drop hydrodynamics and mass transfer were evaluated both experimentally and theoretically. Direct current field effects upon drop size, velocity and mass transfer rates were also observed for multiple drops formed in a three stage sieve tray column. Drop size, velocity, and mass transfer rates were measured experimentally and compared to simple models for direct current electric fields. Agreement between theory and experiment was found for drop charge, size, and velocity. Drop mass transfer coefficients were substantially larger than theoretical predictions while extraction efficiencies were moderately higher. Drop distortion and oscillation were observed and are thought to result in the experimentally observed higher values. For alternating current fields, drop flow streamlines and oscillations were measured and found to compare well with predictions from a solved mathematical model. In addition, equipment was constructed to determine mass transfer rates to oscillating drops. Concentration profiles in still and oscillating drops were measured and qualitatively compared to theoretical predictions.

  10. Numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Ku, A C; Furry, R B; Jordan, W K; Dropkin, D

    1976-10-01

    The transient-state external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying was investigated. The spaces between the heaters and porous product-surfaces were simulated as semi porous channels, with mass-injection into the channels from the sublimation of ice. The energy, vorticity, concentration, and stream function/vorticity equations were the governing equations used as the mathematical model. These partial differential-equations were solved by finite-difference, numberical methods. The Fromm, Alternating Direction Implicity, and Upwind Difference methods were used in solving the parabolic equations; and the Successive Over Relaxation method was adopted to solve the elliptic equation. Numerical solutions obtained from the digital computer for the external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying were computed for Reynolds numbers equal t0 0.1, 1.0, and 4.0 and Grashof numbers equal to 0, +/- 100, and +/- 1000. The Prandtl number selected for water vapor was 1.0. One set of these solutions were compared to a known, analytical solution, and good agreement was obtained. The external heat and mass-transfer mechanism was then combined with the internal-heat-transfer mechanism developed by Dyer and Sunderland (1968), and the equations describing the relation of heater temperatures and product surface-temperatures developed by Massey and Sunderland (1972). A thorough computer-simulation was carried out for the combined heat and mass-transfer mechanism during freeze-drying of food products.

  11. Influence of relative air/water flow velocity on oxygen mass transfer in gravity sewers.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Lucie; Springer, Fanny; Lipeme-Kouyi, Gislain; Buffiere, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Problems related to hydrogen sulfide may be serious for both network stakeholders and the public in terms of health, sustainability of the sewer structure and urban comfort. H2S emission models are generally theoretical and simplified in terms of environmental conditions. Although air transport characteristics in sewers must play a role in the fate of hydrogen sulfide, only a limited number of studies have investigated this issue. The aim of this study was to better understand H2S liquid to gas transfer by highlighting the link between the mass transfer coefficient and the turbulence in the air flow and the water flow. For experimental safety reasons, O2 was taken as a model compound. The oxygen mass transfer coefficients were obtained using a mass balance in plug flow. The mass transfer coefficient was not impacted by the range of the interface air-flow velocity values tested (0.55-2.28 m·s(-1)) or the water velocity values (0.06-0.55 m·s(-1)). Using the ratio between kL,O2 to kL,H2S, the H2S mass transfer behavior in a gravity pipe in the same hydraulic conditions can be predicted.

  12. Kinetic study of the mass transfer of bovine serum albumin in anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, K; Guiochon, G

    2000-01-14

    A kinetic study was made on the mass transfer phenomena of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in two different anion-exchange columns (Resource-Q and TSK-GEL-DEAE-5PW). The analysis of the concentration dependence of the lumped mass transfer rate coefficient (km,L) provided the information about the kinetics of the several mass transfer processes in the columns and the anion exchangers, i.e., the axial dispersion, the fluid-to-particle mass transfer, the intraparticle diffusion, and the adsorption/desorption. In the Resource-Q column, the intraparticle diffusion had a dominant contribution to the band broadening compared with those of the other processes. The surface diffusion coefficient (Ds) of BSA showed a positive concentration dependence, by which the linear dependence of km,L on the BSA concentration seemed to be interpreted. On the other hand, in the TSK-GEL-DEAE-5PW column, the contribution of the adsorption/desorption was also important and almost same as that due to the intraparticle diffusion. There are some differences between the intrinsic properties of the mass transfer kinetics inside the two anion exchangers. It was likely that the positive concentration dependence of Ds was explained by the heterogeneous surface model.

  13. Heat and mass transfer from a supercritical LOX spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegini, H.; Chaturvedi, S. K.; Kondic, N.

    1991-12-01

    The injection, evaporation and diffusion of liquid oxygen in a high pressure airstream in a parallel wall mixing channel is analyzed and computationally solved. The droplet evaporation in the supercritical environment is treated by a nonisothermal droplet heat transfer model which accounts for the finite thermal conductivity of oxygen droplets and the gas film. The nonideal gas effects in the gas phase are modeled by the Redlich-Kwong equation of state. The mixture density and enthalpy are determined by applying the ideal-solution limit which is shown to be valid for the prevailing conditions. The coupled dynamics of droplet and gas phases is calculated by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions. The turbulence effects are modeled by a two equation (k-epsilon) model. The results show that the nonideal gas behavior prevails over a large portion of the mixing channel. Furthermore, the injected liquid oxygen droplets achieve critical temperature very quickly, and as a result they evaporate in the vicinity of the injection point. The effects of injection angle on oxygen mixing characteristics is also investigated.

  14. The Momentum Transfer and Target Mass Dependence of the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Paul Richard

    In order to study some of the exclusive structure and reaction dynamics in the quasi elastic region, (e,e ^' p) measurements on ^{12}C and ^{63 }Cu were performed. These measurements attempt to isolate the nuclear reaction mechanism contribution from the off shell e-p cross section. We performed measurements at five three-momentum transfer |vec {rm q}| for each target, varying |vec{rm q} | by changing the electron scattering angle theta_{rm e^' }. The measurements were performed at the MIT -Bates Linear Accelerator Center. The measurements were compared with Impulse Approximation (IA) predictions, providing quantitative tests of the approximations involved. The measurements for the p-shells were emphasized: the ^{12}C 1p-shell and the ^{63}Cu 2p-shell. For both targets, missing energy spectra were extract up to 50 MeV. The data from the second major shell regions, the ^{12}C s-shell and the ^{63}Cu f-s shell, were also compared with IA predictions. Finally, the ^{12}C results were compared with existing ^{12}C(e,e ^' p) results.

  15. Heat and Mass Transfer with Condensation in Capillary Porous Bodies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study. PMID:24688366

  16. Heat and mass transfer with condensation in capillary porous bodies.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Salah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study.

  17. Care Transitions After Acute Myocardial Infarction for Transferred-In Versus Direct-Arrival Patients.

    PubMed

    Vora, Amit N; Peterson, Eric D; Hellkamp, Anne S; Sutton, Nadia R; Panacek, Edward; Thomas, Laine; de Lemos, James A; Wang, Tracy Y

    2016-03-01

    Many patients in the United States require transfer from one hospital to another for acute myocardial infarction (MI) care. How well these transferred-in patients are transitioned back to their local community is unknown. We used linked Medicare claims data to examine postdischarge outcomes of 39 136 patients with acute MI aged ≥65 years discharged alive from 451 US hospitals in Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network Registry-Get With the Guidelines. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to compare the likelihood of outpatient clinic follow-up and risks of all-cause mortality and all-cause or cardiovascular readmission at 30 days post MI between transferred-in and direct-arrival patients. From 2007 to 2010, 14 060 of 39 136 patients (36%) required interhospital transfer for acute MI care, traveling a median of 43 miles (interquartile range, 27-68 miles; 77.6 km [interquartile range, 48.2-122.6 km]). Compared with those arriving directly, transferred-in patients with MI were slightly younger (median age, 73 versus 74; P<0.01) but less likely to have previous MI, heart failure, and previous revascularization than direct-arrival patients. Relative to direct-arrival patients, those transferred-in had a lower likelihood of outpatient follow-up within 30 days post discharge (risk-adjusted incidence, 69.9% versus 78.2%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.92) and higher adjusted 30-day all-cause and cardiovascular readmission risks (14.5% versus 14.0%; HRall-cause, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15 and 9.5% versus 9.1%; HRcardiovascular, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.22). In contrast, risk-adjusted 30-day mortality was similar between transferred-in and direct arrivals (1.6% versus 1.6%; HR, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.27). Transferred-in patients with acute MI are less likely to have outpatient clinic follow-up within 30 days and more likely to be readmitted within the first 30 days post discharge compared

  18. Simulating transitional flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder using a K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Ibrahim, M.

    1989-01-01

    A boundary layer computer code, called TEXSTAN, has been used to simulate external, transitional, fluid flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder. Turbulence modeling was accomplished by using a low-Reynolds number K-epsilon turbulence model. The study was made for free-stream turbulence intensities less than 15 percent. The comparison of the flat plate heat transfer predictions to experimental data showed good agreement, for the location of transition as well as in the heat transfer coefficient. The typical discrepancy in predicting the heat transfer coefficient was less than 5 percent of the measured value.

  19. Simulating transitional flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder using a K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Ibrahim, M.

    1989-01-01

    A boundary layer computer code, called TEXSTAN, has been used to simulate external, transitional, fluid flow and heat transfer over the flat plate and circular cylinder. Turbulence modeling was accomplished by using a low-Reynolds number K-epsilon turbulence model. The study was made for free-stream turbulence intensities less than 15 percent. The comparison of the flat plate heat transfer predictions to experimental data showed good agreement, for the location of transition as well as in the heat transfer coefficient. The typical discrepancy in predicting the heat transfer coefficient was less than 5 percent of the measured value.

  20. Kepler’s Low-Mass, Low Density Planets Characterized via Transit Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Lissauer, Jack; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed an abundance of planets in a regime of mass and size that is absent from the Solar System. This includes systems of high multiplicity within 1 AU, where low-mass volatile-rich planets have been observed in compact orbital configurations, as have smaller, rocky planets. The existing sample of characterized planets on the mass-radius diagram shows no abrupt transition from rocky planets to those that must be volatile-rich, but characteristic trends are beginning to emerge. More precise characterizations of planets by mass, radius, and incident flux are revealing fundamental properties of a common class of exoplanets.There is a small sample of low mass exoplanets with known masses and radii, whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the super-Earth mass range, detectability limits this sample to planets that have short orbital periods, and high incident fluxes.In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can be used to measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modeling with Kepler data probes planetary masses over orbital periods ranging from ~5-200 days, complementing the sample of RV detections, but also with some overlap.In addition, dynamical fits to observed TTVs can tightly constrain the orbital eccentricity vectors in select cases, which can, alongside the transit light curve, tightly constrain the density and radius of the host star, and hence reduce the uncertainty on planetary radius.TTV studies have revealed a class of low-mass, low-density objects with a substantial mass fraction in the form of a voluminous H-rich atmosphere. We will present new precise planetary mass characterizations from TTVs. We find that super-Earth mass planets

  1. A NUMERICAL METHOD FOR STUDYING SUPER-EDDINGTON MASS TRANSFER IN DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcello, Dominic C.; Tohline, Joel E. E-mail: tohline@phys.lsu.edu

    2012-04-01

    We present a numerical method for the study of double white dwarf (DWD) binary systems at the onset of super-Eddington mass transfer. We incorporate the physics of ideal inviscid hydrodynamical flow, Newtonian self-gravity, and radiation transport on a three-dimensional uniformly rotating cylindrical Eulerian grid. Care has been taken to conserve the key physical quantities such as angular momentum and energy. Our new method conserves total energy to a higher degree of accuracy than other codes that are presently being used to model mass transfer in DWD systems. We present the results of verification tests and simulate the first 20 + orbits of a binary system of mass ratio q 0.7 at the onset of dynamically unstable direct impact mass transfer. The mass transfer rate quickly exceeds the critical Eddington limit by many orders of magnitude, and thus we are unable to model a trans-Eddington phase. It appears that radiation pressure does not significantly affect the accretion flow in the highly super-Eddington regime. An optically thick common envelope forms around the binary within a few orbits. Although this envelope quickly exceeds the spatial domain of the computational grid, the fraction of the common envelope that exceeds zero gravitational binding energy is extremely small, suggesting that radiation-driven mass loss is insignificant in this regime. It remains to be seen whether simulations that capture the trans-Eddington phase of such flows will lead to the same conclusion or show that substantial material gets expelled.

  2. The Size And Shape Of The Mass Transfer Nozzle In Eccentric Interacting Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Alyssa; Haggerty, C.; Sepinsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the amount of mass lost from a star which just fills its Roche Lobe, it is imperative to accurately calculate the size of the nozzle -- the area through which the mass flows. This is normally bounded by the equipotential surface where the density of the exponential atmosphere drops by one scale height. When the stars are in an eccentric orbit, Sepinsky et al. (2007) found that the equipotential surfaces defining the peanut-shaped shell ordinarily enclosing the two stars can "open up", no longer enclosing both stars. Furthermore, when attempting to calculate the orbit-variable mass transfer rate for eccentric systems, Haggerty and Sepinsky (2011) discovered that the equipotential surface defining the outer edge of the nozzle may "open up” -- and that this can occur closer to the donor star than its inner Lagrangian point (L1). In such a case, the nozzle is undefined at L1. Here, we develop a method for calculating the effective area of mass transfer by finding the area of the rings bounded at small radii by the Roche Lobe of the donor and at large radii by the equipotential surface. We calculate the area of the ring and its proximity to the L1 point as a function of eccentricity and the binary parameters. We then compare the mass transfer rate calculated for this area to other recent calculations of the mass transfer rate in eccentric binaries.

  3. Analytical and computational studies of intramolecular electron transfer pertinent to electron transfer and electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neff, Diane; Simons, Jack

    2010-01-28

    Earlier work from this group has suggested that, in electron capture and electron-transfer mass spectrometry experiments on positively charged gas-phase samples of polypeptides, the initial electron attachment event most likely occurs at one of the peptide's positively charged sites (e.g., protonated side chains), although electron attachment can occur at a disulfide or amide site ca. 1-10% of the time. Focusing on the 90-99% dominant channel in which initial electron attachment occurs at a positive site, this paper addresses to what extent and over what distances electron transfer can take place from a positively charged site to a disulfide sigma* or amide pi* orbital, because it is thought that it is through such orbitals that disulfide or N-C(alpha) backbone bond cleavage occurs. Ab initio electronic structure calculations show that, as long as an SS sigma* (or OCN pi*) orbital experiences sufficient Coulomb stabilization from proximal positively charged groups, there are a myriad of excited Rydberg states located on positive sites that are able to induce such intrapeptide electron transfer. Computational data show that the transfer rates decay exponentially with distance for a given Rydberg orbital. An analytical model is developed that allows us to estimate the rates of Rydberg-to-valence and Rydberg-to-Rydberg electron transfers as functions of the Rydberg orbitals' n quantum numbers. This model suggests that transfer can occur over very long distances at rates that are more than competitive with the rates of radiationless relaxation within the manifold of Rydberg states (the latter processes eventually terminate the electron-transfer process an thus the disulfide or N-C(alpha) bond cleavages), and it gives formulas for how these rates depend on n (and thus the radial span of the Rydberg orbitals).

  4. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations of Mass Transfer in Binary Systems by a Free Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Abate, Carlo; Matrozis, Elvijs

    2017-09-01

    A large fraction of stars in binary systems are expected to undergo mass and angular momentum exchange at some point in their evolution, which can drastically alter the chemical and dynamical properties and fates of the systems. Interaction by stellar wind is an important process in wide binaries. However, the details of wind mass transfer are still not well understood. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of wind mass transfer in binary systems to explore mass-accretion efficiencies and geometries of mass outflows, for a range of mass ratios from 0.05 to 1.0. In particular, we focus on the case of a free wind, in which some physical mechanism accelerates the expelled wind material balancing the gravity of the mass-losing star with the wind velocity comparable to the orbital velocity of the system. We find that the mass-accretion efficiency and accreted specific angular momentum increase with the mass ratio of the system. For an adiabatic wind, we obtain that the accretion efficiency onto the secondary star varies from about 0.1% to 8% for mass ratios between 0.05 and 1.0.

  5. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dronawat, S N; Svihla, C K; Hanley, T R

    1997-01-01

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively.

  6. Study of heat and mass transfer during IR drying of paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, H.D.; Thibault, J.; Grandjean, B.P.A. ); Chen, R. . Centre de Recherche en Pates et Papiers)

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the drying of paper using a gas-fired IR dryer. The model accounts for various phenomena: water and vapor mass transfer, conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. The phenomenological equations are solved with a finite difference scheme, including a modified upwind differencing scheme to account for water migration within the paper sheet. The simulation results illustrate the basic underlying phenomena involved in IR paper drying and can be instrumental to the engineer to make the detailed analyses of such a drying process. A sensitivity analysis has shown that the drying rate is most sensitive to parameters governing the IR heat transfer process whereas the paper sheet temperature is most sensitive to parameter governing the mass transfer process with the surroundings.

  7. Landau-Zener transitions mediated by an environment: population transfer and energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Dodin, Amro; Garmon, Savannah; Simine, Lena; Segal, Dvira

    2014-03-28

    We study Landau-Zener transitions between two states with the addition of a shared discretized continuum. The continuum allows for population decay from the initial state as well as indirect transitions between the two states. The probability of nonadiabatic transition in this multichannel model preserves the standard Landau-Zener functional form except for a shift in the usual exponential factor, reflecting population transfer into the continuum. We provide an intuitive explanation for this behavior assuming individual, independent transitions between pairs of states. In contrast, the ground state survival probability at long time shows a novel, non-monotonic, functional form with an oscillatory behavior in the sweep rate at low sweep rate values. We contrast the behavior of this open-multistate model to other generalized Landau-Zener models incorporating an environment: the stochastic Landau-Zener model and the dissipative case, where energy dissipation and thermal excitations affect the adiabatic region. Finally, we present evidence that the continuum of states may act to shield the two-state Landau-Zener transition probability from the effect of noise.

  8. Landau-Zener transitions mediated by an environment: Population transfer and energy dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, Amro; Simine, Lena; Segal, Dvira; Garmon, Savannah

    2014-03-28

    We study Landau-Zener transitions between two states with the addition of a shared discretized continuum. The continuum allows for population decay from the initial state as well as indirect transitions between the two states. The probability of nonadiabatic transition in this multichannel model preserves the standard Landau-Zener functional form except for a shift in the usual exponential factor, reflecting population transfer into the continuum. We provide an intuitive explanation for this behavior assuming individual, independent transitions between pairs of states. In contrast, the ground state survival probability at long time shows a novel, non-monotonic, functional form with an oscillatory behavior in the sweep rate at low sweep rate values. We contrast the behavior of this open-multistate model to other generalized Landau-Zener models incorporating an environment: the stochastic Landau-Zener model and the dissipative case, where energy dissipation and thermal excitations affect the adiabatic region. Finally, we present evidence that the continuum of states may act to shield the two-state Landau-Zener transition probability from the effect of noise.

  9. Mass transfer mechanisms for water adsorbed on silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Water adsorption measurements were carried out on a commercial silica gel desiccant in humidistat tubes employing saturated salt solutions to maintain controlled final equilibrium partial pressures of water vapor over the adsorbent samples. The humidistat designs permitted measurement of adsorption in the air-saturated mode, or in the evacuated mode, where the vapor pressure of the water reestablished by the wet salt slurry was the total gas pressure of the system. Evaluation of the water adsorption data on silica gel obtained under both humidistat conditions disclosed a novel solid-side mass transport mechanism not previously considered in desiccant system modelling. It is proposed that at or about 40% relative humidity, pore flooding on the external surface creates a meniscal force imbalance with respect to the menisci adjacent to unfilled voids within the interior of the particle. At this point and beyond to saturation, fluid flow in a manner analogous to wicking saturates the particle, and appears to be responsible for the appearance of the ''second knee'' in the observed classical BET Type IV isotherm. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, T. H.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Johnson, J. L.; Jappsen, A.-K.; Klessen, R. S.; Clark, P. C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Stacy, A.; Bromm, V.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of the first galaxies at redshifts z ~ 10-15 signaled the transition from the simple initial state of the universe to one of ever increasing complexity. We here review recent progress in understanding their assembly process with numerical simulations, starting with cosmological initial conditions and modelling the detailed physics of star formation. In this context we emphasize the importance and influence of selecting appropriate initial conditions for the star formation process. We revisit the notion of a critical metallicity resulting in the transition from primordial to present-day initial mass functions and highlight its dependence on additional cooling mechanisms and the exact initial conditions. We also review recent work on the ability of dust cooling to provide the transition to present-day low-mass star formation. In particular, we highlight the extreme conditions under which this transition mechanism occurs, with violent fragmentation in dense gas resulting in tightly packed clusters.

  11. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  12. Temperature-difference-driven mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid.

    PubMed

    Struchtrup, Henning; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Irreversible thermodynamics provides interface conditions that yield temperature and chemical potential jumps at phase boundaries. The interfacial jumps allow unexpected transport phenomena, such as the inverted temperature profile [Pao, Phys. Fluids 14, 306 (1971)] and mass transfer from a cold to a warm liquid driven by a temperature difference across the vapor phase [Mills and Phillips, Chem. Phys. Lett. 372, 615 (2002)]. Careful evaluation of the thermodynamic laws has shown [Bedeaux et al., Physica A 169, 263 (1990)] that the inverted temperature profile is observed for processes with a high heat of vaporization. In this paper, we show that cold to warm mass transfer through the vapor from a cold to a warm liquid is only possible when the heat of evaporation is sufficiently small. A necessary criterium for the size of the mass transfer coefficient is given.

  13. Effect of Reynolds number on flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Ikarashi, Yuya; Yamagata, Takayuki; Taguchi, Syoichi

    2016-11-01

    The flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow was studied experimentally by using the mass transfer measurement by plaster dissolution method, the surface flow visualization by oil film method and stereo PIV measurement. The experiments are carried out in a water tunnel of a circular pipe of 56mm in diameter with a working fluid of water. The Reynolds number was varied from 30000 to 200000. The experimental result indicated the change of the mass transfer coefficient distribution in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds number. This phenomenon is further examined by the surface flow visualization and measurement of secondary flow pattern in the elbow, and the results showed the suggested change of the secondary flow pattern in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds numbers.

  14. Occupational hot exposures: a review of heat and mass transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G H; McLean, R C; Stewart, D

    1989-01-01

    The assessment and control of hot working environments is based on an appraisal of the thermal interaction between an individual and the surroundings. This paper examines in detail the processes of convection, radiation and evaporation which constitute the principal mechanisms for this interaction. The defining equations are discussed with particular attention given to the appropriate numerical values of body heat and mass transfer coefficients. The use of the heat-mass transfer analogy for the prediction of the mass transfer coefficient is introduced and verified. Finally, recommendations are given as to the most appropriate set of energy exchange equations for use in the analysis of high-temperature environments. The physiological criteria involved in hot working conditions, and the generation of a suitable assessment procedure based on the energy exchange equations, are the subject of a companion paper.

  15. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  16. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  17. A holographic interferometric method to study combined heat and mass transfer in film sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G.; Worek, W. M.

    1992-08-01

    Sorption by a liquid desiccant is a key process in open-cycle, liquid desiccant cooling systems. In order to study the absorption rates in a liquid desiccant, a fiber-optic, double-wavelength holographic interferometric method was developed and used to measure the combined heat and mass transfer processes that occurred during a regeneration process. In the experiment, the heat and mass transfer processes that occur at the interface between a dry air stream and either a liquid desiccant or a film of water are investigated. The temperature and concentration distribution were calculated and the results were used to determine the Lewis number Le and the local heat and mass transfer coefficients.

  18. Evaporation in relation to CO 2 concentration: Analysis of mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, C. S. P.; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Rao, Surampalli; Abd Elbasit, Mohamed A. M.; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the potential of mass transfer approach in estimating evaporation changes under different CO 2 levels are evaluated using data from controlled chamber experiments in which radiation and wind velocity were kept constant and temperature and relative humidity profiles were varied in different patterns along with CO 2 concentration. Currently, FAO procedure lists three approaches to compute air vapour pressure based on temperature and relative humidity profiles. In this study, the impact of using different procedures of estimating air vapour pressure is examined to assess the use of mass transfer approach for estimating evaporation. To achieve this, a part of the data is used to calibrate mass transfer coefficient which is subsequently used to project evaporation for future states. Accordingly, strategies are ranked for their potential in estimating evaporation. The effect of evaporation rate is compared at 400 ppm and 600 ppm CO 2 level. It has been observed that the evaporation rate is more pronounced at higher CO 2 level.

  19. Stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder.

    PubMed

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-02-26

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases.

  20. Effect of mass transfer resistance on the Lineweaver-Burk plots for flocculating microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ngian, K F; Lin, S H; Martin, W R

    1977-12-01

    It is shown that the mass transfer resistance can significantly distort the linearity of the Lineweaver-Burk plot of the kinetic data for a microbial culture which forms aggregates. For small flocs, the linearity of the Lineweaver-Burk plot is largely retained, but a different slope and intercept will be obtained compared with flocs free from mass transfer resistance. For large flocs, the Lineweaver-Burk plot shows pronounced curvature at high limiting substrate concentrations. Hence, if the true intrinsic kinetic parameters are to be extracted from a highly flocculating microbial culture, sufficient agitation has to be provided to remove the effect of mass transfer resistance. If the behavior of the flocculating microbial culture is to be explored, additional values for some physical parameters, such as the effective diffusion coefficient of the substrate in floc, the floc density, and the mean floc radius, are needed.

  1. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  2. Measurements of airway dimensions and calculation of mass transfer characteristics of the human oral passage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K H; Cheng, Y S; Yeh, H C; Swift, D L

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the geometric shape, perimeter, and cross-sectional area of the human oral passage (from oral entrance to midtrachea) and relates them through dimensionless parameters to the depositional mass transfer of ultrafine particles. Studies were performed in two identical replicate oral passage models, one of which was cut orthogonal to the airflow direction into 3 mm elements for measurement, the other used intact for experimental measurements of ultrafine aerosol deposition. Dimensional data were combined with deposition measurements in two sections of the oral passage (the horizontal oral cavity and the vertical laryngeal-tracheal airway) to calculate the dimensionless mass transfer Sherwood number (Sh). Mass transfer theory suggests that Sh should be expressible as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) and the Schmidt number (Sc). For inhalation and exhalation through the oral cavity (O-C), an empirical relationship was obtained for flow rates from 7.5-30.0 1 min-1: Sh = 15.3 Re0.812 Sc-0.986 An empirical relationship was likewise obtained for the laryngeal-tracheal (L-T) region over the same range of flow rates: Sh = 25.9 Re0.861 Sc-1.37 These relationships were compared to heat transfer in the human upper airways through the well-known analogy between heat and mass transfer. The Reynolds number dependence for both the O-C and L-T relationships was in good agreement with that for heat transfer. The mass transfer coefficients were compared to extrathoracic uptake of gases and vapors and showed similar flow rate dependence. For gases and vapors that conform to the zero concentration boundary condition, the empirical relationships are applicable when diffusion coefficients are taken into consideration.

  3. An assessment of the impact of transition on advanced winged entry vehicle thermal protection system mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, K. E.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the impact of turbulent heating on thermal protection system (TPS) mass for advanced winged entry vehicles. Four basic systems are considered: insulative, metallic hot structures, metallic standoff, and hybrid systems. TPS sizings are performed using entry trajectories tailored specifically to the characteristics of each TPS concept under consideration. Comparisons are made between systems previously sized under the assumption of all laminar heating and those sized using a baseline estimate of transition and turbulent heating. The relative effect of different transition criteria on TPS mass requirements is also examined. Also investigated are entry trajectories tailored to alleviate turbulent heating. Results indicate the significant impact of turbulent heating on TPS mass and demonstrate the importance of both accurate transition criteria and entry trajectory tailoring.

  4. Mass transfer in supercritical fluids instancing selected fluids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Benning, Rainer; Delgado, Antonio; Ertunc, Oezguer

    The research interests lie in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of diffusion and nucle-ation of organic solutes in near-and supercritical state of a solvent, which count as important means of mass transfer in the process engineering industry. The use of supercritical fluids in industrial processes, such as extraction and particle handling, has become a more and more popular method. Take a closer look at the two processes one would find that there are obviously two sub-processes involved in each of the process, namely the diffusion/nucleation as well as a phase transition procedure. Because of the operational limitations in the practice, this phase transition can-not be neglected. So it is also included in the theoretical approach. Classically to deduce conclusions from experiment results, mathematical/physical models outlining property changes and summarizing characteristics of the two processes are expected. In order to become an insight of these phenomena from the origin, and also to serve as a fundamental attribute for the numerical simulation later, the theories of statistical thermodynamics are adopted here as a proper means to describe the behaviors of the two processes. As the diffusion coefficients of the samples in our case are only of an order of approx. 10-8m2s-1, it can be assumed that the processes are in equilibrium (local changes are neglectably small), a model can be built on a general macroscopic approach for equilibrium systems, namely the Boltzmann-Gibbs distri-bution. And some rather general methods e.g. linear response theory can be applied. But as the transfer phenomena are genuinely not equilibrium systems, from this aspect a model can also be built based on the microscopic description -the kinetic theory of the behaviors of the particles of this non-equilibrium system. The characteristics under compensated gravity are also to be considered in the models. The differences and constraints between the models are to be compared and

  5. Sulfide emissions in sewer networks: focus on liquid to gas mass transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Lucie; Springer, Fanny; Lipeme-Kouyi, Gislain; Buffiere, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    H2S emission dynamics in sewers are conditioned by the mass transfer coefficient at the interface. This work aims at measuring the variation of the mass transfer coefficient with the hydraulic characteristics, with the objective of estimating H2S emission in gravity pipes, and collecting data to establish models independent of the system geometry. The ratio between the H2S and O2 mass transfer coefficient was assessed in an 8 L mixed reactor under different experimental conditions. Then, oxygen mass transfer measurements were performed in a 10 m long gravity pipe. The following ranges of experimental conditions were investigated: velocity flow [0-0.61 m.s(-1)], Reynolds number [0-23,333]. The hydrodynamic parameters at the liquid/gas interface were calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In the laboratory-scale reactor, the O2 mass transfer coefficient was found to depend on the stirring rate (rph) as follows: KL,O2 = 0.016 + 0.025 N(3.85). A KL,H2S/KL,O2 ratio of 0.64 ± 0.24 was found, in accordance with previously published data. CFD results helped in refining this correlation: the mass transfer coefficient depends on the local interface velocity ui (m.h(-1)): KL,O2 = 0.016 + 1.02 × 10(-5) ui(3.85) In the gravity pipe device, KL,O2 also exponentially increased with the mean flow velocity. These trends were found to be consistent with the increasing level of turbulence.

  6. Mass and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuewen; Le, Guigao; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-08-01

    Mass conservation and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries have been active topics through the development of the lattice-Boltzmann method. In this paper, we review typical treatments to prevent net mass transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method, and argue that such efforts are in general not necessary and could lead to incorrect results. Carefully designed simulations are conducted to examine the effects of normal boundary movement, tangential density gradient, and lattice grid resolution. Our simulation results show that the global mass conservation can be well satisfied even with local unbalanced mass transfer at boundary nodes, while a local mass conservation constraint can produce incorrect flow and pressure fields. These simulations suggest that local mass conservation, at either a fluid or solid boundary node, is not only an unnecessary consequence to maintain the global mass conservation, but also harmful for meaningful simulation results. In addition, the concern on the momentum addition and reduction associated with status-changing nodes is also not technically necessary. Although including this momentum addition or reduction has no direct influence on flow and pressure fields, the incorrect fluid-particle interaction may affect simulation results of particulate suspensions.

  7. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mechanical surface aerators: Mass-transfer modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.M.; Chou, S.R.

    1999-08-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, many operation units such as equalization and aeration involve oxygen transfer between wastewater and air. While oxygen is transferred from air to wastewater, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are stripped from wastewater to air. Because of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, wastewater treatment operators have to do VOC inventory of their facilities. A new mass-transfer model has been developed to predict the VOC emission rates from batch and continuous aeration tanks with mechanical surface aerators. The model takes into consideration that the VOC mass transfer occurs in two separate mass-transfer zones instead of lumping the overall VOC transfer in the whole aeration tank as is done in the conventional ASCE-based model. The predictive capabilities of the two-zone and the ASCE-based models were examined by calculating the emission rates of 10 priority pollutants from aeration tanks. The effects of the hydraulic retention time, the Henry`s law constant, gas-phase resistance, and the water and air environmental conditions on the VOC emission rates were predicted by the two models.

  8. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  9. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  10. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one wouldmore » expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.« less

  11. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  12. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2017-02-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  13. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  14. An approach to heat and mass transfer analysis during film condensation inside a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcioglu, I.; Gullapoglu, S. ); Uyarel, A.Y. ); Kaygusuz, K. ); Dincer, I. )

    1993-03-01

    An Investigation was conducted to determine the effects of non-condensing gas on vapor condensation. Experiments were carried out during condensation of a mixture of water vapor/non-condensing gas along the inner surface of a vertical tube. Air was used as non-condensing gas and the various profiles of the water vapor/non-condensing gas mixture were employed. A theoretical analysis to predict the heat and mass transfer is presented. The amount of the condensed water obtained by the experiments was found to be close to the theoretical results. The obtained heat and mass transfer results were in good agreement with earlier published results.

  15. New method for mass transfer across the surface of non-spherical particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehmke, T.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for making model particles that allow for the interfacial mass transfer rate to be measured. This is similar to traditional use of gypsum plaster used to measure erosion rates on the timescale of weeks to years. Our new method is useful for measuring erosion rates on the timescale of minutes. We use this to measure the manner in which particle shape affects its rate of dissolution in turbulent flow. The related questions are relevant to mass transfer in turbulence, e.g. in cases of marine biology and pollution by microplastics.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow and Mass Transfer of a Jeffery Fluid over a Nonlinear Stretching Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qasim, Muhammad; Abbas, Zaheer; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of a Jeffery fluid induced by a nonlinearly stretching sheet with mass transfer. The relevant system of partial differential equations has been reduced into ordinary differential equations by employing the similarity transformation. Series solutions of velocity and concentration fields are developed by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Effects of the various parameters such as Hartman number, Schmidt number, and chemical reaction parameter on velocity and concentration fields are discussed by presenting graphs. Numerical values of the mass transfer coefficient are also tabulated and analyzed.

  17. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  18. Jahn-Teller effects in transition-metal compounds with small charge-transfer energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizokawa, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We have studied Jahn-Teller effects in Cs2Au2Br6, ACu3Co4O12(A=Ca or Y), and IrTe2 in which the ligand p-to-transition-metal d charge-transfer energy is small or negative. The Au+/Au3+ charge disproportionation of Cs2Au2Br6 manifests in Au 4f photoemission spectra. In Cs2Au2Br6 with negative Δ and intermediate U, the charge disproportionation can be described using effective d orbitals constructed from the Au 5d and Br 4p orbitals and is stabilized by the Jahn-Teller distortion of the Au3+ site with low-spin d8 configuration. In ACu3Co4O12, Δs for Cu3+ and Co4+ are negative and Us are very large. The Zhang-Rice picture is valid to describe the electronic state, and the valence change from Cu2+/Co4+ to Cu3+/Co3+ can be viewed as the O 2p hole transfer from Co to Cu or d9 + d6L → d9L + d6. In IrTe2, both Δ and U are small and the Ir 5d and Te 5p electrons are itinerant to form the multi-band Fermi surfaces. The ideas of band Jahn-Teller transition and Peierls transition are useful to describe the structural instabilities.

  19. Dynamics of ground and excited state vibrational relaxation and energy transfer in transition metal carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Delor, Milan; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Spall, Steven J; Keane, Theo; Blake, Alexander J; Wilson, Claire; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Weinstein, Julia A

    2014-10-09

    Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy provides insights into the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer in and between molecules, a crucial phenomenon in condensed phase physics, chemistry, and biology. Here we use frequency-domain 2-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational relaxation (VR) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) rates in different solvents in both the electronic ground and excited states of Re(Cl)(CO)3(4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine), a prototypical transition metal carbonyl complex. The strong C≡O and ester C═O stretch infrared reporters, located on opposite sides of the molecule, were monitored in the 1600-2100 cm(-1) spectral region. VR in the lowest charge transfer triplet excited state ((3)CT) is found to be up to eight times faster than in the ground state. In the ground state, intramolecular anharmonic coupling may be solvent-assisted through solvent-induced frequency and charge fluctuations, and as such VR rates are solvent-dependent. In contrast, VR rates in the solvated (3)CT state are surprisingly solvent-insensitive, which suggests that predominantly intramolecular effects are responsible for the rapid vibrational deactivation. The increased VR rates in the excited state are discussed in terms of intramolecular electrostatic interactions helping overcome structural and thermodynamic barriers for this process in the vicinity of the central heavy atom, a feature which may be of significance to nonequilibrium photoinduced processes observed in transition metal complexes in general.

  20. Change of Electric Dipole Moment in Charge Transfer Transitions of Ferrocene Oligomers Studied by Ultrafast Two Photon Absorption (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-16

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0313 CHANGE OF ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT IN CHARGE TRANSFER TRANSITIONS OF FERROCENE OLIGOMERS STUDIED BY ULTRAFAST...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT...CHANGE OF ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT IN CHARGE TRANSFER TRANSITIONS OF FERROCENE OLIGOMERS STUDIED BY ULTRAFAST TWO-PHOTON ABSORPTION (POSTPRINT) 5a

  1. Mott-Hubbard transition in the mass-imbalanced Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Marie-Therese; Wallerberger, Markus; Gunacker, Patrik; Held, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    The mass-imbalanced Hubbard model represents a continuous evolution from the Hubbard to the Falicov-Kimball model. We employ dynamical mean field theory and study the paramagnetic metal-insulator transition, which has a very different nature for the two limiting models. Our results indicate that the metal-insulator transition rather resembles that of the Hubbard model as soon as a tiny hopping between the more localized fermions is switched on. At low temperatures we observe a first-order metal-insulator transition and a three peak structure. The width of the central peak is the same for the more and less mobile fermions when approaching the phase transition, which agrees with our expectation of a common Kondo temperature and phase transition for the two species.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in the Transfer of Spent Nuclear Fuel from "Wet" to "Dry" Cask Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyakin, Yu. E.; Pletnev, A. A.; Fedorovich, E. D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes in brief the heat and mass transfer processes in the transfer of spent nuclear fuel of the RBMK-100 reactor from "wet" to "dry" cask storage. The algorithms are described and the results are presented of the "through" calculation of the heat and mass transfer processes in ampoules and in a metal-concrete cask at various stages of spent nuclear fuel management.

  3. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (klN) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show klN for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60 d- 1. Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  4. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (kl(N)) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show kl(N) for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60d(-1). Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  6. The mass of the Mars-sized exoplanet Kepler-138 b from transit timing.

    PubMed

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F; Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B

    2015-06-18

    Extrasolar planets that pass in front of their host star (transit) cause a temporary decrease in the apparent brightness of the star, providing a direct measure of the planet's size and orbital period. In some systems with multiple transiting planets, the times of the transits are measurably affected by the gravitational interactions between neighbouring planets. In favourable cases, the departures from Keplerian orbits (that is, unaffected by gravitational effects) implied by the observed transit times permit the planetary masses to be measured, which is key to determining their bulk densities. Characterizing rocky planets is particularly difficult, because they are generally smaller and less massive than gaseous planets. Therefore, few exoplanets near the size of Earth have had their masses measured. Here we report the sizes and masses of three planets orbiting Kepler-138, a star much fainter and cooler than the Sun. We determine that the mass of the Mars-sized inner planet, Kepler-138 b, is 0.066(+0.059)(-0.037) Earth masses. Its density is 2.6(+2.4)(-1.5) grams per cubic centimetre. The middle and outer planets are both slightly larger than Earth. The middle planet's density (6.2(+5.8)(-3.4) grams per cubic centimetre) is similar to that of Earth, and the outer planet is less than half as dense at 2.1(+2.2)(-1.2) grams per cubic centimetre, implying that it contains a greater portion of low-density components such as water and hydrogen.

  7. A transition in circumbinary accretion discs at a binary mass ratio of 1:25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Haiman, Zoltán; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew; Farris, Brian

    2016-07-01

    We study circumbinary accretion discs in the framework of the restricted three-body problem (R3Bp) and via numerically solving the height-integrated equations of viscous hydrodynamics. Varying the mass ratio of the binary, we find a pronounced change in the behaviour of the disc near mass ratio q ≡ Ms/Mp ˜ 0.04. For mass ratios above q = 0.04, solutions for the hydrodynamic flow transition from steady, to strongly fluctuating; a narrow annular gap in the surface density around the secondary's orbit changes to a hollow central cavity; and a spatial symmetry is lost, resulting in a lopsided disc. This phase transition is coincident with the mass ratio above which stable orbits do not exist around the L4 and L5 equilibrium points of the R3Bp. Using the DISCO code, we find that for thin discs, for which a gap or cavity can remain open, the mass ratio of the transition is relatively insensitive to disc viscosity and pressure. The q = 0.04 transition has relevance for the evolution of massive black hole binary+disc systems at the centres of galactic nuclei, as well as for young stellar binaries and possibly planets around brown dwarfs.

  8. Thermal compression waves. 2: Mass adjustment and vertical transfer of the total energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Melville E.; Pielke, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    A fully compressible model is used to simulate the mass adjustment that occurs in response to a prescribed heat source. Results illustrate the role that thermal compression waves have in this process. The vertical mass transport associated with compression waves decreases rapidly with height. Most of the mass transport occurs in the horizontal, with the vertical structure of the disturbance similar to that of a Lamb wave. The vertical transfer of total energy in a thermally driven mixed layer is also examined. It is shown that the upward transport of total energy is accomplished by a compression effect rather than by the exchange of warm and cold air by buoyant thermals. Model results are analyzed to determine budgets of total energy, mass and entropy. It is demonstrated that buoyant thermals are predominantly responsible for a transfer of entropy, rather than total energy. In the light of these results the notion of 'heat transport' in a fluid is discussed.

  9. Nonequilibrium transition induced by mass media in a model for social influence.

    PubMed

    González-Avella, J C; Cosenza, M G; Tucci, K

    2005-12-01

    We study the effect of mass media, modeled as an applied external field, on a social system based on Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The numerical simulations show that the system undergoes a nonequilibrium phase transition between an ordered phase (homogeneous culture) specified by the mass media and a disordered (culturally fragmented) one. The critical boundary separating these phases is calculated on the parameter space of the system, given by the intensity of the mass media influence and the number of options per cultural attribute. Counterintuitively, mass media can induce cultural diversity when its intensity is above some threshold value. The nature of the phase transition changes from continuous to discontinuous at some critical value of the number of options.

  10. Evidence of a non-conservative mass transfer for XTE J0929-314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A.; Di Salvo, T.; Gambino, A. F.; Iaria, R.; Burderi, L.; Matranga, M.; Sanna, A.; Riggio, A.

    2017-07-01

    Context. In 1998 the first accreting millisecond pulsar, SAX J1808.4-3658, was discovered and to date 18 systems showing coherent, high frequency (>100 Hz) pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries are known. Since their discovery, this class of sources has shown interesting and sometimes puzzling behaviours. In particular, apart from a few exceptions, they are all transient with very long X-ray quiescent periods implying a quite low averaged mass accretion rate onto the neutron star. Among these sources, XTE J0929-314 has been detected in outburst just once in about 15 years of continuous monitoring of the X-ray sky. Aims: We aim to demonstrate that a conservative mass transfer in this system will result in an X-ray luminosity that is higher than the observed, long-term averaged X-ray luminosity. Methods: Under the hypothesis of a conservative mass transfer driven by gravitational radiation, as expected for this system given the short orbital period of about 43.6 min and the low-mass of the companion implied by the mass function derived from timing techniques, we calculate the expected mass transfer rate in this system and predict the long-term averaged X-ray luminosity. This is compared with the averaged, over 15 years, X-ray flux observed from the system, and a lower limit of the distance to the source is inferred. Results: This distance is shown to be >7.4 kpc in the direction of the Galactic anticentre, implying a large height, >1.8 kpc, of the source with respect to the Galactic plane, placing the source in an empty region of the Galaxy. We suggest that the inferred value of the distance is unlikely. Conclusions: This problem can be solved if we hypothesize that the source is undergoing a non-conservative mass transfer, in which most of the mass transferred from the companion star is ejected from the system, probably because of the (rotating magnetic dipole) radiation pressure of the pulsar. If confirmed by future observations, this may be another piece of

  11. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  12. Transient, compressible heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit iteration procedure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are solved in finite difference form with the aid of a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). Example numerical results demonstrate the characteristics of heat and mass transport in a porous matrix such as a charring ablator. It is emphasized that multidimensional flow must be considered when predicting the thermal response of a porous material subjected to nonuniform boundary conditions.

  13. On the stream-accretion disk interaction - Response to increased mass transfer rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dgani, Ruth; Livio, Mario; Soker, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent interaction between the stream of mass from the inner Lagrangian point and the accretion disk, resulting from an increasing mass transfer rate is calculated. The calculation is fully three-dimensional, using a pseudoparticle description of the hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the results of such calculations, when combined with specific observations, have the potential of both determining essential parameters, such as the viscosity parameter alpha, and can distinguish between different models of dwarf nova eruptions.

  14. The Transition of NASA EOS Datasets to WFO Operations: A Model for Future Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C.; Burks, J.; Jedlovec, G.; Haines, S.

    2007-01-01

    The collocation of a National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office with atmospheric scientists from NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama has afforded a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. Specifically, the NWS office in Huntsville has interacted closely with research scientists within the SPORT (Short-term Prediction and Research and Transition) Center at MSFC. One significant technology transfer that has reaped dividends is the transition of unique NASA EOS polar orbiting datasets into NWS field operations. NWS forecasters primarily rely on the AWIPS (Advanced Weather Information and Processing System) decision support system for their day to day forecast and warning decision making. Unfortunately, the transition of data from operational polar orbiters or low inclination orbiting satellites into AWIPS has been relatively slow due to a variety of reasons. The ability to integrate these high resolution NASA datasets into operations has yielded several benefits. The MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer ) instrument flying on the Aqua and Terra satellites provides a broad spectrum of multispectral observations at resolutions as fine as 250m. Forecasters routinely utilize these datasets to locate fine lines, boundaries, smoke plumes, locations of fog or haze fields, and other mesoscale features. In addition, these important datasets have been transitioned to other WFOs for a variety of local uses. For instance, WFO Great Falls Montana utilizes the MODIS snow cover product for hydrologic planning purposes while several coastal offices utilize the output from the MODIS and AMSR-E instruments to supplement observations in the data sparse regions of the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic. In the short term, these datasets have benefited local WFOs in a variety of ways. In the longer term, the process by which these unique datasets were successfully transitioned to operations will benefit the planning and

  15. The Transition of NASA EOS Datasets to WFO Operations: A Model for Future Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C.; Burks, J.; Jedlovec, G.; Haines, S.

    2007-01-01

    The collocation of a National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office with atmospheric scientists from NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama has afforded a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. Specifically, the NWS office in Huntsville has interacted closely with research scientists within the SPORT (Short-term Prediction and Research and Transition) Center at MSFC. One significant technology transfer that has reaped dividends is the transition of unique NASA EOS polar orbiting datasets into NWS field operations. NWS forecasters primarily rely on the AWIPS (Advanced Weather Information and Processing System) decision support system for their day to day forecast and warning decision making. Unfortunately, the transition of data from operational polar orbiters or low inclination orbiting satellites into AWIPS has been relatively slow due to a variety of reasons. The ability to integrate these high resolution NASA datasets into operations has yielded several benefits. The MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer ) instrument flying on the Aqua and Terra satellites provides a broad spectrum of multispectral observations at resolutions as fine as 250m. Forecasters routinely utilize these datasets to locate fine lines, boundaries, smoke plumes, locations of fog or haze fields, and other mesoscale features. In addition, these important datasets have been transitioned to other WFOs for a variety of local uses. For instance, WFO Great Falls Montana utilizes the MODIS snow cover product for hydrologic planning purposes while several coastal offices utilize the output from the MODIS and AMSR-E instruments to supplement observations in the data sparse regions of the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic. In the short term, these datasets have benefited local WFOs in a variety of ways. In the longer term, the process by which these unique datasets were successfully transitioned to operations will benefit the planning and

  16. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent drying processes -- Experimental and theoretical work

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, C.G.A.

    2000-03-01

    The main objective in this work is to study and deduce a governing equation for net mass transfer in moist air and turbulent flow. Development of simple and reliable steady state models for turbulent moist air-drying has been considered to be quite well covered in literature. However, the lack of necessary background information concerning classical drying models is now being rectified through research carried out with new approaches, which are initiated by advancement in laboratory equipment. The known and trusted models are combined with coupled momentum, heat and mass transfer equations creating a reliable governing mass transfer equation for use in turbulent moist air drying processes, i.e., the advanced drying model (ADM). The ADM is a relatively user friendly and robust model, and it is well-suited for identifying transfer coefficients from boundary layer measurements, for example in modern high intensity paper drying machines. The advanced drying model is analyzed and verified with the specially designed experimental apparatus described in this article. The deduced mass transfer equation is then presented and experimentally verified to clarify why the use of Stefan's diffusion equation should be avoided when calculating high drying intensities in turbulent flow. Finally, when applied to a wide drying range, the classical drying models require parameters which have been experimentally verified. Therefore, a comprehensive knowledge of governing mass transfer mechanisms will also reduce the large number of necessary drying experiments. The advanced drying model, which includes variable physical properties and transport coefficients, allows the simulation of many geometrical shapes and drying configurations and therefore provides a tool for optimizing drying processes in a new manner.

  17. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  18. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  19. External and internal problems of modeling the heat and mass transfer coefficients at particles motion in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    An approach to the determination of the heat and mass transfer coefficients from dispersed particles by the development of the hydrodynamic analogy is considered. The equations for computing the heat and mass transfer coefficients in continuous phase at a laminar regime of the flow around solid particles as well as the mass transfer coefficients in droplets are obtained. Comparisons with the experimental data of different authors are presented.

  20. Heat And Mass Transfer Analysis of a Film Evaporative MEMS Tunable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, William J.

    This thesis details the heat and mass transfer analysis of a MEMs microthruster designed to provide propulsive, attitude control and thermal control capabilities to a cubesat. This thruster is designed to function by retaining water as a propellant and applying resistive heating in order to increase the temperature of the liquid-vapor interface to either increase evaporation or induce boiling to regulate mass flow. The resulting vapor is then expanded out of a diverging nozzle to produce thrust. Because of the low operating pressure and small length scale of this thruster, unique forms of mass transfer analysis such as non-continuum gas flow were modeled using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. Continuum fluid/thermal simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics have been applied to model heat and mass transfer in the solid and liquid portions of the thruster. The two methods were coupled through variables at the liquid-vapor interface and solved iteratively by the bisection method. The simulations presented in this thesis confirm the thermal valving concept. It is shown that when power is applied to the thruster there is a nearly linear increase in mass flow and thrust. Thus, mass flow can be regulated by regulating the applied power. This concept can also be used as a thermal control device for spacecraft.

  1. Results of experimental and theoretical investigations in charge transfer transitions, scintillators and Eu 2+ based phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Alok M.

    2009-11-01

    A brief overview of recent results obtained in scintillator and phosphors are presented. Four topics, that are at the center of considerable research, and which are important from both fundamental and practical point of view, are chosen. The identification and behavior of ligand-to-RE 3+ (RE 3+ = rare earth) charge transfer transition when the ligand ions are halides and N 3- is reviewed. The reasons for the high light yield of the LuI 3:Ce 3+ scintillator is investigated theoretically and a new channel of energy transfer to excitons and directly to the Ce 3+ ion identified. The prospect of increasing the light yield of Ce 3+ based scintillators by the Pr 3+ ion is discussed. Finally, the remarkable luminescence of octahedrally coordinated Eu 2+ ion in Cs 2M 2+P 2O 7 (M 2+ = Ca, Sr) is discussed.

  2. Ultrasonic guided wave propagation across waveguide transitions: energy transfer and mode conversion.

    PubMed

    Puthillath, Padmakumar; Galan, Jose M; Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J; Rose, Joseph L

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of structures containing adhesively bonded joints requires an understanding of the interaction of guided waves with geometric and material discontinuities or transitions in the waveguide. Such interactions result in mode conversion with energy being partitioned among the reflected and transmitted modes. The step transition between an aluminum layer and an aluminum-adhesive-aluminum multi-layer waveguide is analyzed as a model structure. Dispersion analysis enables assessment of (i) synchronism through dispersion curve overlap and (ii) wavestructure correlation. Mode-pairs in the multi-layer waveguide are defined relative to a prescribed mode in a single layer as being synchronized and having nearly perfect wavestructure matching. Only a limited number of mode-pairs exist, and each has a unique frequency range. A hybrid model based on semi-analytical finite elements and the normal mode expansion is implemented to assess mode conversion at a step transition in a waveguide. The model results indicate that synchronism and wavestructure matching is associated with energy transfer through the step transition, and that the energy of an incident wave mode in a single layer is transmitted almost entirely to the associated mode-pair, where one exists. This analysis guides the selection of incident modes that convert into transmitted modes and improve adhesive joint inspection with ultrasonic guided waves.

  3. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes from Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierlenga, Michael; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studies for years but questions remain, due to the difficulty in determining the participation of protein dynamics and quantum effects, especially hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride during the reaction allows for observation of the change in barrier height due to inclusion of quantum effects. Additionally, the same calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle to validate our methods with experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects. The change in barrier height in YADH upon inclusion of quantum effects is indicative of a zero-point energy contribution, and is evidence that the protein mediates a near-barrierless transfer of the rate-limiting hydride. Calculation of kinetic isotope effects using the average difference in barrier between hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. The authors acknowledge the support of the National Institutes of Health Grants GM068036 and GM102226.

  4. Search for light curve modulations among Kepler candidates. Three very low-mass transiting companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Ribas, A.; Barrado, D.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Light curve modulations in the sample of Kepler planet candidates allows the disentangling of the nature of the transiting object by photometrically measuring its mass. This is possible by detecting the effects of the gravitational pull of the companion (ellipsoidal modulations) and in some cases, the photometric imprints of the Doppler effect when observing in a broad band (Doppler beaming). Aims: We aim to photometrically unveil the nature of some transiting objects showing clear light curve modulations in the phase-folded Kepler light curve. Methods: We selected a subsample among the large crop of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) based on their chances to show detectable light curve modulations, i.e., close (a< 12 R⋆) and large (in terms of radius, according to their transit signal) candidates. We modeled their phase-folded light curves with consistent equations for the three effects, namely, reflection, ellipsoidal and beaming (known as REB modulations). Results: We provide detailed general equations for the fit of the REB modulations for the case of eccentric orbits. These equations are accurate to the photometric precisions achievable by current and forthcoming instruments and space missions. By using this mathematical apparatus, we find three close-in very low-mass companions (two of them in the brown dwarf mass domain) orbiting main-sequence stars (KOI-554, KOI-1074, and KOI-3728), and reject the planetary nature of the transiting objects (thus classifying them as false positives). In contrast, the detection of the REB modulations and transit/eclipse signal allows the measurement of their mass and radius that can provide important constraints for modeling their interiors since just a few cases of low-mass eclipsing binaries are known. Additionally, these new systems can help to constrain the similarities in the formation process of the more massive and close-in planets (hot Jupiters), brown dwarfs, and very low-mass companions.

  5. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part II. The role of transition to turbulent flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    The objectives of this presentation are two-fold: first, to demonstrate the connection between the attainable coefficients and transition to turbulent flow by using the transition-based corresponding states method to generalize results obtained with smooth tubes and enhanced tubes, and second, to provide guidelines on the calculation of heat transfer coefficients from pressure-drop data and vice versa by using the transition concept or the functional law of corresponding states.

  6. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  7. Diffusive transfer to membranes as an effective interface between gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Mitchell, Charles; Stevenson, Tracy I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    1997-12-01

    Diffusive transfer was examined as a blotting method to transfer proteins from polyacrylamide gels to membranes for ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The method is well-suited for transfers from isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Spectra have been obtained for 11 pmol of 66 kDa albumin loaded onto an IEF gel and subsequently blotted to polyethylene. Similarly, masses of intact carbonic anhydrase and hemoglobin were obtained from 14 and 20 pmol loadings. This methodology is also compatible with blotting high molecular weight proteins, as seen for 6 pmol of the 150 kDa monoclonal antibody anti-[beta]-galactosidase transferred to Goretex. Polypropylene, Teflon, Nafion and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) also produced good spectra following diffusive transfer. Only analysis from PVDF required that the membrane be kept wet prior to application of matrix. Considerations in mass accuracy for analysis from large-area membranes with continuous extraction and delayed extraction were explored, as were remedies for surface charging. Vapor phase CNBr cleavage was applied to membrane-bound samples for peptide mapping.

  8. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann simulation for flow, mass transfer, and adsorption in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Chen, Zhenqian; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, to predict the dynamics behaviors of flow and mass transfer with adsorption phenomena in porous media at the representative elementary volume (REV) scale, a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for the convection-diffusion equation is developed to solve the transfer problem with an unsteady source term in porous media. Utilizing the Chapman-Enskog analysis, the modified MRT-LB model can recover the macroscopic governing equations at the REV scale. The coupled MRT-LB model for momentum and mass transfer is validated by comparing with the finite-difference method and the analytical solution. Moreover, using the MRT-LB method coupled with the linear driving force model, the fluid transfer and adsorption behaviors of the carbon dioxide in a porous fixed bed are explored. The breakthrough curve of adsorption from MRT-LB simulation is compared with the experimental data and the finite-element solution, and the transient concentration distributions of the carbon dioxide along the porous fixed bed are elaborated upon in detail. In addition, the MRT-LB simulation results show that the appearance time of the breakthrough point in the breakthrough curve is advanced as the mass transfer resistance in the linear driving force model increases; however, the saturation point is prolonged inversely.

  9. Study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow are presented. The experiments were carried out using electric heated annular channels with one and (or) two heat-release surfaces. For the organization of transit flow on a convex heat-release surface, four longitudinal ribs were installed uniformly at its perimeter. Swirl flow was realized using a capillary wound tightly (without gaps) on the ribs. The ratio between swirl and transit flows in the annular gap was varied by applying longitudinal ribs of different height. The experiments were carried out using a closed-type circulatory system. The experimental data were obtained in a wide range of regime parameters. Both water heated to the temperature less than the saturation temperature and water-steam mixture were fed at the inlet of the channels. For the measurement of the temperature of the heat-release surfaces, chromel-copel thermocouples were used. It was shown that the presence of swirl flow on a convex heatrelease surface led to a significant decrease in critical heat flows (CHF) compared to a smooth surface. To increase CHF, it was proposed to use the interaction of swirl flows of the heat carrier. The second swirl flow was transit flow, i.e., swirl flow with the step equal to infinity. It was shown that CHF values for a channel with swirl and transit flow in all the studied range of regime parameters was higher than CHF values for both a smooth annular channel and a channel with swirl. The empirical ratios describing the dependence of CHF on convex and concave heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow on the geometrical characteristics of channels and the regime parameters were obtained. The experiments were carried out at the pressure p = 3.0-16.0 MPa and the mass velocity ρw = 250-3000 kg/(m2s).

  10. Search for the transit of a nearby 2 Earth-mass planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Michael; Affer, Laura; Bonomo, Aldo; Damasso, Mario; Desidera, Silvano; Micela, Giuseppina; Rebolo, Rafael; Ribas, Ignasi; Sozzetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    The frontier of exoplanetology is being pushed to the identification of Earth-sized exoplanets well-suited for detailed characterization with future observatories, notably with JWST. Transit searches targeting nearby M-dwarfs are at the forefront of this effort. Indeed, the favorable planet-star contrast ratios of M-dwarfs enable the best opportunities in the near-future for detailed characterization studies of transiting terrestrial planets and their atmospheres. In this context, we propose here to use the exquisite photometric precision of Spitzer to search for the transit of a new short-period (2.6d) very-low-mass (2 Earth-mass) super-Earth that we have just detected with the HARPS-N spectrograph. This planet orbits at <0.03 au of a nearby (18pc) M1-type dwarf, resulting in a transit probability of 8%. A transit detection would make possible to discriminate metal-rich, silicate rich, and ice-rich planetary compositions, and to test further the hypothesis that the population of dense, close-in planets of 1-6 Earth-mass can be described by a fixed Earth-like compositional model. Furthermore, it would make the planet join the handful of super-Earths well-suited for detailed atmospheric characterization with JWST, thanks to the infrared brightness (K=6.8) and the small size (0.5 solar radius) of its M-dwarf host star.

  11. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  12. The influence of the HGMF on mass-charge transfer in gravisensing cells.

    PubMed

    Kondrachuk, A; Belyavskaya, N

    2001-07-01

    The present work is focused on the influence of the high-gradient-magnetic field (HGMF) on spatial distribution of ion fluxes along the roots (a), cytoplasmic streaming (b), and the processes of plant cell growth connected with intracellular mass and charge transfer (c).

  13. Numerical Problems and Agent-Based Models for a Mass Transfer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Manohar; Shea, Lonnie D.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2009-01-01

    Problems requiring numerical solutions of differential equations or the use of agent-based modeling are presented for use in a course on mass transfer. These problems were solved using the popular technical computing language MATLABTM. Students were introduced to MATLAB via a problem with an analytical solution. A more complex problem to which no…

  14. A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage was developed and validated. The model was developed based on data from wind tunnel experiments conducted at different temperatures and air velocities. Multiple regression analysis was used to derive an equation that related t...

  15. Dissociation and ammonia mass transfer from ammonium solution and dairy cattle manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia (NH**3) emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficient for NH**3 volatilization from media of buffered ...

  16. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  17. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  18. A numerical and experimental study of mass transfer in the artificial kidney.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijie; Poh, Churn K; Huang, Zhongping; Hardy, Peter A; Clark, William R; Gao, Dayong

    2003-08-01

    To develop a more efficient and optimal artificial kidney, many experimental approaches have been used to study mass transfer inside, outside, and cross hollow fiber membranes with different kinds of membranes, solutes, and flow rates as parameters. However, these experimental approaches are expensive and time consuming. Numerical calculation and computer simulation is an effective way to study mass transfer in the artificial kidney, which can save substantial time and reduce experimental cost. This paper presents a new model to simulate mass transfer in artificial kidney by coupling together shell-side, lumen-side, and transmembrane flows. Darcy's equations were employed to simulate shell-side flow, Navier-Stokes equations were employed to simulate lumen-side flow, and Kedem-Katchalsky equations were used to compute transmembrane flow. Numerical results agreed well with experimental results within 10% error. Numerical results showed the nonuniform distribution of flow and solute concentration in shell-side flow due to the entry/exit effect and Darcy permeability. In the shell side, the axial velocity in the periphery is higher than that in the center. This numerical model presented a clear insight view of mass transfer in an artificial kidney and may be used to help design an optimal artificial kidney and its operation conditions to improve hemodialysis.

  19. Mass-transfer properties of insulin on core-shell and fully porous stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nándor; Kiss, Ibolya; Felinger, Attila

    2014-10-31

    The mass-transfer properties of three superficially-porous packing materials, with 2.6 and 3.6μm particle and 1.9, 2.6, and 3.2μm inner core diameter, respectively, were investigated and compared with those of fully porous packings with similar particle properties. Several sources of band spreading in the chromatographic bed have been identified and studied according to the general rate model of chromatography. Besides the axial dispersion in the stream of the mobile phase, and the external mass transfer resistance, the intraparticle diffusion was studied in depth. The first absolute and the second central moments of the peaks of human insulin, over a wide range of mobile phase velocities were measured and used for the calculation of the mass-transfer coefficients. The experimental data were also analyzed using the stochastic or molecular dynamic model of Giddings and Eyring. The dissimilarities of the mass-transfer observed in the different columns were identified and evaluated.

  20. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  1. Temperature Coefficient for Modeling Denitrification in Surface Water Sediments Using the Mass Transfer Coefficient

    Treesearch

    T. W. Appelboom; G. M. Chescheir; R. W. Skaggs; J. W. Gilliam; Devendra M. Amatya

    2006-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers with the high costs of water quality monitoring. When modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks, denitrification within the sediments needs to be accounted for. Birgand et. al. developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment...

  2. Temperature coefficient for modeling denitrification in surface water sediments using the mass transfer coefficient

    Treesearch

    T.W. Appelboom; G.M. Chescheir; F. Birgand; R.W. Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; D. Amatya

    2010-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers. Modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks requires quantifying the denitrification within the sediments in canals and streams. In a previous study, several of the authors developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment denitrification....

  3. Mass transfer in thin films under counter-current gas: experiments and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Lavalle, Gianluca; Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Wehrli, Marc; O Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer in liquid-gas stratified flows is strongly affected by the waviness of the interface. For reactive flows, the chemical reactions occurring at the liquid-gas interface also influence the mass transfer rate. This is encountered in several technological applications, such as absorption units for carbon capture. We investigate the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in a liquid solution. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical channel where a falling film is sheared by a counter-current gas flow. We measure the absorption occurring at different flow conditions, by changing the liquid solution, the liquid flow rate and the gas composition. With the aim to support the experimental results with numerical simulations, we implement in our level-set flow solver a novel module for mass transfer taking into account a variant of the ghost-fluid formalism. We firstly validate the pure mass transfer case with and without hydrodynamics by comparing the species concentration in the bulk flow to the analytical solution. In a final stage, we analyse the absorption rate in reactive flows, and try to reproduce the experimental results by means of numerical simulations to explore the active role of the waves at the interface.

  4. Water-to-air mass transfer of VOCs: Laboratory-scale air sparging system

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.P.; Ong, S.K.; Protopapas, A.

    1998-11-01

    Nonequilibrium air-water mass transfer experiments for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were conducted using a bench-scale air sparging system. VOCs used were carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroform, dichloromethane, and toluene. The average particle size of the porous media used ranged from 0.278 to 1.71 mm. The air-water mass transfer coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental data to a lumped parameter model. The model assumed that the saturated porous media under air sparging conditions consisted of two zones. In the mass transfer zone, VOCs were directly impacted by the flow of air in the air channels, while in the bulk water zone, VOCs were not directly affected by the air flow in the air channels. The estimated air-water mass transfer coefficients (K{sub G}a) were found to increase for higher injected air flow rates and for larger mean particle sizes of porous media but were inversely proportional to the Henry`s law constant of the VOCs. An empirical correlation was developed by correlating the Sherwood number with the Peclet number, the Henry`s law constant, and the mean particle size of porous media. The estimated fraction (F) of the total volume of the porous media directly affected by air channels was between 5 and 20% for fine sand, indicating that a small fraction of the porous media was affected by the advecting air stream.

  5. Temperature coefficient for modeling denitrification in surface water sediments using the mass transfer coefficient.

    Treesearch

    T.W. Appelboom; G.M. Chescheir; F. Birgand; R.W. Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; D. Amatya

    2010-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers. Modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks requires quantifying the denitrification within the sediments in canals and streams. In a previous study, several of the authors developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment denitrification....

  6. Mass transfer coefficient in ginger oil extraction by microwave hydrotropic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, Dwi; Ikhsan, Diyono; Yulianto, Mohamad Endy; Dwisukma, Mandy Ayulia

    2015-12-01

    This research aims to obtain mass transfer coefficient data on the extraction of ginger oil using microwave hydrotropic solvent as an alternative to increase zingiberene. The innovation of this study is extraction with microwave heater and hydrotropic solvent,which able to shift the phase equilibrium, and the increasing rate of the extraction process and to improve the content of ginger oil zingiberene. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Separation Techniques at Chemical Engineering Department of Diponegoro University. The research activities carried out in two stages, namely experimental and modeling work. Preparation of the model postulated, then lowered to obtain equations that were tested and validated using data obtained from experimental. Measurement of experimental data was performed using microwave power (300 W), extraction temperature of 90 ° C and the independent variable, i.e.: type of hydrotropic, the volume of solvent and concentration in order, to obtain zingiberen levels as a function of time. Measured data was used as a tool to validate the postulation, in order to obtain validation of models and empirical equations. The results showed that the mass transfer coefficient (Kla) on zingiberene mass transfer models ginger oil extraction at various hydrotropic solution attained more 14 ± 2 Kla value than its reported on the extraction with electric heating. The larger value of Kla, the faster rate of mass transfer on the extraction process. To obtain the same yields, the microwave-assisted extraction required one twelfth time shorter.

  7. A Laboratory Experiment for Measuring Solid-Liquid Mass Transfer Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapia, Sonia; Vila, Carlos; Dominguez, Herminia; Parajo, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The lab experiment described starts from the principles developed by Sensel and Myers, but the experimental procedure are modified to provide a more reliable experiment assessment. The mass transfer equation is solved and all the involved parameters are calculated by a simple, numerical method.

  8. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  9. Measurement of mass-transfer rates for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.S.; Zhong, L.; Pope, G.A.

    1999-09-01

    Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual, non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants is an emerging, subsurface remediation technology. The potential for nonequilibrium conditions is investigated for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of a NAPL, trichlorethylene (TCE), in a model porous medium. The surfactant formulation consists of an anionic surfactant, sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate, an alcohol, and an electrolyte in aqueous solution. Batch solubilization experiments are conducted to assess the significant of chemical rate limitations. Surfactant flood experiments are conducted in packed columns with residual TCE. Mass-transfer rate coefficients are determined as a function of aqueous-phase pore velocity, NAPL volumetric fraction, and surfactant concentration. A correlation for predicting mass-transfer rate coefficients as a function of system properties is developed. The mass-transfer rate coefficients and correlation are obtained by fitting a transport simulator to the column effluent concentration results. Significant differences are found between the correlation developed here and correlations developed for other NAPL--surfactant systems. The correlation predicts near-linear dependences of mass-transfer rates on the NAPL volumetric fraction and pore velocity. Using the Damkohler number, the degree of nonequilibrium behavior in surfactant-enhanced NAPL solubilization is analyzed for a range of conditions. Nonequilibrium conditions are found to be significant at relatively low NAPL volumetric fractions.

  10. Oxygen mass transfer and scale-up studies in baffled roller bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Nikakhtari, H; Song, W; Nemati, M; Hill, G A

    2014-02-01

    Oxygen mass transfer was studied in conventional, bead mill and baffled roller bioreactors. Using central composite rotational design, impacts of size, rotation speed and working volume on the oxygen mass transfer were evaluated. Baffled roller bioreactor outperformed its conventional and bead mill counterparts, with the highest k(L)a obtained in these configurations being 0.58, 0.19, 0.41 min(-1), respectively. Performances of the bead mill and baffled roller bioreactor were only comparable when a high bead loading (40%) was applied. Regardless of configuration increase in rotation speed and decrease in working volume improved the oxygen mass transfer rate. Increase in size led to enhanced mass transfer and higher k(L)a in baffled roller bioreactor (0.49 min(-1) for 2.2 L and 1.31 min(-1) for 55 L bioreactors). Finally, the experimentally determined k(L)a in the baffled roller bioreactors of different sizes fit reasonably well to an empirical correlation describing the k(L)a in terms of dimensionless numbers.

  11. A Laboratory Experiment for Measuring Solid-Liquid Mass Transfer Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapia, Sonia; Vila, Carlos; Dominguez, Herminia; Parajo, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The lab experiment described starts from the principles developed by Sensel and Myers, but the experimental procedure are modified to provide a more reliable experiment assessment. The mass transfer equation is solved and all the involved parameters are calculated by a simple, numerical method.

  12. Numerical Problems and Agent-Based Models for a Mass Transfer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Manohar; Shea, Lonnie D.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2009-01-01

    Problems requiring numerical solutions of differential equations or the use of agent-based modeling are presented for use in a course on mass transfer. These problems were solved using the popular technical computing language MATLABTM. Students were introduced to MATLAB via a problem with an analytical solution. A more complex problem to which no…

  13. Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

  14. Mixing and mass transfer in a pilot scale U-loop bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Leander A H; Villadsen, John; Jørgensen, Sten B; Gernaey, Krist V

    2017-02-01

    A system capable of handling a large volumetric gas fraction while providing a high gas to liquid mass transfer is a necessity if the metanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus is to be used in single cell protein (SCP) production. In this study, mixing time and mass transfer coefficients were determined in a 0.15 m(3) forced flow U-loop fermenter of a novel construction. The effect on the impeller drawn power when a gas was introduced into the system was also studied. Mixing time decreased and mass transfer increased with increasing volumetric liquid flow rate and specific power input. This happened also for a large volume fraction of the gas, which was shown to have only minor effect on the power drawn from the pump impeller. Very large mass transfer coefficients, considerably higher than those obtainable in an STR and previous tubular loop reactors, could be achieved in the U-loop fermenter equipped with static mixers at modest volumetric liquid and gas flow rates. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 344-354. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Formation pathway of Population III coalescing binary black holes through stable mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Hirai, Ryosuke; Kinugawa, Tomoya; Hotokezaka, Kenta

    2017-07-01

    We study the formation of stellar mass binary black holes (BBHs) originating from Population III (PopIII) stars, performing stellar evolution simulations for PopIII binaries with mesa. We find that a significant fraction of PopIII binaries form massive BBHs through stable mass transfer between two stars in a binary, without experiencing common envelope phases. We investigate necessary conditions required for PopIII binaries to form coalescing BBHs with a semi-analytical model calibrated by the stellar evolution simulations. The BBH formation efficiency is estimated for two different initial conditions for PopIII binaries with large and small separations, respectively. Consequently, in both models, ˜10 per cent of the total PopIII binaries form BBHs only through stable mass transfer and ˜10 per cent of these BBHs merge due to gravitational wave emission within the Hubble time. Furthermore, the chirp mass of merging BBHs has a flat distribution over 15 ≲ Mchirp/M⊙ ≲ 35. This formation pathway of PopIII BBHs is presumably robust because stable mass transfer is less uncertain than common envelope evolution, which is the main formation channel for Population II BBHs. We also test the hypothesis that the BBH mergers detected by LIGO originate from PopIII stars using the total number of PopIII stars formed in the early universe as inferred from the optical depth measured by Planck. We conclude that the PopIII BBH formation scenario can explain the mass-weighted merger rate of the LIGO's O1 events with the maximal PopIII formation efficiency inferred from the Planck measurement, even without BBHs formed by unstable mass transfer or common envelope phases.

  16. Freeze-drying in novel container system: Characterization of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing and understanding different modes of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes to develop a robust freeze-drying process. Two different holder systems were used to freeze-dry in syringes: an aluminum (Al) block and a plexiglass holder. The syringe heat transfer coefficient was characterized by a sublimation test using pure water. Mannitol and sucrose (5% w/v) were also freeze-dried, as model systems, in both the assemblies. Dry layer resistance was determined from manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and product temperature was measured using thermocouples, and was also determined from MTM. Further, freeze-drying process was also designed using Smart freeze-dryer to assess its application for freeze-drying in novel container systems. Heat and mass transfer in syringes were compared against the traditional container system (i.e., glass tubing vial). In the Al block, the heat transfer was via three modes: contact conduction, gas conduction, and radiation with gas conduction being the dominant mode of heat transfer. In the plexiglass holder, the heat transfer was mostly via radiation; convection was not involved. Also, MTM/Smart freeze-drying did work reasonably well for freeze-drying in syringes. When compared to tubing vials, product temperature decreases and hence drying time increases in syringes. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  18. Toward a better understanding of the impact of mass transit air pollutants on human health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modern mass transit systems, based on roads, rail, water, and air, generate toxic airborne pollutants throughout the developed world. This has become one of the leading concerns about the use of modern transportation, particularly in densely-populated urban areas where their use is enormous and inc...

  19. Outcome of Drug Abuse Treatment and Self Concept Improvement for Mass Transit Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biase, D. Vincent; Sullivan, Arthur P.

    Because of increasing concern about drug use in the work place and its impact on public safety, an urban mass transit agency formed a collaborative treatment link with Daytop Village to provide treatment for "impaired" transportation workers. Effective counseling approaches in the residential setting were adapted for ambulatory use and…

  20. A closely packed system of low-mass, low-density planets transiting Kepler-11.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Jack J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Borucki, William J; Fressin, Francois; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Orosz, Jerome A; Rowe, Jason F; Torres, Guillermo; Welsh, William F; Batalha, Natalie M; Bryson, Stephen T; Buchhave, Lars A; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Joshua A; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie L; Cochran, William D; Desert, Jean-Michel; Dunham, Edward W; Fanelli, Michael N; Fortney, Jonathan J; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Holman, Matthew J; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Lopez, Eric; McCauliff, Sean; Miller, Neil; Morehead, Robert C; Quintana, Elisa V; Ragozzine, Darin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Short, Donald R; Steffen, Jason H

    2011-02-03

    When an extrasolar planet passes in front of (transits) its star, its radius can be measured from the decrease in starlight and its orbital period from the time between transits. Multiple planets transiting the same star reveal much more: period ratios determine stability and dynamics, mutual gravitational interactions reflect planet masses and orbital shapes, and the fraction of transiting planets observed as multiples has implications for the planarity of planetary systems. But few stars have more than one known transiting planet, and none has more than three. Here we report Kepler spacecraft observations of a single Sun-like star, which we call Kepler-11, that reveal six transiting planets, five with orbital periods between 10 and 47 days and a sixth planet with a longer period. The five inner planets are among the smallest for which mass and size have both been measured, and these measurements imply substantial envelopes of light gases. The degree of coplanarity and proximity of the planetary orbits imply energy dissipation near the end of planet formation.