Science.gov

Sample records for mass-spectrometry pipeline identifies

  1. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    The comprehensive MS analysis of the peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and its utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation and related platforms, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however, an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we began by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines, including MS-GF+, SEQUEST, and MS-Align+, for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our results demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing data for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage. Taken together, we propose an optimized informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT tag) approaches for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  2. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  3. From raw data to biological discoveries: a computational analysis pipeline for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development.

  5. Mass spectrometry identifies multiple organophosphorylated sites on tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, Hasmik Schopfer, Lawrence M. Peeples, Eric S. Duysen, Ellen G. Grigoryan, Marine Thompson, Charles M. Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-10-15

    Acute toxicity of organophosphorus poisons (OP) is explained by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in nerve synapses. Low-dose effects are hypothesized to result from modification of other proteins, whose identity is not yet established. The goal of the present work was to obtain information that would make it possible to identify tubulin as a target of OP exposure. Tubulin was selected for study because live mice injected with a nontoxic dose of a biotinylated organophosphorus agent appeared to have OP-labeled tubulin in brain as determined by binding to avidin beads and mass spectrometry. The experiments with live mice were not conclusive because binding to avidin beads could be nonspecific. To be convincing, it is necessary to find and characterize the OP-labeled tubulin peptide. The search for OP-labeled tubulin peptides was begun by identifying residues capable of making a covalent bond with OP. Pure bovine tubulin (0.012 mM) was treated with 0.01-0.5 mM chlorpyrifos oxon for 24 h at 37 {sup o}C in pH 8.3 buffer. The identity of labeled amino acids and percent labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. Chlorpyrifos oxon bound covalently to tyrosines 83, 103, 108, 161, 224, 262, 272, 357, and 399 in bovine alpha tubulin, and to tyrosines 50, 51, 59, 106, 159, 281, 310, and 340 in bovine beta tubulin. The most reactive were tyrosine 83 in alpha and tyrosine 281 in beta tubulin. In the presence of 1 mM GTP, percent labeling increased 2-fold. Based on the crystal structure of the tubulin heterodimer (PDB 1jff) tyrosines 83 and 281 are well exposed to solvent. In conclusion seventeen tyrosines in tubulin have the potential to covalently bind chlorpyrifos oxon. These results will be useful when searching for OP-labeled tubulin in live animals.

  6. Mass spectrometry identifies multiple organophosphorylated sites on tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Hasmik; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Peeples, Eric S.; Duysen, Ellen G.; Grigoryan, Marine; Thompson, Charles M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    Acute toxicity of organophosphorus poisons (OP) is explained by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in nerve synapses. Low dose effects are hypothesized to result from modification of other proteins, whose identity is not yet established. The goal of the present work was to obtain information that would make it possible to identify tubulin as a target of OP exposure. Tubulin was selected for study because live mice injected with a nontoxic dose of a biotinylated organophosphorus agent appeared to have OP-labeled tubulin in brain as determined by binding to avidin beads and mass spectrometry. The experiments with live mice were not conclusive because binding to avidin beads could be nonspecific. To be convincing, it is necessary to find and characterize the OP-labeled tubulin peptide. The search for OP-labeled tubulin peptides was begun by identifying residues capable of making a covalent bond with OP. Pure bovine tubulin (0.012 mM) was treated with 0.01–0.5 mM chlorpyrifos oxon for 24 h at 37 °C in pH 8.3 buffer. The identity of labeled amino acids and percent labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. Chlorpyrifos oxon bound covalently to tyrosines 83, 103, 108, 161, 224, 262, 272, 357, and 399 in bovine alpha tubulin, and to tyrosines 50, 51, 59, 106, 159, 281, 310, and 340 in bovine beta tubulin. The most reactive were tyrosine 83 in alpha and tyrosine 281 in beta tubulin. In the presence of 1 mM GTP, percent labeling increased 2-fold. Based on the crystal structure of the tubulin heterodimer (PDB 1jff) tyrosines 83 and 281 are well exposed to solvent. In conclusion seventeen tyrosines in tubulin have the potential to covalently bind chlorpyrifos oxon. These results will be useful when searching for OP-labeled tubulin in live animals. PMID:19632257

  7. Major roles for minor bacterial lipids identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Teresa A

    2016-10-17

    Mass spectrometry of lipids, especially those isolated from bacteria, has ballooned over the past two decades, affirming in the process the complexity of the lipidome. With this has come the identification of new and interesting lipid structures. Here is an overview of several novel lipids, from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with roles in health and disease, whose structural identification was facilitated using mass spectrometry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop.

  8. Identifying Metabolic Subpopulations from Population Level Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism underlies many important cellular decisions, such as the decisions to proliferate and differentiate, and defects in metabolic signaling can lead to disease and aging. In addition, metabolic heterogeneity can have biological consequences, such as differences in outcomes and drug susceptibilities in cancer and antibiotic treatments. Many approaches exist for characterizing the metabolic state of a population of cells, but technologies for measuring metabolism at the single cell level are in the preliminary stages and are limited. Here, we describe novel analysis methodologies that can be applied to established experimental methods to measure metabolic variability within a population. We use mass spectrometry to analyze amino acid composition in cells grown in a mixture of 12C- and 13C-labeled sugars; these measurements allow us to quantify the variability in sugar usage and thereby infer information about the behavior of cells within the population. The methodologies described here can be applied to a large range of metabolites and macromolecules and therefore have the potential for broad applications. PMID:26986964

  9. A capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry pipeline for long term comparable assessment of the urinary metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Boizard, Franck; Brunchault, Valérie; Moulos, Panagiotis; Breuil, Benjamin; Klein, Julie; Lounis, Nadia; Caubet, Cécile; Tellier, Stéphanie; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Decramer, Stéphane; Schanstra, Joost P.; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Although capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) has potential application in the field of metabolite profiling, very few studies actually used CE-MS to identify clinically useful body fluid metabolites. Here we present an optimized CE-MS setup and analysis pipeline to reproducibly explore the metabolite content of urine. We show that the use of a beveled tip capillary improves the sensitivity of detection over a flat tip. We also present a novel normalization procedure based on the use of endogenous stable urinary metabolites identified in the combined metabolome of 75 different urine samples from healthy and diseased individuals. This method allows a highly reproducible comparison of the same sample analyzed nearly 130 times over a range of 4 years. To demonstrate the use of this pipeline in clinical research we compared the urinary metabolome of 34 newborns with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction and 15 healthy newborns. We identified 32 features with differential urinary abundance. Combination of the 32 compounds in a SVM classifier predicted with 76% sensitivity and 86% specificity UPJ obstruction in a separate validation cohort of 24 individuals. Thus, this study demonstrates the feasibility to use CE-MS as a tool for the identification of clinically relevant urinary metabolites. PMID:27694997

  10. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes.

  11. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  12. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2016-11-23

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice.

  13. A case report of Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, H; Rabier, V; Eveillard, M; Mahaza, C; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Chennebault, J-M; Kempf, M; Lemarié, C

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess occurring after a cranial trauma, which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The presence of colonies on classic blood agar plates and the use of MALDI-TOF MS, a valuable diagnostic tool that identified M. hominis due to its presence in the VITEK MS database, allowed the rapid diagnosis of this infection. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Enzymatic resistance to the lipopeptide surfactin as identified through imaging mass spectrometry of bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Hoefler, B. Christopher; Gorzelnik, Karl V.; Yang, Jane Y.; Hendricks, Nathan; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Straight, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Many species of bacteria secrete natural products that inhibit the growth or development of competing species. In turn, competitors may develop or acquire resistance to antagonistic molecules. Few studies have investigated the interplay of these countervailing forces in direct competition between two species. We have used an imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) approach to track metabolites exchanged between Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces sp. Mg1 cultured together. Surfactin is a cyclic lipopeptide produced by B. subtilis that inhibits the formation of aerial hyphae by streptomycetes. IMS analysis exposed an addition of 18 mass units to surfactin in the agar proximal to Streptomyces sp. Mg1 but not other streptomycetes tested. The spatially resolved change in the mass of surfactin indicated hydrolysis of the molecule. We observed that the aerial growth of Streptomyces sp. Mg1 was resistant to inhibition by surfactin, which suggests that hydrolysis was a mechanism of resistance. To identify possible enzymes from Streptomyces sp. Mg1 with surfactin hydrolase activity, we isolated secreted proteins and identified candidates by mass spectrometry. We purified one candidate enzyme that hydrolyzed surfactin in vitro. We tested the role of this enzyme in surfactin resistance by deleting the corresponding gene from the S. Mg1 genome. We observed that aerial growth by the ΔsfhA mutant strain was now sensitive to surfactin. Our results identify an enzyme that hydrolyzes surfactin and confers resistance to aerial growth inhibition, which demonstrates the effective use of an IMS approach to track natural product modifications during interspecies competition. PMID:22826229

  15. Imaging mass spectrometry identifies prognostic ganglioside species in rodent intracranial transplants of glioma and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ermini, Leonardo; Morganti, Elena; Post, Alexander; Yeganeh, Behzad; Caniggia, Isabella; Leadley, Michael; Faria, Claudia C; Rutka, James T; Post, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-MSI) allows us to investigate the distribution of lipid molecules within tissues. We used MALDI-MSI to identify prognostic gangliosides in tissue sections of rat intracranial allografts of rat glioma and mouse intracranial xenografts of human medulloblastoma. In the healthy adult rodent brain, GM1 and GD1 were the main types of glycolipids. Both gangliosides were absent in both intracranial transplants. The ganglioside GM3 was not present in the healthy adult brain but was highly expressed in rat glioma allografts. In combination with tandem mass spectrometry GM3 (d18:1/C24:0) was identified as the most abundant ganglioside species in the glioma allotransplant. By contrast, mouse xenografts of human medulloblastoma were characterized by prominent expression of the ganglioside GM2 (d18:0/C18:0). Together, these data demonstrate that tissue-based MALDI-MSI of gangliosides is able to discriminate between different brain tumors and may be a useful clinical tool for their classification and grading.

  16. Application of high-precision isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry to identify the biosynthetic origins of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Apostol, Izydor; Brooks, Paul D.; Mathews, Antony J.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring (IRM) mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of stable isotopes in several samples of adult human hemoglobin expressed in E. coli, yeast, and human blood. The results showed significant differences in the distribution of 15N and 13C isotopes among hemoglobin samples produced in these organisms. This indicates that IRM mass spectrometry can be used in forensic protein chemistry to identify the origin of protein expression. PMID:11420448

  17. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verrastro, Ivan; Pasha, Sabah; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Pitt, Andrew R.; Spickett, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease. PMID:25874603

  18. Mapping Biological Networks from Quantitative Data-Independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry: Data to Knowledge Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Crowgey, Erin L; Matlock, Andrea; Venkatraman, Vidya; Fert-Bober, Justyna; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry (DIA-MS) strategies and applications provide unique advantages for qualitative and quantitative proteome probing of a biological sample allowing constant sensitivity and reproducibility across large sample sets. These advantages in LC-MS/MS are being realized in fundamental research laboratories and for clinical research applications. However, the ability to translate high-throughput raw LC-MS/MS proteomic data into biological knowledge is a complex and difficult task requiring the use of many algorithms and tools for which there is no widely accepted standard and best practices are slowly being implemented. Today a single tool or approach inherently fails to capture the full interpretation that proteomics uniquely supplies, including the dynamics of quickly reversible chemically modified states of proteins, irreversible amino acid modifications, signaling truncation events, and, finally, determining the presence of protein from allele-specific transcripts. This chapter highlights key steps and publicly available algorithms required to translate DIA-MS data into knowledge.

  19. Mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified proteomic biosignatures of breast cancer in proximal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Lu, Ming; Souda, Puneet; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Chang, Helena R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We have begun an early phase of biomarker discovery in three clinically important types of breast cancer using a panel of human cell lines: HER2 positive, HER2 negative and hormone receptor positive and triple negative (HER2−, ER−, PR−). We identified and characterized the most abundant secreted, sloughed, or leaked proteins released into serum free media from these breast cancer cell lines using a combination of protein fractionation methods before LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 249 proteins were detected in the proximal fluid of 7 breast cancer cell lines. The expression of a selected group of high abundance and/or breast cancer specific potential biomarkers including thromobospondin 1, galectin-3 binding protein, cathepsin D, vimentin, zinc-α2-glycoprotein, CD44, and EGFR from the breast cancer cell lines and in their culture media were further validated by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, mass spectrometry identified a cathepsin D protein single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by alanine to valine replacement from the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Comparison of each cell line media proteome displayed unique and consistent biosignatures regardless of the individual group classifications demonstrating the potential for stratification of breast cancer. Based on the cell line media proteome, predictive Tree software was able to categorize each cell line as HER2 positive, HER2 negative and hormone receptor positive and triple negative based on only two proteins, muscle fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and keratin 19. In addition, the predictive Tree software clearly identified MCF-7 cell line overexpresing the HER2 receptor with the SNP cathepsin D biomarker. PMID:22934887

  20. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-06-02

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  2. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  3. Identifying important ions and positions in mass spectrometry imaging data using CUR matrix decompositions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiyan; Rübel, Oliver; Prabhat; Mahoney, Michael W; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging enables label-free, high-resolution spatial mapping of the chemical composition of complex, biological samples. Typical experiments require selecting ions and/or positions from the images: ions for fragmentation studies to identify keystone compounds and positions for follow up validation measurements using microdissection or other orthogonal techniques. Unfortunately, with modern imaging machines, these must be selected from an overwhelming amount of raw data. Existing techniques to reduce the volume of data, the most popular of which are principle component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization, have the disadvantage that they return difficult-to-interpret linear combinations of actual data elements. In this work, we show that CX and CUR matrix decompositions can be used directly to address this selection need. CX and CUR matrix decompositions use empirical statistical leverage scores of the input data to provide provably good low-rank approximations of the measured data that are expressed in terms of actual ions and actual positions, as opposed to difficult-to-interpret eigenions and eigenpositions. We show that this leads to effective prioritization of information for both ions and positions. In particular, important ions can be found either by using the leverage scores as a ranking function and using a deterministic greedy selection algorithm or by using the leverage scores as an importance sampling distribution and using a random sampling algorithm; however, selection of important positions from the original matrix performed significantly better when they were chosen with the random sampling algorithm. Also, we show that 20 ions or 40 locations can be used to reconstruct the original matrix to a tolerance of 17% error for a widely studied image of brain lipids; and we provide a scalable implementation of this method that is applicable for analysis of the raw data where there are often more than a million rows and/or columns

  4. Identifying and quantifying contaminants contributing to endogenous analytes in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2010-09-15

    Contaminants from various sources including medical devices, laboratory materials and the environment, and analytical apparatus may contribute to their endogenous congeners at different stages of the analytical process. Here, an approach is reported for the identification and quantification of contaminating analytes in biological fluids by stable-isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods. This approach is based on the analysis of different sample volumes and determination of the peak area ratio (PAR) of the endogenous analyte to the stable-isotope labeled analogue serving as the internal standard. The PAR is obtained by selected-ion monitoring or selected-reaction monitoring of appropriate ions. Generation of PAR values that correlate inversely with the sample volume subjected to analysis reveals the existence of contamination. The extent of contamination is obtained by plotting the PAR of endogenous analyte to internal standard versus the reciprocal of the sample volume analyzed. Examples are given for uncontaminated and contaminated endogenous analytes in biological samples, including nitrite and nitrate analyzed by GC/MS, and the fatty acid metabolites oleic acid oxide, oleic acid ethanol amide, and arachidonic acid ethanol amide analyzed by GC/MS/MS. Dependence of the PAR of endogenous analyte to its internal standard upon derivatization time reveals a unique kind of contamination that was identified in the GC/MS analysis of nitrate in plasma as pentafluorobenzyl ester. This kind of contamination occurs at the latest stage of GC/MS analysis and cannot be controlled by reference to the internal standard.

  5. Novel Polyfluorinated Compounds Identified Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Downstream of Manufacturing Facilities near Decatur, Alabama

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity has led to international regulation and phase-outs of certain perfluorinated compounds and little is known about their replacement products. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate the occurrence and identi...

  6. Novel Polyfluorinated Compounds Identified Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Downstream of Manufacturing Facilities near Decatur, Alabama

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern over persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity has led to international regulation and phase-outs of certain perfluorinated compounds and little is known about their replacement products. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate the occurrence and identi...

  7. Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry - A Powerful Tool to Identify Novel c-di-GMP Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Laventie, Benoît-Joseph; Nesper, Jutta; Ahrné, Erik; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Jenal, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made during the last decade towards the identification and characterization of enzymes involved in the synthesis (diguanylate cyclases) and degradation (phosphodiesterases) of the second messenger c-di-GMP. In contrast, little information is available regarding the molecular mechanisms and cellular components through which this signaling molecule regulates a diverse range of cellular processes. Most of the known effector proteins belong to the PilZ family or are degenerated diguanylate cyclases or phosphodiesterases that have given up on catalysis and have adopted effector function. Thus, to better define the cellular c-di-GMP network in a wide range of bacteria experimental methods are required to identify and validate novel effectors for which reliable in silico predictions fail. We have recently developed a novel Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry (CCMS) based technology as a powerful tool to biochemically identify and characterize c-di-GMP binding proteins. This technique has previously been reported to be applicable to a wide range of organisms1. Here we give a detailed description of the protocol that we utilize to probe such signaling components. As an example, we use Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen in which c-di-GMP plays a critical role in virulence and biofilm control. CCMS identified 74% (38/51) of the known or predicted components of the c-di-GMP network. This study explains the CCMS procedure in detail, and establishes it as a powerful and versatile tool to identify novel components involved in small molecule signaling. PMID:25867682

  8. A versatile mass spectrometry-based method to both identify kinase client-relationships and characterize signaling network topology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While more than a thousand protein kinases (PK) have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, relatively little progress has been made towards identifying their individual client proteins. Herein we describe use of a mass spectrometry-based in vitro phosphorylation strategy, termed Kinase...

  9. pcPIR, a photocleavable and mass spectrometry identifiable cross-linker for protein interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Tang, Xiaoting; Weisbrod, Chad; Munske, Gerhard; Eng, Jimmy; von Haller, Priska; Kaiser, Nathan; Bruce, James E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of proof-of-concept experiments using a novel photocleavable and mass spectrometry identifiable cross-linker pcPIR (photocleavable Protein Interaction Reporter). pcPIR can be dissociated under UV irradiation either off- or on-line before the introduction to the mass spectrometers. Photo dissociation of cross-linkers is different from either the gas phase or the chemical cleavage of cross-linkers. Different types of cross-links can be identified using the pcPIR mass relationships, where the mass of cross-linked precursor equals the sum of the masses of the released products and reporter. Since pcPIR is cleaved prior to the entrance to the mass spectrometer, the released peptides are available to be sequenced with routine CID MS/MS experiments and database search algorithms. In this report, the pcPIR strategy of identifying the cross-linked peptides with on- and off-line photocleavage coupled with novel targeted data dependent LC-MS/MS is demonstrated with the use of standard peptides, BSA and human hemoglobin tetramer protein complex. PMID:20373789

  10. Migrating components in a polyurethane laminating adhesive identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Athenstädt, Behnusch; Fünfrocken, Michael; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-08-30

    Plastics are increasingly used as packaging materials for pharmaceuticals. However, diffusion of compounds in plastic into drugs may endanger patients' health. Regulatory authorities therefore demand detailed information about leachable compounds in plastics. Here we identify migrating components of a sterilization-resistant polyurethane (PUR) adhesive used in the primary packaging for an aqueous pharmaceutical. This identification is an essential first step for quantification and toxicological evaluation of the compounds. We used various hyphenated mass spectrometry (MS) methods: gas chromatography (GC/MS) with either electron impact ionization or chemical ionization, and high resolution liquid chromatography (LC/MS) with electrospray ionization. Of the 13 migrating substances detected, 11 are cyclic esters with characteristic fragmentation schemes apparent from their mass spectra. These esters are formed as by-products during the reaction of adipic and isophthalic acid with monoethylene glycol and diethyelene glycol. A cyclic ester of isophthalic acid and tetraethylene glycol and a product of the reaction of isophoron diisocyanate with methanol were clearly identified. Complementary use of several hyphenated mass spectrometric methods enables successful identification of leachable compounds in the PUR adhesive under study. This opens the way for quantification and evaluation of the potential toxicities of these compounds. Despite the range of compositions of PUR laminates, the approach presented here may be applicable for the qualitative assessment of all PURs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Schieltz, David M.; Becher, François; Astot, Crister; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin produced by the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) together with a related protein known as R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Mass spectrometric (MS) assays have the capacity to unambiguously identify ricin and to detect ricin’s activity in samples with complex matrices. These qualitative and quantitative assays enable detection and differentiation of ricin from the less toxic RCA120 through determination of the amino acid sequence of the protein in question, and active ricin can be monitored by MS as the release of adenine from the depurination of a nucleic acid substrate. In this work, we describe the application of MS-based methods to detect, differentiate and quantify ricin and RCA120 in nine blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. Overall, MS-based assays successfully identified all samples containing ricin or RCA120 with the exception of the sample spiked with the lowest concentration (0.414 ng/mL). In fact, mass spectrometry was the most successful method for differentiation of ricin and RCA120 based on amino acid determination. Mass spectrometric methods were also successful at ranking the functional activities of the samples, successfully yielding semi-quantitative results. These results indicate that MS-based assays are excellent techniques to detect, differentiate, and quantify ricin and RCA120 in complex matrices. PMID:26610568

  12. Interstitial Cystitis-Associated Urinary Metabolites Identified by Mass-Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Tobias; Cho, Eunho; Park, Taeeun D.; Deng, Nan; Liu, Zhenqiu; Lee, Tack; Fiehn, Oliver; Kim, Jayoung

    2016-01-01

    This study on interstitial cystitis (IC) aims to identify a unique urine metabolomic profile associated with IC, which can be defined as an unpleasant sensation including pain and discomfort related to the urinary bladder, without infection or other identifiable causes. Although the burden of IC on the American public is immense in both human and financial terms, there is no clear diagnostic test for IC, but rather it is a disease of exclusion. Very little is known about the clinically useful urinary biomarkers of IC, which are desperately needed. Untargeted comprehensive metabolomic profiling was performed using gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry to compare urine specimens of IC patients or health donors. The study profiled 200 known and 290 unknown metabolites. The majority of the thirty significantly changed metabolites before false discovery rate correction were unknown compounds. Partial least square discriminant analysis clearly separated IC patients from controls. The high number of unknown compounds hinders useful biological interpretation of such predictive models. Given that urine analyses have great potential to be adapted in clinical practice, research has to be focused on the identification of unknown compounds to uncover important clues about underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:27976711

  13. Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry Identifies a Novel Antibacterial RNA Polymerase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Walker, Scott S; Degen, David; Nickbarg, Elliott; Carr, Donna; Soriano, Aileen; Mandal, Mihir; Painter, Ronald E; Sheth, Payal; Xiao, Li; Sher, Xinwei; Murgolo, Nicholas; Su, Jing; Olsen, David B; Ebright, Richard H; Young, Katherine

    2017-03-31

    The growing prevalence of drug resistant bacteria is a significant global threat to human health. The antibacterial drug rifampin, which functions by inhibiting bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), is an important part of the antibacterial armamentarium. Here, in order to identify novel inhibitors of bacterial RNAP, we used affinity-selection mass spectrometry to screen a chemical library for compounds that bind to Escherichia coli RNAP. We identified a novel small molecule, MRL-436, that binds to RNAP, inhibits RNAP, and exhibits antibacterial activity. MRL-436 binds to RNAP through a binding site that differs from the rifampin binding site, inhibits rifampin-resistant RNAP derivatives, and exhibits antibacterial activity against rifampin-resistant strains. Isolation of mutants resistant to the antibacterial activity of MRL-436 yields a missense mutation in codon 622 of the rpoC gene encoding the RNAP β' subunit or a null mutation in the rpoZ gene encoding the RNAP ω subunit, confirming that RNAP is the functional cellular target for the antibacterial activity of MRL-436, and indicating that RNAP β' subunit residue 622 and the RNAP ω subunit are required for the antibacterial activity of MRL-436. Similarity between the resistance determinant for MRL-436 and the resistance determinant for the cellular alarmone ppGpp suggests a possible similarity in binding site and/or induced conformational state for MRL-436 and ppGpp.

  14. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Ricin-Containing Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Schieltz, David M; Becher, François; Astot, Crister; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Barr, John R

    2015-11-25

    Ricin is a protein toxin produced by the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) together with a related protein known as R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Mass spectrometric (MS) assays have the capacity to unambiguously identify ricin and to detect ricin's activity in samples with complex matrices. These qualitative and quantitative assays enable detection and differentiation of ricin from the less toxic RCA120 through determination of the amino acid sequence of the protein in question, and active ricin can be monitored by MS as the release of adenine from the depurination of a nucleic acid substrate. In this work, we describe the application of MS-based methods to detect, differentiate and quantify ricin and RCA120 in nine blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. Overall, MS-based assays successfully identified all samples containing ricin or RCA120 with the exception of the sample spiked with the lowest concentration (0.414 ng/mL). In fact, mass spectrometry was the most successful method for differentiation of ricin and RCA120 based on amino acid determination. Mass spectrometric methods were also successful at ranking the functional activities of the samples, successfully yielding semi-quantitative results. These results indicate that MS-based assays are excellent techniques to detect, differentiate, and quantify ricin and RCA120 in complex matrices.

  15. Use of mass spectrometry fingerprinting to identify urinary metabolites after consumption of specific foods.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Amanda J; Favé, Gaëlle; Beckmann, Manfred; Lin, Wanchang; Tailliart, Kathleen; Xie, Long; Mathers, John C; Draper, John

    2011-10-01

    The lack of robust biological markers of dietary exposure hinders the quantitative understanding of causal relations between diet and health. We aimed to develop an efficient procedure to discover metabolites in urine that may have future potential as biomarkers of acute exposure to foods of high public health importance. Twenty-four participants were provided with a test breakfast in which the cereal component of a standardized breakfast was replaced by 1 of 4 foods of high public health importance; 1.5-, 3-, and 4.5-h postprandial urine samples were collected. Flow infusion electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry followed by supervised multivariate data analysis was used to discover signals resulting from consumption of each test food. Fasted-state urine samples provided a universal comparator for food biomarker lead discovery in postprandial urine. The filtering of data features associated with consumption of the common components of the standardized breakfast improved discrimination models and readily identified metabolites that showed consumption of specific test foods. A combination of trimethylamine-N-oxide and 1-methylhistidine was associated with salmon consumption. Novel ascorbate derivatives were discovered in urine after consumption of either broccoli or raspberries. Sulphonated caffeic acid and sulphonated methyl-epicatechin concentrations increased dramatically after consumption of raspberries. This biomarker lead discovery strategy can identify urinary metabolites associated with acute exposure to individual foods. Future studies are required to validate the specificity and utility of potential biomarkers in an epidemiologic context.

  16. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING PHARMACEUTICALS AND POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN DRINKING WATER SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A New High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources

    Andrew H. Grange and G. Wayne Sovocool U.S.EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, ECB, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, NV 891933478

    Mass spectra...

  17. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING PHARMACEUTICALS AND POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN DRINKING WATER SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A New High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources

    Andrew H. Grange and G. Wayne Sovocool U.S.EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, ECB, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, NV 891933478

    Mass spectra...

  18. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of pathogenic bacterial secretomes identified by mass spectrometry in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao Thi; Chon, Tae-Soo; Kim, Jaehan; Seo, Young-Su; Heo, Muyoung

    2017-07-01

    Secreted proteins (secretomes) play crucial roles during bacterial pathogenesis in both plant and human hosts. The identification and characterization of secretomes in the two plant pathogens Burkholderia glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, which cause diseases in rice such as seedling blight, panicle blight, and grain rot, are important steps to not only understand the disease-causing mechanisms but also find remedies for the diseases. Here, we identified two datasets of secretomes in B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, which consist of 118 and 111 proteins, respectively, using mass spectrometry approach and literature curation. Next, we characterized the functional properties, potential secretion pathways and sequence information properties of secretomes of two plant pathogens in a comparative analysis by various computational approaches. The ratio of potential non-classically secreted proteins (NCSPs) to classically secreted proteins (CSPs) in B. glumae BGR1 was greater than that in B. gladioli BSR3. For CSPs, the putative hydrophobic regions (PHRs) which are essential for secretion process of CSPs were screened in detail at their N-terminal sequences using hidden Markov model (HMM)-based method. Total 31 pairs of homologous proteins in two bacterial secretomes were indicated based on the global alignment (identity ≥ 70%). Our results may facilitate the understanding of the species-specific features of secretomes in two plant pathogenic Burkholderia species.

  19. Quantitative Histone Mass Spectrometry Identifies Elevated Histone H3 Lysine 27 (Lys27) Trimethylation in Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Byrum, Stephanie D.; Avaritt, Nathan L.; Davis, Lauren; Shields, Bradley; Mahmoud, Fade; Reynolds, Matthew; Orr, Lisa M.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Shalin, Sara C.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Normal cell growth is characterized by a regulated epigenetic program that drives cellular activities such as gene transcription, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Perturbation of this epigenetic program can lead to events such as mis-regulation of gene transcription and diseases such as cancer. To begin to understand the epigenetic program correlated to the development of melanoma, we performed a novel quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of histone post-translational modifications mis-regulated in melanoma cell culture as well as patient tumors. Aggressive melanoma cell lines as well as metastatic melanoma were found to have elevated histone H3 Lys27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) accompanied by overexpressed methyltransferase EZH2 that adds the specific modification. The altered epigenetic program that led to elevated H3K27me3 in melanoma cell culture was found to directly silence transcription of the tumor suppressor genes RUNX3 and E-cadherin. The EZH2-mediated silencing of RUNX3 and E-cadherin transcription was also validated in advanced stage human melanoma tissues. This is the first study focusing on the detailed epigenetic mechanisms leading to EZH2-mediated silencing of RUNX3 and E-cadherin tumor suppressors in melanoma. This study underscores the utility of using high resolution mass spectrometry to identify mis-regulated epigenetic programs in diseases such as cancer, which could ultimately lead to the identification of biological markers for diagnostic and prognostic applications. PMID:26621846

  20. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics Identifies Longitudinal Urinary Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Radiation-Induced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, John A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Anver, Miriam R; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank J; Mitchell, James B; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-03-15

    Nonlethal exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) is a public concern due to its known carcinogenic effects. Although latency periods for IR-induced neoplasms are relatively long, the ability to detect cancer as early as possible is highly advantageous for effective therapeutic intervention. Therefore, we hypothesized that metabolites in the urine from mice exposed to total body radiation (TBI) would predict for the presence of cancer before a palpable mass was detected. In this study, we exposed mice to 0 or 5.4 Gy TBI, collected urine samples periodically over 1 year, and assayed urine metabolites by using mass spectrometry. Longitudinal data analysis within the first year post-TBI revealed that cancers, including hematopoietic, solid, and benign neoplasms, could be distinguished by unique urinary signatures as early as 3 months post-TBI. Furthermore, a distinction among different types of malignancies could be clearly delineated as early as 3 months post-TBI for hematopoietic neoplasms, 6 months for solid neoplasms, and by 1 year for benign neoplasms. Moreover, the feature profile for radiation-exposed mice 6 months post-TBI was found to be similar to nonirradiated control mice at 18 months, suggesting that TBI accelerates aging. These results demonstrate that urine feature profiles following TBI can identify cancers in mice prior to macroscopic detection, with important implications for the early diagnosis and treatment. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  2. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A 'cardiac-specific finger print' of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a 'MAS-signalosome' model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of 'signalosome' components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor.

  3. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  4. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  5. Leptospira species and serovars identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after database implementation.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piccolo, Giovanna; Gorrini, Chiara; Montecchini, Sara; Buttrini, Mirko; Rossi, Sabina; Piergianni, Maddalena; De Conto, Flora; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina

    2014-06-02

    Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution, endemic in Europe, has been recognized as an important emerging infectious disease, though yet it is mostly a neglected disease which imparts its greatest burden on impoverished populations from developing countries. Leptospirosis is caused by the infection with any of the more than 230 serovars of pathogenic Leptospira sp. In this study we aimed to implement the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) database currently available in our laboratory with Leptospira reference pathogenic (L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, L. kirschneri, L. noguchii), intermediate (L. fainei) and saprophytic (L. biflexa) strains of our collection in order to evaluate its possible application to the diagnosis of leptospirosis and to the typing of strains. This was done with the goal of understanding whether this methodology could be used as a tool for the identification of Leptospira strains, not only at species level for diagnostic purposes, but also at serovar level for epidemiological purposes, overcoming the limits of serological and molecular conventional methods. Twenty Leptospira reference strains were analysed by MALDI-TOF MS. Statistical analysis of the protein spectra was performed by ClinProTools software. The spectra obtained by the analysis of the reference strains tested were grouped into 6 main classes corresponding to the species analysed, highlighting species-specific protein profiles. Moreover, the statistical analysis of the spectra identified discriminatory peaks to recognize Leptospira strains also at serovar level extending previously published data. In conclusion, we confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS could be a powerful tool for research and diagnostic in the field of leptospirosis with broad applications ranging from the detection and identification of pathogenic leptospires for diagnostic purposes to the typing of pathogenic and non-pathogenic leptospires for epidemiological purposes in order to

  6. Candidate autoantigens identified by mass spectrometry in early rheumatoid arthritis are chaperones and citrullinated glycolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Goëb, Vincent; Thomas-L'Otellier, Marlène; Daveau, Romain; Charlionet, Roland; Fardellone, Patrice; Le Loët, Xavier; Tron, François; Gilbert, Danièle; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to identify new early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) autoantibodies. Methods Sera obtained from 110 early untreated RA patients (<6 months) were analyzed by western blot using HL-60 cell extract, separated on one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE, 2-DE). Sera from 50 healthy blood donors and 20 patients with non-RA rheumatisms were used as controls for 1-DE and 2-DE, respectively. The immunoreactive proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis and the presence of potential sites of citrullination in each of these proteins was evaluated. FT-ICR mass spectrometry was used to verify experimentally the effect of citrullination upon the mass profile observed by MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The 110 1-DE patterns allowed detection of 10 recurrent immunoreactive bands of 33, 39, 43, 46, 51, 54, 58, 62, 67 and 70 kDa, which were further characterized by 2-DE and proteomic analysis. Six proteins were already described RA antigens: heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, aldolase, α-enolase, calreticulin, 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) and BiP. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and the far upstream element-binding proteins (FUSE-BP) 1 and 2 were identified as new antigens. Post-translational protein modifications were analyzed and potentially deiminated peptides were found on aldolase, α-enolase, PGK1, calreticulin, HSP60 and the FUSE-BPs. We compared the reactivity of RA sera with citrullinated and noncitrullinated α-enolase and FUSE-BP linear peptides, and showed that antigenicity of the FUSE-BP peptide was highly dependent on citrullination. Interestingly, the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP2) status in RA serum at inclusion was not correlated to the reactivity directed against FUSE-BP citrullinated peptide. Conclusions Two categories of antigens, enzymes of the glycolytic family and molecular chaperones are also targeted by the

  7. Identifying Ca2+-Binding Sites in Proteins by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Using Ca2+-Directed Dissociations

    PubMed Central

    Jamalian, Azadeh; Sneekes, Evert-Jan; Wienk, Hans; Dekker, Lennard J. M.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Ursem, Mario; Luider, Theo M.; Burgers, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a new method to identify calcium-binding sites in proteins using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in concert with calcium-directed collision-induced dissociations. Our method does not require any modifications to the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry apparatus, uses standard digestion protocols, and can be applied to existing high-resolution MS data files. In contrast to NMR, our method is applicable to very small amounts of complex protein mixtures (femtomole level). Calcium-bound peptides can be identified using three criteria: (1) the calculated exact mass of the calcium containing peptide; (2) specific dissociations of the calcium-containing peptide from threonine and serine residues; and (3) the very similar retention times of the calcium-containing peptide and the free peptide. PMID:25023127

  8. A database-augmented, exosome-based mass spectrometry approach exemplarily identifies circulating claudin 3 as biomarker in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Worst, Thomas Stefan; von Hardenberg, Jost; Gross, Julia Christina; Erben, Philipp; Schnoelzer, Martina; Hausser, Ingrid; Bugert, Peter; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Boutros, Michael

    2017-04-09

    In prostate cancer and other malignancies sensitive and robust biomarkers are lacking or have relevant limitations. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), the only biomarker widely used in prostate cancer, is suffering from low specificity. Exosomes offer new perspectives in the discovery of blood-based biomarkers. Here we present a proof-of principle study for a proteomics-based identification pipeline, implementing existing data sources, to exemplarily identify exosome-based biomarker candidates in prostate cancer. Exosomes from malignant PC3 and benign PNT1A cells and from FBS-containing medium were isolated using sequential ultracentrifugation. Exosome and control samples were analyzed on an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer. Proteomic data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003651. We developed a scoring scheme to rank 64 proteins exclusively found in PC3 exosomes, integrating data from four public databases and published mass spectrometry datasets. Among the top candidates, we focused on the tight junction protein claudin 3. Retests under serum-free conditions using immunoblotting and immunogold labeling confirmed the presence of claudin 3 on PC3 exosomes. Claudin 3 levels were determined in the blood plasma of patients with localized (n=58; 42 with Gleason score 6-7, 16 with Gleason score ≥8) and metastatic prostate cancer (n=11) compared to patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (n=15) and healthy individuals (n=15) using ELISA, without prior laborious exosome isolation. ANOVA showed different CLDN3 plasma levels in these groups (p=0.004). CLDN3 levels were higher in patients with Gleason ≥8 tumors compared to patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (p=0.012) and Gleason 6-7 tumors (p=0.029). In patients with localized tumors CLDN3 levels predicted a Gleason score ≥ 8 (AUC=0.705; p=0.164) and did not correlate with serum PSA. By using the described workflow claudin 3 was identified and validated as a potential blood-based biomarker

  9. The use of mass spectrometry to identify antigens from proteasome processing.

    PubMed

    Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Claverol, Stéphane; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Monsarrat, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for the characterization of antigenic peptides that play a major role in the immune system. Most of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptides are generated during the degradation of intracellular proteins by the proteasome, a catalytic complex present in all eukaryotic cells. This chapter focuses on the contribution of MS to the understanding of the mechanisms of antigen processing by the proteasome. This knowledge may be valuable for the design of specific inhibitors of proteasome, which has recently been recognized as a therapeutic target in cancer therapies and for the development of efficient peptidic vaccines in immunotherapies. Examples from the literature have been chosen to illustrate how MS data can contribute first to the understanding of the mechanisms of proteasomal processing and, second, to the understanding of the crucial role of proteasome in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) activation. The general strategy based on MS analyses used in these studies is also described.

  10. Thiouracil cross-linking mass spectrometry: a cell-based method to identify host factors involved in viral amplification.

    PubMed

    Lenarcic, Erik M; Landry, Dori M; Greco, Todd M; Cristea, Ileana M; Thompson, Sunnie R

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic RNA viruses are known to utilize host factors; however, the identity of these factors and their role in the virus life cycle remain largely undefined. Here, we report a method to identify proteins bound to the viral RNA during amplification in cell culture: thiouracil cross-linking mass spectrometry (TUX-MS). TUX-MS relies on incorporation of a zero-distance cross-linker into the viral RNA during infection. Proteins bound to viral RNA are cross-linked prior to cell lysis, purified, and identified using mass spectrometry. Using the TUX-MS method, an unbiased screen for poliovirus (PV) host factors was conducted. All host and viral proteins that are known to interact with the poliovirus RNA were identified. In addition, TUX-MS identified an additional 66 host proteins that have not been previously described in poliovirus amplification. From these candidates, eight were selected and validated. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of two of these uncharacterized host factors results in either a decrease in copy number of positive-stranded RNA or a decrease in PV translation. These data demonstrate that TUX-MS is a robust, unbiased method to identify previously unknown host cell factors that influence virus growth. This method is broadly applicable to a range of RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses, alphaviruses, picornaviruses, bunyaviruses, and coronaviruses.

  11. Thiouracil Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry: a Cell-Based Method To Identify Host Factors Involved in Viral Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lenarcic, Erik M.; Landry, Dori M.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA viruses are known to utilize host factors; however, the identity of these factors and their role in the virus life cycle remain largely undefined. Here, we report a method to identify proteins bound to the viral RNA during amplification in cell culture: thiouracil cross-linking mass spectrometry (TUX-MS). TUX-MS relies on incorporation of a zero-distance cross-linker into the viral RNA during infection. Proteins bound to viral RNA are cross-linked prior to cell lysis, purified, and identified using mass spectrometry. Using the TUX-MS method, an unbiased screen for poliovirus (PV) host factors was conducted. All host and viral proteins that are known to interact with the poliovirus RNA were identified. In addition, TUX-MS identified an additional 66 host proteins that have not been previously described in poliovirus amplification. From these candidates, eight were selected and validated. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of two of these uncharacterized host factors results in either a decrease in copy number of positive-stranded RNA or a decrease in PV translation. These data demonstrate that TUX-MS is a robust, unbiased method to identify previously unknown host cell factors that influence virus growth. This method is broadly applicable to a range of RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses, alphaviruses, picornaviruses, bunyaviruses, and coronaviruses. PMID:23740976

  12. [Identifying immunogenic proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae C43065 by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and cloning their encoding genes].

    PubMed

    Nazierbieke, Wulumuhan; Xiao, Di; Yang, Zhenlong; Ahan, Jianaer; Borrathybay, Entomack

    2016-02-04

    To identify immunogenic proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae C43065. Antigens were extracted from E. rhusiopathiae C43065 by the alkaline extraction method. Proteins in the NaOH-extracted antigen were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and then Western blotting was performed with rabbit antiserum against the NaOH-extracted antigens. The immunogenic protein bands were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The genes encoding 5 major immunogenic proteins was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of E. rhusiopathiae C43065, and inserted into the pMD18-T vector and then sequenced. A total of 9 immunogenic surface proteins in the NaOH-extracted antigen from E. rhusiopathiae C43065 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Four of the proteins were putative virulence-associated proteins: enolase, ATP-binding cassette transporter, glyceraldehyde-3 -phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase class-II. The genes encoding the chaperone protein GroEL, enolase, ATP-binding cassette transporter, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase class-II were 1614, 1296, 1260, 1005 and 867 bp in length, and the nucleotide sequences homologies of the genes between the C43065 strain and the previously reported E. rhusiopathiae Fujisawa strain was more than 98%. Several putative virulence-associated proteins in the NaOH-extracted antigen of E. rhusiopathiae C43065 will be useful for elucidating the roles of these proteins in the pathogenesis of the organism.

  13. Computer language for identifying chemicals with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Kottapalli, Visweswara; Ni, Mingtian; Visvanathan, Arvind

    2005-04-15

    This paper describes a language for expressing criteria for chemical identification with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography paired with mass spectrometry (GC x GC-MS) and presents computer-based tools implementing the language. The Computer Language for Indentifying Chemicals (CLIC) allows expressions that describe rules (or constraints) for selecting chemical peaks or data points based on multi-dimensional chromatographic properties and mass spectral characteristics. CLIC offers chromatographic functions of retention times, functions of mass spectra, numbers for quantitative and relational evaluation, and logical and arithmetic operators. The language is demonstrated with the compound-class selection rules described by Welthagen et al. [W. Welthagen, J. Schnelle-Kreis, R. Zimmermann, J. Chromatogr. A 1019 (2003) 233-249]. A software implementation of CLIC provides a calculator-like graphical user-interface (GUI) for building and applying selection expressions. From the selection calculator, expressions can be used to select chromatographic peaks that meet the criteria or create selection chromatograms that mask data points inconsistent with the criteria. Selection expressions can be combined with graphical, geometric constraints in the retention-time plane as a powerful component for chemical identification with template matching or used to speed and improve mass spectrum library searches.

  14. Profiling methods to identify cold-regulated primary metabolites using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dethloff, Frederik; Erban, Alexander; Orf, Isabel; Alpers, Jessica; Fehrle, Ines; Beine-Golovchuk, Olga; Schmidt, Stefanie; Schwachtje, Jens; Kopka, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter describes the analytical procedures required for the profiling of a metabolite fraction enriched for primary metabolites. The profiling is based on routine gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The generic profiling method is adapted to plant material, specifically to the analysis of single leaves from plants that were exposed to temperature stress experiments. The described method is modular. The modules include a rapid sampling and metabolic inactivation protocol for samples in a wide size range, a sample extraction procedure, a chemical derivatization step that is required to make the metabolite fraction amenable to gas chromatographic analysis, a routine GC-MS method, and finally the procedures of data processing and data mining. A basic and extendable set of standardizations for metabolite recovery and retention index alignment of the resulting GC-MS chromatograms is included. The method has two applications: (1) the rapid screening for changes of relative metabolite pools sizes under temperature stress and (2) the verification of cold-regulated metabolites by exact quantification using a GC-MS protocol with extended internal and external standardization.

  15. Molecular characterization of effluent organic matter identified by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonsior, Michael; Zwartjes, Matthew; Cooper, William J; Song, Weihua; Ishida, Kenneth P; Tseng, Linda Y; Jeung, Matthew K; Rosso, Diego; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Effluent dissolved organic matter (EfOM) collected from the secondary-treated wastewater of the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) located in Fountain Valley, California, USA was compared to natural organic matter collected from the Suwannee River (SRNOM), Florida using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Furthermore, the two different treatment processes at OCSD, activated sludge and trickling filter, were separately investigated. The blend of these two effluents was further evaluated after it had passed through the microfiltration process of the Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF) at Orange County Water District (OCWD). EfOM contained 872 different m/z peaks that were unambiguously assigned to exact molecular formulae containing a single sulfur atom and carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms (CHOS formulae). In contrast, the SRNOM sample only contained 152 CHOS formulae. The trend in CHO molecular compositions was opposite with 2500 CHO formulae assigned for SRNOM but only about 1000 for EfOM. The CHOS-derived mass peaks with highest abundances in EfOM could be attributed to surfactants such as linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS), their co-products dialkyl tetralin sulfonates (DATS) and their biodegraded metabolites such as sulfophenyl carboxylic acids (SPC). The differences between the treatments were found minor with greater differences between sampling dates than treatment methods used.

  16. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  17. Brain norepinephrine identified by mass spectrometry is associated with reproductive status of females of the linden bug Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    PubMed

    Chvalova, Daniela; Zdechovanova, Lenka; Vaneckova, Hana; Hodkova, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    Several biogenic amines, including controversial presence of norepinephrine (NE), were identified by the high performance liquid chromatography equipped with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in brain complexes of adult females of Pyrrhocoris apterus. Quantitative analysis was performed by the high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detector. Levels of NE, dopamine (DA), octopamine (OA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in brain complexes were measured in reproductive vs. diapause females. In field collected samples, levels of NE and DA were significantly higher in reproductive (May) than in non-reproductive (Sep, Oct, Feb) females. In laboratory females, NE is higher in long day photoperiod (reproduction) than in short day photoperiod (diapause) already from the first week of the adult age, while DA shows differences between the two contrasting photoperiods only from the second week of the adult age. No association between reproductive status and levels of OA and 5-HT was found.

  18. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  19. Oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates in rainwater identified by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, K. E.; Turpin, B. J.; Seitzinger, S. P.

    2008-09-01

    Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric organic matter, and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems, yet less than 50% of rainwater organic matter is considered chemically characterized. Precipitation samples collected in New Jersey, USA, were analyzed by negative ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Elemental compositions of 552 unique molecular species were determined in the mass range 50 500 Da in the rainwater. Three main groups of organic compounds were identified: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO) only, sulfur (S) containing CHOS compounds, and S- and nitrogen containing CHONS compounds. Organic acids commonly identified in precipitation were detected, as well as linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, which are persistent pollutants commonly measured in river water, seawater, and sediments, but to our knowledge, not previously documented in atmospheric samples. Within the three main groups of compounds detected in the rainwater, oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy-organosulfates were identified. The majority of the compounds identified are products of atmospheric reactions and are known contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from gas phase, aerosol phase, and in-cloud reactions in the atmosphere. It is suggested that the large uncharacterized component of SOA is the main contributor to the large uncharacterized component of rainwater organic matter.

  20. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  1. Identifying Carbohydrate Ligands of a Norovirus P Particle using a Catch and Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis, recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are present as free oligosaccharides in bodily fluid or glycolipids and glycoproteins on the surfaces of cells. The subviral P particle formed by the protruding (P) domain of the NoV capsid protein serves as a useful model for the study NoV-HBGA interactions. Here, we demonstrate the application of a catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against the P particle to rapidly identify NoV ligands and potential inhibitors. Carbohydrate libraries of 50 and 146 compounds, which included 18 and 24 analogs of HBGA receptors, respectively, were screened against the P particle of VA387, a member of the predominant GII.4 NoVs. Deprotonated ions corresponding to the P particle bound to carbohydrates were isolated and subjected to collision-induced dissociation to release the ligands in their deprotonated forms. The released ligands were identified by ion mobility separation followed by mass analysis. All 13 and 16 HBGA ligands with intrinsic affinities >500 M-1 were identified in the 50 and the 146 compound libraries, respectively. Furthermore, screening revealed interactions with a series of oligosaccharides with structures found in the cell wall of mycobacteria and human milk. The affinities of these newly discovered ligands are comparable to those of the HBGA receptors, as estimated from the relative abundance of released ligand ions.

  2. The utilization of fluorescence to identify the components of lipofuscin by imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, Noah; Anderson, David M; Grey, Angus C.; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Koutalos, Yiannis; Schey, Kevin L.; Crouch, Rosalie K.

    2014-01-01

    Lipofuscin, an aging marker in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with the development of age-related macular degeneration, is primarily characterized by its fluorescence. The most abundant component of RPE lipofuscin is N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) but its exact composition is not known due to the complexity of the RPE extract. In this study, we utilized MALDI imaging to find potential molecules responsible for lipofuscin fluorescence in RPE tissue from Abca4−/−, Sv129, and C57Bl6/J mice ages 2 and 6 month. To assert relationships, the individual images in the MALDI imaging datasets were correlated with lipofuscin fluorescence recorded from the same tissues following proper registration. Spatial correlation information, which is usually is lost in bioanalytics, pinpointed a relatively small number of potential lipofuscin components. The comparison of four samples in each condition further limited the possibility of false positives and provided various new, age- and strain-specific targets. Validating the usefulness of the fluorescence-enhanced imaging strategy, many known adducts of A2E were identified in the short list of lipofuscin components. These results provided evidence that mass spectrometric imaging can be utilized as a tool to begin to identify the molecular substructure of clinically-relevant diagnostic information. PMID:24453194

  3. Metabolomic approach for identifying and visualizing molecular tissue markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis by mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Mori, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In developmental and cell biology it is crucial to evaluate the dynamic profiles of metabolites. An emerging frog model system using Xenopus tropicalis, whose genome sequence and inbred strains are available, is now ready for metabolomics investigation in amphibians. In this study we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) analysis to identify and visualize metabolomic molecular markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis. We detected tissue-specific peaks and visualized their distribution in tissues, and distinguished 19 tissues and their specific peaks. We identified, for the first time, some of their molecular localizations via tandem mass spectrometric analysis: hydrocortisone in artery, L-DOPA in rhombencephalon, taurine in eye, corticosterone in gill, heme in heart, inosine monophosphate and carnosine in muscle, dopamine in nerves, and phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/20:4) in pharynx. This is the first MALDI-MSI study of X. tropicalis tadpoles, as in small tadpoles it is hard to distinguish and dissect the various organs. Furthermore, until now there has been no data about the metabolomic profile of each organ. Our results suggest that MALDI-MSI is potentially a powerful tool for examining the dynamics of metabolomics in metamorphosis as well as conformational changes due to metabolic changes. PMID:27422901

  4. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  5. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  6. Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry to Identify Drug Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Nonhospital Environments in Brunei Darussalam

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ko S.; Shazali, Siti A.; Xu, Zhen; Cutler, Ronald R.; Idris, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistant bacteria have been a growing threat to the community and hospitals due to the misuse of antibiotics by humans, industrialization, and lack of novel antimicrobials currently available. Little is known about the prevalence of drug resistant bacteria in nonhealthcare environments in Brunei Darussalam and about how antibiotic resistant genes are transferred within these environments. Human contact points from different types of environments in Brunei Darussalam, varying from urban to jungle settings, were swabbed and cultured onto selective media to isolate staphylococci bacteria before performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the isolates. The identity of the isolates was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Staphylococci isolates resistant to oxacillin were further tested for their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). PCR analysis of the mecA gene, a gene that confers resistance to oxacillin, is done to determine the level of resistance to oxacillin. Ten different staphylococcal species were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Out of the 36 staphylococci isolates, 24 were resistant to multiple antibiotics including two isolates which were oxacillin resistant. Some staphylococci isolates had similar antibiotic resistance profiles to other staphylococci isolates of different species in the same location. This work provides the first-ever evidence of drug resistant staphylococci in the nonhospital environment in Brunei Darussalam. PMID:27127505

  7. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics identifies UPF1 as a critical gene expression regulator in MonoMac 6 cells.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Meike J; Ossipova, Elena; Oliynyk, Ganna; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2013-06-07

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyzes the two initial steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, a group of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid. Recently, we have demonstrated that 5-LO mRNA expression is regulated by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). In addition to this, 5-LO protein expression was reduced on translational level in UPF1 knockdown cells, suggesting that UPF1 has a positive influence on 5-LO translation. Therefore, a mass spectrometry-based proteomics study was performed to identify compartment-specific protein expression changes upon UPF1 knockdown in differentiated and undifferentiated MM6 cells. The proteomics analysis revealed that the knockdown of UPF1 results in numerous protein changes in the microsomal fraction (~21%) but not in the cytosolic fraction (<1%). The results suggest that UPF1 is a critical gene expression regulator in a compartment-specific way. During differentiation by TGFβ and calcitriol, the majority of UPF1 regulated proteins were adjusted to normal level. This indicates that the translational regulation by UPF1 can potentially be cell differentiation-dependent.

  8. A Systematic Bioinformatics Approach to Identify High Quality Mass Spectrometry Data and Functionally Annotate Proteins and Proteomes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tawhidul; Mohamedali, Abidali; Ahn, Seong Beom; Nawar, Ishmam; Baker, Mark S; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, proteomics and mass spectrometry have taken tremendous strides forward, particularly in the life sciences, spurred on by rapid advances in technology resulting in generation and conglomeration of vast amounts of data. Though this has led to tremendous advancements in biology, the interpretation of the data poses serious challenges for many practitioners due to the immense size and complexity of the data. Furthermore, the lack of annotation means that a potential gold mine of relevant biological information may be hiding within this data. We present here a simple and intuitive workflow for the research community to investigate and mine this data, not only to extract relevant data but also to segregate usable, quality data to develop hypotheses for investigation and validation. We apply an MS evidence workflow for verifying peptides of proteins from one's own data as well as publicly available databases. We then integrate a suite of freely available bioinformatics analysis and annotation software tools to identify homologues and map putative functional signatures, gene ontology and biochemical pathways. We also provide an example of the functional annotation of missing proteins in human chromosome 7 data from the NeXtProt database, where no evidence is available at the proteomic, antibody, or structural levels. We give examples of protocols, tools and detailed flowcharts that can be extended or tailored to interpret and annotate the proteome of any novel organism.

  9. How to identify and discriminate between the methyl quinates of chlorogenic acids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2011-03-01

    The methyl esters of chlorogenic acids, methyl quinates, are widely distributed in plant materials and frequently appear as extraction artifacts in plant samples. This is the first time when liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods have been used for the identification and characterization of the methyl quinates. For this purpose, methyl quinates of mono caffeoylquinic acids and mono feruloylquinic acids were synthesized as authentic standards. The methyl quinates of mono and diacyl chlorogenic acids have shown characteristic fragmentation pattern in their tandem mass spectra. MS(n + 1) spectra of the methyl quinates of diacyl chlorogenic acids were identical to MS(n) spectra of mono acyl derivatives. These quinates do not produce any methyl quinate peak at m/z 205 if compared with quinic acid peak at m/z 191 in negative ion mode. In the MS(n) spectra of these quinates, cinnamic acid part or cinnamoyl part was detected as a base peak in negative ion mode. The retention time, order of elution and fragmentation pattern were completely different if compared with LC-MS(n) methods developed for chlorogenic acids. These LC-MS(n) methods have been applied for the identification and regioisomeric characterization of the methyl quinates of chlorogenic acids in maté tea and woodruff (Galium odoratum). Two methyl caffeoylquinates (2 and 4) were identified as methyl 3-caffeoylquinate and methyl 5-caffeoylquinate. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Performance of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identifying Clinical Malassezia Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Machouart, Marie; Morio, Florent; Sabou, Marcela; Kauffmann-LaCroix, Catherine; Contet-Audonneau, Nelly; Candolfi, Ermanno; Letscher-Bru, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Malassezia comprises commensal yeasts on human skin. These yeasts are involved in superficial infections but are also isolated in deeper infections, such as fungemia, particularly in certain at-risk patients, such as neonates or patients with parenteral nutrition catheters. Very little is known about Malassezia epidemiology and virulence. This is due mainly to the difficulty of distinguishing species. Currently, species identification is based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Only molecular biology techniques identify species with certainty, but they are time-consuming and expensive. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) database for identifying Malassezia species by mass spectrometry. Eighty-five Malassezia isolates from patients in three French university hospitals were investigated. Each strain was identified by internal transcribed spacer sequencing. Forty-five strains of the six species Malassezia furfur, M. sympodialis, M. slooffiae, M. globosa, M. restricta, and M. pachydermatis allowed the creation of a MALDI-TOF database. Forty other strains were used to test this database. All strains were identified by our Malassezia database with log scores of >2.0, according to the manufacturer's criteria. Repeatability and reproducibility tests showed a coefficient of variation of the log score values of <10%. In conclusion, our new Malassezia database allows easy, fast, and reliable identification of Malassezia species. Implementation of this database will contribute to a better, more rapid identification of Malassezia species and will be helpful in gaining a better understanding of their epidemiology. PMID:27795342

  11. Preserved Proteins from Extinct Bison latifrons Identified by Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Hydroxylysine Glycosides are a Common Feature of Ancient Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan C.; Wither, Matthew J.; Nemkov, Travis; Barrett, Alexander; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone samples from several vertebrates were collected from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, in Snowmass Village, Colorado, and processed for proteomics analysis. The specimens come from Pleistocene megafauna Bison latifrons, dating back ∼120,000 years. Proteomics analysis using a simplified sample preparation procedure and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was applied to obtain protein identifications. Several bioinformatics resources were used to obtain peptide identifications based on sequence homology to extant species with annotated genomes. With the exception of soil sample controls, all samples resulted in confident peptide identifications that mapped to type I collagen. In addition, we analyzed a specimen from the extinct B. latifrons that yielded peptide identifications mapping to over 33 bovine proteins. Our analysis resulted in extensive fibrillar collagen sequence coverage, including the identification of posttranslational modifications. Hydroxylysine glucosylgalactosylation, a modification thought to be involved in collagen fiber formation and bone mineralization, was identified for the first time in an ancient protein dataset. Meta-analysis of data from other studies indicates that this modification may be common in well-preserved prehistoric samples. Additional peptide sequences from extracellular matrix (ECM) and non-ECM proteins have also been identified for the first time in ancient tissue samples. These data provide a framework for analyzing ancient protein signatures in well-preserved fossil specimens, while also contributing novel insights into the molecular basis of organic matter preservation. As such, this analysis has unearthed common posttranslational modifications of collagen that may assist in its preservation over time. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001827. PMID:25948757

  12. Preserved Proteins from Extinct Bison latifrons Identified by Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Hydroxylysine Glycosides are a Common Feature of Ancient Collagen.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ryan C; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Barrett, Alexander; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-07-01

    Bone samples from several vertebrates were collected from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, in Snowmass Village, Colorado, and processed for proteomics analysis. The specimens come from Pleistocene megafauna Bison latifrons, dating back ∼ 120,000 years. Proteomics analysis using a simplified sample preparation procedure and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was applied to obtain protein identifications. Several bioinformatics resources were used to obtain peptide identifications based on sequence homology to extant species with annotated genomes. With the exception of soil sample controls, all samples resulted in confident peptide identifications that mapped to type I collagen. In addition, we analyzed a specimen from the extinct B. latifrons that yielded peptide identifications mapping to over 33 bovine proteins. Our analysis resulted in extensive fibrillar collagen sequence coverage, including the identification of posttranslational modifications. Hydroxylysine glucosylgalactosylation, a modification thought to be involved in collagen fiber formation and bone mineralization, was identified for the first time in an ancient protein dataset. Meta-analysis of data from other studies indicates that this modification may be common in well-preserved prehistoric samples. Additional peptide sequences from extracellular matrix (ECM) and non-ECM proteins have also been identified for the first time in ancient tissue samples. These data provide a framework for analyzing ancient protein signatures in well-preserved fossil specimens, while also contributing novel insights into the molecular basis of organic matter preservation. As such, this analysis has unearthed common posttranslational modifications of collagen that may assist in its preservation over time. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001827. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Tear film proteins deposited on high water content contact lenses identified with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kim; Vorum, Henrik; Ehlers, Niels; Aagaard, Nicolaj; Hjortdal, Jesper; Honoré, Bent

    2015-11-01

    Tear film proteins adhere to the surface of contact lenses (CLs). While the proteins in the tears have been extensively studied with various proteomic techniques, adhered proteins to CLs are less studied. In this pilot study, we have separated proteins with 2D gel electrophoresis prior to the conventional mass spectrometry (MS) in order to analyse the deposited proteins on hydrogel CLs from myopic patients. pHEMA and PVA hydrogel CLs worn by 3 patients for different time lengths were analysed. After wear, the CLs were frozen at -20°C. Proteins were extracted in lysis buffer, separated on 12% polyacrylamide gels and silver-stained. Protein spots were excised and identified with liquid chromatography - tandem MS. Deposited proteins were extracted with a yield of 26-66 μg and separated by 2D gel electrophoresis. The silver-stained gels showed similar protein patterns independent of the patient, hydrogel type and wear time. Seventy-two spots were analysed with MS, representing at least 12 different tear film proteins or protein fragments. Deposited tear film proteins from a single set of CLs worn for 1 day can successfully be analysed first with 2D gel electrophoresis and subsequently with MS, thus making examination of individual patients possible. The protein composition appeared homogeneous between the test persons which is a necessity for additional comparison analysis. The molecular masses of the identified proteins indicate that protein degradation occurs only as a minor event. Myopic patients were investigated in this pilot study, but the combined techniques can easily be applied to other eye diseases. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  15. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  16. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  17. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry applied to identifying species of insect-pathogenic fungi from the Metarhizium anisopliae complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be a powerful tool for taxonomic resolution of microorganisms. In this proof-of-concept study, we assessed the effectiveness of this technique to track the current gene sequence-based phylogenet...

  18. Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for identifying respiratory bacterial pathogens: a fast and efficient method.

    PubMed

    López-Fabal, Ma Fátima; Gómez-Garcés, José Luís; López-Hontangas, José Luís; Sanz, Nuria; Muñoz, Carmen; Regodón, Marta

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a reference resource for identifying microorganisms in clinical microbiology services. One hundred and fifty one clinical isolates were selected from respiratory specimens routinely identified as Streptococcus pneumoniae (43), Haemophilus influenzae (64) and Moraxella catarrhalis (44). These identifications were compared with other phenotypical methods and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS Vitek). Result discrepancies were assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Thirty-eight of the 43 strains of S. pneumoniae (86%) were identified as such using phenotypical methods and spectrometry. In 5 cases, MALDI-TOF identified 4 of them as Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and 1 as S. mitis/oralis. Forty-eight of the 64 strains were identified as H. influenzae (75%) using biochemical identification systems and automated identification systems, whereas MALDI-TOF-MS Vitek identified 51 strains (79%) as such. Conventional methods and spectrometry identified all the 40 strains tested (100%) as M. catarrhalis. All strains with discrepant results were sequenced, and in all cases, the identification obtained by spectrometry was confirmed. The results obtained in this study show that mass spectrometry provides identification of these bacteria faster and in a more reliable way than those based on conventional phenotypical methods.

  19. Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-03-04

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. Cross-linking is the process of covalently joining two proteins using cross-linking reagents. After proteolytic cleavage, the cross-linked peptides can be identified using tandem mass spectrometry. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linkering reagent and/or protein to aid both identification and quantitation. However, these approaches have various limitations. These limitations can be overcome with a label-free approach and application of associated data analysis algorithms described in this work.

  20. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Fails To Identify Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Primary Cultures of Respiratory Samples

    PubMed Central

    van Eck, Kim; Faro, Dirk; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; Kuipers, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    We have assessed matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification (Bruker) of nontuberculous mycobacteria from newly positive liquid cultures of respiratory samples. Twelve (22%) of 54 isolates were identified directly from liquid medium. After subculture and with manual laser operation, this rose to 49/54 isolates (91%). MALDI-TOF MS is less promising than previously suggested. PMID:27147723

  1. Intensity fading MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and functional proteomics assignments to identify protease inhibitors in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Covaleda, Giovanni; Trejo, Sebastian A; Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Del Rivero, Maday Alonso; Chavez, Maria Angeles; Aviles, Francesc X

    2017-08-08

    enzymatic assays, affinity-based Intensity-Fading (IF-) MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS), and on-line MS fragmentation, in a fast and easy approach. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Differential tandem mass spectrometry-based cross-linker: a new approach for high confidence in identifying protein cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jayanta K.; Naik, Aishwarya G.; Fessler, Michael B.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Chowdhury, Saiful M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry are now widely used to analyze large-scale protein-protein interactions. The major challenge in cross-linking approaches is the complexity of the mass spectrometric data. New approaches are required that can identify cross-linked peptides with high-confidence and establish a user-friendly analysis protocol for the biomedical scientific community. Here, we introduce a novel cross-linker that can be selectively cleaved in the gas phase using two differential tandem mass-spectrometric fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced or electron transfer dissociation (CID and ETD). This technique produces two signature mass spectra of the same cross-linked peptide, thereby producing high confidence in identifying the sites of interaction. Further tandem mass spectrometry can also give additional confidence on the peptide sequences. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept for this method using standard peptides and proteins. Peptides and proteins were cross-linked and their fragmentation characteristics were analyzed using CID and ETD tandem mass spectrometry. Two sequential cleavages unambiguously identified cross-linked peptides. In addition, the labeling efficiency of the new cross-linker was evaluated in macrophage immune cells after stimulation with the microbial ligand lipopolysaccharide and subsequent pulldown experiments with biotin-avidin affinity chromatography. We believe this strategy will help advance insights into the structural biology and systems biology of cell signaling. PMID:27649375

  3. Identifying the site of spin-trapping in proteins by a combination of liquid chromatography, ELISA and off-line tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lardinois, Olivier M.; Detweiler, Charles D.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mason, Ronald P.; Deterding, Leesa J.

    2008-01-01

    An off-line mass spectrometry method that combines immuno-spin trapping and chromatographic procedures has been developed for selective detection of the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) covalently attached to proteins, an attachment which occurs only subsequent to DMPO trapping of free radicals. In this technique, the protein-DMPO nitrone adducts are digested to peptides with proteolytic agents, peptides from the enzymatic digest are separated by HPLC, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) using polyclonal anti-DMPO nitrone antiserum are used to detect the eluted HPLC fractions that contain DMPO nitrone adducts. The fractions showing positive ELISA signals are then concentrated and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This method, which constitutes the first liquid chromatography-ELISA-mass spectrometry (LC-ELISA-MS)-based strategy for selective identification of DMPO-trapped protein residues in complex peptide mixtures, facilitates location and preparative fractionation of DMPO nitrone adducts for further structural characterization. The strategy is demonstrated for human hemoglobin, horse heart myoglobin and sperm whale myoglobin, three globin proteins known to form DMPO-trappable protein radicals upon treatment with H2O2. The results demonstrate the power of the new experimental strategy to select DMPO-labeled peptides and identify sites of DMPO covalent attachments. PMID:18160050

  4. Application of native-state electrospray mass spectrometry to identify zinc-binding sites on engineered hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Fattor, T J; Lemon, D D; Apostol, I

    2000-09-10

    We report the utility of native-state mass spectrometry to detect zinc ion binding to the engineered hemoglobin rHb52. Various preparations of this recombinant hemoglobin had significantly different oxygen affinities. Detailed characterization of denatured globins did not show any difference between analyzed hemoglobin molecules. However, when solutions of intact hemoglobin pseudotetramers were analyzed by native-state electrospray mass spectrometry, a significant shift in the mass spectrum was observed, indicating labile modification of hemoglobin. Using collision-induced dissociation (CID), we found a mass gain of 63 Da located on the beta-globin. EDTA treatment of modified hemoglobin prior to the infusion removed the modification and restored the predicted oxygen affinity. Ion-trap fragmentation of the +8 charged ion of modified beta-globin showed a neutral loss of 96+/-1 Da, consistent with neutral loss of zinc sulfide. These findings indicated zinc binding to the beta-globin through a cysteine residue. Involvement of Cys93 was confirmed by kinetics of cysteine residue reactivity with dithiodipyridine and peptide mapping. Presence of zinc was confirmed by ICP-MS metal analysis.

  5. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G

    2015-07-31

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter(-1) of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter(-1) for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways.

  6. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline*

    PubMed Central

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter−1 of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter−1 for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  7. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  8. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules.

    PubMed

    Scheubert, Kerstin; Hufsky, Franziska; Böcker, Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    : The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline.

  9. Novel Phenol-soluble Modulin Derivatives in Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Identified through Imaging Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David J.; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Hollands, Andrew; Kersten, Roland; Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Pence, Morgan A.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Derieux, Jaclyn; Moore, Bradley S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Dixon, Jack E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of human disease ranging from localized skin and soft tissue infections to potentially lethal systemic infections. S. aureus has the biosynthetic ability to generate numerous virulence factors that assist in circumventing the innate immune system during disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have uncovered a set of extracellular peptides produced by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) with homology to the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) from Staphylococcus epidermidis. CA-MRSA PSMs contribute to skin infection and recruit and lyse neutrophils, and truncated versions of these peptides possess antimicrobial activity. In this study, novel CA-MRSA PSM derivatives were discovered by the use of microbial imaging mass spectrometry. The novel PSM derivatives are compared with their parent full-length peptides for changes in hemolytic, cytolytic, and neutrophil-stimulating activity. A potential contribution of the major S. aureus secreted protease aureolysin in processing PSMs is demonstrated. Finally, we show that PSM processing occurs in multiple CA-MRSA strains by structural confirmation of additional novel derivatives. This work demonstrates that IMS can serve as a useful tool to go beyond genome predictions and expand our understanding of the important family of small peptide virulence factors. PMID:22371493

  10. Pooled sample strategy in conjunction with high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based background subtraction to identify toxicological markers in dogs treated with ibipinabant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiying; Patrone, Laura; Kozlosky, John; Tomlinson, Lindsay; Cosma, Greg; Horvath, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Metabolomics with chromatography-mass spectrometry is often challenging and relies on statistical tools to discern changes in a metabolome. A pooled sample strategy was proposed, consisting of (1) identification of potential marker candidates by detecting changes of metabolites in a few pooled samples between treated and control groups and (2) validation of markers of statistically significant changes with a large set of individual samples. This strategy was enabled by applying a thorough background subtraction approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry. In a proof-of-principle study, plasma samples were generated and pooled in a 6-week investigational study to identify potential toxicological markers for an observed muscle toxicity associated with the treatment of ibipinabant in dogs. With pooled control samples as backgrounds, potential marker candidates were revealed in the background-subtracted profiles of the pooled ibipinabant-treated samples. After further cleaning with the use of mass defect filtering to exclude drug metabolites and the comparison of profiles between pooled treated samples to eliminate inconsistent peaks, the major biomarker candidates in the profiles were identified to be 19 acylcarnitines. A total of 3 of the 19 acylcarnitines were measured on the set of individual samples to allow for statistical analysis. The results confirmed the significance of acylcarnitine elevations in ibipinabant-treated dogs and indicated that the acylcarnitines could be early markers for the dog-specific toxicity. The advantages of the pooled sample strategy and its potential limitations for metabolomics are discussed.

  11. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A foundation for Environmental Science - Mass Spectrometry: Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies much of the definitive data that environmental scientists rely upon for identifying the molecular compositions (and ultimately the structures) of chemicals. This is not to ignore the complementary, critical roles played by the adjunct practices of sample enrichment (via any of various means of selective extraction) and analyte separation (via the myriad forms of chromatography and electrophoresis).While the power of mass spectrometry has long been highly visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on continued obscurity to the lay public and most non-chemists. Even though mass spectrometry has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing or undergirdidng our existing knowledge about environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is ususally the relevance of ssignificance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the knowledge was acquired. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in

  12. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  13. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  14. Mass spectrometry analysis of intact Francisella bacteria identifies lipid A structure remodeling in response to acidic pH stress.

    PubMed

    Robert, Camille B; Thomson, Michael; Vercellone, Alain; Gardner, Francesca; Ernst, Robert K; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Nigou, Jérôme

    2017-08-12

    Structural modification of lipid A, the lipid anchor of LPS, is one of the strategies used by Gram-negative bacteria to evade host innate immunity. Francisella tularensis is a human pathogen that infects and replicates within phagocytic cells. It produces an atypical lipid A, whose structure precludes an efficient recognition by both innate immune players, TLR4 and cationic antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, a recent report indicates that the lipid A of Francisella (LVS vaccinal strain) undergoes polar modifications when bacteria are grown in human macrophages as compared to in broth. To characterize the structural modifications of lipid A that may be induced intracellularly, Francisella novicida, a surrogate strain for the highly virulent F. tularensis, was submitted to different stress conditions mimicking the harsh environment encountered in the macrophages. To analyze lipid A directly from intact bacteria without any chemical treatment or purification steps, we used a rapid and sensitive MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry approach. Among the many conditions tested, only bacteria exposure to acidic pHs (from 6 to 5) induced a change in lipid A structure. These changes were characterized by an increase in the relative abundance of molecular species bearing an additional hexose unit on the diglucosamine backbone, similar to species present when bacteria are grown under reduced environmental temperature. This lipid A glyco-form, which is observed in trace amounts in normal in vitro growth conditions at 37 °C, may contribute to the intracellular parasitism of macrophages by Francisella. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  15. Scoring Large Scale Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Datasets with MIST

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, Erik; Von Dollen, John; Cimermancic, Peter; Gulbahce, Natali; Sali, Andrej; Krogan, Nevan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments can identify a large number of protein interactions but only a fraction of these interactions are biologically relevant. Here, we describe a comprehensive computational strategy to process raw AP-MS data, perform quality controls and prioritize biologically relevant bait-prey pairs in a set of replicated AP-MS experiments with Mass spectrometry interaction STatistics (MiST). The MiST score is a linear combination of prey quantity (abundance), abundance invariability across repeated experiments (reproducibility), and prey uniqueness relative to other baits (specificity); We describe how to run the full MiST analysis pipeline in an R environment and discuss a number of configurable options that allow the lay user to convert any large-scale AP-MS data into an interpretable, biologically relevant protein-protein interaction network. PMID:25754993

  16. Identifying Differentiation Stage of Individual Primary Hematopoietic Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow by Multivariate Analysis of TOF-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Choi, Ji Sun; Wilson, Robert L.; Harley, Brendan A. C.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple types of blood and immune cells renders hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) valuable for clinical treatment of hematopoietic pathologies and as models of stem cell differentiation for tissue engineering applications. To study directed HSC differentiation and identify the conditions that recreate the native bone marrow environment, combinatorial biomaterials that exhibit lateral variations in chemical and mechanical properties are employed. New experimental approaches are needed to facilitate correlating cell differentiation stage with location in the culture system. We demonstrate that multivariate analysis of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) data can be used to identify the differentiation state of individual hematopoietic cells (HCs) isolated from mouse bone marrow. Here, we identify primary HCs from three distinct stages of B cell lymphopoiesis at the single cell level: HSPCs, common lymphoid progenitors, and mature B cells. The differentiation state of individual HCs in a test set could be identified with a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model that was constructed with calibration spectra from HCs of known differentiation status. The lowest error of identification was obtained when the intra-population spectral variation between the cells in the calibration and test sets was minimized. This approach complements the traditional methods that are used to identify HC differentiation stage. Further, the ability to gather mass spectrometry data from single HSCs cultured on graded biomaterial substrates may provide significant new insight into how HSPCs respond to extrinsic cues as well as the molecular changes that occur during cell differentiation. PMID:22507202

  17. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  18. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  19. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  20. Rapid Screening Technique To Identify Sudan Dyes (I to IV) in Adulterated Tomato Sauce, Chilli Powder, and Palm Oil by Innovative High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Simona; Esposito, Giovanna; Dell'Atti, Luana; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Martucci, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Sudan dyes are synthetic azo dyes used by industry in a variety of applications. Classified as carcinogenic, they are not allowed in foodstuffs; however, their presence as adulterants in food products has been regularly reported. Here, we describe an innovative screening method to detect Sudan I, II, III, and IV in tomato sauce, palm oil, and chilli powder. The method entails minimal sample preparation, completely avoiding the liquid chromatography phase, followed by detection and identification through atmospheric pressure chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in positive ionization mode. Analytes were efficiently identified and detected in samples, fortified both with individual analytes and with their mixture, with an error in mass identification less than 5 ppm. Limits of identification of the analytes in the fortified samples were 0.5 to 1 mg/kg, depending on the dye and matrix. The method had a linear range of 0.05 to 5 mg/kg and good linear relationships (R(2) > 0.98). Repeatability was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation lower than 20%. The method was applied to detect the dyes in real adulterated chilli samples, previously found positive by confirmatory high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and ELISA, and in commercial products purchased from supermarkets. In all positive samples, analytes were correctly identified with an error in mass identification lower than 5 ppm, while none of the 45 commercial samples analyzed were found to be contaminated. The proposed new assay is sensitive, with a limit of identification, for all the three matrices, complying with the limits defined by the European Union (0.5 to 1 mg/kg) for analytical methods. Compared with conventional methods, the new assay is rapid and inexpensive and characterized by a high throughput; thus, it could be suitable as screening technique to identify Sudan dyes in adulterated food products.

  1. A proteomic approach based on peptide affinity chromatography, 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify multiprotein complexes interacting with membrane-bound receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bécamel, Carine; Galéotti, Nathalie; Poncet, Joël; Jouin, Patrick; Dumuis, Aline; Bockaert, Joël

    2002-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that membrane-bound receptors interact with many intracellular proteins. Multiprotein complexes associated with ionotropic receptors have been extensively characterized, but the identification of proteins interacting with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has so far only been achieved in a piecemeal fashion, focusing on one or two protein species. We describe a method based on peptide affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunoblotting to identify the components of multiprotein complexes interacting directly or indirectly with intracellular domains of GPCRs or, more generally, any other membrane-bound receptor. Using this global approach, we have characterized multiprotein complexes that bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2C receptor and are important for its subcellular localization in CNS cells (Bécamel et al., EMBO J., 21(10): 2332, 2002). PMID:12734563

  2. New evidences on efficacy of boronic acid-based derivatization method to identify sugars in plant material by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Faraco, Marianna; Fico, Daniela; Pennetta, Antonio; De Benedetto, Giuseppe E

    2016-10-01

    This work presents an analytical procedure based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry which allows the determination of aldoses (glucose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, xylose, fucose, rhamnose) and chetoses (fructose) in plant material. One peak for each target carbohydrate was obtained by using an efficient derivatization employing methylboronic acid and acetic anhydride sequentially, whereas the baseline separation of the analytes was accomplished using an ionic liquid capillary column. First, the proposed method was optimized and validated. Successively, it was applied to identify the carbohydrates present in plant material. Finally, the procedure was successfully applied to samples from a XVII century painting, thus highlighting the occurrence of starch glue and fruit tree gum as polysaccharide materials.

  3. High-performance mass spectrometry as a drug discovery tool: a high-throughput screening assay to identify RNA-binding ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Drader, Jared J.; Griffey, Richard H.; Hofstadler, Steven A.

    2001-04-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is increasingly being used as a drug discovery tool. We describe the development of a parallel high-throughput screening (HTS) strategy to identify small molecules that bind RNA targets using FTMS as an alternative to classical high-throughput biological screening methods for combinatorial libraries. The Multitarget Affinity/Specificity Screening (MASS) assay takes advantage of the "intrinsic mass" label of each compound and target RNA by employing high resolution, high precision mass measurements. The ability to analyze complex mixtures allows large compound libraries to be screened in the presence of multiple RNA targets simultaneously. The identity of the small molecule(s) which bind, the RNA target to which it binds, the compound-specific binding affinity and the location of the binding site on the RNA can be determined in one set of rapid experiments. The MASS technology detects complexes with dissociation constants of < 5 mM, with high sensitivity.

  4. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  5. Single-cell mass spectrometry with multi-solvent extraction identifies metabolic differences between left and right blastomeres in the 8-cell frog (Xenopus) embryo.

    PubMed

    Onjiko, Rosemary M; Morris, Sydney E; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Single-cell metabolic mass spectrometry enables the discovery (untargeted) analysis of small molecules in individual cells. Using single-cell capillary electrophoresis high-resolution mass spectrometry (CE-HRMS), we recently uncovered small-molecule differences between embryonic cells located along the animal-vegetal and dorsal-ventral axes of the 16-cell frog (Xenopus laevis) embryo, raising the question whether metabolic cell heterogeneity also exists along the left-right body axis. To address this question, we here advance single-cell CE-HRMS for identifying and quantifying metabolites in higher analytical sensitivity, and then use the methodology to compare metabolite production between left and right cells. Our strategy utilizes multiple solvents with complementary physicochemical properties to extract small molecules from single cells and improve electrophoretic separation, increasing metabolite ion signals for quantification and tandem HRMS. As a result, we were able to identify 55 different small molecules in D1 cells that were isolated from 8-cell embryos. To quantify metabolite production between left and right cells, we analyzed n = 24 different D1 cells in technical duplicate-triplicate measurements. Statistical and multivariate analysis based on 80 of the most repeatedly quantified compounds revealed 10 distinct metabolites that were significantly differentially accumulated in the left or right cells (p < 0.05 and fold change ≥1.5). These metabolites were enriched in the arginine-proline metabolic pathway in the right, but not the left D1 cells. Besides providing analytical benefits for single-cell HRMS, this work provides new metabolic data on the establishment of normal body asymmetry in the early developing embryo.

  6. EMERGING POLLUTANTS, MASS SPECTROMETRY, AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically fundamental to amassing our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is the realm of mass spectrometry (MS) - the mainstay of analytical chemistry - the workhorse that supplies definitive data that environmental scientists and engineers reply upon for identifying molecular compositions (and ultimately structures) of chemicals. While the power of MS has long been visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on obscurity to the lay public and many scientists. While MS has played a long, historic (and largely invisible) role in establishing our knowledge of environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is usually the relevance or significance of the knowledge acquired from the application of the tool that has ultimate meaning to the public and science at large - not how the data were acquired. Methods (736/800): Mass Spectrometry and the

  7. An Open Data Format for Visualization and Analysis of Cross-Linked Mass Spectrometry Results.

    PubMed

    Hoopmann, Michael R; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important element in the understanding of protein function, and chemical cross-linking shotgun mass spectrometry is rapidly becoming a routine approach to identify these specific interfaces and topographical interactions. Protein cross-link data analysis is aided by dozens of algorithm choices, but hindered by a lack of a common format for representing results. Consequently, interoperability between algorithms and pipelines utilizing chemical cross-linking remains a challenge. pepXML is an open, widely-used format for representing spectral search algorithm results that has facilitated information exchange and pipeline development for typical shotgun mass spectrometry analyses. We describe an extension of this format to incorporate cross-linking spectral search results. We demonstrate application of the extension by representing results of multiple cross-linking search algorithms. In addition, we demonstrate adapting existing pepXML-supporting software pipelines to analyze protein cross-linking results formatted in pepXML. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  9. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  10. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  11. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  12. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  13. Comparison of N-linked Glycoproteins in Human Whole Saliva, Parotid, Submandibular, and Sublingual Glandular Secretions Identified using Hydrazide Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Prasanna; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Pang, Eric; Yan, Weihong; Wong, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Saliva is a body fluid that holds promise for use as a diagnostic fluid for detecting diseases. Salivary proteins are known to be heavily glycosylated and are known to play functional roles in the oral cavity. We identified N-linked glycoproteins in human whole saliva, as well as the N-glycoproteins in parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glandular fluids. Materials and Methods We employed hydrazide chemistry to affinity enrich for N-linked glycoproteins and glycopeptides. PNGase F releases the N-peptides/proteins from the agarose-hydrazide resin, and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the salivary N-glycoproteins. Results A total of 156 formerly N-glycosylated peptides representing 77 unique N-glycoproteins were identified in salivary fluids. The total number of N-glycoproteins identified in the individual fluids was: 62, 34, 44, and 53 in whole saliva, parotid fluid, submandibular fluid, and sublingual fluid, respectively. The majority of the N-glycoproteins were annotated as extracellular proteins (40%), and several of the N-glycoproteins were annotated as membrane proteins (14%). A number of glycoproteins were differentially found in submandibular and sublingual glandular secretions. Conclusions Mapping the N-glycoproteome of parotid, submandibular, and sublingual saliva is important for a thorough understanding of biological processes occurring in the oral cavity and to realize the role of saliva in the overall health of human individuals. Moreover, identifying glycoproteins in saliva may also be valuable for future disease biomarker studies. PMID:21960768

  14. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  15. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  16. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  17. Hydrocarbons identified in extracts from estuarine water accommodated no. 2 fuel oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Walker, A. L.; Bieri, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented on a computerized gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analysis of methylene chloride and n-heptane extracts of a No. 2 fuel oil accommodated estuarine water sample. The analytical method is briefly described, and the limitations on the identifications are categorized. Some attempt was made to determine major and trace constituents in the water accommodate. Altogether 66 hydrocarbon compounds were identified specifically, and 75 compounds were partially identified. Seven compounds could be recognized as major constituents of the water accommodated oil and ten were present only as traces. The aromatic compounds found were alkyl benzenes, naphthalene, tetralin, indane, biphenyl, fluorene, anthracene, and some of their alkyl substituted isomers in the range of carbon numbers C7 to C15. Four n-alkanes, C10 to C13, were found along with four other assorted hydrocarbons.

  18. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lun, Aaron Tl; Wong, Jason Wh; Downard, Kevin M

    2012-08-20

    Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk.

  19. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  20. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  1. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  2. Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry To Identify Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and Investigate the Epidemiology of an Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Price, Gareth R.; Schooneveldt, Jacqueline M.; Schlebusch, Sanmarié; Tilse, Martyn H.; Urbanski, Tess; Hamilton, Brett; Venter, Deon

    2012-01-01

    The control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has become an increasing burden on health care resources since their discovery over 20 years ago. Current techniques employed for their detection include time-consuming and laborious phenotypic methods or molecular methods requiring costly equipment and consumables and highly trained staff. An accurate, rapid diagnostic test has the ability to greatly reduce the spread of this organism, which has the ability to colonize patients for long periods, potentially even lifelong. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a technology with the ability to identify organisms in seconds and has shown promise in the identification of other forms of antimicrobial resistance in other organisms. Here we show that MALDI-TOF MS is capable of rapidly and accurately identifying vanB-positive Enterococcus faecium VRE from susceptible isolates. Internal validation of the optimal model generated produced a sensitivity of 92.4% and a specificity of 85.2%. Prospective validation results, following incorporation into the routine laboratory work flow, demonstrated a greater sensitivity and specificity at 96.7% and 98.1%, respectively. In addition, the utilization of MALDI-TOF MS to determine the relatedness of isolates contributing to an outbreak is also demonstrated. PMID:22740710

  3. Multicenter matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) identifies proteomic differences in breast-cancer-associated stroma.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Tim J A; Balluff, Benjamin D; Jones, Emrys A; Schöne, Cédrik D; Schmitt, Manfred; Aubele, Michaela; Kroep, Judith R; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Mesker, Wilma E; Walch, Axel; McDonnell, Liam A

    2014-11-07

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has rapidly established itself as a powerful biomarker discovery tool. To date, no formal investigation has assessed the center-to-center comparability of MALDI MSI experiments, an essential step for it to develop into a new diagnostic method. To test such capabilities, we have performed a multicenter study focused on biomarkers of stromal activation in breast cancer. MALDI MSI experiments were performed in two centers using independent tissue banks, infrastructure, methods, and practitioners. One of the data sets was used for discovery and the other for validation. Areas of intra- and extratumoral stroma were selected, and their protein signals were compared. Four protein signals were found to be significantly associated with tumor-associated stroma in the discovery data set measured in Munich. Three of these peaks were also detected in the independent validation data set measured in Leiden, all of which were also significantly associated with intratumoral stroma. Hierarchical clustering displayed 100% accuracy in the Munich MSI data set and 80.9% accuracy in the Leiden MSI data set. The association of one of the identified mass signals (PA28) with stromal activation was confirmed with immunohistochemistry performed on 20 breast tumors. Independent and international MALDI MSI investigations could identify validated biomarkers of stromal activation.

  4. Using Vitek MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to identify species belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex: a relevant alternative to molecular biology?

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, Hélène; Daure, Sophie; Eveillard, Matthieu; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii belongs to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex (Acb) containing 2 other pathogenic species: Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. Identification of these bacteria remains problematic despite the use of matrix-assisted laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Here, we enriched the SARAMIS™ database of the Vitek MS® plus mass spectrometer to improve the identification of species of the Acb complex. For each species, we incremented reference spectra. Then, a SuperSpectrum was created based on the selection of 40 specific masses. In a second step, we validated reference spectra and SuperSpectra with 100 isolates identified by rpoB gene sequencing. All the isolates were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS with the database we created as compared to the identifications obtained by rpoB sequencing. Our database enabled rapid and reliable identification of the pathogen species belonging to the Acb complex. Identification by MALDI-TOF MS with our database is a good alternative to molecular biology.

  5. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Clausen, P A; Knudsen, H N; Larsen, K; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K

    2008-11-14

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9h(-1) and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting. Emission samples for TD-GC-O/MS analysis from the FLEC were on Tenax TA. Although many volatile VOCs were detected by MS, only the odor active VOCs are reported here. In total, 142 odor active VOCs were detected in the emissions from the oils. About 50 of the odor active VOCs were identified or tentatively identified by GC-MS. While 92 VOCs were detected from the oil used in the floor oil, only 13 were detected in the low-odor linseed oil. The major odor active VOCs were aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Spearmen rank correlation of the GC-O profiles showed that the odor profile of the linseed oil likely influenced the odor profile of the floor oil based on this linseed oil.

  6. Identifying the metabolic perturbations in earthworm induced by cypermethrin using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ch, Ratnasekhar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Pandey, Pathya; Saxena, Prem Narain; Reddy Mudiam, Mohana Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Globally, cypermethrin is one of the most widely used synthetic pyrethroid for agricultural and domestic purposes. Most part of the pesticides used in the agriculture ends up as residues in the soil, making soil dwelling organisms, especially earthworms more susceptible to pesticide intoxication. Cypermethrin is known to be a neurotoxicant to many model organisms, including mammals and insects, but such type of toxicity evidence is not available for invertebrate systems like earthworms. In the present work, metabolomics based approach was utilized to identify the toxic mechanism of action of cypermethrin on earthworm (Metaphire posthuma) and these were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cypermethrin such as 2.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg (1/40th, 1/20th, 1/10th and 1/5th of LC50, respectively) for fourteen days. The results revealed that 22 metabolites (mainly fatty acids, sugars and amino acids) were shown significant responses in the exposed earthworms and these responses are dose dependent. It is proposed that mainly carbohydrate and fatty acids in neural system metabolism was disturbed. Overall, the results provided that metabolomics can be an effective tool to understand the effects of cypermethrin on the metabolic responses of earthworm Metaphire posthuma. PMID:26514086

  7. Photochemically induced changes in dissolved organic matter identified by ultrahigh resolution fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonsior, Michael; Peake, Barrie M; Cooper, William T; Podgorski, David; D'Andrilli, Juliana; Cooper, William J

    2009-02-01

    Sunlight-induced molecular changes have been observed in two samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in the Cape Fear River system, North Carolina, USA. The molecular composition of a water sample collected in the Black River (sample B210, salinity 0) and another water sample collected within the Cape Fear River estuary (sample M61, salinity 13.7) were analyzed using an ultrahigh resolution 9.4 Tesla (T) electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Additionally, the Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/vis) absorbance as well as the excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra were determined to identify changes in the optical properties associated with photochemical reactions of the chromophoric DOM (CDOM). The molecular formulas forthe Cape Fear River Estuary (M61) sample before the irradiation experiments indicated the presence of highly aromatic compounds which were not present in the unirradiated Black River sample (B210). These aromatic compounds, with oxygen-subtracted double bond equivalents (DBE-O) values greater than nine, are more photoreactive and readily photodegraded relative to saturated compounds. Compounds with DBE-O values below nine are less photoreactive. The UV/vis absorbance and EEM fluorescence results supported this different photodegradation behavior, suggesting that the photoreactivity of CDOM is highly dependent on the molecular composition of the CDOM.

  8. Identifying unknown by-products in drinking water using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry and in silico toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Donghong; Li, Na; Luo, Qian; Xu, Xiong; Wang, Zijian

    2016-11-01

    Improvements in extraction and detection technologies have increased our abilities to identify new disinfection by-products (DBPs) over the last 40 years. However, most previous studies combined DBP identification and measurement efforts with toxicology to address concerns on a few expected DBPs, making it difficult to better define the health risk from the individual DBPs. In this study, a nontargeted screening method involving comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC × GC-qMS) combined with OECD QSAR Toolbox Ver. 3.2 was developed for identifying and prioritizing of volatile and semi-volatile DBPs in drinking water. The method was successfully applied to analyze DBPs formed during chlorination, chloramination or ozonation of the raw water. Over 500 compounds were tentatively identified in each sample, showing the superior performance of this analytical technique. A total of 170 volatile and semi-volatile DBPs representing fourteen chemical classes were then identified, according to the criteria that the DBP was presented in the duplicate treated samples. The genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of the DBPs were evaluated using Toolbox, and 58 DBPs were found to be actual or potential genotoxicants. The accuracy of the compound identification was determined by comparing 47 identified compounds with commercially available standards. About 90% (41 of the 47) of the compounds that were automatically identified using the library were correct. The results show that GC×GC-qMS coupled with a quantitative structure-activity relationship model is a powerful and fast nontargeted screening technique for compounds. The method and results provide us a new idea for identification and prioritization of DBPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Usefulness and accuracy of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a supplementary tool to identify mosquito vector species and to invest in development of international database.

    PubMed

    Raharimalala, F N; Andrianinarivomanana, T M; Rakotondrasoa, A; Collard, J M; Boyer, S

    2017-09-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality. The identification of vector species relies mainly on morphological features and/or molecular biology tools. The first method requires specific technical skills and may result in misidentifications, and the second method is time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study is to assess the usefulness and accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a supplementary tool with which to identify mosquito vector species and to invest in the creation of an international database. A total of 89 specimens belonging to 10 mosquito species were selected for the extraction of proteins from legs and for the establishment of a reference database. A blind test with 123 mosquitoes was performed to validate the MS method. Results showed that: (a) the spectra obtained in the study with a given species differed from the spectra of the same species collected in another country, which highlights the need for an international database; (b) MALDI-TOF MS is an accurate method for the rapid identification of mosquito species that are referenced in a database; (c) MALDI-TOF MS allows the separation of groups or complex species, and (d) laboratory specimens undergo a loss of proteins compared with those isolated in the field. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is a useful supplementary tool for mosquito identification and can help inform vector control. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  10. CaMKII Phosphorylation of Na(V)1.5: Novel in Vitro Sites Identified by Mass Spectrometry and Reduced S516 Phosphorylation in Human Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Herren, Anthony W; Weber, Darren M; Rigor, Robert R; Margulies, Kenneth B; Phinney, Brett S; Bers, Donald M

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(V)1.5, drives the upstroke of the cardiac action potential and is a critical determinant of myocyte excitability. Recently, calcium (Ca(2+))/calmodulin(CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has emerged as a critical regulator of Na(V)1.5 function through phosphorylation of multiple residues including S516, T594, and S571, and these phosphorylation events may be important for the genesis of acquired arrhythmias, which occur in heart failure. However, phosphorylation of full-length human Na(V)1.5 has not been systematically analyzed and Na(V)1.5 phosphorylation in human heart failure is incompletely understood. In the present study, we used label-free mass spectrometry to assess phosphorylation of human Na(V)1.5 purified from HEK293 cells with full coverage of phosphorylatable sites and identified 23 sites that were phosphorylated by CaMKII in vitro. We confirmed phosphorylation of S516 and S571 by LC-MS/MS and found a decrease in S516 phosphorylation in human heart failure, using a novel phospho-specific antibody. This work furthers our understanding of the phosphorylation of Na(V)1.5 by CaMKII under normal and disease conditions, provides novel CaMKII target sites for functional validation, and provides the first phospho-proteomic map of full-length human Na(V)1.5.

  11. A High-Throughput Screen to Identify LRRK2 Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease Using RapidFire Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leveridge, Melanie; Collier, Lee; Edge, Colin; Hardwicke, Phil; Leavens, Bill; Ratcliffe, Steve; Rees, Mike; Stasi, Luigi Piero; Nadin, Alan; Reith, Alastair D

    2016-02-01

    LRRK2 is a large multidomain protein containing two functional enzymatic domains: a GTPase domain and a protein kinase domain. Dominant coding mutations in the LRRK2 protein are associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among such pathogenic mutations, Gly2019Ser mutation in the LRRK2 kinase domain is the most frequent cause of familial PD in Caucasians and is also found in some apparently sporadic PD cases. This mutation results in 2- to 3-fold elevated LRRK2 kinase activity compared with wild type, providing a clear clinical hypothesis for the application of kinase inhibitors in the treatment of this disease. To date, reported screening assays for LRRK2 have been based on detection of labeled adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate or on antibody-based detection of phosphorylation events. While these assays do offer a high-throughput method of monitoring LRRK2 kinase activity, they are prone to interference from autofluorescent compounds and nonspecific events. Here we describe a label-free assay for LRRK2 kinase activity using the RapidFire mass spectrometry system. This assay format was found to be highly robust and enabled a screen of 100,000 lead-like small molecules. The assay successfully identified a number of known LRRK2 chemotypes that met stringent physicochemical criteria.

  12. Identifying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infections in mice via breath analysis using secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Jackson C.; Hill, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious health threat, causing an estimated 11,000 deaths per year in the United States. MRSA pneumonias account for 16% of invasive infections, and can be difficult to detect as the current state-of-the-art diagnostics require that bacterial DNA is recovered from the infection site. Because 60% of patients with invasive infections die within 7 days of culturing positive for MRSA, earlier detection of the pathogen may significantly reduce mortality. We aim to develop breath-based diagnostics that can detect Staphylococcal lung infections rapidly and non-invasively, and discriminate MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), in situ. Using a murine lung infection model, we have demonstrated that secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprinting can be used to robustly identify isogenic strains of MRSA and MSSA in the lung 24 h after bacterial inoculation. Principal components analysis (PCA) separates MRSA and MSSA breathprints using only the first component (p < 0.001). The predominant separation in the PCA is driven by shared peaks, low-abundance peaks, and rare peaks, supporting the use of biomarker panels to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of breath-based diagnostics. PMID:25307159

  13. Novel glutathione conjugates of phenyl isocyanate identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Johansson Mali'n, Tove; Lindberg, Sandra; Åstot, Crister

    2014-01-01

    Phenyl isocyanate is a highly reactive compound that is used as a reagent in organic synthesis and in the production of polyurethanes. The potential for extensive occupational exposure to this compound makes it important to elucidate its reactivity towards different nucleophiles and potential targets in the body. In vitro reactions between glutathione and phenyl isocyanate were studied. Three adducts of glutathione with phenyl isocyanate were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Mass spectrometric data for these adducts have not previously been reported. Nucleophilic attack on phenyl isocyanate occurred via either the cysteinyl thiol group or the glutamic acid α-amino group of glutathione. In addition, a double adduct was formed by the reaction of both these moieties. NMR analysis confirmed the proposed structure of the double adduct, which has not previously been described. These results suggest that phenyl isocyanate may react with free cysteines, the α-amino group and also with lysine residues whose side chain contains a primary amine.

  14. A novel approach to identify plant parasitic nematodes using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perera, Modika R; Vanstone, Vivien A; Jones, Michael G K

    2005-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes are difficult to identify because different species are morphologically similar, and this makes their control more difficult. The aim of this work was to develop a rapid, simple method to identify plant parasitic nematodes, based on analysis of protein profiles of nematodes generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). Two methods have been used: grinding and direct analysis of intact nematodes. Both methods were standardised using the nematode Anguina tritici (wheat seed-gall nematode) as a model. Development of the approach involved optimisation of experimental parameters to generate reproducible diagnostic protein profiles for plant parasitic nematodes. With alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as the matrix, the most effective solvent extraction was with 90% acetone. With sinapinic acid (SA) as matrix, 90% ethanol was most effective. When intact nematodes were analysed directly by mixing with the matrix solution, 40 min extraction with CHCA matrix solution generated the best protein profiles. The standardised methods were applied to analyse the seed-gall nematodes A. tritici and A. funesta and to the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, which infects many horticultural crops. Typical protein profiles and diagnostic peaks were identified for these nematode species and for mixtures of Anguina species. The results provide 'proof-of-concept' that these nematode species can be identified by protein profiling using MALDI-TOFMS. This new approach could be extended to identify other plant and non-plant parasitic nematodes. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  15. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify contaminants in water: an insight on environmental forensics.

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julian; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2014-06-06

    Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqTOF-MS) acquiring full scan MS data for quantification, and automatic data dependent information product ion spectra (IDA-MS/MS) without any predefinition of the ions by the user was checked for identifying organic contaminants in water samples. The use of a database with more than 2000 compounds achieved high confidence results for a wide number of contaminants based upon retention time, accurate mass, isotopic pattern and MS/MS library searching. More than 20 contaminants, mostly pharmaceuticals, but also mycotoxins and polyphenols were unambiguously identified. Furthermore, the combination of statistical data analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by empirical formula calculation, on-line database searching and MS/MS fragment ion interpretation achieves not only the successful detection of unknown contaminants but also the selection of those relevant to different types of waters. Unknown compounds, such as C₂₀H₃₄O₃, were identified in waste water showing the prospects of this technique. A group of 42 currently used pesticides were selected as target compounds to evaluate the quantitative possibilities. Mean recoveries and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD) were 48-79% (4-20% RSD). The limit of detections ranged from 0.02 to 2 ng L(-1), with a validated limit of quantification of 2 ng L(-1) for water after solid-phase (SPE) isolation and concentration. The quantitative data obtained using UHPLC-QqTOF-MS were compared with those obtained using conventional LC-MS/MS with a triple quadrupole (QqQ). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identifies 90% of bacteria directly from blood culture vials.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, W; Jaulhac, B; Hoffmann, A-M; Ludes, B; Kostrzewa, M; Riegel, P; Prévost, G

    2010-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now widely used for marker/multi-biomarker detection in medical diagnosis. We tested a new protocol for bacterial identification from blood culture broths in hospital routine by using collection tubes with separator gels on 503 included samples examined over 3 months, where 1.5 mL was injected by a syringe into BD Vacutainer tubes from BACTEC-positive bottles, before processing for bacterial protein extraction. Samples were loaded in duplicate onto the MALDI MS target, allowing a series of 12 samples to be processed in duplicate within 80 min by using Biflex III and BioTyper 2.0 software (Bruker). Including polymicrobial samples, 193 of 213 of Gram-negative bacteria (91.08%) and 284 of 319 of Gram-positive bacteria (89.02%) were correctly identified at the species level. Enterobacteriaceae constituted 35.15% of all species found, Staphylococaceae 37.96%, Streptococaceae and Enterococaceae 20.85%, Pseudomonadaceae 1.69%, and anaerobes 2.44%. In most of the polymicrobial samples, one of the species present was identified (80.9%). Seven isolates remained misidentified as Streptococcus pneumoniae, all belonging to Streptococcus mitis. Staphylococcus aureus was identified better when grown on anaero-aerobic medium, and MALDI BioTyper identification scores as low as 1.4 were pertinent, provided that four successive proposals of the same species were given. This new protocol correlates with conventional microbiology procedures by up to 90%, and by >95% for only monomicrobial samples, and provides a decreased turn-around time for identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures, making this technology suitable also for blood cultures, with less delay and cost decreases in bacterial diagnostics, and favouring better care of patients.

  17. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  18. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  19. Hybrid instruments for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to refine further the technique of mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry efforts are being made to combine the desirable features of sector based tandem instruments with those of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. This has resulted in the construction of tandem mass spectrometers which incorporate both sector type analyzers and quadrupole mass filters. These so-called hybrid instruments, designed specifically for mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry applications, are appearing in a variety of geometries each with unique features. This review describes the hybrid instruments reported to data and discusses general considerations for evaluating hybrid instruments with regard to application. 100 references.

  20. Correlation of mass spectrometry identified bacterial biomarkers from a fielded pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry biodetector with the microbiological gram stain classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A Peter; Dworzanski, Jacek P; Tripathi, Ashish; Maswadeh, Waleed M; Wick, Charles H

    2004-11-01

    A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (Py-GC-IMS) briefcase system has been shown to detect and classify deliberately released bioaerosols in outdoor field scenarios. The bioaerosols included Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, MS-2 coliphage virus, and ovalbumin protein species. However, the origin and structural identities of the pyrolysate peaks in the GC-IMS data space, their microbiological information content, and taxonomic importance with respect to biodetection have not been determined. The present work interrogates the identities of the peaks by inserting a time-of-flight mass spectrometry system in parallel with the IMS detector through a Tee connection in the GC module. Biological substances producing ion mobility peaks from the pyrolysis of microorganisms were identified by their GC retention time, matching of their electron ionization mass spectra with authentic standards, and the National Institutes for Standards and Technology mass spectral database. Strong signals from 2-pyridinecarboxamide were identified in Bacillus samples including Bacillus anthracis, and its origin was traced to the cell wall peptidoglycan macromolecule. 3-Hydroxymyristic acid is a component of lipopolysaccharides in the cell walls of Gram-negative organisms. The Gram-negative Escherichia coli organism showed significant amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid derivatives and degradation products in Py-GC-MS analyses. Some of the fatty acid derivatives were observed in very low abundance in the ion mobility spectra, and the higher boiling lipid species were absent. Evidence is presented that the Py-GC-ambient temperature and pressure-IMS system generates and detects bacterial biochemical information that can serve as components of a biological classification scheme directly correlated to the Gram stain reaction in microorganism taxonomy.

  1. Identifying interacting proteins of a Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1 using GFP-Trap and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Yin, Jiang-An; Cai, Shi-Qing

    2014-06-25

    Chloride channels belong to a superfamily of ion channels that permit passive passage of anions, mainly chloride, across cell membrane. They play a variety of important physiological roles in regulation of cytosolic pH, cell volume homeostasis, organic solute transport, cell migration, cell proliferation, and differentiation. However, little is known about the functional regulation of these channels. In this study, we generated an integrated transgenic worm strain expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused CLC-type chloride channel 1 (CLH-1::GFP), a voltage-gated chloride channel in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). CLH-1::GFP was expressed in some unidentified head neurons and posterior intestinal cells of C. elegans. Interacting proteins of CLH-1::GFP were purified by GFP-Trap, a novel system for efficient isolation of GFP fusion proteins and their interacting factors. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that a total of 27 high probability interacting proteins were co-trapped with CLHp-1::GFP. Biochemical evidence showed that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (EEF-1), one of these co-trapped proteins identified by MS, physically interacted with CLH-1, in consistent with GFP-Trap experiments. Further immunostaining data revealed that the protein level of CLH-1 was significantly increased upon co-expression with EEF-1. These results suggest that the combination of GFP-Trap purification with MS is an excellent tool to identify novel interacting proteins of voltage-gated chloride channels in C. elegans. Our data also show that EEF-1 is a regulator of voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1.

  2. Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Identify Key Interactions in the HER2-HER3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Interface* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy S.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Sept, David; Bose, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase is a driver oncogene in many human cancers, including breast and gastric cancer. Under physiologic levels of expression, HER2 heterodimerizes with other members of the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB family, and the HER2-HER3 dimer forms one of the most potent oncogenic receptor pairs. Previous structural biology studies have individually crystallized the kinase domains of HER2 and HER3, but the HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimer structure has yet to be solved. Using a reconstituted membrane system to form HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimers and carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry, we observed that HER2 and HER3 kinase domains preferentially form asymmetric heterodimers with HER3 and HER2 monomers occupying the donor and acceptor kinase positions, respectively. Conformational changes in the HER2 activation loop, as measured by changes in carboxyl group labeling, required both dimerization and nucleotide binding but did not require activation loop phosphorylation at Tyr-877. Molecular dynamics simulations on HER2-HER3 kinase dimers identify specific inter- and intramolecular interactions and were in good agreement with MS measurements. Specifically, several intermolecular ionic interactions between HER2 Lys-716-HER3 Glu-909, HER2 Glu-717-HER3 Lys-907, and HER2 Asp-871-HER3 Arg-948 were identified by molecular dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of the cancer-associated mutations HER2 D769H/D769Y, HER3 E909G, and HER3 R948K (also numbered HER3 E928G and R967K) on kinase activity in the context of this new structural model. This study provides valuable insights into the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB kinase structure and interactions, which can guide the design of future therapies. PMID:23843458

  3. Identifying drug metallation sites on peptides using electron transfer dissociation (ETD), collision induced dissociation (CID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS).

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan P; Brown, Jeffery M; Campuzano, Iain; Sadler, Peter J

    2010-08-14

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) have been used to locate the precise binding sites for platinum and ruthenium anticancer complexes on the peptide Substance P. We show that ETD combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry significantly reduces mass spectral complexity and improves the S/N of the product-ions formed.

  4. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  5. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Wruck, Colin D.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript ( As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10-9 M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level.

  6. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Wruck, Colin D; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript (As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10(-9) M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  8. Tandem mass spectrometry, but not T-cell receptor excision circle analysis, identifies newborns with late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Duse, Marzia; Malvagia, Sabrina; Lippi, Francesca; Funghini, Silvia; Bianchi, Leila; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Valleriani, Claudia; Ombrone, Daniela; Moriondo, Maria; Villanelli, Fabio; Speckmann, Carsten; Adams, Stuart; Gaspar, Bobby H; Hershfield, Michael; Santisteban, Ines; Fairbanks, Lynette; Ragusa, Giovanni; Resti, Massimo; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Azzari, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by genetic variants that disrupt the function of ADA. In its early-onset form, it is rapidly fatal to infants. Delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID is characterized by insidious progressive immunodeficiency that leads to permanent organ damage or death. Quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or tandem mass spectrometry (tandem-MS) analysis of dried blood spots (DBSs) collected at birth can identify newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and are used in screening programs. However, it is not clear whether these analyses can identify newborns who will have delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID before symptoms appear. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate whether tandem-MS and quantitative TREC analyses of DBSs could identify newborns who had delayed-onset ADA-SCID later in life. We tested stored DBSs collected at birth from 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID using tandem-MS (PCT EP2010/070517) to evaluate levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine and real-time PCR to quantify TREC levels. We also analyzed DBSs from 3 newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and 2 healthy newborn carriers of ADA deficiency. The DBSs taken at birth from the 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID had adenosine levels of 10, 25, and 19 μmol/L (normal value, <1.5 μmol/L) and 2'-deoxyadenosine levels of 0.7, 2.7, and 2.4 μmol/L (normal value, <0.07 μmol/L); the mean levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine were respectively 12.0- and 27.6-fold higher than normal values. DBSs taken at birth from all 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA deficiency had normal TREC levels, but TRECs were undetectable in blood samples taken from the same patients at the time of diagnosis. Tandem-MS but not TREC quantification identifies newborns with delayed- or late-onset ADA deficiency. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A feasibility study to identify proteins in the residual Pap test fluid of women with normal cytology by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The proteomic analysis of body fluids is a growing technology for the identification of protein biomarkers of disease. Given that Papanicolaou tests (Pap tests) are routinely performed on over 30 million women annually in the U.S. to screen for cervical cancer, we examined the residual Pap test fluid as a source of protein for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In the liquid-based Pap test, cervical cells are collected from the ectocervix and placed into an alcohol-based fixative prior to staining and pathologic examination. We hypothesized that proteins shed by cells of the female genital tract can be detected in the Pap test fixative by MS-based proteomic techniques. We examined the feasibility of using residual fluid from discarded Pap tests with cytologically “normal” results to optimize sample preparation for MS analysis. The protein composition of the cell-free Pap test fluid was determined by silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate -polyacrylamide gels, and the abundance of serum proteins was examined by Western immunoblot using an antibody against human serum albumin. Both pooled and individual samples were trypsin digested and analyzed by two-dimensional MS/MS. Proteins were identified by searching against the Human Uniprot database, and characterized for localization, function and relative abundance. Results The average volume of the residual Pap test fluid was 1.5 ml and the average protein concentration was 0.14 mg/ml. By Western immunoblot we showed that the amount of albumin in each sample was significantly reduced compared to normal serum. By MS/MS, we identified 714 unique proteins in pooled Pap test samples and an average of 431 proteins in individual samples. About 40% of the proteins identified were extracellular or localized to the plasma membrane. Almost 20% of the proteins identified were involved in immunity and defense, characteristic of the healthy cervical-vaginal proteome. By merging the protein sets from the

  10. Neuropeptides of the beetle, Tenebrio molitor identified using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and deduced sequences from the Tribolium castaneum genome.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert J; Audsley, Neil

    2008-02-01

    Four neuropeptides were identified from the brain and corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (CC-CA) of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and information derived from the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Leucomyosuppressin (a FLRFamide), previously associated with cockroaches, but also subsequently identified from honey bee seen as a prominent peptide in both brain and CC-CA of T.molitor. A coding sequence for this peptide is found in the genome of T. castaneum. In addition, three FXPRLamides (pyrokinins), provisionally Tenmo-PK-1, Tenmo-PK-2 and Tenmo-PK-3 (HVVNFTPRLamide, SPPFAPRLamide, HL(I)SPFSPRLamide) were identified in both CC-CA and brain of T. molitor, again on the basis of predicted occurrence or similarity in T. castaneum. The sequence of Tenmo-PK-2 is the same as the PK-2 of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Other peptides readily predicted from the genome of T. castaneum include two AKH/HrTH peptides (Trica-AKH-1; pELNFSTDWamide and Trica-AKH-2; pELNFTPNWamide), the second of which is identical to Pyrap-AKH, an AKH-related peptide (Trica AKH-L; pEVTFSRDWPamide), two CRF-related diuretic factors (Trica-DH 37 and Trica-DH 47), the latter identical to Tenmo-DH 47, a putative antidiuretic factor (Trica-ADFb; LYDDGSYKPHVYGF-OH), two sulfakinin-like peptides (Trica-SK-1; pETSDDY(SO(3))GHLRFamide, and Trica SK-2; GEEPFDDYGHMRFamide), a potential allatostatin-C (Trica-AS; pESRYRQCYFNPISCF-OH), six allatostatin-B/myoinhibitory peptides (Trica-AST-B-1,2,3,4,5 & 6; DWNKDLHIWamide, GWNNLHEGWamide, AWQSLQSGWamide, NWGQFHGGWamide, SKWDNFRGSWamide, EPAWSNLGIWamide), an allatotropin-like peptide (Trica-ATL; GIEALKYHNMDLGTARGYamide), four 'CAPA'-related peptides (Trica-CAPA-1,2,3,4; NKLASVYALTPSLRVamide, RIGKMVSFPRIamide, PGANSGGMWFGPRLamide, SENFTPWAYIILNGEAPIIREVHYSPRLamide), proctolin (RYLPT), a potential SIFamide (Trica-SIFa; TYRKPPFNGSIFamide), an

  11. Mass spectrometry: a revolution in clinical microbiology?

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Espinal, Paula; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Messad, Nourredine; Pantel, Alix; Sotto, Albert

    2013-02-01

    Recently, different bacteriological laboratory interventions that decrease reporting time have been developed. These promising new broad-based techniques have merit, based on their ability to identify rapidly many bacteria, organisms difficult to grow or newly emerging strains, as well as their capacity to track disease transmission. The benefit of rapid reporting of identification and/or resistance of bacteria can greatly impact patient outcomes, with an improvement in the use of antibiotics, in the reduction of the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and in mortality rates. Different techniques revolve around mass spectrometry (MS) technology: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), PCR combined with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESIMS), iPLEX MassArray system and other new evolutions combining different techniques. This report emphasizes the (r)evolution of these technologies in clinical microbiology.

  12. Metaproteomics: Harnessing the power of high performance mass spectrometry to identify the suite of proteins that control metabolic activities in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Chourey, Karuna; Giannone, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The availability of extensive genome information for many different microbes, including unculturable species in mixed communities from environmental samples, has enabled systems-biology interrogation by providing a means to access genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic information. To this end, metaproteomics exploits the power of high performance mass spectrometry for extensive characterization of the complete suite of proteins expressed by a microbial community in an environmental sample. PMID:23469896

  13. Clinical significance of coryneform Gram-positive rods from blood identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and their susceptibility profiles - a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Ammara; Chen, Derrick J; Strand, Gregory J; Dylla, Brenda L; Cole, Nicolynn C; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Patel, Robin

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), most Gram-positive rods (GPRs) are readily identified; however, their clinical relevance in blood cultures remains unclear. Herein, we assessed the clinical significance of GPRs isolated from blood and identified in the era of MALDI-TOF MS. A retrospective chart review of patients presenting to the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, from January 1, 2013, to October 13, 2015, was performed. Any episode of a positive blood culture for a GPR was included. We assessed the number of bottles positive for a given isolate, time to positivity of blood cultures, patient age, medical history, interpretation of culture results by the healthcare team and whether infectious diseases consultation was obtained. We also evaluated the susceptibility profiles of a larger collection of GPRs tested in the clinical microbiology laboratory of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN from January 1, 2013, to October 31, 2015. There were a total of 246 GPRs isolated from the blood of 181 patients during the study period. 56% (n = 101) were deemed contaminants by the healthcare team and were not treated; 33% (n = 59) were clinically determined to represent true bacteremia and were treated; and 8% (n = 14) were considered of uncertain significance, with patients prescribed treatment regardless. Patient characteristics associated with an isolate being treated on univariate analysis included younger age (P = 0.02), identification to the species level (P = 0.02), higher number of positive blood culture sets (P < 0.0001), lower time to positivity (P < 0.0001), immunosuppression (P = 0.03), and recommendation made by an infectious disease consultant (P = 0.0005). On multivariable analysis, infectious diseases consultation (P = 0.03), higher number of positive blood culture sets (P = 0.0005) and lower time to positivity (P = 0.03) were associated with an isolate being treated. 100, 83, 48 and 34% of GPRs

  14. International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS).

    PubMed

    Cooks, R G; Gelpi, E; Nibbering, N M

    2001-02-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the recently formalized International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS). It is presented here in order to increase awareness of the opportunities for collaboration in mass spectrometry in an international context. It also describes the recent 15th International Mass Spectrometry Conference, held August/September 2000, in Barcelona. Each of the authors is associated with the IMSS. The 15th Conference, which covers all of mass spectrometry on a triennial basis, was chaired by Professor Emilio Gelpi of the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Barcelona. The outgoing and founding President of the IMSS is Professor Graham Cooks, Purdue University, and the incoming President is Professor Nico Nibbering, University of Amsterdam. Similar material has been provided to the Editors of other journals that cover mass spectrometry.

  15. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  16. Neuroscience and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, Magnus; Buchholz, Bruce A; Hillegonds, Darren J; Vogel, John S

    2005-02-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had a great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as 3H, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 41Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, allowing safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 microg kg(-1)). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the time-scale of decades. We review here how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  17. Clinical and microbiological features of a cystic fibrosis patient chronically colonized with Pandoraea sputorum identified by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, A; Morosini, M I; Lamas, A; García-Castillo, M; García-García, L; Cantón, R; Máiz, L

    2012-03-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment.

  18. Comparison of the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with that of other commercial identification systems for identifying Staphylococcus saprophyticus in urine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Lee, Hao; Chen, Chung-Ming; Du, Shin-Hei; Cheng, Ya-Chih; Hsu, Chen-Ching; Chung, Meng-Yu; Teng, Shih-Hua; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2013-05-01

    Among 30 urinary isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified by sequencing methods, the rate of accurate identification was 100% for Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 86.7% for the Phoenix PID and Vitek 2 GP systems, 93.3% for the MicroScan GP33 system, and 46.7% for the BBL CHROMagar Orientation system.

  19. Clinical and Microbiological Features of a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Chronically Colonized with Pandoraea sputorum Identified by Combining 16S rRNA Sequencing and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, A.; Morosini, M. I.; Lamas, A.; García-Castillo, M.; García-García, L.; Máiz, L.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment. PMID:22170922

  20. Characterizing Low Molecular Weight Organic Matter in Arctic Polygonal Tundra Soils to Identify Biogeochemical Hotspots Using a Dual-Separation, High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, M.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Iversen, C. M.; Hettich, R.

    2016-12-01

    Reliably modeling biogeochemical processes (e.g. decomposition, plant-microbial competition for nutrients) across spatial or temporal scales requires elucidating the chemical composition of low molecular weight (LMW) dissolved soil organic matter (DOM). Our understanding is limited, however, by the wide-ranging physicochemical properties and high fluxes of these compounds, posing major challenges in detection, isolation, and quantification. Here, we developed and evaluated a sensitive, non-targeted approach to characterize LMW DOM in the Arctic, a unique system that is warming at a rate twice that of the global average and may have significant feedbacks to global C and N cycles. Soil cores were collected from a continuous permafrost, polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska (71° 16' N) and sectioned into 5 cm increments. Water and salt extracts from each section were filtered and injected onto C18 reversed-phase or zwitterionic-type hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ZIC-pHILIC) columns for separation. LMW DOM profiles were obtained using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), and unique features, known and unknown, were characterized by LC retention time, accurate mass (m/z), and molecular fragmentation pattern. Coupling two orthogonal chromatographic separations with HRMS enabled the characterization of hundreds of analytes in a single measurement providing enhanced, high-throughput coverage of LMW DOM from soil extracts. The complexity and relative/absolute intensities of LMW DOM features (e.g. organic acids, amino sugars, peptides) varied across polygon type (high- or low-centered), extract condition, and with depth, providing an information-rich, molecular signal of LMW DOM availability across scales. Comprehensively profiling this complex mixture of small molecules of both biotic and abiotic origin provides a chemical signature of biological function, allowing for more reliable predictions of how discrete, molecular-scale processes may control

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  3. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis in a living-donor kidney transplant recipient identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a case report.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Tsuchiya, Yukiko; Kawabe, Mayuko; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Mafune, Aki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Koike, Kentaro; Shimizu, Akihiro; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Hori, Seiji; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2017-02-07

    Helicobacter cinaedi causes bacteremia and cellulitis, mainly in immunocompromised patients. We report a rare case of H. cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis in a living-donor kidney transplant recipient identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A 54-year-old Asian man with IgA nephropathy underwent living-donor kidney transplantation 14 years previously. He was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of fever and multifocal cellulitis. H. cinaedi was isolated and identified from the patient's blood using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gyrase subunit B-targeted polymerase chain reaction assays. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has proven over the years to be a rapid and accurate universal method for the identification of microorganisms. The combined use of these detection methods enabled the appropriate administration of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. The patient recovered completely, with no recurrence.

  4. Pipeline to Identify Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kim L; Cassin, Andrew M; Lonsdale, Andrew; Bacic, Antony; Doblin, Monika S; Schultz, Carolyn J

    2017-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are functional proteins that lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. The study of IDPs is a rapidly growing area as the crucial biological functions of more of these proteins are uncovered. In plants, IDPs are implicated in plant stress responses, signaling, and regulatory processes. A superfamily of cell wall proteins, the hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs), have characteristic features of IDPs. Their protein backbones are rich in the disordering amino acid proline, they contain repeated sequence motifs and extensive posttranslational modifications (glycosylation), and they have been implicated in many biological functions. HRGPs are evolutionarily ancient, having been isolated from the protein-rich walls of chlorophyte algae to the cellulose-rich walls of embryophytes. Examination of HRGPs in a range of plant species should provide valuable insights into how they have evolved. Commonly divided into the arabinogalactan proteins, extensins, and proline-rich proteins, in reality, a continuum of structures exists within this diverse and heterogenous superfamily. An inability to accurately classify HRGPs leads to inconsistent gene ontologies limiting the identification of HRGP classes in existing and emerging omics data sets. We present a novel and robust motif and amino acid bias (MAAB) bioinformatics pipeline to classify HRGPs into 23 descriptive subclasses. Validation of MAAB was achieved using available genomic resources and then applied to the 1000 Plants transcriptome project (www.onekp.com) data set. Significant improvement in the detection of HRGPs using multiple-k-mer transcriptome assembly methodology was observed. The MAAB pipeline is readily adaptable and can be modified to optimize the recovery of IDPs from other organisms. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Mass spectrometry in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2014-01-01

    In environmental toxicology, mass spectrometry can be applied to evaluate both exposure to chemicals as well as their effects in organisms. Various ultra-trace techniques are employed today to measure pollutants in different environmental compartments. Increasingly, effect-directed analysis is being applied to focus chemical monitoring on sites of ecotoxicological concern. Mass spectrometry is also very instrumental for studying the interactions of chemicals with organisms on the molecular and cellular level, providing new insights into mechanisms of toxicity. In the future, diverse mass spectrometry-based techniques are expected to become even more widely used in this field, contributing to the refinement of currently used environmental risk assessment strategies.

  6. Tandem Affinity Purification Approach Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Post-translational Modifications of Histones Associated with Chromatin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Sophie; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2017-01-01

    Protein purification by tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tag coupled to mass spectrometry analysis is usually used to reveal protein complex composition. Here we describe a TAP-tag purification of chromatin-bound proteins along with associated nucleosomes, which allow exhaustive identification of protein partners. Moreover, this method allows exhaustive identification of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the associated histones. Thus, in addition to partner characterization, this approach reveals the associated epigenetic landscape that can shed light on the function and properties of the studied chromatin-bound protein.

  7. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction.

  8. The value of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in identifying clinically relevant bacteria: a comparison with automated microbiology system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunmei; Huang, Shenglei; Shan, Yuzhang; Ye, Xiangru

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been developed as a new-type soft ionization mass spectrometry in the recent year. Increasing number of clinical microbiological laboratories consider it as an innovate approach for bacterial identification. Methods A total of 876 clinical strains, comprising 52 species in 27 genus, were obtained from Fudan University Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital. We compared the identification accuracy of the Vitek MS system (bioMerieux, Marcy l’Etoile) to other conventional methods for bacterial identification. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed as a reference identification method in cases of discrepant results. Results The Vitek MS system consistently produced accurate results within minutes of loading, while conventional methods required several hours to produce identification results. Among the 876 isolates, the overall performance of Vitek MS was significantly better than the conventional method both for correct species identification (830, 94.7% vs. 746, 85.2%, respectively, P=0.000). Conclusions Compared to traditional identification methods, MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, accurate and economical technique to enhance the clinical value of microorganism identification. PMID:24822117

  9. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  10. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  11. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic.

  12. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  13. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikamanon, Pornpat; Pun, Elroy; Chou, Wayne; Koter, Marek D; Gershon, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein-amide proton hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) is used to investigate protein conformation, conformational changes and surface binding sites for other molecules. To our knowledge, software tools to automate data processing and analysis from sample fractionating (LC-MALDI) mass-spectrometry-based HDX workflows are not publicly available. Results An integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H) has been developed for the processing of LC-MALDI-derived HDX data. Based on an experiment-wide template, and taking an ab initio approach to chromatographic and spectral peak finding, initial data processing is based on accurate mass-matching to fully deisotoped peaklists accommodating, in MS/MS-confirmed peptide library searches, ambiguous mass-hits to non-target proteins. Isotope-shift re-interrogation of library search results allows quick assessment of the extent of deuteration from peaklist data alone. During raw spectrum editing, each spectral segment is validated in real time, consistent with the manageable spectral numbers resulting from LC-MALDI experiments. A semi-automated spectral-segment editor includes a semi-automated or automated assessment of the quality of all spectral segments as they are pooled across an XIC peak for summing, centroid mass determination, building of rates plots on-the-fly, and automated back exchange correction. The resulting deuterium uptake rates plots from various experiments can be averaged, subtracted, re-scaled, error-barred, and/or scatter-plotted from individual spectral segment centroids, compared to solvent exposure and hydrogen bonding predictions and receive a color suggestion for 3D visualization. This software lends itself to a "divorced" HDX approach in which MS/MS-confirmed peptide libraries are built via nano or standard ESI without source modification, and HDX is performed via LC-MALDI using a standard MALDI-TOF. The complete TOF2H package includes additional (eg LC analysis) modules. Conclusion

  15. Mass spectrometry of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Stanly, Christopher; Vilasi, Annalisa; Fiume, Immacolata; Capasso, Giovambattista; Turiák, Lilla; Buzas, Edit I; Vékey, Károly

    2016-01-01

    The review briefly summaries main features of extracellular vesicles, a joint terminology for exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic vesicles. These vesicles are in the center of interest in biology and medical sciences, and form a very active field of research. Mass spectrometry (MS), with its specificity and sensitivity, has the potential to identify and characterize molecular composition of these vesicles; but as yet there are only a limited, but fast-growing, number of publications that use MS workflows in this field. MS is the major tool to assess protein composition of extracellular vesicles: qualitative and quantitative proteomics approaches are both reviewed. Beside proteins, lipid and metabolite composition of vesicles might also be best assessed by MS techniques; however there are few applications as yet in this respect. The role of alternative analytical approaches, like gel-based proteomics and antibody-based immunoassays, are also mentioned. The objective of the review is to give an overview of this fast-growing field to help orient MS-based research on extracellular vesicles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  17. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  18. Mass spectrometry for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Demirev, Plamen A

    2004-11-01

    A physical method currently being developed for malaria parasite detection and diagnosis in blood is reviewed in this article. The method - direct laser desorption mass spectrometry - is based on the detection of heme (iron protoporphyrin) as a unique qualitative and quantitative molecular biomarker for malaria. In infected erythrocytes, the parasite sequesters heme in a molecular crystal (hemozoin) - a volume of highly concentrated and purified biomarker molecules. Laser desorption mass spectrometry detects only heme from hemozoin in parasite-infected blood, and not heme that is bound to hemoglobin or other proteins in uninfected blood samples. The method requires only a drop of blood with minimal sample preparation. Laser desorption mass spectrometry may become a rapid and high-throughput tool for specific and sensitive pan-malaria detection at levels below 10 parasites/mul of blood.

  19. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  20. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  1. Mass spectrometry guided structural biology.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M; Hopper, Jonathan Ts; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-10-01

    With the convergence of breakthroughs in structural biology, specifically breaking the resolution barriers in cryo-electron microscopy and with continuing developments in crystallography, novel interfaces with other biophysical methods are emerging. Here we consider how mass spectrometry can inform these techniques by providing unambiguous definition of subunit stoichiometry. Moreover recent developments that increase mass spectral resolution enable molecular details to be ascribed to unassigned density within high-resolution maps of membrane and soluble protein complexes. Importantly we also show how developments in mass spectrometry can define optimal solution conditions to guide downstream structure determination, particularly of challenging biomolecules that refuse to crystallise.

  2. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  3. Laser ablation/Fourier transform mass spectrometry of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, William R.; Brenna, J. T.

    1989-10-01

    Laser ablation/ionization followed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry is used to identify and characterize polymers. The mass spectra of several polymers are discussed, including polyimide, polyamic acid, Dupont Tefzel, and polyphenylene sulfide.

  4. Dissecting the ubiquitin pathway by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Peng, Junmin

    2007-01-01

    Summary Protein modification by ubiquitin is a central regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Recent proteomics developments in mass spectrometry enable systematic analysis of cellular components in the ubiquitin pathway. Here, we review the advances in analyzing ubiquitinated substrates, determining modified lysine residues, quantifying polyubiquitin chain topologies, as well as profiling deubiquitinating enzymes based on the activity. Moreover, proteomic approaches have been developed for probing the interactome of proteasome and for identifying proteins with ubiquitin-binding domains. Similar strategies have been applied on the studies of the modification by ubiquitin-like proteins as well. These strategies are discussed with respect to their advantages, limitations and potential improvements. While the utilization of current methodologies has rapidly expanded the scope of protein modification by the ubiquitin family, a more active role is anticipated in the functional studies with the emerging of quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:17055348

  5. FPLC and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry identify candidate necrosis-inducing proteins from culture filtrates of the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Ben M'Barek, Sarrah; Cordewener, Jan H G; Tabib Ghaffary, Seyed M; van der Lee, Theo A J; Liu, Zhaohui; Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Mehrabi, Rahim; America, Antoine H P; Robert, Olivier; Friesen, Timothy L; Hamza, Sonia; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Kema, Gerrit H J

    2015-06-01

    Culture filtrates (CFs) of the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici were assayed for necrosis-inducing activity after infiltration in leaves of various wheat cultivars. Active fractions were partially purified and characterized. The necrosis-inducing factors in CFs are proteinaceous, heat stable and their necrosis-inducing activity is temperature and light dependent. The in planta activity of CFs was tested by a time series of proteinase K (PK) co-infiltrations, which was unable to affect activity 30min after CF infiltrations. This suggests that the necrosis inducing proteins (NIPs) are either absent from the apoplast and likely actively transported into mesophyll cells or protected from the protease by association with a receptor. Alternatively, plant cell death signaling pathways might be fully engaged during the first 30min and cannot be reversed even after PK treatment. Further fractionation of the CFs with the highest necrosis-inducing activity involved fast performance liquid chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. This revealed that most of the proteins present in the fractions have not been described before. The two most prominent ZtNIP encoding candidates were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris and subsequent infiltration assays showed their differential activity in a range of wheat cultivars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An efficient approach to identify different chemical markers between fibrous root and rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Xu; Yuan, Jian-Chao; Kang, Li-Ping; Pang, Xu; Yan, Ren-Yi; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Xin-Guang; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-09-10

    An ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was established and applied to rapidly distinguish the chemical differences between fibrous root and rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. The datasets of tR-m/z pairs, ion intensity and sample code were processed by principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis. Chemical markers could be identified based on their exact mass data, fragmentation characteristics, and retention times. And the new compounds among chemical markers could be isolated rapidly guided by the ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and their definitive structures would be further elucidated by NMR spectra. Using this approach, twenty-four markers were identified on line including nine new saponins and five new steroidal saponins of them were obtained in pure form. The study validated this proposed approach as a suitable method for identification of the chemical differences between various medicinal parts in order to expand medicinal parts and increase the utilization rate of resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  8. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  9. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  10. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  11. Review: mass spectrometry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    The present review covers the main research in the area of mass spectrometry from the 1990s which was about the same time as the Russian Federation emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union (USSR). It consists of two main parts-application of mass spectrometry to chemistry and related fields and creation and development of mass spectrometric technique. Both traditional and comparatively new mass spectrometric methods were used to solve various problems in organic chemistry (reactivity of gas-phase ions, structure elucidation and problems of identification, quantitative and trace analysis, differentiation of stereoisomers, derivatization approaches etc.), biochemistry (proteomics and peptidomics, lipidomics), medical chemistry (mainly the search of biomarkers, pharmacology, doping control), environmental, petrochemistry, polymer chemistry, inorganic and physical chemistry, determination of natural isotope ratio etc. Although a lot of talented mass spectrometrists left Russia and moved abroad after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the vitality of the mass spectral community proved to be rather high, which allowed the continuation of new developments in the field of mass spectrometric instrumentation. They are devoted to improvements in traditional magnetic sector mass spectrometers and the development of new ion source types, to analysis and modification of quadrupole, time-of-flight (ToF) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) analyzers. The most important achievements are due to the creation of multi-reflecting ToF mass analyzers. Special attention was paid to the construction of compact mass spectrometers, particularly for space exploration, of combined instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer and accelerating mass spectrometers. The comparatively young Russian Mass Spectrometry Society is working hard to consolidate the mass spectrometrists from Russia and foreign countries, to train young professionals on new appliances and regularly

  12. Pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry of rhizodeposits - a new approach to identify potential effects of genetically modified plants on soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Melnitchouck, Alexei; Leinweber, Peter; Broer, Inge; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to investigate the qualitative composition of rhizodeposits leached from soils cropped with non-transgenic and genetically modified (GM) potatoes, and disclose if there were GM-specific modifications in potato rhizodeposition, and (2) to compare these results with conventional bulk parameters of microbial activity in soil. We have raised potatoes from a non-transgenic line (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) and three GM lines, which expressed a gene for the resistance to kanamycin (DLH 9000) and a gene for T4 lysozyme (DL10 and DL12). A sandy soil placed in 340 cm3-"CombiSart" containers was used, from which the rhizodeposit was leached after a six-week growth period. The freeze-dried leachates were analyzed by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS). The Py-FI mass spectra gave detailed molecular-chemical information about the composition of leachates, indicating that the potato growth generally altered the composition of the soil solution. Moreover, a principal component analysis of the mass spectra showed differences between the leachates from the non-transgenic parent line and the GM potatoes as well as among the latter group. However, these differences in molecular composition could not be assigned to the release of T4-lysozyme into soil. Dehydrogenase activity and substrate-induced soil respiration as more common bulk parameters of soil microbial activity failed to disclose any significant effects of the various potatoes grown. The limitations of the described rhizodeposit leaching and analysis for risk assessment of GM potato cropping under field conditions are discussed critically. However, it could be concluded that the Py-FI mass spectrometric "fingerprint" can be developed as a fast, comprehensive, highly sensitive and reproducible analytical approach to discern any effects GM-crops may exert on soil ecological parameters.

  13. Polysialylated N-Glycans Identified in Human Serum Through Combined Developments in Sample Preparation, Separations and Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kronewitter, Scott R.; Marginean, Ioan; Cox, Jonathan T.; Zhao, Rui; Hagler, Clay D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Carlson, Timothy S.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-02

    The N-glycan diversity of human serum glycoproteins, i.e. the human blood serum N-glycome, is complex due to the range of glycan structures potentially synthesizable by human glycosylation enzymes. The reported glycome, however, is limited by methods of sample preparation, available analytical platforms, e.g., based upon electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and software tools for data analysis. In this report, several improvements have been implemented in sample preparation and analysis to extend ESI-MS glycan characterization and to provide an improved view of glycan diversity. Sample preparation improvements include acidified, microwave-accelerated, PNGase F N-glycan release, and sodium borohydride reduction were optimized to improve quantitative yields and conserve the number of glycoforms detected. Two-stage desalting (during solid phase extraction and on the analytical column) increased the sensitivity by reducing analyte signal division between multiple reducing-end-forms or cation adducts. On-line separations were improved by using extended length graphitized carbon columns and adding TFA as an acid modifier to a formic acid/reversed phase gradient which provides additional resolving power and significantly improved desorption of both large and heavily sialylated glycans. To improve MS sensitivity and provide gentler ionization conditions at the source-MS interface, subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has been utilized. When method improvements are combined together with the Glycomics Quintavariate Informed Quantification (GlyQ-IQ) recently described1 these technologies demonstrate the ability to significantly extend glycan detection sensitivity and provide expanded glycan coverage. We demonstrate application of these advances in the context of the human serum glycome, and for which our initial observations include detection of a new class of heavily sialylated N-glycans, including polysialylated N-glycans.

  14. A quick and easy method to identify bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pennanec, Xaviera; Dufour, Alain; Haras, Dominique; Réhel, Karine

    2010-02-01

    Concerns with water quality have increased in recent years, in part due to the more frequent contamination of water by pathogens like E. coli and L. pneumophila. Current methods for the typing of bacteria in water samples are based on culture of samples on specific media. These techniques are time-consuming, subject to the impact of interferents and do not totally meet all the requirements of prevention. There is a need for accurate and rapid identification of these microorganisms. This report deals with the detection of bacteria, more precisely of Legionella spp., and the development of an analytical strategy for a rapid and unambiguous identification of these pathogens in water from diverse origins. Therefore, a protein mass mapping using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of whole bacteria combined with a home-made database of bacteria spectra is applied. A large variety of different bacteria and microorganisms is used to approach the actual composition of samples with numerous interferents. The objective is to propose a universal method for sampling preparation before MALDI MS analysis and optimised spectrometric conditions for reproducible intense peaks. Several experimental factors known to influence signal quality such as time and media of culture have been studied. The proposed method gives promising results for a sure differentiation of Legionella species and subspecies and a rapid identification of bacteria which are the most dangerous or difficult to eradicate. This method is easy to perform with an excellent reproducibility. The analytical protocol and the corresponding database were validated on samples from different origins (cooling tower, plumbing hot water). Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Optimizing the composition of measurements for identifying pipeline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebneva, O. A.; Novitskii, N. N.

    2014-09-01

    The task considered in the article is a constituent part of the problem of identifying pipeline systems, central to which is exerting an active effect on the conditions determining the accuracy with which the actual parameters of real systems are estimated, the knowledge of which is of key importance for efficient retrofitting, adjustment, and dispatch control. An algorithm invariant to possible problem statements is developed, which allows the global solution to be obtained within a finite and limited number of steps.

  16. Protein Quantitation of the Developing Cochlea Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows for the measurement of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a biological system. Additionally, mass spectrometry can also be used to quantify proteins and peptides. However, observing quantitative differences between biological systems using mass spectrometry-based proteomics can be challenging because it is critical to have a method that is fast, reproducible, and accurate. Therefore, to study differential protein expression in biological samples labeling or label-free quantitative methods can be used. Labeling methods have been widely used in quantitative proteomics, however label-free methods have become equally as popular and more preferred because they produce faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Here, we describe the methods by which proteins are isolated and identified from cochlear sensory epithelia tissues at different ages and quantitatively differentiated using label-free mass spectrometry.

  17. The Use of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry, Ribotyping and Phenotypic Tests to Identify Lactic Acid Bacteria from Fermented Cereal Foods in Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire)

    PubMed Central

    Soro-Yao, Amenan A; Schumann, Peter; Thonart, Philippe; Djè, Koffi M; Pukall, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) protein analysis, automated ribotyping, and phenotypic tests (e.g., cell morphology, gas production from glucose, growth and acid production on homofermemtative-heterofermentative differential (HHD) agar medium, sugar fermentation patterns) were used to identify 23 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fermented cereal foods available in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Pediococcus acidilactici (56.5%), Lactobacillus fermentum (30.4%), L. salivarius (4.3%), P. pentosaceus (4.3%) and L. plantarum subsp. plantarum (4.3%) were the species and subspecies identified. Protein based identification was confirmed by automated ribotyping for selected isolates and was similar to that provided by the phenotypic characterization. MALDI-TOF MS protein analysis provided a high level of discrimination among the isolates and could be used for the rapid screening of LAB starter cultures. PMID:25279017

  18. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  19. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  20. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reichel, W L; Prouty, R M; Gay, M L

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  1. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  2. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  3. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  4. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided.

  5. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  6. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  7. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  8. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  9. Glycosaminoglycan Glycomics Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The fact that sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary for the functioning of all animal physiological systems drives the need to understand their biology. This understanding is limited, however, by the heterogeneous nature of GAG chains and their dynamic spatial and temporal expression patterns. GAGs have a regulated structure overlaid by heterogeneity but lack the detail necessary to build structure/function relationships. In order to provide this information, we need glycomics platforms that are sensitive, robust, high throughput, and information rich. This review summarizes progress on mass-spectrometry-based GAG glycomics methods. The areas covered include disaccharide analysis, oligosaccharide profiling, and tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. PMID:23325770

  10. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(n)) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  11. Mass spectrometry in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, C; Martinez, J; Aubagnac, J L

    2000-01-01

    In the fast expanding field of combinatorial chemistry, profiling libraries has always been a matter of concern--as illustrated by the buoyant literature over the past seven years. Spectroscopic methods, including especially mass spectrometry and to a lesser extent IR and NMR, have been applied at different levels of combinatorial library synthesis: in the rehearsal phase to optimize the chemistry prior to library generation, to confirm library composition, and to characterize after screening each structure that exhibits positive response. Most of the efforts have been concentrated on library composition assessment. The difficulties of such analyses have evolved from the infancy of the combinatorial concept, where large mixtures were prepared, to the recent parallel syntheses of collections of discrete compounds. Whereas the complexity of the analyses has diminished, an increased degree of automation was simultaneously required to achieve efficient library component identification and quantification. In this respect, mass spectrometry has been found to be the method of choice, providing rapid, sensitive, and informative analyses, especially when coupled to chromatographic separation. Fully automated workstations able to cope with several hundreds of compounds per day have been designed. After a brief introduction to describe the combinatorial approach, library characterization will be discussed in detail, considering first the solution-based methodologies and secondly the support-bound material analyses.

  12. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  14. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  16. Merging bioactivity with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based chemometrics to identify minor immunomodulatory compounds from a Micronesian adaptogen, Phaleria nisidai.

    PubMed

    Kulakowski, Daniel M; Wu, Shi-Biao; Balick, Michael J; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-10-17

    This study presents a strategy based on repeatable reversed-phase LC-TOF-MS methods and chemometric statistical tools, including untargeted PCA and supervised OPLS-DA models, to identify low-yielding compounds with potent immunostimulant activity in Phaleria nisidai (Thymelaeaceae), a plant with a history of use as an adaptogen on the islands of Palau in Micronesia. IFNγ ELISA assays were used to classify chromatographic fractions according to imunomodulatory activity prior to LC-TOF-MS chemometric analysis to target and identify compounds likely to contribute to observed activity. Simplexin, a daphnane diterpene ester, was identified for the first time from this genus and caused an increase in the production of cytokines (IFNγ, IL1β, IL6, and IL13) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Five other daphnane diterpene esters were tentatively identified for the first time from this plant based on mass spectral data and are marker metabolites distinguishing active from inactive fractions. This analytical approach increased the efficiency of bioactivity-guided fractionation and has the potential to minimize redundant isolation and identify minor constituents with potent activity from a complex matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Improvement of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification of difficult-to-identify bacteria and its impact in the workflow of a clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Belén; Marín, Mercedes; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Cercenado, Emilia; Ruiz, Adrián; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluates matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) capability for the identification of difficult-to-identify microorganisms. A total of 150 bacterial isolates inconclusively identified with conventional phenotypic tests were further assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and by MALDI-TOF MS following 2 methods: a) a simplified formic acid-based, on-plate extraction and b) performing a tube-based extraction step. Using the simplified method, 29 isolates could not be identified. For the remaining 121 isolates (80.7%), we obtained a reliable identification by MALDI-TOF: in 103 isolates, the identification by 16S rRNA sequencing and MALDI TOF coincided at the species level (68.7% from the total 150 analyzed isolates and 85.1% from the samples with MALDI-TOF result), and in 18 isolates, the identification by both methods coincided at the genus level (12% from the total and 14.9% from the samples with MALDI-TOF results). No discordant results were observed. The performance of the tube-based extraction step allowed the identification at the species level of 6 of the 29 unidentified isolates by the simplified method. In summary, MALDI-TOF can be used for the rapid identification of many bacterial isolates inconclusively identified by conventional methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Martró Català, Elisa; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases are still a cause of high mortality and morbidity rates. Current microbiological diagnostic methods are based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolated microorganisms, which can be obtained in about 24-48 h. Given that the microbiological identification is of major importance for patient management, new diagnostic methods are needed in order to detect and identify microorganisms in a timely and accurate manner. Over the last few years, several molecular techniques based on the amplification of microbial nucleic acids have been developed with the aim of reducing the time needed for the identification of the microorganisms involved in different infectious processes. On the other hand, mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and consistent alternative to conventional methods for microorganism identification. This review describes the most widely used mass spectrometry technologies -matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF)-, both for protein and nucleic acid analysis, as well as the commercial platforms available. Related publications of most interest in clinical microbiology are also reviewed.

  19. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    PubMed

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  20. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Domingo, Diego; Tudó, Griselda

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 170 species of mycobacteria have been described, of which more than one third may be pathogenic to humans, representing a significant workload for microbiology laboratories. These species must be identified in clinical practice, which has long been a major problem due to the shortcomings of conventional (phenotypic) methods and the limitations and complexity of modern methods largely based on molecular biology techniques. The aim of this review was to briefly describe different aspects related to the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of mycobacteria. Several difficulties are encountered with the use of this methodology in these microorganisms mainly due to the high pathogenicity of some mycobacteria and the peculiar structure of their cell wall, requiring inactivation and special protein extraction protocols. We also analysed other relevant aspects such as culture media, the reference methods employed (gold standard) in the final identification of the different species, the cut-off used to accept data as valid, and the databases of the different mass spectrometry systems available. MS has revolutionized diagnosis in modern microbiology; however, specific improvements are needed to consolidate the use of this technology in mycobacteriology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  2. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  3. Novel cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) neoepitopes identified in synovial fluids from patients with joint diseases using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Dahlberg, Leif E; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-07-25

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDSPAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization.Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided.

  4. RT-PCR and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RT-PCR/ESI-MS) for Identifying Acute Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Blyn, Lawrence; Rothman, Richard E.; Ramachandran, Padmini; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Ecker, David; Sampath, Rangarajan; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of respiratory viruses traditionally relies on culture or antigen detection.We aimed to demonstrate capacity of the RT-PCR/ESI-MS platform to identify clinical relevant respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples and compare the diagnostic performance characteristics relative to conventional culture- and antigen-based methods. A RT-PCR/ESI-MS respiratory virus surveillance kit designed to detect respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza types 1-4, adenoviridae types A-F, coronaviridae, human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus was evaluated using both mock-ups and frozen archived NPA (N=280), 95 of which were positive by clinical virology methods. RT-PCR/ESI-MS detected 74/95 (77.9%) known positive samples and identified an additional 13/185 (7%) from culture negative samples. Viruses that are non-detectable with conventional methods were also identified. Viral load was semi-quantifiable and ranged from 2,400 to >320,000copies/ml. Time to results was 8hrs. RT-PCR/ESI-MS showed promise in rapid detection of respiratory viruses, merits further evaluation for use in clinical settings. PMID:21251562

  5. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  6. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications.

    PubMed

    Imaduwage, Kasun P; Go, Eden P; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Determination of oxidative protein modifications using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    Numerous oxidative modifications to proteins and amino acids have been identified with most susceptible, to varying degrees, of some form of oxidative modification. The consequence of oxidation on protein structure and function reveals that some of these modifications are functionally important. The discovery and accurate characterization/description of existing and new modifications requires modern instrumentation, great care, and attention to detail, especially if the modifications are present in low stoichiometric quantities or they only exist transiently. The focus of this brief review is on the use of mass spectrometry, protein chemistry, and proteomics methods and tools to identify oxidatively modified proteins and peptides along with the characterization of specific sites. Many of the specialized mass spectrometry technologies and techniques are becoming more widely available in research laboratories with mass spectrometry or proteomics facilities allowing even non-expert researchers in the field to accurately determine modifications. Illustrative examples of some approaches are provided from the author's work, collaborative research projects, and elsewhere.

  8. Coded Apertures in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Gehm, Michael E; Russell, Zachary E; Chen, Evan X; Di Dona, Shane T; Wolter, Scott D; Danell, Ryan M; Kibelka, Gottfried; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Brady, David J; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-12

    The use of coded apertures in mass spectrometry can break the trade-off between throughput and resolution that has historically plagued conventional instruments. Despite their very early stage of development, coded apertures have been shown to increase throughput by more than one order of magnitude, with no loss in resolution in a simple 90-degree magnetic sector. This enhanced throughput can increase the signal level with respect to the underlying noise, thereby significantly improving sensitivity to low concentrations of analyte. Simultaneous resolution can be maintained, preventing any decrease in selectivity. Both one- and two-dimensional (2D) codes have been demonstrated. A 2D code can provide increased measurement diversity and therefore improved numerical conditioning of the mass spectrum that is reconstructed from the coded signal. This review discusses the state of development, the applications where coding is expected to provide added value, and the various instrument modifications necessary to implement coded apertures in mass spectrometers.

  9. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  10. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  11. Affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Patrick, J.S.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1995-02-15

    A new technique, affinity membrane introduction mass spectrometry, is described. In this method, a chemically modified membrane is used to selectively adsorb analytes bearing a particular functional group and concentrate them from solution. Release of the bound analyte results in its transfer across the membrane and allows it to be monitored mass spectrometrically, using, in the present case, a benchtop ion trap instrument. Alkylamine-modified cellulose membranes are used to bind substituted benzaldehydes through imine formation at high pH. Release of the bound aldehyde is achieved by acid hydrolysis of the surface-bound imine. Benzaldehyde is detected with excellent specificity at 10 ppm in a complex mixture using this method. Using the enrichment capability of the membrane, a full mass spectrum of benzaldehyde can be measured at a concentration of 10 ppb. The behavior of a variety of other aldehydes is also discussed to illustrate the capabilities of the method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, Joshua F.; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wang, Zihao; Camp, David G.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Stanley, Pamela; Hart, Gerald W.; Hunt, Donald F.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-08

    O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible post-translational modification of Ser and Thr residues on cytosolic and nuclear proteins found in all higher eukaryotes. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of brain proteins has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, understanding specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in AD has been impeded by the difficulty in characterization of O-GlcNAc sites on proteins. In this study, we modified a chemical/enzymatic photochemical cleavage approach for enriching O-GlcNAcylated peptides in samples containing {approx}100 {micro}g of tryptic peptides from mouse cerebrocortical brain tissue. A total of 274 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were identified. Of these 168 were not previously known to be modified by O-GlcNAc. Overall, 458 O-GlcNAc sites on Ser and Thr residues in 195 proteins were identified. Many of the modified residues are either known phosphorylation sites or located in close proximity to known phosphorylation sites. These findings support the proposed regulatory crosstalk between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation. This study produced the most comprehensive O-GlcNAc proteome of mammalian brain tissue with both protein identification and O-GlcNAc site assignment. Interestingly, we observed O-{beta}-GlcNAc on EGF-like repeats in the extracellular domains of five membrane proteins, thus representing the first evidence for extracellular O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian systems by the ER-resident O-GlcNAc transferase (EOGT). We also report a GlcNAc-{beta}-1,3-Fuc-{alpha}-1-O-Thr modification on the EGF-like repeat of the Versican core protein, a novel substrate of Fringe {beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases.

  13. Metabolomics approach based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the chemical constituents of the Traditional Chinese Er-Zhi-Pill.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xunlong; Zhong, Yanmei; Yan, Kangqi; Xiao, Xuerong; Duan, Lian; Wang, Ruolun; Wang, Laiyou

    2017-07-01

    Er-Zhi-Pill, which consists of Ligustri lucidi fructus and Ecliptae prostratae herba, is a classical traditional Chinese medicinal formulation widely used as a liver-nourishing and kidney-enriching tonic. To identify the bioactive ingredients of Er-Zhi-Pill and characterize the variation of chemical constituents between co-decoction and mix of individually decocted L. lucidi fructus and E. prostratae herba, a novel metabolomics approach based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion modes, was established to comprehensively analyze chemical constituents and probe distinguishable chemical markers. In total, 68 constituents were unambiguously or tentatively identified through alignment of accurate molecular weights within an error margin of 5 ppm, elemental composition and fragmentation characteristics, including eight constituents, which were confirmed by comparing to reference standards. Furthermore, principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis using Simca-p+ 12.0 software were applied to investigate chemical differences between formulations obtained by co-decoction and a mixture of individual decoctions. Global chemical differences were found in samples of two different decoction methods, and 16 components, including salidroside, specneuzhenide and wedelolactone, contributed most to the observed differences. This study provides a basic chemical profile for the quality control and further mechanism research of Er-Zhi-Pill. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Identifying the provenance of Leach's storm petrels in the North Atlantic using polychlorinated biphenyl signatures derived from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Megson, David; Brown, Thomas A; Johnson, Glenn W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Votier, Stephen C; Lohan, Maeve C; Comber, Sean; Kalin, Robert; Worsfold, Paul J

    2014-11-01

    PCB signatures can be used for source identification, exposure studies, age dating and bio-monitoring. This study uses comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS) to produce a PCB signature comprised of over 80 PCBs for individual Leach's storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa). The Leach's storm petrel is a relatively small, elusive, understudied pelagic bird, which only returns to remote islands under darkness during the breeding season. Samples were obtained from 25 Leach's storm petrels found dead in Canada and the UK following storm events in 2006 and 2009. Tissue samples were extracted and analysed by GCxGC-ToFMS and results showed that 83 PCB congeners were present in >60% of samples. An assessment of the PCB signature in four different tissue types showed that it did not vary greatly in samples obtained from the gut, heart, liver and stomach. Multivariate statistical analysis identified a distinctive PCB signature in birds from Canada and Europe which was used to identify the regional provenance and transatlantic movement of individual birds. The findings showcase the ability of GCxGC-ToFMS to provide the high quality congener specific analysis that is necessary for PCB fingerprinting, as well as highlighting the potential of PCB signatures for use in ecological studies of movement, foraging and behaviour.

  15. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  16. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  17. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  18. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  19. Purifying protein complexes for mass spectrometry: applications to protein translation.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J; Fleischer, Tracey C; Weaver, Connie M; Gerbasi, Vincent R; Jennings, Jennifer L

    2005-03-01

    Proteins control and mediate most of the biological activities in the cell. In most cases, proteins either interact with regulatory proteins or function in large molecular assemblies to carryout biological processes. Understanding the functions of individual proteins requires the identification of these interacting proteins. With its speed and sensitivity, mass spectrometry has become the dominant method for identifying components of protein complexes. This article reviews and discusses various approaches to purify protein complexes and analyze the proteins using mass spectrometry. As examples, methods to isolate and analyze protein complexes responsible for the translation of messenger RNAs into polypeptides are described.

  20. Microorganisms in cryopreserved semen and culture media used in the in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS).

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Dávila; Santos, Vanessa G; Braga, Patrícia A C; Ferreira, Christina R; Ballottin, Daniela; Tasic, Ljubica; Basso, Andréa C; Sanches, Bruno V; Pontes, José H F; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Garboggini, Fabiana Fantinatti; Eberlin, Marcos N; Tata, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Commercial cattle breeders produce their own herd offspring for the dairy and beef market using artificial insemination. The procedure involves sanitary risks associated with the collection and commercialization of the germplasm, and the in vitro production and transfer of the bovine embryos must be monitored by strict health surveillance. To avoid the spreading of infectious diseases, one must rely on using controlled and monitored germplasm, media, and reagents that are guaranteed free of pathogens. In this article, we investigated the use of a new mass spectrometric approach for fast and accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in bovine semen and in culture media employed in the embryo in vitro production process. The microorganisms isolated from samples obtained in a commercial bovine embryo IVP setting were identified in a few minutes by their conserved peptide/protein profile, obtained applying matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), matched against a commercial database. The successful microorganisms MS identification has been confirmed by DNA amplification and sequencing. Therefore, the MS technique seems to offer a powerful tool for rapid and accurate microorganism identification in semen and culture media samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of gunshot residues using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Regina Verena; Beavis, Alison; Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the "gold standard" for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis.

  2. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  3. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Profiling of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaodan; Jacob, Naduparambil K.; Amunugama, Ravindra; Lucas, David M.; Knapp, Amy R.; Ren, Chen; Davis, Melanie E.; Marcucci, Guido; Parthun, Mark R.; Byrd, John C.; Fishel, Richard A.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Here we describe the use of reverse-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS) to simultaneously characterize variants and post-translationally modified isoforms for each histone. The analysis of intact proteins significantly reduces the time of sample preparation and simplifies data interpretation. LC-MS analysis and peptide mass mapping have previously been applied to identify histone proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications. However, these studies provided limited characterization of both linker histones and core histones. The current LC-MS analysis allows for the simultaneous observation of all histone PTMs and variants (both replacement and bulk histones) without further enrichment, which will be valuable in comparative studies. Protein identities were verified by the analysis of histone H2A species using RPLC fractionation, AU-PAGE separation and nano-LC-MS/MS. PMID:17254850

  4. FAPA mass spectrometry of designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Gierczyk, Blazej; Reszke, Edward; Babij, Michal; Gotszalk, Teodor; Schroeder, Grzegorz; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the analysis of designer drugs is described. In this paper, we present application of FAPA MS for identification of exemplary psychotropic drugs: JWH-122, 4BMC, Pentedrone, 3,4-DNNC and ETH-CAT. We have utilized two approaches for introducing samples into the plasma stream; first in the form of a methanolic aerosol from the nebulizer, and the second based on a release of vapors from the electrically heated crucible by thermal desorption. The analytes were ionized by FAPA and identified in the mass analyzer. The order of release of the compounds depends on their volatility. These methods offer fast and reliable structural information, without pre-separation, and can be an alternative to the Electron Impact, GC/MS, and ESI for fast analysis of designer-, and other psychoactive drugs.

  5. Mass spectrometry methodology in lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian'an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-06-11

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease.

  6. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  7. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  8. Describing the Diapause-Preparatory Proteome of the Beetle Colaphellus bowringi and Identifying Candidates Affecting Lipid Accumulation Using Isobaric Tags for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteome Quantification (iTRAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qian-Qian; Liu, Wen; Zhu, Fen; Lei, Chao-Liang; Hahn, Daniel A.; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Prior to entering diapause, insects must prepare themselves physiologically to withstand the stresses of arresting their development for a lengthy period. While studies describing the biochemical and cellular milieu of the maintenance phase of diapause are accumulating, few studies have taken an “omics” approach to describing molecular events during the diapause preparatory phase. We used isobaric tags and mass spectrometry (iTRAQ) to quantitatively compare the expression profiles of proteins identified during the onset of diapause preparation phase in the heads of adult female cabbage beetles, Colaphellus bowringi. A total of 3,175 proteins were identified, 297 of which were differentially expressed between diapause-destined and non-diapause-destined female adults and could therefore be involved in diapause preparation in this species. Comparison of identified proteins with protein function databases shows that many of these differentially expressed proteins enhanced in diapause destined beetles are involved in energy production and conversion, carbohydrate metabolism and transport, and lipid metabolism. Further hand annotation of differentially abundant peptides nominates several associated with stress hardiness, including HSPs and antioxidants, as well as neural development. In contrast, non-diapause destined beetles show substantial increases in cuticle proteins, suggesting additional post-emergence growth. Using RNA interference to silence a fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) that was highly abundant in the head of diapause-destined females prevented the accumulation of lipids in the fat body, a common product of diapause preparation in this species and others. Surprisingly, RNAi against the FABP also affected the transcript abundance of several heat shock proteins. These results suggest that the identified differentially expressed proteins that play vital roles in lipid metabolism may also contribute somehow to enhanced hardiness to environmental stress

  9. Source-identifying biomarker ions between environmental and clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei using whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Niyompanich, Suthamat; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Srisanga, Kitima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which is an endemic disease in Northeast Thailand and Northern Australia. Environmental reservoirs, including wet soils and muddy water, serve as the major sources for contributing bacterial infection to both humans and animals. The whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been applied as a rapid, accurate, and high-throughput tool for clinical diagnosis and microbiological research. In this present study, we employed a whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS approach for assessing its potency in clustering a total of 11 different B. pseudomallei isolates (consisting of 5 environmental and 6 clinical isolates) with respect to their origins and to further investigate the source-identifying biomarker ions belonging to each bacterial group. The cluster analysis demonstrated that six out of eleven isolates were grouped correctly to their sources. Our results revealed a total of ten source-identifying biomarker ions, which exhibited statistically significant differences in peak intensity between average environmental and clinical mass spectra using ClinProTools software. Six out of ten mass ions were assigned as environmental-identifying biomarker ions (EIBIs), including, m/z 4,056, 4,214, 5,814, 7,545, 7,895, and 8,112, whereas the remaining four mass ions were defined as clinical-identifying biomarker ions (CIBIs) consisting of m/z 3,658, 6,322, 7,035, and 7,984. Hence, our findings represented, for the first time, the source-specific biomarkers of environmental and clinical B. pseudomallei.

  10. Web Resources for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Zhao, Jie; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Yunping

    2015-01-01

    With the development of high-resolution and high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) technology, a large quantum of proteomic data is continually being generated. Collecting and sharing these data are a challenge that requires immense and sustained human effort. In this report, we provide a classification of important web resources for MS-based proteomics and present rating of these web resources, based on whether raw data are stored, whether data submission is supported, and whether data analysis pipelines are provided. These web resources are important for biologists involved in proteomics research. PMID:25721607

  11. Identification of unknown surfactants using electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy preceded by liquid ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fukazawa, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Takashi; Sato, Hisakuni

    2002-05-01

    Commercially available but completely unknown surfactants used in the tin-lead plating industry were successfully identified by using electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy techniques, preceded by liquid ionization mass spectrometry used to obtain the preliminary information. The mass spectral data suggested that ethoxylated nonionic surfactants having a homologous distribution of molecular weights like 520, 564, 608, 652, 696, etc. were present. The NMR data suggested the presence of two aromatic rings and a quaternary carbon for the hydrophobe moiety instead of the well-known alkyl chains or alkylphenols. The unknown surfactants were finally concluded to be novel nonionic 4-(alpha,alpha-dimethylbenzyl)-phenol ethoxylates.

  12. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry—especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644965

  13. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Quick View

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-24

    MSI QuickView is a software designed to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) for greatly speeding up experimental feedback (visualization and analysis) of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI or IMS) data during data acquisition. Often different software loads the entire data set, i.e., all lines of data into computer memory (RAM). This causes out of memory errors for larger datasets. We solved this in MSI QuickView by reading in the data one line at a time. Only the required information (e.g. the final pixel values for that line of heat map) is maintained in RAM. Interim analysis options include the mean intensity vs. m/z spectrum, intensity vs. time spectrums for up to 6 different m/z values or ranges chosen by the user and heat maps for each line. This assists in validating the usefulness of the particular experiment after scanning the first few lines. In addition, the tool facilitates further processing and analysis of the massive datasets. The user can manually pick different m/z values, time ranges, scroll through the spectra for any line in the data without having to load it in manually, save multiple images, change aspect ratios for the heat maps, and process the heat maps in multiple ways including overlaying images at different m/z values, displaying up to 9 different heat maps, alignment of scans along each line etc. There is no manipulation of the data required by the user to visualize the data.

  14. The occurrence of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila in clinical and environmental samples in Denmark identified by mip gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Svarrer, C W; Uldum, S A

    2012-10-01

    In Denmark, several laboratories use PCR as a routine diagnostic method for Legionnaires' disease, and almost all PCR-positive samples are investigated by culture. From 1993 to 2010, isolates of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila were obtained from respiratory samples from 33 patients, and from 1997 to 2010, 42 isolates of Legionella non-pneumophila species were obtained and saved from water samples from 39 different sites in Denmark. Macrophage infectivity potentiator gene (mip) sequencing was used as a reference method to identify the Legionella non-pneumophila species. Only one of the 75 isolates did not meet the acceptance criterion of a similarity of ≥98% to sequences in the database. The species distribution between clinical and environmental isolates varied. For the former, four species were detected, with Legionella bozemanae and Legionella micdadei predominating (both 44%). For the latter, eight species were detected, with Legionella anisa predominating (52%). The distribution among the Danish clinical isolates was different from the general distribution both in Europe and outside Europe, where L. bozemanae and Legionella longbeachae are the most commonly found clinical Legionella non-pneumophila species. The 75 isolates were also investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): 64 were correctly identified, with a score of ≥2.0; eight had a score of <2.0, but only two of these were wrongly identified; and three gave no results with MALDI-TOF MS. Both mip sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS are robust methods for Legionella species identification.

  15. Comparison of the Bruker Biotyper and VITEK MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Systems Using a Formic Acid Extraction Method to Identify Common and Uncommon Yeast Isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Won, Eun Jeong; Kee, Seung Jung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal

    2017-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows rapid and accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates. In-tube formic acid/acetonitrile (FA/ACN) extraction is recommended prior to the analysis with MALDI Biotyper, but the direct on-plate FA extraction is simpler. We compared the Biotyper with the VITEK MS for the identification of various clinically relevant yeast species, focusing on the use of the FA extraction method. We analyzed 309 clinical isolates of 42 yeast species (four common Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and 37 uncommon yeast species) using the Biotyper and VITEK MS systems. FA extraction was used initially for all isolates. If 'no identification' result was obtained following the initial FA extraction, these samples were then retested by using FA (both systems, additive FA) or FA/ACN (Biotyper only, additive FA/ACN) extraction. These results were compared with those obtained by sequence-based identification. Both systems correctly identified all 158 isolates of the four common Candida species after the initial FA extraction. The Biotyper correctly identified 8.7%, 30.4%, and 100% of 23 C. neoformans isolates after performing initial FA, additive FA, and FA/ACN extractions, respectively, while VITEK MS identified all C. neoformans isolates after the initial FA extraction. Both systems had comparable identification rates of 37 uncommon yeast species (128 isolates), following the initial FA (Biotyper, 74.2%; VITEK MS, 73.4%) or additive FA (Biotyper, 82.0%; VITEK MS, 73.4%). The identification rate of most common and uncommon yeast isolates is comparable between simple FA extraction/Biotyper method and VITEK MS methods, but FA/ACN extraction is necessary for C. neoformans identification by Biotyper.

  16. A systematic review of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry compared to routine microbiological methods for the time taken to identify microbial organisms from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P; Davies, P; Hollingworth, W; Stoddart, M; MacGowan, A

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstream infections are a significant source of mortality and morbidity. Patient outcomes are improved by rapid identification of the causative pathogen and administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has recently emerged as an alternative to microbiological identification. It is important to establish whether the costs of MALDI-TOF are justified by more timely identification and appropriate therapy, reduced length of stay and reduced hospital costs. We undertook a systematic review of the literature comparing MALDI-TOF and routine methods for the identification of the aetiological agent in patients with known or suspected bloodstream infection. The primary outcome of the review was the 'time to identify' organisms. Information on related measures such as 'time to appropriate antimicrobial treatment' and downstream hospital cost was also collected where reported. Ten of 775 articles identified met the inclusion criteria. All included studies were observational. MALDI-TOF identification was at least 24 h faster than routine methods in most circumstances. MADLI-TOF was associated with a reduction in downstream hospital costs and length of stay in studies reporting these outcomes. The observational studies reviewed provide evidence of potentially substantial time savings of MALDI-TOF in pathogen identification and instigation of appropriate therapy, which may also reduce hospital stay. Due to the small number of studies, all at relatively high risk of bias, this cannot be considered as definitive evidence of the impact of MALDI-TOF. More and better evidence, including impact on patient health and cost-effectiveness, is required.

  17. Simulation of Two Dimensional Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Teaching Proteomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Amanda; Sekera, Emily; Payne, Jill; Craig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are separated (usually by chromatography or electrophoresis) and identified by mass spectrometry. We have created 2DE Tandem MS, a computer program designed for use in the biochemistry, proteomics, or bioinformatics classroom. It contains two simulations--2D electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.…

  18. Following the Biochemical and Morphological Changes of Bacillus atrophaeus during Sporulation using Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, H J; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Horn, J; Frank, M; Gard, E E

    2006-05-03

    The overall objective of this report is to develop a real-time single-particle mass spectrometry technique called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) in order to efficiently screen and identify bioaerosols and single cells of national security and public health concern.

  19. Simulation of Two Dimensional Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Teaching Proteomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Amanda; Sekera, Emily; Payne, Jill; Craig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are separated (usually by chromatography or electrophoresis) and identified by mass spectrometry. We have created 2DE Tandem MS, a computer program designed for use in the biochemistry, proteomics, or bioinformatics classroom. It contains two simulations--2D electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.…

  20. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context.

  1. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client*

    PubMed Central

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Müller, André C.; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification–mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein–protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression. PMID:26933192

  2. Universal Mass Spectrometry-Based Life Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Giri, C.

    2017-02-01

    The search for ET life will be an important 21st century solar system exploration goal. Mass spectrometry offers a comprehensive, rapid way of "chemotyping" environmental samples. Preparation of a reference catalogue of abiotic and biological samples is described.

  3. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  4. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  5. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adaway, Joanne E; Keevil, Brian G; Owen, Laura J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory medicine has seen the introduction and evolution of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in routine clinical laboratories over the last 10-15 years. There still exists a wide diversity of assays from very esoteric and highly specialist manual assays to more simplified kit-based assays. The technology is not static as manufacturers are continually making improvements. Mass spectrometry is now commonly used in several areas of diagnostics including therapeutic drug monitoring, toxicology, endocrinology, paediatrics and microbiology. Some of the most high throughput analyses or common analytes include vitamin D, immunosuppressant monitoring, androgen measurement and newborn screening. It also offers flexibility for the measurement of analytes in a variety of different matrices which would prove difficult with immunoassays. Unlike immunoassays or high-pressure liquid chromatography assays using ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, mass spectrometry offers better specificity and reduced interferences if attention is paid to potential isobaric compounds. Furthermore, multiplexing, which enables multiple analytes to be measured with the same volume of serum is advantageous, and the requirement for large sample volumes is decreasing as instrument sensitivity increases. There are many emerging applications in the literature. Using mass spectrometry to identify novel isoforms or modified peptides is possible as is quantification of proteins and peptides, with or without protein digests. Future developments by the manufacturers may also include mechanisms to improve the throughput of samples and strategies to decrease the level of skill required by the operators.

  6. Mass spectrometry imaging, an emerging technology in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience.

  7. Analysis of proteins and proteomes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mann, M; Hendrickson, R C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-01

    A decade after the discovery of electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), methods that finally allowed gentle ionization of large biomolecules, mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool in protein analysis and the key technology in the emerging field of proteomics. The success of mass spectrometry is driven both by innovative instrumentation designs, especially those operating on the time-of-flight or ion-trapping principles, and by large-scale biochemical strategies, which use mass spectrometry to detect the isolated proteins. Any human protein can now be identified directly from genome databases on the basis of minimal data derived by mass spectrometry. As has already happened in genomics, increased automation of sample handling, analysis, and the interpretation of results will generate an avalanche of qualitative and quantitative proteomic data. Protein-protein interactions can be analyzed directly by precipitation of a tagged bait followed by mass spectrometric identification of its binding partners. By these and similar strategies, entire protein complexes, signaling pathways, and whole organelles are being characterized. Posttranslational modifications remain difficult to analyze but are starting to yield to generic strategies.

  8. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  9. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  10. An Automated Proteogenomic Method Uses Mass Spectrometry to Reveal Novel Genes in Zea mays*

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Natalie E.; Shen, Zhouxin; He, Yupeng; Walley, Justin W.; Cassidy, California Jack; Briggs, Steven P.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    New technologies in genomics and proteomics have influenced the emergence of proteogenomics, a field at the confluence of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. First generation proteogenomic toolkits employ peptide mass spectrometry to identify novel protein coding regions. We extend first generation proteogenomic tools to achieve greater accuracy and enable the analysis of large, complex genomes. We apply our pipeline to Zea mays, which has a genome comparable in size to human. Our pipeline begins with the comparison of mass spectra to a putative translation of the genome. We select novel peptides, those that match a region of the genome that was not previously known to be protein coding, for grouping into refinement events. We present a novel, probabilistic framework for evaluating the accuracy of each event. Our calculated event probability, or eventProb, considers the number of supporting peptides and spectra, and the quality of each supporting peptide-spectrum match. Our pipeline predicts 165 novel protein-coding genes and proposes updated models for 741 additional genes. PMID:24142994

  11. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  12. Mass spectrometry analysis of nucleosides and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Ed; Bond, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely utilised in the study of nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides as components of nucleic acids and as bioactive metabolites in their own right. In this review, the application of mass spectrometry to such analysis is overviewed in relation to various aspects regarding the analytical mass spectrometric and chromatographic techniques applied and also the various applications of such analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. LTQ-XL mass spectrometry proteome analysis expands the Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR regulon to include cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterases and phosphoproteins, and identifies novel open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Hansi; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Sarracino, David; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2014-01-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well known for its antibiotic resistance and intricate regulatory network, contributing to its success as an opportunistic pathogen. This study is an extension of our transcriptomic analyses (microarray and RNA-Seq) to understand the global changes in PAO1 upon deleting a gene encoding a transcriptional regulator AmpR, in the presence and absence of β-lactam antibiotic. This study was performed under identical conditions to explore the proteome profile of the ampR deletion mutant (PAOΔampR) using LTQ-XL mass spectrometry. The proteomic data identified ~53% of total PAO1 proteins and expanded the master regulatory role of AmpR in determining antibiotic resistance and multiple virulence phenotypes in P. aeruginosa. AmpR proteome analysis identified 853 AmpR-dependent proteins, which include 102 transcriptional regulators and 21 two-component system proteins. AmpR also regulates cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PA4367, PA4969, PA4781) possibly affecting major virulence systems. Phosphoproteome analysis also suggests a significant role for AmpR in Ser, Thr and Tyr phosphorylation. These novel mechanisms of gene regulation were previously not associated with AmpR. The proteome analysis also identified many unannotated and misannotated ORFs in the P. aeruginosa genome. Thus, our data sheds light on important virulence regulatory pathways that can potentially be exploited to deal with P. aeruginosa infections. The AmpR proteome data not only confirmed the role of AmpR in virulence and resistance to multiple antibiotics, but also expanded the perimeter of AmpR regulon. The data presented here points to the role of AmpR in regulating cyclic di-GMP levels and phosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr, adding another dimension to the regulatory functions of AmpR. We also identify some previously unannotated/misannotated ORFs in the P. aeruginosa genome, indicating the limitations of existing ORF analyses software. This study will contribute towards

  14. Application of mass spectrometry in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Kleiner, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has arguably become the core technology in proteomics. The application of mass spectrometry based techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of global proteome samples derived from complex mixtures has had a big impact in the understanding of cellular function. Here, we give a brief introduction to principles of mass spectrometry and instrumentation currently used in proteomics experiments. In addition, recent developments in the application of mass spectrometry in proteomics are summarised. Strategies allowing high-throughput identification of proteins from highly complex mixtures include accurate mass measurement of peptides derived from total proteome digests and multidimensional peptide separations coupled with mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins permits the characterisation of protein isoforms. Recent developments in stable isotope labelling techniques and chemical tagging allow the mass spectrometry based differential display and quantitation of proteins, and newly established affinity procedures enable the targeted characterisation of post-translationally modified proteins. Finally, advances in mass spectrometric imaging allow the gathering of specific information on the local molecular composition, relative abundance and spatial distribution of peptides and proteins in thin tissue sections.

  15. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a Reliable Tool to Identify Species of Catalase-negative Gram-positive Cocci not Belonging to the Streptococcus Genus.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Velázquez, Viviana Rojas; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using 190 Catalase-negative Gram-Positive Cocci (GPC) clinical isolates. All isolates were identified by conventional phenotypic tests following the proposed scheme by Ruoff and Christensen and MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker Daltonics, BD, Bremen, Germany). Two different extraction methods (direct transfer formic acid method on spot and ethanol formic acid extraction method) and different cut-offs for genus/specie level identification were used. The score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer (≥ 2.000 for species-level, 1.700 to 1.999 for genus level and <1.700 no reliable identification) and lower cut-off scores (≥1.500 for genus level, ≥ 1.700 for species-level and score <1.500 no reliable identification) were considered for identification. A minimum difference of 10% between the top and next closest score was required for a different genus or species. MALDI-TOF MS identification was considered correct when the result obtained from MS database agreed with the phenotypic identification result. When both methods gave discordant results, the 16S rDNA or sodA genes sequencing was considered as the gold standard identification method. The results obtained by MS concordant with genes sequencing, although discordant with conventional phenotyping, were considered correct. MS results discordant with 16S or sodA identification were considered incorrect. Using the score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer, 97.37% and 81.05% were correctly identified to genus and species level, respectively. On the other hand, using lower cut-off scores for identification, 97.89% and 94.21% isolates were correctly identified to genus and species level respectively by MALDI-TOF MS and no significant differences between the results obtained with two extraction methods were obtained. The results obtained suggest that MALDI-TOF MS has the potential of being an

  16. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a Reliable Tool to Identify Species of Catalase-negative Gram-positive Cocci not Belonging to the Streptococcus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Velázquez, Viviana Rojas; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using 190 Catalase-negative Gram-Positive Cocci (GPC) clinical isolates. Methods: All isolates were identified by conventional phenotypic tests following the proposed scheme by Ruoff and Christensen and MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker Daltonics, BD, Bremen, Germany). Two different extraction methods (direct transfer formic acid method on spot and ethanol formic acid extraction method) and different cut-offs for genus/specie level identification were used. The score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer (≥ 2.000 for species-level, 1.700 to 1.999 for genus level and <1.700 no reliable identification) and lower cut-off scores (≥1.500 for genus level, ≥ 1.700 for species-level and score <1.500 no reliable identification) were considered for identification. A minimum difference of 10% between the top and next closest score was required for a different genus or species. MALDI-TOF MS identification was considered correct when the result obtained from MS database agreed with the phenotypic identification result. When both methods gave discordant results, the 16S rDNA or sodA genes sequencing was considered as the gold standard identification method. The results obtained by MS concordant with genes sequencing, although discordant with conventional phenotyping, were considered correct. MS results discordant with 16S or sodA identification were considered incorrect. Results: Using the score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer, 97.37% and 81.05% were correctly identified to genus and species level, respectively. On the other hand, using lower cut-off scores for identification, 97.89% and 94.21% isolates were correctly identified to genus and species level respectively by MALDI-TOF MS and no significant differences between the results obtained with two extraction methods were obtained. Conclusion: The results obtained suggest that MALDI

  17. [Application of mass spectrometry to bacterial identification].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Álvaro Pascual; Ballestero-Téllez, Mónica; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; Iglesias, Manuel Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Correct and rapid identification of bacteria is essential for the correct diagnosis and treatment of infected patients. Until a few years ago, biochemical, colorimetric or even antibiotic sensitivity tests were used to identify genera and species. The main limitations of these methods were the time needed for their performance and the difficulty of distinguishing between microorganisms that were little reactive, highly similar, or difficult to culture. Many of these problems have been solved by the introduction of mass spectrometry (MS) in the laboratory with the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight). Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of this technology is essential to be able to take maximum advantage of this technique. Not all microorganisms can be identified with the same ease and reliability by MALDI-TOF and microbiologists need to know how to interpret the results obtained with this technique and the available alternatives in order to identify the microorganisms causing the most problems. This article aims to summarise the available information on the correct identification of the main human pathogenic bacteria through the use of MALDI-TOF MS, focusing on Gram-negative, Grampositive and anaerobic microorganisms. The main factors that must be taken into account for the reliable identification of any bacterium are the conditions for culture, sample preparation with the ideal extraction method and especially the use of a correct and updated database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  19. Identification of metabolites of hexazinone by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiser, R W; Belasco, I J; Rhodes, R C

    1983-11-01

    The metabolites of hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione ] obtained in the rat and in plants were identified by mass spectrometry. Rat urine metabolites were identified from direct probe spectra obtained on metabolites separated by thin-layer chromatography. Sugarcane metabolites were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry of the trimethylsilyl derivatives. The major metabolic routes were found to be hydroxylation of the cyclohexyl group and demethylation. All identifications were confirmed by synthesis and direct comparison of chromatographic data and mass spectra. Hexazinone is metabolized quickly and extensively in the biological systems studied, and is relatively nonpersistent in the environment.

  20. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R; Friedman, Alan E; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell surface

  1. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K.; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R.; Friedman, Alan E.; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell

  2. Glossary of terms for separations coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K

    2010-06-18

    This document is a glossary of terms for separations coupled to mass spectrometry. It covers gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the sample introduction, ionization, and data analysis methods used with these combined techniques. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  4. Signatures for Mass Spectrometry Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring data quality and proper instrument functionality is a prerequisite for scientific investigation. Manual quality assurance is time-consuming and subjective. Metrics for describing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) data have been developed; however, the wide variety of LC–MS instruments and configurations precludes applying a simple cutoff. Using 1150 manually classified quality control (QC) data sets, we trained logistic regression classification models to predict whether a data set is in or out of control. Model parameters were optimized by minimizing a loss function that accounts for the trade-off between false positive and false negative errors. The classifier models detected bad data sets with high sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. Moreover, the composite classifier was dramatically more specific than single metrics. Finally, we evaluated the performance of the classifier on a separate validation set where it performed comparably to the results for the testing/training data sets. By presenting the methods and software used to create the classifier, other groups can create a classifier for their specific QC regimen, which is highly variable lab-to-lab. In total, this manuscript presents 3400 LC–MS data sets for the same QC sample (whole cell lysate of Shewanella oneidensis), deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000320–PXD000324. PMID:24611607

  5. Protein identification using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is an efficient technique for the identification of peptides on the basis of their fragmentation pattern (MS/MS scan). It can generate individual spectra for each peptide, thereby creating a powerful tool for protein identification on the basis of peptide characterization. This important advance in automatic data acquisition has allowed an efficient association between liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, and the use of nanocolumns and nanoelectrospray ionization has dramatically increased the efficiency of this method. Now large sets of peptides can be identified at a femtomole level. At the end of the process, batch processing of the MS/MS spectra produces peptide lists that identify purified proteins or protein mixtures with high confidence.

  6. Examining Histone Posttranslational Modification Patterns by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants and posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are essential for epigenetic regulation of transcriptional expression. Single and/or combinatorial PTMs of histones play important roles in development and disease formation. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a powerful tool to study histone variants and PTMs as it not only can identify novel PTMs but also can provide quantitative measurement of a spectrum of histone variants and PTMs in the same sample. In this chapter, we employ a combination of chemical derivation and high resolution mass spectrometry to identify and quantify multiple histone variants and PTMs. Histones are acid extracted and modified with propionyl groups, and subsequently produces suitable sizes of fragments for MS analysis by trypsin digestion. The newly generated N-termini of histone peptides can be differentially marked by stable isotope labeling in a second reaction of propionylation, which enables direct comparison between two different samples in the following MS analysis. PMID:22910200

  7. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    REPORT NO. 170) ’ Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers* T. Mgnea, . Baaji R. by T. Magnera, V. Balaji, R...reverse it necessary and identify by block number) Laser ablation of a variety of polysilanes at 308 nm using fluences of 150-250 m./Q per pulse, well...rapid ablation of neat solid polysilanes with UV laser light suggested their potential utility as self-developing phocoresists. 3 Further interest in this

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  9. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  10. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  11. Mass Spectrometry: A Technique of Many Faces

    PubMed Central

    Olshina, Maya A.; Sharon, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes form the critical foundation for a wide range of biological process, however understanding the intricate details of their activities is often challenging. In this review we describe how mass spectrometry plays a key role in the analysis of protein assemblies and the cellular pathways which they are involved in. Specifically, we discuss how the versatility of mass spectrometric approaches provides unprecedented information on multiple levels. We demonstrate this on the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, a process that is responsible for protein turnover. We follow the various steps of this degradation route and illustrate the different mass spectrometry workflows that were applied for elucidating molecular information. Overall, this review aims to stimulate the integrated use of multiple mass spectrometry approaches for analyzing complex biological systems. PMID:28100928

  12. Macromolecule mass spectrometry: citation mining of user documents.

    PubMed

    Kostoff, Ronald N; Bedford, Clifford D; del Río, J Antonio; Cortes, Héctor D; Karypis, George

    2004-03-01

    Identifying research users, applications, and impact is important for research performers, managers, evaluators, and sponsors. Identification of the user audience and the research impact is complex and time consuming due to the many indirect pathways through which fundamental research can impact applications. This paper identified the literature pathways through which two highly-cited papers of 2002 Chemistry Nobel Laureates Fenn and Tanaka impacted research, technology development, and applications. Citation Mining, an integration of citation bibliometrics and text mining, was applied to the >1600 first generation Science Citation Index (SCI) citing papers to Fenn's 1989 Science paper on Electrospray Ionization for Mass Spectrometry, and to the >400 first generation SCI citing papers to Tanaka's 1988 Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry paper on Laser Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Bibliometrics was performed on the citing papers to profile the user characteristics. Text mining was performed on the citing papers to identify the technical areas impacted by the research, and the relationships among these technical areas.

  13. Mass spectrometry in the home and garden.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  14. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  17. Mass spectrometry methods to study protein-metabolite interactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Peng, Hui; Emili, Andrew

    2017-09-21

    To ​​​​understand and manipulate biochemical processes and signaling pathways, the knowledge of endogenous protein-metabolite interactions would be extremely helpful. Recent developments in precision mass spectrometry, high-throughput proteomics and sensitive metabolomic profiling are beginning to converge on a possible solution, heralding a new era of global metabolome-proteome 'interactome' studies that promise to change biomedical research and drug discovery. Areas covered: Here, we review innovative mass spectrometry-based methods and recent pioneering studies aimed at elucidating the physical associations of small molecule ligands with cellular proteins. The technologies covered belong to two main categories: tag-based and tag-free methods. We emphasize the latter in this review, and outline promising experimental workflows and key data analysis considerations involved. Expert opinion: Recent ground-breaking advances in chemical-proteomics technology and allied computational methods now make the global detection of protein-ligand engagement an increasingly attractive research problem. Despite ongoing challenges, rapid progress in the field is expected these coming next few years, leading to a refreshed systems biology research paradigm and much needed new opportunities for improving sparse drug discovery pipelines.

  18. Characterization of a model Phillips catalyst by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Di Croce, Pascal Gabriel; Aubriet, Frédéric; Chéty-Gimondo, Rachel; Muller, Jean-François; Grange, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A model Phillips catalyst for ethylene polymerization, prepared by spin coating a Cr(III)(Cr(acac)3) precursor on a silicon wafer, was submitted to an oxidative activation. Laser ablation Fourier transform mass spectrometry provided direct information on molecular species at the silicon wafer surface during activation. At 350 degrees C the chromium precursor was degraded, while chromium oxide species were formed. The chromium concentration decreased with temperature. The activated model catalyst was active for ethylene polymerization. Using complementary techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry), the polymer was identified as crystalline polyethylene. After 1 h of polymerization at 160 degrees C, dome-like structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Their morphologies were constituted of regions of parallel aligned lamellae of polymer.

  19. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Jianbo; Shen, Dejun; Saxton, Romaine E.; Chang, Helena R.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management. PMID:19662217

  20. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  1. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  2. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  3. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  4. Estimating the Efficiency of Phosphopeptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V.; Wang, Pengcheng; Paez Paez, Juan Sebastian; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2017-03-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a significant role in the identification of unknown phosphoproteins and sites of phosphorylation in biological samples. Analyses of protein phosphorylation, particularly large scale phosphoproteomic experiments, have recently been enhanced by efficient enrichment, fast and accurate instrumentation, and better software, but challenges remain because of the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation and poor phosphopeptide ionization efficiency and fragmentation due to neutral loss. Phosphoproteomics has become an important dimension in systems biology studies, and it is essential to have efficient analytical tools to cover a broad range of signaling events. To evaluate current mass spectrometric performance, we present here a novel method to estimate the efficiency of phosphopeptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides were directly isolated from whole plant cell extracts, dephosphorylated, and then incubated with one of three purified kinases—casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase 6, and SNF-related protein kinase 2.6—along with 16O4- and 18O4-ATP separately for in vitro kinase reactions. Phosphopeptides were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS. The phosphopeptide identification rate was estimated by comparing phosphopeptides identified by tandem mass spectrometry with phosphopeptide pairs generated by stable isotope labeled kinase reactions. Overall, we found that current high speed and high accuracy mass spectrometers can only identify 20%-40% of total phosphopeptides primarily due to relatively poor fragmentation, additional modifications, and low abundance, highlighting the urgent need for continuous efforts to improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency.

  5. Estimating the Efficiency of Phosphopeptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Xue, Liang; Arrington, Justine V.; Wang, Pengcheng; Paez Paez, Juan Sebastian; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2017-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has played a significant role in the identification of unknown phosphoproteins and sites of phosphorylation in biological samples. Analyses of protein phosphorylation, particularly large scale phosphoproteomic experiments, have recently been enhanced by efficient enrichment, fast and accurate instrumentation, and better software, but challenges remain because of the low stoichiometry of phosphorylation and poor phosphopeptide ionization efficiency and fragmentation due to neutral loss. Phosphoproteomics has become an important dimension in systems biology studies, and it is essential to have efficient analytical tools to cover a broad range of signaling events. To evaluate current mass spectrometric performance, we present here a novel method to estimate the efficiency of phosphopeptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. Phosphopeptides were directly isolated from whole plant cell extracts, dephosphorylated, and then incubated with one of three purified kinases—casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase 6, and SNF-related protein kinase 2.6—along with 16O4- and 18O4-ATP separately for in vitro kinase reactions. Phosphopeptides were enriched and analyzed by LC-MS. The phosphopeptide identification rate was estimated by comparing phosphopeptides identified by tandem mass spectrometry with phosphopeptide pairs generated by stable isotope labeled kinase reactions. Overall, we found that current high speed and high accuracy mass spectrometers can only identify 20%-40% of total phosphopeptides primarily due to relatively poor fragmentation, additional modifications, and low abundance, highlighting the urgent need for continuous efforts to improve phosphopeptide identification efficiency. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins from human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Zhang, Du; Marshall, John G

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to convey the accelerating rate and growing importance of mass spectrometry applications to human blood proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry can rapidly detect and identify the ionizable peptides from the proteins in a simple mixture and reveal many of their post-translational modifications. However, blood is a complex mixture that may contain many proteins first expressed in cells and tissues. The complete analysis of blood proteins is a daunting task that will rely on a wide range of disciplines from physics, chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, electromagnetic instrumentation, mathematics and computation. Therefore the comprehensive discovery and analysis of blood proteins will rank among the great technical challenges and require the cumulative sum of many of mankind's scientific achievements together. A variety of methods have been used to fractionate, analyze and identify proteins from blood, each yielding a small piece of the whole and throwing the great size of the task into sharp relief. The approaches attempted to date clearly indicate that enumerating the proteins and peptides of blood can be accomplished. There is no doubt that the mass spectrometry of blood will be crucial to the discovery and analysis of proteins, enzyme activities, and post-translational processes that underlay the mechanisms of disease. At present both discovery and quantification of proteins from blood are commonly reaching sensitivities of ∼1 ng/mL.

  7. Mass spectrometry provides warning of carbon monoxide exposure via trifluoromethane.

    PubMed

    Woehick, H J; Dunning, M; Nithipatikom, K; Kulier, A H; Henry, D W

    1996-06-01

    The chemical breakdown of isoflurane, enflurane, or desflurane in dried carbon dioxide absorbents may produce carbon monoxide. Some mass spectrometers can give false indications of enflurane during anesthetic breakdown. During clinical anesthesia with isoflurane or desflurane, the presence of carbon monoxide in respiratory gas was confirmed when enflurane was inappropriately indicated by a clinical mass spectrometer that identified enflurane at mass to charge ratio = 69. In vitro, isoflurane, enflurane, or desflurane in oxygen was passed through dried carbon dioxide absorbents at 35, 45, and 55 degrees C. Gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry identified several clinical incidents in which 30-410 ppm carbon monoxide was measured in respiratory gas. Trifluoromethane was produced during in vitro breakdown of isoflurane or desflurane. Although these inappropriately indicated quantities of "enflurane" correlated (r2 > 0.95) to carbon monoxide concentrations under a variety of conditions, this ratio varied with temperature, anesthetic agent, absorbent type, and water content. Trifluoromethane causes the inappropriate indication of enflurane by mass spectrometry, and indicates isoflurane and desflurane breakdown. Because the ratio of carbon monoxide to trifluoromethane varies with conditions, this technique cannot be used to quantitatively determine the amount of carbon monoxide to which a patient is exposed. If any warning of anesthetic breakdown results from this technique then remedial steps should be taken immediately to stop patient exposure to carbon monoxide. No warning can be provided for the breakdown of enflurane by this technique.

  8. A metaproteomic pipeline to identify newborn mouse gut phylotypes.

    PubMed

    Del Chierico, Federica; Petrucca, Andrea; Mortera, Stefano Levi; Vernocchi, Pamela; Rosado, Maria M; Pieroni, Luisa; Carsetti, Rita; Urbani, Andrea; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-01-31

    In order to characterize newborn mouse gut microbiota phylotypes in very early-life stages, an original metaproteomic pipeline, based on LC-MS(2)-spectra and Mascot driven NCBI non-redundant repository database interrogation was developed. An original computational analysis assisted in the generation of a taxonomic gut architecture from protein hits to operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and related functional categories. Regardless of the mouse's genetic background, a prevalence of Firmicutes (Lactobacillaceae) and Proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) was observed among the entire Eubacteria taxonomic node. However, a higher abundance of Firmicutes was retrieved for Balb/c gut microbiota compared to Rag2(ko) mice, the latter was mainly characterized by a Proteobacteria enriched microbiota. The metaproteomic-obtained OTUs were supported, for the identification (ID) of the cultivable bacteria fraction, corroborated by axenic culture-based MALDI-TOF MS IDs. Particularly, functional analysis of Rag2(ko) mice gut microbiota proteins revealed the presence of abundant glutathione, riboflavin metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway components, possibly related to genetic background. The metaproteomic pipeline herein presented may represent a useful tool to investigate the highly debated onset of the human gut microbiota in the first days of life, when the bacterial composition, despite its very low diversity (complexity), is still very far from an exhaustive description and other complex microbial consortia. The manuscript deals with a "frontier" topic regarding the study of the gut microbiota and the application of a metaproteomic pipeline to unveil the complexity of this fascinating ecosystem at the very early stages of life. Indeed during these phases, its diversity is very low but the bacterial content is highly "instable", and the relative balance between mucosal and fecal bacteria starts its dynamics of "fight" to get homeostasis. However, in the neonatal period

  9. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection coupled to electrospray time-of-flight and ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry to identify phenolic compounds from a Cistus ladanifer aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arroyo, S; Barrajón-Catalán, E; Micol, V; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2010-01-01

    Cistus ladanifer is an aromatic shrub that is widespread in the Mediterranean region. The labdanum exudate is used in the fragrance industry and has been characterised. However, there is not enough information about the phenolic content of the raw plant, the aerial part of it being a very rich source of bioactive compounds. Characterisation of the bioactive compounds of the raw plant and its aerial parts. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometric detection was used to carry out the comprehensive characterisation of a Cistus ladanifer shrub aqueous extract. Two different MS techniques were coupled to HPLC: time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Many well-known compounds present in Cistus ladanifer were characterised, such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, ellagitanins, hexahydroxydiphenoyl and derivatives, and other compounds. The method described simultaneously separated a wide range of phenolic compounds and the proposed characterisation of the major compounds of this extract was carried out. It is important to highlight that, to our knowledge, this is the first time that a Cistus ladanifer aqueous extract from the raw plant has been characterised.

  10. Pipeline to Identify Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cassin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are functional proteins that lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. The study of IDPs is a rapidly growing area as the crucial biological functions of more of these proteins are uncovered. In plants, IDPs are implicated in plant stress responses, signaling, and regulatory processes. A superfamily of cell wall proteins, the hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs), have characteristic features of IDPs. Their protein backbones are rich in the disordering amino acid proline, they contain repeated sequence motifs and extensive posttranslational modifications (glycosylation), and they have been implicated in many biological functions. HRGPs are evolutionarily ancient, having been isolated from the protein-rich walls of chlorophyte algae to the cellulose-rich walls of embryophytes. Examination of HRGPs in a range of plant species should provide valuable insights into how they have evolved. Commonly divided into the arabinogalactan proteins, extensins, and proline-rich proteins, in reality, a continuum of structures exists within this diverse and heterogenous superfamily. An inability to accurately classify HRGPs leads to inconsistent gene ontologies limiting the identification of HRGP classes in existing and emerging omics data sets. We present a novel and robust motif and amino acid bias (MAAB) bioinformatics pipeline to classify HRGPs into 23 descriptive subclasses. Validation of MAAB was achieved using available genomic resources and then applied to the 1000 Plants transcriptome project (www.onekp.com) data set. Significant improvement in the detection of HRGPs using multiple-k-mer transcriptome assembly methodology was observed. The MAAB pipeline is readily adaptable and can be modified to optimize the recovery of IDPs from other organisms. PMID:28446635

  11. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  12. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  13. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  14. A Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Method for Screening Disulfide Tethering Fragments.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Kenneth K; Davies, Julia L; Merron, Connie; Ogden, Pierce; Sijbesma, Eline; Ottmann, Christian; Renslo, Adam R; Wilson, Christopher; Arkin, Michelle R

    2017-09-01

    We report the refinement of a high-throughput, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based screening method for the identification of covalent small-molecule binders to proteins. Using a custom library of 1600 disulfide-capped fragments targeting surface cysteine residues, we optimize sample preparation, chromatography, and ionization conditions to maximize the reliability and flexibility of the approach. Data collection at a rate of 84 s per sample balances speed with reliability for sustained screening over multiple, diverse projects run over a 24-month period. The method is applicable to protein targets of various classes and a range of molecular masses. Data are processed in a custom pipeline that calculates a percent bound value for each compound and identifies false positives by calculating significance of detected masses (signal significance). An example pipeline is available through Biovia's ScienceCloud Protocol Exchange. Data collection and analysis methods for the screening of covalent adducts of intact proteins are now fast enough to screen the largest covalent compound libraries in 1 to 2 days.

  15. Direct infusion mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for human metabonomics? A serum metabonomic study of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yu, Quan; Yan, Xiaomei; Hang, Wei; Zheng, Jiaxin; Xing, Jinchun; Huang, Benli

    2010-11-01

    Serum samples from kidney cancer patients and healthy controls were analyzed by both direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with a high resolution ESI-Q-TOFMS. The classification and biomarker discovery capacities of the two methods were compared, and MS/MS experiments were carried out to identify potential biomarkers. DIMS had comparable classification and prediction capabilities to LC-MS but consumed only ~5% of the analysis time. With regard to biomarker discovery, twenty-three variables were found as potential biomarkers by DIMS, and 48 variables were obtained by LC-MS. DIMS is recommended to be a fast diagnostic method for kidney cancer, while LC-MS is necessary when comprehensive screening of biomarkers is required.

  16. Analysis of polar lipids in the serum from rats fed shiitake by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shanggong; Peng, Min; Ronis, Martin; Badger, Thomas; Fang, Nianbai

    2010-12-22

    Consumption of a shiitake mushroom diet has been reported to have effects on serum phospholipids. However, much less is known about the effect on serum polar lipids including lysophospholipids and free fatty acids. In the present study, the effects of a shiitake diet were evaluated on the basis of identification and quantification of individual polar lipid components in rat serum using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. By comparison with standards and published data, 50 lysophospholipids and 32 free fatty acids were identified, and the concentrations of 27 polar lipids in rat serum were determined. Shiitake diets decreased the levels of all individual polar lipid components in the serum of male rat. The total level of serum polar lipids in males fed 4% shiitake diets (1365.71 mol/L) was significantly lower than that of the control (2270.26 mol/L). However, shiitake diets did not significantly affect the levels of serum polar lipids in female rats.

  17. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia.

    PubMed

    Downard, Kevin M; de Laeter, John R

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. Peter Jeffery's establishment of geochronological dating techniques in Western Australia in the early 1950s led to the establishment of geochronology research both at the Australian National University and at what is now the Curtin Institute of Technology in the 1960s. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. An article such as this can never be complete. It instead focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important

  18. Peptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry with alternate fragmentation modes.

    PubMed

    Guthals, Adrian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2012-09-01

    The high-throughput nature of proteomics mass spectrometry is enabled by a productive combination of data acquisition protocols and the computational tools used to interpret the resulting spectra. One of the key components in mainstream protocols is the generation of tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra by peptide fragmentation using collision induced dissociation, the approach currently used in the large majority of proteomics experiments to routinely identify hundreds to thousands of proteins from single mass spectrometry runs. Complementary to these, alternative peptide fragmentation methods such as electron capture/transfer dissociation and higher-energy collision dissociation have consistently achieved significant improvements in the identification of certain classes of peptides, proteins, and post-translational modifications. Recognizing these advantages, mass spectrometry instruments now conveniently support fine-tuned methods that automatically alternate between peptide fragmentation modes for either different types of peptides or for acquisition of multiple MS/MS spectra from each peptide. But although these developments have the potential to substantially improve peptide identification, their routine application requires corresponding adjustments to the software tools and procedures used for automated downstream processing. This review discusses the computational implications of alternative and alternate modes of MS/MS peptide fragmentation and addresses some practical aspects of using such protocols for identification of peptides and post-translational modifications.

  19. Imaging mass spectrometry with nuclear microprobes for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Honda, Y.; Ninomiya, S.; Seki, T.; Aoki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2009-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique using nuclear microprobes is presented in this paper for biological applications. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important technique for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells. However, due to low yields of large molecular ions, the conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), that uses keV primary ion beams, is typically applied for imaging of either elements or low mass compounds. In this study, we performed imaging mass spectrometry using MeV ion beams collimated to about 10 μm, and successfully obtained molecular ion images from plant and animal cell sections. The molecular ion imaging of the pollen section showed high intensities of PO3- ions in the pollen cytoplasm, compared to the pollen wall, and indicated the heterogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. The 3T3-L1 cell image revealed the high intensity of PO3- ions, in particular from the cell nucleus. The result showed that not only the individual cell, but also the cell nucleus could be identified with the present imaging technique.

  20. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Devary, Brooks J.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.

    2007-09-03

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane, (C6H6N12O12, MW 438) {CL-20}, is a high-energy propellent that has been recently developed and successfully tested (Nielsen et al. 1998). CL-20 releases more energy on ignition and is more stable to accidental detonation than currently used energetic materials. It is expected to replace many of the energetic materials currently being used by the Department of Defense (DoD). The EPA method 8330 (EPA 1997) for the analysis of explosives and metabolites in soils calls for the use of UV/Vis detection. High performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantify CL-20 and precursor concentration (Bazaki et al. 1998`) at relatively high concentrations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to identify different crystal forms of CL-20 (4 isomers; Kim et al. 1998). Campbell et al. (1997) utilized particle beam mass spectrometry for the analysis of enzymatic degradation of explosives. Introduction and recent improvements of ionization techniques such as electrospray (ES) have allowed the mass spectrometer to become more widely used in liquid chromatography. Schilling(1996) also examined explosive components and metabolites using electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Schilling’s results showed that compared to thermospray LC/MS, APCI and ES were more sensitive than thermospray by at least an order of magnitude. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), 10 nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water have been analyzed using solid phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-APCI mass spectrometry (Cassada et al. 1999). The method detection limits indicate that nitramine and nitroaromatic compounds can be routinely determined in ground water samples using electrospray LC/MS with concentration techniques utilizing solid-phase extraction. Miller et al. (1996) studied nitrated explosives with mobile phase

  1. Liquid chromatography-thermospray mass spectrometry of DNA adducts formed with mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Musser, S M; Pan, S S; Callery, P S

    1989-07-14

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermospray mass spectrometry were combined for the analysis of DNA adducts formed from the interaction of the anticancer drugs mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa with calf thymus DNA. The adducts formed from reaction of mitomycin C and porfiromycin with DNA were separated from unmodified nucleosides by HPLC on a C18 column and identified by thermospray mass spectrometry. Thiotepa DNA adducts readily depurinated from DNA and were chromatographed and identified by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as the modified bases without the ribose moiety attached. The utility of thermospray mass spectrometry for the identification of microgram quantities of nucleoside adducts and depurinated base adducts of these anticancer drugs was demonstrated.

  2. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  3. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  4. Analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oil of Polygonum minus Huds. using two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ghani, Ma'aruf Abd; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Noor, Normah Mohd

    2010-10-12

    The essential oil in leaves of Polygonum minus Huds., a local aromatic plant, were identified by a pipeline of gas chromatography (GC) techniques coupled with mass-spectrometry (MS), flame ionization detector (FID) and two dimensional gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOF MS). A total of 48 compounds with a good match and high probability values were identified using this technique. Meanwhile, 42 compounds were successfully identified in this study using GC-MS, a significantly larger number than in previous studies. GC-FID was used in determining the retention indices of chemical components in P. minus essential oil. The result also showed the efficiency and reliability were greatly improved when chemometric methods and retention indices were used in identification and quantification of chemical components in plant essential oil.

  5. Applications of plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of bioactive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The applications of Cf-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of peptides is evaluated. Sample preparation is a critical stage in such type of analyses. The plasma desorption mass spectra of compounds dissolved and electrosprayed in solutions containing reduced glutathione, showed increased molecular ion signal, reduced peak widths and an increase in multiply charged ions. Plasma desorption mass spectrometry was also evaluated for the analysis of glycopeptides, especially the glycosylation site microheterogeneity. The three N-linked sites of bovine fetuin, as a model glycoprotein, digested with trypsin and treated with neuraminidase, were identified by a combination of amino acid composition, amino acid sequence and molecular ions obtained by mass spectrometry. Methodology has also been developed for the study of mixed disulfides formed between the Cys residue of peptides and glutathione by mass spectrometry.

  6. Characterizing the Syphilis-Causing Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Proteome Using Complementary Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Lithgow, Karen V.; Meehan, Conor J.; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Cameron, Caroline E.; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Kenyon, Chris R.; Van Raemdonck, Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is the etiological agent of syphilis, a chronic multistage disease. Little is known about the global T. pallidum proteome, therefore mass spectrometry studies are needed to bring insights into pathogenicity and protein expression profiles during infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the T. pallidum proteome profile during infection, we studied T. pallidum ssp. pallidum DAL-1 strain bacteria isolated from rabbits using complementary mass spectrometry techniques, including multidimensional peptide separation and protein identification via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap) tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 6033 peptides were detected, corresponding to 557 unique T. pallidum proteins at a high level of confidence, representing 54% of the predicted proteome. A previous gel-based T. pallidum MS proteome study detected 58 of these proteins. One hundred fourteen of the detected proteins were previously annotated as hypothetical or uncharacterized proteins; this is the first account of 106 of these proteins at the protein level. Detected proteins were characterized according to their predicted biological function and localization; half were allocated into a wide range of functional categories. Proteins annotated as potential membrane proteins and proteins with unclear functional annotations were subjected to an additional bioinformatics pipeline analysis to facilitate further characterization. A total of 116 potential membrane proteins were identified, of which 16 have evidence supporting outer membrane localization. We found 8/12 proteins related to the paralogous tpr gene family: TprB, TprC/D, TprE, TprG, TprH, TprI and TprJ. Protein abundance was semi-quantified using label-free spectral counting methods. A low correlation (r = 0.26) was found between previous microarray signal data and

  7. Single-Cell Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Passarelli, Melissa K.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique used to map the distributions of endogenous biomolecules with sub-cellular resolution. Currently, secondary ion mass spectrometry is the predominant technique for single-cell IMS, thanks to its sub-micron lateral resolution and surface sensitivity. However, recent methodological and technological developments aimed at improving the spatial resolution of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) have made this technique a potential platform of single-cell IMS. MALDI opens the field of single-cell IMS to new possibilities, including single cell proteomic imaging and atmospheric pressure analyses; however, sensitivity is a challenge. In this report, we estimate the availability of proteins and lipids in a single cell and discuss strategies employed to improve sensitivity at the single-cell level. PMID:23948695

  8. Targeted Quantitation of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  9. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry - from DNA to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    2013-12-01

    A brief review of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presented. The present work touches on a few technical aspects and recent developments of AMS, and describes two specific applications of AMS, the dating of human DNA with the 14C bomb peak and the search for superheavy elements in nature. Since two extended general reviews on technical developments in AMS [1] and applications of AMS [2] will appear in 2013, frequent reference to these reviews is made.

  11. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  12. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  13. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  14. Radiation Biomarker Research Using Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    The data was of insufficient quality to obtain definitive biomarkers. Trips were also made to AFRL/HEDR at Brooks City Base to assist with their...sample analysis using the Finnigan LTQ located there. Mr. Mullens and Ms. Nagore assisted with training personnel at AFRL/HEDR and when necessary...techniques with saliva samples and matrix- assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), we have been able to

  15. [Photon burst mass spectrometry technique.] Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, W.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    The basic tools have been developed and demonstrated for selective detection of Kr isotopes in the Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry technique. The effort is divided into: photon burst measurements on Mg{sup +} demonstrating high isotopic selectivity, charge exchange of Kr{sup +} with Cs and Rb to produce metastable Kr atoms, development of a diode laser system for photon burst detection of Kr{sup +}, and measurements of photon bursts detection of Kr.

  16. Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a standardized data processing pipeline for large-scale reproducible proteomics informatics

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Slagel, Joseph; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Democratization of genomics technologies has enabled the rapid determination of genotypes. More recently the democratization of comprehensive proteomics technologies is enabling the determination of the cellular phenotype and the molecular events that define its dynamic state. Core proteomic technologies include mass spectrometry to define protein sequence, protein:protein interactions, and protein post-translational modifications. Key enabling technologies for proteomics are bioinformatic pipelines to identify, quantitate, and summarize these events. The Trans-Proteomics Pipeline (TPP) is a robust open-source standardized data processing pipeline for large-scale reproducible quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics. It supports all major operating systems and instrument vendors via open data formats. Here we provide a review of the overall proteomics workflow supported by the TPP, its major tools, and how it can be used in its various modes from desktop to cloud computing. We describe new features for the TPP, including data visualization functionality. We conclude by describing some common perils that affect the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets, as well as some major upcoming features. PMID:25631240

  17. Novel biomarkers of protein oxidation sites and degrees using horse cytochrome c as the target by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wansong; Liu, Rutao; Guo, Changying; Sun, Feng

    2011-05-01

    Biomarkers held both incredible application and significant challenge in probing the oxidation mechanisms of proteins under oxidative stress. Here, mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) was applied to establish a new pipeline to probe the oxidation sites and degrees of horse cytochrome c (HCC) with its oxidative products serving as the biomarkers. Samples of native and UV/H(2)O(2) oxidized HCCs were digested by trypsin and subjected to biomarker discovery using LC/MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experiment results proved that the main oxidation sites were located at Cys(14), Cys(17), Met(65) and Met(80) residues in peptides C(14)AQC(heme)HTVEK(22), C(14)AQCHTVEK(22), E(60)ETLMEYLENPKK(73), M(80)IFAGIK(86) and M(80)IFAGIKK(87). Quantitative analysis on the oxidized peptides showed the oxidation degrees of target sites had positive correlations with extended oxidation dose and controlled by residues types and their accessibility to solvent molecules. Being able to provide plentiful information for the oxidation sites and oxidation degrees, the identified oxidized products were feasibility biomarkers for HCC oxidation, compared with the conventional protein carbonyl assay.

  18. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS.

  19. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  20. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (<1000 Da) in biological fluids is currently in most cases performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Analysis of these compounds in biological fluids (plasma, urine, saliva, hair...) is a difficult task requiring a sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  1. Calculating Measurement Uncertainties for Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, R. M.; Goldberg, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    A complete and transparent characterization of measurement uncertainty is fundamentally important to the interpretation of analytical results. We have observed that the calculation and reporting of uncertainty estimates for isotopic measurement from a variety of analytical facilities are inconsistent, making it difficult to compare and evaluate data. Therefore, we recommend an approach to uncertainty estimation that has been adopted by both US national metrology facilities and is becoming widely accepted within the analytical community. This approach is outlined in the ISO "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement" (GUM). The GUM approach to uncertainty estimation includes four major steps: 1) Specify the measurand; 2) Identify uncertainty sources; 3) Quantify components by determining the standard uncertainty (u) for each component; and 4) Calculate combined standard uncertainty (u_c) by using established propagation laws to combine the various components. To obtain a desired confidence level, the combined standard uncertainty is multiplied by a coverage factor (k) to yield an expanded uncertainty (U). To be consistent with the GUM principles, it is also necessary create an uncertainty budget, which is a listing of all the components comprising the uncertainty and their relative contribution to the combined standard uncertainty. In mass spectrometry, Step 1 is normally the determination of an isotopic ratio for a particular element. Step 2 requires the identification of the many potential sources of measurement variability and bias including: gain, baseline, cup efficiency, Schottky noise, counting statistics, CRM uncertainties, yield calibrations, linearity calibrations, run conditions, and filament geometry. Then an equation expressing the relationship of all of the components to the measurement value must be written. To complete Step 3, these potential sources of uncertainty must be characterized (Type A or Type B) and quantified. This information

  2. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Diagnosis and Surgical Margin Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ifa, Demian R.; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a clinical need for new technologies that would enable rapid disease diagnosis based on diagnostic molecular signatures. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has revolutionized the means by which molecular information can be obtained from tissue samples in real time and with minimal sample pretreatment. New developments in ambient ionization techniques applied to clinical research suggest that ambient ionization mass spectrometry will soon become a routine medical tool for tissue diagnosis. Content This review summarizes the main developments in ambient ionization techniques applied to tissue analysis, with focus on desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, probe electrospray ionization, touch spray, and rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry. We describe their applications to human cancer research and surgical margin evaluation, highlighting integrated approaches tested for ex vivo and in vivo human cancer tissue analysis. We also discuss the challenges for clinical implementation of these tools and offer perspectives on the future of the field. Summary A variety of studies have showcased the value of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for rapid and accurate cancer diagnosis. Small molecules have been identified as potential diagnostic biomarkers, including metabolites, fatty acids, and glycerophospholipids. Statistical analysis allows tissue discrimination with high accuracy rates (>95%) being common. This young field has challenges to overcome before it is ready to be broadly accepted as a medical tool for cancer diagnosis. Growing research in new, integrated ambient ionization mass spectrometry technologies and the ongoing improvements in the existing tools make this field very promising for future translation into the clinic. PMID:26555455

  3. Common Data Analysis Pipeline | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    CPTAC supports analyses of the mass spectrometry raw data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) for the public using a Common Data Analysis Pipeline (CDAP). The data types available on the public portal are described below. A general overview of this pipeline can be downloaded here. Mass Spectrometry Data Formats RAW (Vendor) Format

  4. Vaporization Studies of Olivine via Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, G. C. C.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olivine is the major mineral in the Earth's upper mantle occurring predominantly in igneous rocks and has been identified in meteorites, asteroids, the Moon and Mars. Among many other important applications in planetary and materials sciences, the thermodynamic properties of vapor species from olivine are crucial as input parameters in computational modelling of the atmospheres of hot, rocky exoplanets (lava planets). There are several weight loss studies of olivine vaporization in the literature and one Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) study. In this study, we examine a forsterite-rich olivine (93% forsterite and 7% fayalite, Fo93Fa7) with KEMS to further understand its vaporization and thermodynamic properties.

  5. Screening for multiple weight loss and related drugs in dietary supplement materials by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry and their confirmation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Fenhong; Monroe, Douglas; El-Demerdash, Aref; Palmer, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    A new method has been developed using flow injection tandem mass spectrometry to semi-quantitatively screen for weight loss drugs, including sibutramine, N-desmethylsibutramine, N-didesmethylsibutramine, and phenolphthalein in dietary supplements. Positive identification of these drugs in samples was further confirmed and quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The degradation products of sibutramine were observed and identified by LC-MS/MS which include N-desmethylsibutramine, N-didesmethylsibutramine, N-formyldesmethylsibutramine, and N-formyldidesmethylsibutramine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Nuclear applications of inorganic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John

    2010-01-01

    There are several basic characteristics of mass spectrometry that are not always fully appreciated by the science community. These characteristics include the distinction between relative and absolute isotope abundances, and the influence of isotope fractionation on the accuracy of isotopic measurements. These characteristics can be illustrated in the field of nuclear physics with reference to the measurement of nuclear parameters, which involve the use of enriched isotopes, and to test models of s-, r-, and p-process nucleosynthesis. The power of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) to measure trace elements in primitive meteorites to produce accurate Solar System abundances has been essential to the development of nuclear astrophysics. The variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation used to measure the isotopic composition of elements has sometimes been accompanied by a lack of implementation of basic mass spectrometric protocols which are applicable to all instruments. These metrological protocols are especially important in atomic weight determinations, but must also be carefully observed in cases where the anomalies might be very small, such as in studies of the daughter products of extinct radionuclides to decipher events in the early history of the Solar System. There are occasions in which misleading conclusions have been drawn from isotopic data derived from mass spectrometers where such protocols have been ignored. It is important to choose the mass spectrometer instrument most appropriate to the proposed experiment. The importance of the integrative nature of mass spectrometric measurements has been demonstrated by experiments in which long, double beta decay and geochronological decay half-lives have been measured as an alternative to costly radioactive-counting experiments. This characteristic is also illustrated in the measurement of spontaneous fission yields, which have accumulated over long periods of time. Mass spectrometry is also a

  7. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  8. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  9. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  10. Biological accelerator mass spectrometry at Uppsala University.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Bryhni, Helge; Palminger-Hallén, Ira; Ståhle, Lars

    2009-03-01

    A new research programme for the biological applications of accelerator mass spectrometry has been initiated at Uppsala University and the first results are presented. A (14)C-labelled pharmaceutical substance has been dissolved in human blood, plasma and urine and diluted over 3 orders of magnitude. The measured drug concentrations were found to be in good agreement with the predicted values. Furthermore, the effect of the sample preparation background contribution has been studied as the sample amount was varied down to sub-microl sizes.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry of the planetary elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, L. K.; Clacher, A. P.; Morris, K.; King, S. J.; Cresswell, R. G.; Day, J. P.; Livens, F. R.

    1997-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry has been applied for the first time to the detection of 237Np. Sensitivity approaches 105 atoms. A first measurement of the mobility of 237Np in a marine environment is reported, and lends support to the prediction that neptunium should be substantially more mobile than plutonium. Measurements of backgrounds and transmissions for plutonium and neptunium in different charge states are also reported. In addition, the relative negative ion formation probabilities for the monoxide ions of Th, U, Np and Pu have been measured.

  12. Isotopic trace analysis by atomic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffels, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    All the production facilities at Hanford are now shut down. However, the legacy from half a century of plutonium production includes 177 underground storage tanks of up to one million gallons each containing the largest accumulation of high-level radioactive waste in what used to be called ``the free world.`` Hanford`s new mission, in addition to a spectrum of ongoing research and development, is radioactive waste management and environmental restoration. Isotope-ratio mass spectrometry will continue to be an essential tool in monitoring the progress of that mission.

  13. Probing Bunyavirus N protein oligomerisation using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Dale A; Ariza, Antonio; Edwards, Thomas A; Barr, John N; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Bunyaviruses have become a major threat to both humans and livestock in Europe and the Americas. The nucleocapsid (N) protein of these viruses is key to the replication cycle and knowledge of the N oligomerisation state is central to understanding the viral lifecycle and for development of therapeutic strategies. METHODS Bunyamwera virus and Schmallenberg virus N proteins (BUNV-N and SBV-N) were expressed recombinantly in E. coli as hexahistidine-SUMO-tagged fusions, and the tag removed subsequently. Noncovalent nano-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry was conducted in the presence and absence of short RNA oligonucleotides. Instrumental conditions were optimised for the transmission of intact protein complexes into the gas phase. The resulting protein-protein and protein-RNA complexes were identified and their stoichiometries verified by their mass. Collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was used in cases of ambiguity. RESULTS Both BUNV-N and SBV-N proteins reassembled into N-RNA complexes in the presence of RNA; however, SBV-N formed a wider range of complexes with varying oligomeric states. The N:RNA oligomers observed were consistent with a model of assembly via stepwise addition of N proteins. Furthermore, upon mixing the two proteins in the presence of RNA no heteromeric complexes were observed, thus revealing insights into the specificity of oligomerisation. CONCLUSIONS Noncovalent mass spectrometry has provided the first detailed analysis of the co-populated oligomeric species formed by these important viral proteins and revealed insights into their assembly pathways. Using this technique has also enabled comparisons to be made between the two N proteins. PMID:24573811

  14. Simultaneous determination of three dipeptides (JBP485, Gly-Sar and JBP923) in the cell lysates by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to identify the function of the PEPT1 transfected cell.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinjin; Meng, Qiang; Liu, Qi; Wang, Changyuan; Huo, Xiaokui; Zhang, Zhe; Kaku, Taiichi; Liu, Kexin

    2014-12-01

    A simple and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of JBP485, Gly-Sar and JBP923 in the cell lysates using methanol as a deproteinization solvent was developed and validated. Detection was performed by turbo ionspray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode using the transitions of m/z 147.1 → m/z 90.1 for Gly-Sar, m/z 201.1 → m/z 86.1 for JBP485, m/z 219.1 → m/z 86.1 for JBP923 and m/z 152.0 → m/z 110.0 for paracetamol (internal standard). The analytes were separated on a Hypersil ODS C18 HPLC column using isocratic elution mode with a mobile phase containing 0.1% formic acid in water-methanol (97:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The calibration curves were demonstrated to be linear over the concentration range of 5.00-5000 nm with coefficient of 0.9968 for Gly-Sar, 0.9975 for JBP485 and 0.9952 for JBP923. The intra- and inter-day precisions were <10.2% for each quality contro; level, and the accuracy was within ±5.6% for each analyte. The matrix effect, the extraction recovery and stabilities of LC-MS/MS analysis were also investigated. This validated method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of JBP485, Gly-Sar and JBP923 in the cell lysates for identification of stably transfected HeLa cells with human PEPT1. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Characterization of botulinum progenitor toxins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hines, Harry B; Lebeda, Frank; Hale, Martha; Brueggemann, Ernst E

    2005-08-01

    Botulinum toxin analysis has renewed importance. This study included the use of nanochromatography-nanoelectrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry to characterize the protein composition of botulinum progenitor toxins and to assign botulinum progenitor toxins to their proper serotype and strain by using currently available sequence information. Clostridium botulinum progenitor toxins from strains Hall, Okra, Stockholm, MDPH, Alaska, and Langeland and 89 representing serotypes A through G, respectively, were reduced, alkylated, digested with trypsin, and identified by matching the processed product ion spectra of the tryptic peptides to proteins in accessible databases. All proteins known to be present in progenitor toxins from each serotype were identified. Additional proteins, including flagellins, ORF-X1, and neurotoxin binding protein, not previously reported to be associated with progenitor toxins, were present also in samples from several serotypes. Protein identification was used to assign toxins to a serotype and strain. Serotype assignments were accurate, and strain assignments were best when either sufficient nucleotide or amino acid sequence data were available. Minor difficulties were encountered using neurotoxin-associated protein identification for assigning serotype and strain. This study found that combined nanoscale chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques can characterize C. botulinum progenitor toxin protein composition and that serotype/strain assignments based upon these proteins can provide accurate serotype and, in most instances, strain assignments using currently available information. Assignment accuracy will continue to improve as more nucleotide/amino acid sequence information becomes available for different botulinum strains.

  16. Photosensitized oxidation of phosphatidylethanolamines monitored by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melo, Tânia; Santos, Nuno; Lopes, Diana; Alves, Eliana; Maciel, Elisabete; Faustino, Maria A F; Tomé, João P C; Neves, Maria G P M S; Almeida, Adelaide; Domingues, Pedro; Segundo, Marcela A; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2013-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy combines visible light and a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of molecular oxygen to generate reactive oxygen species able to modify biological structures such as phospholipids. Phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), being major phospholipid constituents of mammalian cells and membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, are potential targets of photosensitization. In this work, the oxidative modifications induced by white light in combination with cationic porphyrins (Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF and Tetra-Py(+)-Me) were evaluated on PE standards. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) were used to identify and characterize the oxidative modifications induced in PEs (POPE: PE 16:0/18:1, PLPE: PE 16:0/18:2, PAPE: PE 16:0/20:4). Photo-oxidation products of POPE, PLPE and PAPE as hydroxy, hydroperoxy and keteno derivatives and products due to oxidation in ethanolamine polar head were identified. Hydroperoxy-PEs were found to be the major photo-oxidation products. Quantification of hydroperoxides (PE-OOH) allowed differentiating the potential effect in photodamage of the two porphyrins. The highest amounts of PE-OOH were notorious in the presence of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF, a highly efficient PS against bacteria. The identification of these modifications in PEs is an important key point in the understanding cell damage processes underlying photodynamic therapy approaches. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Research Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A.; Donahue, D. J.; Burr, G. S.; Beck, W.; Hatheway, A. L.; Biddulph, D. L.; McHargue, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility has been operated at the University of Arizona since 1982. This is an excellent example of a facility which has benefitted from the NSF Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Facilities Program. AMS has many applications to the fields of geochronology, geoarchaeology, paleoclimatology. A wide range of climatic, geologic and archeological records can be characterized by measuring their 14C and 10Be concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These records are found not only in the traditional sampling sites such as lake sediments and ice cores, but also in diverse natural accumulates and biogeochemical products such as: loess/paleosol deposits, corals, speleothems, and forest-fire horizons. The in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials provides several possibilities of determining their chronology. Thes studies are important for understanding cosmic-ray production of radionuclides in rock surfaces, by which we can draw conclusions about exposure time and erosion. Studies on extraterrestrial materials such as lunar samples allow us to determine the solar and galactic cosmic-ray fluxes in the past, and the cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in meteorites can be used to determine terrestrial ages. In this paper, we will highlight some selected applications of AMS, including dating of some interesting art works and artifacts, to show some of the great range of studies which can be undertaken.

  20. Mass Spectrometry of Proteins in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz-Knorr, Michelle; Papantonakis, Michael; Ermer Haglund, David, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    Infrared matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI) is an effective technique for mass identification and structural analysis of biomolecules. We are using liquid glycerol/water matrices in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a liquid nitrogen cooled sample stage to provide a more natural environment for biomolecules. An Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm) and also a tunable free electron laser (2-9 μm) are used to induce desorption and ionization by exciting the O-H and CH2 stretching vibrations in the glycerol. This vibrationally enhanced ionization makes IR-MALDI very efficient, as observed in the mass spectra of small peptides. This work is a first step toward using mass spectrometry to study noncovalently bound protein complexes in vitro and to study proteins in their cellular environment. Supported by the Medical Free Electron Laser Program of the Office of Naval Research and the Vanderbilt Molecular Biophysics Training Grant of the National Institutes of Health

  1. Improving gene annotation using peptide mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Stephen; Shen, Zhouxin; Ng, Julio; Florea, Liliana; Guigó, Roderic; Briggs, Steven P.; Bafna, Vineet

    2007-01-01

    Annotation of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome sequencing projects. In spite of tremendous recent advances in computational gene finding, comprehensive annotation remains a challenge. Peptide mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for researching the dynamic proteome and suggests an attractive approach to discover and validate protein-coding genes. We present algorithms to construct and efficiently search spectra against a genomic database, with no prior knowledge of encoded proteins. By searching a corpus of 18.5 million tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) from human proteomic samples, we validate 39,000 exons and 11,000 introns at the level of translation. We present translation-level evidence for novel or extended exons in 16 genes, confirm translation of 224 hypothetical proteins, and discover or confirm over 40 alternative splicing events. Polymorphisms are efficiently encoded in our database, allowing us to observe variant alleles for 308 coding SNPs. Finally, we demonstrate the use of mass spectrometry to improve automated gene prediction, adding 800 correct exons to our predictions using a simple rescoring strategy. Our results demonstrate that proteomic profiling should play a role in any genome sequencing project. PMID:17189379

  2. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  3. Toward Single-Molecule Nanomechanical Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukes, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a preeminent methodology of proteomics since it provides rapid and quantitative identification of protein species with relatively low sample consumption. Yet with the trend toward biological analysis at increasingly smaller scales, ultimately down to the volume of an individual cell, MS with few-to-single molecule resolution will be required. We report the first realization of MS based on single-biological-molecule detection with nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). NEMS provide unparalleled mass resolution, now sufficient for detection of individual molecular species in real time. However, high sensitivity is only one of several components required for MS. We demonstrate a first complete prototype NEMS-MS system for single-molecule mass spectrometry providing proof-of-principle for this new technique. Nanoparticles and protein species are introduced by electrospray injection from the fluid phase in ambient conditions into vacuum and subsequently delivered to the NEMS detector by hexapole ion optics . Mass measurements are then recorded in real-time as analytes adsorb, one-by-one, onto a phase-locked, ultrahigh frequency (UHF) NEMS resonator. These first NEMS-MS spectra, obtained with modest resolution from only several hundred mass adsorption events, presage the future capabilities of this methodology. We outline the substantial improvements feasible in near term, through recent advances and technological avenues that are unique to NEMS-MS.

  4. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  5. Expanded newborn screening by mass spectrometry: New tests, future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ombrone, Daniela; Giocaliere, Elisa; Forni, Giulia; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has become a leading technology used in clinical chemistry and has shown to be particularly sensitive and specific when used in newborn screening (NBS) tests. The success of tandem mass spectrometry is due to important advances in hardware, software and clinical applications during the last 25 years. MS/MS permits a very rapid measurement of many metabolites in different biological specimens by using filter paper spots or directly on biological fluids. Its use in NBS give us the chance to identify possible treatable metabolic disorders even when asymptomatic and the benefits gained by this type of screening is now recognized worldwide. Today the use of MS/MS for second-tier tests and confirmatory testing is promising especially in the early detection of new disorders such as some lysosomal storage disorders, ADA and PNP SCIDs, X-adrenoleucodistrophy (X-ALD), Wilson disease, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The new challenge for the future will be reducing the false positive rate by using second-tier tests, avoiding false negative results by using new specific biomarkers and introducing new treatable disorders in NBS programs.

  6. Unexpected Analyte Oxidation during Desorption Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    During the analysis of surface spotted analytes using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), abundant ions are sometimes observed that appear to be the result of oxygen addition reactions. In this investigation, the effect of sample aging, the ambient lab environment, spray voltage, analyte surface concentration, and surface type on this oxidative modification of spotted analytes, exemplified by tamoxifen and reserpine, during analysis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was studied. Simple exposure of the samples to air and to ambient lighting increased the extent of oxidation. Increased spray voltage lead also to increased analyte oxidation, possibly as a result of oxidative species formed electrochemically at the emitter electrode or in the gas - phase by discharge processes. These oxidative species are carried by the spray and impinge on and react with the sampled analyte during desorption/ionization. The relative abundance of oxidized species was more significant for analysis of deposited analyte having a relatively low surface concentration. Increasing spray solvent flow rate and addition of hydroquinone as a redox buffer to the spray solvent were found to decrease, but not entirely eliminate, analyte oxidation during analysis. The major parameters that both minimize and maximize analyte oxidation were identified and DESI-MS operational recommendations to avoid these unwanted reactions are suggested.

  7. Linking high resolution mass spectrometry data with exposure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a growing need in the field of exposure science for monitoring methods that rapidly screen environmental media for suspect contaminants. Measurement and analysis platforms, based on high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), now exist to meet this need. Here we describe results of a study that links HRMS data with exposure predictions from the U.S. EPA's ExpoCast™ program and in vitro bioassay data from the U.S. interagency Tox21 consortium. Vacuum dust samples were collected from 56 households across the U.S. as part of the American Healthy Homes Survey (AHHS). Sample extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC–TOF/MS) with electrospray ionization. On average, approximately 2000 molecular features were identified per sample (based on accurate mass) in negative ion mode, and 3000 in positive ion mode. Exact mass, isotope distribution, and isotope spacing were used to match molecular features with a unique listing of chemical formulas extracted from EPA's Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) database. A total of 978 DSSTox formulas were consistent with the dust LC–TOF/molecular feature data (match score ≥ 90); these formulas mapped to 3228 possible chemicals in the database. Correct assignment of a unique chemical to a given formula required additional validation steps. Each suspect chemical was prioritized for follow-up confirmation using abundance and detection frequency results, along wi

  8. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites.

  9. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  10. Different Ways to On-Line Hyphenate Centrifugal Partition Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry: Application to Prenylated Xanthones from Garcinia mangostana.

    PubMed

    Destandau, Emilie; Michel, Thomas; Toribio, Alix; Elfakir, Claire

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal partition chromatography is a liquid-liquid separation method well adapted for the fractionation or purification of natural compounds from plant extracts. However, following the preparative isolation, the fractions collected must be analysed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography to evaluate their composition and/or their purity. These additional steps are time-consuming and increase the risk of compound degradation. In order to get an instantaneous analysis of fraction content with structural information on the phytochemicals eluted, it is possible to hyphenate on-line centrifugal partition chromatography with mass spectrometry. Depending on the complexity of the extract, two different kinds of centrifugal partition chromatography-mass spectrometry coupling can be performed: centrifugal partition chromatography-mass spectrometry or centrifugal partition chromatography-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupling. In the first case, one part of the centrifugal partition chromatography effluent is directly introduced in the mass spectrometry ionisation source to identify the eluted compounds, while in the second case, it is directed to a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system where compounds are first separated thanks to high-performance liquid chromatography and then identified using mass spectrometry. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Mass spectrometry of polycyclic tetracarboxylic ('ARN') acids and tetramethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Paul A; Smith, Benjamin E; Rowland, Steven J

    2010-11-15

    Polycyclic C(80) tetracarboxylic (so-called 'ARN') acids are found as calcium salts in deposits which form in certain oilfield pipelines and equipment. Characterisation of these acids is important for improving the prediction and hence avoidance or minimisation of oilfield deposition problems. Although several of the acids have been isolated and characterised (as regioisomeric mixtures) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometric methods are likely to be much more useful for the routine analysis of oils and deposits containing the acids. A publication summarising the mass spectra of the purified acids and major derivatives might thus be a very useful source of reference for scientists and technologists studying these unusual compounds. We now report the characterisation of several of the purified acids and of the tetramethyl esters by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in both positive ion and negative ion modes, by multistage ESI-MS with a suggested rationalisation of the ions produced, by positive ion atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI), and by positive ion electron ionisation (EI)-MS. Tentative identifications of C(80) acyclic, mono-, bi- and tricylic tetraacids and the δ(13)C isotope values of a mixture of the semi-pure acids determined by MS are also reported for the first time.

  12. The HUPO proteomics standards initiative- mass spectrometry controlled vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Gerhard; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Ovelleiro, David; Jones, Andrew R; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Deutsch, Eric W; Chambers, Matthew; Kallhardt, Marius; Levander, Fredrik; Shofstahl, James; Orchard, Sandra; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Stephan, Christian; Meyer, Helmut E; Eisenacher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Controlled vocabularies (CVs), i.e. a collection of predefined terms describing a modeling domain, used for the semantic annotation of data, and ontologies are used in structured data formats and databases to avoid inconsistencies in annotation, to have a unique (and preferably short) accession number and to give researchers and computer algorithms the possibility for more expressive semantic annotation of data. The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO)-Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) makes extensive use of ontologies/CVs in their data formats. The PSI-Mass Spectrometry (MS) CV contains all the terms used in the PSI MS-related data standards. The CV contains a logical hierarchical structure to ensure ease of maintenance and the development of software that makes use of complex semantics. The CV contains terms required for a complete description of an MS analysis pipeline used in proteomics, including sample labeling, digestion enzymes, instrumentation parts and parameters, software used for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins and the parameters and scores used to determine their significance. Owing to the range of topics covered by the CV, collaborative development across several PSI working groups, including proteomics research groups, instrument manufacturers and software vendors, was necessary. In this article, we describe the overall structure of the CV, the process by which it has been developed and is maintained and the dependencies on other ontologies. Database URL: http://psidev.cvs.sourceforge.net/viewvc/psidev/psi/psi-ms/mzML/controlledVocabulary/psi-ms.obo.

  13. PyQuant: A Versatile Framework for Analysis of Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Christopher J.; Kim, Min-Sik; Na, Chan Hyun; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry data necessitates an analytical pipeline that captures the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the experiments. Currently, data analysis is often coupled to specific software packages, which restricts the analysis to a given workflow and precludes a more thorough characterization of the data by other complementary tools. To address this, we have developed PyQuant, a cross-platform mass spectrometry data quantification application that is compatible with existing frameworks and can be used as a stand-alone quantification tool. PyQuant supports most types of quantitative mass spectrometry data including SILAC, NeuCode, 15N, 13C, or 18O and chemical methods such as iTRAQ or TMT and provides the option of adding custom labeling strategies. In addition, PyQuant can perform specialized analyses such as quantifying isotopically labeled samples where the label has been metabolized into other amino acids and targeted quantification of selected ions independent of spectral assignment. PyQuant is capable of quantifying search results from popular proteomic frameworks such as MaxQuant, Proteome Discoverer, and the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline in addition to several standalone search engines. We have found that PyQuant routinely quantifies a greater proportion of spectral assignments, with increases ranging from 25–45% in this study. Finally, PyQuant is capable of complementing spectral assignments between replicates to quantify ions missed because of lack of MS/MS fragmentation or that were omitted because of issues such as spectra quality or false discovery rates. This results in an increase of biologically useful data available for interpretation. In summary, PyQuant is a flexible mass spectrometry data quantification platform that is capable of interfacing with a variety of existing formats and is highly customizable, which permits easy configuration for custom analysis. PMID:27231314

  14. PyQuant: A Versatile Framework for Analysis of Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Na, Chan Hyun; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry data necessitates an analytical pipeline that captures the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the experiments. Currently, data analysis is often coupled to specific software packages, which restricts the analysis to a given workflow and precludes a more thorough characterization of the data by other complementary tools. To address this, we have developed PyQuant, a cross-platform mass spectrometry data quantification application that is compatible with existing frameworks and can be used as a stand-alone quantification tool. PyQuant supports most types of quantitative mass spectrometry data including SILAC, NeuCode, (15)N, (13)C, or (18)O and chemical methods such as iTRAQ or TMT and provides the option of adding custom labeling strategies. In addition, PyQuant can perform specialized analyses such as quantifying isotopically labeled samples where the label has been metabolized into other amino acids and targeted quantification of selected ions independent of spectral assignment. PyQuant is capable of quantifying search results from popular proteomic frameworks such as MaxQuant, Proteome Discoverer, and the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline in addition to several standalone search engines. We have found that PyQuant routinely quantifies a greater proportion of spectral assignments, with increases ranging from 25-45% in this study. Finally, PyQuant is capable of complementing spectral assignments between replicates to quantify ions missed because of lack of MS/MS fragmentation or that were omitted because of issues such as spectra quality or false discovery rates. This results in an increase of biologically useful data available for interpretation. In summary, PyQuant is a flexible mass spectrometry data quantification platform that is capable of interfacing with a variety of existing formats and is highly customizable, which permits easy configuration for custom analysis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  15. Mass spectrometry analyses of rat 2b myosin heavy chain isoform.

    PubMed

    Zurmanová, J; Malácová, D; Půta, F; Novák, P; Rícný, J; Soukup, T

    2007-01-01

    We have separated 2b myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform from the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle by SDS-PAGE and analyzed it by two subsequent mass spectrometry techniques. After tryptic digestion, the obtained peptides were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation reflectron Time of Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and sequenced by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ESI LC/MS/MS). The analyzed peptides proportionally covered 30 % of the 2b MyHC isoform sequence. The results suggest that the primary structure is identical with the highest probability to a NCBI database record ref|NP_062198.1|, representing the last updated record of rat 2b isoform. Nonetheless, four peptides carrying amino acid substitution(s) in comparison with the NCBI database record were identified.

  16. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  17. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  18. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    PubMed

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  20. Live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masujima, Tsutomu

    2009-08-01

    The history from bio-imaging to live single-cell mass spectrometry (MS) is herein reviewed. The limitation of the current bio-imaging method is probing only known molecules, and a method for finding new molecules is needed for cells which, however, show individual behaviors even in the same incubation dish. Single-cell MALDI-TOF/MS has been developed, but it can detect only molecules that can be easily ionized, and not be exhaustive. Recently, the contents of a single cell have been sucked out by a nano-electro spray tip, and directly introduced into MS by nano-spray ionization. Thousands of molecular peaks have been successfully and exhaustively detected, and an extraction method for key molecules was also developed. This new method is now being widely applied to explore site- or state-specific molecules in various aspects of cell dynamisms.

  1. Recent trends in inorganic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Barshick, C.M.; Duckworth, D.C.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    The field of inorganic mass spectrometry has seen substantial change in the author`s professional lifetime (over 30 years). Techniques in their infancy 30 years ago have matured; some have almost disappeared. New and previously unthought of techniques have come into being; some of these, such as ICP-MS, are reasonably mature now, while others have some distance to go before they can be so considered. Most of these new areas provide fertile fields for researchers, both in the development of new analytical techniques and by allowing fundamental studies to be undertaken that were previously difficult, impossible, or completely unforeseen. As full coverage of the field is manifestly impossible within the framework of this paper, only those areas with which the author has personal contact will be discussed. Most of the work originated in his own laboratory, but that of other laboratories is covered where it seemed appropriate.

  2. Characterization of Microorganisms by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Catherine E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-10-02

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for characterization and analysis of microorganisms, specifically bacteria, is described here as a rapid screening tool. The objective of this technique is not comprehensive protein analysis of a microorganism but rather a rapid screening of the organism and the accessible protein pattern for characterization and distinction. This method is based on the ionization of the readily accessible and easily ionizable portion of the protein profile of an organism that is often characteristic of different bacterial species. The utility of this screening approach is yet to reach its full potential but could be applied to food safety, disease outbreak monitoring in hospitals, culture stock integrity and verification, microbial forensics or homeland security applications.

  3. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxycirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for on-line fraction during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 34 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  4. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxyscirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for ''on-line fractionation'' during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 1 figure, 11 tables.

  5. [Future applications of mass spectrometry in microbiology].

    PubMed

    Vila, Jordi; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Burillo, Almudena; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) has been vigorously introduced in many clinical microbiology laboratories for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria and fungi. In fact, the implementation of this methodology can be considered a revolution in these laboratories. In addition to microbial identification, MALDI-TOF MS is being used for the detection of some mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and for the molecular typing of bacteria. A number of current and future applications that increase the versatility of this methodology may also be mentioned. Among these are its direct application on clinical samples, the detection of toxins or specific microbial antigens, and its application in the fields of virology and parasitology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Glass microfabricated nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Ville; Haapala, Markus; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami

    2007-05-01

    A microfluidic nebulizer chip for mass spectrometry is presented. It is an all-glass device which consists of fusion bonded Pyrex wafers with embedded flow channels and a nozzle at the chip edge. A platinum heater is located on the wafer backside. Fabrication of the chip is detailed, especially glass deep etching, wafer bonding, and metal patterning. Various process combinations of bonding and metallization have been considered (anodic bonding vs. fusion bonding; heater inside/outside channel; metallization before/after bonding; platinum lift-off vs. etching). The chip vaporizes the liquid sample (0.1-10 microL min(-1)) and mixes it with a nebulizer gas (ca. 100 sccm N2). Operating temperatures can go up to 500 degrees C ensuring efficient vaporization. Thermal insulation of the glass ensures low temperatures at the far end of the chip, enabling easy interconnections.

  7. Study of odor recorder using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Tomohiro; Nakamoto, Takamichi; Moriizumi, Toyosaka

    It is necessary to determine the recipe of a target odor with sufficient accuracy to realize an odor recorder for recording and reproducing it. We studied the recipe measurement method of a target odor using a mass spectrometry. It was confirmed that the linear superposition was valid when the binary mixture of the apple-flavor components such as isobutyric acid and ethyl valerate was measured. The superposition of a mass spectrum pattern may enable the recipe determination of a multi-component odor easily. In this research, we succeeded in the recipe determinations of orange flavor made up of 14 component odors when its typical recipe, the equalized, the citral-enhanced and the citronellol-enhanced ones were measured.

  8. Functional phosphoproteomic mass spectrometry-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics tools are crucial for understanding the structure and dynamics of signaling networks. Approaches such as affinity purification followed by MS have also been used to elucidate relevant biological questions in health and disease. The study of proteomes and phosphoproteomes as linked systems, rather than research studies of individual proteins, are necessary to understand the functions of phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated proteins under spatial and temporal conditions. Phosphoproteome studies also facilitate drug target protein identification which may be clinically useful in the near future. Here, we provide an overview of general principles of signaling pathways versus phosphorylation. Likewise, we detail chemical phosphoproteomic tools, including pros and cons with examples where these methods have been applied. In addition, basic clues of electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation fragmentation are detailed in a simple manner for successful phosphoproteomic clinical studies. PMID:23369623

  9. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  11. Mass Spectrometry Imaging in Oncology Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R J A; Bunch, J; McGinnity, D F

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been integrated in to many areas of drug discovery and development. It can have significant impact in oncology drug discovery as it allows efficacy and safety of compounds to be assessed against the backdrop of the complex tumour microenvironment. We will discuss the roles of MSI in investigating compound and metabolite biodistribution and defining pharmacokinetic -pharmacodynamic relationships, analysis that is applicable to all drug discovery projects. We will then look more specifically at how MSI can be used to understand tumour metabolism and other applications specific to oncology research. This will all be described alongside the challenges of applying MSI to industry research with increased use of metrology for MSI. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids or other organic compounds by their molecular masses. Among the different MSI strategies, MALDI-MSI provides a sensitive and label-free approach for imaging of a wide variety of protein or peptide biomarkers from the surface of tissue sections, being currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery and tissue classification. In the field of rheumatology, MALDI-MSI has been applied to date for the analysis of joint tissues such as synovial membrane or cartilage. This review summarizes the studies and key achievements obtained using MALDI-MSI to increase understanding on rheumatic pathologies and to describe potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  14. Steroid Hormone Analysis by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Steven J.; Soldin, Offie P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND New high-performance liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods are among the most successful approaches to improve specificity problems inherent in many immunoassays. CONTENT We emphasize problems with immunoassays for the measurement of steroids and review the emerging role of LC-MS/MS in the measurement of clinically relevant steroids. The latest generation of tandem mass spectrometers has superior limits of quantification, permitting omission of previously employed derivatization steps. The measurement of steroid profiles in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenal insufficiency, chronic pelvic pain and prostatitis, oncology (breast cancer), and athletes has important new applications. CONCLUSIONS LC-MS/MS now affords the specificity, imprecision, and limits of quantification necessary for the reliable measurement of steroids in human fluids, enhancing diagnostic capabilities, particularly when steroid profiles are available. PMID:19325015

  15. Mass spectrometry and Web 2.0.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K

    2007-10-01

    The term Web 2.0 is a convenient shorthand for a new era in the Internet in which users themselves are both generating and modifying existing web content. Several types of tools can be used. With social bookmarking, users assign a keyword to a web resource and the collection of the keyword 'tags' from multiple users form the classification of these resources. Blogs are a form of diary or news report published on the web in reverse chronological order and are a popular form of information sharing. A wiki is a website that can be edited using a web browser and can be used for collaborative creation of information on the site. This article is a tutorial that describes how these new ways of creating, modifying, and sharing information on the Web are being used for on-line mass spectrometry resources.

  16. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  17. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Shanks, Richard P.; Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  18. Dating silk by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Klauenberg, Kathryn; Ballard, Mary

    2011-10-01

    A new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) technique is introduced for age estimation of silk textiles based on amino acid racemization rates. With an L to D conversion half-life of ~2500 years for silk (B. mori) aspartic acid, the technique is capable of dating silk textiles ranging in age from several decades to a few-thousand-years-old. Analysis required only ~100 μg or less of silk fiber. Except for a 2 h acid hydrolysis at 110 °C, no other sample preparation is required. The CE-MS analysis takes ~20 min, consumes only nanoliters of the amino acid mixture, and provides both amino acid composition profiles and D/L ratios for ~11 amino acids.

  19. Multiplex mass spectrometry imaging for latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Korte, Andrew R; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed in-parallel data acquisition of orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and ion trap MS and/or MS/MS scans for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS imaging (MSI) to obtain rich chemical information in less data acquisition time. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel application of this multiplex MSI methodology for latent fingerprints. In a single imaging experiment, we could obtain chemical images of various endogenous and exogenous compounds, along with simultaneous MS/MS images of a few selected compounds. This work confirms the usefulness of multiplex MSI to explore chemical markers when the sample specimen is very limited. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  1. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in nutrition research

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    Many of the biochemical pathways and processes that form the foundation of modern nutrition research was elucidated using stable isotopes as physiological tracers. Since the discovery of stable isotopes, improvements and innovations in mass spectrometry and chromatography have led to greatly expanded applications. This research project was designed to evaluate gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as a tool for isotopic tracer studies and to delineate the operational parameters for the analysis of {sup 13}C-labeled cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate. The same isotope ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the ratio mass spectrometer was then used as the base instrument for the development of two additional inlet systems: a continuous-flow inlet for the analyses of {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} and a filament inlet for on-line combustion and isotopic analysis of non-volatile organic compounds. Each of these three inlets was evaluated and their utility in nutrition research illustrated. GC/C/IRMS was used to analyze cholesterol, leucine and {alpha}-ketoisocaproate with good accuracy, precision and little isotopic memory. For all three compounds the detection limits achieved well surpassed currently used technologies. For compounds that can be well separated by GC, GC/C/IRMS is a valuable analytical tool. The continuous-flow inlet provided good accuracy and precision for measurements of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} from breath tests and {sup 18}O as CO{sub 2} from total energy expenditure tests. Most importantly, the continuous-flow inlet increased sample throughput by at least a factor of three over conventional analytical techniques. The filament inlet provided accurate and precise {sup 13}C ratio measurements of both natural abundance and enriched standards of non-volatile organic compounds of physiological interest.

  2. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  3. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  4. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Oxidized Prenyl Peptides by CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawal, Ruchika P.; Shahinuzzaman, A. D. A.; Chowdhury, Saiful M.

    2017-04-01

    Farnesylation and geranylgeranylation are the two types of prenyl modification of proteins. Prenylated peptides are highly hydrophobic and their abundances in biological samples are low. In this report, we studied the oxidized prenylated peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and identified them by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry. Modified prenyl peptides were generated utilizing strong and low strength oxidizing agents to selectively oxidize and epoxidize cysteine sulfur and prenyl side chain. We selected three peptides with prenyl motifs and synthesized their prenylated versions. The detailed characteristic fragmentations of oxidized and epoxidized farnesylated and geranylgeranylated peptides were studied side by side with two popular fragmentation techniques. CID and ETD mass spectrometry clearly distinguished the modified version of these peptides. ETD mass spectrometry provided sequence information of the highly labile modified prenyl peptides and showed different characteristic fragmentations compared with CID. A detailed fragmentation of modified geranylgeranylated peptides was compared by CID and ETD mass spectrometry for the first time.

  5. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  6. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  7. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Oxidized Prenyl Peptides by CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhawal, Ruchika P; Shahinuzzaman, A D A; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2017-04-01

    Farnesylation and geranylgeranylation are the two types of prenyl modification of proteins. Prenylated peptides are highly hydrophobic and their abundances in biological samples are low. In this report, we studied the oxidized prenylated peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and identified them by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry. Modified prenyl peptides were generated utilizing strong and low strength oxidizing agents to selectively oxidize and epoxidize cysteine sulfur and prenyl side chain. We selected three peptides with prenyl motifs and synthesized their prenylated versions. The detailed characteristic fragmentations of oxidized and epoxidized farnesylated and geranylgeranylated peptides were studied side by side with two popular fragmentation techniques. CID and ETD mass spectrometry clearly distinguished the modified version of these peptides. ETD mass spectrometry provided sequence information of the highly labile modified prenyl peptides and showed different characteristic fragmentations compared with CID. A detailed fragmentation of modified geranylgeranylated peptides was compared by CID and ETD mass spectrometry for the first time. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Interlaboratory study to evaluate the robustness of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Christian; Barbas, Coral; López-Gonzálvez, Ángeles; Garcia, Antonia; Benavente, Fernando; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; Blanc, Tim; Freckleton, Gordon; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Shanmuganathan, Meera; de l'Escaille, Francois; Far, Johann; Haselberg, Rob; Huang, Sean; Huhn, Carolin; Pattky, Martin; Michels, David; Mou, Si; Yang, Feng; Neusuess, Christian; Tromsdorf, Nora; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Park, SungAe Suhr

    2015-07-06

    A collaborative study on the robustness and portability of a capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry method for peptide mapping was performed by an international team, consisting of 13 independent laboratories from academia and industry. All participants used the same batch of samples, reagents and coated capillaries to run their assays, whereas they utilized the capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry equipment available in their laboratories. The equipment used varied in model, type and instrument manufacturer. Furthermore, different types of sheath-flow capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry interfaces were used. Migration time, peak height and peak area of ten representative target peptides of trypsin-digested bovine serum albumin were determined by every laboratory on two consecutive days. The data were critically evaluated to identify outliers and final values for means, repeatability (precision within a laboratory) and reproducibility (precision between laboratories) were established. For relative migration time the repeatability was between 0.05 and 0.18% RSD and the reproducibility between 0.14 and 1.3% RSD. For relative peak area repeatability and reproducibility values obtained were 3-12 and 9-29% RSD, respectively. These results demonstrate that capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry is robust enough to allow a method transfer across multiple laboratories and should promote a more widespread use of peptide mapping and other capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry applications in biopharmaceutical analysis and related fields.

  10. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Oxidized Prenyl Peptides by CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawal, Ruchika P.; Shahinuzzaman, A. D. A.; Chowdhury, Saiful M.

    2016-10-01

    Farnesylation and geranylgeranylation are the two types of prenyl modification of proteins. Prenylated peptides are highly hydrophobic and their abundances in biological samples are low. In this report, we studied the oxidized prenylated peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and identified them by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry. Modified prenyl peptides were generated utilizing strong and low strength oxidizing agents to selectively oxidize and epoxidize cysteine sulfur and prenyl side chain. We selected three peptides with prenyl motifs and synthesized their prenylated versions. The detailed characteristic fragmentations of oxidized and epoxidized farnesylated and geranylgeranylated peptides were studied side by side with two popular fragmentation techniques. CID and ETD mass spectrometry clearly distinguished the modified version of these peptides. ETD mass spectrometry provided sequence information of the highly labile modified prenyl peptides and showed different characteristic fragmentations compared with CID. A detailed fragmentation of modified geranylgeranylated peptides was compared by CID and ETD mass spectrometry for the first time.

  11. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  12. HMPL: A Pipeline for Identifying Hemimethylation Patterns by Comparing Two Samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuying; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation (the addition of a methyl group to a cytosine) is an important epigenetic event in mammalian cells because it plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Most previous methylation studies assume that DNA methylation occurs on both positive and negative strands. However, a few studies have reported that in some genes, methylation occurs only on one strand (ie, hemimethylation) and has clustering patterns. These studies report that hemimethylation occurs on individual genes. It is unclear whether hemimethylation occurs genome-wide and whether there are hemimethylation differences between cancerous and noncancerous cells. To address these questions, we have developed the first-ever pipeline, named hemimethylation pipeline (HMPL), to identify hemimethylation patterns. Utilizing the available software and the newly developed Perl and R scripts, HMPL can identify hemimethylation patterns for a single sample and can also compare two different samples.

  13. Identification of synthetic by-products in combinatorial libraries using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aubagnac, J L; Amblard, M; Enjalbal, C; Subra, G; Martinez, J; Durand, P; Renaut, P

    1999-10-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI) and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to analyze randomly chosen samples from parallel syntheses carried out on derivatized polypropylene crowns compatible with a Multipin solid support system. Side-reactions and by-products were clearly identified, and the yields of the expected molecules were unexpectedly low for most samples. LC-MS was superior to HPLC with absorbance detection or electrospray mass spectrometry alone for determining the identity and purity of each desired combinatorial compounds.

  14. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for early identification of bacteria grown in blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Zabbe, Jean-Benoît; Zanardo, Laura; Mégraud, Francis; Bessède, Emilie

    2015-08-01

    This note reports an interesting way to rapidly identify bacteria grown from blood culture bottles. Chocolate agar plates were inoculated with 1 drop of the positive blood bottle medium. After a 3-hour incubation, the growth veil was submitted to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: 77% of the bacteria present have been correctly identified.

  15. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities. Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2011-08-24

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner.

  16. Utility of liquid chromatography/fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/thermospray mass spectrometry for structure identification of metabolites of a fluorinated herbicide.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Chott, R C; Solsten, R T

    1992-09-01

    This study demonstrates a useful application of on-line microbore high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fast atom bombardment (FAB) and thermospray (TSP) mass spectrometry techniques for identification of metabolites from the in vitro metabolism of an experimental Monsanto herbicide: 2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl-N-[2-methyl-6- (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acetamide, 'chloroacetanilide'. The microbore HPLC FAB technique on a high-resolution sector mass spectrometer accelerated identification of polar metabolites from the in vitro metabolism study of the herbicide. It provided good chromatographic resolution and excellent FAB sensitivity with strong protonated molecular ions. Scanning high-resolution LC/FAB mass spectrometry also provided molecular formulae for structural elucidation of unknown metabolites. Sample purification and concentration were minimized. Identification of less polar metabolites was carried out using LC/TSP mass spectrometry with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. LC/TSP mass spectrometry provided useful structural information for both polar and less polar metabolites because their spectra showed more fragmentation than FAB spectra. Glutathione conjugation was the major reaction observed during in vitro incubation of the herbicide. Oxidation of the chloroacetanilide by rat liver enzymes was also a significant metabolic reaction. Seven metabolites were identified, of which four were glutathione conjugates.

  17. Analysis of protein composition using multidimensional chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-11-03

    Multidimensional liquid chromatography of peptides produced by protease digestion of complex protein mixtures followed by tandem mass spectrometry can be coupled with automated database searching to identify large numbers of proteins in complex samples. These methods avoid the limitations of gel electrophoresis and in-gel digestions by directly identifying protein mixtures in solution. One method used extensively is named Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT), where reversed-phase chromatography and strong cation-exchange chromatography are coupled directly in a microcapillary column. This column is then placed in line between an HPLC and a mass spectrometer for complex mixture analysis. MudPIT remains a powerful approach for analyzing complex mixtures like whole proteomes and protein complexes. MudPIT is used for quantitative proteomic analysis of complex mixtures to generate novel biological insights.

  18. Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Laboratory: Applications in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Garg, Uttam; Zhang, Yan Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used in research and specialized clinical laboratories for decades as a very powerful technology to identify and quantify compounds. In recent years, application of MS in routine clinical laboratories has increased significantly. This is mainly due to the ability of MS to provide very specific identification, high sensitivity, and simultaneous analysis of multiple analytes (>100). The coupling of tandem mass spectrometry with gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) has enabled the rapid expansion of this technology. While applications of MS are used in many clinical areas, therapeutic drug monitoring, drugs of abuse, and clinical toxicology are still the primary focuses of the field. It is not uncommon to see mass spectrometry being used in routine clinical practices for those applications.

  19. The Role of Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics in Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Andrew D.; Lanz, Christian; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation metabolomics can be defined as the global profiling of biological fluids to uncover latent, endogenous small molecules whose concentrations change in a dose-response manner following exposure to ionizing radiation. In response to the potential threat of nuclear or radiological terrorism, the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry (CMCR) was established to develop field-deployable biodosimeters based, in principle, on rapid analysis by mass spectrometry of readily and easily obtainable biofluids. In this review, we briefly summarize radiation biology and key events related to actual and potential nuclear disasters, discuss the important contributions the field of mass spectrometry has made to the field of radiation metabolomics, and summarize current discovery efforts to use mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to identify dose-responsive urinary constituents, and ultimately to build and deploy a noninvasive high-throughput biodosimeter. PMID:19890938

  20. Application of dual tree complex wavelet transform in tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Selvaraaju; Tay, David B H; Cooke, Ira; Faou, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a widely used technique in molecular biology for high throughput identification and sequencing of peptides (and proteins). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is a specialised mass spectrometry technique whereby the sequence of peptides can be determined. Preprocessing of the MS/MS data is indispensable before performing any statistical analysis on the data. In this work, preprocessing of MS/MS data is proposed based on the Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT) using almost symmetric Hilbert pair of wavelets. After the preprocessing step, the identification of peptides is done using the database search approach. The performance of the proposed preprocessing technique is evaluated by comparing its performance against Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT). The preprocessing performed using DTCWT identified more peptides compared to DWT and SWT.

  1. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments.

  2. Protocol for the purification of proteins from biological extracts for identification by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, Luc; Boschetti, Egisto

    2007-01-01

    When a protein signal is selected by mass spectrometry as being a potential biomarker, it is necessary to formally identify it. This process involves separation of the protein in question and its identification by either peptide fingerprinting or tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. In the following pages, a simple and rapid protocol is described. Basically, the protocol consists of an initial rational selection of a few sorbents followed by alignment of these as a series of columns to obtain the purified target protein. This preparation is then submitted to electrophoresis, the band is excised and the trypsin digest is analyzed by either mass spectrometry (mass fingerprinting approach) or by LC-MS/MS (sequencing). The development of the process takes only a few days. Experimental data for the isolation and identification of proteins are discussed and two examples are shown.

  3. Defining mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways with mass spectrometry-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Powell, David W; Pierce, William M; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2005-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases are a group of ubiquitously expressed kinase pathways that have been conserved from yeast through humans. They control a large number of critical cell functions. Identification of targets of those kinases is necessary to define signal transduction pathways that lead to cell responses. The application of a number of mass spectrometry-based techniques to the identification of phosphoproteins is reviewed. A new proteomic approach is described for the identification of the downstream targets of specific kinases that combines phosphorylation of cell lysates in in vitro kinase reactions by active recombinant kinase with protein separation by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE and phosphoprotein identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry or by phosphopeptide enrichment and tandem mass spectrometry. The results suggested that a combination of multiple approaches will be required to fully identify phosphoproteomes. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 24:847-864, 2005.

  4. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in in vitro drug metabolite screening.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Ari; Turpeinen, Miia; Pelkonen, Olavi

    2009-02-01

    A combination of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has proven its status as the most powerful analytical tool for screening and identifying drug metabolites in modern drug discovery. These techniques have become irreplaceable for drug metabolism laboratories, providing high amounts of information from a wide variety of samples. This review focuses on the most common and useful applications of these techniques when working on in vitro metabolism, more specifically with screening and identification of chemically stable or reactive metabolites formed via biotransformation reactions. Matching specific tasks and suitable instruments is a recurring consideration; for many reasons, the time-of-flight or orbitrap mass spectrometry provides clearly increased efficiency in metabolite profiling compared to other types of mass spectrometry.

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of Glycosylation and Hydroxylation of Basement Membrane Collagen IV by High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Basak, Trayambak; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Tabb, David L; Hudson, Billy G; Vanacore, Roberto M

    2016-01-04

    Collagen IV is the main structural protein that provides a scaffold for assembly of basement membrane proteins. Posttranslational modifications such as hydroxylation of proline and lysine and glycosylation of lysine are essential for the functioning of collagen IV triple-helical molecules. These modifications are highly abundant posing a difficult challenge for in-depth characterization of collagen IV using conventional proteomics approaches. Herein, we implemented an integrated pipeline combining high-resolution mass spectrometry with different fragmentation techniques and an optimized bioinformatics workflow to study posttranslational modifications in mouse collagen IV. We achieved 82% sequence coverage for the α1 chain, mapping 39 glycosylated hydroxylysine, 148 4-hydroxyproline, and seven 3-hydroxyproline residues. Further, we employed our pipeline to map the modifications on human collagen IV and achieved 85% sequence coverage for the α1 chain, mapping 35 glycosylated hydroxylysine, 163 4-hydroxyproline, and 14 3-hydroxyproline residues. Although lysine glycosylation heterogeneity was observed in both mouse and human, 21 conserved sites were identified. Likewise, five 3-hydroxyproline residues were conserved between mouse and human, suggesting that these modification sites are important for collagen IV function. Collectively, these are the first comprehensive maps of hydroxylation and glycosylation sites in collagen IV, which lay the foundation for dissecting the key role of these modifications in health and disease.

  6. Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

    1995-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2

  7. [The gas-liquid cromatography with mass spectrometry for the identification of yeasts].

    PubMed

    Paredes-Salido, F; Mira-Gutiérrez, J; Sasián-Macías, P; García-Martos, P

    2001-03-01

    Methods based on gas chromatography, have been used for identification of the yeasts. In order to know the value of the patterns obtained by this method, we have used this technique and mass spectrometry on 44 strains belonging to 16 genus and 21 species of collection yeasts, identifying the corresponding peaks to 22 fatty acids methyl esters by means of the reaction times of the corresponding standards and the confirmation of molecular weigh by mass spectrometry. The correlation coefficient was of 0.848965. The chromatographic technique seems of great utility for the determination of lipidotypes.

  8. Routine identification of Nocardia species by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Girard, Victoria; Mailler, Sandrine; Polsinelli, Sophie; Jacob, Delphine; Saccomani, Marie Christine; Celliere, Beatrice; Monnin, Valerie; van Belkum, Alex; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Durand, Géraldine

    2017-01-01

    We here show adequate species identification for bacterial isolates of the genus Nocardia spp. through VITEK mass spectrometry. Application of a specific sample preparation method in combination with a robust matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) database leads to 94% accurate identification to the species level on a set of 164 isolates. The possibility to identify Nocardia spp. using MALDI-TOF MS will be available in the next release of VITEK MS update (IVD Version 3.0).

  9. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Evangelista, Daniela; Zuccaro, Antonio; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool), QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA) by ab initio methods) helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is freely

  10. Characterisation of DEFB107 by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bryan J.; Eastwood, Hayden; Clark, Dave J.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Dorin, Julia A.; Maxwell, Alison; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Bernstein, Summer L.; Bowers, Michael T.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian defensins are small endogenous cationic proteins which form a class of antimicrobial peptides that is part of the innate immune response of all mammalian species [R. Lehrer, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (9) (2004) 727; T. Ganz, R.I. Lehrer, Curr. Opin. Immunol. 6 (4) (1994) 584] [1] and [2]. We have developed mass spectrometry based strategies for characterising the structure-activity relationship of defensins [D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, N.C. Polfer, P.E. Barran, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (47) (2004) 48671; P.E. Barran, N.C. Polfer, D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, P.R.R. Langridge-Smith, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, R.P. Millar, M.T. Bowers, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 240 (2005) 273] [3] and [4], and here we present data obtained from a five cysteine containing [beta]-defensin, DEFB107. The synthetic product of this human defensin exists with a glutathione capping group, its oxidation state and disulphide connectivity have been determined via accurate mass measurements and peptide mass mapping respectively, and despite possessing three disulphide bridges, it does not fit the [beta]-defensin canonical motif. With the use of molecular modelling, we have generated candidate geometries to discern the influence of disulphide bridging on the overall tertiary structure of DEFB107. These are compared with experimental results from ion mobility measurements. Defensins display activity against a wide variety of pathogens including both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Their mechanism of mode of action is unknown, but is believed to involve defensin aggregation at cell surfaces, followed by cell permeabilisation and hence deathE To probe this mechanism, the localisation of DEFB107 in synthetic vesicles was studied using H/D exchange and mass spectrometry. The results obtained are used to analyse the antimicrobial activity of DEFB107.

  11. Isotope ratio analysis by Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Chimiak, L. M.; Dallas, B.; Griep-Raming, J.; Juchelka, D.; Makarov, A.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Several technologies are being developed to examine the intramolecular isotopic structures of molecules (i.e., site-specific and multiple substitution), but various limitations in sample size and type or (for IRMS) resolution have so far prevented the creation of a truly general technique. We will discuss the initial findings of a technique based on Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using the Thermo Scientific Q Exactive GC — an instrument that contains an Orbitrap mass analyzer. Fourier transform mass spectrometry is marked by exceptionally high mass resolutions (the Orbitrap reaches M/∆M in the range 250,000-1M in the mass range of greatest interest, 50-200 amu). This allows for resolution of a large range of nearly isobaric interferences for isotopologues of volatile and semi-volatile compounds (i.e., involving isotopes of H, C, N, O and S). It also provides potential to solve very challenging mass resolution problems for isotopic analysis of other, heavier elements. Both internal and external experimental reproducibilities of isotope ratio analyses using the Orbitrap typically conform to shot-noise limits down to levels of 0.2 ‰ (1SE), and routinely in the range 0.5-1.0 ‰, with similar accuracy when standardized to concurrently run reference materials. Such measurements can be made without modifications to the ion optics of the Q Exactive GC, but do require specially designed sample introduction devices to permit sample/standard comparison and long integration times. The sensitivity of the Q Exactive GC permits analysis of sub-nanomolar samples and quantification of multiply-substituted species. The site-specific capability of this instrument arises from the fact that mass spectra of molecular analytes commonly contain diverse fragment ion species, each of which samples a specific sub-set of molecular sites. We will present applications of this technique to the biological and abiological chemistry of amino acids, forensic identification of

  12. Interfacing membrane mimetics with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Michael T.; Hoi, Kin Kuan; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Membrane proteins play critical physiological roles and make up the majority of drug targets. Due to their generally low expression levels and amphipathic nature, membrane proteins represent challenging molecular entities for biophysical study. Mass spectrometry offers several sensitive approaches to study the biophysics of membrane proteins. By preserving noncovalent interactions in the gas phase and using collisional activation to remove solubilization agents inside the mass spectrometer, native mass spectrometry (MS) is capable of studying isolated assemblies that would be insoluble in aqueous solution, such as membrane protein oligomers and protein-lipid complexes. Conventional methods use detergent to solubilize the protein prior to electrospray ionization. Gas-phase activation inside the mass spectrometer removes the detergent to yield the isolated proteins with bound ligands. This approach has proven highly successful for ionizing membrane proteins. With the appropriate choice of detergents, membrane proteins with bound lipid species can be observed, which allows characterization of protein-lipid interactions. However, detergents have several limitations. They do not necessarily replicate the native lipid bilayer environment, and only a small number of protein-lipid interactions can be resolved. In this Account, we summarize the development of different membrane mimetics as cassettes for MS analysis of membrane proteins. Examples include amphipols, bicelles, and picodiscs with a special emphasis on lipoprotein Nanodiscs. Polydispersity and heterogeneity of the membrane mimetic cassette is a critical issue for study by MS. Ever more complex datasets consisting of overlapping protein charge states and multiple lipid-bound entities have required development of new computational, theoretical, and experimental approaches to interpret both mass and ion mobility spectra. We will present the rationale and limitations of these approaches. Starting with the

  13. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  14. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  15. Advantageous Uses of Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hale, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative protein measurements by mass spectrometry have gained wide acceptance in research settings. However, clinical uptake of mass spectrometric protein assays has not followed suit. In part, this is due to the long-standing acceptance by regulatory agencies of immunological assays such as ELISA assays. In most cases, ELISAs provide highly accurate, sensitive, relatively inexpensive, and simple assays for many analytes. The barrier to acceptance of mass spectrometry in these situations will remain high. However, mass spectrometry provides solutions to certain protein measurements that are difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish by immunological methods. Cases where mass spectrometry can provide solutions to difficult assay development include distinguishing between very closely related protein species and monitoring biological and analytical variability due to sample handling and very high multiplexing capacity. This paper will highlight several examples where mass spectrometry has made certain protein measurements possible where immunological techniques have had a great difficulty. PMID:23365751

  16. Sharing and community curation of mass spectrometry data with GNPS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Don Duy; Watrous, Jeramie; Kapono, Clifford A; Luzzatto-Knaan, Tal; Porto, Carla; Bouslimani, Amina; Melnik, Alexey V; Meehan, Michael J; Liu, Wei-Ting; Crüsemann, Max; Boudreau, Paul D; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Kersten, Roland D; Pace, Laura A; Quinn, Robert A; Duncan, Katherine R; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Floros, Dimitrios J; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Kleigrewe, Karin; Northen, Trent; Dutton, Rachel J; Parrot, Delphine; Carlson, Erin E; Aigle, Bertrand; Michelsen, Charlotte F; Jelsbak, Lars; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Pevzner, Pavel; Edlund, Anna; McLean, Jeffrey; Piel, Jörn; Murphy, Brian T; Gerwick, Lena; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Yang, Yu-Liang; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Maansson, Maria; Keyzers, Robert A; Sims, Amy C; Johnson, Andrew R.; Sidebottom, Ashley M; Sedio, Brian E; Klitgaard, Andreas; Larson, Charles B; P., Cristopher A Boya; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Gonzalez, David J; Silva, Denise B; Marques, Lucas M; Demarque, Daniel P; Pociute, Egle; O'Neill, Ellis C; Briand, Enora; Helfrich, Eric J. N.; Granatosky, Eve A; Glukhov, Evgenia; Ryffel, Florian; Houson, Hailey; Mohimani, Hosein; Kharbush, Jenan J; Zeng, Yi; Vorholt, Julia A; Kurita, Kenji L; Charusanti, Pep; McPhail, Kerry L; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Vuong, Lisa; Elfeki, Maryam; Traxler, Matthew F; Engene, Niclas; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Vining, Oliver B; Baric, Ralph; Silva, Ricardo R; Mascuch, Samantha J; Tomasi, Sophie; Jenkins, Stefan; Macherla, Venkat; Hoffman, Thomas; Agarwal, Vinayak; Williams, Philip G; Dai, Jingqui; Neupane, Ram; Gurr, Joshua; Rodríguez, Andrés M. C.; Lamsa, Anne; Zhang, Chen; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Duggan, Brendan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Allard, Pierre-Marie; Phapale, Prasad; Nothias, Louis-Felix; Alexandrov, Theodore; Litaudon, Marc; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kyle, Jennifer E; Metz, Thomas O; Peryea, Tyler; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; VanLeer, Danielle; Shinn, Paul; Jadhav, Ajit; Müller, Rolf; Waters, Katrina M; Shi, Wenyuan; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin; Knight, Rob; Jensen, Paul R; Palsson, Bernhard O; Pogliano, Kit; Linington, Roger G; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Lopes, Norberto P; Gerwick, William H; Moore, Bradley S; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bandeira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the diverse chemistries present in natural products (NP) for biotechnology and medicine remains untapped because NP databases are not searchable with raw data and the NP community has no way to share data other than in published papers. Although mass spectrometry techniques are well-suited to high-throughput characterization of natural products, there is a pressing need for an infrastructure to enable sharing and curation of data. We present Global Natural Products Social molecular networking (GNPS, http://gnps.ucsd.edu), an open-access knowledge base for community wide organization and sharing of raw, processed or identified tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. In GNPS crowdsourced curation of freely available community-wide reference MS libraries will underpin improved annotations. Data-driven social-networking should facilitate identification of spectra and foster collaborations. We also introduce the concept of ‘living data’ through continuous reanalysis of deposited data. PMID:27504778

  17. Advanced Mass Spectrometry Technologies for the Study of Microbial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jessica L.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) has been successfully applied to the field of microbial pathogenesis with promising results, principally in diagnostic microbiology to rapidly identify bacteria based on the molecular profiles of small cell populations. Direct profiling of molecules from serum and tissue samples by MALDI MS providesa means to study the pathogen-host interaction and to discover potential markers of infection. Systematic molecular profiling across tissue sections represents a new imaging modality, enabling regiospecific molecular measurements to be made in situ, in both two- and three-dimensional analyses. Herein, we briefly summarize work that employs MALDI MS to study the pathogenesis of microbial infection. PMID:24997399

  18. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Measurement of Aminotransferase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Chengsen; Xu, Yang; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    A change in enzyme activity has been used as a clinical biomarker for diagnosis and is useful in evaluating patient prognosis. Current laboratory measurements of enzyme activity involve multi-step derivatization of the reaction products followed by quantitative analysis of these derivatives. This study simplified the reaction systems by using only the target enzymatic reaction and directly detecting its product. A protocol using paper spray mass spectrometry for identifying and quantifying the reaction product has been developed. Evaluation of the activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was chosen as a proof-of-principle. The volume of sample needed is greatly reduced compared with the traditional method. Paper spray has a desalting effect that avoids sprayer clogging problems seen when examining serum samples by nanoESI. This very simple method does not require sample pretreatment and additional derivatization reactions, yet it gives high quality kinetic data, excellent limits of detection (60 ppb from serum), and coefficients of variation <10% in quantitation.

  19. Identification of c-MYC SUMOylation by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kalkat, Manpreet; Chan, Pak-Kei; Wasylishen, Amanda R.; Srikumar, Tharan; Kim, Sam S.; Ponzielli, Romina; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z.

    2014-01-01

    The c-MYC transcription factor is a master regulator of many cellular processes and deregulation of this oncogene has been linked to more than 50% of all cancers. This deregulation can take many forms, including altered post-translational regulation. Here, using immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry, we identified a MYC SUMOylation site (K326). Abrogation of signaling through this residue by substitution with arginine (K326R) has no obvious effects on MYC half-life, intracellular localization, transcriptional targets, nor on the biological effects of MYC overexpression in two different cell systems assessed for soft agar colony formation, proliferation, and apoptosis. While we have definitively demonstrated that MYC SUMOylation can occur on K326, future work will be needed to elucidate the mechanisms and biological significance of MYC regulation by SUMOylation. PMID:25522242

  20. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  1. Matrix Factorization Techniques for Analysis of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Siy, Peter W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Chen, Yanfeng; Liu, Ying; Sullards, M. Cameron; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is a method for understanding the molecular distribution in a two-dimensional sample. This method is effective for a wide range of molecules, but generates a large amount of data. It is difficult to extract important information from these large datasets manually and automated methods for discovering important spatial and spectral features are needed. Independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization are explained and explored as tools for identifying underlying factors in the data. These techniques are compared and contrasted with principle component analysis, the more standard analysis tool. Independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization are found to be more effective analysis methods. A mouse cerebellum dataset is used for testing.

  2. Mass spectrometry analysis of gliadins in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Pasquale; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, scientific research on wheat gluten proteins has followed three main directions aimed at (1) finding relationships between individual genetic alleles coding for gliadins, high or low molecular weight glutenin subunits, and the viscoelastic dough properties of flour-derived products such as pasta and bread; (2) identifying prolamins and derived peptides involved in celiac disease, a pathological condition in which the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals is reversibly damaged; and (3) developing and validating sensitive and specific methods for detecting trace amounts of gluten proteins in gluten-free foods for celiac disease patients. In this review, the main aspects of current and perspective applications of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies to the structural characterization of gliadins are presented, with focus on issues related to detection, identification, and quantification of intact gliadins, as well as gliadin-derived peptides relevant to the biochemical, immunological, and toxicological aspects of celiac disease.

  3. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E; Yevdokimov, Alexander V; Smith, James L; Oxley, Jimmie C

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Analyzing the posttranslational modification status of Notch using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Shinako; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Notch is modified by multiple types of posttranslational modifications, most of which are known to affect Notch function. The extracellular domain (ECD) is modified with N-glycosylation and at least three types of O-glycosylation (O-fucose, O-glucose, and O-GlcNAc), while the intracellular domain is hydroxylated, phosphorylated, and ubiquitinated. In order to analyze the structure and function of the O-glycans decorating the ECD, we have developed semiquantitative mass spectral methods for identifying modifications at individual sites on Notch that are generally applicable to most posttranslational modifications. Here we describe the expression and purification of Notch ECD fragments, digestion of the fragments with proteases to prepare for mass spectral analysis, and identification of peptides modified with O-glycans using mass spectrometry.

  5. Analysis of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Immunopeptidomes Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Etienne; Kowalewski, Daniel J.; Chiek Koh, Ching; Sturm, Theo; Schuster, Heiko; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    The myriad of peptides presented at the cell surface by class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are referred to as the immunopeptidome and are of great importance for basic and translational science. For basic science, the immunopeptidome is a critical component for understanding the immune system; for translational science, exact knowledge of the immunopeptidome can directly fuel and guide the development of next-generation vaccines and immunotherapies against autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancers. In this mini-review, we summarize established isolation techniques as well as emerging mass spectrometry-based platforms (i.e. SWATH-MS) to identify and quantify MHC-associated peptides. We also highlight selected biological applications and discuss important current technical limitations that need to be solved to accelerate the development of this field. PMID:26628741

  6. Analysis of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Immunopeptidomes Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caron, Etienne; Kowalewski, Daniel J; Chiek Koh, Ching; Sturm, Theo; Schuster, Heiko; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-12-01

    The myriad of peptides presented at the cell surface by class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are referred to as the immunopeptidome and are of great importance for basic and translational science. For basic science, the immunopeptidome is a critical component for understanding the immune system; for translational science, exact knowledge of the immunopeptidome can directly fuel and guide the development of next-generation vaccines and immunotherapies against autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancers. In this mini-review, we summarize established isolation techniques as well as emerging mass spectrometry-based platforms (i.e. SWATH-MS) to identify and quantify MHC-associated peptides. We also highlight selected biological applications and discuss important current technical limitations that need to be solved to accelerate the development of this field.

  7. Quantification of antidepressants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winecker, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are of great interest to clinical and forensic toxicologists as they are frequently used in suicidal gestures; they can be the source of drug interactions and some have narrow therapeutic indices making the potential for toxicity more likely. There are five categories of antidepressants based on function and/or structure. These are monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), cyclic antidepressants including tricyclic and tetracyclic compounds (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), and atypical compounds. This method is designed to detect the presence of antidepressant drugs in blood/serum, urine, and tissue specimens using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) following liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and identified by relative retention times and mass spectra.

  8. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  9. Tandem mass spectrometry data quality assessment by self-convolution

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Keng Wah; Tham, Wai Mun

    2007-01-01

    Background Many algorithms have been developed for deciphering the tandem mass spectrometry (MS) data sets. They can be essentially clustered into two classes. The first performs searches on theoretical mass spectrum database, while the second based itself on de novo sequencing from raw mass spectrometry data. It was noted that the quality of mass spectra affects significantly the protein identification processes in both instances. This prompted the authors to explore ways to measure the quality of MS data sets before subjecting them to the protein identification algorithms, thus allowing for more meaningful searches and increased confidence level of proteins identified. Results The proposed method measures the qualities of MS data sets based on the symmetric property of b- and y-ion peaks present in a MS spectrum. Self-convolution on MS data and its time-reversal copy was employed. Due to the symmetric nature of b-ions and y-ions peaks, the self-convolution result of a good spectrum would produce a highest mid point intensity peak. To reduce processing time, self-convolution was achieved using Fast Fourier Transform and its inverse transform, followed by the removal of the "DC" (Direct Current) component and the normalisation of the data set. The quality score was defined as the ratio of the intensity at the mid point to the remaining peaks of the convolution result. The method was validated using both theoretical mass spectra, with various permutations, and several real MS data sets. The results were encouraging, revealing a high percentage of positive prediction rates for spectra with good quality scores. Conclusion We have demonstrated in this work a method for determining the quality of tandem MS data set. By pre-determining the quality of tandem MS data before subjecting them to protein identification algorithms, spurious protein predictions due to poor tandem MS data are avoided, giving scientists greater confidence in the predicted results. We conclude that

  10. [Building Mass Spectrometry Spectral Libraries of Human Cancer Cell Lines].

    PubMed

    Faktor, J; Bouchal, P

    Cancer research often focuses on protein quantification in model cancer cell lines and cancer tissues. SWATH (sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra), the state of the art method, enables the quantification of all proteins included in spectral library. Spectral library contains fragmentation patterns of each detectable protein in a sample. Thorough spectral library preparation will improve quantitation of low abundant proteins which usually play an important role in cancer. Our research is focused on the optimization of spectral library preparation aimed at maximizing the number of identified proteins in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. First, we optimized the sample preparation prior entering the mass spectrometer. We examined the effects of lysis buffer composition, peptide dissolution protocol and the material of sample vial on the number of proteins identified in spectral library. Next, we optimized mass spectrometry (MS) method for spectral library data acquisition. Our thorough optimized protocol for spectral library building enabled the identification of 1,653 proteins (FDR < 1%) in 1 µg of MCF-7 lysate. This work contributed to the enhancement of protein coverage in SWATH digital biobanks which enable quantification of arbitrary protein from physically unavailable samples. In future, high quality spectral libraries could play a key role in preparing of patient proteome digital fingerprints.Key words: biomarker - mass spectrometry - proteomics - digital biobanking - SWATH - protein quantificationThis work was supported by the project MEYS - NPS I - LO1413.The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study.The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 7. 5. 2016Accepted: 9. 6. 2016.

  11. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird’s view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive. PMID:17481942

  12. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-06-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird's view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  14. Deciphering the histone code using mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueberheide, Beatrix M.; Mollah, Sahana

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, studies surrounding chromatin research have grown exponentially. A major focus of chromatin biology is centered on understanding of how histone modifications alter chromatin structure at the molecular and mechanistic levels. Discoveries are being made at a rapid pace due to the advent of new and innovative techniques. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool in the field of histone research due to its speed, sensitivity, and ease of use. This has resulted in the identification of a number of novel histone modification sites. In consequence, new roles in biological processes have been discovered and hypothetical models, such as the `histone code' have been reaffirmed or refined. One significant advantage to using mass spectrometric techniques is that the combinations of modifications on different sites can be determined which is crucial to deciphering the `histone code'. In this manuscript, the mass spectrometric approaches developed over the past decade for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are discussed.

  15. NITPICK: peak identification for mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Bernhard Y; Kirchner, Marc; Steen , Hanno; Steen, Judith AJ; Hamprecht , Fred A

    2008-01-01

    Background The reliable extraction of features from mass spectra is a fundamental step in the automated analysis of proteomic mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Results This contribution proposes a sparse template regression approach to peak picking called NITPICK. NITPICK is a Non-greedy, Iterative Template-based peak PICKer that deconvolves complex overlapping isotope distributions in multicomponent mass spectra. NITPICK is based on fractional averagine, a novel extension to Senko's well-known averagine model, and on a modified version of sparse, non-negative least angle regression, for which a suitable, statistically motivated early stopping criterion has been derived. The strength of NITPICK is the deconvolution of overlapping mixture mass spectra. Conclusion Extensive comparative evaluation has been carried out and results are provided for simulated and real-world data sets. NITPICK outperforms pepex, to date the only alternate, publicly available, non-greedy feature extraction routine. NITPICK is available as software package for the R programming language and can be downloaded from . PMID:18755032

  16. Pushing the limits of accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Beene, J. R.; Danchev, M.; Doupé, J.; Fuentes, B.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Hausladen, P. A.; Juras, R. C.; Liang, J. F.; Litherland, A. E.; Liu, Y.; Meigs, M. J.; Mills, G. D.; Mueller, P. E.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pavan, J.; Sinclair, J. W.; Stracener, D. W.

    2007-06-01

    A renewed interest in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) from nuclear physics laboratories is emerging in connection with Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs). At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) we are exploring the AMS capabilities of the 25-MV tandem accelerator. Behind this effort is the realization that two fields of research - AMS and RIBs - complement each other in techniques. Development of effective and efficient beam purification techniques is of common interest to both AMS and the RIB program. Two main characteristics of the 25-MV tandem provide unique opportunities for performing the highest sensitivity measurements of AMS; namely (i) the highest operating voltage in the world, and (ii) a folded geometry which involves a 180° magnet in the terminal. For the RIB program, we have used AMS techniques to improve the sensitivity of detection of some radioactive species in the measurement of unknown masses of n-rich nuclei. For AMS, we have concentrated in exploring two important isotopes, 14C and 36Cl, for applications that require the highest sensitivity. We have successfully measured 36Cl/Cl ratios as low as a few times 10-16 in seawater samples demonstrating that our setup has the highest sensitivity for this isotope and proving that 36Cl can be measured at the levels required for a tracer in oceanography.

  17. Proton Dynamics in Protein Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Lyu, Wenping; Rossetti, Giulia; Konijnenberg, Albert; Natalello, Antonino; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Orozco, Modesto; Sobott, Frank; Grandori, Rita; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-03-16

    Native electrospray ionization/ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI/IM-MS) allows an accurate determination of low-resolution structural features of proteins. Yet, the presence of proton dynamics, observed already by us for DNA in the gas phase, and its impact on protein structural determinants, have not been investigated so far. Here, we address this issue by a multistep simulation strategy on a pharmacologically relevant peptide, the N-terminal residues of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ(1-16)). Our calculations reproduce the experimental maximum charge state from ESI-MS and are also in fair agreement with collision cross section (CCS) data measured here by ESI/IM-MS. Although the main structural features are preserved, subtle conformational changes do take place in the first ∼0.1 ms of dynamics. In addition, intramolecular proton dynamics processes occur on the picosecond-time scale in the gas phase as emerging from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations at the B3LYP level of theory. We conclude that proton transfer phenomena do occur frequently during fly time in ESI-MS experiments (typically on the millisecond time scale). However, the structural changes associated with the process do not significantly affect the structural determinants.

  18. Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Xi; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Guo, Yin-Long

    2016-10-04

    A carbon fiber ionization (CFI) technique was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of various organic compounds with different polarities. The design of the CFI technique was based on the good compatibility and dispersion of samples and solutions in different solvents on carbon fiber. As a fast, convenient, and versatile ionization method, CFI-MS is especially efficient for analyzing many low/nonpolar organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, long-chain aliphatic aldehydes, sensitive steroids, terpenoids, and organometallic compounds. Some of these compounds may not be well-analyzed by electrospray ionization or electron ionization mass spectrometry. On the basis of our experimental results, the major ion formation mechanism of CFI-MS was suggested to involve desorption in a steam-distillation-like process, and then, ionization occurred mainly via corona discharge under high voltage. CFI-MS could not only work alone but also be coupled with separation techniques. It works well when coupled with supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) as well as in the analysis of exhaled human air. The high flexibility and versatility of CFI-MS has extended its applications in many areas, such as fast chemical screening, clinical testing, and forensic analysis.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  20. Mass spectrometry in bioinorganic analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lobiński, Ryszard; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Szpunar, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    A considerable momentum has recently been gained by in vitro and in vivo studies of interactions of trace elements in biomolecules due to advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) used as a detector in chromatography and capillary and planar electrophoresis. The multi-isotopic (including non-metals such as S, P, or Se) detection capability, high sensitivity, tolerance to matrix, and large linearity range regardless of the chemical environment of an analyte make ICP MS a valuable complementary technique to electrospray MS and MALDI MS. This review covers different facets of the recent progress in metal speciation in biochemistry, including probing in vitro interactions between metals and biomolecules, detection, determination, and structural characterization of heteroatom-containing molecules in biological tissues, and protein monitoring and quantification via a heteroelement (S, Se, or P) signal. The application areas include environmental chemistry, plant and animal biochemistry, nutrition, and medicine. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 25:255-289, 2006.

  1. Chip-mass spectrometry for glycomic studies.

    PubMed

    Bindila, Laura; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of micro- and nanochip front end technologies for electrospray mass spectrometry addressed a major challenge in carbohydrate analysis: high sensitivity structural determination and heterogeneity assessment in high dynamic range mixtures of biological origin. Chip-enhanced electrospray ionization was demonstrated to provide reproducible performance irrespective of the type of carbohydrate, while the amenability of chip systems for coupling with different mass spectrometers greatly advance the chip/MS technique as a versatile key tool in glycomic studies. A more accurate representation of the glycan repertoire to include novel biologically-relevant information was achieved in different biological sources, asserting this technique as a valuable tool in glycan biomarker discovery and monitoring. Additionally, the integration of various analytical functions onto chip devices and direct hyphenation to MS proved its potential for glycan analysis during the recent years, whereby a new analytical tool is on the verge of maturation: lab-on-chip MS glycomics. The achievements until early beginning of 2007 on the implementation of chip- and functional integrated chip/MS in systems glycobiology studies are reviewed here. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Chen, Sharon S

    2005-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics involves the identification and quantitation of protein components in various biological systems. Stable isotope labelling technology, by both metabolic and chemical methods, has been the most commonly used approach for global proteome-wide profiling. Recently, its capability has been extended from labelled pairs to multiple labels, allowing for the simultaneous quantification of multiplex samples. The ion intensity-based quantitative approach has progressively gained more popularity as mass spectrometry performance has improved significantly. Although some success has been reported, it remains difficult comprehensively to characterise the global proteome, due to its enormous complexity and dynamic range. The use of sub-proteome fractionation techniques permits a simplification of the proteome and provides a practical step towards the ultimate dissection of the entire proteome. Further development of the technology for targeting sub-proteomes on a functional basis - such as selecting proteins with differential expression profiles from mass spectrometric analyses, for further mass spectrometric sequencing in an intelligent manner--is expected in the near future.

  3. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  4. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Laboratory Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusair, O.; Bauder, W.; Gyürky, G.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Fülöp, Zs; Greene, J.; Kinoshita, N.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme sensitivity and discrimination power of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows for the search and the detection of rare nuclides either in natural samples or produced in the laboratory. At Argonne National Laboratory, we are developing an AMS setup aimed in particular at the detection of medium and heavy nuclides, relying on the high ion energy achievable with the ATLAS superconducting linear accelerator and on gas-filled magnet isobaric separation. The setup was recently used for the detection of the 146Sm p-process nuclide and for a new determination of the 146Sm half-life (68.7 My). AMS plays an important role in the measurement of stellar nuclear reaction cross sections by the activation method, extending thus the technique to the study of production of long-lived radionuclides. Preliminary measurements of the 147Sm(γ,n)146Sm are described. A measurement of the 142Nd(α,γ)146Sm and 142Nd(α,n)145Sm reactions is in preparation. A new laser-ablation method for the feeding of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is described.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of small biological samples.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2008-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for isotopic ratio measurements. In the biomedical field, AMS can be used to measure femtomolar concentrations of labeled drugs in body fluids, with direct applications in early drug development such as Microdosing. Likewise, the regenerative properties of cells which are of fundamental significance in stem-cell research can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by AMS analysis of human DNA. However, AMS nominally requires about 1 mg of carbon per sample which is not always available when dealing with specific body substances such as localized, organ-specific DNA samples. Consequently, it is of analytical interest to develop methods for the routine analysis of small samples in the range of a few tens of microg. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator to study small biological samples using AMS. Different methods are presented and compared. A (12)C-carrier sample preparation method is described which is potentially more sensitive and less susceptible to contamination than the standard procedures.

  6. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  7. JAMSS: proteomics mass spectrometry simulation in Java.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rob; Prince, John T

    2015-03-01

    Countless proteomics data processing algorithms have been proposed, yet few have been critically evaluated due to lack of labeled data (data with known identities and quantities). Although labeling techniques exist, they are limited in terms of confidence and accuracy. In silico simulators have recently been used to create complex data with known identities and quantities. We propose Java Mass Spectrometry Simulator (JAMSS): a fast, self-contained in silico simulator capable of generating simulated MS and LC-MS runs while providing meta information on the provenance of each generated signal. JAMSS improves upon previous in silico simulators in terms of its ease to install, minimal parameters, graphical user interface, multithreading capability, retention time shift model and reproducibility. The simulator creates mzML 1.1.0. It is open source software licensed under the GPLv3. The software and source are available at https://github.com/optimusmoose/JAMSS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. 1912: a Titanic year for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Downard, Kevin M

    2012-08-01

    The 1912 sinking of the Titanic continues to capture the imagination and fascination of the general public. The year coincides with the birth of mass spectrometry that began with the cathode ray experiments performed by Joseph John (J. J.) Thomson in Cambridge. Modifications made to Thomson's cathode ray apparatus by Francis William Aston, resulted in an increase in the brightness of the positive rays that aided their detection. This led to the discovery of heavy isotopes for many of the chemical elements in the ensuing decades. As the discovery of (22) Ne was reported in 1913, another of Thomson's students was taking part in an expedition to help save future ocean liners from the fate of the Titanic. Geoffrey Ingram Taylor took part in the first ice patrol of the North Atlantic in 1913 aboard the SS Scotia to investigate the formation and position of icebergs. This article, 100 years on, describes Taylor's work and its impact on safe ocean passage across the Atlantic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  10. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  11. Complementary nontargeted and targeted mass spectrometry techniques to determine bioaccumulation of halogenated contaminants in freshwater species.

    PubMed

    Myers, Anne L; Watson-Leung, Trudy; Jobst, Karl J; Shen, Li; Besevic, Sladjana; Organtini, Kari; Dorman, Frank L; Mabury, Scott A; Reiner, Eric J

    2014-12-02

    Assessing the toxicological significance of complex environmental mixtures is challenging due to the large number of unidentified contaminants. Nontargeted analytical techniques may serve to identify bioaccumulative contaminants within complex contaminant mixtures without the use of analytical standards. This study exposed three freshwater organisms (Lumbriculus variegatus, Hexagenia spp., and Pimephales promelas) to a highly contaminated soil collected from a recycling plant fire site. Biota extracts were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and mass defect filtering to identify bioaccumulative halogenated contaminants. Specific bioaccumulative isomers were identified by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRToF). Targeted analysis of mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PXDD/PXDFs, X = Br and Cl) was performed by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS). Relative sediment and biota instrument responses were used to estimate biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs). Bioaccumulating contaminants varied among species and included polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), chlorinated and mixed brominated/chlorinated anthracenes/phenanthrenes, and pyrenes/fluoranthenes (Cl-PAHs and X-PAHs, X = Br and Cl), as well as PXDD/PXDFs. Bioaccumulation potential among isomers also varied. This study demonstrates how complementary high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques identify persistent and bioaccumulative contaminants (and specific isomers) of environmental concern.

  12. Identification of minor acylglycerols less polar than triricinolein in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triacylglycerols in castor oil less polar than triricinolein were identified by electrospray ionization – mass spectrometry using the lithium adducts of the acylglycerols from the HPLC fractions of castor oil. Thirty four new molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids in casto...

  13. Identification of acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids in castor oil by mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ricinoleate, a monohydroxy fatty acid, in castor oil has many industrial uses. Dihydroxy fatty acids can also be used in industry. The C18 HPLC fractions of castor oil were used for mass spectrometry of lithium addicts to identify the acylglycerols containing dihydroxy fatty acids. Four diacylglycer...

  14. A general method for targeted quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) provides protein structural information by identifying covalently linked proximal amino acid residues on protein surfaces. The information gained by this technique is complementary to other structural biology methods such as x-ray crystallography, NM...

  15. Proteogenomic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Praveen; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Yadav, Amit Kumar; Shrivastava, Priyanka; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Anand, Sridhar; Sundaram, Hema; Kingsbury, Reena; Harsha, H C; Nair, Bipin; Prasad, T S Keshava; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Katoch, Kiran; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Kumar, Prahlad; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Dash, Debasis; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-12-01

    The genome sequencing of H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was completed in 1998 followed by the whole genome sequencing of a clinical isolate, CDC1551 in 2002. Since then, the genomic sequences of a number of other strains have become available making it one of the better studied pathogenic bacterial species at the genomic level. However, annotation of its genome remains challenging because of high GC content and dissimilarity to other model prokaryotes. To this end, we carried out an in-depth proteogenomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain using Fourier transform mass spectrometry with high resolution at both MS and tandem MS levels. In all, we identified 3176 proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis representing ~80% of its total predicted gene count. In addition to protein database search, we carried out a genome database search, which led to identification of ~250 novel peptides. Based on these novel genome search-specific peptides, we discovered 41 novel protein coding genes in the H37Rv genome. Using peptide evidence and alternative gene prediction tools, we also corrected 79 gene models. Finally, mass spectrometric data from N terminus-derived peptides confirmed 727 existing annotations for translational start sites while correcting those for 33 proteins. We report creation of a high confidence set of protein coding regions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome obtained by high resolution tandem mass-spectrometry at both precursor and fragment detection steps for the first time. This proteogenomic approach should be generally applicable to other organisms whose genomes have already been sequenced for obtaining a more accurate catalogue of protein-coding genes.

  16. Use of MALDI Mass Spectrometry for Identification of Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, C. L.; Stump, M.; Jones, J.; Lay, J. O.; Fleming, R.

    2003-12-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that bacteria can be characterized using whole cells and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). However, identification of specific bacterial proteins usually requires analysis of cellular fractions or purified extracts. This presentation will discuss the first application of Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) to analysis of bacterial proteins directly from whole cells. In this research it is seen that accurate mass MALDI-FTMS can be used to characterize specific ribosomal proteins directly from Escherichia coli cells. Using the high-accuracy mass measurements and high resolution isotope profile data thus available it is possible to confirm posttranslational modifications proposed previously on the basis of low resolution mass measurements. In our initial work, ribosomal proteins from E. coli whole cells were observed with errors of less than 27 ppm. This was accomplished directly from whole cells without fractionation, concentration, or overt overexpression of characteristic cellular proteins. More recently, by use of carbon and nitrogen isotopically-depleted growth media additional E. coli proteins have been identified with even smaller mass measurement errors. MALDI FTMS also provided information regarding E. coli lipids in the low-mass region. Although ions with m/z values below 1000 were previously observed by FTMS of whole cells, the work to be presented was the first report of detection of ions in the 5000 to 10 000 m/z range by MALDI-FTMS using whole cells. The implications of these results for genus, species, and strain assignments of such organisms will be discussed.

  17. Mass Spectrometry Detection of Isolevuglandin Adduction to Specific Protein Residues

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Casey D.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2014-01-01

    The aging process seems to be associated with oxidative stress and hence increased production of lipid peroxidation products, including isolevuglandins (isoLGs). The latter are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes which can form covalent adducts with primary amino groups of enzymes and proteins and alter the properties of these biomolecules. Yet, little is currently known about amino acid-containing compounds affected by isoLG modification in different age-related pathological processes. To facilitate the detection of these biomolecules, we developed a strategy in which the purified enzyme (or protein) of interest is first treated with authentic isoLG in vitro to evaluate whether it contains reactive lysine residues prone to modification with isoLGs. The data obtained serve as a basis for making the “GO/NO GO” decision as to whether to pursue a further search of this isoLG modification in a biological sample. In this chapter, we describe the conditions for the in vitro isoLG modification assay and how to use mass spectrometry to identify the isoLG-modified peptides and amino acid residues. Our studies were carried out on cytochrome P450 27A1, an important metabolic enzyme, and utilized iso[4]levuglandin E2 as a prototypical isoLG. The isoLG-treated cytochrome P450 was subjected to proteolysis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for peptide separation and analysis by Mascot, a proteomics search engine, for the presence of modified peptides. The developed protocol could be applied to characterization of other enzymes/proteins and other types of unconventional post-translational protein modification. PMID:25323515

  18. Paper-Based Electrochemical Cell Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-08-01

    On-line coupling of electrochemistry (EC) to mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful approach for identifying intermediates and products of EC reactions in situ. In addition, EC transformations have been used to increase ionization efficiency and derivatize analytes prior to MS, improving sensitivity and chemical specificity. Recently, there has been significant interest in developing paper-based electroanalytical devices as they offer convenience, low cost, versatility, and simplicity. This report describes the development of tubular and planar paper-based electrochemical cells (P-EC) coupled to sonic spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (P-EC/SSI-MS). The EC cells are composed of paper sandwiched between two mesh stainless steel electrodes. Analytes and reagents can be added directly to the paper substrate along with electrolyte, or delivered via the SSI microdroplet spray. The EC cells are decoupled from the SSI source, allowing independent control of electrical and chemical parameters. We utilized P-EC/SSI-MS to characterize various EC reactions such as oxidations of cysteine, dopamine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and diphenyl sulfide. Our results show that P-EC/SSI-MS has the ability to increase ionization efficiency, to perform online EC transformations, and to capture intermediates of EC reactions with a response time on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. The short response time allowed detection of a deprotonated diphenyl sulfide intermediate, which experimentally confirms a previously proposed mechanism for EC oxidation of diphenyl sulfide to pseudodimer sulfonium ion. This report introduces paper-based EC/MS via development of two device configurations (tubular and planar electrodes), as well as discusses the capabilities, performance, and limitations of the technique.

  19. Paper-Based Electrochemical Cell Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Min; Perry, Richard H

    2015-10-01

    On-line coupling of electrochemistry (EC) to mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful approach for identifying intermediates and products of EC reactions in situ. In addition, EC transformations have been used to increase ionization efficiency and derivatize analytes prior to MS, improving sensitivity and chemical specificity. Recently, there has been significant interest in developing paper-based electroanalytical devices as they offer convenience, low cost, versatility, and simplicity. This report describes the development of tubular and planar paper-based electrochemical cells (P-EC) coupled to sonic spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (P-EC/SSI-MS). The EC cells are composed of paper sandwiched between two mesh stainless steel electrodes. Analytes and reagents can be added directly to the paper substrate along with electrolyte, or delivered via the SSI microdroplet spray. The EC cells are decoupled from the SSI source, allowing independent control of electrical and chemical parameters. We utilized P-EC/SSI-MS to characterize various EC reactions such as oxidations of cysteine, dopamine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and diphenyl sulfide. Our results show that P-EC/SSI-MS has the ability to increase ionization efficiency, to perform online EC transformations, and to capture intermediates of EC reactions with a response time on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. The short response time allowed detection of a deprotonated diphenyl sulfide intermediate, which experimentally confirms a previously proposed mechanism for EC oxidation of diphenyl sulfide to pseudodimer sulfonium ion. This report introduces paper-based EC/MS via development of two device configurations (tubular and planar electrodes), as well as discusses the capabilities, performance, and limitations of the technique.

  20. Reliability of veterinary drug residue confirmation: high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-01-26

    Confirmation of suspected residues has been a long time domain of tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ). The currently most widely used confirmation strategy relies on the use of two selected reaction monitoring signals (SRM). The details of this confirmation procedure are described in detail in the Commission Decision 93/256/EC (CD). On the other hand, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is nowadays increasingly used for trace analysis. Yet its utility for confirmatory purposes has not been well explored and utilized, since established confirmation strategies like the CD do not yet include rules for modern HRMS technologies. It is the focus of this paper to evaluate the likelihood of false positive and false negative confirmation results, when using a variety of HRMS based measurement modes as compared to conventional QqQ mass spectrometry. The experimental strategy relies on the chromatographic separation of a complex blank sample (bovine liver extract) and the subsequent monitoring of a number of dummy transitions respectively dummy accurate masses. The term "dummy" refers to precursor and derived product ions (based on a realistic neutral loss) whose elemental compositions (CxHyNzOdCle) were produced by a random number generator. Monitoring a large number of such hypothetical SRM's, or accurate masses inevitably produces a number of mass traces containing chromatographic peaks (false detects) which are caused by eluting matrix compounds. The number and intensity of these peaks were recorded and standardized to permit a comparison among the two employed MS technologies. QqQ performance (compounds which happen to produce a response in two SRM traces at identical retention time) was compared with a number of different HRMS(1) and HRMS(2) detection based modes. A HRMS confirmation criterion based on two full scans (an unfragmented and an all ion fragmented) was proposed. Compared to the CD criteria, a significantly lower probability of false

  1. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble ( apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  2. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  3. Mass Spectrometry of Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Westphall, Michael S.; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air–droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-μL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing chargere combination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  4. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  5. Charging of Proteins in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Anna C.; Xia, Zijie; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-02-01

    Factors that influence the charging of protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and function were investigated. Protein ions ranging in molecular weight from 12.3 to 79.7 kDa and pI values from 5.4 to 9.6 were formed from different solutions and reacted with volatile bases of gas-phase basicities higher than that of ammonia in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of cytochrome c ions formed from aqueous ammonium or potassium acetate is the same. Moreover, ions formed from these two solutions do not undergo proton transfer to 2-fluoropyridine, which is 8 kcal/mol more basic than ammonia. These results provide compelling evidence that proton transfer between ammonia and protein ions does not limit protein ion charge in native electrospray ionization. Both circular dichroism and ion mobility measurements indicate that there are differences in conformations of proteins in pure water and aqueous ammonium acetate, and these differences can account for the difference in the extent of charging and proton-transfer reactivities of protein ions formed from these solutions. The extent of proton transfer of the protein ions with higher gas-phase basicity bases trends with how closely the protein ions are charged to the value predicted by the Rayleigh limit for spherical water droplets approximately the same size as the proteins. These results indicate that droplet charge limits protein ion charge in native mass spectrometry and are consistent with these ions being formed by the charged residue mechanism.

  6. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach.

  7. Molecular mass spectrometry imaging in biomedical and life science research.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This review describes the current state of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in life sciences. A brief overview of mass spectrometry principles is presented followed by a thorough introduction to the MSI workflows, principles and areas of application. Three major desorption-ionization techniques used in MSI, namely, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) are described, and biomedical and life science imaging applications of each ionization technique are reviewed. A separate section is devoted to data handling and current challenges and future perspectives are briefly discussed at the end.

  8. Optimization of matrix assisted desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the characterization of Bacillus and Brevibacillus species

    PubMed Central

    AlMasoud, Najla; Xu, Yun; Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Goodacre, Royston

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been an increased interest in using various analytical techniques for detecting and identifying microorganisms. More recently there has been an explosion in the application of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for bacterial characterization, and here we optimize this approach in order to generate reproducible MS data from bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus and Brevibacillus. Unfort