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Sample records for masseter temporalis digastric

  1. Heterogeneity of fiber characteristics in the rat masseter and digastric muscles.

    PubMed

    Sano, R; Tanaka, E; Korfage, J A M; Langenbach, G E J; Kawai, Nobuhiko; van Eijden, T M G J; Tanne, K

    2007-10-01

    The functional requirements in muscle use are related to the fiber type composition of the muscles and the cross-sectional area of the individual fibers. We investigated the heterogeneity in the fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional area in two muscles with an opposing function, namely the digastric and masseter muscles (n = 5 for each muscle) of adult male rats, by means of immunohistochemical staining according to their myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content. The digastric and masseter muscles were taken from Wistar strain male rats 10 weeks old. In the masseter six predefined sample locations were examined; in the digastric four. Most regions showed dominant proportions of type IIA and IIX fibers. However, both muscles also revealed a regional heterogeneity in their fiber type distribution. In the digastric, type I fibers were detected only at the central and deep areas of the anterior and posterior belly, respectively. Meanwhile, the peripheral area of the anterior belly contained a higher proportion of type IIB fibers. In the masseter, the type I fibers were absent. In the superficial masseter the distribution of IIA and IIB fibers was significantly different between the superior and inferior regions. In the deep masseter, regional differences were observed among all four examined areas, of which the posterolateral region contained the highest proportion of type IIB fibers. The cross-sectional areas of type IIB fibers were always the largest, followed by the type IIX and IIA fibers. Only a few differences in cross-sectional area of corresponding fiber types were detected between the various sites. In conclusion, the masseter and digastric muscles showed an obvious heterogeneity of fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional area. Their heterogeneity reflects the complex role of the both muscles during function. This detailed description of the fiber type composition can serve as a reference for future studies examining the muscular adaptations after

  2. Fatigue in the masseter and temporalis muscles at constant load.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Zanotti, Gianfranco; Mantovani, Enrica; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue is usually defined as the point at which a particular level of force can be no longer maintained. In the present study, surface EMG of the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles was measured in ten healthy young adults performing a unilateral molar (right side) clench. The subjects clenched on a bite force transducer at a fixed force level of 13 kg (127 N) as long as they could (endurance). The test ended when the subjects could no longer produce the required bite force. From the EMG recordings, the median power frequency was calculated at the beginning of the task (T0), after one minute of clenching (T1), and at the end of the task (T2, endurance time). For each subject and muscle, percentage decrements in the median power frequency were also computed at T1 and T2. Endurance time ranged between 79 and 470 s. Significant modifications in the median power frequency in both masseter muscles (right side, p=0.003; left side, p=0.02, analysis of variance) were found, with a significant difference for the median frequency at T2 (p<0.02 at post hoc test). The modifications in the temporalis muscles were not significant (p>0.05). Additionally, at T1, significant percentage decrements in the median power frequency were found for both right side muscles (p<0.05, paired Student's ). The left side muscles modifications (p>0.05) were not significant. A significant effect of side was found (p=0.007, analysis of variance), without effects of muscle and no muscle x side interaction. At T2, both masseter muscles and the right side temporalis had a significant modification in their median power frequency. Overall, the modifications were larger in the masseter than in the temporalis muscles (p=0.022, analysis of variance), without effects of side and no muscle x side interaction. In conclusion, a fixed submaximal muscular contraction provoked fatigue modifications in the EMG power spectra that were well comparable to those obtained in previous investigations using forces

  3. Mechanism of motor coordination of masseter and temporalis muscles for increased masticatory efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Tomoko; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Aya; Fujishita, Ayumi; Kohara, Haruka; Moriuchi, Emi; Yoshimi, Keiko; Tsai, Chi-Yang; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-02-09

    The demand for the use of mice as animal models for elucidating the pathophysiologies and pathogeneses of oral motor disorders has been increasing in recent years, as more and more kinds of genetically modified mice that express functional disorders of the stomatognathic system become available. However, the fundamental characteristics of mouse jaw movements during mastication have yet to be fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of the masseter and temporalis muscles, and the mechanisms of motor coordination of these muscles for increasing masticatory efficiency in the closing phase in mice. Twenty-two male Jcl:ICR mice were divided into control (n = 8), masseter hypofunction (n = 7), and temporalis hypofunction groups (n = 7). Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT⁄A) was used to induce muscle hypofunction. The masticatory movement path in the horizontal direction during the occlusal phase became unstable after BoNT⁄A injection into the masseter muscle. BoNT⁄A injection into the temporalis muscle decreased antero-posterior excursion of the late-closing phase corresponding to the power phase of the chewing cycle. These results suggest that the masseter plays an important role in stabilizing the grinding path, where the food bolus is ground by sliding the posterior teeth from back to front during the occlusal phase. The temporalis plays a major role in retracting the mandible more posteriorly in the early phase of closing, extending the grinding path. Masticatory efficiency is thus increased based on the coordination of activities by the masseter and temporalis muscles. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. The Predictability from Skull Morphology of Temporalis and Masseter Muscle Cross-Sectional Areas in Humans.

    PubMed

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Zapata MuÑoz, Victor; O'higgins, Paul

    2015-07-01

    To carry out functional simulations of the masticatory system that aim to predict strain magnitudes it is important to apply appropriate jaw-elevator muscle forces. Force magnitude estimation from directly measured muscle physiological cross-sectional area or anatomical cross-sectional area (CSA) is not possible for fossils and skeletal material from museum collections. In these cases, muscle CSAs are often estimated from bony features. This approach has been shown to be inaccurate in a prior study based on direct measurements from cadavers. Postmortem alterations as well as age changes in muscle form might explain this discrepancy. As such, the present study uses CT images from 20 living individuals to directly measure temporalis and masseter muscle CSAs and estimated cross-sectional areas (ECSAs) from bony features. The relationships between CSAs and ECSAs were assessed by comparing mean values and by examining correlations. ECSAs are up to 100% greater than CSA and the means of these variables for each muscle differ significantly. Further, ECSA is significantly correlated with CSA for temporalis but not masseter. Cranial centroid size is only significantly associated with CSA for temporalis. These findings indicate that ECSAs should be employed with caution in simulations of human masticatory system functioning; they do not reflect CSAs and it is plausible that this also applies to studies of closely related living and fossil taxa. When ECSAs are used, sensitivity analyses are required to determine the impact of potential errors.

  5. Electromyographic analysis of masseter and anterior temporalis muscle in sleep bruxers after occlusal splint wearing.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Cesar Ferreira; Vasconcelos Paes, Fernando José; de Faria Junior, Newton Santos; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Politti, Fabiano

    2012-04-01

    Bruxism is widely defined as an anxiety response to environmental stress. Occlusal splints are frequently used in sleep bruxism, to protect teeth from damage resulting from the contraction force of mandibular muscles, or to reduce the orofacial pain by relaxing masticatory muscles. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed in 15 women presenting sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorders related to occupational stress, after nocturnal use of the occlusal splint. The EMG signals were recorded twice per patient: After a work shift (pre-splint) and after a night of sleep with the occlusal splint (post-splint) before a new workday. The parametric t-paired test was used to compare differences of the RMS amplitude between pre and post-splint records, for resting and maximal clenching effort. The level of significance for each comparison was set to p < 0.05. The results of the study supports the premise that the use of occlusal splint reduces EMG activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, in patients who presented with sleep bruxism related to occupational stress.

  6. In vitro quantification of strain patterns in the craniofacial skeleton due to masseter and temporalis activities.

    PubMed

    Maloul, Asmaa; Regev, Eran; Whyne, Cari M; Beek, Marteen; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2012-09-01

    Many complications in craniofacial surgery can be attributed to a lack of characterization of facial skeletal strain patterns. This study aimed to delineate human midfacial strain patterns under uniform muscle loading. The left sides of 5 fresh-frozen human cadaveric heads were dissected of all soft tissues except the temporalis and masseter muscles. Tensile forces were applied to the free mandibular ends of the muscles. Maxillary alveolar arches were used to restrain the skulls. Eight strain gauges were bonded to the surface of the midface to measure the strain under single muscle loading conditions (100 N). Maxillary strain gauges revealed a biaxial load state for both muscles. Thin antral bone experienced high maximum principal tensile strains (maximum of 685.5 με) and high minimum principal compressive strains (maximum of -722.44 με). Similar biaxial patterns of lower magnitude were measured on the zygoma (maximum of 208.59 με for maximum principal strains and -78.11 με for minimum principal strains). Results, consistent for all specimens and counter to previously accepted concepts of biomechanical behavior of the midface under masticatory muscle loading, included high strain in the thin maxillary antral wall, rotational bending through the maxilla and zygoma, and a previously underestimated contribution of the temporalis muscle. This experimental model produced repeatable strain patterns quantifying the mechanics of the facial skeleton. These new counterintuitive findings underscore the need for accurate characterization of craniofacial strain patterns to address problems in the current treatment methods and develop robust design criteria.

  7. Fatigue analysis in the masseters and temporalis muscles in patients with temporomandibular disorder during short period of mastication.

    PubMed

    Caria, Paulo H F; Bigaton, Delaine R; de Oliveira, Anamaria S; Bérzin, Fausto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to look for signals of muscle fatigue in volunteers with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) during short period of mastication. Twenty female volunteers selected by Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) participated, 10 with myogenic TMD (experimental) and 10 clinically normal (control). The Masseter and Temporalis muscles were evaluated electromyographically with active differential surface electrodes. The masticatory activity was recorded for 15 seconds and the signals were normalized by 4 seconds of teeth clenching. Three complete masticatory cycles were taken to calculating the median frequency (MF) and electromyographic amplitude (RMS). The data were submitted to statistics analysis and non-parametric tests. The results showed that RMS and median frequency did not change during the mastication period analyzed, indicating the absence of muscle fatigue, for the Masseter and Temporalis muscles in both groups (p> 0.05). These results confirm the absence of signals of muscle fatigue in masticatory muscles during short period of mastication even in individuals with TMD, possibly due to increased of blood flow, consequence of dynamic muscle contraction and the individual characteristics of muscle fiber composition and recruitment.

  8. Pressure pain thresholds assessed over temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy individuals, patients with tension-type headache, and those with migraine--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sanne; Petersen, Marie Weinreich; Svendsen, Anette Sand; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarize the available scientific literature addressing pressure pain threshold (PPT) values over the temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy humans, patients with tension-type headache (TTH), and those with migraine both in males and females. Six relevant medical databases for the literature search were included: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, BioMed Central, and Embase. The search strategy was performed applying 15 keywords (eg, pressure pain threshold, temporalis muscle, tension type headache, pressure algometer) and their combinations. A total of 156 articles were identified, and 40 relevant articles were included. The main outcomes of the systematic review were extracted, and it was demonstrated that the PPT values in general were lower in patients compared with healthy subjects, and this was especially noted for temporalis in both females (migraine: 231.2 ± 38.3 kPa < TTH: 248.4 ± 39.3 kPa < healthy: 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (migraine: 225.5 ± 61.2 kPa < TTH: 264.2 ± 32.5 kPa < healthy: 314.8 ± 63.3 kPa). The masseter muscle seemed to be more sensitive than the other 2 muscles, in both females (healthy: masseter 194.1 ± 62.7 kPa < frontalis 277.5 ± 51.1 kPa < temporalis 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (healthy: masseter 248.2 ± 48.4 kPa < temporalis 314.8 ± 63.3 < frontalis 388 kPa). Females had lower PPT values than those of males in temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles. This work is the first to systematically review the scientific literature addressing PPT values over craniofacial muscles of healthy subjects, patients with TTH, and those with migraine to provide the PPT value ranges. Based on these findings, a set of guidelines was established to assist future studies including PPT assessments over craniofacial muscles.

  9. Relationship between Occlusal Force Distribution and the Activity of Masseter and Anterior Temporalis Muscles in Asymptomatic Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Bartlomiej W.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy subjects have a prevalent side on which they display higher-muscle activity during clenching. The relationship between symmetry of masseter muscle (MM) and anterior temporalis (TA) muscle activities and occlusion has been evaluated on the basis of physiological parameters. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the symmetry of surface EMG (sEMG) activity in asymptomatic young adults is related to symmetry of occlusal contacts. Material. The study population consisted of seventy-two 18-year-old subjects with no temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. Method. All the participants underwent an sEMG recording with an 8-channel electromyograph (BioEMG III). A T-Scan III evolution 7.01 device was used to analyze the occlusal contact points. Results. The correlation between the activity of right (R) and left (L) TA and the percentage of occlusal contacts was assessed, but no significant differences were found between the RMM and LMM muscles. The differences in the medium values of sEMG between males and females were not statistically significant. Equilibrated muscular activity between RTA and LTA occurred when occlusal contacts reached the percentage of 65% on the left side. Conclusion. The symmetry of sEMG activity in asymptomatic young adults is not related to symmetry of occlusal contacts. PMID:23509713

  10. The immediate effect of changing mandibular position on the EMG activity of the masseter, temporalis, sternocleidomastoid, and trapezius muscles.

    PubMed

    Ceneviz, Caroline; Mehta, Noshir R; Forgione, Albert; Sands, M J; Abdallah, Emad F; Lobo Lobo, Silvia; Mavroudi, Sofia

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the immediate effect of changing mandibular position on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter (MS), temporalis (TM), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and trapezius (TR) muscles. Thirty-three (33) asymptomatic subjects (16 males and 17 females), ages 23 to 52 were selected. Surface EMG recordings were obtained for all muscles bilaterally with the mandible in a relaxed open position (relaxed) and during maximal voluntary clenching (fullbite) for the following: a non-repositioning appliance (NONREPOS) and repositioning appliance (REPOS). REPOS significantly reduced EMG activity of all muscles bilaterally during fullbite. During relaxation, reduction in EMG activity was only found for TR bilaterally. NONREPOS decreased the EMG activity bilaterally for TM and TR and unilaterally (left) for MS and SCM during fullbite. During relaxation, NONREPOS decreased muscle activity bilaterally for TR and SCM. A unilateral reduction was found for TM (right). These findings suggest that immediate alterations in mandibular position affect the cranio-cervical system. Both mandibular positions tested lowered the EMG activity of masticatory and cervical muscles in the relaxed and fullbite positions. The trapezius muscle was the most responsive to alterations in mandibular position.

  11. Quantitative analysis of masseter and temporalis EMGs: a comparison of anterior guided versus balanced occlusal concepts in patients wearing complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Grubwieser, G; Flatz, A; Grunert, I; Kofler, M; Ulmer, H; Gausch, K; Kulmer, S

    1999-09-01

    The lack of easily measurable, objective physiological activity parameters of the masseter and temporalis muscle during jaw movements in humans has led to the consideration to revise data of surface electromyographies (EMGs) by applying a computerized quantification method. The aim of this follow-up analysis was to get quantitative data out of EMG-records of an earlier study. These records were obtained with two different splints, splint 1 providing an anterior front-canine guidance and splint 2 providing bilateral balanced occlusion. Utilizing a computer aided integration method led to numeric results which statistically proves the prediction of the previous investigation. Applying the integration method, the EMG raw signal was transformed into area-values which enabled a statistical work up of the data. Wilcoxon test statistics shows a significant (P<0.05) lower muscle activity in patients wearing dentures providing anterior front-canine guidance compared to those with balanced occlusion. It is concluded that the neuromuscular activity of the elevator muscles is highly reproducible and that the neuromuscular function is similar in edentulous subjects to that found in people with natural teeth. Furthermore, the study statistically proves earlier visual data that all those subjects, whose muscle activities were observed with anterior guidance (splint 1) compared to bilateral balanced occlusion (splint 2) showed significantly lower values with regard to subjects wearing splint 2.

  12. Temporalis function in anthropoids and strepsirrhines: an EMG study.

    PubMed

    Hylander, William L; Wall, Christine E; Vinyard, Christopher J; Ross, Callum; Ravosa, Mathew R; Williams, Susan H; Johnson, Kirk R

    2005-09-01

    The major purpose of this study is to analyze anterior and posterior temporalis muscle force recruitment and firing patterns in various anthropoid and strepsirrhine primates. There are two specific goals for this project. First, we test the hypothesis that in addition to transversely directed muscle force, the evolution of symphyseal fusion in primates may also be linked to vertically directed balancing-side muscle force during chewing (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). Second, we test the hypothesis of whether strepsirrhines retain the hypothesized primitive mammalian condition for the firing of the anterior temporalis, whereas anthropoids have the derived condition (Weijs [1994] Biomechanics of Feeding in Vertebrates; Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p. 282-320). Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the left and right anterior and posterior temporalis muscles were recorded and analyzed in baboons, macaques, owl monkeys, thick-tailed galagos, and ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, as we used the working-side superficial masseter as a reference muscle, we also recorded and analyzed EMG activity of the left and right superficial masseter in these primates. The data for the anterior temporalis provided no support for the hypothesis that symphyseal fusion in primates is linked to vertically directed jaw muscle forces during mastication. Thus, symphyseal fusion in primates is most likely mainly linked to the timing and recruitment of transversely directed forces from the balancing-side deep masseter (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). In addition, our data demonstrate that the firing patterns for the working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles are near identical in both strepsirrhines and anthropoids. Their working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles fire asynchronously and reach peak activity during the power stroke. Similarly, their working- and balancing-side posterior temporalis muscles also fire

  13. A rare variation of the digastric muscle

    PubMed Central

    KALNIEV, MANOL; KRASTEV, DIMO; KRASTEV, NIKOLAY; VIDINOV, KALIN; VELTCHEV, LUDMIL; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER; MILEVA, MILKA

    2013-01-01

    The digastric muscle is composed by two muscle bellies: an anterior and a posterior, joined by an intermediate tendon. This muscle is situated in the anterior region of the neck. The region between the hyoid bone and the mandible is divided by an anterior belly into two triangles: the submandibular situated laterally and the submental triangle which is located medially. We found that the anatomical variations described in the literature relate mainly to the anterior belly and consist of differences in shape and attachment of the muscle. During routine dissection in February 2013 in the section hall of the Department of Anatomy and Histology in Medical University – Sofia we came across a very interesting variation of the digastric muscle. The digastric muscles that presented anatomical variations were photographed using a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T1 camera, with a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar lens. We found out bilateral variation of the digastric muscle in one cadaver. The anterior bellies were very thin and insert to the hyoid bone. Two anterior bellies connect each other and thus they formed a loop. The anatomical variations observed of our study related only to the anterior belly, as previously described by other authors. It is very important to consider the occurrence of the above mentioned variations in the digastric muscle when surgical procedures are performed on the anterior region of the neck. PMID:26527971

  14. Masseter and medial pterygoid muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, R; Rishi, Sudhirkumar; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2011-09-26

    Hypertrophy refers to an enlargement caused by an increase in the size but not in the number of cells. Generalised masticatory muscle hypertrophy may affect the temporalis muscle, masseters and medial pterygoids in a variety of combinations. Masseteric hypertrophy may present as either unilateral or bilateral painless swelling of unknown origin in the region of angle of mandible. It is a relatively rare condition and presents a diagnostic dilemma. While the history and clinical examination are important in differentiating this benign condition from parotid or dental pathology, they cannot necessarily exclude rare malignant lesion within the muscle. Advanced imaging modalities like CT and MRI are essential to confirm the diagnosis. Here the authors are reporting a unique case of masseter muscle hypertrophy along with medial pterygoid hypertrophy which was missed clinically but confirmed using CT and MRI.

  15. Masseter function and skeletal malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Sciote, J J; Raoul, G; Ferri, J; Close, J; Horton, M J; Rowlerson, A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to review the relationship between the function of the masseter muscle and the occurrence of malocclusions. An analysis was made of the masseter muscle samples from subjects who underwent mandibular osteotomies. The size and proportion of type-II fibers (fast) decreases as facial height increases. Patients with mandibular asymmetry have more type-II fibers on the side of their deviation. The insulin-like growth factor and myostatin are expressed differently depending on the sex and fiber diameter. These differences in the distribution of fiber types and gene expression of this growth factor may be involved in long-term postoperative stability and require additional investigations. Muscle strength and bone length are two genetically determined factors in facial growth. Myosin 1H (MYOH1) is associated with prognathia in Caucasians. As future objectives, we propose to characterize genetic variations using "Genome Wide Association Studies" data and their relationships with malocclusions.

  16. Observational Study on the Occurrence of Muscle Spindles in Human Digastric and Mylohyoideus Muscles

    PubMed Central

    De Santanna, Amleto; Cervioni, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Although the occurrence of muscle spindles (MS) is quite high in most skeletal muscles of humans, few MS, or even absence, have been reported in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. Even if this condition is generally accepted and quoted in many papers and books, observational studies are scarce and based on histological sections of a low number of specimens. The aim of the present study is to confirm previous data, assessing MS number in a sample of digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. We investigated 11 digastric and 6 mylohyoideus muscles from 13 donors. Muscle samples were embedded in paraffin wax, cross-sectioned in a rostrocaudal direction, and stained using haematoxylin-eosin. A mean of 5.1 ± 1.1 (range 3–7) MS was found in digastric muscles and mean of 0.5 ± 0.8 (range 0–2) in mylohyoideus muscles. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found with the control sample, confirming the correctness of the histological procedure. Our results support general belief that the absolute number of spindles is sparse in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. External forces, such as food resistance during chewing or gravity, do not counteract jaw-opening muscles. It is conceivable that this condition gives them a limited proprioceptive importance and a reduced need for having specific receptors as MS. PMID:25165696

  17. Observational study on the occurrence of muscle spindles in human digastric and mylohyoideus muscles.

    PubMed

    Saverino, Daniele; De Santanna, Amleto; Simone, Rita; Cervioni, Stefano; Cattrysse, Erik; Testa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Although the occurrence of muscle spindles (MS) is quite high in most skeletal muscles of humans, few MS, or even absence, have been reported in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. Even if this condition is generally accepted and quoted in many papers and books, observational studies are scarce and based on histological sections of a low number of specimens. The aim of the present study is to confirm previous data, assessing MS number in a sample of digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. We investigated 11 digastric and 6 mylohyoideus muscles from 13 donors. Muscle samples were embedded in paraffin wax, cross-sectioned in a rostrocaudal direction, and stained using haematoxylin-eosin. A mean of 5.1 ± 1.1 (range 3-7) MS was found in digastric muscles and mean of 0.5 ± 0.8 (range 0-2) in mylohyoideus muscles. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found with the control sample, confirming the correctness of the histological procedure. Our results support general belief that the absolute number of spindles is sparse in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. External forces, such as food resistance during chewing or gravity, do not counteract jaw-opening muscles. It is conceivable that this condition gives them a limited proprioceptive importance and a reduced need for having specific receptors as MS.

  18. Digastric Muscle Phenotypes of the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome is frequently associated with complex difficulties in oromotor development, feeding, and swallowing. However, the muscle phenotypes underlying these deficits are unclear. We tested the hypotheses that the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS has significantly altered myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform profiles of the muscles involved in feeding and swallowing, as well as reductions in the speed of these movements during behavioral assays. SDS-PAGE, immunofluorescence, and qRT-PCR were used to assess MyHC isoform expression in pertinent muscles, and functional feeding and swallowing performance were quantified through videofluoroscopy and mastication assays. We found that both the anterior digastric (ADG) and posterior digastric (PDG) muscles in 11-day old and 5–6 week old Ts65Dn groups showed significantly lower MyHC 2b protein levels than in age-matched euploid control groups. In videofluoroscopic and videotape assays used to quantify swallowing and mastication performance, 5–6 week old Ts65Dn and euploid controls showed similar swallow rates, inter-swallow intervals, and mastication rates. In analysis of adults, 10–11 week old Ts65Dn mice revealed significantly less MyHC 2b mRNA expression in the posterior digastric, but not the anterior digastric muscle as compared with euploid controls. Analysis of MyHC 2b protein levels across an adult age range (10–53 weeks of age) revealed lower levels of MyHC 2b protein in the PDG of Ts65Dn than in euploids, but similar levels of MyHC 2b in the ADG. Cumulatively, these results indicate biochemical differences in some, but not all, muscles involved in swallowing and jaw movement in Ts65Dn mice that manifest early in post-natal development, and persist into adulthood. These findings suggest potential utility of this model for future investigations of the mechanisms of oromotor difficulties associated with Down syndrome. PMID:27336944

  19. Cysticercosis of the masseter: MRI and sonographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Nagarjuna, M; Belaval, V; Shetty, S; Salins, P C

    2015-01-01

    Cysticercal involvement of the masseter is an uncommon manifestation of a relatively common parasitic infestation. Sonographic evaluation of many isolated cases of cysticercosis has been extensively described. However, there are scanty reports on MRI appearance of cysticercal involvement of the masseter. This report presents classical imaging appearance of cysticercal involvement of the masseter on sonography and MRI. The pattern of the disease and MRI appearance of lesions in the masseter, highlighting the role of diffusion-weighted images, are described. PMID:25734242

  20. Bimaxillary protrusion with masseter muscle hypertrophy treated with titanium screw anchorage and masseter surgical reduction.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Kuroda, Shingo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Mishima, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Toshio; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with bimaxillary protrusion and masseter muscle hypertrophy. At age 21 years 7 months, this woman had temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms, severe bimaxillary protrusion, and a prominent mandibular angle with facial asymmetry. After an attempt to alleviate the TMD symptoms with occlusal splint stabilization, portions of the masseter muscle and the mandible were surgically removed. Titanium screws were placed bilaterally in both arches, and a retraction force was applied. After active treatment for 38 months, the convexity of the facial profile with lip protrusion was improved remarkably, and good occlusion was achieved. The prominent mandibular angle with facial asymmetry was improved as a result of the surgical reduction of the masseter muscle and the modeling ostectomy near the masseteric tuberosity. The TMD symptoms disappeared, and the jaw movement pattern became normal. Therefore, our results suggest that this combination treatment would be useful for masseter muscle hypertrophy for morphologic and functional problems.

  1. Voluntary and reflex control of the human temporalis muscle.

    PubMed

    Scott, B J J; Mason, A G; Cadden, S W

    2002-07-01

    Electromyographic recordings (EMGs) were made in 10 human subjects from the anterior and posterior parts of the temporalis muscle using skin surface electrodes. The activities produced by voluntary maximal clenching tasks and the reflex responses to electrical stimulation of the muco-gingival junction were studied. In most subjects, maximum activity in both parts of the muscle occurred when clenching in the intercuspal position (anterior temporalis: 7 of 10 subjects; posterior temporalis: 9 of 10 subjects). Clenching maximally in the retruded position usually resulted in less activity; when this activity was expressed as a percentage of the maximum achieved by each subject for that part of the muscle, the median values were: anterior temporalis, 68% and posterior temporalis, 79%. Clenching in the protruded position produced little or no activity (median values: anterior temporalis, 3%; posterior temporalis, 5%). There were no significant differences between the EMG activities of the anterior and posterior parts of the muscle during these tasks when the activities were normalized to the maximum achieved in each part of the muscle. Application of electrical stimuli at the muco-gingival junction (upper incisor region) produced reflex inhibitions and excitations in both parts of the muscle. There were no significant differences in the thresholds of these reflexes between the anterior and posterior parts of the muscle. Furthermore, there was little difference between the two parts of the muscle in terms of the latencies, durations and magnitudes of the responses. Thus the results of the study suggest that there are similar neural control mechanisms for the anterior and posterior parts of the temporalis muscle despite the common view that these parts of the muscle have different functions.

  2. Experimentally induced masseter-pain changes masseter but not sternocleidomastoid muscle-related activity during mastication.

    PubMed

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of induced masseter-muscle pain on the amplitude of muscle activation, symmetry and coactivation of jaw- and neck-muscles during mastication. Twenty-eight male volunteers, mean age±SD 20.6±2.0years, participated in this study. Surface electromyography of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles was performed bilaterally during mastication of a gummy candy before and after injections of monosodium glutamate solution and isotonic saline solution. As a result, we observed a decrease in the amplitude of activation of the masseter muscle on the working side (p=0.009; d=0.34) and a reduction in the asymmetry between the working and the balancing side during mastication (p=0.007; d=0.38). No changes were observed either on the craniocervical electromyographic variables. In conclusion, experimentally induced pain reduced the masseter muscle activation on the working side, thereby reducing the physiological masseters' recruitment asymmetry between the two sides during mastication. No effects on SCM activity were detected. These results may partly explain the initial maladaptative changes underlying TMD conditions.

  3. Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders S; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Edin, Benoni B; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Reflex responses in jaw-opening muscles can be evoked when a brittle object cracks between the teeth and suddenly unloads the jaw. We hypothesized that this reflex response is flexible and, as such, is modulated according to the instructed goal of biting through an object. Study participants performed two different biting tasks when holding a peanut half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut half only (single-split task), and in the other task, they were asked to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split task). In both tasks, the peanut split evoked a jaw-opening muscle response, quantified from electromyogram (EMG) recordings of the digastric muscle in a window 20-60 ms following peanut split. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the jaw-opening muscle response in the single-split trials was about twice the size of the jaw-opening muscle response in the double-split trials. A linear model that predicted the jaw-opening muscle response on a single-trial basis indicated that task settings played a significant role in this modulation but also that the presplit digastric muscle activity contributed to the modulation. These findings demonstrate that, like reflex responses to mechanical perturbations in limb muscles, reflex responses in jaw muscles not only show gain-scaling but also are modulated by subject intent.

  4. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  5. Bilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kar, Jugal Kishore; Kar, Manoranjan; Maiti, Saswati; Sen, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Isolated idiopathic bilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy is a very rare clinical entity. It can change the facial appearance that manifests itself as a morphopsychological conflict for the subject, which is termed as 'Minotaur syndrome' in the medical literature. Here one such case is reported. The second patient sought medical attention for fear of malignancy.

  6. Prevalence of hyperactive digastric muscles during swallowing as measured by electromyography in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L B; Last, F C; Salerno, V M

    1997-01-01

    One purpose of this clinical study is to establish a relationship between the hyper activity of the digastric muscles and predisposition of an individual to MPDS (myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome). If a population predisposed to MPD could be identified by an early diagnosis, intervention and treatment could eliminate potential pain in adulthood. Secondly, can the employment of electromyography to aid in the diagnosis of patients with MPD be helpful in establishing a program of prevention and treatment? Thirty-one patients, male and female, were randomly selected from among those routinely diagnosed as having myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome by the dental staff at the Long Island Center for Craniofacial Pain. Eighteen patients who did not experience any symptoms of facial pain comprised the control group in the study. This study demonstrated that the average trace readings which indicate the activity of the digastric muscles, as measured by the electromyogram from patients experiencing facial pain were significantly higher than those from patients without pain symptoms. In every instance, the correlation between facial pain and abnormal swallow patterns which are a cause of hyperactivity of the digastrics was confirmed.

  7. Lower Lip Suspension Using Bilateral Temporalis Muscle Flaps and Fascia Lata Grafts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    muscle, as in a Gil- lies-type temporalis flap for facial reanimation (Figs. 1 and 2). A strip of muscle measuring 5 cm wide is then raised from superior...formed procedure. DISCUSSION The temporalis muscle is a robust flap, and its transfer has long had a place in the history of facial reanimation ...temporalis turndown flaps for dynamic lower lip reanimation in 1934.4 McLaughlin de- scribed disinsertion of the muscle from the coro- noid through a

  8. The effects of masseter muscle pain on biting performance.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Y Y; Peng, C C; Wen, S C; Lin, L D; Wang, J S; Lou, K L

    2003-10-01

    The present study applied a standardized test food of known hardness to evaluate the biting performance of 20 female patients who had pain mainly in the masseter muscle during palpation. Another 20 women of a similar age group who were pain-free during examination served as controls. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles and the jaw position were recorded and measured when the subjects were biting through two types of test foods with known hardness (hard type, 20 kg hardness and extra-hard type, 60 kg hardness). Pressure-pain-threshold (PPT) values of both the patients and the normal subjects were obtained with an algometer. It was found that the PPT of the patients with pain was significantly lower and that the extra-hard food took more masseter muscle activity and more working side jaw movement in both the pain and the normal groups. During both hard and extra-hard food biting, a significantly longer duration of masseter muscle activity was found in pain patients while the total muscle activity was not significantly stronger. Strong correlation existed between SCM and masseter muscle activity during both hard and extra-hard food biting in the patient group, while such correlation was very weak in the normal group. In conclusion, painful masseter muscles required longer masseter and SCM muscle contraction time for breaking through a hard food of 20 kg and more, and co-activation of SCM and masseter muscles existed and was more evident when the food was harder or the pain was more severe.

  9. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor in masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Yazc, Haşmet; Yiğit, Barş; Doğan, Sedat; Sunter, Ahmet Volkan; Behzatoğlu, Kemal

    2013-05-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumor is a member of malignant small round cell tumors. These tumors especially originate from the central and autonomous nervous system. However, these tumors may be originated from peripheral tissues and are called peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor. A 14-year-old girl attended to the Ear Nose Throat Clinic with the complaint of progressive painless swelling mass for 2 months on the right side of the face. Neck magnetic resonance imaging showed 3.5 × 2.5 × 2-cm isointense mass on T1 and hyperintense on T2 sequences. There was no pathological lymphadenopathy on computed tomographic scan. As a result of mandibular cortical invasion seen on computed tomographic scan, radical surgical excision was decided as surgical treatment. Total parotidectomy with preserving facial nerve and partial mandibulectomy with a 2-cm margin of safety were done, and reconstruction plaque applied to the mandible. Two lymph nodes were seen at the submandibular region. For this reason, prophylactic supraomohyoid neck dissection had also been performed. Pathological assessment proved the diagnosis of PNET, and chemoradiotherapy was planned for the patient.To our knowledge, this is the second reported case in literature. In this present case, peripheral neuroectodermal tumor in the masseter muscle and its diagnosis and treatment process were reported with literature review.

  10. Developmental and functional considerations of masseter muscle partitioning.

    PubMed

    Widmer, C G; English, A W; Morris-Wiman, J

    2007-04-01

    The masseter muscle participates in a wide variety of activities including mastication, swallowing and speech. The functional demands for accurate mandibular positioning and generation of forces during incising or a power stroke require a diverse set of forces that are determined by the innate muscle form. The complex internal tendon architecture subdivides the masseter into multiple partitions that can be further subdivided into neuromuscular compartments representing small motor unit territories. Individual masseter compartments have unique biomechanical properties that, when activated individually or in groups, can generate a wide range of sagittal and off-sagittal torques about the temporomandibular joint. The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) fibre-type distribution in the adult masseter is sexually dimorphic and is influenced by hormones such as testosterone. These testosterone-dependent changes cause a phenotype switch from slower to faster fibre-types in the male. The development of the complex organization of the masseter muscle, the MyHC fibre-type message and protein expression, and the formation of endplates appear to be pre-programmed and not under control of the muscle nerve. However, secondary myotube generation and endplate maturation are nerve dependent. The delayed development of the masseter muscle compared with the facial, tongue and jaw-opening muscles may be related to the delayed functional requirements for chewing. In summary, masseter muscle form is pre-programmed prior to birth while muscle fibre contractile characteristics are refined postnatally in response to functional requirements. The motor control mechanisms that are required to coordinate the activation of discrete functional elements of this muscle remain to be determined.

  11. Screening for variations in anterior digastric musculature prior to correction of post-traumatic anterior open bite by injection of botulinum toxin type A: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    It has recently been reported that long-standing post-traumatic open bite can be successfully corrected with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection into the anterior belly of the digastric muscle (ABDM). The report documented an individual with bilaterally symmetrical and otherwise unremarkable anterior digastric musculature. However, the existence of variant anterior digastric musculature is common and may complicate the management of anterior open bite with BTX-A injection. Screening for variant ABDM can be accomplished via ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Screening for variant ABDM should be performed prior to BTX-A injection in order to account for musculature that may exert undesired forces, such as inferolateral deviation, on the anterior mandible in patients with anterior open bite.

  12. [Relationship between jaws and the masseter muscle by superimposing MR images on the cephalogram].

    PubMed

    Higashino, Ryoji

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological relationship between maxillofacial skeleton and masseter by superimposing the masseter image constructed by MR image scanning on the cephalogram. Sixteen subjects with different mandibular plane angle were examined in this study. Cephalogram and MR images of each subject were taken, and the images were input to a computer by using a digitizer. The areas of masseter were selected in each MR scan image which were projected to the mid-sagittal layer of the MR scan images. The synthesized image of cephalogram and masseter was obtained by completely superimposing sagittal images of the masseter with the mid-sagittal-plane MR image on the cephalogram. The inclination of masseter was determined by the center of gravity on the cross-section of masseter. These synthesized images of cephalogram and masseter showed various shapes of masseter according to different mandibular plane angle. The inclination of masseter had a close correlation with some skeletal parameters (mandibular plane angle, ANB, Y-axis, facial angle, saddle angle) of cephalometric analysis. The volume of the masseter also had a close correlation with skeletal parameters (mandibular plane angle, gonial angle, Y-axis). These results revealed that morphometric analysis using synthesized images of cephalogram and masseter is useful, and that the inclination and the volume of masseter may have an influence on the shape of the mandibular bone and its vertical and anteroposterior development.

  13. Lengthening Temporalis Myoplasty: Virtual Animation-Assisted Technical Video.

    PubMed

    Aljudaibi, Nawaf; Bennis, Yasmine; Duquennoy-Martinot, Veronique; Labbé, Daniel; Guerreschi, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Lengthening temporalis myoplasty is a well-established procedure for dynamic palliative reanimation of the lip in facial palsy sequelae. The particularity of this technique is that the entire temporal muscle is transferred from the coronoid process to the upper half of the lip without interposition of aponeurotic tissue. To date, no video describing the technique was available. This is the first video describing the entire procedure, from preoperative markings through postoperative rehabilitation. In the video presented herein, the authors craft virtual three-dimensional animations in addition to a live operation on a patient performed by Daniel Labbé, who first described this technique 20 years ago.

  14. Treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with temporalis muscle and fascia flap.

    PubMed

    Su-Gwan, K

    2001-06-01

    This study sought to determine the efficacy of interpositional arthroplasty with temporalis muscle and fascia flap in the treatment of unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in adults. This retrospective study of seven cases evaluated the postoperative results of interpositional arthroplasty on temporalis muscle and fascia flap in adults. The operative protocol for unilateral TMJ ankylosis entailed, (1) resection of ankylotic mass, (2) intraoral ipsilateral coronoidectomy, (3) contralateral coronoidectomy when necessary, (4) interpositional tissue transfer to the TMJ with temporalis muscle and fascia flap, (5) maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), and (6) early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy. The results of this protocol were encouraging, while the functional results of interpositional arthroplasty on temporalis muscle and fascia flap were satisfactory. The findings of this study support the use of temporalis muscle and fascia flap in adult patients with unilateral TMJ ankylosis. Early postoperative initial exercise, physiotherapy, and strict follow-up play an important role in preventing postoperative adhesions.

  15. An Infiltrative Angioarchitectural Variant of Arteriovenous Malformation of Temporalis

    PubMed Central

    Byatnal, Aditi Amit; Rakheja, Mahima; Byatnal, Amit Raghavendra; Narayanaswamy, Venkadasalapathy

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies of the head and neck region pose a certain diagnostic and therapeutic paradox. Management of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is a challenge owing to the presence of abnormal vascular communications and high recurrence. We report a case of a 19-year-old male patient, who presented with diffuse swelling in the right temporal region. Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) suggested it to be an AVM in the temporalis muscle, having afferents in the ascending pharyngeal artery, with cavernous angioma. Surgical excision of the lesion was carried out under carotid control. Histopathology of the excised specimen utilizing special stains confirmed the presence of AVM. An absence of distinct nidus concomitant along with the exuberant proliferation of capillaries between the muscle fibres suggested it be an infiltrative angioarchitectural variant. The present case highlights significance of diagnosing AVM in temporalis muscle which is a rare occurrence in head and neck region. Also, the importance of ruling out other closely resembling vascular diathesis, both non neoplastic and malignant is discussed. PMID:25386534

  16. Effect of Reflection of Temporalis Muscle During Cranioplasty With Titanium Mesh After Standard Trauma Craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yichao; Jiang, Jiyao; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Cranioplasty (CP) with titanium mesh after standard trauma craniectomy (STC) has been proven to be a favorable technology. According to reflection of temporalis muscle or not, the CP was divided into 2 operation ways. Effect of reflection of temporalis muscle has not been systematically researched. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled to assess the effect of reflection of temporalis muscle during CP after STC. Cranial index of symmetry was adopted to evaluate the aesthetic results, transcranial Doppler was used to assess change of cerebral blood flow (CBF), functional independence measurements were performed to monitor the improvement of neuronal function, and complications associated with CP were also recorded. The results displayed that reflection of temporalis muscle or not had no effect on the anesthetic results. Both operation ways could improve CBF and neuronal function. Cranioplasty with reflection of temporalis muscle could improve CBF and neuronal function more significantly. Furthermore, reflection of temporalis muscle would not increase complications associated with CP. Reflection of temporalis muscle during CP with titanium mesh after STC proves to be an effective and safe operation way.

  17. The role of temporalis fascia for free mucosal graft survival in small nasal septal perforation repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun-Ju; Choi, Jin; Lee, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Sung-Won; Nam, In-Chul; Park, Yong-Su; Jin, Sang-Gyun; Cheon, Byung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Temporalis fascia has been used widely as a interposition graft for mucosal rotation flap in nasal septal perforation repair. However, the exact role of temporalis fascia in healing process has not yet been clarified. For the pedicle of rotation flap has been considered as a major vehicle for nutrition distribution, the role of temporalis fascia has been devaluated. In this study, we experienced small nasal septal perforation repairs using free mucosal graft not having pedicles but covered by temporalis fascia. Three patients with small nasal septal perforations not larger than 1 × 1 cm were included. In 2 patients, the perforations were repaired using free composite grafts from the inferior turbinate mucosa covered by continuous temporalis fascia not divided, and the surgical results were successful with complete healings. In 1 patient, however, the temporalis fascia was divided into 2 parts to better fit the shape of the perforation, and the graft failed to survive. These surgical results suggest that the temporalis fascia might have an important role in healing process of nasal septal defect and could be used as a beneficial options for small mucosal defect repair surgeries using free mucosal grafts.

  18. Correction of post-traumatic anterior open bite by injection of botulinum toxin type A into the anterior belly of the digastric muscle: case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Tae; Kim, Seong-Gon; Park, Young-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic anterior open bite can occur as a result of broken balance among the masticatory muscles. The superior hyoid muscle group retracts the mandible downward and contributes to the anterior open bite. Denervation of the digastric muscle by injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) can reduce the power of the digastric muscle and help to resolve the post-traumatic anterior open bite. A patient with a bilateral angle fracture had an anterior open bite even after undergoing three operations under general anesthesia and rubber traction. Although the open bite showed some improvement by the repeated operation, the occlusion was still unstable six weeks after the initial treatment. To eliminate the residual anterior open bite, BTX-A was injected into the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Following injection of BTX-A, the anterior open bite showed immediate improvement. Complication and relapse were not observed during follow-up. Long-standing post-traumatic open bite could be successfully corrected by injection of BTX-A into the anterior belly of the digastric muscle without complication. PMID:24471041

  19. Modification of the Labbé Procedure: Integration of the Deep Temporalis Fascia Turnover Flap.

    PubMed

    Teven, Chad M; Bank, Jonathan; Gottlieb, Lawrence J; Reid, Russell R

    2015-06-01

    Modification of the lengthening temporalis myoplasty for reanimation of facial paralysis is presented. A patient experienced traumatic laceration of the left facial nerve resulting in left hemifacial paralysis. Multiple attempts at nerve repair were unsuccessful. For smile restoration, a Labbé procedure was performed. Because of inadequate length, the temporalis tendon could not be directly secured to the modiolus. Therefore, an inferiorly based temporalis fascia flap was recruited from the deep temporal fascia and reflected inferiorly to provide additional length by which the tendon could be secured to the modiolus. This technique provided immediate smile restoration and required no additional donor site.

  20. Management of Unilateral Masseter Hypertrophy and Hypertrophic Scar—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Naresh; Malaviya, Rajanikanth K.; Gupta, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Masseter muscle hypertrophy is a rare condition of idiopathic cause. It clinically presents as an enlargement of one or both masseter muscles. Most patients complain of facial asymmetry; however, symptoms such as trismus, protrusion, and bruxism may also occur. Several treatment options reported for masseter hypertrophy are present, which range from simple pharmacotherapy to more invasive surgical reduction. Keloid scar with unilateral masseter hypertrophy is a rarely seen in clinical practice. This paper reports a case of unilateral masseter hypertrophy with keloid scar in the angle of the mandible for which surgical treatment was rendered to the patient by using a single approach. PMID:22844620

  1. Higher masseter muscle mass in grazing than in browsing ruminants.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinold R; Streich, W Jürgen; Fickel, Jörns; Hummel, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Using cranioskeletal measurements, several studies have generated evidence that grazing ruminants have a more pronounced mastication apparatus, in terms of muscle insertion areas and protuberances, than browsing ruminants, with the resulting hypothesis that grazers should have larger, heavier chewing muscles than browsers. However, the only investigation of this so far [Axmacher and Hofmann (J Zool 215:463-473, 1988)] did not find differences between ruminant feeding types in the masseter muscle mass of 22 species. Here, we expand the dataset to 48 ruminant species. Regardless of phylogenetic control in the statistical treatment, there was a significant positive correlation of body mass and masseter mass, and also a significant association between percent grass in the natural diet and masseter mass. The results support the concept that ruminant species that ingest more grass have relatively larger masseter muscles, possibly indicating an increased requirement to overcome the resistance of grass forage. The comparative chewing resistance of different forage classes may represent a rewarding field of ecophysiological research.

  2. [Benefits and limits of sonography of the masseter muscle].

    PubMed

    Siegert, R; Wimmer, L

    1990-07-01

    A sonographic method for diagnosis, follow-up and quantification of normal and hypertrophied masseter muscles is presented. This technique lends itself to diagnosis of macroscopic structural alterations of the muscle as well as tumors in the vicinity. Functional or microscopic tissue changes like trigger points in myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome cannot be detected sonographically.

  3. Relationship between masseter muscle size and maxillary morphology.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasuki; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shigeeda, Toru; Shinohara, Akihiko; Igarashi, Yu; Sakaguchi, Masahito; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between masseter muscle size and craniofacial morphology, focusing on the maxilla. Twenty-four patients (11 males and 13 females; mean age 27.6 ± 5.6 years) underwent cephalometric analyses. Ultrasonography was used to measure the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the masseter muscle and bite force was measured using pressure sensitive film. The results showed that CSA-relaxed was positively correlated with upper anterior face height (UAFH)/total anterior face height (TAFH) and negatively with lower anterior face height (LAFH)/TAFH and LAFH (P < 0.05). CSA-clenched was correlated positively with SN-palatal, FH-palatal, UAFH/TAFH, and lower posterior face height (LPFH)/total posterior face height (TPFH) and negatively with LAFH/TAFH, LAFH, upper posterior face height (UPFH)/TPFH, and UPFH (P < 0.05). Bite force was positively correlated with LPFH/TPFH and negatively with UPFH/TPFH (P < 0.05). As the masseter became larger, the anterior maxillary region tended to shift downwards relative to the cranial base, whereas the posterior region tended to shift upwards. The decrease in LAFH/TAFH and increase in LPFH/TPFH as the size of the masseter muscle increases may be influenced not only by the inclination of the mandibular plane but also by the clockwise rotation of the maxilla.

  4. Hemimaxillectomy for desmoplastic ameloblastoma with immediate temporalis flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elo, Jeffrey A; Tandon, Rahul; Allen, Chad N; Murray, Matthew D

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors encountered, occurring more frequently than all other tumors combined, if one excludes the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. These tumors can cause severe expansion of the cortical bones and gross anatomic deformities. They can affect the dentition, causing tooth mobility and displacement. Fortunately, morbidity can be minimized with recognition on routine radiographic examination. The tissue may be unilocular or multilocular and has been described as having a "soap-bubble" appearance. Nevertheless, its radiographic appearance is insufficient to make a definitive diagnosis, because other tumors have similar appearance. Although the anatomic distribution and progression of ameloblastoma remain fairly consistent, alternative manifestations follow an atypical clinical course. One such variant is the desmoplastic ameloblastoma. We present a case of maxillary desmoplastic ameloblastoma treated with hemimaxillectomy and immediate reconstruction with temporalis flap that was recurrence-free at 36 months.

  5. Silicone vs temporalis fascia interposition in TMJ ankylosis: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sumit; Gupta, Hemant; Mohammad, Shadab; Mehra, Hemant; Natu, Subodh Shankar; Gupta, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJa) is a distressing condition, but can be surgically managed by gap or interpositional arthroplasty, with an aim to restore joint function and prevent re-ankylosis. The aim of this paper is to compare two interposition materials used in management of TMJ ankylosis. Methods 15 patients with TMJa were randomly allocated to two groups: group A (n = 6), interposition material used was medical-grade silicon elastomer, and group B (n = 9) where the interposition material used was temporalis fascia. Patients were followed up at regular intervals of 1 and 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months and were assessed on following parameters: pain by VAS Scale, maximal mouth opening (MMO), implant rejection, and recurrence. Results The results showed a loss of 4.6% and 7.9% in maximal interincisal mouth opening at 3rd and 6th months in Group A while Group B had a mean loss of 9% and 10% at 3rd and 6th months respectively without any significant difference. None of our cases showed recurrence or implant rejection. Conclusion We conclude that silicone is comparable to temporalis fascia in terms of stability, surgical ease, and adaptability. It not only restores the function of mandible and ensures good maximum interincisal opening but also maintains the vertical ramal height. Also, it requires less operating time and is easy to handle but is not economical. It might be an effective way to restore function and prevent re-ankylosis. PMID:27195207

  6. Morphofunctional Compensation of Masseter Muscles in Unilateral Posterior Crossbite Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cutroneo, G.; Vermiglio, G.; Centofanti, A.; Rizzo, G.; Runci, M.; Favaloro, A.; Piancino, M.G.; Bracco, P.; Ramieri, G.; Bianchi, F.; Speciale, F.; Arco, A.; Trimarchi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral posterior crossbite is a widespread, asymmetric malocclusion characterized by an inverse relationship of the upper and lower buccal dental cusps, in the molar and premolar regions, on one side only of the dental arch. Patients with unilateral posterior crossbite exhibit an altered chewing cycles and the crossbite side masseter results to be less active with respect to the contralateral one. Few studies about morphological features of masticatory muscle in malocclusion disorders exist and most of these have been performed on animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and protein expression characteristics of masseter muscles in patients affected by unilateral posterior crossbite, by histological and immunofluorescence techniques. We have used antibody against PAX-7, marker of satellite cells, and against α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε- and ζ-sarcoglycans which are transmembrane glycoproteins involved in sarcolemma stabilization. By statistical analysis we have evaluated differences in amount of myonucley between contralateral and ipsilateral side. Results have shown: i) altered fibers morphology and atrophy of ipsilateral muscle if compared to the contralateral one; ii) higher number of myonuclei and PAX-7 positive cells in contralateral side than ipsilateral one; iii) higher pattern of fluorescence for all tested sarcoglycans in contralateral side than ipsilateral one. Results show that in unilateral posterior crossbite hypertrophic response of contralateral masseter and atrophic events in ipsilateral masseter take place; by that, in unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion masticatory muscles modify their morphology depending on the function. That could be relevant in understanding and healing of malocclusion disorders; in fact, the altered balance about structure and function between ipsilateral and contralateral muscles could, long-term, lead and/ or worsen skeletal asymmetries. PMID:27349311

  7. Masseter Myosin Heavy Chain Composition Varies With Mandibular Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Raoul, Gwénaël; Rowlerson, Anthea; Sciote, James; Codaccioni, Emmanuel; Stevens, Laurence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Duhamel, Alain; Ferri, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Human jaw dysmorphologies are frequent and often affect young patients, resulting in malocclusion of teeth and inappropriate jaw relationships. Treatment is performed by means of orthodontics with orthognathic surgery as required. Mandibular asymmetry is one of the most frequent dysmorphologies, but in many cases, the specific cause is unknown. In healthy patients who were undergoing orthognathic surgery for correction of malocclusion, we tested the hypothesis that masseter muscle phenotype composition, which determines contractile properties, was different between sides in patients with mandibular asymmetry but not in those without mandibular asymmetry. After cephalometric analysis, 50 patients from whom we obtained samples of both right and left masseter muscles were separated into 2 groups: with or without mandibular lateral deviation. Samples were immunostained with myosin-isoform–specific antibodies to identify 4 skeletal muscle fiber types, and their fiber areas and proportions were measured. Two-tailed Wilcoxon test for paired samples was used to compare the 4 fiber-type compositions by means of percent occupancy and mean fiber area on both sides. Patients with mandibular asymmetry were associated with a significant increase of type II fiber occupancy (P = 0.0035) on the same side as the deviation. This finding that masseter muscle phenotype is significantly linked to mandibular asymmetry is of relevance to physiotherapeutic and surgical managements of jaw discrepancies and merits further investigation in the light of its possible role in the etiology of this condition. PMID:21586952

  8. Recruitment stability in masseter motor units during isometric voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Scutter, S D; Türker, K S

    1998-10-01

    Recruitment of single motor units (SMUs) of the masseter muscle was studied using macro representation (MacroRep) as the indicator of motor unit size. When subjects followed a slow isometric force ramp, units were usually recruited in order of MacroRep size. However, pooling the data from repeated ramps in the same subject resulted in a weak relationship between MacroRep size and force recruitment threshold, probably due to marked variations in the relative contributions of the jaw muscles, and varying levels of cocontraction, in the development of total bite force in each ramp. The force recruitment thresholds of individual SMUs showed marked variability, but recruitment threshold stability was improved when expressed as a percentage of maximum surface electromyographic (SEMG) activity in the ipsilateral masseter. Therefore the SEMG recruitment threshold was concluded to be a more stable and accurate indicator of the SMU's position in the recruitment hierarchy in a given muscle. It was concluded that SMUs in masseter are recruited according to the size principle, and that when investigating recruitment in jaw muscles, SEMG recruitment threshold should be used in preference to force recruitment threshold.

  9. Masseter reflex in the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and type 3.

    PubMed

    García, Antonio; Alvarez, Silvia; Infante, Jon; Berciano, José

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation we assess the utility of the masseter reflex for diagnostic purposes in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. We studied the masseter reflex electrophysiologically in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2, 10 patients) and type 3 (SCA3/MJD, 13 patients). In SCA2, the masseter reflex was abnormal in 9 (90%) patients. In SCA3/MJD, the masseter reflex was normal in all 13 patients. Our findings suggest that the masseter reflex is a reliable test that provides additional data prior to molecular study in the differentiation between SCA2 and SCA3/MJD. Masseter reflex abnormalities in SCA2 patients could be better explained by dysfunction of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus/tract.

  10. Ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle as predictors of cephalometric indices in orthodontics: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Naser-Ud-Din, S; Sampson, W J; Dreyer, C W; Thoirs, K

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the potential of ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle to accurately predict indices normally derived from cephalograms. Masseter muscle measurements on 11 adults (22 to 30 y) were made using lateral cephalometrics and extended field-of-view ultrasound. The ultrasound technique was validated in a simulation pilot study using 12 dry skulls and raw chicken breasts. Twenty cephalometric variables were analyzed against four ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle. Highly significant correlations (r = 0.81-0.85, p = 0.001-0.002) between ultrasound measurements of the masseter muscle and cephalometric measurements representing the length of the superficial masseter muscle, the length and shape of the mandible and vertical facial proportions were demonstrated. Predictive equations from regression analyses were constructed to deduce ramus length and shape from the ultrasound measurements. The results provide pilot data suggesting that ultrasound is a potential clinical tool for sequential evaluation of masseter muscle length in orthodontics and facial muscle growth studies.

  11. Simultaneous Bilateral Hypertrophies of the Parotid Gland and Masseter Muscle: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Rohan; Mandel, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Increased salivary demand can lead to enlarged parotid salivary glands, and increased activity of the masseter muscles can cause masseter hypertrophy. This report describes a most unusual case of simultaneous bilateral hypertrophies of the parotid gland and masseter muscle originating from the very extensive habit of chewing gum. An extensive literature review uncovered many cases of the independent existence of masseteric or parotid hypertrophy, but no example of the simultaneous occurrence of these 2 conditions.

  12. The course of the buccal nerve: relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period

    PubMed Central

    MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. R.; RODRÍGUEZ-VÁZQUEZ, J. F.; CUADRA, C.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. A.; JIMÉNEZ-COLLADO, J.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the course of the buccal nerve and its relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period. Serial sections of 90 human fetal specimens ranging from 9 to 17 wk development were studied by light microscopy. Each fetal specimen was studied on both right and left sides, making a total of 180 cases for study. A 3-D reconstruction of the region analysed in one of the specimens was made. In 89 cases the buccal nerve was located medial to the temporalis muscle; in 73 cases it penetrated the muscle; in 15 cases it lay in a canal formed by the muscle fibres and was covered by fascia, and finally, in 3 cases it was a branch of the inferior alveolar nerve. The study has revealed that in a large number of cases the buccal nerve maintains an intimate association with the temporalis muscle. PMID:11327204

  13. Diverse firing properties of single motor units in the inner and outer portions of the guinea pig anterior digastric muscle.

    PubMed

    Lev-Tov, A; Tal, M; Lavy, R

    1993-02-01

    Microwire recordings from the histochemically heterogeneous inner compartment of the guinea pig anterior digastric muscle (ADG) revealed tonic firing of single motor units, which were spontaneously active and could also be recruited following orofacial afferent stimulation and during rhythmic jaw movements (RJM). As units with tonic firing were not observed in the homogeneously fast-twitch outer ADG, the tonic units were classified as slow-twitch motor units. Irregular patterns of motor-unit firing at variable frequencies were observed after orofacial stimulation and during RJM in the outer and inner compartments. The irregular firing pattern of units in the fast-twitch outer compartment was characterized by shorter and less variable bursts than that of units in the heterogeneous inner compartment. A phasic, centrally driven firing pattern was observed during RJM in outer and inner ADG units. The firing frequency of some of these units was modulated during the rhythmical bursts. It is suggested that, as in limb muscles, functionally specialized ADG motor units are recruited in an orderly sequence, starting with spontaneously active, slow-twitch units in the inner compartment, continuing with fast-twitch units recruited upon enhancement of the synaptic drive (as in the case of orofacial stimulation), and ending with massive, rhythmical recruitment of slow- and fast-twitch units during RJM.

  14. Functional Compartmentalization of the Human Superficial Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A.; Biotti Picand, Jorge L.; de la Rosa, Francisco J. Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle’s motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20–60% MVBF). PMID:25692977

  15. Functional compartmentalization of the human superficial masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A; Biotti Picand, Jorge L; de la Rosa, Francisco J Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle's motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20-60% MVBF).

  16. Temporalis Muscle Tendon Unit Transfer for Smile Restoration After Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Owusu Boahene, Kofi D

    2016-02-01

    Temporalis muscle tendon unit (MTU) transfer may be used as a single-stage procedure for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. Principles and biomechanics of muscle function and tendon transposition are essential in optimizing outcome. Critical steps and pearls for success include minimizing scarring, maintaining glide plains, mobilizing adequate tendon length, insertion of MTU at ideal tension based on intraoperative dynamic tension-excursion relationship, and insertion of tendon as close to the lip margin as possible. Because muscles adapt to tension, load, and task changes by altering their sarcomere arrangement and muscle fiber composition, physiotherapy should be initiated to use the repurposed temporalis MTU for smile restoration.

  17. Medullary infarcts may cause ipsilateral masseter reflex abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thömke, Frank; Marx, Jürgen J; Cruccu, Giorgio; Stoeter, Peter; Hopf, Hanns C

    2007-10-01

    There is a suprasegmental influence on the masseter reflex (MassR) in animals, which is mediated via the fifth nerve spinal nucleus (5SpN). Corresponding data in humans are lacking. Out of 268 prospectively recruited patients with clinical signs of acute brainstem infarctions, we identified 38 with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented unilateral infarcts caudal to the levels of the fifth nerve motor and main sensory nuclei. All had biplanar T2- and echo planar diffusion-weighted MRI and MassR testing. Five patients (13%) had ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. In all, the infarcts involved the region of the 5SpN. Patients with medullary infarcts involving the region of the 5SpN may thus have ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. This possibly represents an interruption of an excitatory projection mediated via the 5SpN to masseter motoneurons in the fifth nerve motor nucleus. MassR abnormalities with medullary lesions restrict the topodiagnostic value of the MassR.

  18. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis and Fibrosis of Temporalis Muscle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungsuk; Kim, James Y; Wotman, Michael T; Behrman, David A; Israel, Howard

    2016-04-01

    A case of severe mandibular hypomobility due to fibrosis of the left temporalis tendon, combined with ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint, is presented. This case emphasizes the importance of reconstructing the historical timeline to establish a correct diagnosis, ultimately leading to appropriate treatment. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques and the importance of postoperative rehabilitation are emphasized.

  19. Endoscopic Transmaxillary Transposition of Temporalis Flap for Recurrent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Closure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Regi; Girishan, Shabari; Chacko, Ari George

    2016-12-01

    Objective To describe the technique of endoscopic transmaxillary temporalis muscle flap transposition for the repair of a persistent postoperative sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid leak. Design The repair of a recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak for a patient who had undergone endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of an invasive silent corticotroph Hardy C and Knosp Grade IV pituitary adenoma was undertaken. The patient had completed postoperative radiotherapy for the residual tumor and presented with cerebrospinal fluid leak, 1 year later. The initial two attempts to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with free grafts failed. Therefore, an endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis muscle flap was attempted to stop the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Results The endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the vascularized temporalis muscle flap onto the cerebrospinal fluid leak repair site resulted in successful closure of the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis flap resulted in closure of recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with recurrent pituitary adenoma, who had undergone previous surgery and radiotherapy. This technique has advantages over the endoscopic transpterygoid transposition of the same flap and could be used as a complementary technique in selected patients.

  20. Autologous Vascularized Dural Wrapping for Temporalis Muscle Preservation and Reconstruction After Decompressive Craniectomy: Report of Twenty-five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Nocchi, Niccolo; Di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Temporalis muscle reconstruction is a necessary step during frontotemporal cranioplasty ensuing decompressive craniectomy (DC). During this procedure, scarring between the temporalis muscle and the dural layer may lead to complicated muscle dissection, which carries an increased risk of dura and muscle damage. At time of DC, temporalis muscle wrapping by an autologous vascularized dural flap can later on facilitate dissection and rebuilding during the subsequent cranioplasty. In a span of 2 years, we performed 57 DCs for different etiologies. In 30 cases, the temporalis muscle was isolated by wrapping its inner surface using the autologous dura. At cranioplasty, the muscle could easily be dissected from the duraplasty. The inner surface was easily freed from the autologous dural envelope, and reconstruction achieved in an almost physiological position. Follow-up examinations were held at regular intervals to disclose signs of temporalis muscle depletion. Twenty-five patients survived to undergo cranioplasty. Muscle dissection could always be performed with no injury to the dural layer. No complications related to temporalis muscle wrapping were recorded. Face asymmetry developed in four cases but it was always with bone resorption. None of the patients with a good neurological recovery reported functional or aesthetic complaints. In our experience, temporalis muscle wrapping by vascularized autologous dura proved to be effective in preserving its bulk and reducing its adhesion to duraplasty, thereby improving muscle dissection and reconstruction during cranioplasty. Functional and aesthetic results were satisfying, except in cases of bone resorption. PMID:24067769

  1. Anatomical relationship between the position of the sigmoid sinus, tympanic membrane and digastric ridge with the mastoid segment of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Boemo, R L; Navarrete, M L; Lareo, S; Pumarola, F; Chamizo, J; Perelló, E

    2008-04-01

    Our study was carried out to examine the relationships of the sigmoid sinus, tympanic membrane and digastric ridge with the mastoid segment of the facial nerve. We studied 33 adult temporal bones. The distances among these structures were evaluated according specific landmarks that can be repeated in a simple manner. We found a good relation, in a proportional and lineal order, between these three structures and the facial nerve. This study indicated a correlation between the position of these three structures and the mastoid segment of the facial nerve through a simple morphometric method.

  2. Anterior temporalis and suprahyoid EMG activity during jaw clenching and tooth grinding.

    PubMed

    Aldana, Karina; Miralles, Rodolfo; Fuentes, Aler; Valenzuela, Saúl; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anterior temporalis and suprahyoid electromyographic (EMG) activity during jaw clenching and tooth grinding at different jaw posture tasks. The study included 30 healthy subjects with natural dentition and bilateral molar support, incisive protrusive guidance and bilateral laterotrusive canine guidance. Bipolar surface electrodes were located on the right anterior temporalis and suprahyoid muscles. Three EMG recordings in the standing position were performed in the following tasks: C. clenching in the intercuspal position (IP); P1. eccentric grinding from IP to protrusive edge-to-edge contact position; P2. clenching in protrusive edge-to-edge contact position; P3. concentric grinding from protrusive edge-to-edge contact position to IP; L1. eccentric grinding from IP to laterotrusive edge-to-edge contact position; L2. clenching in laterotrusive edge-to-edge contact position; L3. concentric grinding from laterotrusive edge-to-edge contact position to IP. EMG activity during protrusive and laterotrusive tasks was lower than intercuspal position in the anterior temporalis, whereas an opposite EMG pattern was observed in the suprahyoid muscles activity, excepting recorded activity in L2 (mixed model with unstructured covariance matrix). Anterior temporalis activity was higher during P3 than P1 and P2 tasks and during L3 than L1 and L2 tasks, whereas in the suprahyoid muscles, activity was higher during P1 than P2 tasks and during L1 than L2 and L3 tasks. These results could support the idea of a differential modulation of the motor neuron pools of anterior temporalis and suprahyoid muscles of peripheral and/or central origin.

  3. Elevated Fractalkine (CX3CL1) Levels in the Trigeminal Ganglion Mechanically Sensitize Temporalis Muscle Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Brian E; O'Brien, Melissa; Dong, Xu-Dong; Gazerani, Parisa

    2016-05-21

    It has been proposed that after nerve injury or tissue inflammation, fractalkine (CX3CL1) released from dorsal root ganglion neurons acts on satellite glial cells (SGCs) through CX3C receptor 1 (CX3CR1) to induce neuroplastic changes. The existence and importance of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in the trigeminal ganglia has not yet been clarified. This study investigated (1) whether trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervate temporalis muscle and their associated SGCs contain fractalkine and/or express CX3CR1, (2) if intraganglionic injection of fractalkine increases the mechanical sensitivity of temporalis muscle afferent fibers, (3) whether complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation of the temporalis muscle alters the expression of fractalkine or its receptor in the trigeminal ganglion, and (4) if intraganglionic administration of CX3CR1 antibodies alters afferent mechanical sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in male and female rats were used to address these questions. It was found that ∼50 % of temporalis ganglion neurons and ∼25 % of their associated SGCs express CX3CR1, while only neurons expressed fractalkine. Temporalis muscle inflammation increased the expression of fractalkine, but only in male rats. Intraganglionic injection of fractalkine (25 g/ml; 3 μl) induced prolonged afferent mechanical sensitization. Intraganglionic injection of CX3CR1 antibody increased afferent mechanical threshold, but this effect was greater in controls than in rats with CFA-induced muscle inflammation. These findings raise the possibility that basal fractalkine signalling within the trigeminal ganglion plays an important role in mechanical sensitivity of masticatory muscle sensory afferent fibers and that inhibition of CX3CR1 signaling within the trigeminal ganglia may induce analgesia through a peripheral mechanism.

  4. The influence of pain on masseter spindle afferent discharge.

    PubMed

    Capra, Norman F; Hisley, Calvin K; Masri, Radi M

    2007-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide proprioceptive feedback supporting normal patterns of motor activity and kinesthetic sensibility. During mastication, jaw muscle spindles play an important role in monitoring and regulating the chewing cycle and the bite forces generated during mastication. Both acute and chronic orofacial pain disorders are associated with changes in proprioceptive feedback and motor function. Experimental jaw muscle pain also alters the normal response of masseter spindle afferents to ramp and hold jaw movements. It has been proposed that altered motor function and proprioceptive input results from group III muscle afferent modulation of the fusimotor system which alters spindle afferent sensitivity in limb muscles. The response to nociceptive stimuli may enhance or reduce the response of spindle afferents to proprioceptive stimuli. Several experimental observations suggesting the possibility that a similar mechanism also functions in jaw muscles are presented in this report. First, evidence is provided to show that nociceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle primarily influences the amplitude sensitivity of spindle afferents with relatively little effect on the dynamic sensitivity. Second, reversible inactivation of the caudal trigeminal nuclei attenuates the nociceptive modulation of spindle afferents. Finally, functionally identified gamma-motoneurons in the trigeminal motor nucleus are modulated by intramuscular injection with algesic substances. Taken together, these results suggest that pain-induced modulation of spindle afferent responses are mediated by small diameter muscle afferents and that this modulation is dependent, in part, on the relay of muscle nociceptive information from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis onto trigeminal gamma-motoneurons. The implication of these results will be considered in light of current theories on the relationship between jaw muscle pain and oral motor function.

  5. Genetic stretching factors in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Breuel, Wiebke; Krause, Micaela; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2013-09-01

    Up to 30% of patients relapse after orthognathic operations, and one reason might be incomplete neuromuscular adaptation of the masticatory muscles. Displacement of the mandible in sagittal or vertical directions, or both, leads to stretching or compression of these muscles. The aim of this study was to analyse stretching factors in 35 patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible (Classes II and III). Tissue samples were taken from both sides of the masseter muscle (anterior and posterior) both before and 6 months after operation. Developmental myosin heavy chains MYH3 and MYH8, the fast and slow MYH 1, 2, and 7, and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) 2, forkhead transcription factor (FOX)O3a, calcineurin, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)1c (stretching and regeneration-specific), were analysed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations of Class II and III with sagittal and vertical cephalometric measurements ANB and ML-NL-angle were examined, and the results showed significant differences in amounts of MYH8 (p<0.05), MYH1 (p<0.05), and FOXO3a (p<0.05) between the 2 groups. Regeneration factor COX2 is more dominant in Class II. Surgically, bite opening (ML/NL angle) correlated with stretching indicators FOXO3a, calcineurin, and NFAT1c only in Class II patients. This means that stretching of the masseter muscle caused by lengthening of the mandible and raising of the bite in Class II patients was more likely to lead to relapse (similar to that in patients with open bite) than in Class III patients. In conclusion, deep bite should be reduced more by incisor intrusion than by skeletal opening. The focus in these patients should be directed towards physiotherapeutic strengthening of the muscles of mastication, and more consideration should be given to change in the vertical dimension.

  6. Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Catharina; Liu, Jing-Xia; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Eriksson, Per-Olof

    2011-04-01

    Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior.

  7. Reduced masticatory function is related to lower satellite cell numbers in masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M A R; Grefte, S; Bronkhorst, E M; Carels, C E L; Kiliaridis, S; Von den Hoff, J W

    2014-06-01

    The physiology of masseter muscles is known to change in response to functional demands, but the effect on the satellite cell (SC) population is not known. In this study, the hypothesis is tested that a decreased functional demand of the masseter muscle causes a reduction of SCs. To this end, twelve 5-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were put on a soft diet (SD, n = 6) or a hard diet (HD, n = 6) and sacrificed after 14 days. Paraffin sections of the superficial masseter and the m. digastricus (control muscle) were stained with haematoxylin and eosin for tissue survey and with anti-myosin heavy chain (MHC) for slow and fast fibres. Frozen sections of both muscles were double-stained for collagen type IV and Pax7. Slow MHC fibres were equally distributed in the m. digastricus but only localized in a small area of the m. masseter. No differences between HD or SD for the m. digastricus were found. The m. masseter had more SCs per fibre in HD than in SD (0.093 ± 0.007 and 0.081 ± 0.008, respectively; P = 0.027). The m. masseter had more fibres per surface area than the m. digastricus in rats with an SD group (758.1 ± 101.6 and 568.4 ± 85.6, P = 0.047) and a HD group (737.7 ± 32.6 and 592.2 ± 82.2; P = 0.007). The m. digastricus had more SCs per fibre than the m. masseter in the SD group (0.094 ± 0.01 and 0.081 ± 0.008; P = 0.039). These results suggest that reduced masseter muscle function is related to a lower number of SCs. Reduced muscle function might decrease microdamage and hence the requirement of SCs in the muscle fibres.

  8. Reconstruction of the Orbit With a Temporalis Muscle Flap After Orbital Exenteration

    PubMed Central

    Uyar, Yavuz; Yıldırım, Güven; Kuzdere, Mustafa; Arbağ, Hamdi; Jorayev, Chary; Kılıç, Mehmet Vefa; Gümrükçü, Said Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the role of the temporalis muscle flap in primary reconstruction after orbital exenteration. Methods A retrospective nonrandomized study of orbital exenterations performed between 1990 and 2010 for malignant tumors of the skin, paranasal sinus, and nasal cavity is presented. Results The study included 13 patients (nine men, four women; age range, 30-82 years) with paranasal sinus, nasal cavity, or skin carcinomas. Primary reconstruction of the cavity was performed in all patients after orbital exenteration. No visible defects in the muscle flap donor site were present. Local recurrences were readily followed up with nasal endoscopy, whereas radiology helped to diagnose intracranial involvement in three patients. Two patients died of systemic metastases and five died for other reasons Conclusion The temporalis muscle flap is readily used to close the defect after orbital exenteration, and does not prevent the detection of recurrence. PMID:25729496

  9. Oronasal fistula repair utilizing a temporalis muscle flap in a dog with severe trismus.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Ryan P; Farese, James P; Bacon, Nicholas J; Lurie, David M; Milner, Rowan J

    2011-01-01

    A 9 yr old spayed female cocker spaniel presented for evaluation of an invasive maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. Curative intent surgery and radiation therapy allowed for local control of the neoplasm; however, the development of a persistent oronasal fistula prevented a complete recovery. A temporalis myofascial rotation flap allowed for successful resolution of the maxillary defect. Implementation of the flap was relatively simple and was associated with few complications.

  10. Nociceptive temporalis inhibitory reflexes evoked by CO2-laser stimulation in tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Sciruicchio, V; Specchio, L M; Puca, F

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the laser-induced suppression periods of the temporalis muscle in patients with tension-type headache, compared with the pattern of temporalis activity suppression induced by electrical stimulation. Fifteen patients with chronic and 10 with episodic tension-type headaches were selected. Suppression periods were recorded simultaneously from both temporalis muscles using both electrical stimuli and CO2-laser stimuli. A significant reduction in the later electrically induced suppression period was found in both tension-type headache groups. Laser stimulation induced a first suppression period (LSP1) with a latency of about 50 ms in all patients. The features of LSP1 were similar across groups. The LSP1 should correspond to the first suppression period induced by electrical stimulus, which is partly a nociceptive response, whereas the second period seemed negligibly linked with the activation of pain-related afferents, though probably their activation may contribute to increase the reflex duration and to emphasize abnormalities in tension-type headache.

  11. Role of temporalis muscle over activity in chronic tension type headache: effect of yoga based management.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, R; Dureja, G P; Tripathi, M; Bhattacharjee, M; Bijlani, R L; Mathur, R

    2007-01-01

    The role of central versus peripheral mechanisms has always been questioned while explaining the etiopathogenesis of chronic tension type headache (CTTH). The following study was done to study the role of muscle spasm in CTTH. 15 patients of CTTH and 7 age matched controls were included in the study and their m. temporalis EMG was recorded for one minute each during rest, mental activity and maximal voluntary contraction and subjective pain scoring was done by visual analogue scale. The results revealed significant overactivity of m.temporalis in CTTH patients at rest when compared with control subjects (P = 0.01 and 0.03 left and right side respectively). After respective interventions namely non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs, botulinum toxin injections and yogic life style course, the EMG records revealed decrease in the mean EMG amplitude of m. temporalis during rest and mental activity more significantly after yoga based interventions (P = 0.03) and subjective pain scores decreased from 7.00 +/- 2.10 to 2.00 +/- 1.26 (P = 0.02) supporting the beneficial effect of such non invasive techniques.

  12. A cineradiographic and electromyographic study of mastication in Tenrec ecaudatus.

    PubMed

    Oron, U; Crompton, A W

    1985-08-01

    Regular chewing was studied in the specialized Malagasy insectivore Tenrec ecaudatus with the aid of precisely correlated electromyography of the main adductors, digastrics, and two hyoid muscles and cineradiography for which metallic markers were placed in the mandibles, tongue, and hyoid bone. During the power stroke the body of the mandible moves dorsally and medially. The medially directed component of movement at this time is greatly increased by simultaneous rotation of the mandible about its longitudinal axis. The highly mobile symphysis, spherical dentary condyle, loss of superficial masseter muscle and zygoma, and the simplified zalamnodont molars all appear to be related to the large amount of mandibular rotation that occurs during occlusion. The balancing side lateral pterygoid muscle (inferior head) apparently shifts the working side mandible laterally during the last part of opening and the first part of closing. The working side temporalis and the superficial masseter muscle are both responsible for the shift back to the midline. The temporalis is usually active to the same extent on the working and balancing sides during the power stroke. The level of activity (amplitude) of the temporalis and duration of the power stroke increase with harder foods. Whenever soft foods are chewed, the superficial masseter is only active on the working side; whenever foods of increasing hardness are chewed, its level of activity on the balancing side increases to approach that of the working side. Mandibular rotation is greatly reduced when hard foods are chewed.

  13. Comparative analysis of masseter fiber architecture in tree-gouging (Callithrix jacchus) and nongouging (Saguinus oedipus) callitrichids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2004-09-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) (Callitrichidae, Primates) share a broadly similar diet of fruits, insects, and tree exudates. Common marmosets, however, differ from tamarins by actively gouging trees with their anterior teeth to elicit tree exudate flow. During tree gouging, marmosets produce relatively large jaw gapes, but do not necessarily produce relatively large bite forces at the anterior teeth. We compared the fiber architecture of the masseter muscle in tree-gouging Callithrix jacchus (n = 10) to nongouging Saguinus oedipus (n = 8) to determine whether the marmoset masseter facilitates producing these large gapes during tree gouging. We predict that the marmoset masseter has relatively longer fibers and, hence, greater potential muscle excursion (i.e., a greater range of motion through increased muscle stretch). Conversely, because of the expected trade-off between excursion and force production in muscle architecture, we predict that the cotton-top tamarin masseter has more pinnate fibers and increased physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) as compared to common marmosets. Likewise, the S. oedipus masseter is predicted to have a greater proportion of tendon relative to muscle fiber as compared to the common marmoset masseter. Common marmosets have absolutely and relatively longer masseter fibers than cotton-top tamarins. Given that fiber length is directly proportional to muscle excursion and by extension contraction velocity, this result suggests that marmosets have masseters designed for relatively greater stretching and, hence, larger gapes. Conversely, the cotton-top tamarin masseter has a greater angle of pinnation (but not significantly so), larger PCSA, and higher proportion of tendon. The significantly larger PCSA in the tamarin masseter suggests that their masseter has relatively greater force production capabilities as compared to marmosets. Collectively, these results suggest that the fiber

  14. Muscle-spindle distribution in relation to the fibre-type composition of masseter in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Rowlerson, A; Mascarello, F; Barker, D; Saed, H

    1988-01-01

    The various parts of the masseter muscle complex (pars superficialis, pars profunda, zygomaticomandibularis, maxillomandibularis) in the rat, guinea-pig, rabbit, cat and macaque monkey were examined to discover whether they showed any relationship between the distribution of muscle spindles and extrafusal fibre types. Intrafusal (spindle) and extrafusal fibre types in masseter were compared with those in limb muscles and were identified by a combination of standard histochemical methods and indirect immunoperoxidase staining with antibodies specific for the various isoforms of myosin characteristic of fibre types in mammalian muscle. In general, the fibre-type properties of intrafusal fibres in masseter resembled those in limb muscle spindles, but the extrafusal fibre-type composition was unlike that in most limb muscles. In the rat masseter, most of the spindles were clustered together in a few very restricted areas. Extensive fusion of the external capsules of adjacent spindles, resulting in the formation of giant spindles, was seen in the cat and monkey masseter; this was sometimes accompanied by the enclosure of extrafusal fibres within the fused spindles. Common to all species, but strongest of all in the rat, was a close association between the distributions of muscle spindles and extrafusal Type I (slow twitch) fibres within the masseter complex. Muscle spindles and Type I fibres were either absent or rarest in the superficial part of masseter, but were most common in the deep layer (pars profunda) or zygomaticomandibularis. The functional significance of these observations is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2978294

  15. The role of P2X3 receptors in bilateral masseter muscle allodynia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tariba Knežević, Petra; Vukman, Robert; Antonić, Robert; Kovač, Zoran; Uhač, Ivone; Simonić-Kocijan, Sunčana

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between bilateral allodynia induced by masseter muscle inflammation and P2X3 receptor expression changes in trigeminal ganglia (TRG) and the influence of intramasseteric P2X3 antagonist administration on bilateral masseter allodynia. Methods To induce bilateral allodynia, rats received a unilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the masseter muscle. Bilateral head withdrawal threshold (HWT) was measured 4 days later. Behavioral measurements were followed by bilateral masseter muscle and TRG dissection. Masseter tissue was evaluated histopathologically and TRG tissue was analyzed for P2X3 receptor mRNA expression by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. To assess the P2X3 receptor involvement in nocifensive behavior, two doses (6 and 60 μg/50 μL) of selective P2X3 antagonist A-317491 were administrated into the inflamed masseter muscle 4 days after the CFA injection. Bilateral HWT was measured at 15-, 30-, 60-, and 120-minute time points after A-317491 administration. Results HWT was bilaterally reduced after the CFA injection (P < 0.001). Intramasseteric inflammation was confirmed ipsilaterally to the CFA injection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated enhanced P2X3 expression in TRG ipsilaterally to CFA administration (P < 0.01). In comparison with controls, the dose of 6 μg of A-317491 significantly increased bilateral HWT at 15-, 30-, and 60-minute time points after the A-317491 administration (P < 0.001), whereas the dose of 60 μg of A-317491 was efficient at all time points ipsilaterally (P = 0.004) and at 15-, 30-, and 60-minute time points contralaterally (P < 0.001). Conclusion Unilateral masseter inflammation can induce bilateral allodynia in rats. The study provided evidence that P2X3 receptors can functionally influence masseter muscle allodynia and suggested that P2X3 receptors expressed in TRG neurons are involved in masseter

  16. Efficacy of massage treatment technique in masseter muscle hardness: robotic experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Yuichiro; Ariji, Yoshiko; Kise, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to clarify the masseter muscle hardness in patients with myofascial pain, to examine their changes after massage, and to analyze whether the hardness can be an index for massage treatment. Sixteen patients with myofascial pain (12 with unilateral and 4 with bilateral masseter muscle pain) and 24 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The masseter hardness between patients and the healthy volunteers was compared. The changes in the hardness in patients after massage were examined. The relation of the hardness with massage regimens and efficacies was analyzed. There was a significant right-and-left difference of the hardness in patients, although there was no difference in the healthy volunteers. The hardness decreased after massage. The pretreatment asymmetry index of the hardness showed a significant correlation with the massage pressure. It was concluded that there was a significant difference between the right and left masseter hardness in patients with myofascial pain. After massage treatment, the masseter hardness and right-and-left difference decreased. The hardness may be an index for determining the massage pressure.

  17. Distribution of slow muscle fiber of muscle spindle in postnatal rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Iwao; Imura, Kosuke; Miwa, Yoko; Ide, Yoshiaki; Murata, Megumi; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the properties of the muscle spindle in the masseter muscle at an immunohistochemical level in rats fed for 6 weeks. Slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured and intrafusal fibers in the muscle spindle were studied to determine the relationship between the superficial and deep regions of rat masseter muscle after alternated feeding pattern. However, muscle spindles were found in both regions, mainly in the deep region of the posterior superficial region of masseter muscle. The total number of the slow fiber in the intrafusal fiber and number of muscle spindle in the deep region were high from 5 to 8 weeks old in spite of various dimensions of data such as diameter and the compositions of the intrafusal fiber. The relationship of the protein expression of slow MyHC in the two regions at 5 weeks old reversed five weeks later (10 weeks old). This period is an important stage because the mastication system in masseter muscle with muscle spindle may be changed during the alternated feeding pattern of suckling to mastication. The changes may be a marker of the feeding system and of the control by the tension receptor of muscle spindle in this stage of masseter muscle after postnatal development.

  18. A comprehensive approach to long-standing facial paralysis based on lengthening temporalis myoplasty.

    PubMed

    Labbè, D; Bussu, F; Iodice, A

    2012-06-01

    Long-standing peripheral monolateral facial paralysis in the adult has challenged otolaryngologists, neurologists and plastic surgeons for centuries. Notwithstanding, the ultimate goal of normality of the paralyzed hemi-face with symmetry at rest, and the achievement of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection, has not been fully reached. At the beginning of the 20(th) century, the main options were neural reconstructions including accessory to facial nerve transfer and hypoglossal to facial nerve crossover. In the first half of the 20(th) century, various techniques for static correction with autologous temporalis muscle and fascia grafts were proposed as the techniques of Gillies (1934) and McLaughlin (1949). Cross-facial nerve grafts have been performed since the beginning of the 1970s often with the attempt to transplant free-muscle to restore active movements. However, these transplants were non-vascularized, and further evaluations revealed central fibrosis and minimal return of function. A major step was taken in the second half of the 1970s, with the introduction of microneurovascular muscle transfer in facial reanimation, which, often combined in two steps with a cross-facial nerve graft, has become the most popular option for the comprehensive treatment of long-standing facial paralysis. In the second half of the 1990s in France, a regional muscle transfer technique with the definite advantages of being one-step, technically easier and relatively fast, namely lengthening temporalis myoplasty, acquired popularity and consensus among surgeons treating facial paralysis. A total of 111 patients with facial paralysis were treated in Caen between 1997 and 2005 by a single surgeon who developed 2 variants of the technique (V1, V2), each with its advantages and disadvantages, but both based on the same anatomo-functional background and aim, which is transfer of the temporalis muscle tendon on the coronoid process to the lips. For a comprehensive

  19. The epithelialization process in the healing temporalis myofascial flap in oral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheung, L K

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the epithelialization process in the healing temporalis myofascial flap (TMF). Eight cats underwent maxillectomy and immediate reconstruction with TMF. They were killed at the determined time and the reconstructed maxillae were processed for examination by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results revealed that epithelialization of the healing TMF was initiated by hyperplastic changes followed by active migration of epithelial cells deriving from the wound margins. The partial maxillectomy wound was completely covered by a smooth oral mucosa at postoperative week 24. The mucosa had histological and ultrastructural features different from normal palatal mucosa.

  20. Masseter thickness, endurance and exercise-induced pain in subjects with different vertical craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Farella, Mauro; Bakke, Merete; Michelotti, Ambra; Rapuano, Alessia; Martina, Roberto

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare neuromuscular features of the masseter muscle in subjects with different vertical craniofacial morphology. Fifteen short-faced (mandibular plane-Frankfurt plane angle < 15 degrees) and 15 normal- to long-faced (mandibular plane-Frankfurt plane angle > or = 23 degrees) male students participated. The thickness of the masseter was assessed by ultrasonography. Onset and endurance of exercise pain were recorded during sustained biting at a level of 15% of maximum voluntary contraction and 30 micro V electromyographic activity. Pain and fatigue was measured on visual analog scales before and after the biting, as well as before and after 10 min chewing. Statistical comparison showed that the masseter muscle was significantly thicker (+15%) in the short-faced than the normal- to long-faced subjects. The pain onset time and endurance time were also consistently shorter in short-faced subjects, whereas the intensity of pain and fatigue did not differ significantly between the two groups. Multiple stepwise regression showed positive influence from the mandibular plane inclination and the masseter thickness on the pain onset time and endurance time. The present findings support the concept that subjects with different craniofacial morphology show neuromuscular differences.

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin type A in the masseter muscle: Effects on incisor eruption in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Alfonso L.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Greenlee, Geoffrey M.; Herring, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for the paralytic food poisoning, botulism. Commercial formulations such as botulinum neurotoxin type A are increasingly used for various conditions, including cosmetic recontouring of the lower face by injection of the large masseter muscles. The paralysis of a major muscle of mastication lowers occlusal force and thus might affect tooth eruption. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral masseter muscle injection of botulinum neurotoxin type A on the rate of eruption of incisors in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that the teeth would overerupt in an underloaded environment. Methods Forty rabbits were injected with either botulinum neurotoxin type A or saline solution in 1 masseter muscle. Mastication and muscle force production were monitored, and incisor eruption rate was assessed by caliper measurement of grooved teeth. Results The injection of saline solution had no effect. The masseter muscle injected with botulinum neurotoxin type A showed a dramatic loss of force 3 weeks after injection despite apparently normal mastication. Incisor eruption rate was significantly decreased for the botulinum neurotoxin type A group, an effect attributed to decreased attrition. Conclusions This study has implications for orthodontics. Although findings from ever-growing rabbit incisors cannot be extrapolated to human teeth, it is clear that botulinum neurotoxin type A caused a decrease in bite force that could influence dental eruption. PMID:23561411

  2. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles' activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps.

  3. Clenching and grinding: effect on masseter and sternocleidomastoid electromyographic activity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Macarena; Valdivia, José; Fresno, María Javiera; Miralles, Rodolfo; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Valenzuela, Saúl; Fuentes, Aler

    2009-07-01

    This study compares the effect of clenching and grinding on masseter and sternocleidomastoid electromyographic (EMG) activity during different jaw posture tasks in the sagittal plane. The study included 34 healthy subjects with natural dentition, Class I bilateral molar Angle relationship, and absence of posterior occlusal contacts during mandibular protrusion. An inclusion criterion was that subjects had to be free of signs and symptoms of any dysfunction of the masticatory system. Bipolar surface electrodes were located on the right masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles. EMG activity was recorded while the subjects were in standing position, during the following jaw posture tasks: A. maximal clenching in the intercuspal position; B. grinding from intercuspal position to edge-to-edge protrusive contact position; C. maximal clenching in the edge-to-edge protrusive contact position; D. grinding from edge-to-edge protrusive contact position to intercuspal position; E. grinding from retrusive contact position to intercuspal position. EMG activities in tasks B, C, D, and E were significantly lower than in task A in both muscles (mixed model with unstructured covariance matrix). EMG activity among tasks B, C, D, and E did not show significant differences in both muscles, except between tasks D and E in the masseter muscle. A higher effect was observed on the masseter than on the sternocleidomastoid muscle to avoid excessive muscular activity during clenching and grinding. The EMG patterns observed could be of clinical importance in the presence of parafunctional habits, i.e., clenching and/or grinding.

  4. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles’ activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps. PMID:27708727

  5. Transcriptome analysis of trigeminal ganglia following masseter muscle inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jennifer; Asgar, Jamila; Ro, Jin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain in masticatory muscles is a major medical problem. Although mechanisms underlying persistent pain in masticatory muscles are not fully understood, sensitization of nociceptive primary afferents following muscle inflammation or injury contributes to muscle hyperalgesia. It is well known that craniofacial muscle injury or inflammation induces regulation of multiple genes in trigeminal ganglia, which is associated with muscle hyperalgesia. However, overall transcriptional profiles within trigeminal ganglia following masseter inflammation have not yet been determined. In the present study, we performed RNA sequencing assay in rat trigeminal ganglia to identify transcriptome profiles of genes relevant to hyperalgesia following inflammation of the rat masseter muscle. Results Masseter inflammation differentially regulated >3500 genes in trigeminal ganglia. Predominant biological pathways were predicted to be related with activation of resident non-neuronal cells within trigeminal ganglia or recruitment of immune cells. To focus our analysis on the genes more relevant to nociceptors, we selected genes implicated in pain mechanisms, genes enriched in small- to medium-sized sensory neurons, and genes enriched in TRPV1-lineage nociceptors. Among the 2320 candidate genes, 622 genes showed differential expression following masseter inflammation. When the analysis was limited to these candidate genes, pathways related with G protein-coupled signaling and synaptic plasticity were predicted to be enriched. Inspection of individual gene expression changes confirmed the transcriptional changes of multiple nociceptor genes associated with masseter hyperalgesia (e.g., Trpv1, Trpa1, P2rx3, Tac1, and Bdnf) and also suggested a number of novel probable contributors (e.g., Piezo2, Tmem100, and Hdac9). Conclusion These findings should further advance our understanding of peripheral mechanisms involved in persistent craniofacial muscle pain conditions and provide a

  6. The effects of changes in response-independent pay upon human masseter EMG. M.A. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proni, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle was recorded in five human subjects who were presented with systematically varied rates of non-contingent pay. Rates of pay were varied between sessions in either a descending or an ascending series. The number of masseter contractions was found to be greater during the descending series than during the ascending series, especially when a descending series of pay changes followed an ascending series. Verbal physical displays of anger and aggression were noted during descending series. These data indicated a possible relation between masseter contractions and aggression.

  7. Fetal Tendinous Connection Between the Tensor Tympani and Tensor Veli Palatini Muscles: A Single Digastric Muscle Acting for Morphogenesis of the Cranial Base.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Hiroshi; Amano, Osamu; Murakami, Gen

    2016-04-01

    Some researchers contend that in adults the tensor tympani muscle (TT) connects with the tensor veli palatini muscle (TVP) by an intermediate tendon, in disagreement with the other researchers. To resolve this controversy, we examined serial sections of 50 human embryos and fetuses at 6-17 weeks of development. At 6 weeks, in the first pharyngeal arch, a mesenchymal connection was found first to divide a single anlage into the TT and TVP. At and after 7 weeks, the TT was connected continuously with the TVP by a definite tendinous tissue mediolaterally crossing the pharyngotympanic tube. At 11 weeks another fascia was visible covering the cranial and lateral sides of the tube. This "gonial fascia" had two thickened borders: the superior one corresponded to a part of the connecting tendon between the TT and TVP; the inferior one was a fibrous band ending at the os goniale near the lateral end of the TVP. In association with the gonial fascia, the fetal TT and TVP seemed to provide a functional complex. The TT-TVP complex might first help elevate the palatal shelves in association with the developing tongue. Next, the tubal passage, maintained by contraction of the muscle complex, seems to facilitate the removal of loose mesenchymal tissues from the tympanic cavity. Third, the muscle complex most likely determined the final morphology of the pterygoid process. Consequently, despite the controversial morphologies in adults, the TT and TVP seemed to make a single digastric muscle acting for the morphogenesis of the cranial base.

  8. Three novel antimicrobial peptides from the skin of the Indian bronzed frog Hylarana temporalis (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Reshmy, V; Preeji, V; Parvin, A; Santhoshkumar, K; George, S

    2011-05-01

    Amphibian skin secretion is considered as a rich source of bioactive peptides. The present work describes the successful identification of three novel peptides named brevinin-1TEa, brevinin-2TEa and brevinin-2TEb present in the skin secretion of Indian bronzed frog Hylarana temporalis. The deduced open reading frame encoding the biosynthetic precursor of brevinin-1TEa consisted of 70 amino acid residues and brevinin-2TEa and brevinin-2TEb consisted of 71 and 72 amino acids, respectively. All the three peptides showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative than against Gram-positive bacteria. On the basis of the antibacterial and haemolytic activity, brevinin-2TEb is the most potent peptide reported in the present study. Further research on these peptides may provide potential clue towards newer drug development to combat various microbial diseases.

  9. Temporalis pull-through vs fascia lata augmentation in facial reanimation for facial paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical rehabilitation of facial palsy is challenging as each case is unique and success rate is often unpredictable. In one technique, temporalis is elevated from origin preserving vessels, and this elevation increases the length which is tunneled into buccal tissues (pull-through technique, Group A). In the other technique, a harvested fascia lata is attached to temporalis after a coronoidectomy release and the fascia lata is attached to the modiolus (Group B). The aim of this study is to compare the two different surgical techniques. Materials and Methods: Case records of 22 cases, 15 females, and 7 males who were operated between 2008 and 2012 for facial palsy with at least 1-year follow-up, using either of the techniques were assessed for pull of muscle, postoperative pain, recovery time, motor control, and symmetry at rest. Descriptive statistics are presented. Results: The Group A (n = 7) and Group B (n = 15) formed the study group. In the Group A, residual asymmetry (n = 3), poor postoperative muscle pull (n = 2) were noticed while in the modified group it was 2 and 3, respectively. The technique used in Group B had better pull of muscle, symmetry, faster recovery time, and better motor control at 1-year follow-up than the conventional technique. Discussion and Conclusion: The difference between the two groups is due to preservation of original muscular architecture, vascular channel supply. As the muscle is not traumatized, no fibrosis occurs aiding regaining of normal function. In addition, the facial reanimation is more successful in the Group B. The mechanism and success behind the technique used in Group B is discussed elaborately in terms of localregional anatomy and physiology PMID:28299269

  10. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship - a study in a rodent model

    SciTech Connect

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Santos, Jean N.; Baptista, Abrahao F.; Aguiar, Marcio C.

    2010-05-31

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  11. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship—a study in a rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Aguiar, Marcio C.; Santos, Jean N.

    2010-05-01

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  12. Intramuscular Cavernous Haemangioma of Masseter Muscle – A Case Report of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin; Kaur, Kamaljit; Gupta, Akshat

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular haemangioma are rare benign congenital neoplasm of proliferative vascular in nature due to increased endothelial cell turnover. Less than 20% of these are found in head and neck region. The masseter muscle accounts for 5% of all intramuscular haemangioma of head and neck region. They are non metastasizing tumours which may suddenly start growing in later stages. The present article will discuss the clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities and surgical treatment of cavernous Haemangioma involving masseter muscle in a 15-year-old young female patient in whom a surgical excision of whole lesion was done under general anaesthesia and no reoccurrence of the lesion was observed after one year of follow up. PMID:26023649

  13. Analysis of masseter deformation patterns during a maximum exertion clenching in patients with unilateral chewing

    PubMed Central

    BUSATO, A.; BALCONI, G.; VISMARA, V.; BERTELÈ, L.; GARO, G.; DE GREGORIO, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of the following study is to examine both masseter muscles (left/right) in a group of patients suffering from unilateral chewing during a maximum exertion isometric contraction using the deformation pattern analysis of ultrasound videos and compare them with the results obtained by studying patients with alternate bilateral chewing patterns. Materials and methods This study has been conducted by use of an ultrasound machine and a linear probe which allowed us to record a video (DCM) comprised of 45 frames per second (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm). The probe was fixed to a brace and the patients were asked to clench their teeth as hard as possible, obtain the muscle’s maximum exertion, for 5 seconds three times, with 30 seconds intervals in between. Both right and left masseter muscles were analyzed. We applied to the ultrasound video a dedicated software (Mudy 1.7.7.2 AMID Sulmona Italy) for the analysis of muscle deformation patterns. The total number of patients for this study is 150. Out of this number, 50 belong to Group A, mono lateral chewing on the left side arch, and 50 to Group B, mono lateral chewing on the right side arch. The remains patients belong to Group C, bilateral alternate chewing. The deformation pattern analysis of the skeletal muscles on ultrasound videos allows us to highlight with ease the clear difference in the clenching capabilities and strain management between the dominant masseter and the subordinate masseter in a unilaterally chewing patient. Results In the sample investigated both in Group A and Group B the unilateral chewing is associated with a series of parameters (number, shape, volume, position and orientation of the teeth) and is also associated with the extension of the cutting surface really available. PMID:28280533

  14. Electromyographic analysis of masseter muscle in newborns during suction in breast, bottle or cup feeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When breastfeeding is difficult or impossible during the neonatal period, an analysis of muscle activity can help determine the best method for substituting it to promote the child’s development. The aim of this study was to analyze the electrical activity of the masseter muscle using surface electromyography during suction in term newborns by comparing breastfeeding, bottle and cup feeding. Methods An observational, cross-sectional analytical study was carried out on healthy, clinically stable term infants, assigned to receive either breast, or bottle or cup feeding. Setting was a Baby Friendly accredited hospital. Muscle activity was analyzed when each infant showed interest in sucking using surface electromyography. Root mean square averages (RMS) recorded in microvolts were transformed into percentages (normalization) of the reference value. The three groups were compared by ANOVA; the “stepwise” method of the multiple linear regression analysis tested the model which best defined the activity of the masseter muscle in the sample at a significance level of 5%. Results Participants were 81 full term newborns (27 per group), from 2 to 28 days of life. RMS values were lower for bottle (mean 44.2%, SD 14.1) than breast feeding (mean 58.3%, SD 12.7) (P = 0.003, ANOVA); cup feeding (52.5%, SD 18.2%) was not significantly different (P > 0.05). For every gram of weight increase, RMS increased by 0.010 units. Conclusions Masseter activity was significantly higher in breastfed newborns than in bottle-fed newborns, who presented the lowest RMS values. Levels of masseter activity during cup-feeding were between those of breast and bottle feeding, and did not significantly differ from either group. This study in healthy full term neonates endorses cup rather than bottle feeding as a temporary substitute for breastfeeding. PMID:24885762

  15. Jaw-opening accuracy is not affected by masseter muscle vibration in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, B; Häggman-Henrikson, B; Wänman, A; Lindkvist, M; Hellström, F

    2014-11-01

    There is a functional integration between the jaw and neck regions with head extension-flexion movements during jaw-opening/closing tasks. We recently reported that trigeminal nociceptive input by injection of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle altered this integrated jaw-neck function during jaw-opening/closing tasks. Thus, in jaw-opening to a predefined position, the head-neck component increased during pain. Previous studies have indicated that muscle spindle stimulation by vibration of the masseter muscle may influence jaw movement amplitudes, but the possible effect on the integrated jaw-neck function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of masseter muscle vibration on jaw-head movements during a continuous jaw-opening/closing task to a target position. Sixteen healthy men performed two trials without vibration (Control) and two trials with bilateral masseter muscle vibration (Vibration). Movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. Differences in jaw-opening and head movement amplitudes between Control and Vibration, as well as achievement of the predefined jaw-opening target position, were analysed with Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. No significant group effects from vibration were found for jaw or head movement amplitudes, or in the achievement of the target jaw-opening position. A covariation between the jaw and head movement amplitudes was observed. The results imply a high stability for the jaw motor system in a target jaw-opening task and that this task was achieved with the head-neck and jaw working as an integrated system.

  16. SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY OF MASSETER AND TEMPORAL MUSCLES WITH USE PERCENTAGE WHILE CHEWING ON CANDIDATES FOR GASTROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    dos SANTOS, Andréa Cavalcante; da SILVA, Carlos Antonio Bruno

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Surface electromyography identifies changes in the electrical potential of the muscles during each contraction. The percentage of use is a way to treat values enabling comparison between groups. Aim: To analyze the electrical activity and the percentage of use of masseter and temporal muscles during chewing in candidates for gastric bypass. Methods: It was used Surface Electromyography Miotool 200,400 (Miotec (r), Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil) integrated with Miograph 2.0 software, involving patients between 20-40 years old. Were included data on electrical activity simultaneously and in pairs of temporal muscle groups and masseter at rest, maximum intercuspation and during the chewing of food previously classified. Results: Were enrolled 39 patients (59 women), mean age 27.1+/-5.7. The percentage of use focused on temporal muscle, in a range of 11-20, female literacy (n=11; 47.82) on the left side and 15 (65.21) on the right-hand side. In the male, nine (56.25) at left and 12 (75.00) on the right-hand side. In masseter, also in the range of 11 to 20, female literacy (n=10; 43.48) on the left side and 11 (47.83) on the right-hand side. In the male, nine (56.25) at left and eight (50.00) on the right-hand side. Conclusion: 40-50% of the sample showed electrical activity in muscles (masseter and temporal) with variable values, and after processing into percentage value, facilitating the comparison of load of used electrical activity between the group, as well as usage percentage was obtained of muscle fibers 11-20% values involving, representing a range that is considered as a reference to the group studied. The gender was not a variable. PMID:27683776

  17. Effect of triiodothyronine on the maxilla and masseter muscles of the rat stomatognathic system.

    PubMed

    Mariúba, M V; Goulart-Silva, F; Bordin, S; Nunes, M T

    2011-07-01

    The maxilla and masseter muscles are components of the stomatognathic system involved in chewing, which is frequently affected by physical forces such as gravity, and by dental, orthodontic and orthopedic procedures. Thyroid hormones (TH) are known to regulate the expression of genes that control bone mass and the oxidative properties of muscles; however, little is known about the effects of TH on the stomatognathic system. This study investigated this issue by evaluating: i) osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteopontine (OPN) mRNA expression in the maxilla and ii) myoglobin (Mb) mRNA and protein expression, as well as fiber composition of the masseter. Male Wistar rats (~250 g) were divided into thyroidectomized (Tx) and sham-operated (SO) groups (N = 24/group) treated with T3 or saline (0.9%) for 15 days. Thyroidectomy increased OPG (~40%) and OPN (~75%) mRNA expression, while T3 treatment reduced OPG (~40%) and OPN (~75%) in Tx, and both (~50%) in SO rats. Masseter Mb mRNA expression and fiber type composition remained unchanged, despite the induction of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. However, Mb content was decreased in Tx rats even after T3 treatment. Since OPG and OPN are key proteins involved in the osteoclastogenesis inhibition and bone mineralization, respectively, and that Mb functions as a muscle store of O2 allowing muscles to be more resistant to fatigue, the present data indicate that TH also interfere with maxilla remodeling and the oxidative properties of the masseter, influencing the function of the stomatognathic system, which may require attention during dental, orthodontic and orthopedic procedures in patients with thyroid diseases.

  18. Effect of hypnosis on masseter EMG recorded during the 'resting' and a slightly open jaw posture.

    PubMed

    Al-Enaizan, N; Davey, K J; Lyons, M F; Cadden, S W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether minimal levels of electromyographic activity in the masseter muscle are altered when individuals are in a verified hypnotic state. Experiments were performed on 17 volunteer subjects (8 male, 9 female) all of whom gave informed consent. The subjects were dentate and had no symptoms of pain or masticatory dysfunction. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were made from the masseter muscles and quantified by integration following full-wave rectification and averaging. The EMGs were obtained (i) with the mandible in 'resting' posture; (ii) with the mandible voluntarily lowered (but with the lips closed); (iii) during maximum voluntary clenching (MVC). The first two recordings were made before, during and after the subjects were in a hypnotic state. Susceptibility to hypnosis was assessed with Spiegel's eye-roll test, and the existence of the hypnotic state was verified by changes in ventilatory pattern. On average, EMG levels expressed as percentages of MVC were less: (i) when the jaw was deliberately lowered as opposed to being in the postural position: (ii) during hypnosis compared with during the pre- and post-hypnotic periods. However, analysis of variance followed by post hoc tests with multiple comparison corrections (Bonferroni) revealed that only the differences between the level during hypnosis and those before and after hypnosis were statistically significant (P < 0·05). As the level of masseter EMG when the mandible was in 'resting' posture was reduced by hypnosis, it appears that part of that EMG is of biological origin.

  19. A shape prior-based MRF model for 3D masseter muscle segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Tahir; Fundana, Ketut; Lüthi, Marcel; Beinemann, Jörg; Cattin, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    Medical image segmentation is generally an ill-posed problem that can only be solved by incorporating prior knowledge. The ambiguities arise due to the presence of noise, weak edges, imaging artifacts, inhomogeneous interior and adjacent anatomical structures having similar intensity profile as the target structure. In this paper we propose a novel approach to segment the masseter muscle using the graph-cut incorporating additional 3D shape priors in CT datasets, which is robust to noise; artifacts; and shape deformations. The main contribution of this paper is in translating the 3D shape knowledge into both unary and pairwise potentials of the Markov Random Field (MRF). The segmentation task is casted as a Maximum-A-Posteriori (MAP) estimation of the MRF. Graph-cut is then used to obtain the global minimum which results in the segmentation of the masseter muscle. The method is tested on 21 CT datasets of the masseter muscle, which are noisy with almost all possessing mild to severe imaging artifacts such as high-density artifacts caused by e.g. the very common dental fillings and dental implants. We show that the proposed technique produces clinically acceptable results to the challenging problem of muscle segmentation, and further provide a quantitative and qualitative comparison with other methods. We statistically show that adding additional shape prior into both unary and pairwise potentials can increase the robustness of the proposed method in noisy datasets.

  20. Muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  1. Histological study of masseter muscle in a mouse muscular dystrophy model (mdx mouse).

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kasahara, N; Amano, M; Yoshii, M; Watanabe, H; Ide, Y

    2000-08-01

    Histological changes in the masseter muscle were observed over time in mdx mice, a muscular dystrophy model. It was found that marked necrosis occurs about the time of weaning at around 4 weeks of age; then the tissue actively regenerates at 8 weeks and stabilizes as regenerated muscle with centronuclei at 15 weeks old. This study examined the centronucleus in regenerated muscle. The process from necrosis to regeneration in muscle fibers occurs a little later in the masseter muscle than in other limbic muscles. Regenerated muscles observed around 15 weeks after birth showed a moth-eaten appearance. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation of transverse sections of muscle fibers revealed that myofibrils surrounded lost regions in the area showing a moth-eaten appearance. Thus, some defensive mechanism may affect the ability of muscle fibers to maintain a function close to normal in mdx mice even though the muscle fibers develop muscular dystrophy. The function of the masseter muscle drastically changes from sucking to mastication behavior at around 4 weeks, and this was considered to influence the morphological changes in the muscle tissue. The moth-eaten appearance seen at 15 weeks may represent an appropriate myofibril reconstruction preventing invasion of the lost regions.

  2. Muscle Fatigue in the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC) of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF%) revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P < 0.0000). The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:25883949

  3. Alternative male mating tactics of the substrate brooding cichlid Telmatochromis temporalis in Lake Tanganyika.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Rei; Munehara, Hiroyuki; Kohda, Masanori

    2005-05-01

    Telmatochromis temporalis is a bi-parental substrate brooding cichlid endemic to Lake Tanganyika. Paired males were always larger than their mates and had territories around nests against conspecific males. However, males smaller than the paired females were found in 18% of the nests. Here we report a reproductive tactic of these small males. The small males had as heavy gonads as paired males, and the gonad somatic index (GSI) of the small males was much higher than that of the latter. The examinations of the paternity and maternity using microsatellite-DNA as a genetic marker revealed that the small males were not genetically related to the pair members, and sired some young in 3 of 5 nests. These small males did not guard the broods, suggesting that they are likely to perform reproductive parasitism as sneakers. Paired males could not enter their spawning nests due to their large size, which made it difficult to chase out sneakers once they entered the nest. Some males as small as the sneakers were found outside the territories of paired males, and their gonads were quite small. Circumstantial evidence suggests that small males have two alternative investment patterns: investing in gonad to be sneakers, and investing in growth to probably be territorial males.

  4. Fiber-type differences in masseter muscle associated with different facial morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Rowlerson, Anthea; Raoul, Gwénaël; Daniel, Yousif; Close, John; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Ferri, Joel; Sciote, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The influence of muscle forces and associated physiologic behaviors on dental and skeletal development is well recognized but difficult to quantify because of the limited understanding of the interrelationships between physiologic and other mechanisms during growth. Methods The purpose of this study was to characterize fiber-type composition of masseter muscle in 44 subjects during surgical correction of malocclusion. Four fiber types were identified after immunostaining of biopsy sections with myosin heavy chain-specific antibodies, and the average fiber diameter and percentage of muscle occupancy of the fiber types were determined in each of 6 subject groups (Class II or Class III and open bite, normal bite, or deepbite). A 2 × 3 × 4 analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between mean areas for fiber types, vertical relationships, and sagittal relationships. Results There were significant differences in percentage of occupancy of fiber types in masseter muscle in bite groups with different vertical dimensions. Type I fiber occupancy increased in open bites, and conversely, type II fiber occupancy increased in deepbites. The association between sagittal jaw relationships and mean fiber area was less strong, but, in the Class III group, the average fiber area was significantly different between the open bite, normal bite, and deepbite subjects. In the Class III subjects, type I and I/II hybrid fiber areas were greatly increased in subjects with deepbite. Conclusions Given the variation between subjects in fiber areas and fiber numbers, larger subject populations will be needed to demonstrate more significant associations between sagittal relationships and muscle composition. However, the robust influence of jaw-closing muscles on vertical dimension allowed us to conclude that vertical bite characteristics vary according to the fiber type composition of masseter muscle. PMID:15643413

  5. Human Masseter Muscle Fiber Type Properties, Skeletal Malocclusions, and Muscle Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sciote, James Joseph; Horton, Michael J.; Rowlerson, Anthea M.; Ferri, Joel; Close, John M.; Raoul, Gwenael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We identified masseter muscle fiber type property differences in subjects with dentofacial deformities. Patients and Methods Samples of masseter muscle were collected from 139 young adults during mandibular osteotomy procedures to assess mean fiber areas and percent tissue occupancies for the 4 fiber types that comprise the muscle. Subjects were classified into 1 of 6 malocclusion groups based on the presence of a skeletal Class II or III sagittal dimension malocclusion and either a skeletal open, deep, or normal bite vertical dimension malocclusion. In a subpopulation, relative quantities of the muscle growth factors IGF-I and GDF-8 gene expression were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Fiber properties were not different in the sagittal malocclusion groups, but were very different in the vertical malocclusion groups (P ≤ .0004). There were significant mean fiber area differences for type II (P ≤ .0004) and type neonatal—atrial (P = .001) fiber types and for fiber percent occupancy differences for both type I–II hybrid fibers and type II fibers (P ≤ .0004). Growth factor expression differed by gender for IGF-I (P = .02) and GDF-8 (P < .01). The ratio of IGF-I:GDF-8 expression associates with type I and II mean fiber areas. Conclusion Fiber type properties are very closely associated with variations in vertical growth of the face, with statistical significance for overall comparisons at P ≤ .0004. An increase in masseter muscle type II fiber mean fiber areas and percent tissue occupancies is inversely related to increases in vertical facial dimension. PMID:21821327

  6. Changes in masseter muscle trigger points following strain-counterstrain or neuro-muscular technique.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-García, Jordi; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Girao, Didac; Atienza-Meseguer, Albert; Planella-Abella, Sergi; Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immediate effects, on pressure pain sensitivity and active mouth opening, following the application of neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique in latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the masseter muscle. Seventy-one subjects, 34 men and 37 women, aged 20-65 years old, participated in this study. Subjects underwent a screening process to establish the presence of MTrPs in the masseter muscle. Subjects were divided randomly into three groups: group A which was treated with a neuromuscular intervention, group B treated with the strain/counter-strain technique, and group C as control group. Each treatment group received a weekly treatment session during 3 consecutive weeks. Outcomes measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), active mouth opening and local pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) elicited by the application of 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure over the MTrP. They were captured at baseline and 1 week after discharge by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation of the subject. The ANOVA found a significant groupxtime interaction (F=25.3; p<0.001) for changes in PPT, changes in active mouth opening (F=10.5; p<0.001), and local pain evoked by 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure (F=10.1; p<0.001). Within-group effect sizes were large (d>1) for PPT and mouth opening, and moderate for local pain (d<0.7, 0.5) in both intervention groups; but small (d<0.2) for the control group in all outcomes. No significant differences between both intervention groups were found for any outcome (p>0.8). Our results suggest that neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique might be employed in the management of latent MTrPs in the masseter muscle.

  7. Conditioning of the masseter inhibitory reflex by homotopically applied painful heat in humans.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O K; Svensson, P; Ellrich, J; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1998-12-01

    During contraction of the jaw-closing muscles, afferent input from the intraoral and perioral region can elicit two bilateral suppression periods (SP1 and SP2, respectively) in the masseter electromyogram (EMG). Non-painful electrical stimulation 2 cm from the left labial commissure was used in the present study to evoke these trigeminal inhibitory reflexes. The subjects maintained a level of 50% of their maximum masseter EMG. The degree of suppression was quantified as the percentage suppression of the mean EMG activity in a fixed post-stimulus interval (SP2, 40-90 ms). Further, brief (200 ms) painful radiant heat conditioning stimuli were delivered to the ipsilateral cheek, in order to investigate the influence of nociceptive input on the (non-nociceptive) trigeminal masseter inhibitory reflex. Nine different conditions combining radiant heat and electrical stimuli were used. Twelve stimuli were presented for each condition. The radiant heat preceded the electrical test stimuli by fixed inter-stimulus intervals (ISI), ranging from 100 ms to 500 ms. At 250-350 ms ISIs, the bilateral SP2 suppression was significantly reduced to less than 10%, in comparison to an average suppression degree of 32.5% without conditioning stimuli. The subjects perceived the heat stimulus before the electrical stimulus for a majority of the 12 pairs of stimuli at these ISIs. No differences were found in the VAS ratings for the different conditions. For the contralateral SP1, larger suppression was seen for the 300 ms ISI compared with stimulation without conditioning heat stimuli. Onset and offset for the SP1 was, however, only detected in three subjects using a criteria of 20% suppression of the pre-stimulus activity. A pre-pulse inhibitory effect onto inter-neurons in the SP2 pathways or habituation of the same inter-neurons by the heat stimuli are suggested as possible explanations for the interaction between the non-nociceptive and nociceptive input in the present study.

  8. Metabolic Changes in Masseter Muscle of Rats Submitted to Acute Stress Associated with Exodontia

    PubMed Central

    Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Fernandes, Fernanda Silva; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara; Fernández, Rodrigo Alberto Restrepo; Calzzani, Ricardo Alexandre; Nascimento, Glauce Crivelaro; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence has shown that stress may be associated with alterations in masticatory muscle functions. Morphological changes in masticatory muscles induced by occlusal alterations and associated with emotional stress are still lacking in the literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of acute stress on metabolic activity and oxidative stress of masseter muscles of rats subjected to occlusal modification through morphological and histochemical analyses. In this study, adult Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: a group with extraction and acute stress (E+A); group with extraction and without stress (E+C); group without extraction and with acute stress (NO+A); and control group without both extraction and stress (NO+C). Masseter muscles were analyzed by Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Diaphorase (NADH) and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) techniques. Statistical analyses and two-way ANOVA were applied, followed by Tukey-Kramer tests. In the SDH test, the E+C, E+A and NO+A groups showed a decrease in high desidrogenase activities fibers (P < 0.05), compared to the NO+C group. In the NADH test, there was no difference among the different groups. In the ROS test, in contrast, E+A, E+C and NO+A groups showed a decrease in ROS expression, compared to NO+C groups (P < 0.05). Modified dental occlusion and acute stress - which are important and prevalent problems that affect the general population - are important etiologic factors in metabolic plasticity and ROS levels of masseter muscles. PMID:26053038

  9. [INVESTIATION OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF TEMPORAL AND MASSETER MUSCLES AFTER ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT OF MALOCCLUSION COMPLICATED BY DENTAL CROWDING].

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko, M I

    2014-01-01

    The results of investigation showed that it is necessary to use complex methods of orthodontic treatment in patients with malocclusion complicated by dental crowding. Orthodontic appliance therapy should be accompanied by differentiated massage and mioymnastics to improve functional state of masseter and temporal muscles. It was found that after the treatment electromyographic potential amplitude of temporal muscles is on the average in 1.5 times lower as compared with pretreatment records (P < 0.05). It was observed increase on the average in 1.5 times in electromyographic potential oscillation amplitude of masseter muscles during clenching after the treatment of maxillary and mandibular dental crowding (P < 0.05). Treatment of dental crowding resulted in restoration of masseter muscles functional symmetry. During clenching index MASI(MM) significantly decreased in all groups in comparison with pretreatment indices (P < 0.05).

  10. Myositis ossificans of the masseter muscle: A rare location. Report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Fernández, Míriam; Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Romanini-Montecino, Carolina; Saez-Barba, Manel; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2016-01-01

    Background Myositis Ossificans is a rare heterotopic bone formation within a muscle being the masticatory muscles exceptionally involved. In most cases there is a previous trauma, bearing in mind that there may be many other etiologies. CT scan and panoramic radiographs along with histological findings are essential diagnostic aids. Case Desciption We report a rare case of MO of masseter muscle in 49 years-old woman after repetitive wisdom tooth infection with the discussion of clinical, radiological and histological features. Clinical Implications MO is a rare disease of masticatory muscles being the masseter the most frequently affected. Wide surgical excision with free margins is the treatment of choice although close postoperative monitoring it’s essential to avoid relapses. Key words:Myositis ossificans, myositis ossificans traumatica, masticatory muscles, masseter muscle, trauma. PMID:27034763

  11. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: A new approach to facial rehabilitation with the "mirror-effect" method].

    PubMed

    Blanchin, T; Martin, F; Labbe, D

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis often reveals two conditions that are hard to control: labial occlusion and palpebral closure. Today, there are efforts to go beyond the sole use of muscle stimulation techniques, and attention is being given to cerebral plasticity stimulation? This implies using the facial nerves' efferent pathway as the afferent pathway in rehabilitation. This technique could further help limit the two recalcitrant problems, above. We matched two groups of patients who underwent surgery for peripheral facial paralysis by lengthening the temporalis myoplasty (LTM). LTM is one of the best ways to examine cerebral plasticity. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed nerve and is both motor and sensory. After a LTM, patients have to use the trigeminal nerve differently, as it now has a direct role in generating the smile. The LTM approach, using the efferent pathway, therefore, creates a challenge for the brain. The two groups followed separate therapies called "classical" and "mirror-effect". The "mirror-effect" method gave a more precise orientation of the patient's cerebral plasticity than did the classical rehabilitation. The method develops two axes: voluntary movements patients need to control their temporal smile; and spontaneous movements needed for facial expressions. Work on voluntary movements is done before a "digital mirror", using an identical doubled hemiface, providing the patient with a fake copy of his face and, thus, a 7 "mirror-effect". The spontaneous movements work is based on what we call the "Therapy of Motor Emotions". The method presented here is used to treat facial paralysis (Bell's Palsies type), whether requiring surgery or not. Importantly, the facial nerve, like the trigeminal nerve above, is also a mixed nerve and is stimulated through the efferent pathway in the same manner.

  12. Is cartilage better than temporalis muscle fascia in type I tympanoplasty? Implications for current surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Iacovou, Emily; Vlastarakos, Petros V; Papacharalampous, George; Kyrodimos, Efthymios; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the hearing results and graft integration rates in patients undergoing myringoplasty for the reconstruction of the tympanic membrane, with the use of either cartilage or temporalis muscle fascia (TMF). A systematic literature review in Medline and other database sources up to February 2012 was carried out, and the pooled data were meta-analyzed. Twelve studies were systematically analyzed. One represented level I, one level II and ten level III evidence. The total number of treated patients was 1,286. Cartilage reconstruction was used in 536, TMF in 750 cases. Two level III studies showed a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative air-bone gap closure, in favor of cartilage grafting. The mean graft integration rate was 92.4 % in the cartilage group and 84.3 % in the TMF group (p < 0.05). The rates of re-perforations were 7.6 and 15.5 %, respectively (p < 0.05). Among the other complications of type I tympanoplasty, retraction pockets, otitis media with effusion, anterior blunting, and graft lateralization were usually surgically managed, whereas most of the rest were minor and could be dealt with conservatively. The graft integration rate in myringoplasty is higher after using cartilage, in comparison with fascia reconstructions (grade C strength of recommendation), and the rate of re-perforation is significantly lower. Although cartilage is primarily used as grafting material in cases of Eustachian tube dysfunction, adhesive otitis media, and subtotal perforation in everyday surgical practice, a wider utilization for the reconstruction of the tympanic membrane in myringoplasties can be recommended.

  13. Mini-temporalis transposition: a less invasive procedure of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Yang, Xianxian; Wang, Wei; Li, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Facial paralysis is a common craniofacial deformity that is responsible for significant psychological and functional impairment. Free muscle transfer in 2 stages and latissimus dorsi transfer in one stage may be the most effective surgical procedure for achieving a symmetrical spontaneous smile for a patient with complete facial paralysis. However, these 2 procedures are unsuitable for many incomplete patients. The authors introduce a less invasive procedure, termed mini-temporalis transposition that is able to achieve a symmetrical spontaneous smile in incomplete patients. Through a zigzag incision into the temporal region, the middle third of the temporalis is transferred and elongated with the palmaris longus tendon or combined with the deep temporal fascia. The strips are anchored to key points at the modiolus and the middle of the ipsilateral orbicularis oris muscle through a small intraoral incision and subcutaneous tunnel. The key points are marked during preoperative smile analysis. This procedure was applied to 15 patients with long-standing incomplete facial paralysis. All patients obtained improvements in smile symmetry after the operation, and patients' satisfaction was high. In addition, no damage to residual facial nerve functions or development of procedure-induced complications (such as a facial contour defect, lip eversion or puckering, or skin tethering) was observed in any of the patients. Nevertheless, slight temporal hollowing was observed in 4 patients, and mild bulkiness over the zygomatic arch was a common observation. In summary, the mini-temporalis transfer technique is a safe and effective method of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

  14. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ.

  15. Action potentials and twitch forces of rabbit masseter motor units at optimum jaw angle.

    PubMed

    van Eijden, T M G J; Turkawski, S J J

    2002-08-01

    This study examines mutual correlations between electrical and contractile motor-unit properties. Action potentials and twitch force responses of 42 masseter motor units were recorded in 14 rabbits. Motor units were excited by stimulating motoneurones in the trigeminal motor nucleus. Action potentials and twitches were measured at different jaw gapes between 0 and 21 degrees, in steps of 3 degrees. For each motor unit, the jaw angle-active force interrelation was determined and variables for action potential and force were compared at the jaw angle at which the motor unit produced the largest force. The results showed a large variation in variables for action potential and force, possibly related to the variation in motor-unit morphology. A weak correlation was found between the variables for action-potential amplitude and the magnitude of optimum force, indicating that motor units producing larger forces tended to have action potentials with larger amplitudes. Twitch-contraction time and the moment arm of the motor unit correlated positively with both the median frequency and the duration of the action potential. This indicates that slower contracting motor units had longer action potentials and is in accord with the earlier observation that slower motor units are preferentially located in the anterior regions of the masseter.

  16. Electromyography of masticatory muscles in craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B C; Cooper, D L; Lucente, F E

    1991-02-01

    Patients presenting to the otolaryngologist with complaints such as otalgia, dizziness, tinnitus, or fullness in the ear may be experiencing the effects of craniomandibular disorders. These disorders can involve dysfunction in the delicate interrelationship of the skull, mandible, cervical vertebrae, and neuromuscular apparatus and can present as myofacial pain. Electromyographic recordings using surface electrodes were made bilaterally on the masseter, anterior temporalis, and digastric muscles in 641 craniomandibular patients, before and after transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation, at their initial presentation and following the insertion of mandibular orthopedic appliances. In the presenting patient, muscle-resting levels significantly decreased from hyperactive levels with transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation therapy. The creation of a new occlusal position with an orthotic appliance was found to correlate with a significant reduction in otolaryngologic symptoms as well as an increase in maximum muscle activity in function and coordination of muscle groups during mandibular movement. Thus, clinical electromyographic studies are an important aid in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders.

  17. Changes in rabbit jaw-muscle activity parameters in response to reduced masticatory load.

    PubMed

    Grünheid, T; Brugman, P; Zentner, A; Langenbach, G E J

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical food properties influence the neuromuscular activity of jaw-closing muscles during mastication. It is, however, unknown how the activity profiles of the jaw muscles are influenced by long-term alterations in masticatory load. In order to elucidate the effect of reduced masticatory load on the daily habitual activity profiles of three functionally different jaw muscles, the electromyograms of the masseter, temporalis and digastric muscles were recorded telemetrically in 16 male rabbits between seven and 20 weeks of age. Starting at eight weeks of age the experimental animals were fed significantly softer pellets than the control animals. Daily muscle activity was quantified by the relative duration of muscle use (duty time), burst number and burst length in relation to multiple activity levels. The daily duty time and burst number of the masseter muscle were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group at 5% and 10% of the maximum activity during the two weeks following the change in food hardness. By contrast, altered food hardness did not significantly influence the activity characteristics of the temporalis and digastric muscles. The findings suggest that a reduction in masticatory load decreases the neuromuscular activity of the jaw-closing muscles that are primarily responsible for force generation during mastication. This decrease is most pronounced in the weeks immediately following the change in food hardness and is limited to the activity levels that reflect muscle contractions during chewing. These findings support the conclusion that the masticatory system manifests few diet-specific long-term changes in the activity profiles of jaw muscles.

  18. The masticatory system under varying functional load. Part 1: Structural adaptation of rabbit jaw muscles to reduced masticatory load.

    PubMed

    Vreeke, Marloes; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; Grünheid, Thorsten

    2011-08-01

    Skeletal muscle fibres can change their myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform and cross-sectional area, which determine their contraction velocity and maximum force generation, respectively, to adapt to varying functional loads. In general, reduced muscle activity induces transition towards faster fibres and a decrease in fibre cross-sectional area. In order to investigate the effect of a reduction in masticatory load on three functionally different jaw muscles, the MyHC composition and the corresponding cross-sectional area of fibres were determined in the superficial masseter, superficial temporalis, and digastric muscles of male juvenile New Zealand White rabbits that had been raised on a soft diet (n=8) from 8 to 20 weeks of age and in those of normal diet controls (n=8). Differences between groups were tested for statistical significance using a Mann-Whitney rank sum test. The proportion and cross-sectional area of fibres co-expressing MyHC-I and MyHC-cardiac alpha were significantly smaller in the masseter muscles of the animals that had been fed soft food than in those of the controls. In contrast, the proportions and cross-sectional areas of the various fibre types in the temporalis and digastric muscles did not differ significantly between the groups. The results suggest that reducing the masticatory load during development affects the contraction velocity and maximum force generation of the jaw-closing muscles that are primarily responsible for force generation during chewing. These muscles adapt structurally to the reduced functional load with changes in the MyHC composition and cross-sectional area mainly within their slow fibre compartment.

  19. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  20. Temporal profile and amplitude of human masseter muscle activity is adapted to food properties during individual chewing cycles.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, A; Johansson, R S; Trulsson, M

    2014-05-01

    Jaw actions adapt to the changing properties of food that occur during a masticatory sequence. In the present study, we investigated how the time-varying activation profile of the masseter muscle changes during natural chewing in humans and how food hardness affects the profile. We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscle together with the movement of the lower jaw in 14 healthy young adults (mean age 22) when chewing gelatin-based model food of two different hardness. The muscle activity and the jaw kinematics were analysed for different phases of the chewing cycles. The increase in the excitatory drive of the masseter muscle was biphasic during the jaw-closing phase showing early and late components. The transition between these components occurred approximately at the time of tooth-food contact. During the masticatory sequence, when the food was particularised, the size of the early component as well as the peak amplitude of the EMG significantly decreased along with a reduction in the duration of the jaw-closing phase. Except for amplitude scaling, food hardness did not appreciably affect the muscle's activation profile. In conclusion, when chewing food during natural conditions, masseter muscle activation adapted throughout the masticatory sequence, principally during the jaw-closing phase and influenced both early and late muscle activation components. Furthermore, the adaptation of jaw actions to food hardness was affected by amplitude scaling of the magnitude of the muscle activity throughout the masticatory sequence.

  1. Interpositional Gap Arthroplasty by Versatile Pedicled Temporalis Myofascial Flap in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis- A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Vikas; Bansal, Anupam; Kumawat, Vinod; Kaur, Jasleen; Shaikh, Ahemer Arif

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a situation in which the mandibular condyle is fused to the glenoid fossa by bone or fibrous tissue. The management of TMJ ankylosis has a complicated chore and it is challenging for the maxillofacial surgeon because of technical hitches and high rate of re-ankylosis. Interpositional gap arthroplasty is one of the modalities for its management. A range of inter-positional materials have been used to avert recurrence after gap arthroplasty in TMJ ankylosis. The aim of this series was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomyofacial flap in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis as an interpositional gap arthroplasty. A total of 10 cases with unilateral TMJ ankylosis were treated by interpositional gap arthroplasty by pedicled temporalis myofacial flap and evaluated with a follow-up of 6 months to 5 years (Mean 3.3 years) for the functional stability of TMJ. All the patients were successfully treated. There were no signs of recurrence in any patients up to last follow up visit. The result showed that temporalis myofascial flap is a preferable choice for inter-positional gap arthroplasty which proves its versatility as an inter-positional material. PMID:27891496

  2. Pedicle Temporalis Fascial Flap with Axial Scalp Flap Obviates Need of Free Flap in Extensive Scalp Wound

    PubMed Central

    Khainga, S. O.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive scalp defect with exposed bone is best reconstructed with flaps. Majority of these wounds are now routinely reconstructed with free flaps in many centers. Free flaps however require lengthy operative time and may not be available to all patients, where possible less extensive options should thus be encouraged. A sixty-eight-year-old patient presented to us with a Marjolin's ulcer on the vertex of the scalp. After wide local excision a defect of about 17 cm and 12 cm was left. The defect was successfully covered with a combination of an ipsilateral pedicle temporalis fascial flap and an axial supraorbital scalp flap with good outcome. In conclusion wide defects of the scalp can be fully covered with a combination of local flaps. The axial scalp flap and the pedicle temporalis fascial flap where applicable provide an easy and less demanding option in covering such wounds. These flaps are reliable with good blood supply and have got less donor side morbidity. PMID:28194294

  3. Three-dimensional CT might be a potential evaluation modality in correction of asymmetrical masseter muscle hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

    PubMed

    No, Yeon A; Ahn, Byeong Heon; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    For correction of this asymmetrical hypertrophy, botulinum toxin type A (BTxA) injection is one of convenient treatment modalities. Unfortunately, physical examination of masseter muscle is not enough to estimate the exact volume of muscle hypertrophy difference. Two Koreans, male and female, of bilateral masseter hypertrophy with asymmetricity were evaluated. BTxA (NABOTA(®), Daewoong, Co. Ltd., Seoul, Korea) was injected at master muscle site with total 50 U (25 U at each side) and volume change was evaluated with three-dimensional (3D) CT image analysis. Maximum reduction of masseter hypertrophy was recognized at 2-month follow-up and reduced muscle size started to restore after 3 months. Mean reduction of masseter muscle volume was 36% compared with baseline. More hypertrophied side of masseter muscle presented 42% of volume reduction at 2-month follow-up but less hypertrophied side of masseter muscle showed 30% of volume shrinkage. In conclusion, 3D CT image analysis might be the exact evaluation tool for correction of asymmetrical masseter hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

  4. Demographic Effects of Habitat Restoration for the Grey-Crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis, in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Vesk, Peter A.; Robinson, Doug; van der Ree, Rodney; Wilson, Caroline M.; Saywell, Shirley; McCarthy, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Considerable resources are spent on habitat restoration across the globe to counter the impacts of habitat loss and degradation on wildlife populations. But, because of time and resourcing constraints on many conservation programs, the effectiveness of these habitat restoration programs in achieving their long-term goals of improving the population viability of particular wildlife species is rarely assessed and many restoration programs cannot demonstrate their effectiveness. Without such demonstration, and in particular demonstrating the causal relationships between habitat restoration actions and demographic responses of the target species, investments in restoration to achieve population outcomes are of uncertain value. Approach Here, we describe an approach that builds on population data collected for a threatened Australian bird – the Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis - to evaluate how effectively targeted habitat restoration work improves its viability. We built upon an extensive historical survey by conducting surveys 13 years later at 117 sites stratified by presence/absence of restoration works and by detection or not of birds in the first survey. Our performance metric was the number of individuals in a social group, which is both a measure of local abundance and directly related to breeding success. We employed an occupancy model to estimate the response of Grey-crowned Babbler social group size to the effects of time, restoration works, local habitat as measured by the density of large trees, and distance to the nearest other known group of babblers. Results and implications Babbler group size decreased over the survey period at sites without restoration works, but restoration works were effective in stemming declines where they were done. Restoration was responsible for a difference of about one bird per group of 3-5 individuals; this is an important effect on the reproductive success of the social group. Effectiveness of

  5. The postoperative trismus, nerve injury and secondary angle formation after partial masseter muscle resection combined with mandibular angle reduction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A patient, who underwent partial masseter muscle resection and mandibular angle reduction at a plastic surgery clinic, visited this hospital with major complaints of trismus and dysesthesia. A secondary angle formation due to a wrong surgical method was observed via clinical and radiological examinations, and the patient complained of trismus due to the postoperative scars and muscular atrophy caused by the masseter muscle resection. The need for a masseter muscle resection in square jaw patients must be approached with caution. In addition, surgical techniques must be carefully selected in order to prevent complications, and obtain effective and satisfactory surgery results. PMID:28280710

  6. Nocturnal electromyographic evaluation of masseter muscle activity in the complete denture patient.

    PubMed

    von Gonten, A S; Palik, J F; Oberlander, B A; Rugh, J D

    1986-11-01

    Nocturnal oral activity was evaluated in 12 complete denture wearers by means of EMG measurements of the masseter muscle. Patients who had worn dentures for at least 6 months were selected. EMG levels were compared when subjects slept with and without the dentures in the mouth. Three subjects appeared to have reduced EMG values when sleeping with the dentures. However, no overall group trends or significant differences were obtained. High variability in nightly EMG values could not be explained by a post hoc analysis of patient oral symptoms or denture characteristics. Efforts should be directed at improved methodology to study the specific mechanism of the effect of denture wearing on nocturnal muscle activity levels. Additional knowledge is needed on the occurrence and effects of parafunctional habits in the edentulous patients.

  7. The role of masseter muscle EMG during DISE to predict the effectiveness of MAD: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Marchese, M R; Scarano, E; Rizzotto, G; Grippaudo, C; Paludetti, G

    2016-12-01

    The use of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) increases the activity of the temporo-mandibular (TM) complex and masseter (MM) muscles with the risk of reducing treatment compliance. Predictors of treatment outcome are of importance in selecting patients who might benefit from MAD without side effects. The role of mandibular advancement (MA) during drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is controversial. In three cases (BMI < 30) affected by non-severe OSAS (AHI < 30 e/h), we recorded the surface EMG signal of MM activity during DISE. At follow-up all cases improved the AHI, two cases that showed transient increase of MM activity did not suffer from changes of overjet and did not complain of discomfort with the use of MAD. The case that showed a continuing increase of MM activity reported TM discomfort without changes of dental occlusion. EMG of MM during DISE may contribute to ameliorate the selection of cases amenable to treatment with MAD.

  8. Influence of gum-chewing on the haemodynamics in female masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Abe, N; Yashiro, K; Hidaka, O; Takada, K

    2009-04-01

    Blood flow in active skeletal muscles provides energy substrate, oxygen and reduction of excessive heat and metabolic by-products. Although cyclic jaw motions such as those during mastication and speech articulation are the primitive oro-facial functions, possible effects of the cyclic muscle contractions on the intramuscular haemodynamics of the jaw muscles remains scarcely known. We investigated the masseteric haemodynamics during and after gum-chewing. Ten healthy female adults participated in the study. Electromyography, kinetics of masseter muscle oxygenation, electrocardiogram and blood pressure were recorded simultaneously. The subjects were asked to perform gum-chewing and cyclic jaw motion without gum bolus (empty-chewing task). The haemodynamics parameters were compared between the two experimental conditions. During gum-chewing task, deoxygenated haemoglobin and sympathetic nerve activity increased, while tissue blood oxygen saturation decreased. Blood pressure and parasympathetic nerve activity did not change. The overall behaviour of haemodynamic parameters during empty-chewing task was similar to that observed during gum-chewing task. However, the latency periods from the end of chewing until significant changes in the haemodynamic parameters were notably shorter (P < 0.05) in gum-chewing task as compared with those associated with empty-chewing task. The duration of the changes was shorter with empty-chewing than with gum-chewing. Fluctuations in masseter muscle haemodynamics associated with chewing jaw movement differed depending on the level of muscle contraction during movement. The differences became statistically significant immediately after the commencement of chewing and after the cessation movement. During the chewing movement, automatic nerve activities increased in response to the level of muscle contraction during movement.

  9. Time Course Analysis of the Effects of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Pain and Vasomotor Responses Evoked by Glutamate Injection into Human Temporalis Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt da Silva, Larissa; Kulas, Dolarose; Karshenas, Ali; Cairns, Brian E.; Bach, Flemming W.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    The effect of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) on glutamate-evoked temporalis muscle pain and vasomotor responses was investigated in healthy men and women over a 60 day time course. Subjects participated in a pre-BoNTA session where their responses to injection of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) and saline (0.2 mL) into the temporalis muscles were assessed. On Day 1, BoNTA (5 U) was injected into one temporalis muscle and saline into the contralateral temporalis muscle, in a randomized order. Subjects then received intramuscular injections of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) into the left and right temporalis muscles at 3 h and subsequently 7, 30 and 60 days post-injection of BoNTA. Pain intensity, pain area, and neurogenic inflammation (skin temperature and skin blood perfusion) were recorded. Prior to BoNTA treatment, glutamate evoked significantly greater pain and vasomotor reactions (P < 0.001) than saline. BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate-evoked pain intensity (P < 0.05), pain area (P < 0.01), skin blood perfusion (P < 0.05), and skin temperature (P < 0.001). The inhibitory effect of BoNTA was present at 3 h after injection, peaked after 7 days and returned to baseline by 60 days. Findings from the present study demonstrated a rapid action of BoNTA on glutamate-evoked pain and neurogenic inflammation, which is in line with animal studies. PMID:24517906

  10. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Material and Methods Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. Results A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. Conclusions EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle

  11. Management and control of isotonic contraction generated stress: evaluation of masseter muscle deformation pattern by means of ecography

    PubMed Central

    BUSATO, A.; BALCONI, G.; VISMARA, V.; BERTELÈ, L.; GARO, G.; DE GREGORIO, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The objective of the following study is to observe the behavior of the six layers of the masseter during an isometric contraction at maximum exertion with the deformation pattern analysis method. Materials and methods This study has been conducted by use of an ultrasound machine (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm) which allowed us to record a video (DCM) comprised of 45 frames per second. The probe was fixed to a brace and the patient was asked to clench their teeth as hard as possible, obtain the muscle’s maximum exertion, for 5 seconds three times, with 30 seconds intervals in between. Both right and left masseter muscles were analyzed. Then we applied to the resulting video a software (Mudy 1.7.7.2 AMID Sulmona Italy) for the analysis of muscle deformation patterns (contraction, dilatation, cross-plane, vertical strain, horizontal strain, vertical shear, horizontal shear, horizontal displacement, vertical displacement). The number of videos of masseter muscles in contraction at maximum exertion due to dental clenching made during this research is around 12,000. Out of these we chose 1,200 videos which examine 200 patients (100 females, 100 males). Results The analysis of the deformation patterns of the masseter allows us to observe how the six layers of the muscle have different and specific functions each, which vary depending on the applied force (application point, magnitude and direction) so that we find it impossible to assign to one of the three sections of the muscle a mechanical predominance. Therefore it appears that the three parts of the muscle have specific and synergistic tasks PMID:28280532

  12. Effect of time of contraction and rest on the masseter and anterior temporal muscles activity in subjects with temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Graciosa, Maylli Daiani; Soares, Licerry Palma; Sperandio, Fabiana Flores; Santos, Gilmar Moraes; Degan, Viviane Veroni; Gadotti, Inaê Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of time of contraction and rest on the masseter and temporal muscles activity. Methods 49 female subjects between 18 and 30 years of age were divided into TMD (n: 26) and control groups (n: 23). Surface electromyograph was used to evaluate the anterior temporal and masseter muscles during contraction and rest protocols. The root means square, median frequency and slope coefficient of the linear regression line parameters were analyzed. Results A significant effect of time in the contraction and rest muscle protocols was found. TMD patients showed a significant decrease in median frequency in the right masseter muscle and the slope coefficient in the right temporal muscle during the contraction protocol to control subjects. Conclusion Despite the TMD patients presented with higher fatigue susceptibility compared to the control group, both groups must meet the maximum time of 5 s of maximum voluntary contraction and at least 30 s rest between successive contractions of masticatory muscles during clinical or research assessment protocols.

  13. Association of Masseter Muscle Activities during Awake and Sleep Periods with Self-Reported Anxiety, Depression, and Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Shehryar N; Iwasaki, Laura R; Dunford, Robert; Nickel, Jeffrey C; McCall, Willard; Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2015-01-01

    Aim and background The objective of this study was to determine if duty factors (DF) of low-magnitude MMA during awake and sleep periods were associated with self-reports of anxiety, depression, and somatic symptoms, and if so, whether or not any associations were modified by gender or the presence of pain. Limited information is currently available in the literature regarding the association of low-magnitude masseter muscle activities (MMA) in habitual environmental settings and the presence of psychological symptoms. Materials and methods Sixty-eight consenting participants were classified using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders examination and validated self-reporting psychological symptom evaluation questionnaires. Each subject also had masseter electromyography recordings during standardized biting tasks in 2 laboratory sessions to calibrate the in-field MMA collected during 3 awake and 3 sleep periods. Results During awake periods, subjects with self-reported depression and somatic symptoms had statistically high odds of having higher DF of low-magnitude MMA (defined by ≥ 75th percentile of sample). The association between high DF of low-magnitude MMA and self-reported depression symptoms was significantly augmented among male participants, whereas, the association between high DF of low-magnitude MMA and self-reported somatic symptoms was significantly increased among female participants without pain. Conclusion These pilot data support associations of low-magnitude masseter muscle activities with self-reported depression and somatic symptoms during awake periods. PMID:26709387

  14. Influence of temporomandibular disorder on temporal and masseter muscles and occlusal contacts in adolescents: an electromyographic study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to analyse the influence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) on electromyographic activity in the masseter and temporal muscles of adolescents and investigate a possible association with the number of occlusal contacts. Methods The Helkimo Index was administered for the diagnosis of TMD and classification of the adolescents into three groups: without TMD; with mild TMD; and with moderate/severe TMD. Carbon paper was used for the determination of occlusal contact points. A standardised electromyographic evaluation was performed on the masticatory muscles at rest, during habitual chewing and during maximum voluntary clenching. The readings were normalised to maximum voluntary clenching. Statistical analysis involved the chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test. The Kruskal-Wallis test and one-way analysis of variance with Dunn’s post hoc test were used to compare differences between groups. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) were calculated for the determination of correlations between the number of occlusal contacts and RMS values. Results Electromyography revealed significant differences in the right and left masseter and temporal muscles at rest and during chewing among the three groups. These differences were not observed during maximum voluntary clenching. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups with and without TMD regarding the number of occlusal contacts. Conclusion Electromyographic activity in the masseter and temporal muscles was greater among adolescents with moderate to severe TMD. PMID:24721559

  15. Functional relationships between the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activities during gum chewing:.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Kazuo; Matsubara, Nozomu; Hisano, Masataka; Soma, Kunimichi

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between masseter muscle (MM) and sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) activities and between mandibular and head movements during mastication, under experimental muscle fatigue. The sample consisted of 12 adults with individually normal occlusion. The subjects were asked to chew gum at three different times: before maximum clenching, immediately after maximum clenching, and 3 minutes after maximum clenching. At these times, we examined the activity of the MM and SCM as well as the movement of the mandible and head. The activity and movement were simultaneously measured using both electromyography and the motion capture system. The MM activity time after clenching was significantly shorter than that before clenching, whereas the SCM activity time was significantly longer after clenching. There was no significant difference in the changes of three-dimensional distance of the mandibular movement between the respective times. On the other hand, the changes in the three-dimensional distance of head movement after clenching increased when compared with before clenching. Furthermore, the difference in the time of MM and SCM activity onset and of mandibular and head movement onset after clenching was shorter than that before clenching. A functional relationship exists between the MM and SCM activities and between mandibular and head movements during mastication.

  16. Biosignal Analysis to Assess Mental Stress in Automatic Driving of Trucks: Palmar Perspiration and Masseter Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports. PMID:25738768

  17. Biosignal analysis to assess mental stress in automatic driving of trucks: palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-02

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports.

  18. Schedule-induced masseter EMG in facial pain subjects vs. no-pain controls.

    PubMed

    Gramling, S E; Grayson, R L; Sullivan, T N; Schwartz, S

    1997-02-01

    Empirical reports suggest that oral habits (e.g., teeth clenching) may be behavioral mediators linking stress to muscle hyperreactivity and the development of facial pain. Another report suggests that excessive behavioral adjuncts develop in conjunction with fixed-time stimulus presentation. The present study assessed the extent to which the oral habits exhibited by facial pain patients are schedule-induced. Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) symptomatology (n = 15) and pain-free controls (n = 15) participated in a 4-phase experiment (adaptation, baseline, task, recovery) designed to elicit schedule-induced behaviors. Self-report of oral habits and negative affect were recorded after each phase. Objective measures of oral habits were obtained via behavioral observation and masseter EMG recordings. Results revealed that negative arousal significantly increased during the fixed-time (FT) task and was also associated with increased oral habits among the TMD subjects. Moreover, 40% of the TMD subjects and none of the controls exhibited a pattern of EMG elevations in the early part of the inter-stimulus interval that met a strict criteria for scheduled-induced behavior per se. Taken together, these results suggest that the TMD subjects were engaging in schedule-induced oral habits. The adjunctive behavior literature seems to provide a plausible explanation as to how oral habits develop and are maintained in TMD patients, despite their painful consequences.

  19. Sarcoglycan complex in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles of baboons: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Cutroneo, G; Centofanti, A; Speciale, F; Rizzo, G; Favaloro, A; Santoro, G; Bruschetta, D; Milardi, D; Micali, A; Di Mauro, D; Vermiglio, G; Anastasi, G; Trimarchi, F

    2015-06-05

    The sarcoglycan complex consists of a group of single-pass transmembrane glycoproteins that are essential to maintain the integrity of muscle membranes. Any mutation in each sarcoglycan gene causes a series of recessive autosomal dystrophin-positive muscular dystrophies. Negative fibres for sarcoglycans have never been found in healthy humans and animals. In this study, we have investigated whether the social ranking has an influence on the expression of sarcoglycans in the skeletal muscles of healthy baboons. Biopsies of masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles were processed for confocal immunohistochemical detection of sarcoglycans. Our findings showed that baboons from different social rankings exhibited different sarcoglycan expression profiles. While in dominant baboons almost all muscles were stained for sarcoglycans, only 55% of muscle fibres showed a significant staining. This different expression pattern is likely to be due to the living conditions of these primates. Sarcoglycans which play a key role in muscle activity by controlling contractile forces may influence the phenotype of muscle fibres, thus determining an adaptation to functional conditions. We hypothesize that this intraspecies variation reflects an epigenetic modification of the muscular protein network that allows baboons to adapt progressively to a different social status.

  20. Sarcoglycan Complex in Masseter and Sternocleidomastoid Muscles of Baboons: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cutroneo, G.; Centofanti, A.; Speciale, F.; Rizzo, G.; Favaloro, A.; Santoro, G.; Bruschetta, D.; Milardi, D.; Micali, A.; Di Mauro, D.; Vermiglio, G.; Anastasi, G.; Trimarchi, F.

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoglycan complex consists of a group of single-pass transmembrane glycoproteins that are essential to maintain the integrity of muscle membranes. Any mutation in each sarcoglycan gene causes a series of recessive autosomal dystrophin-positive muscular dystrophies. Negative fibres for sarcoglycans have never been found in healthy humans and animals. In this study, we have investigated whether the social ranking has an influence on the expression of sarcoglycans in the skeletal muscles of healthy baboons. Biopsies of masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles were processed for confocal immunohistochemical detection of sarcoglycans. Our findings showed that baboons from different social rankings exhibited different sarcoglycan expression profiles. While in dominant baboons almost all muscles were stained for sarcoglycans, only 55% of muscle fibres showed a significant staining. This different expression pattern is likely to be due to the living conditions of these primates. Sarcoglycans which play a key role in muscle activity by controlling contractile forces may influence the phenotype of muscle fibres, thus determining an adaptation to functional conditions. We hypothesize that this intraspecies variation reflects an epigenetic modification of the muscular protein network that allows baboons to adapt progressively to a different social status. PMID:26150161

  1. Adaptation of rat jaw muscle fibers in postnatal development with a different food consistency: an immunohistochemical and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Kinouchi, Nao; Kawakami, Emi; Tanne, Kazuo; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanaka, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    The development of the craniofacial system occurs, among other reasons, as a response to functional needs. In particular, the deficiency of the proper masticatory stimulus affects the growth. The purpose of this study was to relate alterations of muscle activity during postnatal development to adaptational changes in the muscle fibers. Fourteen 21-day-old Wistar strain male rats were randomly divided into two groups and fed on either a solid (hard-diet group) or a powder (soft-diet group) diet for 63 days. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time), the total burst number and their average length exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining and their cross-sectional area was measured. All muscle fibers were identified as slow type I and fast type IIA, IIX or IIB (respectively, with increasing twitch contraction speed and fatigability). At lower activity levels (exceeding 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle was significantly higher in the soft-diet group than in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). At higher activity levels (exceeding 20 and 50% of the peak activity), the duty time of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the duty time of the anterior temporalis muscle at any muscle activity level. The percentage of type IIA fibers of the superficial masseter muscle in the soft-diet group was significantly lower than that in the hard-diet group (P < 0.01) and the opposite was true with regard to type IIB fibers (P < 0

  2. Argus II retinal prosthesis implantation with scleral flap and autogenous temporalis fascia as alternative patch graft material: a 4-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Matet, Alexandre; Amar, Nawel; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Barale, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Argus II retinal prosthesis is composed of an epiretinal electrode array positioned over the macula and connected to an extrascleral electronics case via a silicone cable, running through a sclerotomy. During implantation, the manufacturer recommends to cover the sclerotomy site with a patch of processed human pericardium to prevent postoperative hypotony and conjunctival erosion by the underlying electronics case. Due to biomedical regulations prohibiting the use of this material in France, we developed an alternative technique combining a scleral flap protecting the sclerotomy and an autogenous graft of superior temporalis fascia overlying the electronics case. Methods The purpose of this study is to describe the 4-year outcomes of this modified procedure in three subjects who underwent Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System implantation. Clinical data consisting of intraocular pressure measurements and tolerance in terms of conjunctival erosion or inflammation were retrospectively assessed over a 4-year postoperative follow-up. Results None of the three patients implanted with the modified technique developed ocular hypotony over 4 years. A normal, transient conjunctival inflammation occurred during the first postoperative month but conjunctival erosion was not observed in any of the three patients over 4 years. Four years after implantation, the autogenous temporalis fascia graft remained well tolerated and the retinal prosthesis was functional in all three patients. Conclusion The combination of an autograft of superficial temporalis fascia and a scleral flap efficiently prevented leakage through the sclerotomy site, ocular hypotony, and conjunctival erosion by the extrascleral electronics case. This modified technique is suitable for the implantation of existing and forthcoming retinal prostheses. Superficial temporalis fascia may also be used as alternative to commercial tectonic tissues for scleral wound repair in clinical settings where they

  3. Positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and their innervating nerves with special reference to the lateral pterygoid and the midmedial and discotemporal muscle bundles of temporalis

    PubMed Central

    AKITA, KEIICHI; SHIMOKAWA, TAKASHI; SATO, TATSUO

    2000-01-01

    For an accurate assessment of jaw movement, it is crucial to understand the comprehensive formation of the masticatory muscles with special reference to the relationship to the disc of the temporomandibular joint. Detailed dissection was performed on 26 head halves of 14 Japanese cadavers in order to obtain precise anatomical information of the positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and the branches of the mandibular nerve. After complete removal of the bony elements, the midmedial muscle bundle in all specimens and the discotemporal muscle bundle in 6 specimens, derivatives of the temporalis, which insert into the disc were observed. On the anterior area of the articular capsule and the disc of the temporomandibular joint, the upper head of the lateral pterygoid, the midmedial muscle bundle of temporalis and the discotemporal bundle of temporalis were attached mediolaterally, and in 3 specimens the posterosuperior margin of the zygomaticomandibularis was attached to the anterolateral area of the disc. It is suggested that these muscles and muscle bundles contribute to various mandibular movements. Although various patterns of the positional relationships between the muscles and muscle bundles and the their innervating nerves are observed in the present study, relative positional relationships of the muscles and muscle bundles and of nerves of the mandibular nerve are consistent. A possible scheme of the developmental formation of the masticatory muscles based on the findings of the positional relationships between the muscles and the nerves is presented. PMID:11005720

  4. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  5. Involvement of IL-1 in the Maintenance of Masseter Muscle Activity and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Ko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunji; Kanzaki, Makoto; Endo, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise reportedly stimulates IL-1 production within working skeletal muscles, but its physiological significance remains unknown due to the existence of two distinct IL-1 isoforms, IL-1α and IL-1β. The regulatory complexities of these two isoforms, in terms of which cells in muscles produce them and their distinct/redundant biological actions, have yet to be elucidated. Taking advantage of our masticatory behavior (Restrained/Gnawing) model, we herein show that IL-1α/1β-double-knockout (IL-1-KO) mice exhibit compromised masseter muscle (MM) activity which is at least partially attributable to abnormalities of glucose handling (rapid glycogen depletion along with impaired glucose uptake) and dysfunction of IL-6 upregulation in working MMs. In wild-type mice, masticatory behavior clearly increased IL-1β mRNA expression but no incremental protein abundance was detectable in whole MM homogenates, whereas immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that both IL-1α- and IL-1β-immunopositive cells were recruited around blood vessels in the perimysium of MMs after masticatory behavior. In addition to the aforementioned phenotype of IL-1-KO mice, we found the IL-6 mRNA and protein levels in MMs after masticatory behavior to be significantly lower in IL-1-KO than in WT. Thus, our findings confirm that the locally-increased IL-1 elicited by masticatory behavior, although present small in amounts, contributes to supporting MM activity by maintaining normal glucose homeostasis in these muscles. Our data also underscore the importance of IL-1-mediated local interplay between autocrine myokines including IL-6 and paracrine cytokines in active skeletal muscles. This interplay is directly involved in MM performance and fatigability, perhaps mediated through maintaining muscular glucose homeostasis. PMID:26599867

  6. Classification of muscle spindle afferents innervating the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Dessem, Dean; Capra, Norman

    2006-09-01

    Taylor et al. [Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J.F., 1992a. The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. J Physiol 456, 609-628] developed a method to classify muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (Sch) and ramp and hold stretches. They demonstrated that cat jaw muscle spindle afferents show high proportion of intermediate responses to ramp and hold jaw stretch. Together with observations on the responses to Sch their data suggests that the majority of jaw muscle spindle afferents are influenced by a combination of nuclear bag(2) and nuclear chain fibres. Relatively few are influenced solely by nuclear bag(1) fibres. The purpose of this study was to categorize jaw muscle spindle afferent in rodents in response to ramp and hold stretches. Several measures were used to classify spindle afferents including (1) conduction velocity, (2) coefficient of variation (C.V.) of the interspike interval during jaw opening, and (3) the dynamic sensitivity and the initial discharge of spindle afferents before and after succinylcholine infusion (Sch, 100mg/kg, i.v.). Consistent with observations in the cat jaw muscles, the distribution of the conduction velocity and the C.V. of Vmes masseter afferents were unimodal. Therefore, these parameters were of little value in functional classification of spindle innervation. Succinylcholine injection either markedly increased the dynamic sensitivity or produced no change in Vmes afferents. Unlike cat jaw muscle spindle afferents, the effect of Sch on the initial discharge was not clearly separable from those responding or not responding to Sch. These results suggest that rat jaw muscle spindle afferents, have physiological properties that are primarily intermediate in nature and are likely to reflect a predominance of influence from nuclear bag(2) and chain fibres. However, the distinction between bag(2) and chain fibres influences is not as clearly defined in the rat compared to

  7. Involvement of IL-1 in the Maintenance of Masseter Muscle Activity and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Ko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunji; Kanzaki, Makoto; Endo, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise reportedly stimulates IL-1 production within working skeletal muscles, but its physiological significance remains unknown due to the existence of two distinct IL-1 isoforms, IL-1α and IL-1β. The regulatory complexities of these two isoforms, in terms of which cells in muscles produce them and their distinct/redundant biological actions, have yet to be elucidated. Taking advantage of our masticatory behavior (Restrained/Gnawing) model, we herein show that IL-1α/1β-double-knockout (IL-1-KO) mice exhibit compromised masseter muscle (MM) activity which is at least partially attributable to abnormalities of glucose handling (rapid glycogen depletion along with impaired glucose uptake) and dysfunction of IL-6 upregulation in working MMs. In wild-type mice, masticatory behavior clearly increased IL-1β mRNA expression but no incremental protein abundance was detectable in whole MM homogenates, whereas immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that both IL-1α- and IL-1β-immunopositive cells were recruited around blood vessels in the perimysium of MMs after masticatory behavior. In addition to the aforementioned phenotype of IL-1-KO mice, we found the IL-6 mRNA and protein levels in MMs after masticatory behavior to be significantly lower in IL-1-KO than in WT. Thus, our findings confirm that the locally-increased IL-1 elicited by masticatory behavior, although present small in amounts, contributes to supporting MM activity by maintaining normal glucose homeostasis in these muscles. Our data also underscore the importance of IL-1-mediated local interplay between autocrine myokines including IL-6 and paracrine cytokines in active skeletal muscles. This interplay is directly involved in MM performance and fatigability, perhaps mediated through maintaining muscular glucose homeostasis.

  8. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  9. Ultrasound and analysis of the deformation patterns of the masseter muscle: comparing surgical anatomy, ultrasound and functional anatomy

    PubMed Central

    BUSATO, A.; BALCONI, G.; VISMARA, V.; BERTELÈ, L.; GARO, G.; DE GREGORIO, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose We have tried to demonstrate whether the analysis of the muscle strain allows us to identify the three distinct functional areas of the architecture of the masseter, as one would see them by performing or viewing an anatomical dissection of said muscle, and whether these sections have behave differently in terms of origin and coping of the strain they face (quantitative analysis). Materials and methods This work has been elaborated by the use of an ultrasound machine (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm) which allowed us to record a 45 frame per second video (DCM). Videos has been elaborated by use of an ultrasound machine (MicrUs ext-1H Telemed Medical Systems Milano) and a linear probe (L12-5l40S-3 5–12 MHz 40 mm) which allowed us to record a 45 frame per second video (DCM). We applied to the resulting video a software (Mudy 1.7.7.2 AMID Sulmona Italy) for the analysis of muscle deformation patters (contraction, dilatation, cross-plane, vertical strain, horizontal strain, vertical shear, horizontal shear, horizontal displacement, vertical displacement). The number of videos of masseter muscles in contraction at maximum exertion due to dental clenching made during this research is around 12,000. Out of these we chose 1,200 videos which examine 200 patients (100 females, 100 males). Results The deformation pattern analysis of the skeletal muscle on ultrasound basis seems to be an adequate instrument to use during the investigation of the functional structure of the masseter muscle given its ability to highlight the distinct activity of each separate part of the muscle. Conclusions Moreover the strain does not apply to the muscle uniformly; instead it varies according to the observed area. PMID:28280530

  10. Spatiotemporal Profiles of Proprioception Processed by the Masseter Muscle Spindles in Rat Cerebral Cortex: An Optical Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mari; Nakamura, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Muscle spindles in the jaw-closing muscles, which are innervated by trigeminal mesencephalic neurons (MesV neurons), control the strength of occlusion and the position of the mandible. The mechanisms underlying cortical processing of proprioceptive information are critical to understanding how sensory information from the masticatory muscles regulates orofacial motor function. However, these mechanisms are mostly unknown. The present study aimed to identify the regions that process proprioception of the jaw-closing muscles using in vivo optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye in rats under urethane anesthesia. First, jaw opening that was produced by mechanically pulling down the mandible evoked an optical response, which reflects neural excitation, in two cortical regions: the most rostroventral part of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and the border between the ventral part of the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) and the insular oral region (IOR). The kinetics of the optical signal, including the latency, amplitude, rise time, decay time and half duration, in the S1 region for the response with the largest amplitude were comparable to those in the region with the largest response in S2/IOR. Second, we visualized the regions responding to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, which activates both motor efferent fibers and somatosensory afferent fibers, including those that transmit nociceptive and proprioceptive information. Masseter nerve stimulation initially excited the rostral part of the S2/IOR region, and an adjacent region responded to jaw opening. The caudal part of the region showing the maximum response overlapped with the region responding to jaw opening, whereas the rostral part overlapped with the region responding to electrical stimulation of the maxillary and mandibular molar pulps. These findings suggest that proprioception of the masseter is processed in S1 and S2/IOR. Other sensory information, such as nociception, is

  11. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  12. Molecular Motor MYO1C, Acetyltransferase KAT6B and Osteogenetic Transcription Factor RUNX2 Expression in Human Masseter Muscle Contributes to Development of Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Desh, Heather; Gray, S Lauren; Horton, Michael J; Raoul, Gwenael; Rowlerson, Anthea M; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R; Sciote, James J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodeling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Design Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fiber type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan® RT-PCR. Fiber type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. Results There were very significant associations (P<0.0000001) between MYO1C and KAT6B expressions. There were also significant associations (P<0.005) between RUNX2 expression and masseter muscle type II fiber properties. Very few significant associations were identified between MYO1C and masseter muscle fiber type properties. Conclusions The relationship between MYO1C and KAT6B suggests that the two are interacting in chromatin remodeling for gene expression. This is the nuclear myosin1 (NM1) function of MYO1C. A surprising finding is the relationship between RUNX2 and type II masseter muscle fibers, since RUNX2 expression in mature muscle was previously unknown. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle. PMID:24698832

  13. The effects of simultaneous but unequal response-independent pay to pairs of human subjects on masseter EMG and bodily movements. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electromyographic activity and bodily movement of the masseter muscle were recorded in three pairs of human subjects, where one member of each pair was systematically presented with greater pay and each could reduce the value of money received by the other. The number of biting responses was as high or higher for the subject receiving less money immediately after coin delivery. However, the number of masseter contractions for the subject receiving more money remained higher at other times during the unequal pay conditions. No responses of pay reduction were emitted by any subject toward another.

  14. The electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with TMD and unilateral posterior crossbite.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana; Lichota, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on the electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with subjective symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD). The sample consisted of 50 patients (22 female and 28 male) aged 18.4 to 26.3 years (mean 20.84, SD 1.14) with subjective symptoms of TMD and unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion and 100 patients without subjective symptoms of TMD and malocclusion (54 female and 46 male) aged between 18.4 and 28.7 years (mean 21.42, SD 1.06). The anamnestic interviews were conducted according to a three-point anamnestic index of temporomandibular dysfunction (Ai). Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Recordings were carried out in the mandibular rest position and during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Analysis of the results of the EMG recordings confirmed the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on variations in spontaneous muscle activity in the mandibular rest position and maximum voluntary contraction. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Asymmetry Index (As) and Torque Coefficient (Tc), responsible for a laterodeviating effect on the mandible caused by unbalanced right and left masseter and temporal muscles.

  15. The Electrical Activity of the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with TMD and Unilateral Posterior Crossbite

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Lichota, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on the electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with subjective symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD). The sample consisted of 50 patients (22 female and 28 male) aged 18.4 to 26.3 years (mean 20.84, SD 1.14) with subjective symptoms of TMD and unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion and 100 patients without subjective symptoms of TMD and malocclusion (54 female and 46 male) aged between 18.4 and 28.7 years (mean 21.42, SD 1.06). The anamnestic interviews were conducted according to a three-point anamnestic index of temporomandibular dysfunction (Ai). Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Recordings were carried out in the mandibular rest position and during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Analysis of the results of the EMG recordings confirmed the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on variations in spontaneous muscle activity in the mandibular rest position and maximum voluntary contraction. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Asymmetry Index (As) and Torque Coefficient (Tc), responsible for a laterodeviating effect on the mandible caused by unbalanced right and left masseter and temporal muscles. PMID:25883948

  16. Isolation and Pharmacological Characterization of α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a, a Short-Chain Postsynaptic Neurotoxin from the Venom of the Western Desert Taipan, Oxyuranus temporalis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Carmel M.; Ahmad Rusmili, Muhamad Rusdi; Hodgson, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Taipans (Oxyuranus spp.) are elapids with highly potent venoms containing presynaptic (β) and postsynaptic (α) neurotoxins. O. temporalis (Western Desert taipan), a newly discovered member of this genus, has been shown to possess venom which displays marked in vitro neurotoxicity. No components have been isolated from this venom. We describe the characterization of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (α-EPTX-Ot1a; 6712 Da), a short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin, which accounts for approximately 30% of O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1–1 µM) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect-twitches, and abolished contractile responses to exogenous acetylcholine and carbachol, in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. The inhibition of indirect twitches by α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) was not reversed by washing the tissue. Prior addition of taipan antivenom (10 U/mL) delayed the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) and markedly attenuated the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1 µM). α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a displayed pseudo-irreversible antagonism of concentration-response curves to carbachol with a pA2 value of 8.02 ± 0.05. De novo sequencing revealed the main sequence of the short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin (i.e., α-elapitoxin-Ot1a) as well as three other isoforms found in O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a shows high sequence similarity (i.e., >87%) with other taipan short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxins. PMID:26938558

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Mastoid Cavity Obliteration by Vascularised Temporalis Myofascial Flap and Deep Temporal Fascial-Periosteal Flap in Canal Wall Down Mastoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Jagdeepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A consensus is emerging amongst otologists that obliteration of the mastoid cavity that results after modified radical mastoidectomy is a sound option to prevent cavity related problems such as otorrhoea, infection, granulation tissue and hearing loss. A variety of techniques have been proposed to perform the obliteration. Aim The present study aimed to compare the conventional method of mastoid cavity obliteration by vascularised temporalis myofascial flap with deep temporal fascial-periosteal flap in canal wall down mastoidectomy. Materials and Methods The prospective study (conducted between July 2012 and August 2013) randomly assigned patients with evidence of attico-antral disease to two groups (20 in each group). After canal wall down mastoidectomy, a superior based vascularised temporalis myofascial flap was used to obliterate the resultant mastoid cavity in group 1 patients and an inferior based deep temporal fascial-periosteal flap was used in group 2 patients for the cavity obliteration. They were then followed up till day 90. Results Cavity obliteration was better in group 2 (90%) as compared to group 1 (80%). Similarly, the final status of epithelisation of cavity at 90th day was clinically superior in patients of group 2 (85%) as compared to group 1 (75%). However, these difference were not statistically significant. Conclusion The clinical superiority of the results with temporal fascial-periosteal flap can be attributed to less frequent complications (partial obliteration and epithelisation of resultant mastoid cavities, residual perforation and persistent ear discharge) as compared to myofascial flap. PMID:28208893

  18. Random control trial of dermis-fat graft and interposition of temporalis fascia in the management of temporomandibular ankylosis in children.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Pradhan, R; Mohammad, S; Jaiswara, C

    2008-10-01

    Temporomandibular ankylosis is a disabling condition that affects hygiene and cosmetic appearance. Several interpositional grafts such as meniscus, muscle, fascia, skin, cartilage, fat, dura, alloplastic materials and xenografts have been used to prevent recurrence of ankylosis. We studied the advantages and disadvantages of dermis fat graft as an interposition material after arthroplasty and compared it with temporalis fascia interposition. Seventeen patients with temporomandibular ankylosis involving 20 joints were randomly divided into two groups; the first group had operations for interposition of dermis-fat graft that was taken from the groin. Patients in control group had operations to interpose temporalis fascia and muscle from the same surgical site. All were assessed by age, sex, etiology, clinical features and post surgical complications. The groups were matched in age and the male: female ratio was 0.89:1.The median duration of ankylosis was 7.3 (range 2-11) years. Postoperative and follow up interincisal mouth opening was satisfactory with good healing of the dermis-fat graft donor site. We conclude that the use of dermis fat grafts has minimal donor site morbidity, and is a safe and effective interposition material to prevent the recurrence of temporomandibular ankylosis.

  19. Evaluation of Internal Echogenic Pattern of Masseter in Subjects with Myofascial Pain/ Myositis, Oral Submucous Fibrosis, Chewers, Bruxers and Healthy Individuals- A Preliminary Ultrasonographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Raghunandan Iyengar, Asha; Patil, Seema; Guddannanavar Karibasappa, Ganga; Beloor Vasudev, Subash; Kumar Joshi, Revan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: The masseter is generally involved in myofascial pain, myositis, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), bruxism, and in subjects with habitual tobacco/arecanut chewing. In all the above conditions, changes in the internal echogenic pattern on ultrasonography of the muscle may be observed. Purpose: The present study aimed at evaluating the internal echogenic pattern of masseter by ultrasonography in subjects with various conditions affecting masster muscle. Materials and Method: The study subjects were categorized into 5 groups consisting of 20 subjects each with the following conditions; Group 1: myofascial pain or myositis, Group 2: oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), Group 3: habitual chewing of tobacco/arecanut without OSMF, Group 4: bruxism. Group 5 consisted of 20 healthy subjects. An ultrasonographic examination of masseter was performed in all subjects and the echogenic pattern was classified into Types I, II and III. The images were examined by two observers and inter-observer variability was assessed. Differences in internal echogenic pattern between study groups and control group was evaluated using Chi- square test. Results: A good inter observer agreement was noted (k value= 0.8). An equal distribution of Types II and III echogenic pattern was noted in myofascial pain/myositis group. Type II was predominant in subjects with OSMF, habitual tobacco/arecanut chewing and bruxism. Type I was predominant in controls. The echogenic pattern differed significantly from controls in subjects with myofascial pain/myositis and OSMF (p=0.00001*, 0.0237* respectively), whereas in subjects with habitual tobacco/ arecanut chewing and bruxism, it did not differ significantly from controls (p=0.2482, 0.1223 respectively). Conclusion: Ultrasonographic examination of the echogenic pattern may help in understanding the nature of the disease process affecting the masseter muscle in various conditions. PMID:27942553

  20. Potential clinical application of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot in temporomandibular disorder patients with myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Ogi, Nobumi; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2014-11-11

    Objectives: To investigate the safety, suitable treatment regimen, and efficacy of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot. Methods: Forty-one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with myofascial pain (8 men, 33 women, median age: 46 years) were enrolled. The safety, suitable massage regimen, and efficacy of this treatment were investigated. Changes in masseter muscle thickness were evaluated on sonograms. Results: No adverse events occurred with any of the treatment sessions. Suitable massage was at pressure of 10 N for 16 minutes. Five sessions were performed every 2 weeks. Total duration of treatment was 9·5 weeks in median. Massage treatment was effective in 70·3% of patients. Masseter muscle thickness decreased with treatment in the therapy-effective group. Conclusion: This study confirmed the safety of massage treatment, and established a suitable regimen. Massage was effective in 70·3% of patients and appeared to have a potential as one of the effective treatments for myofascial pain.

  1. TMJ inflammation increases Fos expression in the nucleus raphe magnus induced by subsequent formalin injection of the masseter or hindpaw of rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Hoon; Imbe, Hiroki; Iwai-Liao, Yasutomo

    2006-08-01

    The study was designed to examine the effect of persistent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation on neuronal activation in the descending pain modulatory system in response to noxious stimulus. Formalin was injected into the left masseter muscle or hindpaw of rats 10 days after injection of the left TMJ with saline or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The results showed that 10-day persistent TMJ inflammation (induced by CFA) alone did not induce a significant increase in Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-LI) neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) or locus coeruleus (LC), but that formalin injection of the masseter muscle or hindpaw induced a significant increase in Fos-LI neurons in the RVM and LC of rats with and without TMJ inflammation (P < 0.05). However, persistent TMJ inflammation significantly increased Fos-LI neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) induced by subsequent formalin injection of the masseter muscle and hindpaw (70.2% increase and 53.8% increase, respectively, over the control TMJ-saline-injected rats; P < 0.05). The results suggest that persistent TMJ inflammation increases neuronal activity, in particularly in the NRM, by the plastic change of the descending pain modulatory system after ipsilateral application of a noxious stimulus to either orofacial area or a spatially remote body area.

  2. Compression-induced hyperaemia in the rabbit masseter muscle: a model to investigate vascular mechano-sensitivity of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Turturici, Marco; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network may underlie rapid dilatory events in skeletal muscles. Previous investigations have been mostly based either on in vitro or on whole-limb studies, neither preparation allowing one to assess the musculo-vascular specificity under physiological conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize the mechano-sensitivity of an exclusively-muscular vascular bed in vivo. In five anesthetized rabbits, muscle blood flow was continuously monitored in the masseteric artery, bilaterally (n = 10). Hyperaemic responses were evoked by compressive stimuli of different extent (50, 100 and 200 mm Hg) and duration (0.5, 1, 2 and 5 s) exerted by a servo-controlled motor on the masseter muscle. Peak amplitude of the hyperaemic response ranged from 340 ± 30% of baseline (at 50 mm Hg) to 459 ± 57% (at 200 mm Hg) (P < 0.05), did not depend on stimulus duration and exhibited very good reliability (ICC = 0.98) when reassessed at 30 min intervals. The time course of the response depended neither on applied pressure nor on the duration of the stimulus. In conclusion, for its high sensitivity and reliability this technique is adequate to characterize mechano-vascular reactivity and may prove useful in the investigation of the underlying mechanisms, with implications in the control of vascular tone and blood pressure in health and disease.

  3. Positional changes of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles after surgical mandibular advancement procedures: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Dicker, G J; Koolstra, J H; Castelijns, J A; Van Schijndel, R A; Tuinzing, D B

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated whether surgical mandibular advancement procedures induced a change in the direction and the moment arms of the masseter (MAS) and medial pterygoid (MPM) muscles. Sixteen adults participated in this study. The sample was divided in two groups: Group I (n=8) with a mandibular plane angle (mpa) <39° and Group II (n=8) with an mpa >39°. Group I patients were treated with a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). Those in Group II were treated with a BSSO combined with a Le Fort I osteotomy. Pre- and postoperative direction and moment arms of MAS and MPM were compared in these groups. Postsurgically, MAS and MPM in Group II showed a significantly more vertical direction in the sagittal plane. Changes of direction in the frontal plane and changes of moment arms were insignificant in both groups. This study demonstrated that bimaxillary surgery in patients with an mpa >39° leads to a significant change of direction of MAS and MPM in the sagittal plane.

  4. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-08-15

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep-wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally.

  5. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  6. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  7. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling.

  8. The prognosis of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) during a fixed orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Marzo, Giuseppe; Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Tetè, Stefano; Festa, Felice

    2012-01-01

    Among treatments in the literature for myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), the most reliable therapies in dentistry are spray and stretch, and, although less frequently used, anesthetic injection. Adult MPS subjects are often treated using fixed orthodontic therapy for resolution of malocclusion. There is no clarity in the literature on the prognosis of MPS during orthodontic therapy. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognosis of MPS during orthodontic treatment of subjects with malocclusion, initially diagnosed as having MPS. The analysis covered the medical records of 91 young adult Caucasians scheduled for orthodontic treatment for various malocclusions. Thirty-seven of the patients were initially diagnosed as also having MPS (T0). Thirty patients began the orthodontic treatment and were recalled for a re-evaluation of MPS after dental alignment and dental class correction was achieved (T1). A wait-and-see strategy was applied in seven subjects who were included as the control subjects. They received no treatment for MPS. At T1, a statistically significant decrease was observed in the study group in the presence of any clicking or creaking noises from the jaw joint, a significant jaw joint and jaw muscle pain reduction, and a quality of life improvement. Among patients who were depressed at the beginning of treatment, the majority felt better at the follow-up evaluation. On muscular palpation, a statistically significant decrease was found on the visual analogic scale value of the middle fibers of the temporalis muscle, temporalis tendon, clavicular and sternal division of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, masseter muscles, and posterior cervical muscles. The temporalis and the masseter muscles showed a significant decrease in the number of subjects with trigger points (TrPs) in all areas in the study group, after treatment. The digastric and sternocleidomastoid muscles also showed a significant reduction in the number of subjects with TrPs. Subjects with

  9. Effects of gadolinium chloride on basal flow and compression-induced rapid hyperemia in the rabbit masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Turturici, M; Roatta, S

    2014-06-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate the role of mechano-sensitive channels on basal muscle blood flow and on the compression-induced rapid hyperaemia. To this aim, the mechano-sensitive channel blocker Gadolinium (Gd(3+)) is employed, which already proved to reduce the myogenic response in isolated vessels. Muscle blood flow (MaBF) was recorded from the masseteric artery in 8 urethane-anesthetized rabbits. Rapid hyperemic responses were evoked by 1-s lasting compressions of the masseter muscle (MC) delivered before and after close arterial infusion of Gd(3+) in the masseteric artery. Three infusions were performed at 1-h interval, producing estimated plasma concentration (EPC) of 0.045, 0.45 and 4.5 mM, in the masseteric artery. The amplitude of the hyperaemic response to MC, equal to 195±77% of basal flow in control condition, was reduced by 9.5±19.4% (p=0.18) and 45±28% (p<0.01) while basal MaBf increased by 10±3% (p=0.90) and by 68±30% (p<0.01) at EPC of 0.045 and 0.45 mM, respectively. At EPC of 4.5 mM a strong reduction in both MaBF (by 54±13%, p<0.01) and MC response (75±12%, p<0.01) was instead observed. These effects did not depend on time from infusion. At all doses employed Gd(3+) never affected arterial blood pressure, heart rate and contralateral MaBF. While the effects observed at the highest EPC likely result from blood vessel occlusion due to Gd(3+) precipitation, the effects observed at lower concentrations demonstrate that Gd(3+) affects musculo-vascular function by decreasing both resting vascular tone and responsiveness to mechanical stimuli. The results are compatible with a Gd(3+)-induced blockade of vascular mechano-sensitive channels.

  10. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Hua, Chia-ho; Daw, Najat; Navid, Fariba; Davidoff, Andrew M.; McGregor, Lisa; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; McCrarey, Lola; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  11. Neuromuscular interfacing: a novel approach to EMG-driven multiple DOF physiological models.

    PubMed

    Pau, James W L; Xie, Shane S Q; Xu, W L

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that involves first identifying and verifying the available superficial muscles that can be recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) signals, and then developing a musculoskeletal model based on these findings, which have specifically independent DOFs for movement. Such independently controlled multiple DOF EMG-driven models have not been previously developed and a two DOF model for the masticatory system was achieved by implementing independent antagonist muscle combinations for vertical and lateral movements of the jaw. The model has six channels of EMG signals from the bilateral temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles to predict the motion of the mandible. This can be used in a neuromuscular interface to manipulate a jaw exoskeleton for rehabilitation. For a range of different complexities of jaw movements, the presented model is able to consistently identify movements with 0.28 - 0.46 average normalized RMSE. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach at determining complex multiple DOF movements and its applicability to any joint system.

  12. What Determines Habitat Quality for a Declining Woodland Bird in a Fragmented Environment: The Grey-Crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis in South-Eastern Australia?

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kate P.; Holland, Greg J.; Clarke, Rohan H.; Cooke, Raylene; Bennett, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding what constitutes high quality habitat is crucial for the conservation of species, especially those threatened with extinction. Habitat quality frequently is inferred by comparing the attributes of sites where a species is present with those where it is absent. However, species presence may not always indicate high quality habitat. Demographic parameters are likely to provide a more biologically relevant measure of quality, including a species’ ability to successfully reproduce. We examined factors believed to influence territory quality for the grey-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus temporalis), a cooperatively breeding woodland bird that has experienced major range contraction and population decline in south-eastern Australia. Across three broad regions, we identified active territories and determined the presence of fledglings and the size of family groups, as surrogates of territory quality. These measures were modelled in relation to habitat attributes within territories, the extent of surrounding wooded vegetation, isolation from neighbouring groups, and the size of the neighbourhood population. Fledgling presence was strongly positively associated with group size, indicating that helpers enhance breeding success. Surprisingly, no other territory or landscape-scale variables predicted territory quality, as inferred from either breeding success or group size. Relationships between group size and environmental variables may be obscured by longer-term dynamics in group size. Variation in biotic interactions, notably competition from the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), also may contribute. Conservation actions that enhance the number and size of family groups will contribute towards reversing declines of this species. Despite associated challenges, demographic studies have potential to identify mechanistic processes that underpin population performance; critical knowledge for effective conservation management. PMID:26098355

  13. What Determines Habitat Quality for a Declining Woodland Bird in a Fragmented Environment: The Grey-Crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis in South-Eastern Australia?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kate P; Holland, Greg J; Clarke, Rohan H; Cooke, Raylene; Bennett, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    Understanding what constitutes high quality habitat is crucial for the conservation of species, especially those threatened with extinction. Habitat quality frequently is inferred by comparing the attributes of sites where a species is present with those where it is absent. However, species presence may not always indicate high quality habitat. Demographic parameters are likely to provide a more biologically relevant measure of quality, including a species' ability to successfully reproduce. We examined factors believed to influence territory quality for the grey-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus temporalis), a cooperatively breeding woodland bird that has experienced major range contraction and population decline in south-eastern Australia. Across three broad regions, we identified active territories and determined the presence of fledglings and the size of family groups, as surrogates of territory quality. These measures were modelled in relation to habitat attributes within territories, the extent of surrounding wooded vegetation, isolation from neighbouring groups, and the size of the neighbourhood population. Fledgling presence was strongly positively associated with group size, indicating that helpers enhance breeding success. Surprisingly, no other territory or landscape-scale variables predicted territory quality, as inferred from either breeding success or group size. Relationships between group size and environmental variables may be obscured by longer-term dynamics in group size. Variation in biotic interactions, notably competition from the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), also may contribute. Conservation actions that enhance the number and size of family groups will contribute towards reversing declines of this species. Despite associated challenges, demographic studies have potential to identify mechanistic processes that underpin population performance; critical knowledge for effective conservation management.

  14. Regulation of jaw-specific isoforms of myosin-binding protein-C and tropomyosin in regenerating cat temporalis muscle innervated by limb fast and slow motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lucia H D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-11-01

    Cat jaw-closing muscles are a distinct muscle allotype characterized by the expression of masticatory-specific myofibrillar proteins. Transplantation studies showed that expression of masticatory myosin heavy chain (m-MyHC) is promoted by fast motor nerves, but suppressed by slow motor nerves. We investigated whether masticatory myosin-binding protein-C (m-MBP-C) and masticatory tropomyosin (m-Tm) are similarly regulated. Temporalis muscle strips were transplanted into limb muscle beds to allow innervation by fast or slow muscle nerve during regeneration. Regenerated muscles were examined postoperatively up to 168 days by peroxidase IHC using monoclonal antibodies to m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm. Regenerates in both muscle beds expressed fetal and slow MyHCs, m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm during the first 4 weeks. Longer-term regenerates innervated by fast nerve suppressed fetal and slow MyHCs, retaining m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm, whereas fibers innervated by slow nerve suppressed fetal MyHCs and the three masticatory-specific proteins, induced slow MyHC, and showed immunohistochemical characteristics of jaw-slow fibers. We concluded that expression of m-MBP-C and m-Tm is coregulated by m-MyHC and that neural impulses to limb slow muscle are capable of suppressing masticatory-specific proteins and to channel gene expression along the jaw-slow phenotype unique to jaw-closing muscle.

  15. Re-examination of the surface EMG activity of the masseter muscle in young adults during chewing of two test foods.

    PubMed

    Karkazis, H C; Kossioni, A E

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the texture of food on the masseter EMG activity during chewing. Fresh raw carrots and non-adhesive chewing gums of similar size and weight were used as representing a hard and a soft food respectively. The mean values for the IEMG activity, the duration of the chewing cycle, the chewing rate and the relative contraction time during chewing were significantly higher for the carrots while no significant difference was found in the chewing burst duration between the two test foods. Finally a strong inverse correlation was found between chewing rate and cycle duration. It was concluded that the texture of food has an obvious effect on EMG activity during chewing and that adjustments to changes in food consistency are made mainly by altering the chewing rate, the duration of the chewing cycle and the IEMG activity.

  16. Evidence that the contraction-induced rapid hyperemia in rabbit masseter muscle is based on a mechanosensitive mechanism, not shared by cutaneous vascular beds.

    PubMed

    Turturici, Marco; Mohammed, Mazher; Roatta, Silvestro

    2012-08-15

    Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to contribute to the rapid hyperemia at the onset of exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role played by the mechanosensitivity of the vascular network. In 12 anesthetized rabbits blood flow was recorded from the exclusively muscular masseteric artery in response to brief spontaneous contractions (BSC) of the masseter muscle, artery occlusion (AO), muscle compression (MC), and muscle stretch (MS). Activation of masseter muscle was monitored by electromyography (EMG). Responses to AO were also recorded from the mostly cutaneous facial and the central ear arteries. Five animals were also tested in the awake condition. The hyperemic response to BSC (peak amplitude of 394 ± 82%; time to peak of 1.8 ± 0.8 s) developed with a latency of 300-400 ms from the beginning of the EMG burst and 200-300 ms from the contraction-induced transient flow reduction. This response was neither different from the response to AO (peak amplitude = 426 ± 158%), MC, and MS (P = 0.23), nor from the BSC response in the awake condition. Compared with the masseteric artery, the response to AO was markedly smaller both in the facial (83 ± 18%,) and in the central ear artery (68 ± 20%) (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the rapid contraction-induced hyperemia can be replicated by a variety of stimuli affecting transmural pressure in muscle blood vessels and is thus compatible with the Bayliss effect. This prominent mechanosensitivity appears to be a characteristic of muscle and not cutaneous vascular beds.

  17. Effect of intravenous infusion of a beta-adrenergic blocking agent on the haemodynamic changes in human masseter muscle induced by cold-pressor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, K; Kuboki, T; Miyawaki, T; Shimada, M; Yamashita, A; Clark, G T

    1999-06-01

    Eight healthy non-smoking males (mean age: 24.1 +/- 1.1 years) without any history of chronic muscle pain and migraine participated in this study. Haemoglobin (Hb) and oxygen (O2) saturation in the right masseter muscle were continuously recorded with a non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopic device. Heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. The experiment had three phases: a placebo drug (physiological saline) with cold-pressor trial, a 30-sec maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) trial, and a propranolol with cold-pressor trial. The saline and drug trials each involved continuous recording for 1 min before, 2 min during and 5 min after the cold-pressor stimulation (4 degrees C). Physiological saline (20 ml) or propranolol hydrochloride (20 ml) were infused at the rate of 2 ml/min. This infusion was begun 20 min before the baseline recording and participants did not know which solution (saline or propranolol) was being infused. For the MVC trial, each participant was asked to perform a 30-sec clench of their jaw-closing muscles. There was a rest period of 15 min between each trial. The individual Hb and O2 data were normalized so that the baseline at the beginning of the experiment was equal to zero, and the Hb and O2 data were normalized as a percentage of the individual's own highest absolute Hb and O2 after and during the MVC, respectively. The results showed that the mean baseline Hb 1 min before cold-pressor stimulation was significantly lower in the beta-blocker trial than in the placebo trial (p = 0.035). The mean change in Hb from baseline during cold-pressor stimulation in the beta-blocker trial was also significantly less than in the placebo trial (p = 0.035). The mean Hb rebound change after the cold-pressor stimulation in the beta-blocker trial was significantly higher than in the placebo trial, and no significant heart-rate differences were observed in the period after cold-pressor stimulation. Overall, the mean heart rate before and during that

  18. Myosin proteins identified from masseter muscle using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction--a pilot study of the relevance to orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Suchak, Archna; Hunt, Nigel P; Shah, Rishma; Sinanan, Andrea C M; Lloyd, Tim; Lewis, Mark P

    2009-04-01

    There is a clearly established relationship between masticatory muscle structure and facial form. Human studies in this area, however, have been limited, especially in consideration of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) family of contractile proteins. The aim of this pilot study was to assess if differences were detectable between genotype with respect to MyHC isoforms and the vertical facial phenotype in a sample of nine Caucasian female patients, age range 18-49 years, using a novel rapid technique. Masseter muscle biopsies were taken from patients with a range of vertical facial form. The levels of expression of the MyHC isoform genes MYH 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 were compared with the expression in a female calibrator patient aged 23 years with normal vertical facial form, using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that there were distinct differences in gene expression between patients with a wide range of variation although changes in MYH1 were consistent with one cephalometric variable, the maxillo-mandibular angle. The full procedure, from start to finish, can be completed within half a day. Rapid genotyping of patients in this way could reveal important information of relevance to treatment. This technology has potential as a diagnostic and prognostic aid when considering correction of certain malocclusions.

  19. A preliminary analysis of the relationship between jaw-muscle architecture and jaw-muscle electromyography during chewing across primates.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, Christopher J; Taylor, Andrea B

    2010-04-01

    The architectural arrangement of the fibers within a muscle has a significant impact on how a muscle functions. Recent work on primate jaw-muscle architecture demonstrates significant associations with dietary variation and feeding behaviors. In this study, the relationship between masseter and temporalis muscle architecture and jaw-muscle activity patterns is explored using Belanger's treeshrews and 11 primate species, including two genera of strepsirrhines (Lemur and Otolemur) and five genera of anthropoids (Aotus, Callithrix, Cebus, Macaca, and Papio). Jaw-muscle weights, fiber lengths, and physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA) were quantified for this preliminary analysis or collected from the literature and compared to published electromyographic recordings from these muscles. Results indicate that masseter architecture is unrelated to the superficial masseter working-side/balancing-side (W/B) ratio across primate species. Alternatively, relative temporalis architecture is correlated with temporalis W/B ratios across primates. Specifically, relative temporalis PCSA is inversely related to the W/B ratio for the anterior temporalis, indicating that as animals recruit a larger relative percentage of their balancing-side temporalis, they possess the ability to generate relatively larger amounts of force from these muscles. These findings support three broader conclusions. First, masseter muscle architecture may have experienced divergent evolution across different primate clades related to novel functional roles in different groups. Second, the temporalis may be functionally constrained (relative to the masseter) across primates in its functional role of creating vertical occlusal forces during chewing. Finally, the contrasting results for the masseter and temporalis suggest that the fiber architecture of these muscles has evolved as distinct functional units in primates.

  20. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  1. Comparison between sensory and motor transcutaneous electrical nervous stimulation on electromyographic and kinesiographic activity of patients with temporomandibular disorder: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present controlled clinical trial was to assess the effect of a single 60 min application of transcutaneous electrical nervous stimulation (TENS) at sensory stimulation threshold (STS), compared to the application of motor stimulation threshold (MTS) as well as to untreatment, on the surface electromyographic (sEMG) and kinesiographic activity of patients with tempormanbibular disorder (TMD). Methods Sixty female subjects, selected according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria, suffering from unilateral TMD in remission were assigned to MTS, STS or untreatment. Pre- and post-treatment differences in the sEMG activity of temporalis anterior (TA), masseter (MM), digastric (DA) and sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM), as well in the interocclusal distance (ID), within group were tested using the Wilcoxon test, while differences among groups were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test; the level of significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Results Significant pre- and post-treatment differences were observed in MTS and STS groups, for TA and MM of both sides; no significant difference was detected between MTS and STS groups. Kinesiographic results showed that the vertical component of ID was significantly increased after TENS in MTS and STS groups. Conclusions STS TENS could be effective, as well as MTS, in reduce the sEMG activity of masticatory muscles and to improve the ID of TMD patients in remission. Future studies are needed to confirm the results of the present study. Clinical relevance. The present study demonstrates that the application of TENS is effective in reduce the sEMG activity, as well as in increasing the ID of patients with TMD; our study did not support superior effectiveness of MTS or STS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01832207 PMID:23672400

  2. Reliability of EMG activity versus bite-force from human masticatory muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Y.; Iwasaki, L.R.; McCall, W.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Lozier, E.; Nickel, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The reproducibility of electromyographic (EMG) activity in relation to static bite-force from masticatory muscles for a given biting situation is largely unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the reliability of EMG activity in relation to static bite-force in humans. Eighty-four subjects produced 5 unilateral static bites of different forces at different biting positions on molars and incisors, at two separate sessions, while surface EMG activities were recorded from temporalis, masseter, and suprahyoid muscles bilaterally. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) were used, where an ICC of ≥ 0.60 indicated good reliability of these slopes. ICCs for jaw closing muscles during molar biting were: temporalis ipsilateral 0.58 to 0.93 and contralateral 0.88 to 0.91, masseter ipsilateral 0.75 to 0.86 and contralateral 0.69 to 0.88; while during incisor biting were: temporalis ipsilateral 0.56 to 0.81 and contralateral 0.34 to 0.86, masseter ipsilateral 0.65 to 0.78 and contralateral 0.59 to 0.80. For the suprahyoid muscles the confidence intervals were mostly wide and most included zero. Slopes of the EMG activity versus bite-force for a given biting situation were reliable for temporalis and masseter muscles. These results support the use of these outcome measurements for the estimation and validation of mechanical models of the masticatory system. PMID:21564316

  3. Surface EMG of the masticatory muscles (Part 3): Impact of changes to the dynamic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hugger, S; Schindler, H J; Kordass, B; Hugger, A

    2013-01-01

    The third part of this literature review on the clinical relevance of surface electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles summarizes the results of clinical studies in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), preferably randomized controlled trials, examining the impact of changes to the dynamic occlusion. Clenching in left and right laterotrusive positions results in decrease in EMG activity of masseter and temporalis muscles on both working and non-working side. Masseter muscle exhibits largely uniform bilateral activity in laterotrusive positions, independent of canine guidance or group function with and without non-working side contacts. There is a dominance of temporalis muscle activity on the working side and, in case of posterior contacts and balancing contacts, temporalis muscle activity increases and changes from an unilateral to a symmetrical pattern.

  4. Lamination of the masticatory muscles in the Phascolarctos cinereus (Koala) according to their innervations.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Koh; Townsend, Grant

    2009-05-01

    The masticatory muscles are usually classified into four groups: masseter, temporalis, lateral pterygoid and medial pterygoid. The communicating muscle bundle between the temporalis and masseter called the zygomaticomandibular muscle exists. The laminations within these muscles are commonly separated by aponeuroses. Nerves control the action of muscles, so improved understanding about innervation patterns in the masticatory muscles is important in the consideration of muscle function. In this study, we focus on the relationships between the nerves supply and the lamination of masticatory muscles in Phascolarctos cinereus (Koala). The masseter muscle consists of superficial and deep muscle layers. The superficial muscle layer of the masseter muscle is divided into rostro-lateral and caudo-internal nerve layers. The deep muscle layer of the masseter muscle is divided into rostral, rostro-lateral, medial and caudo-internal nerve layers. The nerves that innervate the zygomaticomandibular muscle are distributed to the lateral area of the coronoid process. The temporalis muscle was divided into internal layer of the coronoid process, a lateral layer of the coronoid process and a posterior layer by the nerve distribution pattern. The medial pterygoid muscle divided into rostro-internal, medial and caudo-lateral nerve layers.

  5. The function of the disco-muscular apparatus in the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Bade, H

    1999-01-01

    The morphology and function of the disco-muscular apparatus of the human TMJ is a controversial subject. Connections between the muscles which move the mandible and the "disco-capsular complex" have been described in a contradictory way. The disco-muscular apparatus is also described as being more extensive than that of the M. pterygoideus alone to include to the Mm. temporalis and masseter. However, the involvement of the latter is considered to be a peripheral variation of the normal anatomy and of little, if any, functional significance. The existence of independent relationships between the deep portions of the masseter and temporal muscles and the disco-capsular apparatus of the human TMJ is rarely discussed or explained. The morphologic findings were derived from fixed and unfixed human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of varying ages and both sexes, whereby the functional maturity of the masticatory apparatus was taken into consideration. The results of the study show that aside from fibers originating from the superior venter of the M. pterygoideus lateralis, additional muscle or connective tissue fibers from the perimysium of the M. masseter are inserted to varying extents into the disc. The same is true for the M. temporalis, which is also directly connected to the disc via muscular or fibrous elements, or indirectly via fibers from the M. masseter. The insertion of the M. pterygoideus lateralis is always in the medial portion of the Discus articularis and those of the Mm. temporalis and masseter in the middle and lateral portions of the disc respectively. It is highly probable that a direct force transfer through the Mm. temporalis and masseter to the articular disc takes place, and that these muscles contribute to the movement of the disc during jaw movement, whereas the size and form of the muscle insertions are subject to a great deal of individual variation.

  6. Muscle fibre types in the suprahyoid muscles of the rat

    PubMed Central

    COBOS, A. R.; SEGADE, L. A. G.; FUENTES, I.

    2001-01-01

    Five muscle fibre types (I, IIc, IIa, IIx and IIb) were found in the suprahyoid muscles (mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric) of the rat using immuno and enzyme histochemical techniques. More than 90% of fibres in the muscles examined were fast contracting fibres (types IIa, IIx and IIb). The geniohyoid and the anterior belly of the digastric had the greatest number of IIb fibres, whilst the mylohyoid was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres. The posterior belly of the digastric contained a greater percentage of aerobic fibres (83.4%) than the anterior belly (67.8%). With the exception of the geniohyoid, the percentage of type I and IIc fibres, which have slow myosin heavy chain (MHCβ), was relatively high and greater than has been previously reported in the jaw-closing muscles of the rat, such as the superficial masseter. The geniohyoid and mylohyoid exhibited a mosaic fibre type distribution, without any apparent regionalisation, although in the later MHCβ-containing fibres (types I and IIc) were primarily located in the rostral 2/3 region. In contrast, the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric revealed a clear regionalisation. In the anterior belly of the digastric 2 regions were observed: both a central region, which was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres and where all of the type I and IIc fibres were located, and a peripheral region, where type IIb fibres predominated. The posterior belly of the digastric showed a deep aerobic region which was greater in size and where type I and IIc fibres were confined, and a superficial region, where primarily type IIx and IIb fibres were observed. PMID:11322721

  7. Indications for jaw gape-related control of relative muscle activation in sequent chewing strokes.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, P A; Morneburg, T R

    2010-03-01

    Jaw muscle activity ratios in unilateral isometric biting differ from ratios of unilateral chewing but approach the latter if the jaw gape in biting is made as small as the minimum interocclusal distance (MID) of chewing. Especially, the masseter working/balancing side ratio (W/B-ratio) becomes as asymmetric as in chewing, because of reduction in balancing side (BS) masseter activity. This behaviour of ratios might reflect a 'chewing-specific' motor strategy induced when isometric biting is performed with a 'chewing-like' gape. If this hypothesis applies, activity ratios should be associated with MIDs of sequent chewing strokes in a similar manner as with incremented jaw gapes in isometric biting. To test this prediction, bilateral surface electromyograms of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles and incisor movements were recorded during unilateral chewing in 52 subjects. W/B-ratios of masseter and temporalis activities and temporalis/masseter-ratios on both sides were calculated. The ratios were related to MIDs of consecutive chewing cycles. Three of the four ratios were associated with masticatory MID in the same manner as with jaw gape in isometric biting. In particular with decreasing MID, the masseter W/B-ratio increased from 1.5 to 2.2 (P < 0.01). This increase in asymmetry was attributed to a stronger decrease in masseter activity on the BS than on the working side. We conclude that relative jaw muscle activation is associated with interocclusal distance in a similar way in isometric biting and in chewing. This analogy supports the idea of a common jaw gape-related neuromuscular strategy facilitated by afferent signalling of interocclusal distance.

  8. Accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis of the masticatory muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Packer, Amanda Carine; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; de Castro, Ester Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis (area and extension) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 104 female volunteers from the university community. Following the application of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, the volunteers were divided into a TMD group (n = 52) and control group (n = 52), and evaluated using infrared thermography. The area and extension of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured on the images. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy (area under the curve), best cutoff point, sensitivity and specificity. A significant difference in skin temperature between groups was only found in the measurement of the area of the left anterior temporalis muscle (p = 0.011). The area under the ROC curve was less than the reference values for all muscles evaluated in the analyses of area and extension. Thus, neither method of infrared thermography tested for the quantification of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles (analysis of area and extension) is consistent with the RDC/TMD for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD in women.

  9. Surface electromyographic assessment of patients with long lasting temporomandibular joint disorder pain.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Lodetti, Gianluigi; Paiva, Guiovaldo; De Felicio, Claudia Maria; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-08-01

    The normalized electromyographic characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and healthy controls were compared. Thirty TMD patients (15 men, 15 women, mean age 23 years) with long lasting pain (more than 6 months), and 20 control subjects matched for sex and age were examined. All patients had arthrogenous TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Surface electromyography of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Standardized EMG indices and the median power frequency were obtained, and compared between the two groups and sexes using ANOVAs. During clenching, the TMD patients had larger asymmetry in their temporalis muscles, larger temporalis activity relative to masseter, and reduced mean power frequencies than the control subjects (p<0.05, ANOVA). In both groups, the mean power frequencies of the temporalis muscles were larger than those of the masseter muscles (p<0.001). No sex related differences, and no sex × group interactions were found. In conclusion, young adult patients with long lasting TMD have an increased and more asymmetric standardized activity of their temporalis anterior muscle, and reduced mean power frequencies, relative to healthy controls.

  10. The influence of occlusion on jaw and neck muscle activity: a surface EMG study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Tartaglia, G M; Galletta, A; Grassi, G P; Sforza, C

    2006-05-01

    The electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles during maximum voluntary teeth clench were assessed in 27 male and 35 female healthy young adults. Subjects were divided into two groups: (i) 'complete' Angle Class I (bilateral, symmetric canine and molar Class I relationships), and (ii) 'partial' Angle Class I (one to three canine/molar Class I relationships, the remaining relationships were Class II or Class III). On average, standardized muscular symmetry ranged 80.7-87.9%. During maximum voluntary teeth clench, average co-contraction of SCM muscle was 13.7-23.5% of its maximum contraction. On average, all torque coefficients (potential lateral displacing component) were >90%, while all antero-posterior coefficients (relative activities of masseter and temporalis muscles) were >85%. The average integrated areas of the masseter and temporalis EMG potentials over time ranged 87.4-106.8 muV/muV s%. Standardized contractile muscular activities did not differ between 'complete' and 'partial' Angle Class I, and between sexes (two-way analysis of variance). A trend toward a larger intragroup variability in EMG indices was observed in the subjects with 'partial' Angle Class I than in those with 'complete' Angle Class I (significant difference for the temporalis muscle symmetry, P = 0.013, analysis of variance). In conclusion, the presence of a complete or partial Angle occlusal Class I did not seem to influence the standardized contractile activities of masseter, temporalis and SCM muscles during a maximum voluntary clench. Subjects with a 'complete' Angle Class I were somewhat a more homogenous group than subjects with 'partial' Angle Class I.

  11. Increased sternocleidomastoid, but not trapezius, muscle activity in response to increased chewing load.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta; Nordh, Erik; Eriksson, Per-Olof

    2013-10-01

    Previous findings, during chewing, that boluses of larger size and harder texture result in larger amplitudes of both mandibular and head-neck movements suggest a relationship between increased chewing load and incremental recruitment of jaw and neck muscles. The present report evaluated jaw (masseter and digastric) and neck [sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and trapezius] muscle activity during the chewing of test foods of different sizes and textures by 10 healthy subjects. Muscle activity was recorded by surface electromyography and simultaneous mandibular and head movements were recorded using an optoelectronic technique. Each subject performed continuous jaw-opening/jaw-closing movements whilst chewing small and large boluses of chewing gum and rubber silicone (Optosil). For jaw opening/jaw closing without a bolus, SCM activity was recorded for jaw opening concomitantly with digastric activity. During chewing, SCM activity was recorded for jaw closing concomitantly with masseter activity. Trapezius activity was present in some, but not all, cycles. For the masseter and SCM muscles, higher activity was seen with larger test foods, suggesting increased demand and recruitment of these muscles in response to an increased chewing load. This result reinforces the previous notion of a close functional connection between the jaw and the neck motor systems in jaw actions and has scientific and clinical significance for studying jaw function and dysfunction.

  12. Alteration of masticatory muscle EMG activities during chewing after a reversible bite-raising in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Hayato; Masuda, Yuji; Adachi, Tadafumi; Arai, Yoshinori; Kato, Takafumi; Morimoto, Toshifumi

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have investigated the effects of increasing the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) with an oral appliance on masticatory muscle EMG activity during oral behaviours in humans and animals. The present study investigated whether a short-term and reversible increase in OVD, followed by a reduction in OVD to the normal level, resulted in a time-correlated change in the EMG activities of the masseter and digastric muscles during chewing. To do this, a guinea pig model in which an increased OVD was established with natural tooth contacts was used. In the control group, in which no bite-raising treatment was applied, OVD gradually increased with a natural growth during the experimental period whilst the masseter and digastric EMG activities, burst duration, and chewing rhythm were unchanged. When the increase in OVD was established in the bite-raised group, the EMG activities of the masseter and digastric muscles were significantly increased by 88.6 and 55.2% from those before bite-raising treatment, respectively. However, during the following 11 days, the increased EMG activities of both muscles did not show changes associated with the subsequent decrease in the OVD to a normal level. The burst durations of both muscles and chewing rhythm were not significantly affected by the change in OVD during the experimental period. Within the limited recording period of the study, the return of OVD from increased to normal levels did not reverse the increased chewing-related masticatory muscle EMG activity that was induced by the bite-raising treatment.

  13. The functional significance of the squamosal suture in Australopithecus boisei.

    PubMed

    Rak, Y

    1978-07-01

    A juvenile Australopithecus boisei specimen from the Omo basin, southern Ethiopia, is found to exhibit and extraordinarily large overlap of the temporal squama on the parietal, a phenomenon shared with at least two adult specimens of A. boisei. An attempt is made to interpret the overlap as a structural (bony/ligamentous) adaptation necessitated by the unique combination of certain components of the masticatory system of A. boisei. These are: (1) the massiveness and strength of the temporalis muscle, (2) its relatively anterior location, and (3) the lateral position of the masseter muscle due to the flaring of the zygomatic arches. The effect of the temporalis muscle is to create excessive pressure on the portion of the squamosal suture along the parietal, while the lateral placement of the masseter and the resultant increase of pressure on the temporal squama via the zygomatic arch tend to "loosen" the contact between the temporal and parietal bones.

  14. Bruxism secondary to brain injury treated with Botulinum toxin-A: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El Maaytah, Mohammed; Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Swinson, Brian; Hopper, Colin; Ayliffe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We report a successful treatment of bruxism in a patient with anoxic brain injury using botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A). On examination the mouth opening was 0 mm, no feeding was possible through the mouth. Botulinum toxin was injected into the masseter and temporalis; great improvement in trismus and bruxism was noted after 3 weeks. One further treatment improved the mouth opening on the following week and the patient was discharged from our care to be reviewed when required. PMID:17123443

  15. Thermographic characterization of masticatory muscle regions in volunteers with and without myogenous temporomandibular disorder: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, M L; Vardasca, R; Weber, M; Crosato, E M; Arita, E S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to conduct a non-invasive measurement of the cutaneous temperature of selected masticatory muscle regions of volunteers with and without myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD), using infrared thermography. Methods: 23 females (10 myogenous TMD volunteers and 13 controls) were recruited and studied. The temperature at the surface of the facial area over the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles was assessed by medical thermography, using regional lateral views and clinical examination. Results: The temperature levels measured at the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle regions in myogenous TMD volunteers (32.85 ± 0.85 and 34.37 ± 0.64 ºC, respectively) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those measured in controls (33.49 ± 0.92 and 34.78 ± 0.44 ºC, respectively). Medical infrared imaging indicated a mean difference of 1.4 ºC between the masseter and anterior temporalis regions. Analysis of the comparison between the absolute and normalized mean temperatures was performed using the pairwise comparison of receiver operating characteristic curves, and no statistically significant difference was observed (p > 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of the thermographic assessment for the masseter region was of 70% and 73%, respectively and for the anterior temporalis region was of 80% and 62%, respectively. Conclusions: This method of evaluating masticatory muscle regions of this preliminary study seems to indicate that it can be used as an aid in complimentary diagnosing of TMDs. PMID:25144605

  16. Motor control of jaw muscles in chewing and in isometric biting with graded narrowing of jaw gape.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, P A; Jamal, T; Morneburg, T R

    2008-10-01

    When a certain bite force is applied during unilateral chewing, the combination of jaw elevator muscle activities is different than when a comparable force is applied in unilateral isometric biting, e.g. on a force transducer. Masticatory peak force is generated in a nearly isometric phase of the chewing cycle, with a jaw gape of about 1 mm. In contrast, peak force in isometric biting on force measuring equipment usually induces jaw gapes of 6 mm or even more. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the jaw gape influences relative activation of elevator muscles in unilateral isometric biting. We further examined whether such influence could explain the different activity combinations of chewing and isometric biting. In thirty asymptomatic males, masseter and temporalis activities were recorded during intermittent isometric biting with jaw gapes of 6, 5, 3, 2 and 1 mm and during unilateral chewing. Activity combinations were described by working/balancing ratios and by temporalis/masseter ratios. With decreasing jaw gape the working/balancing ratio of the posterior temporalis decreased (P < 0.002) while that of the masseter increased (P < 0.001). Likewise, the temporalis/masseter ratio on the balancing side increased (P < 0.001). With decreasing jaw gape, activity ratios of isometric biting approached ratios of chewing. We conclude that: (i) relative jaw muscle activation in isometric biting depends on the jaw gape, (ii) relative muscle activation in chewing resembles relative activation of isometric biting with a small 'chewing-like' gape. This suggests that characteristic activity combinations in chewing are mainly a result of the approximately isometric contraction during the slow closing phase of the chewing cycle.

  17. Impact of Functional Appliances on Muscle Activity: A Surface Electromyography Study in Children

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Piątkowska, Dagmara; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Background Electromyography (EMG) is the most objective tool for assessing changes in the electrical activity of the masticatory muscles. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the tone of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in growing children before and after 6 months of treatment with functional removable orthodontic appliances. Material/Methods The sample conisted of 51 patients with a mean age 10.7 years with Class II malocclusion. EMG recordings were performed by using a DAB-Bluetooth instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Recordings were performed in mandibular rest position, during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and during maximum effort. Results The results of the study indicated that the electrical activity of the muscles in each of the clinical situations was the same in the group of girls and boys. The factor that determined the activity of the muscles was their type. In mandibular rest position and in MVC, the activity of the temporalis muscles was significantly higher that that of the masseter muscels. The maximum effort test indicated a higher fatigue in masseter than in temporalis muscles. Conclusions Surface electromyography is a useful tool for monitoring muscle activity. A 6-month period of functional therapy resulted in changes in the activity of the masticatory muscles. PMID:25600247

  18. Comparative jaw muscle anatomy in kangaroos, wallabies, and rat-kangaroos (marsupialia: macropodoidea).

    PubMed

    Warburton, Natalie Marina

    2009-06-01

    The jaw muscles were studied in seven genera of macropodoid marsupials with diets ranging from mainly fungi in Potorous to grass in Macropus. Relative size, attachments, and lamination within the jaw adductor muscles varied between macropodoid species. Among macropodine species, the jaw adductor muscle proportions vary with feeding type. The relative mass of the masseter is roughly consistent, but grazers and mixed-feeders (Macropus and Lagostrophus) had relatively larger medial pterygoids and smaller temporalis muscles than the browsers (Dendrolagus, Dorcopsulus, and Setonix). Grazing macropods show similar jaw muscle proportions to "ungulate-grinding" type placental mammals. The internal architecture of the jaw muscles also varies between grazing and browsing macropods, most significantly, the anatomy of the medial pterygoid muscle. Potoroines have distinctly different jaw muscle proportions to macropodines. The masseter muscle group, in particular, the superficial masseter is enlarged, while the temporalis group is relatively reduced. Lagostrophus fasciatus is anatomically distinct from other macropods with respect to its masticatory muscle anatomy, including enlarged superficial medial pterygoid and deep temporalis muscles, an anteriorly inflected masseteric process, and the shape of the mandibular condyle. The enlarged triangular pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone, in particular, is distinctive of Lagsotrophus.

  19. Influence of vision on masticatory muscles function: surface electromyographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarella, Domenico; Palazzo, Antonio; De Lillo, Alfredo; Lo Russo, Lucio; Paduano, Sergio; Laino, Luigi; Chimenti, Claudio; Frezza, Federica; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of the ocular disorders (OD) in pathogenesis of MMp is still a controversal issue. Ocular arc reflexes (OAR) may involve changes in head and neck posture and generate modifications of contraction resulting in muscle contraction and finally weakness. sEMG tests were performed on 28 patients (13 with masticatory muscles pain and myopia/15 healthy) in rest position with eyes open and eyes closed. Patients group control (healthy patients) showed no significance difference in sEMG record in open/close test. In non healthy patients there were great differences between the sEMG recordings with eyes closed and open. Temporalis and masseters showed a statistical difference of means activation in two tests (temporalis p = 0.0010; masseters = 0.0006). Great difference there was in means muscles activation between open eyes healthy test and non healthy. No difference in close eyes test was evaluated in temporalis and masseters close test in the two groups. The exact causes of MMp are still unknown. The role how ocular disorders (OD) may play an important role in pathogenesis of MMp is still a controversal issue. Ocular arc reflexes (OAR) may involve changes in head and neck posture and generate modifications of contraction resulting in muscle contraction and finally weakness. PMID:25002919

  20. Temporaly germinating rhythms of moss Funaria hygrometrica Hedw. spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundiak, O.; Demkiv, O.

    The process of an organism development is regular and gradual. These characteristics of the development are especially evident in archegonial plants. It was shown that spores of moss Funar ia hygrometrica Hedw. in Knop's nutrient medium with 0,2% glucose in the dark in vertical orientation of Petry dishes, germinated polarly depending on gravity direction. At the begining, the primary rhyziod developed being usually directed downwards and then after 24 hours primary chloronema developed growing usually upwards. The amyloplasts sedimentation was shown before the rhyzoid and chloronema formation. It determines not only the time, but spatial orientation of the primary rhyzoid and chloronema (Pundjak at al., 2001). EGTA in concentration of 510- 5 M inhibited the initiation of the primary rhyzoid. The primary chloronema developed as usual in 48 h after the spores sowing. Temporary cooling caused analogical effect. Basing on these results we drew the conclusion that the primary rhyzoid and chloronema differently react on the action of EGTA and the cooling. The primary chloronema was more tolerant then the rhyzoid and maintained its usual gravisensitivy. Thus, we can think that EGTA and the cooling stop the development of primary rhyzoid, but it does not disturb physiological rhythm which underlais in the base of the function of the biological clock. The stability of biological rhythms and their indeterminism in respect of described above external and internal factors is real thanks to dissipation, which makes considerable interval of uncertainties of distributions of distances between segments of biopolymers and thus, of their fermentative activities (Pundjak,2001). Therefore the rise of biological clocks of each organism is in certain sense transcendental.

  1. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy: a new plastic surgery procedure.

    PubMed

    Morselli, P G

    2000-10-01

    Bilateral hypertrophy of the temporal muscle can give the impression of a harsh facial appearance that manifests itself as a morphopsychological conflict for the subject involved (Minotaur syndrome). This article describes a new facial aesthetic surgical procedure in the area of the temporal muscle. The author describes the surgical technique and the surgical instrument that he developed specifically for performing aesthetic contouring of the temporal area by reducing the muscle volume discrepancy ("myosuction"). The follow-up results of 11 cases demonstrated that this procedure renders valid results in the overall aesthetic reharmonization of the face and an improvement of individual psychological well-being.

  2. Assessment of jaw movements by magnetic sensor in relation to topographies of orofacial behaviour in freely moving rats: Studies with the dopamine D(1)-like receptor agonists SKF 83822 vs SKF 83959.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Kiguchi, Motori; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kinsella, Anthony; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Waddington, John L

    2010-04-25

    This study applies new magnetic sensor-electromyographic technology for recording jaw movements in freely moving rats to analyse topographies of orofacial movement that occur in association with individual elements of behaviour under challenge with two dopamine D(1)-like receptor agonists, SKF 83822 ([R/S]-6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-[3-methyl-phenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) and SKF 83959([R/S]-3-methyl-6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-1-[3-methyl-phenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine). Grooming of the snout/face involved primarily dominant-mouth opening jaw movements with small activation of digastric muscles; subsequent grooming of the flank/trunk was characterised by repetitive, uniform jaw movements with small activation of digastric and masseter muscles. In contrast, grooming of the fingers and tail typically involved high-frequency jaw movements with variable vertical jaw movements and/or strong activation of masseter muscles. Vacuous chewing involved two distinct patterns of jaw movements: a dominant-closing pattern, with strong activation of masseter muscles, and a dominant-opening pattern, with slight activation of masseter muscles. SKF 83822 stimulates dopamine D(1)-like receptors and activates adenylate cyclase but not phosphoinositide hydrolysis, while SKF 83959 stimulates dopamine D(1)-like receptors and activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis but not adenylate cyclase. These agonists exerted differential effects on jaw movements, as SKF 83959 induced more jaw movements per episode of syntactic grooming than SKF 83822, while SKF 83822 induced more jaw movements during non-syntactic grooming than SKF 83959. Magnetic sensor technology in freely moving animals resolved distinct topographies of orofacial movement and informs on their relationship to other behaviours in the rodent repertoire and to dopamine D(1)-like receptor function.

  3. Masticatory muscles of the great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Tomo, Soichiro; Tomo, Ikuko; Townsend, Grant C; Hirata, Kazuaki

    2007-04-01

    The great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) belongs to the Diprotodontia suborder (herbivorous marsupials of Australia) of the order of marsupials. We dissected the masticatory muscles in the great-gray kangaroo and classified them based on their innervation. Three (two male and one female) adult great-gray kangaroos (M. giganteus), fixed with 10% formalin, were examined. The masseter muscle of the great-gray kangaroo was classified into four layers (superficial layers 1, 2, 3, and a deep layer), all innervated by masseteric nerves. Layer 1 of the masseter muscle was well developed and the deep layer inserted into the masseteric canal. The zygomaticomandibular muscle, which belongs to both the masseter and temporalis muscles, was innervated by both the masseteric nerve and posterior deep temporal nerve, and the temporalis muscle was innervated by the anterior and posterior deep temporal nerves. The medial pterygoid muscle, which was innervated by the medial pterygoid nerve, was divided into superficial and deep portions. The lateral pterygoid muscle was divided into superior and inferior heads by the buccal nerve. We propose that the relationship of the masticatory muscles in the kangaroo has evolved by passive anterior invasion of the deep layer of the masseter by the medial pterygoid muscle via the masseteric canal, associated with the development of an anteroposterior mode of mastication.

  4. Surface EMG of jaw-elevator muscles and chewing pattern in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Piancino, M G; Farina, D; Talpone, F; Castroflorio, T; Gassino, G; Margarino, V; Bracco, P

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation process of masticatory patterns to a new complete denture in edentulous subjects. For this purpose, muscle activity and kinematic parameters of the chewing pattern were simultaneously assessed in seven patients with complete maxillary and mandibular denture. The patients were analysed (i) with the old denture, (ii) with the new denture at the delivery, (iii) after 1 month and (iv) after 3 months from the delivery of the new denture. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles of both sides and jaw movements were tracked measuring the motion of a tiny magnet attached at the lower inter-incisor point. The subjects were asked to chew a bolus on the right and left side. At the delivery of the new denture, peak EMG amplitude of the masseter of the side of the bolus was lower than with the old denture and the masseters of the two sides showed the same intensity of EMG activity, contrary to the case with the old denture. EMG amplitude and asymmetry of the two masseter activities returned as with the old denture in 3 months. The EMG activity in the temporalis anterior was larger with the old denture than in the other conditions. The chewing cycle width and lateral excursion decreased at the delivery of the new denture and recovered after 3 months.

  5. Effect of bolus hardness on the chewing pattern and activation of masticatory muscles in subjects with normal dental occlusion.

    PubMed

    Piancino, Maria Grazia; Bracco, Pietro; Vallelonga, Teresa; Merlo, Andrea; Farina, Dario

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of bolus hardness on the kinematic of mastication and jaw-elevator muscle activity in subjects with normal dental occlusion and function. The mandibular motion and the surface EMG envelope of the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles were assessed in twelve subjects during mastication of a soft and hard bolus of the same size. When chewing the hard bolus, the chewing pattern in the frontal plane was significantly higher and wider, with smaller closure angle and higher peak velocity than when chewing the soft bolus. EMG peak amplitude of both the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles was higher for the side of the bolus but the contralateral side increased its activity significantly more than the ipsilateral side when the hardness of the bolus increased (for the masseter, mean+/-SD: 130.4+/-108.1% increase for the contralateral side and 29.6+/-26.9% for the ipsilateral side). Moreover, the peak EMG activity for both muscles occurred more distant from the closure point with hard bolus. The increased activity of the contralateral side may help maintaining the mandibular equilibrium, with indirect participation to the power stroke generated by the chewing-side masseter. The results provide kinematic and EMG adaptations to bolus hardness in healthy subjects and can be used as normative data in the development of methods for early diagnosis of impaired chewing function.

  6. Changes in activity and structure of jaw muscles in Parkinson's disease model rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Kawai, N; Ohnuki, Y; Saeki, Y; Korfage, J A M; Langenbach, G E J; Kitayama, T; Watanabe, M; Sano, R; Tanne, K; Tanaka, E

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a major neurological disease, is characterised by a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Patients with PD frequently show chewing and swallowing dysfunctions, but little is known about the characteristics of their stomatognathic functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of PD on jaw muscle fibre and functions. PD model rats were made by means of the injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats. Five weeks after the injection, a radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter and anterior belly of digastric muscles. Muscle activity was recorded for 3 days and was evaluated by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time). After recording the muscle activities, jaw muscles were isolated for immunohistochemical and PCR analyses. In PD model rats, the following findings of the digastrics muscles verify that compared to the control group: (i) the higher duty time exceeding 5% of the peak activity level, (ii) the higher expression of the mRNA of myosin heavy chain type I, and (iii) the tendency for fast to slow fibre-type transition. With respect to the masseter muscle, there were no significant differences in all analyses. In conclusion, PD leads to the changes in the jaw behaviours, resulting in a PD-specific chewing and swallowing dysfunctions.

  7. Electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles in elderly women – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Kopacz, Karolina; Fronczek-Wojciechowska, Magdalena; Padula, Gianluca; Szatko, Franciszek

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of age and chosen factors related to aging such as dentition, muscle strength, and nutrition on masticatory muscles electromyographic activity during chewing in healthy elderly women. Background With longer lifespan there is a need for maintaining optimal quality of life and health in older age. Skeletal muscle strength deteriorates in older age. This deterioration is also observed within masticatory muscles. Methods A total of 30 women, aged 68–92 years, were included in the study: 10 individuals had natural functional dentition, 10 were missing posterior teeth in the upper and lower jaw reconstructed with removable partial dentures, and 10 were edontoulous, using complete removable dentures. Surface electromyography was performed to evaluate masticatory muscles activity. Afterwards, measurement of masseter thickness with ultrasound imaging was performed, body mass index and body cell mass index were calculated, and isometric handgrip strength was measured. Results Isometric maximal voluntary contraction decreased in active masseters with increasing age and in active and passive temporalis muscles with increasing age and increasing body mass index. In active masseter, mean electromyographic activity during the sequence (time from the start of chewing till the end when the test food became ready to swallow) decreased with increasing age and during the cycle (single bite time) decreased with increasing age and increasing body mass index. In active and passive temporalis muscles, mean electromyographic activity during the sequence and the cycle decreased with increasing age, increasing body mass index, and loss of natural dentition. Individuals with natural dentition had significantly higher mean muscle activity during sequence and cycle in active temporalis muscles than those wearing full dentures and higher maximal activity during cycle in individuals with active and passive temporalis muscles than in complete denture wearers

  8. Mastication and the postorbital ligament: dynamic strain in soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Herring, Susan W; Rafferty, Katherine L; Liu, Zi Jun; Lemme, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Although the FEED database focuses on muscle activity patterns, it is equally suitable for other physiological recording and especially for synthesizing different types of information. The present contribution addresses the interaction between muscle activity and ligamentary stretch during mastication. The postorbital ligament is the thickened edge of a septum dividing the orbital contents from the temporal fossa and is continuous with the temporal fascia. As a tensile element, this fascial complex could support the zygomatic arch against the pull of the masseter muscle. An ossified postorbital bar has evolved repeatedly in mammals, enabling resistance to compression and shear in addition to tension. Although such ossification clearly reinforces the skull against muscle pull, the most accepted explanation is that it helps isolate the orbital contents from contractions of the temporalis muscle. However, it has never been demonstrated that the contraction of jaw muscles deforms the unossified ligament. We examined linear deformation of the postorbital ligament in minipigs, Sus scrofa, along with electromyography of the jaw muscles and an assessment of changes in pressure and shape in the temporalis. During chewing, the ligament elongated (average 0.9%, maximum 2.8%) in synchrony with the contraction of the elevator muscles of the jaw. Although the temporalis bulged outward and created substantial pressure against the braincase, the superficial fibers usually retracted caudally, away from the postorbital ligament. In anesthetized animals, stimulating either the temporalis or the masseter muscle in isolation usually elongated the ligament (average 0.4-0.7%). These results confirm that contraction of the masticatory muscles can potentially distort the orbital contents and further suggest that the postorbital ligament does function as a tension member resisting the pull of the masseter on the zygomatic arch.

  9. Effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury on muscle activity of head, neck and trunk muscles: a cross-sectional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Salini, Vincenzo; Teté, Stefano; Festa, Felice

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the that effects a pathology of the knee, due to an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, has on muscular activity of neck, head, and trunk muscles. Twenty-five (25) subjects (mean age 28+/-9 years) with ACL injury of the left knee were compared with a control no-pathology group. Surface electromyography (sEMG) at mandibular rest position and maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) wasused to evaluate muscular activity of the areas: masseter, anterior temporalis, posterior cervicals, sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and upper and lower trapezius. The sEMG activity of each muscle, as well as the asymmetry index between the right and the left sides, were compared between the two groups. Subjects in the study group showed a significant increase in the asymmetry index of the sEMG activity of the anterior temporalis at mandibular rest position (p<0.05). At rest, the areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the control group showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with subjects in the study group, both in the right and the left sides (p<0.05). The same was found for the sEMG activity of the areas of SCM and lower trapezius. At MVC, the right areas of anterior temporalis and masseter in the study subjects showed a significantly lower sEMG activity compared with the control group. The same was observed for the lower trapezius area, both in the right and the left sides. In general, ACL injury appears to provide a change in the sEMG activity of head, neck and trunk muscles.

  10. Jaw muscles of Old World squirrels.

    PubMed

    Thorington, R W; Darrow, K

    1996-11-01

    The jaw, suprahyoid, and extrinsic tongue muscles were studied in 11 genera, belonging to five tribes, of Old World squirrels. Significant variation in most of the adductor muscles is evident. The most primitive state of sciuromorphy is seen in the African tree squirrels Paraxerus and Funisciurus, especially as reflected in the anterior deep masseter. A derived state of sciuromorphy is found in five genera of Old World squirrels and perhaps evolved independently in each. Reduction of the temporalis muscle was observed in three genera, distantly related to one another. A unique arrangement of the superficial masseter is reported in the Asian giant tree squirrels, Ratufa. The arrangement of the masseter in the African pygmy squirrel, Myosciurus, is very similar to that of the South American pygmy squirrel, Sciurillus. We present hypotheses about the functional significance of these differences. In the derived state of sciuromorphy, which is found in three cases in squirrels that feed extensively on hard fruits, the anterior deep masseter is well positioned to increase the strength of the power stroke of the incisor bite. Among the pygmy squirrels, the position of the anterior deep masseter suggests that it plays a more significant role in molar chewing.

  11. Test-retest reliability of quantitative sensory testing for mechanical somatosensory and pain modulation assessment of masticatory structures.

    PubMed

    Costa, Y M; Morita-Neto, O; de Araújo-Júnior, E N S; Sampaio, F A; Conti, P C R; Bonjardim, L R

    2017-03-01

    Assessing the reliability of medical measurements is a crucial step towards the elaboration of an applicable clinical instrument. There are few studies that evaluate the reliability of somatosensory assessment and pain modulation of masticatory structures. This study estimated the test-retest reliability, that is over time, of the mechanical somatosensory assessment of anterior temporalis, masseter and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) using the anterior temporalis as the test site. Twenty healthy women were evaluated in two sessions (1 week apart) by the same examiner. Mechanical detection threshold (MDT), mechanical pain threshold (MPT), wind-up ratio (WUR) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were assessed on the skin overlying the anterior temporalis, masseter and TMJ of the dominant side. CPM was tested by comparing PPT before and during the hand immersion in a hot water bath. anova and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were applied to the data (α = 5%). The overall ICCs showed acceptable values for the test-retest reliability of mechanical somatosensory assessment of masticatory structures. The ICC values of 75% of all quantitative sensory measurements were considered fair to excellent (fair = 8·4%, good = 33·3% and excellent = 33·3%). However, the CPM paradigm presented poor reliability (ICC = 0·25). The mechanical somatosensory assessment of the masticatory structures, but not the proposed CPM protocol, can be considered sufficiently reliable over time to evaluate the trigeminal sensory function.

  12. The relationships among jaw-muscle fiber architecture, jaw morphology, and feeding behavior in extant apes and modern humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    The jaw-closing muscles are responsible for generating many of the forces and movements associated with feeding. Muscle physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA) and fiber length are two architectural parameters that heavily influence muscle function. While there have been numerous comparative studies of hominoid and hominin craniodental and mandibular morphology, little is known about hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture. We present novel data on masseter and temporalis internal muscle architecture for small- and large-bodied hominoids. Hominoid scaling patterns are evaluated and compared with representative New- (Cebus) and Old-World (Macaca) monkeys. Variation in hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture is related to both absolute size and allometry. PCSAs scale close to isometry relative to jaw length in anthropoids, but likely with positive allometry in hominoids. Thus, large-bodied apes may be capable of generating both absolutely and relatively greater muscle forces compared with smaller-bodied apes and monkeys. Compared with extant apes, modern humans exhibit a reduction in masseter PCSA relative to condyle-M1 length but retain relatively long fibers, suggesting humans may have sacrificed relative masseter muscle force during chewing without appreciably altering muscle excursion/contraction velocity. Lastly, craniometric estimates of PCSAs underestimate hominoid masseter and temporalis PCSAs by more than 50% in gorillas, and overestimate masseter PCSA by as much as 30% in humans. These findings underscore the difficulty of accurately estimating jaw-muscle fiber architecture from craniometric measures and suggest models of fossil hominin and hominoid bite forces will be improved by incorporating architectural data in estimating jaw-muscle forces.

  13. Longitudinal evaluation of jaw muscle activity and mandibular kinematics in young patients with Class II malocclusion treated with the Teuscher activator

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Maria J.; Cacho, Alberto; Alarcón, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A longitudinal study was performed to evaluate the jaw muscle activity and mandibular kinematics after Teuscher activator treatment and at 2 years after orthodontic treatment completion. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven children with Class II division 1 malocclusion were evaluated before treatment (T0; mean: 11.6 years), after functional treatment (T1; mean: 12.8 years), and 2 years after orthodontic treatment (T2; mean: 18 years). Bilateral surface electromyographic activities of the anterior temporalis, posterior temporalis, masseter, and suprahyoid muscle areas were analyzed at rest and during clenching, swallowing, and mastication. Kinematic recordings of the mandibular maximum opening, lateral shift, right and left lateral excursions, and protrusion were evaluated. Results: Compared to T0, the left masseter activity during clenching was decreased at T1 but increased at T2, similar to the other evaluated muscles. The suprahyoid activity during swallowing was increased at T1 but decreased at T2. The masseter activity during mastication was increased at T1 and further increased at T2. The left and right lateral excursions and protrusion did not show significant changes throughout the experiment. Conclusions: Teuscher activator and subsequent fixed orthodontic treatment improved jaw muscle function; however, a long period was needed to attain complete neuromuscular adaptation. Key words:Class II malocclusion, jaw muscles, mandibular kinematics, sEMG, Teuscher activator. PMID:23385506

  14. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A treatment of neck pain related to nocturnal bruxism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Di Venere, Daniela; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Objective This case report describes a patient with nocturnal bruxism and related neck pain treated with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A). Clinical Features The patient was a 27-year-old man with nocturnal bruxism and difficulty in active mouth opening and chewing and neck pain at rest. His numeric pain score was 7 of 10. Surface electromyography of the temporalis and masseter muscles showed typical signs of hyperactivity, characterized by compound muscle action potential amplitude alterations. Intervention and Outcome After clinical evaluation, he was treated with BTX-A to reduce masseter and temporalis muscle hyperactivity. After 3 days of treatment with BTX-A, with each masseter muscle injected with a dose of about 40 mouse units with a dilution of 1 mL and with temporal muscle bilaterally injected with 25 mouse units with the same dilution, a decrease in bruxism symptoms was reported. Neck pain also decreased after the first treatment (visual analog scale of 2/10) and then resolved completely. After 4 weeks, electromyography showed the reduction of muscle hyperactivity with a decrease in the amplitude of the motor action potential. The same reduction in signs and symptoms was still present at assessment 3 months posttreatment. Conclusion These findings suggest that BTX-A may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of bruxism and related disorders. PMID:22027036

  15. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  16. Functional assessment of subfamily variation in maxillomandibular morphology among Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ravosa, M J

    1990-06-01

    Among Old World monkeys, subfamily variation in maxillomandibular form is commonly attributed to divergent dietary and social behaviors. However, our knowledge of any musculoskeletal adaptations for gape in cercopithecines, and folivory in colobines, is incomplete. Such data are requisite to a more informed perspective on the evolutionary morphology of these taxa. Structural analyses of gape and biomechanical efficiency were applied to a representative sample of adult cercopithecids. Factors pertaining to the biomechanical scaling of cranial structures were evaluated with least-squares bivariate regression techniques. To assess subfamily differences in masticatory efficiency, analyses of covariance were made between relevant factors. Cercopithecines achieve increased gape and relative canine size mainly with strong positive allometry of the facial skull, combined with a larger gonial angle. Colobines possess a relatively long masseter lever arm and short facial skull, as well as an enlargened masseter-medial pterygoid complex. Subfamily differences in temporalis lever arm scaling are negligible. Biomechanical comparisons within and between subfamilies suggest that the mechanical advantage of the temporalis is relatively greater than that of the masseter, while the mechanical advantage of both muscles increases with face length. Evidence is presented to stress the need for adequate consideration of the dependent variable in allometric investigations of skull form.

  17. [The usage of E.M.G. in the dental research and the clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Droukas, B; Antoniou, D

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this review, refers to the use of electromyography (EMG) in studying the stomatognathic system. EMG is used for the study of function and fatigue of the masticatory muscles, the recording of centric relation etc. The behavior of the masticatory muscles (especially of the masseter and the temporalis) in the cases of TMJ dysfunction are also reviewed. In the second part, there is a description of the use of EMG biofeedback in the treatment of TMJ dysfunction, myofacial pain and bruxism. Finally, there is reference to the portable modular EMG biofeedback units.

  18. Sleep bruxism: a comprehensive overview for the dental clinician interested in sleep medicine.

    PubMed

    Carra, Maria Clotilde; Huynh, Nelly; Lavigne, Gilles

    2012-04-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) is a common sleep-related motor disorder characterized by tooth grinding and clenching. SB diagnosis is made on history of tooth grinding and confirmed by polysomnographic recording of electromyographic (EMG) episodes in the masseter and temporalis muscles. The typical EMG activity pattern in patients with SB is known as rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA). The authors observed that most RMMA episodes occur in association with sleep arousal and are preceded by physiologic activation of the central nervous and sympathetic cardiac systems. This article provides a comprehensive review of the cause, pathophysiology, assessment, and management of SB.

  19. Morphology of the Jaw-Closing Musculature in the Common Wombat (Vombatus ursinus) Using Digital Dissection and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Alana C.; Trusler, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Wombats are unique among marsupials in having one pair of upper incisors, and hypsodont molars for processing tough, abrasive vegetation. Of the three extant species, the most abundant, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), has had the least attention in terms of masticatory muscle morphology, and has never been thoroughly described. Using MRI and digital dissection to compliment traditional gross dissections, the major jaw adductor muscles, the masseter, temporalis and pterygoids, were described. The masseter and medial pterygoid muscles are greatly enlarged compared to other marsupials. This, in combination with the distinctive form and function of the dentition, most likely facilitates processing a tough, abrasive diet. The broad, flat skull and large masticatory muscles are well suited to generate a very high bite force. MRI scans allow more detail of the muscle morphology to be observed and the technique of digital dissections greatly enhances the knowledge obtained from gross dissections. PMID:25707001

  20. Morphology of the jaw-closing musculature in the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) using digital dissection and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Alana C; Trusler, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Wombats are unique among marsupials in having one pair of upper incisors, and hypsodont molars for processing tough, abrasive vegetation. Of the three extant species, the most abundant, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), has had the least attention in terms of masticatory muscle morphology, and has never been thoroughly described. Using MRI and digital dissection to compliment traditional gross dissections, the major jaw adductor muscles, the masseter, temporalis and pterygoids, were described. The masseter and medial pterygoid muscles are greatly enlarged compared to other marsupials. This, in combination with the distinctive form and function of the dentition, most likely facilitates processing a tough, abrasive diet. The broad, flat skull and large masticatory muscles are well suited to generate a very high bite force. MRI scans allow more detail of the muscle morphology to be observed and the technique of digital dissections greatly enhances the knowledge obtained from gross dissections.

  1. Can palpation-induced muscle pain pattern contribute to the differential diagnosis among temporomandibular disorders, primary headaches phenotypes and possible bruxism?

    PubMed Central

    Porporatti, André-Luís; Calderon, Patrícia-dos-Santos; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2016-01-01

    Background The evaluation of possible differences in the distribution or characteristics of palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles could be valuable in terms of diagnostic assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different combinations of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter palpation-induced pain in the diagnostic of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), primary headaches and bruxism. Material and Methods A total of 1200 dental records of orofacial pain adult patients were analyzed. The outcomes were dichotomously classified (presence/absence) as following: a) AT and/or masseter palpation-induced pain; b) myogenous TMD; c) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia (arthrogenous TMD); d) migraine; e) tension-type headache (TTH); f) self-reported bruxism. Binomial logistic regression model (α = 5%) was applied to the data considering the palpation-induced muscle pain as the dependent variable. Results Mean age (SD) were 35.7 years (13.4) for 635 included dental records (83% females). Myogenous and arthrogenous TMD, migraine, TTH and bruxism were mainly associated with, respectively, masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=5.77, 95%CI 3.86-8.62), AT or masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.39, 95%CI 1.57-3.63), bilateral AT palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.67, 95%CI 1.64-4.32), masseter and AT palpation-induced pain (p=0.009 - OR=1.62, 95%CI 1.12-2.33) and bilateral masseter palpation-induced pain (p=0.01 - OR=1.74, 95%CI 1.13-2.69). Conclusions Palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles may play a role in the differential diagnosis among painful TMD, primary headaches and bruxism. Key words:Diagnosis, temporomandibular joint disorders, migraine, tension-type headache, bruxism. PMID:26615507

  2. Form and function of the masticatory musculature in the tree sloths, Bradypus and Choloepus.

    PubMed

    Naples, V L

    1985-01-01

    The tree sloths, Bradypus and Choloepus, show unusual masticatory specializations, compared to each other and to other mammals. Both have an incomplete zygomatic arch with descending jugal process, a complex superficial masseter, a large temporalis and medial pterygoid musculature, and a lateral pterygoid with two heads. In Choloepus the deep masseter and zygomaticomandibularis are typical when compared to other mammals. However, in Bradypus there is an ascending jugal process from which enlarged and vertically oriented deep masseter and zygomaticomandibularis muscles originate. Although both sloths are folivores, the anterior teeth in Choloepus are caniniform, while those of Bradypus have lost such elongation. In both sloths the glenoid cavity is similarly located; however, in Bradypus the craniomandibular joint is raised above the occlusal plane, and the pterygoid flanges are elongated. Prediction of the evolutionary sequence of cranial changes from Choloepus-like (primitive) to Bradypus-like (derived) morphology is based upon the most parsimonious model of masseter-medial pterygoid complex changes for masticatory efficiency improvement. The model proposes that the condylar neck in Bradypus was elongated and that this single change predicated a series of other structural changes. Mandibular movement patterns in both sloths showed anteromedially directed unilateral power strokes as in other mammals. Puncture-crushing, tooth-sharpening, and chewing cycles are distinct in Choloepus, less so in Bradypus. The masticatory rate is slow in sloths compared to other mammals of similar body size, averaging 590 ms per cycle for Choloepus and 510 ms for Bradypus.

  3. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles of the adult rat induces bone loss at the condyle and alveolar regions of the mandible associated with a bone proliferation at a muscle enthesis.

    PubMed

    Kün-Darbois, Jean-Daniel; Libouban, Hélène; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    In man, botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is injected in masticatory muscles for several indications such as trismus, bruxism, or masseter hypertrophy. Bone changes in the mandible following BTX injections in adult animal have therefore became a subject of interest. The aim of this study was to analyze condylar and alveolar bone changes following BTX unilateral injections in masseter and temporal muscles in adult rats. Mature male rats (n = 15) were randomized into 2 groups: control (CTRL; n = 6) and BTX group (n= 9). Rats of the BTX group received a single injection of BTX into right masseter and temporal muscles. Rats of the CTRL group were similarly injected with saline solution. Rats were sacrificed 4 weeks after injections. Masticatory muscles examination and microcomputed tomography (microCT) were performed. A significant difference of weight was found between the 2 groups at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Atrophy of the right masseter and temporal muscles was observed in all BTX rats. MicroCT analysis showed significant bone loss in the right alveolar and condylar areas in BTX rats. Decrease in bone volume reached -20% for right alveolar bone and -35% for right condylar bone. A hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the digastric muscle enthesis was found on every right hemimandible in the BTX group and none in the CTRL group. BTX injection in masticatory muscles leads to a significant and major mandible bone loss. These alterations can represent a risk factor for fractures in human. The occurrence of a hypertrophic bone metaplasia at the Mus Digastricus enthesis may constitute an etiological factor for tori.

  4. Postnatal development of fiber type composition in rabbit jaw and leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Korfage, J A M; Helmers, R; Matignon, M de Goüyon; van Wessel, T; Langenbach, G E J; van Eijden, T M G J

    2009-01-01

    We examined the difference in fiber type composition and cross-sectional areas during postnatal development in male rabbit jaw muscles and compared these with changes in leg muscles. The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content of the fibers was determined by immunohistochemistry. No fiber type difference was found between the jaw muscles in 20-week-old rabbits. However, the way this adult fiber type composition was reached differed between the muscles. The deep temporalis, medial pterygoid, and superficial masseter displayed an increase in alpha fibers during early and a decrease during late postnatal development. Other jaw muscles displayed an increase in alpha fibers during early development only. In contrast, alpha fibers were not found in the soleus, in which fiber type changes were completed at week 4. The gastrocnemius muscle did not change its fiber type composition. Initially, fibers in jaw-opening muscles had larger cross-sectional areas than in other muscles, but they increased less during development. Although there were no large differences in the fiber type composition of muscles in young adult rabbits, large differences were found in the jaw muscles, but not in the leg muscles, during development. In part, these developmental changes in fiber percentages within the jaw muscles can be explained by functional modifications in this muscle group. In the present study, the deep temporalis, medial pterygoid, and superficial masseter showed the most dramatic percent changes in fibers during postnatal development.

  5. Jaw muscles of New World squirrels.

    PubMed

    Ball, S S; Roth, V L

    1995-06-01

    The jaw, suprahyoid, and extrinsic tongue muscles are described for eight species of New World squirrels, spanning more than an order of magnitude in body mass. Anatomical differences are discussed in the light of body size, natural history, and phylogeny. The relative sizes of different muscles, their orientations, and the shapes and positions of their areas of attachment vary but show few trends in relation to body size. The anatomical differences are likewise not readily explained by the mechanical requirements of the animals' diets, which are similar. The most marked anatomical differences occur in Sciurillus (the pygmy tree squirrel), as well as those genera--Glaucomys (the flying squirrel) and Tamias (the chipmunk)--that are taxonomically most distinct from the tree squirrels. Sciurillus is noteworthy for its unusually small temporalis and an anterior deep masseter that is oriented to assist in retraction of the jaw. Tamias has a more vertically oriented temporalis and greater inclination in the anterior masseter muscles than the other squirrels, features that may be associated with its large diastema and relatively posteriorly situated cheek teeth, which in turn may relate to its having cheek pouches. Our results form a valuable database of information to be used in further studies of functional morphology and phylogeny.

  6. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects.

  7. Early management of skeletal open bite with spring-loaded and magnetic bite blocks.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Umal H; Bhad-Patil, Wasundhara A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of spring-loaded and magnetic bite blocks in growing individuals with skeletal open bites. The sample consisted of patients between 8 and 13 years of age randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with spring-loaded bite blocks while the other received treatment with magnetic bite blocks. Further, a group matched for age, sex, and mandibular plane angle served as a control. The treatment effects were evaluated clinically and cephalometrically and by electromyographic (EMG) examination of the masseter and temporalis muscles after 8 months. Both appliances showed significantly (P<.05) favorable orthopedic effects. The spring-loaded bite blocks closed the existing open bite by 3.3 mm on average with a significant maxillary incisor extrusion and molar intrusion. Magnetic bite blocks produced an average of 4.9 mm of open bite closure with significant intrusion of the molars in both arches. Overall, both appliances significantly enhanced condylar growth, altered it to a more anterosuperior direction, and produced significant true forward mandibular rotation. Significant increases in masseter and temporalis muscle activity at rest and maximum clenching were noted in both groups, which could be a positive factor in retaining the achieved result. After 10 months of retention with passive bite blocks, cephalograms indicated only an insignificant relapse.

  8. EMG spectral characteristics of masticatory muscles and upper trapezius during maximum voluntary teeth clenching.

    PubMed

    Lodetti, Gianluigi; Mapelli, Andrea; Musto, Federica; Rosati, Riccardo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2012-02-01

    To assess the surface electromyographic spectral characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles during the performance of maximum voluntary clench (MVC) tasks, 29 healthy young adults (15 men, 14 women, mean age 22years) were examined. Electromyography of masseter, temporalis and upper trapezius muscles was performed during 5-s MVCs either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Using a fast Fourier transform, the median power frequency (MPF) was obtained for the first and last seconds of clench, and compared between sexes, muscles, sides, tests and time intervals using ANOVAs. On average, the MPFs did not differ between sexes or sides (p>0.05), but significant effects of muscle (MPF temporalis larger than masseter, larger than trapezius muscles), test (larger MPFs when clenching in intercuspal position than when clenching on cotton rolls) and time (larger MPFs in the first than in the fifth second of clench) were found. In conclusion, a set of data to characterize the sEMG spectral characteristics of jaw and neck muscles in young adult subjects performing MVC tasks currently in use within the dental field was obtained. Reference values may assist in the assessment of patients with alterations in the cranio-cervical-mandibular system.

  9. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  10. Influence of bite force on jaw muscle activity ratios in subject-controlled unilateral isometric biting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Pröschel, Peter Alfred; Morneburg, Thomas Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Ratios of muscle activities in unilateral isometric biting are assumed to provide information on strategies of muscle activation independently from bite force. If valid, this assumption would facilitate experiments as it would justify subject-control instead of transducer-based force control in biting studies. As force independence of ratios is controversial, we tested whether activity ratios are associated with bite force and whether this could affect findings based on subject-controlled force. In 52 subjects, bite force and bilateral masseter and temporalis electromyograms were recorded during unilateral biting on a transducer with varying force levels and with uniform subject-controlled force. Working/balancing and temporalis/masseter ratios of activity peaks were related to bite force peaks. Activity ratios were significantly but weakly correlated with the bite force. The subject-controlled force varied within +/-25% around the prescribed force in 95% of all bites. This scatter could cause a variation of group mean activity ratios of at most +/-6% because of the weak correlation between bite force and ratios. As this small variation is negligible in most cases, subject-control of bite force can be considered an appropriate method to obtain group means of relative muscle activation in particular when force control with transducers is not feasible.

  11. Chewing pattern and muscular activation in open bite patients.

    PubMed

    Piancino, Maria Grazia; Isola, Gaetano; Merlo, Andrea; Dalessandri, Domenico; Debernardi, Cesare; Bracco, Pietro

    2012-04-01

    Different studies have indicated, in open bite patients, that masticatory muscles tend to generate a small maximum bite force and to show a reduced cross-sectional area with a lower EMG activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinematics parameters of the chewing cycles and the activation of masseters and anterior temporalis muscles of patients with anterior dental open bite malocclusion. There have been no previous reports evaluating both kinematic values and EMG activity of patients with anterior open bite during chewing. Fifty-two young patients (23 boys and 29 girls; mean age±SD 11.5±1.2 and 10.2±1.6years, respectively) with anterior open bite malocclusion and 21 subjects with normal occlusion were selected for the study. Kinematics parameters and surface electromyography (EMG) were simultaneously recorded during chewing a hard bolus with a kinesiograph K7-I Myotronics-Usa. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the open bite patients and the control group for a narrower chewing pattern, a shorter total and closing duration of the chewing pattern, a lower peak of both the anterior temporalis and the masseter of the bolus side. In this study, it has been observed that open bite patients, lacking the inputs from the anterior guidance, that are considered important information for establishing the motor scheme of the chewing pattern, show narrower chewing pattern, shorter lasting chewing cycles and lower muscular activation with respect to the control group.

  12. In-field masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related TMD diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, S.N.; McCall, W.; Dunford, R.; Nickel, J.C.; Iwasaki, L.R.; Crow, H.C.; Gonzalez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pain-related Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and 6 males participated in this study. Material & Methods Using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC-TMD), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded in–field muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse–Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p ≤ 0.003). Results No statistically significant association was found among four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25% and ≥80% ranges). Conclusion This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful-TMD conditions. PMID:25865542

  13. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P < .0001), whereas the shape of the skull was significantly rounder compared to controls. Temporal muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship.

  14. Surgical treatment of Moebius syndrome by platsma and temporalis muscle transfers.

    PubMed

    Edgerton, M T; Tuerk, D B; Fisher, J C

    1975-03-01

    The essential features of Moebius syndrome are described. The etiology of the condition remains in doubt. The role of heredity and the possible familial incidence are noted. We present two cases of Moebius syndrome in which the facial paralysis was surgically corrected by means of dynamic muscle transfers. The use of an innervated platysma muscle flap in the first patient is believed to be the first surgical description of such a procedure.

  15. [Cartilage island versus temporalis fascia in high-risk tympanic perforation].

    PubMed

    Durán-Padilla, Carmen Lucía; Martínez-Chávez, Jaime; Amador-Licona, Norma; Pereyra-Nobara, Texar Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: la timpanoplastía para la perforación timpánica de alto riesgo es un reto. Es necesario comparar las técnicas más útiles y factibles en nuestro medio para estos pacientes. El objetivo fue comparar la timpanoplastía con cartílago en isla para tratamiento de perforación de membrana timpánica de alto riesgo frente al uso de fascia temporal. Métodos: ensayo clínico aleatorizado y controlado en 69 pacientes mayores de 10 años, con perforación timpánica de alto riesgo en un hospital de tercer nivel. Se estadificó el índice MERI (Middle Ear Risk Index) y se realizó audiometría inicial. A los 7, 30 y 60 días postoperatorios se valoró integración del injerto. La audiometría se repitió solo a los 60 días. Resultados: de los 69 pacientes, 33 recibieron cartílago en isla (grupo 1) y 36 fascia temporal (grupo 2). La tasa de éxito en el grupo 1 fue de 93.9% a los 30 y 60 días y de 83.3% en el grupo 2 (p = 0.17). Tampoco fue diferente la ganancia auditiva entre los grupos: 33.1 frente a 33.6 dB, en los grupos 1 y 2, respectivamente (p = 0.88). Conclusión: no hay diferencia en los resultados morfológicos y audiométricos con timpanoplastía con cartílago en isla frente a fascia temporal en el tratamiento de perforaciones timpánicas de alto riesgo.

  16. Campylorrhinus lateralis, Bilateral microphthalmia and odontoma temporalis in an Oldenburg Foal.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, C; Cornillie, P; Tüllmann, V; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2016-04-01

    An Oldenburg colt with wry nose was autopsied after having lived for only 30 min. It presented cyanotic oral mucosae, underdeveloped eyes and a right-sided temporal osseous mass. The applicable nomenclature for the defects is discussed, and the potential etiopathogenesis is explored by describing the normal embryonic development of the affected body parts.

  17. Intramuscular Capillary Haemangioma of the Temporalis Muscle: A Rare Case with A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nikhil; Nambillath, Arif Kavungal; Meher, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    An Intramuscular Haemangioma (IMH) is a benign mesenchymal tumour of the endothelial cells that accounts for less than 1% of all haemangiomas. Here we report the case of a capillary type intramuscular haemangioma in a five-year-old boy, only the fourth such case reported in literature, along with a relevant review of the literature. The lesion was surgically managed, with no recurrence in the follow up period till date. PMID:28384897

  18. Influence of playing wind instruments on activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Gotouda, A; Yamaguchi, T; Okada, K; Matsuki, T; Gotouda, S; Inoue, N

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of change in sound tone of playing wind instruments on activity of jaw-closing muscles and the effect of sustained playing for a long time on fatigue of jaw-closing muscles. Electromyograms (EMG) of 19 brass instrument players and 14 woodwind instrument players were measured while playing instruments in tuning tone and high tone and under other conditions. Nine brass instrument players and nine woodwind instrument players played instruments for 90 min. Before and after the exercise, power spectral analyses of EMG from masseter muscles at 50% of maximum voluntary clenching level were performed and mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Root mean square (RMS) of EMG in masseter and temporal muscles while playing were slightly larger than those at rest but extremely small in comparison with those during maximum clenching. Root mean square in orbicularis oris and digastric muscles were relatively large when playing instruments. In the brass instrument group, RMS in high tone was significantly higher than that in tuning tone in all muscles examined. In the woodwind instrument group, RMS in high tone was not significantly higher than that in tuning tone in those muscles. Mean power frequency was not decreased after sustained playing in both instrument groups. These findings indicate that contractive load to jaw-closing muscles when playing a wind instrument in both medium and high tone is very small and playing an instrument for a long time does not obviously induce fatigue of jaw-closing muscles.

  19. Masticatory muscle architecture in the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Mammalia, Rodentia): new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; Saksiri, Soonchan

    2009-01-01

    We present the first descriptive comparison of the skull, mandible and jaw muscles of the recently recovered Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus. The gross anatomy of five specimens captured in Laos and internal architecture of the jaw musculature were studied using dissections. The following muscles are described: temporal, masseter, pterygoids, digastric, mylohyoid, geniohyoid and transverse mandibular. The description of the masticatory apparatus of L. aenigmamus offers a rare opportunity to assess the order of establishment of the morphological characters during the evolution of Ctenohystrica. Striking convergences have occurred during the evolution of Diatomyidae and L. aenigmamus presents a unique combination of myological features that corresponds to a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characters. If L. aenigmamus is a sciurognathous rodent, we have to assume that it independently acquired a pars reflexa of the superficial masseter. We show for the first time that the development of this pars reflexa has occurred several times during the evolution of Ctenohystrica and can no longer be considered a synapomorphic feature of ‘Hystricognathi’. These results bring new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy and have profound implications for the interpretation of the fossil record of early hystricognath rodents. PMID:19694873

  20. Digital dissection of the masticatory muscles of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (Mammalia, Rodentia)

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, Chris G.

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, of the family Bathyergidae is a subterranean rodent that feeds on underground roots and tubers and digs extensive tunnel systems with its incisors. It is a highly unusual mammal with regard to its social structure, longevity, pain insensitivity and cancer resistance, all of which have made it the subject of a great deal of research in recent years. Yet, much of the basic anatomy of this species remains undocumented. In this paper, we describe the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature of the naked mole-rat, as revealed by contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography. This technique uses an iodine stain to enable the imaging of soft tissues with microCT. The iodine-enhanced scans were used to create 3D reconstructions of the naked mole-rat masticatory muscles from which muscle masses were calculated. The jaw-closing musculature of Heterocephalus glaber is relatively very large compared to other rodents and is dominated by the superficial masseter, the deep masseter and the temporalis. The temporalis in particular is large for a rodent, covering the entirety of the braincase and much of the rear part of the orbit. The morphology of the masseter complex described here differs from two other published descriptions of bathyergid masticatory muscles, but is more similar to the arrangement seen in other rodent families. The zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscle does not protrude through the infraorbital foramen on to the rostrum and thus the naked mole-rat should be considered protrogomorphous rather than hystricomorphous, and the morphology is consistent with secondarily lost hystricomorphy as has been previously suggested for Bathyergidae. Overall, the morphology of the masticatory musculature indicates a species with a high bite force and a wide gape–both important adaptations for a life dominated by digging with the incisors. PMID:25024917

  1. Using sensitivity analysis to validate the predictions of a biomechanical model of bite forces.

    PubMed

    Sellers, William Irvin; Crompton, Robin Huw

    2004-02-01

    Biomechanical modelling has become a very popular technique for investigating functional anatomy. Modern computer simulation packages make producing such models straightforward and it is tempting to take the results produced at face value. However the predictions of a simulation are only valid when both the model and the input parameters are accurate and little work has been done to verify this. In this paper a model of the human jaw is produced and a sensitivity analysis is performed to validate the results. The model is built using the ADAMS multibody dynamic simulation package incorporating the major occlusive muscles of mastication (temporalis, masseter, medial and lateral pterygoids) as well as a highly mobile temporomandibular joint. This model is used to predict the peak three-dimensional bite forces at each teeth location, joint reaction forces, and the contributions made by each individual muscle. The results for occlusive bite-force (1080N at M1) match those previously published suggesting the model is valid. The sensitivity analysis was performed by sampling the input parameters from likely ranges and running the simulation many times rather than using single, best estimate values. This analysis shows that the magnitudes of the peak retractive forces on the lower teeth were highly sensitive to the chosen origin (and hence fibre direction) of the temporalis and masseter muscles as well as the laxity of the TMJ. Peak protrusive force was also sensitive to the masseter origin. These result shows that the model is insufficiently complex to estimate these values reliably although the much lower sensitivity values obtained for the bite forces in the other directions and also for the joint reaction forces suggest that these predictions are sound. Without the sensitivity analysis it would not have been possible to identify these weaknesses which strongly supports the use of sensitivity analysis as a validation technique for biomechanical modelling.

  2. EMG analysis of trapezius and masticatory muscles: experimental protocol and data reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Sforza, C; Rosati, R; De Menezes, M; Musto, F; Toma, M

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to define a standardised protocol for the electromyographic evaluation of trapezius muscle in dentistry and to assess its within- and between-session repeatability. Surface electromyography of trapezius, masseter and temporal muscles was performed in 40 healthy subjects aged 20-35 years during shoulder elevation, and maximum teeth clenching with and without cotton rolls. Two repetitions were made both within (same electrodes) and between sessions (different electrodes). Maximum voluntary clench on cotton rolls was used to standardise the potentials of the six analysed muscles with tooth contact; shoulder elevation was used to standardise the upper trapezius potentials. From the standardised electromyographic potentials, several indices (muscle symmetry; masticatory muscle torque and relative activity; total masticatory muscle activity; trapezius cervical load, percentage co-contraction of trapezius during teeth clenching) were computed; random (technical error of measurement) and systematic (Student's t-test, Analysis of Variance) errors were assessed. For all indices, no systematic errors were found between the two separate data collection sessions. Within session, limited (lower than 8%) technical errors of measurement were found for temporalis and masseter symmetry, torque and activity indices, and the trapezius cervical load. Larger random errors were obtained for trapezius symmetry and total masticatory muscle activity (up to 20%). Between sessions, no significant differences were found for trapezius co-contraction. In conclusion, a protocol for the standardisation of trapezius muscle that may be used within dental clinical applications was defined, and the repeatability of masseter, temporalis and trapezius electromyographic recordings for serial assessments was assessed in healthy subjects.

  3. Digital dissection of the masticatory muscles of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (Mammalia, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Cox, Philip G; Faulkes, Chris G

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, of the family Bathyergidae is a subterranean rodent that feeds on underground roots and tubers and digs extensive tunnel systems with its incisors. It is a highly unusual mammal with regard to its social structure, longevity, pain insensitivity and cancer resistance, all of which have made it the subject of a great deal of research in recent years. Yet, much of the basic anatomy of this species remains undocumented. In this paper, we describe the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature of the naked mole-rat, as revealed by contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography. This technique uses an iodine stain to enable the imaging of soft tissues with microCT. The iodine-enhanced scans were used to create 3D reconstructions of the naked mole-rat masticatory muscles from which muscle masses were calculated. The jaw-closing musculature of Heterocephalus glaber is relatively very large compared to other rodents and is dominated by the superficial masseter, the deep masseter and the temporalis. The temporalis in particular is large for a rodent, covering the entirety of the braincase and much of the rear part of the orbit. The morphology of the masseter complex described here differs from two other published descriptions of bathyergid masticatory muscles, but is more similar to the arrangement seen in other rodent families. The zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscle does not protrude through the infraorbital foramen on to the rostrum and thus the naked mole-rat should be considered protrogomorphous rather than hystricomorphous, and the morphology is consistent with secondarily lost hystricomorphy as has been previously suggested for Bathyergidae. Overall, the morphology of the masticatory musculature indicates a species with a high bite force and a wide gape-both important adaptations for a life dominated by digging with the incisors.

  4. Comparison between Trans-Cranial Electromagnetic Stimulation and Low-Level Laser on Modulation of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Seada, Yasser Ibrahim; Nofel, Reda; Sayed, Hayam Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine which of the transcranial electromagnetic stimulation or low level laser therapy is more effective in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia of multiple sclerosis patients. [Methods] Thirty multiple sclerosis patients of both sexes participated in this study. The age of the subjects ranged from 40 to 60 years and their mean age was (56.4–6.6). Participants were randomly selected from Dental and Neurology Outpatient Clinics at King Khalid Hospital, Najran University, Saudi Arabia. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of 15. The Laser group received a low level laser therapy, 830 nm wavelength, 10 Hz and 15 min duration, while the Electromagnetic group received repetitive transcranial electromagnetic stimulation at a frequency of 10 Hz, intensity of 50 mA and duration of 20 minutes. Patients were assessed pre and post treatment for degree of pain using a numerical rating scale, maximal oral mouth opening using a digital calibrated caliper, masseter muscle tension using a tensiometer and a compound action potentials of masseter and temporalis muscles. [Results] There were significant improvements after treatment in both groups, with a significant difference between the Electromagnetic and Laser groups, in favor of the Electromagnetic group. [Conclusion] Repetitive transcranial electromagnetic stimulation at 10 Hz, 50 mA, and 20 minutes duration is more effective than low level laser therapy at reducing trigeminal pain, increasing maximum oral mouth opening, masseter and temporalis muscle tension in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:24259883

  5. Association between food mixing ability and electromyographic activity of jaw-closing muscles during chewing of a wax cube.

    PubMed

    Fueki, K; Sugiura, T; Yoshida, E; Igarashi, Y

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify association between food mixing ability and activity of jaw-closing muscles during chewing of a wax cube. Twenty subjects with complete dentitions (mean age 24.1 years) were directed to chew a two-coloured paraffin wax cube for 10 strokes on preferred chewing side. Surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from the right and left masseter and anterior temporalis muscles during chewing of the wax cube. Maximum voltage, duration and muscle work for burst of each chewing cycle were measured on integrated EMG in each muscle. Food mixing ability was estimated as mixing ability index determined from the colour mixture and shape of the chewed wax cube. Some EMG parameters of all muscles except for masseter muscle on non-chewing side showed significant positive correlations with the mixing ability index (r = 0.45-0.56, P < 0.05). However, most of the EMG parameters correlated with one another. As a result, only muscle work of masseter muscle on the chewing side was identified as a significant predictor accounting for 28% interindividual variation in the mixing ability index (P < 0.01). These results suggest that activity of jaw-closing muscles during chewing the wax cube seems to be weakly related to food mixing ability.

  6. Surface raw electromyography has a moderate discriminatory capacity for differentiating between healthy individuals and those with TMD: a diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Ratón, Mónica; Mora, Maria J; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; López-Cedrún, José; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2014-06-01

    The use of surface electromyography (sEMG) to identify subjects with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is controversial. The main objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of EMG to differentiate between healthy subjects and those with TMD. This study evaluated 53 individuals with TMD who were referred to the university service and who fulfilled the eligibility criteria during the period of the study. Thirty-eight dental students were also recruited satisfying same eligibility criteria but without TMD. The inclusion criteria were to be fully dentate, have normal occlusion, and be righthanded. The exclusion criteria were periodontal pathology, caries or damaged dental tissues, orthodontic therapy, maxillofacial disease, botulinum A toxin therapy, and psychological disorders. The means of the masseter muscles, right (RM) and left (LM), and temporalis muscles, right (RT) and left (LT), and intraindividual indexes during resting and during clenching were calculated. Raw sEMG activity was used to determine the cutoff points and calculate the diagnostic accuracy of sEMG. The diagnostic accuracy of these variables for a diagnosis of TMD was evaluated by using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under it (AUC). A new transformed diagnostic variable was obtained by using the Generalized Additive Models (GAM). Optimal cutoff points were obtained where the sensitivity and specificity were similar and by the Youden index. The highest estimated AUC was 0.660 (95% CI 0.605-0.871) corresponding to the rLT variable during rest. When rLT and rACTIVITY (differences divided by sums of temporalis versus masseter muscles) were considered as a linear combination, the AUC increased to 0.742 (95% CI; 0.783-0.934). In conclusion, the raw sEMG evaluation of rest provided moderate sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between healthy individuals and those with TMD. The use of the indexes (mainly assessing the dominance of

  7. Effects of cervical mobilization and exercise on pain, movement and function in subjects with temporomandibular disorders: a single group pre-post test

    PubMed Central

    CALIXTRE, Letícia Bojikian; GRÜNINGER, Bruno Leonardo da Silva; HAIK, Melina Nevoeiro; ALBURQUERQUE-SENDÍN, Francisco; OLIVEIRA, Ana Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the effect of a rehabilitation program based on cervical mobilization and exercise on clinical signs and mandibular function in subjects with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Material and Methods: Single-group pre-post test, with baseline comparison. Subjects Twelve women (22.08±2.23 years) with myofascial pain and mixed TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Outcome measures Subjects were evaluated three times: twice before (baseline phase) and once after intervention. Self-reported pain, jaw function [according to the Mandibular Functional Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ)], pain-free maximum mouth opening (MMO), and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of both masseter and temporalis muscles were obtained. Baseline and post-intervention differences were investigated, and effect size was estimated through Cohen’s d coefficient. Results Jaw function improved 7 points on the scale after the intervention (P=0.019), and self-reported pain was significantly reduced (P=0.009). Pain-free MMO varied from 32.3±8.8 mm to 38±8.8 mm and showed significant improvement (P=0.017) with moderate effect size when compared to the baseline phase. PPT also increased with moderate effect size, and subjects had the baseline values changed from 1.23±0.2 kg/cm2 to 1.4±0.2 kg/cm2 in the left masseter (P=0.03), from 1.31±0.28 kg/cm2 to 1.51±0.2 kg/cm2 in the right masseter (P>0.05), from 1.32±0.2 kg/cm2 to 1.46±0.2 kg/cm2 in the left temporalis (P=0.047), and from 1.4±0.2 kg/cm2 to 1.67±0.3 kg/cm2 in the right temporalis (P=0.06). Conclusions The protocol caused significant changes in pain-free MMO, self-reported pain, and functionality of the stomatognathic system in subjects with myofascial TMD, regardless of joint involvement. Even though these differences are statistically significant, their clinical relevance is still questionable. PMID:27383698

  8. Differential expression of genes involved in the calcium homeostasis in masticatory muscles of MDX mice.

    PubMed

    Kunert-Keil, C H; Gredes, T; Lucke, S; Botzenhart, U; Dominiak, M; Gedrange, T

    2014-04-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and its murine model, mdx, are characterized by Ca(2+) induced muscle damage and muscle weakness followed by distorted dentofacial morphology. In both, DMD patients and in mdx mice, could be proven so far that only the extraocular muscles (EOM) are not affected by muscular dystrophy. The EOMs are protected against calcium overload by enhanced expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis. We could recently demonstrate that masticatory muscles of mdx mice are differentially affected by muscle dystrophy. The dystrophic masseter and temporalis shows muscle histology comparable to all other skeletal muscles in this animal model, whereas dystrophic tongue muscles seem to develop a milder phenotype. Due to this fact it is to hypothesize that an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis seems to underlie the mdx masticatory muscle pathology. Aim of this study was to examine the mRNA and protein levels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases SERCA1 and SERCA2, the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases Atp2b1 and Atp2b4, the sodium/calcium exchanger NCX1, the ryanodine receptor 1, parvalbumin, sarcolipin, phospholamban and the L-type Ca(2+) channel alpha-1 subunit (Cacna1s) in Musculus masseter, temporalis, and tongue of 100 day old control and mdx mice. In mdx masseter muscle significant increased mRNA levels of NCX1 and Cacna1s were found compared to control mice. In contrast, the mRNA amount of RYR1 was significant reduced in mdx temporalis muscle, whereas ATP2b4 was significant increased. In mdx tongue a down-regulation of the ATP2b1, sarcolipin and parvalbumin mRNA expression was found, whereas the phospholamban mRNA level was significantly increased compared to controls. These data were verified by western blot analyses. Our findings revealed that mdx masticatory muscles showed an unequally altered expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis that can support the differences in masticatory muscles response to dystrophin deficiency.

  9. Feeding mechanics and dietary implications in the fossil sloth Neocnus (Mammalia: Xenarthra: Megalonychidae) from Haiti.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Robert K

    2011-10-01

    Haitian species of the extinct ground sloth genus Neocnus (Mammalia: Pilosa: Megalonychidae) have previously been hypothesized to have a much reduced jugal bone and a correspondingly reduced masseter musculature but a paucity of specimens has prevented further investigation of this hypothesis. Recent discovery of jugal bones belonging to Haitian specimens of Neocnus within the University of Florida Museum collections enables the element to be more accurately described. The discovery also makes it possible to explore mastication in these sloths. Osteological characters related to feeding were examined, along with comparative estimations of bite force with the extant tree sloths, Bradypus and Choloepus, and their known dietary habits as a means to infer aspects of the paleodiet of Neocnus. There is a significant difference in moment arm calculations for m. masseter between predicted and actual jugals, but the overall significance for bite force is lost and hampered by small sample size. Neocnus demonstrates a variety of characters that are similar to those of Bradypus and not to Choloepus, which is a close phylogenetic relative. The masticatory musculature of Neocnus enabled a chewing cycle emphasizing a grinding combination of mesiodistal and linguobuccal movements of the molariform dentition. The orientations of m. masseter and m. temporalis are estimated to produce relatively high bite force ratios that imply a masticatory system with stronger versus faster components. Because of the similarity of bite forces and jaw mechanics to those of Bradypus, in addition to a number of osteological adaptations indicative of herbivorous grazers (elevated mandibular condyle, large and complex masseter, and robust angular process), the Haitian forms of Neocnus are considered to have been selective feeders with a folivorous diet.

  10. Mastication-induced modulation of the jaw-opening reflex during different periods of mastication in awake rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mostafeezur, Rahman; Yamamura, Kensuke; Kurose, Masayuki; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2009-02-13

    The present study aimed to determine if sensory inputs from the intraoral mechanoreceptors similarly contributed to regulating the activity of the jaw-opening muscles throughout the masticatory sequence. We also aimed to determine if sensory inputs from the chewing and non-chewing sides equally regulated the activity of the jaw-opening muscles. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of jaw muscles (digastric and masseter) and jaw movements were recorded in awake rabbits. The entire masticatory sequence was divided into preparatory, rhythmic-chewing and preswallow periods, based on jaw muscles activity and jaw movements. The jaw-opening reflex (JOR) was evoked by unilateral low-intensity stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) on either the chewing or non-chewing side. Amplitude of the JOR was assessed by measuring peak-to-peak EMG activity in the digastric muscle, and was compared among the masticatory periods and between the chewing and non-chewing sides. The JOR was strongly suppressed during the jaw-closing phase in the rhythmic-chewing and preswallow periods, but this effect was transiently attenuated during the late part of the jaw-opening phase in these periods. However, modulation of the JOR varied from strong suppression to weak facilitation during the preparatory period. The patterns of JOR modulation were similar on the chewing and non-chewing sides in all masticatory periods. The results suggest that the sensory inputs from the intraoral mechanoreceptors regulate the activity of the jaw-opening muscles differently during the preparatory period compared with the other masticatory periods. Sensory inputs from both the chewing and non-chewing sides similarly regulate the activity of the jaw-opening muscles.

  11. [Actinomycosis sub-masseter abscess, simulating a parotiditis. Review of case and revision of literature].

    PubMed

    Padilla Parrado, M; Aranzana Gómez, A; Jiménez Antolín, J A; García Manríquez, A; Céspedes Más, M; Menéndez Loras, L M

    2003-01-01

    We present one case of a pluripathologic female patient who has developed an submaseterin abscess secondary to an actinomyces mandibular osteomielitis. The initial presentation seems an acute supurative parothiditis. We describe its presentation, evolution, special tests done for its diagnostic, as also the discussion of the type and duration of the treatment. And we include also a differential diagnosis between the two diseases, with a similar form. We do also a bibliographic revision of the few similar cases published.

  12. Frenulectomy of the tongue and the influence of rehabilitation exercises on the sEMG activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Baldini, Aberto; Mummolo, Stefano; Marchetti, Enrico; Giuca, Maria Rita; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess by surface electromyography (sEMG) the changes in sub-mental, orbicularis oris, and masticatory muscle activity after a lingual frenulectomy. Rehabilitation exercises in subjects with ankyloglossia, characterized by Class I malocclusion, were assessed as well. A total of 24 subjects were selected. Thirteen subjects (mean age 7±2.5years) with Class I malocclusion and ankyloglossia were treated with lingual frenulectomy and rehabilitation exercises, while 11 subjects (mean age 7±0.8years) with normal occlusion and normal lingual frenulum were used as controls. The inclusion criteria for both groups were the presence of mixed dentition and no previous orthodontic treatment. The sEMG recordings were taken at the time of the first visit (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 6months (T2) for the treated group. Recordings were taken at the same time for the control group. Due to the noise inherent with the sEMG recording, special attention was paid to obtain reproducible and standardized recordings. The tested muscles were the masseter, anterior temporalis, upper and lower orbicularis oris, and sub-mental muscles. The sEMG recordings were performed at rest, while kissing, swallowing, opening the mouth, clenching the teeth and during protrusion of the mandible. These recordings were made by placing electrodes in the area of muscle contraction. At T0, the treated group showed different sEMG activity of the muscles with respect to the control group, with significant differences at rest and during some test tasks (p<0.05). In the treated group, an increase in sEMG potentials was observed for the masseter muscle, from T0 to T2, during maximal voluntary clenching. During swallowing and kissing, the masseter and sub-mental muscles showed a significant increase in their sEMG potentials from T0 to T2. During the protrusion of the mandible, the masseter and anterior temporalis significantly decreased their sEMG activity, while the sub-mental area increased

  13. A Case of Bruxism-Induced Otalgia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Here, the author presents a case of bruxism-induced otalgia in a 29-year-old female patient. The pain was sharp and penetrating in character. It was usually worse in the morning and frequently radiated to the right temporal area. She had received unsuccessful medical treatments for migraine headache. The otoendoscopic examination revealed a normal tympanic membrane. A thorough inspection of her teeth revealed excessive wear on the incisal edges, and the cause of her otalgia was identified as bruxism-related temporomandibular joint disorder. After the use of an occlusal splint and repeated botulinum toxin injections in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, along with good sleep hygiene, she experienced significant relief of pain and symptoms. The author suggests that multidisciplinary cooperation between ENT clinicians and dentists is necessary for the quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment of bruxism and the consequential referred otalgia.

  14. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID AND MASTICATORY MUSCLES IN PATIENTS WITH VESTIBULAR LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions. PMID:19082397

  15. Trismus and diffuse polymyalgia: an unusual presentation of recurrent metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Ramsis; Zhai, Jing; Morgan, Robert; Prakash, Neal

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman first presented in 2009 with abdominal distention. The diagnosis of stage IA right ovarian tumour was made by fertility-sparing surgery. In the subsequent years, the involvement of the left ovary and metastasis to the lungs prompted further surgical intervention and chemotherapy. By 2013, she experienced insidious, debilitating and diffuse musculoskeletal pain with trismus. Polymyositis or diffuse radiculitis was suspected. Imaging studies identified enhancing lesions in the thigh musculature, temporalis, parotid gland, pterygoid, masseter, tongue, cerebellum and leptomeninges. Biopsy of one of the thigh lesions confirmed the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma. She succumbed to the disease in November 2013. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer and its resilience to conventional chemotherapy. On account of its high death rate, it is recommended that the epithelial–mesenchymal transition be researched and early therapy targeted at the k-ras oncogene initiated in spite of the tumour's lower initial staging. PMID:24835804

  16. The effect of denture stability on bite force and muscular effort.

    PubMed

    Caloss, R; Al-Arab, M; Finn, R A; Throckmorton, G S

    2011-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that denture instability limits the amount of voluntary muscular effort generated by denture wearers. Seventeen edentulous subjects (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years) with newly acquired implant-retained mandibular overdentures and a conventional maxillary denture participated. Maximum bite forces and corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity from the temporalis and masseter muscles (bilaterally) were recorded under two experimental conditions: (i) Unilateral premolar and molar bites without additional support, and (ii) premolar and molar bites with bite block support on the opposite side. In addition, EMG values alone were recorded during maximum clenching without any transducer between the upper and lower dentures. The level of muscular effort was significantly higher with greater denture support. These results indicate that denture instability probably prevents denture wearers from using the full potential of their jaw muscles, especially during unilateral biting and chewing, even with two implants supporting the mandibular dentures.

  17. The effects of a single intercuspal interference on electromyographic characteristics of human masticatory muscles during maximal voluntary teeth clenching.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Serrao, G; Colombo, A; Schmitz, J H

    1999-07-01

    In 13 healthy subjects (eight men and five women, mean age, 22 years), an aluminum intercuspal interference (height, 0.25 mm) was placed on the maxillary right first premolar to study its effect on the contractile symmetry of the right and left masseter and anterior temporalis muscles when measured through a Percentage Overlapping Coefficient (POC), derived from surface electromyographic recordings of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Additionally, and to estimate the potential of the experimental intercuspal interference to induce lateral displacement of the mandible, a Torque Coefficient (TC) was derived from surface electromyographic recordings. The conclusion was that the experimental occlusal interference gave rise to asymmetric contractile activity in the studied mandibular elevator muscles as well as a potential to displace the mandible in a lateral direction.

  18. A Case of Bruxism-Induced Otalgia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, the author presents a case of bruxism-induced otalgia in a 29-year-old female patient. The pain was sharp and penetrating in character. It was usually worse in the morning and frequently radiated to the right temporal area. She had received unsuccessful medical treatments for migraine headache. The otoendoscopic examination revealed a normal tympanic membrane. A thorough inspection of her teeth revealed excessive wear on the incisal edges, and the cause of her otalgia was identified as bruxism-related temporomandibular joint disorder. After the use of an occlusal splint and repeated botulinum toxin injections in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, along with good sleep hygiene, she experienced significant relief of pain and symptoms. The author suggests that multidisciplinary cooperation between ENT clinicians and dentists is necessary for the quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment of bruxism and the consequential referred otalgia. PMID:27626088

  19. The measurement and facilitation of cooperative task performance. [reactions of humans to stress exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine under what conditions jaw clenching will occur in humans as a response to stress exposure. The method for measuring reactions to stress involves a series of electrical recordings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. A high fixed-ratio response requirement in the first series of experiments shows that jaw clenching in humans occurs in situations analogous to those which produce biting in infrahuman subjects. In the second series, reduction in the amounts of money recieved by subjects is shown to cause increases in the jaw clench response and other negative effect motor behaviors. The third series demonstrates that perception of more favorable conditions existing for another person can increase anger and hostility in the subject.

  20. Necrotizing and eosinophilic masticatory myositis in farmed mink: a preliminary description.

    PubMed

    Needle, D B; Hollinger, C; Shelton, G D; Fitzgerald, S D

    2014-01-01

    This report describes necrotizing and eosinophilic myositis affecting the masticatory muscles of a group of mink. Affected animals demonstrated sudden death with marked subcutaneous oedema over the dorsal head. The temporalis and masseter muscles were pale, swollen and friable. Histologic changes consisted of varying degrees of myodegeneration, myonecrosis and inflammation. Eosinophils were prominent in the inflammatory infiltrate. Similar to dogs, masticatory muscles in mink were found to contain unique type 2M fibres, suggesting a possible target for an immune response. Aerobic and anaerobic tissue cultures of the affected musculature revealed no significant pathogens. Histological and nutritional analyses were not typical of vitamin E/selenium deficiency. This case series supports the existence of a novel disease entity in mink with some features comparable with masticatory muscle myositis in dogs.

  1. Facial reanimation after acoustic neuroma resection: options and timing of intervention.

    PubMed

    Boahene, Kofi

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis following acoustic neuroma (AN) resection can be devastating, but timely and strategic intervention can minimize the resulting facial morbidity. A central strategy in reanimating the paralyzed face after AN resection is to restore function of the native facial muscles using available facial nerves or repurposed cranial nerves, mainly the hypoglossal or masseter nerves. The timing of reinnervation is the single most influential factor that determines outcomes in facial reanimation surgery. The rate of recovery of facial function in the first 6 months following AN resection may be used to predict ultimate facial function. Patients who show no signs of recovery in the first 6 months, even when their facial nerves are intact, recover poorly and are candidates for early facial reinnervation. With delay, facial muscles become irreversibly paralyzed. Reanimation in irreversible paralysis requires the transfer of functional muscle units such as the gracilis or the temporalis muscle tendon unit.

  2. Treatment of displaced mandibular condylar fracture with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Akbay, Ercan; Cevik, Cengiz; Damlar, Ibrahim; Altan, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this case report is to discuss the effect on condylar reduction of botulinum toxin A treatment used in a child with displaced fracture at condylar neck of mandible. A 3-years old boy was admitted to our clinic for incomplete fracture of mandibular symphysis and displaced condylar fracture at the left side. An asymmetrical occlusal splint with intermaxillary fixation was used instead of open reduction and internal fixation because of incomplete fracture of symphysis and possible complications of condyle surgery. However, it was observed that condylar angulation persisted despite this procedure. Thus, botulinum toxin A was administered to masseter, temporalis and pterygoideus medialis muscles. At the end of first month, it was seen that mandibular condyle was almost completely recovered and that fusion was achieved. In conclusion, Botulinum A toxin injection aiming the suppression of masticatory muscle strength facilitates the reduction in the conservative management of displaced condyle in pediatric patients.

  3. The orthodontic treatment of TMD patients: EMG effects of a functional appliance.

    PubMed

    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Titolo, Cristina; Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare; Bracco, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work was to test the effects of the Function Generator Bite (FGB) on the masticatory muscles of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) subjects. Two groups were selected for the study. A group of 20 TMD patients (group F) requiring orthodontic treatment and treated with FGB and a group of 10 healthy subjects (group H) were considered. Both groups were evaluated before the therapy began (TO) and then after 18 months of therapy (T1). An electromyographic analysis of the masseter and temporalis anterior muscles and a clinical evaluation according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) were performed. A statistical difference between the two groups was observed at TO with respect to the activity index. TMD subjects showed a lower value of the index. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the utility of this EMG index as a diagnostic indicator.

  4. Occlus-o-Guide® versus Andresen activator appliance: neuromuscular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to assess the muscular variations at the electromyography (EMG) level for the anterior temporalis muscles and masseter muscles during treatment with Occlus-o-Guide® and Andresen activator appliances. Methods Eighty-two patients (35 males and 47 females) aged between 8 and 12 years (mean age, 10.5 ± 0.8 years) participated in the study. Fifty patients underwent treatment with an Occlus-o-Guide® and 32 patients with an Andresen activator. All patients underwent EMG examination using a Freely EMG (De Gotzen, Legnano, Italy) and surface bipolar electrodes when the appliances were worn for the first time (T0), and after 6 months (T1) and after 12 months (T2) of appliance use. Results Statistical analysis showed that both at T0 and T2, the percent overlapping coefficient (POC) of the anterior temporalis muscles was not statistically different between the appliance groups. At T0, the POC of the masseter muscles was significantly lower for the Andresen appliance as compared to the Occlus-o-Guide® (p = 0.02), while at T2 this significance was lost. Conclusions At insertion of an appliance, all patients show neuromuscular balance that does not correspond to orthognathic occlusion. Both appliances work by creating muscular imbalance. With the appliances in situ, EMG responses were generally analogous for the Occlus-o-Guide® and the Andresen activator; however, the imbalance was greater and the recovery of the orthological muscular balance was slower in patients under treatment with the Andresen activator as compared to those with the Occlus-o-Guide®. PMID:24325935

  5. Strain in the Braincase and Its Sutures During Function

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Susan W.; Teng, Shengyi

    2010-01-01

    The skull is distinguished from other parts of the skeleton by its composite construction. The sutures between bony elements provide for interstitial growth of the cranium, but at the same time they alter the transmission of stress and strain through the skull. Strain gages were bonded to the frontal and parietal bones of miniature pigs and across the interfrontal, interparietal and coronal sutures. Strains were recorded 1) during natural mastication in conjunction with electromyographic activity from the jaw muscles and 2) during stimulation of various cranial muscles in anesthetized animals. Vault sutures exhibited vastly higher strains than did the adjoining bones. Further, bone strain primarily reflected torsion of the braincase set up by asymmetrical muscle contraction; the tensile axis alternated between +45° and −45° depending on which diagonal masseter/temporalis pair was most active. However, suture strains were not related to overall torsion but instead were responses to local muscle actions. Only the coronal suture showed significant strain (tension) during jaw opening; this was caused by the contraction of neck muscles. All sutures showed strain during jaw closing, but polarity depended on the pattern of muscle usage. For example, masseter contraction tensed the coronal suture and the anterior part of the interfrontal suture, whereas the temporalis caused compression in these locations. Peak tensile strains were larger than peak compressive strains. Histology suggested that the skull is bent at the sutures, with the ectocranial surface tensed and the endocranial surface predominantly compressed. Collectively, these results indicate that skulls with patent sutures should be analyzed as complexes of independent parts rather than solid structures. PMID:10918130

  6. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  7. Posterior scissors-bite: masticatory jaw movement and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Tomonari, H; Kubota, T; Yagi, T; Kuninori, T; Kitashima, F; Uehara, S; Miyawaki, S

    2014-04-01

    Scissors-bite is a malocclusion characterised by buccal inclination or buccoversion of the maxillary posterior tooth and/or linguoclination or linguoversion of the mandibular posterior tooth. This type of malocclusion causes reduced contact of the occlusal surfaces and can cause excessive vertical overlapping of the posterior teeth. This case-control study is the first to evaluate both masticatory jaw movement and masseter and temporalis muscle activity in patients with unilateral posterior scissors-bite. Jaw movement variables and surface electromyography data were recorded in 30 adult patients with unilateral posterior scissors-bite malocclusion and 18 subjects with normal occlusion in a case-control study. The chewing pattern on the scissors-bite side significantly differed from that of the non-scissors-bite side in the patients and of the right side in the normal subjects. These differences included a narrower chewing pattern (closing angle, P < 0.01; cycle width, P < 0.01), a longer closing duration (P < 0.05), a slower closing velocity (P < 0.01) and lower activities of both the temporalis (P < 0.05) and the masseter (P < 0.05) muscles on the working side. In 96% of the patients with unilateral posterior scissors-bite, the preferred chewing side was the non-scissors-bite side (P = 0.005). These findings suggest that scissors-bite malocclusion is associated with the masticatory chewing pattern and muscle activity, involving the choice of the preferred chewing side in patients with unilateral posterior scissors-bite.

  8. Modeling of muscle forces in humans with and without temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, LR; Liu, H; Gonzalez, YM; Marx, DB; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subjects with/without temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD) were tested for differences in muscle forces. Setting and Sample Population School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. Ninety-one subjects were classified in 4 groups based on presence/absence (+/-) of chronic myofascial and/or TMJ pain (P) and bilateral disc displacement (DD). Material & Methods Validated numerical models employed an organizational objective and subjects’ anatomy to calculate masticatory muscle forces during static biting. ANOVA and Holm step-down procedure post-hoc tests assessed group differences. Theoretical geometries, representing the range of subjects’ muscle orientations, were surveyed via numerical models to identify key combinations resulting in high muscle forces. Effect-size (Cohen’s d) and ANOVA/post-hoc tests assessed group differences in key muscle orientations. Results +P-DD subjects had significantly higher muscle forces, especially for lateral pterygoid muscles, compared to the other groups (P<0.01) for bite-forces that were directed posteromedially or posterolaterally on mandibular molars and posteriorly and slightly medially on mandibular incisors. Key muscle orientations for peak lateral pterygoid muscle forces were identified and group comparisons showed mean orientation in +P-DD compared to other diagnostic groups was ≥5° more upright for masseter and ≥3° more posteriorly-directed for temporalis muscles (all Cohen’s d ≥0.8). Conclusion Predicted lateral pterygoid muscle forces were significantly higher in +P-DD compared to other groups for specific biting conditions and were attributable, in part, to differences in masseter and temporalis muscle orientations. PMID:25865546

  9. Properties of synaptic transmission from the reticular formation dorsal to the facial nucleus to trigeminal motoneurons during early postnatal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Gemba-Nishimura, A; Inoue, T; Nakamura, S; Nakayama, K; Mochizuki, A; Shintani, S; Yoshimura, S

    2010-03-31

    We previously reported that electrical stimulation of the reticular formation dorsal to the facial nucleus (RdVII) elicited excitatory masseter responses at short latencies and that RdVII neurons were antidromically activated by stimulation of the trigeminal motor nucleus (MoV), suggesting that excitatory premotor neurons targeting the MoV are likely located in the RdVII. We thus examined the properties of synaptic transmission from the RdVII to jaw-closing and jaw-opening motoneurons in horizontal brainstem preparations from developing rats using voltage-sensitive dye, patch-clamp recordings and laser photostimulation. Electrical stimulation of the RdVII evoked optical responses in the MoV. Combined bath application of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (non-NMDA) receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), and the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) reduced these optical responses, and addition of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline further reduced the remaining responses. Electrical stimulation of the RdVII evoked postsynaptic currents (PSCs) in all 19 masseter motoneurons tested in postnatal day (P)1-4 rats, and application of CNQX and the NMDA receptor antagonist (+/-)-3(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) reduced the PSC amplitudes by more than 50%. In the presence of CNQX and CPP, the GABA(A) receptor antagonist SR95531 further reduced PSC amplitude, and addition of strychnine abolished the remaining PSCs. Photostimulation of the RdVII with caged glutamate also evoked PSCs in masseter motoneurons of P3-4 rats. In P8-11 rats, electrical stimulation of the RdVII also evoked PSCs in all 14 masseter motoneurons tested, and the effects of the antagonists on the PSCs were similar to those in P1-4 rats. On the other hand, RdVII stimulation evoked PSCs in only three of 16 digastric motoneurons tested. These results suggest that both neonatal and

  10. Morphological and Functional Parameters in Patients with Tooth Wear before and after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sierpinska, Teresa; Kuc, Joanna; Golebiewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Advanced tooth wear often results in lost vertical dimension and impacts facial aesthetics. Complex restorative treatment can replace the lost tooth structure and improve functional occlusal and facial skeleton parameters. Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess changes in the morphological and functional occlusal parameters of the facial skeleton after prosthetic rehabilitation that increased lost occlusal vertical dimension. Material and Methodology: 50 patients with advanced tooth wear were clinically examined, to assess the degree of wear. Each subject underwent cephalometric analysis, digital occlusal analysis, and electromyographic analysis, of the anterior temporalis, superficial masetter, anterior digastric, and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Prosthodontic treatment was performed to restore the occlusal vertical dimension of each subject’s occlusion, which was followed by repeating the pretreatment analyses. Pre and post treatment parameters were statistically compared. Results: Pre-treatment cephalometric analysis showed that lost vertical dimension reduced anterior facial height and resulted in small angular skeletal parameters. Post treatment anterior facial height increased from the increased occlusal vertical dimension. The mean value of functional electrical activity during clenching post treatment, increased compared to pretreatment. Conclusion: Increasing the vertical dimension of occlusion improved facial aesthetics by positively affecting facial skeletal angles. The restored occlusal surface morphology changed the pre treatment flat broad occlusal contacts into more point contacts. The increased vertical dimension of occlusion after treatment also increased muscle activity levels over the pretreatment levels after three months period of adaptation. PMID:23802024

  11. Deep pain sensitivity is correlated with oral-health-related quality of life but not with prosthetic factors in complete denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Yuri Martins; PORPORATTI, André Luís; HILGENBERG-SYDNEY, Priscila Brenner; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) is considered a risk factor for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and is influenced by psychological variables. Objectives To correlate deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles with prosthetic factors and Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in completely edentulous subjects. Material and Methods A total of 29 complete denture wearers were recruited. The variables were: a) Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) of the masseter and temporalis; b) retention, stability, and tooth wear of dentures; c) Vertical Dimension of Occlusion (VDO); d) Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) adapted to orofacial pain. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficient, the Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, the Point-Biserial correlation coefficient, and the Bonferroni correction (α=1%) were applied to the data. Results The mean age (standard deviation) of the participants was of 70.1 years (9.5) and 82% of them were females. There were no significant correlations with prosthetic factors, but significant negative correlations were found between the OHIP and the PPT of the anterior temporalis (r=-0.50, 95% CI-0.73 to 0.17, p=0.005). Discussion The deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles in complete dentures wearers is associated with OHRQoL, but not with prosthetic factors. PMID:26814457

  12. Dietary hardness, loading behavior, and the evolution of skull form in bats.

    PubMed

    Santana, Sharlene E; Grosse, Ian R; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2012-08-01

    The morphology and biomechanics of the vertebrate skull reflect the physical properties of diet and behaviors used in food acquisition and processing. We use phyllostomid bats, the most diverse mammalian dietary radiation, to investigate if and how changes in dietary hardness and loading behaviors during feeding shaped the evolution of skull morphology and biomechanics. When selective regimes of food hardness are modeled, we found that species consuming harder foods have evolved skull shapes that allow for more efficient bite force production. These species have shorter skulls and a greater reliance on the temporalis muscle, both of which contribute to a higher mechanical advantage at an intermediate gape angle. The evolution of cranial morphology and biomechanics also appears to be related to loading behaviors. Evolutionary changes in skull shape and the relative role of the temporalis and masseter in generating bite force are correlated with changes in the use of torsional and bending loading behaviors. Functional equivalence appears to have evolved independently among three lineages of species that feed on liquids and are not obviously morphologically similar. These trends in cranial morphology and biomechanics provide insights into behavioral and ecological factors shaping the skull of a trophically diverse clade of mammals.

  13. Influence of surgical orthodontic treatment on masticatory function in skeletal Class III patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Yagi, T; Tomonari, H; Ikemori, T; Miyawaki, S

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal Class III patients exhibit malocclusion characterised by Angle Class III and anterior crossbite, and their occlusion shows total or partially lateral crossbite of the posterior teeth. Most patients exhibit lower bite force and muscle activity than non-affected subjects. While orthognathic surgery may help improve masticatory function in these patients, its effects have not been fully elucidated. The aims of the study were to evaluate jaw movement and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients in comparison with control subjects with normal occlusion. Jaw movement variables and EMG data were recorded in 14 female patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and 15 female controls with good occlusion. Significant changes in jaw movement, from a chopping to a grinding pattern, were observed after orthognathic treatment (closing angle P < 0.01; cycle width P < 0.01), rendering jaw movement in the patient group similar to that of the control group. However, the grinding pattern in the patient group was not as broad as that of controls. The activity indexes, indicating the relative contributions of the masseter and temporalis muscles (where a negative value corresponds to relatively more temporalis activity and vice versa) changed from negative to positive after treatment (P < 0.05), becoming similar to those of control subjects. Our findings suggest that orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients improves the masticatory chewing pattern and muscle activity. However, the chewing pattern remains incomplete compared with controls.

  14. Effects of sympathetic stimulation on the rhythmical jaw movements produced by electrical stimulation of the cortical masticatory areas of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Djupsjöbacka, M; Lytvynenko, S; Passatore, M

    2005-03-01

    The somatomotor and sympathetic nervous systems are intimately linked. One example is the influence of peripheral sympathetic fibers on the discharge characteristics of muscle spindles. Since muscle spindles play important roles in various motor behaviors, including rhythmic movements, the working hypothesis of this research was that changes in sympathetic outflow to muscle spindles can change rhythmic movement patterns. We tested this hypothesis in the masticatory system of rabbits. Rhythmic jaw movements and EMG activity induced by long-lasting electrical cortical stimulation were powerfully modulated by electrical stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN). This modulation manifested itself as a consistent and marked reduction in the excursion of the mandibular movements (often preceded by a transient modest enhancement), which could be attributed mainly to corresponding changes in masseter muscle activity. These changes outlasted the duration of CSN stimulation. In some of the cortically evoked rhythmic jaw movements (CRJMs) changes in masticatory frequency were also observed. When the jaw-closing muscles were subjected to repetitive ramp-and-hold force pulses, the CRMJs changed characteristics. Masseter EMG activity was strongly enhanced and digastric EMG slightly decreased. This change was considerably depressed during CSN stimulation. These effects of CSN stimulation are similar in sign and time course to the depression exerted by sympathetic activity on the jaw-closing muscle spindle discharge. It is suggested that the change in proprioceptive information induced by an increase in sympathetic outflow (a) has important implications even under normal conditions for the control of motor function in states of high sympathetic activity, and (b) is one of the mechanisms responsible for motor impairment under certain pathological conditions such as chronic musculoskeletal head-neck disorders, associated with stress conditions.

  15. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of masticatory muscles spasticity in children with cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Gouw-Soares, Sheila Cynthia; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Baeder, Fernando Martins

    2016-02-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder frequently present in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). This study aimed to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the spasticity of the masseter and anterior temporal muscle fibers in children with CP over three weeks of intermittent laser exposures. The bite force (BF) of the masticatory muscles and the amplitude of mouth opening were evaluated before and after laser irradiation in 30 children with CP. Both sides of the masseter and temporalis muscles were irradiated with low-intensity diode laser pulses of 808-nm wavelength six times over three consecutive weeks. During the subsequent three weeks of postlaser exposures, although no laser treatment was applied, the evaluation parameters were measured and recorded. A significant improvement in the amplitude of mouth opening and a decrease in the BF were observed in the weeks following LLLT (P<0.05). However, by the sixth week post-LLLT, the BF and the amplitude of mouth opening reverted to values equivalent to those obtained before the first application of LLLT. Our investigation revealed low-level energy exposures from a 808-nm diode laser to be an effective short-term therapeutic tool. This method increased the amplitude of mouth opening and decreased the muscle tonus of children with spastic CP over a time course of three weeks of intermittent laser applications.

  16. Bruxism after brain injury: successful treatment with botulinum toxin-A.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, C B; Lai, J M; Francisco, G E

    1997-11-01

    Bruxism, the rhythmic grinding of teeth--usually during sleep--is not an infrequent complication of traumatic brain injury. Its prevalence in the general population is 21%, but its incidence after brain injury is unknown. Untreated, bruxism causes masseter hypertrophy, headache, temporomandibular joint destruction, and total dental wear. We report a case of complete resolution of postanoxic bruxism after treatment with botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A). The patient was a 28-year-old man with no history of bruxism who sustained an anoxic brain injury secondary to cardiac arrest of unknown etiology. On admission to our rehabilitation unit 2 months after the injury, the patient presented with severe bruxism and heavy dental wear. The patient was injected with a total of 200 units of BTX-A to each masseter and temporalis. There was total resolution of bruxism 2 days after injection, with no complications. On follow-up 3 months after injection, the patient remained free of bruxism. We propose that botulinum toxin be considered as a treatment for bruxism secondary to anoxic brain injury. Further studies regarding muscle selection and medication dosage are warranted to elucidate the toxin's efficacy in this condition.

  17. The occlusal appliance effect on myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Pablo; Arzola, Juan Francisco; Valdivia, José; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2013-04-01

    There are limited studies about the effects of occlusal appliance (OA) after three months of use. This study aimed to compare myofascial pain (MP) according to RDC/TMD, craniocervical relationships (CR) and masseter and temporalis bilateral electromyographic (EMG) activity, before and after three months of occlusal appliance use. Nineteen patients participated in this study. Cephalometric and RDC/TMD diagnostics were performed previously (baseline) and at the end of the study period (three months). EMG recordings at clinical mandibular rest position (MRP), during swallowing of saliva (SW) and during maximum voluntary clenching (MVC) were performed as follows: after one hour of use of an OA; after three months of using the OA for a minimum of 16 hours each day; and immediately after removal from the mouth. MP was relieved in all patients at the end of the study period. CR did not change significantly between baseline and after removal of the OA at the end of the study period. EMG activity during MRP, SW, and MVC decreased in both muscles after one hour using the OA and maintained the same level for the three-month period. When comparing baseline versus final EMG activity without OA, a significant decrease was only observed in the masseter muscle. The results observed in the present study are relevant to clinicians because they imply that the therapeutic effect of OA does not significantly affect the homeostasis of the craniocervical system.

  18. Distinct association between the antagonistic jaw muscle activity levels and cardiac activity during chewing and NREM sleep in the freely moving guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takafumi; Masuda, Yuji; Miyano, Keiji; Higashiyama, Makoto; Yano, Hiroyuki; Haque, Tahsinul; Sato, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2015-04-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of the association between cardiac activity and the electromyographic (EMG) level of the antagonistic jaw muscles during chewing and NREM sleep in guinea pigs after systemic clonidine injections. Ten animals were prepared for chronic experiments to monitor sleep, cardiac activity and EMG activity of jaw-closing masseter (MAS) and jaw-opening anterior belly of digastric (ADG) muscles. The recordings were made for ten hours with the injections of saline or clonidine (10 μg/kg, i.p.). Integrated EMG activity of the two muscles and mean heart rate (mHR) were calculated for every 10-s epoch. During the two hours after clonidine injection, the duration of REM sleep and mHR were significantly reduced. During chewing, the high EMG activity level of the two muscles and the activity ratio between the two muscles were not modified although mHR was decreased. During NREM sleep, after clonidine injection, the low EMG activity level at baseline was further decreased by 20-30% in parallel to a decrease of mHR although the heterogeneity of the activity ratio remained unaltered. The results suggest that the maintenance of the activity level for the antagonistic jaw muscles are regulated by the distinct physiological mechanisms reflecting the behavioral states during conscious chewing and unconscious NREM sleep.

  19. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. Results: The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P < 0.0001). Clicking noise during mouth chewing was significantly different between groups (P = 0.01). And, there was significant difference in the frequencies of maximum opening of the mouth between groups (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that subjects’ war veterans with PTSD have significantly poorer TMJ functional status than the control subjects. PMID:25077153

  20. Dose-volume factors correlating with trismus following chemoradiation for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    RAO, SHYAM D.; SALEH, ZIAD H.; SETTON, JEREMY; TAM, MOSES; MCBRIDE, SEAN M.; RIAZ, NADEEM; DEASY, JOSEPH O.; LEE, NANCY Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the dose-volume factors in mastication muscles that are implicated as possible causes of trismus in patients following treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for head and neck cancers. Material and methods All evaluable patients treated at our institution between January 2004 and April 2009 with chemotherapy and IMRT for squamous cell cancers of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, hypopharynx or larynx were included in this analysis (N = 421). Trismus was assessed using CTCAE 4.0. Bi-lateral masseter, temporalis, lateral pterygoid and medial pterygoid muscles were delineated on axial computed tomography (CT) treatment planning images, and dose-volume parameters were extracted to investigate univariate and multimetric correlations. Results Forty-six patients (10.9%) were observed to have chronic trismus of grade 1 or greater. From analysis of baseline patient characteristics, toxicity correlated with primary site and patient age. From dose-volume analysis, the steepest dose thresholds and highest correlations were seen for mean dose to ipsilateral masseter (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient Rs = 0.25) and medial pterygoid (Rs = 0.23) muscles. Lyman-Kutcher-Burman modeling showed highest correlations for the same muscles. The best correlation for multimetric logistic regression modeling was with V68Gy to the ipsilateral medial pterygoid (Rs = 0.29). Conclusion Chemoradiation-induced trismus remains a problem particularly for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Strong dose-volume correlations support the hypothesis that limiting dose to the ipsilateral masseter muscle and, in particular, the medial pterygoid muscle may reduce the likelihood of trismus. PMID:25920361

  1. Surface electromyographic patterns of masticatory, neck, and trunk muscles in temporomandibular joint dysfunction patients undergoing anterior repositioning splint therapy.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Tetè, Stefano; D'Attilio, Michele; Perillo, Letizia; Festa, Felice

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of neck, trunk, and masticatory muscles in subjects with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement treated with anterior mandibular repositioning splints. sEMG activities of the muscles in 34 adult subjects (22 females and 12 males; mean age 30.4 years) with TMJ internal derangement were compared with a control group of 34 untreated adults (20 females and 14 males; mean age 31.8 years). sEMG activities of seven muscles (anterior and posterior temporalis, masseter, posterior cervicals, sternocleidomastoid, and upper and lower trapezius) were studied bilaterally, with the mandible in the rest position and during maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), at the beginning of therapy (T0) and after 10 weeks of treatment (T1). Paired and Student's t-tests were undertaken to determine differences between the T0 and T1 data and in sEMG activity between the study and control groups. At T0, paired masseter, sternocleidomastoid, and cervical muscles, in addition to the left anterior temporal and right lower trapezius, showed significantly greater sEMG activity (P = 0.0001; P = 0.0001; for left cervical, P = 0.03; for right cervical, P = 0.0001; P = 0.006 and P = 0.007 muscles, respectively) compared with the control group. This decreased over the remaining study period, such that after treatment, sEMG activity revealed no statistically significant difference when compared with the control group. During MVC at T0, paired masseter and anterior and posterior temporalis muscles showed significantly lower sEMG activity (P = 0.03; P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively) compared with the control group. In contrast, at T1 sEMG activity significantly increased (P = 0.02; P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively), but no difference was observed in relation to the control group. Splint therapy in subjects with internal disk derangement seems to affect sEMG activity of the masticatory, neck, and trunk

  2. A pilot study of ambulatory masticatory muscle activities in TMJD diagnostic groups

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, LR; Gonzalez, YM; Liu, H; Marx, DB; Gallo, LM; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine differences in masticatory muscle usage between TMJD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population Seventy-one informed and consented subjects (27 men; 44 women) participated at the University at Buffalo. Material and Methods Research Diagnostic Criteria and imaging data were used to categorize subjects according to presence/absence (+/−) of TMJ disc placement (DD) and chronic pain (P) (+DD+P, n=18; +DD-P, n =14; −DD-P, n=39). EMG/bite-force calibrations determined subject-specific masseter and temporalis muscle activities per 20 N bite-force (T20N, μV). Over 3 days and nights subjects collected EMG recordings. Duty factors (DFs, % of recording time) were determined based on threshold intervals (5–9, 10–24, 25–49, 50–79, ≥80%T20N). ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc tests identified (i) diagnostic group differences in T20N, and (ii) effects of diagnostic group, gender, time, and interval, and on muscle DFs. Results Mean (±standard error) temporalis T20N in +DD+P subjects was significantly higher (71.4±8.8 μV) than masseter T20N in these subjects (19.6±8.8 μV; P=0.001) and in −DD-P subjects (25.3±6.0 μV, P=0.0007). Masseter DFs at 5–9%T20N were significantly higher in +DD-P women (3.48%) than +DD-P men (0.85%) and women and men in both other diagnostic groups (all P<0.03); and in +DD+P women (2.00%) compared to −DD-P men (0.83%; P=0.029). Night-time DFs at 5–9%T20N in +DD-P women (1.97%) were significantly higher than in −DD-P men (0.47%) and women (0.24%; all P<0.01). Conclusions Between-group differences were found in masticatory muscle activities in both laboratory and natural environmental settings. PMID:25865543

  3. Analysis of rhythmical jaw movements produced by taste stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, K; Nishimuta, K; Yasumatsu, K; Ninomiya, Y

    2001-04-01

    Taste stimulation of the mouth induces various oral movements. Sucrose or salt solution induces rhythmical jaw movements (RJM) or tongue protrusion as an ingestive behavior. Bitter taste induces a gaping or tongue retraction as an aversive behavior. There is no report that describes the precise pattern of jaw movements induced by taste stimulation. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the pattern of the taste-induced RJM with electromyographic activities of the masticatory muscles in the anesthetized rat. When water was injected into the mouth of the rat, an RJM was induced. In this type of RJM, the lower jaw swung right and left side in each open-close cycle alternately. The anterior digastric muscle was active in every opening phase, while activities of the jaw closing muscles were generally weak. The RJM induced by water was opening-dominant movements. Sucrose or salt solution induced a similar pattern of RJM to water-induced RJM. When acetic acid was injected, amplitude of the alternate lateral jaw movement was significantly larger than that in the water-induced RJM. The activity of the superficial temporalis muscle was large in those closing phases with ipsilateral side movement, while it was small in the closing phases with contralateral movement. The pattern of quinine-induced RJM was characterized by small lateral, large open-close and large antero-posterior movements. Tastes which are reported to induce ingestive behavior such as sweet or salty don't alter the pattern of RJM; however, the tastes which induce aversive behavior make the pattern of RJM different from the water-induced RJM.

  4. The effects of manual therapy and exercise directed at the cervical spine on pain and pressure pain sensitivity in patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    La Touche, R; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Fernández-Carnero, J; Escalante, K; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, S; Paris-Alemany, A; Cleland, J A

    2009-09-01

    No studies have investigated the effects of the treatments directed at the cervical spine in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Our aim was to investigate the effects of joint mobilization and exercise directed at the cervical spine on pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity in the muscles of mastication in patients with TMD. Nineteen patients (14 females), aged 19-57 years, with myofascial TMD were included. All patients received a total of 10 treatment session over a 5-week period (twice per week). Treatment included manual therapy techniques and exercise directed at the cervical spine. Outcome measures included bilateral pressure pain threshold (PPT) levels over the masseter and temporalis muscles, active pain-free mouth opening (mm) and pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and were all assessed pre-intervention, 48 h after the last treatment (post-intervention) and at 12-week follow-up period. Mixed-model anovas were used to examine the effects of the intervention on each outcome measure. Within-group effect sizes were calculated in order to assess clinical effect. The 2 x 3 mixed model anova revealed significant effect for time (F = 77.8; P < 0.001) but not for side (F = 0.2; P = 0.7) for changes in PPT over the masseter muscle and over the temporalis muscle (time: F = 66.8; P < 0.001; side: F = 0.07; P = 0.8). Post hoc revealed significant differences between pre-intervention and both post-intervention and follow-up periods (P < 0.001) but not between post-intervention and follow-up period (P = 0.9) for both muscles. Within-group effect sizes were large (d > 1.0) for both follow-up periods in both muscles. The anova found a significant effect for time (F = 78.6; P < 0.001) for changes in pain intensity and active pain-free mouth opening (F = 17.1; P < 0.001). Significant differences were found between pre-intervention and both post-intervention and follow-up periods (P < 0.001) but not between the post-intervention and follow-up period (P > 0

  5. Muscular activity may improve in edentulous patients after implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I; Schimmel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Data sourcesMedline via Pubmed and the Cochrane Library were searched from January 1980 to September 2013. This was complemented by a manual search of the magazines Deutsche Zahnaerztliche Zeitung, Quintessenz, Zeitschrift für Zahnärztliche Implantologie, Schweizerische Monatszeitschrift and Implantologie. Additionally, the list of reference s of all selected full-text articles and related reviews were further scrutinised for potential included studies in English or German.Study selectionThree review authors independently searched for clinical trials that assessed the muscular activity in the intervention groups: edentulous patients treated with implant-overdentures (IODs) and implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (ISFDPs) and the comparison groups: dentates and edentulous patients treated with mucosa-borne complete removable dental prostheses (CRDPs).Data extraction and synthesisThe primary outcome was the muscular activity (measured by electromyography [EMG]) in masseter or temporalis muscle of the participants during clenching and chewing. The data extraction of each included study consisted of author, year, age range, treatment, number of participants, number of implants inserted, arch treated, opposite jaw, kind and side of the muscles that were measured. EMG gain or loss (unit measured: volt) was considered by using the effect size. For the meta-analyses only the studies that included masseter muscle measured separately from temporalis were considered. Concerning the side of measurement (right and left side measured together or right and left side measured separately), only the dominant type in each category was included.ResultsSixteen articles, out of the initial 646 retrieved abstracts, were analysed. The muscular activity of edentulous subjects increased after implant support therapy during clenching (effect size [ES]: 2.18 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 3.23]) and during chewing (ES: 1.45 [95 % CI: 1.21, 1.69]). In addition, the pooled EMG

  6. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Jaw Motor Events during Sleep in Sleep Bruxism Patients: A Polysomnographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Joo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kato, Takafumi; Park, Hyung Uk; Heo, Kyoung; Kim, Seong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on jaw motor episodes during sleep in patients with or without orofacial pain who did not respond to oral splint treatment. Methods: Twenty subjects with a clinical diagnosis of SB completed this study. Ten subjects received bilateral BoNT-A injections (25 U per muscle) into the masseter muscles only (group A), and the other 10 received the injections into both the masseter and temporalis muscles (group B). Video-polysomnographic (vPSG) recordings were made before and at 4 weeks after injection. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) and orofacial activity (OFA) were scored and analyzed for several parameters (e.g., frequency of episodes, bursts per episode, episode duration). The peak amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the two muscles was also measured. Results: BoNT-A injection did not reduce the frequency, number of bursts, or duration for RMMA episodes in the two groups. The injection decreased the peak amplitude of EMG burst of RMMA episodes in the injected muscles (p < 0.001, repeated measure ANOVA) in both groups. At 4 weeks after injection, 9 subjects self-reported reduction of tooth grinding and 18 subjects self-reported reduction of morning jaw stiffness. Conclusions: A single BoNT-A injection is an effective strategy for controlling SB for at least a month. It reduces the intensity rather than the generation of the contraction in jaw-closing muscles. Future investigations on the efficacy and safety in larger samples over a longer follow-up period are needed before establishing management strategies for SB with BoNT-A. Citation: Shim YJ; Lee MK; Kato T; Park HU; Heo K; Kim ST. Effects of botulinum toxin on jaw motor events during sleep in sleep bruxism patients: a polysomnographic evaluation. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):291-298. PMID:24634627

  7. The clenching-grinding spectrum and fear circuitry disorders: clinical insights from the neuroscience/paleoanthropology interface.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan; Ralston, Tyler C; Williams, Andrew E; Yamashita, Jennifer M; Bracha, Adam S

    2005-04-01

    This review discusses the clenching-grinding spectrum from the neuropsychiatric/neuroevolutionary perspective. In neuropsychiatry, signs of jaw clenching may be a useful objective marker for detecting or substantiating a self-report of current subjective emotional distress. Similarly, accelerated tooth wear may be an objective clinical sign for detecting, or substantiating, long-lasting anxiety. Clenching-grinding behaviors affect at least 8 percent of the population. We argue that during the early paleolithic environment of evolutionary adaptedness, jaw clenching was an adaptive trait because it rapidly strengthened the masseter and temporalis muscles, enabling a stronger, deeper and therefore more lethal bite in expectation of conflict (warfare) with conspecifics. Similarly, sharper incisors produced by teeth grinding may have served as weaponry during early human combat. We posit that alleles predisposing to fear-induced clenching-grinding were evolutionarily conserved in the human clade (lineage) since they remained adaptive for anatomically and mitochondrially modern humans (Homo sapiens) well into the mid-paleolithic. Clenching-grinding, sleep bruxism, myofacial pain, craniomaxillofacial musculoskeletal pain, temporomandibular disorders, oro-facial pain, and the fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue spectrum disorders are linked. A 2003 Cochrane meta-analysis concluded that dental procedures for the above spectrum disorders are not evidence based. There is a need for early detection of clenching-grinding in anxiety disorder clinics and for research into science-based interventions. Finally, research needs to examine the possible utility of incorporating physical signs into Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition posttraumatic stress disorder diagnostic criteria. One of the diagnostic criterion that may need to undergo a revision in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition is Criterion D (persistent fear

  8. The effect of culture on pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Ohrbach, R; Michelotti, A; List, T

    2016-02-01

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0.001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0.003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0.017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P ≤ 0.006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0.001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 0.01). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0.001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test.

  9. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on the Masticatory Muscles and Physiologic Sleep Variables in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Giannasi, Lilian Chrystiane; Matsui, Miriam Yumi; Freitas, Sandra Regina Batista; Caldas, Bruna F.; Grossmann, Eduardo; Amorim, José Benedito O.; dos Santos, Israel dos Reis; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Gomes, Monica Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term employed to define a group of non-progressive neuromotor disorders caused by damage to the immature or developing brain, with consequent limitations regarding movement and posture. CP may impair orapharygeal muscle tone, leading to a compromised chewing function and to sleep disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea). Thirteen adults with CP underwent bilateral masseter and temporalis neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy. The effects on the masticatory muscles and sleep variables were evaluated using electromyography (EMG) and polysomnography (PSG), respectively, prior and after 2 months of NMES. EMG consisted of 3 tests in different positions: rest, mouth opening and maximum clenching effort (MCE). EMG values in the rest position were 100% higher than values recorded prior to therapy for all muscles analyzed (p < 0.05); mean mouth opening increased from 38.0 ± 8.0 to 44.0 ± 10.0 cm (p = 0.03). A significant difference in MCE was found only for the right masseter. PSG revealed an improved in the AHI from 7.2±7.0/h to 2.3±1.5/h (p < 0.05); total sleep time improved from 185 min to 250 min (p = 0.04) and minimun SaO2 improved from 83.6 ± 3.0 to 86.4 ± 4.0 (p = 0.04). NMES performed over a two-month period led to improvements in the electrical activity of the masticatory muscles at rest, mouth opening, isometric contraction and sleep variables, including the elimination of obstructive sleep apnea events in patients with CP. Trial Registration ReBEC RBR994XFS http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br PMID:26247208

  10. Jaw-muscle architecture and mandibular morphology influence relative maximum jaw gapes in the sexually dimorphic Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E; Hylander, William L; Vinyard, Christopher J; Taylor, Andrea B

    2015-05-01

    Maximum jaw gape is a performance variable related to feeding and non-feeding oral behaviors, such as canine gape displays, and is influenced by several factors including jaw-muscle fiber architecture, muscle position on the skull, and jaw morphology. Maximum gape, jaw length, and canine height are strongly correlated across catarrhine primates, but relationships between gape and other aspects of masticatory apparatus morphology are less clear. We examine the effects of jaw-adductor fiber architecture, jaw-muscle leverage, and jaw form on gape in an intraspecific sample of sexually dimorphic crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis). As M. fascicularis males have relatively larger maximum gapes than females, we predict that males will have muscle and jaw morphologies that facilitate large gape, but these morphologies may come at some expense to bite force. Male crab-eating macaques have relatively longer jaw-muscle fibers, masseters with decreased leverage, and temporomandibular joint morphologies that facilitate the production of wide gapes. Because relative canine height is correlated with maximum gape in catarrhines, and males have relatively longer canines than females, these results support the hypothesis that male M. fascicularis have experienced selection to increase maximum gape. The sexes do not differ in relative masseter physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA), but males compensate for a potential trade-off between muscle excursion versus muscle force with increased temporalis weight and PCSA. This musculoskeletal configuration is likely functionally significant for behaviors involving aggressive canine biting and displays in male M. fascicularis and provides additional evidence supporting the multifactorial nature of the catarrhine masticatory apparatus. Our results have implications for the evolution of craniofacial morphology in catarrhine primates and reinforce the importance of evaluating additional factors other than feeding behavior and diet

  11. Condyle-fossa modifications and muscle interactions during herbst treatment, part 1. New technological methods.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, John C; Woodside, Donald G; Altuna, Gurkan; Kuftinec, Mladen M; Angelopoulos, Gerassimos; Bourque, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    Changes in the condyle, the glenoid fossa, and the muscles of mastication were investigated in subjects undergoing continuous orthopedic advancement of the mandible with a Herbst-block appliance. The total sample consisted of 56 subjects and included 15 nonhuman primates (in the middle mixed, early permanent, and permanent dentitions), 17 human Herbst patients in the early permanent dentition, and 24 human controls from the Burlington Growth Center. The 8 nonhuman primates in the middle mixed dentition were the focus of this study. Mandibular advancement was obtained progressively in 5 animals by adding stops to the telescopic arms of fixed functional Herbst appliances with occlusal coverage; activations of 5.0 mm, 7.0 mm, and 8.0 mm were achieved. Two primates served as controls, and the third was a sham control. Two experimental animals and the 2 controls also wore surgically implanted electromyographic electrodes in the superior and inferior heads of the lateral pterygoid muscles and in the superficial masseter and anterior digastric muscles. Changes in condylar growth direction and amount were assessed with the Björk method from measurements made on serial cephalometric tracings superimposed on metallic implants. Undecalcified sections, treated with intravenous tetracycline vital staining, were viewed with fluorescence microscopy to examine histologic changes in the condyle and the glenoid fossa. New bone formation in the fossa associated with continuous mandibular protrusion was quantified by using computerized histomorphometric analysis of decalcified histological sections and polarized light. The unique combination of permanently implanted electromyographic electrodes, tetracycline vital staining, and histomorphometry represents a significant technological advancement in methods and materials. Together, they demonstrated different muscle-bone interaction results for functional appliances than those reported in previous studies. In Part 1 of this study, we

  12. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  13. [Myofascial trigger points, pain, disability and quality of sleep in patients with chronic tension-type headache: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Martín-Herrero, Clara; Rodrigues de Souza, Daiana P; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2012-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. The referred pain induced by myofascial trigger points (MTP) and sleep disorders can be factors that contribute to chronic tension-type headache. AIM. To determine the relationship between MTP, intensity of pain, disability and quality of sleep in people with chronic tension-type headache. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Participants in the study consisted of 16 patients with chronic tension-type headache and 15 healthy controls. A visual analogue scale was used to measure the intensity of the pain, and the neck disability questionnaire and the Pittsburgh (quality of sleep) questionnaire were also employed. MTP were explored in the temporal, masseter, upper trapezius, suboccipital, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, semispinalis capitis and anterior digastric muscles by a blind evaluator. RESULTS. The subjects with chronic tension-type headache had greater cervical disability (p < 0.001) than the controls, whereas the quality of sleep showed a tendency (p = 0.092). A positive correlation was found between the worst pain last week with the Pittsburgh questionnaire (r = 0.631; p = 0.009) and disability (r = 0.521; p = 0.046), as well as a positive correlation between disability and quality of sleep (r = 0.815; p < 0.001). The patients with headache displayed a higher number of MTP than the healthy controls (p < 0.001), the presence of active MTP being found exclusively in the patients. No association was found between the number of MTP and intensity of pain, disability or quality of sleep. CONCLUSIONS. Quality of sleep and active MTP can be different factors contributing to chronic tension-type headache. Nevertheless, the presence of MTP could also be an epiphenomenon of the pain.

  14. EMG study for perioral facial muscles function during mastication.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, S; Tsuboi, A; Watanabe, M; Sasaki, K

    2008-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify the temporal and quantitative modulation in the orbicularis oris (OO) and buccinator (BUC) muscle activities during mastication. Ten healthy males (26.9 +/- 1.0 years) participated. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the facial muscles were recorded with fine wire electrodes when chewing the chewing gum (one to four sticks) and peanuts (one to five pieces). Surface EMGs of the masseter (MAS) and digastric muscles were recorded simultaneously. EMGs of the OO and BUC showed rhythmic single-peaked bursts corresponding to the jaw-opening phase of chewing cycles. The total cycle lengths were constant regardless of the food amount. Integrated EMGs of the OO changed significantly when the amount of both foods changed (anova: P < 0.05). Those of the BUC changed significantly with the amount of gum changed (P < 0.05), but did not change with the amount of peanuts changed. The burst duration of OO changed significantly when the amount of gum changed during ipsilateral chewing (P < 0.05). When the amount of peanuts changed during ipsilateral chewing, the onset of OO and the peak of BUC based on the onset of MAS activity changed significantly (P < 0.05). However, the onset, peak and offset of the OO and BUC based on the offset of MAS did not change regardless of the amounts chewed. The changes of the OO and BUC activities may derive from chewing-generated sensory inputs in accordance with the physical property of food in part, which would relate to the function of these muscles during mastication.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance diagnosis of variations in the anatomical location of the major salivary glands in 1680 dogs and 187 cats.

    PubMed

    Durand, A; Finck, M; Sullivan, M; Hammond, G

    2016-03-01

    During assessment of routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heads of dogs, variations in the location of mandibular and zygomatic salivary glands (SGs) were observed incidentally. The aims of this retrospective study were to describe anatomical variations of the major SGs found on MRI and computed tomography (CT) studies of the head in dogs and cats and to investigate possible clinical relevancy. No anatomical variation of the SGs was seen in cats, but in dogs, although variation of the parotid SG was not identified, that of the mandibular SG was found in 33/1680 animals (2%), either unilaterally (6/33 right-sided, 13/33 left-sided) or bilaterally (14/33). The Border terrier breed (19/33, 58%) was over-represented. Each atypically located mandibular SG was positioned medial to the digastric muscle and rostral to the retropharyngeal lymph node. The sublingual glands were difficult to delineate from the mandibular glands. Anatomical variation of one zygomatic gland (3/4 left-sided) was identified in four small-breed dogs (0.2%). Each atypically located zygomatic gland was tilted at the ventrorostral aspect of the masseter muscle underneath the skin surface. MRI and CT characteristics were not different between typically and atypically located SGs. None of the dogs had clinical signs related with SG disease. It was concluded that, with suspected breed predispositions, incidental unilateral or bilateral anatomical variations of mandibular and zygomatic SGs can be encountered in dogs and an awareness of these possible variations may be important in pre-surgical planning.

  16. Evaluation of jaw and neck muscle activities while chewing using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Narita, Noriyuki; Endo, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to quantitatively clarify the physiological features in rhythmically coordinated jaw and neck muscle EMG activities while chewing gum using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in 20 healthy subjects. The chewing side masseter muscle EMG signal was used as the reference signal, while the other jaw (non-chewing side masseter muscle, bilateral anterior temporal muscles, and bilateral anterior digastric muscles) and neck muscle (bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles) EMG signals were used as the examined signals in EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses. Chewing-related jaw and neck muscle activities were aggregated in the first peak of the power spectrum in rhythmic chewing. The gain in the peak frequency represented the power relationships between jaw and neck muscle activities during rhythmic chewing. The phase in the peak frequency represented the temporal relationships between the jaw and neck muscle activities, while the non-chewing side neck muscle presented a broad range of distributions across jaw closing and opening phases. Coherence in the peak frequency represented the synergistic features in bilateral jaw closing muscles and chewing side neck muscle activities. The coherence and phase in non-chewing side neck muscle activities exhibited a significant negative correlation. From above, the bilateral coordination between the jaw and neck muscle activities is estimated while chewing when the non-chewing side neck muscle is synchronously activated with the jaw closing muscles, while the unilateral coordination is estimated when the non-chewing side neck muscle is irregularly activated in the jaw opening phase. Thus, the occurrence of bilateral or unilateral coordinated features in the jaw and neck muscle activities may correspond to the phase characteristics in the non-chewing side neck muscle activities during rhythmical chewing. Considering these novel findings in healthy subjects, EMG

  17. A preliminary analysis of correlated evolution in Mammalian chewing motor patterns.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wall, Christine E; Doherty, Alison H; Crompton, Alfred W; Hylander, William L

    2011-08-01

    Descriptive and quantitative analyses of electromyograms (EMG) from the jaw adductors during feeding in mammals have demonstrated both similarities and differences among species in chewing motor patterns. These observations have led to a number of hypotheses of the evolution of motor patterns, the most comprehensive of which was proposed by Weijs in 1994. Since then, new data have been collected and additional hypotheses for the evolution of motor patterns have been proposed. Here, we take advantage of these new data and a well-resolved species-level phylogeny for mammals to test for the correlated evolution of specific components of mammalian chewing motor patterns. We focus on the evolution of the coordination of working-side (WS) and balancing-side (BS) jaw adductors (i.e., Weijs' Triplets I and II), the evolution of WS and BS muscle recruitment levels, and the evolution of asynchrony between pairs of muscles. We converted existing chewing EMG data into binary traits to incorporate as much data as possible and facilitate robust phylogenetic analyses. We then tested hypotheses of correlated evolution of these traits across our phylogeny using a maximum likelihood method and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Both sets of analyses yielded similar results highlighting the evolutionary changes that have occurred across mammals in chewing motor patterns. We find support for the correlated evolution of (1) Triplets I and II, (2) BS deep masseter asynchrony and Triplets I and II, (3) a relative delay in the activity of the BS deep masseter and a decrease in the ratio of WS to BS muscle recruitment levels, and (4) a relative delay in the activity of the BS deep masseter and a delay in the activity of the BS posterior temporalis. In contrast, changes in relative WS and BS activity levels across mammals are not correlated with Triplets I and II. Results from this work can be integrated with dietary and morphological data to better understand how feeding and the

  18. Dental Implants – Perceiving Patients’ Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Soumendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG) findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects) and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects). Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2%) were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50) of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01) basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings. PMID:26465146

  19. Glutamate and capsaicin effects on trigeminal nociception I: Activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Lam, David K; Sessle, Barry J; Hu, James W

    2009-01-28

    We have examined the effect of the peripheral application of glutamate and capsaicin to deep craniofacial tissues in influencing the activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents. The activity of single trigeminal nociceptive afferents with receptive fields in deep craniofacial tissues were recorded extracellularly in 55 halothane-anesthetized rats. The mechanical activation threshold (MAT) of each afferent was assessed before and after injection of 0.5 M glutamate (or vehicle) and 1% capsaicin (or vehicle) into the receptive field. A total of 68 afferents that could be activated by blunt noxious mechanical stimulation of the deep craniofacial tissues (23 masseter, 5 temporalis, 40 temporomandibular joint) were studied. When injected alone, glutamate and capsaicin activated and induced peripheral sensitization reflected as MAT reduction in many afferents. Following glutamate injection, capsaicin-evoked activity was greater than that evoked by capsaicin alone, whereas following capsaicin injection, glutamate-evoked responses were similar to glutamate alone. These findings indicate that peripheral application of glutamate or capsaicin may activate or induce peripheral sensitization in a subpopulation of trigeminal nociceptive afferents innervating deep craniofacial tissues, as reflected in changes in MAT and other afferent response properties. The data further suggest that peripheral glutamate and capsaicin receptor mechanisms may interact to modulate the activation and peripheral sensitization in some deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

  20. Oral Health, Temporomandibular Disorder, and Masticatory Performance in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Rejane L. S.; Bonjardim, Leonardo R.; Neves, Eduardo L. A.; Santos, Lidiane C. L.; Nunes, Paula S.; Garcez, Catarina A.; Souza, Cynthia C.; Araújo, Adriano A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism, as well as to measure masticatory performance of subjects with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2). Methods and Results. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) for both groups, control (CG) and CMT2, was considered low (CG = 2.46; CMT2 = 1.85, P = 0.227). The OHIP-14 score was considered low (CG = 2.86, CMT2 = 5.83, P = 0.899). The prevalence of self-reported TMD was 33.3% and 38.9% (P = 0.718) in CG and CMT2 respectively and for self-reported bruxism was 4.8% (CG) and 22.2% (CMT2), without significant difference between groups (P = 0.162). The most common clinical sign of TMD was masseter (CG = 38.1%; CMT2 = 66.7%) and temporalis (CG = 19.0%; GCMT2 = 33.3%) muscle pain. The geometric mean diameter (GMD) was not significantly different between groups (CG = 4369; CMT2 = 4627, P = 0.157). Conclusion. We conclude that the CMT2 disease did not negatively have influence either on oral health status in the presence and severity of TMD and bruxism or on masticatory performance. PMID:24391462

  1. "Bochdalek's" skull: morphology report and reconstruction of face.

    PubMed

    Klepáček, Ivo; Malá, Pavla Zedníková

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to create a real model of a face using the well preserved "Bochdalek's skull" (from an eighteenth Century female aged 18 years) kept in the museum of anatomy (Institute of Anatomy, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague). The skull had previously been appraised as a deformed skull with an adhesion present on both sides of the jaw, most likely of post-traumatic origin (bilateral syngnathia). In an attempt to find the best description for it, and to identify the spatial relationships between the surface of the facial bones which had changed in shape, as well as the formation of soft tissue on the face, we decided to perform a 3D reconstruction of the face. Due to the necessity of preserving the unique original undamaged skull, we created an exact digital "casting" of the facial bone structure on a computer first, which we then converted into a three-dimensional model using a 3D RepRap printer. We needed to take into consideration the fact that we had no portrait of the girl, just the skull. For this reason, we opted for a selected combination of anthropologic steps (the modified Manchester technique), which in our view, allows for optimum creation of the topography of the face in keeping with the deformed skull. The resulting reconstructed face was old in appearance with an overhanging lower lip and flattened surfaces in the areas of the temporalis and masseter muscles.

  2. Relation between vertical facial morphology and jaw muscle activity in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Graziano; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Antinori, Marco; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to quantitatively analyze the relation between the activity of masticatory muscles and the inclination of the mandibular plane in a group of 73 healthy white men aged 20-36 years. The three-dimensional coordinates of soft-tissue landmarks gnathion and left and right gonion were digitized using an electromagnetic computerized instrument, the orientation of mandibular plane relative to the true vertical was computed and projected on the anatomical sagittal plane. The electromyographic (EMG) potentials of left and right masseter and temporalis anterior during maximum voluntary teeth clenching were recorded, and the mean EMG amplitude calculated. Two groups of men with opposite facial morphology were then selected: all men with a steep mandibular plane (higher than the mean plus one standard deviation) entered a first group (10 'long face' subjects), while all men with a relatively more horizontal mandibular plane (lower than the mean minus one standard deviation) entered a second group (13 'short face' subjects). Mean EMG potentials computed in the two groups were compared by using Student's t -test for independent samples. All the EMG potentials recorded during maximum voluntary clench in the 'long face' men were lower than that recorded in the 'short face' men, with statistically significant differences for all four analyzed muscles (p < 0.05). In conclusion, a non-invasive three-dimensional method confirmed that facial morphology and muscular function are significantly related, at least in men with a sound stomatognathic apparatus.

  3. Analysis of thermal pain sensitivity and psychological profiles in different subgroups of TMD patients.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Clark, G T; Kim, Y K; Chung, J W

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated differences in pain sensitivities and psychological profiles among different temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain subtypes. Evaluation was done on 36 normal subjects and 39 TMD patients with high Graded Chronic Pain scale scores. TMD patients were placed in three pain subgroups (myogenous, arthrogenous, mixed) using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) axis I guidelines. RDC/TMD axis II profiles including depression and somatization were analysed. Cold pain threshold (CPT), heat pain threshold (HPT), and heat pain tolerance threshold (HPTT) were measured on three facial regions (anterior temporalis, masseter, TMJ) and a leg region (anterior tibialis). The arthrogenous pain subgroup showed significantly higher CPT and lower HPT and HPTT in the facial region, and lower HPTT in the anterior tibialis region compared with normal and myogenous pain subgroups. The myogenous pain subgroup had significantly higher somatization scores than normal and arthrogenous pain subgroups, and higher depression scores than normal subjects. The results suggest that peripheral and/or central sensitization are present in chronic arthrogenous pain more so than in myogenous pain, and this phenomenon appears to take place regardless of the patient's psychological profiles. These results may explain the underlying mechanism that aggravates TMD pain.

  4. Sleep bruxism possibly triggered by multiple sclerosis attacks and treated successfully with botulinum toxin: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Serhan; Kaleağası, Hakan; Fidancı, Halit

    2015-09-01

    Sleep bruxism refers to a nocturnal parafunctional activity including the clenching, grinding or gnashing of teeth. While most of the nocturnal bruxism cases seen in the general population are apparently idiopathic, it has been reported to be associated with a range of neurological diseases such as Huntington's disease, cranio-cervical dystonia and post-anoxic brain damage, but not multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe three cases of MS patients who have had moderate to severe complaints of bruxism in the two weeks following their relevant MS attacks. None of the three patients had a diagnosis of bruxism prior to her attack. The diagnosis was confirmed in one out of three by a polysomnography. One patient did not have any complaints related to bruxism previous to her attack, whereas two had mild and infrequent complaints. The symptoms of the relevant attacks were left hemihypesthesia in all and hemiparesis in two. None of the patients had spasticity that could result in severe teeth clenching. All three patients presented with morning headaches and jaw pain or tightness and were treated successfully with botulinum toxin (Btx) injections applied to their masseter and temporalis muscles. The cause of bruxism is controversial but lesions of the cortico-basalganglia-thalamo-cotrical loops are thought to be most likely. However, acute or chronic lesions in those pathways were not demonstrated in the 3 patients. It is feasible that they had normal appearing white matter interruptions in their cortico-basalganglia-thalamocortical loops along with their relevant attack.

  5. Botulinum toxin injection for bruxism associated with brain injury: case report.

    PubMed

    Kesikburun, Serdar; Alaca, Rıdvan; Aras, Berke; Tuğcu, Ilknur; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2014-01-01

    Bruxism is involuntary grinding of the teeth and can occur as a complication of brain injury. If untreated, bruxism can lead to severe occlusal trauma. Herein, we present a patient with traumatic brain injury and nocturnal bruxism that was treated with botulinum toxin injection. A 21 yr old male patient with traumatic brain injury from a car accident was admitted to our inpatient rehabilitation unit. He had a history of coma for 2 wk in the intensive care unit. The initial cranial computed tomography scan indicated a superior thalamic hemorrhage. On admission to our department 3 mo postinjury, his mental status was good and he was able to walk without assistance, but he had mild ataxia. He complained about severe teeth grinding at night, which began 2 mo postinjury. Botulinum toxin-A was injected into the masseter muscles (20 U in each muscle) and temporalis muscles (15 U in each muscle) bilaterally. A decrease in bruxism was reported within 3 d. Clinical improvement persisted at assessment 4 mo posttreatment. Botulinum toxin injection can be used as an effective treatment for bruxism associated with brain injury.

  6. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  7. Sensitivity analysis of a validated subject-specific finite element model of the human craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Szwedowski, T D; Fialkov, J; Whyne, C M

    2011-01-01

    Developing a more complete understanding of the mechanical response of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) to physiological loads is fundamental to improving treatment for traumatic injuries, reconstruction due to neoplasia, and deformities. Characterization of the biomechanics of the CFS is challenging due to its highly complex structure and heterogeneity, motivating the utilization of experimentally validated computational models. As such, the objective of this study was to develop, experimentally validate, and parametrically analyse a patient-specific finite element (FE) model of the CFS to elucidate a better understanding of the factors that are of intrinsic importance to the skeletal structural behaviour of the human CFS. An FE model of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton was created from subject-specific computed tomography data. The model was validated based on bone strain measurements taken under simulated physiological-like loading through the masseter and temporalis muscles (which are responsible for the majority of craniofacial physiologic loading due to mastication). The baseline subject-specific model using locally defined cortical bone thicknesses produced the strongest correlation to the experimental data (r2 = 0.73). Large effects on strain patterns arising from small parametric changes in cortical thickness suggest that the very thin bony structures present in the CFS are crucial to characterizing the local load distribution in the CFS accurately.

  8. The use of electromyography to quantify muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Myslinski, N R; Buxbaum, J D; Parente, F J

    1985-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the feasibility of using electromyography (EMG) to quantify muscle pain in patients suffering from chronic myofacial pain dysfunction (MPD). Ten patients were carefully selected to include those having mild to severe pain, but not any major psychological or other physiological dysfunction. Measurements of perceived pain and EMG frequency and amplitude were recorded before and after standard analgesic therapy. EMG recordings were collected bilaterally from the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles during the resting, swallowing, clenching and chewing modes of activity. Multiple regression (R) analysis indicated that changes in perceived pain are correlated with changes in the EMG and can be determined by using the following formula: delta P = (delta F) (0.405) + C where P = perceived pain level, F = EMG frequency, and C = 1.533. By computing the Phi coefficients, the highest correlation between EMG recordings and subjective pain ratings was demonstrated in the resting mode. In this mode, 64% (multiple R = 0.80) of the variance in perceived pain difference scores from pre- to post-therapy tests could be determined. A significant relationship exists between the change in perceived pain and the EMG (t = 2.525, p less than 0.05), whether pain levels increase or decrease. The implementation of this method to quantify expected changes in pain due to muscle spasm in uncomplicated individuals is discussed.

  9. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy for implant-related temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Paul; Peterson, Erik J; Durham, Justin; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a patient experiencing several years of pain associated with bilateral failed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Proplast/Teflon fossa prostheses. Despite surgical removal of the prostheses and comprehensive conservative management, including typical pharmacotherapy approaches for chronic pain, pain was still not relieved, and management was revised to target a putative chronic inflammatory disorder. Methotrexate was prescribed because of its known efficacy for inflammation and pain reduction in rheumatoid arthritis. Titration of methotrexate dosage over 5 months to a weekly dose of 20 mg resulted in reduced pain intensity at rest, increased pain-free maximal jaw opening, and a reduction in the sensory component of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Maximum assisted jaw opening remained the same, as did the palpation tenderness of both TMJs and of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy may represent a viable option when conservative treatments have failed to provide significant pain relief in patients who have had Proplast/Teflon TMJ implants.

  10. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    PubMed Central

    Hassel, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection. PMID:23299659

  11. Caramel as a Model System for Evaluating the Roles of Mechanical Properties and Oral Processing on Sensory Perception of Texture.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty B; Luck, Paige J; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-03-01

    Food formulation can have a significant impact on texture perception during oral processing. We hypothesized that slight modifications to caramel formulations would significantly alter mechanical and masticatory parameters, which can be used to explain differences in texture perception. A multidisciplinary approach was applied by evaluating relationships among mechanical properties, sensory texture, and oral processing. Caramels were utilized as a highly adhesive and cohesive model system and the formulation was adjusted to generate distinct differences in sensory hardness and adhesiveness. Descriptive analysis was used to determine sensory texture, and mechanical properties were evaluated by oscillatory rheology, creep recovery, and pressure sensitive tack measurements. Oral processing was measured by determining activity of anterior temporalis and masseter muscles via electromyography and tracking jaw movement during chewing. The substitution of agar or gelatin for corn syrup at 0.6% w/w of the total formulation resulted in increased sensory hardness and decreased adhesiveness. Creep recovery and pressure sensitive tack testing were more effective at differentiating among treatments than oscillatory rheology. Hardness correlated inversely with creep compliance, and both stickiness and tooth adhesiveness correlated with pressure sensitive adhesive force. Harder samples, despite being less adhesive, were associated with increased muscle activity and jaw movement during mastication. Tooth packing, not linked with any mechanical property, correlated with altered jaw movement. The combination of material properties and oral processing parameters were able to explain all sensory texture differences in a highly adhesive food.

  12. Effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain and fatigue in human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Martina, R

    2001-04-01

    Gum chewing has been accepted as an adjunct to oral hygiene, as salivary stimulant and vehicle for various agents, as well as for jaw muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain, fatigue and pressure tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen women without temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were requested to perform one of the following chewing tasks in three separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and empty-chewing with no bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 40 min at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, perceived muscle pain and masticatory fatigue were rated on visual analog scales (VAS) before, throughout, and after the chewing task. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed before and immediately after the chewing tasks, and again after 24 h. The VAS scores for pain and fatigue significantly increased only during the hard gum chewing, and after 10 min of recovery VAS scores had decreased again, almost to their baseline values. No significant changes were found for PPTs either after hard or soft gum chewing. The findings indicate that the jaw muscles recover quickly from prolonged chewing activity in subjects without TMD.

  13. The projection of jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents to fifth nerve motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Appenteng, K; O'Donovan, M J; Somjen, G; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1978-01-01

    1. By spike-triggered averaging of intracellular synaptic noise it has been shown in pentobarbitone anaesthetized cats that jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents with their cell bodies in the mid-brain have a relatively weak monosynaptic projection to masseter and temporalis motoneurones. 2. Extending the spike-triggered averaging method to recording extracellular excitatory field potentials it has been shown that virtually all the spindles do project monosynaptically to the motoneurone pool. It is concluded that the general weakness of the projection is due to its restriction to a small proportion of the motoneurones, possibly those concerned most with tonic postural functions. 3. The shape of individual intracellular e.p.s.p.s together with the spatial distribution of extracellular excitatory potential fields provide some evidence for a dentrically weighted distribution of the synapses. 4. Evidence is presented that both primary- and secondary-type spindle afferents project monosynaptically, the secondary effects being some 71% of the strength of the primary ones. PMID:149860

  14. Effects of adding fluids to solid foods on muscle activity and number of chewing cycles.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Andries; Engelen, Lina; Abbink, Jan; Pereira, Luciano J

    2007-06-01

    The production of a sufficient amount of saliva is indispensable for good chewing. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will facilitate the chewing process, especially for dry foods. The effect might be larger for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. Furthermore, adding fluids that contain mucins or alpha-amylase may have a larger facilitating effect on mastication than the addition of water alone. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut, and Gouda cheese. In addition, they chewed on these foods after different volumes of water, artificial saliva containing mucins, or a solution of alpha-amylase had been added. Muscle activity and number of chewing strokes until swallowing were measured. The salivary flow rates of the subjects were also determined. Adding fluid to the food significantly reduced the number of chewing cycles and total muscular work (i.e. the integrated surface electromyograpy of masseter and temporalis muscles measured bilaterally, summed for all chewing cycles) until swallowing for all foods, except carrot. The largest effects were observed for melba and cake, which are dry products requiring sufficient saliva to form a coherent bolus safe for swallowing. More facilitation of the chewing process was observed after adding fluid to breakfast cake for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. The type of fluid had no significant effect on the chewing process.

  15. The shrew tamed by Wolff's law: do functional constraints shape the skull through muscle and bone covariation?

    PubMed

    Cornette, Raphaël; Tresset, Anne; Herrel, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Bone is a highly plastic tissue that reflects the many potential sources of variation in shape. Here, we focus on the functional aspects of bone remodeling. We choose the skull for our analyses because it is a highly integrated system that plays a fundamental role in feeding and is thus, likely under strong natural selection. Its principal mechanical components are the bones and muscles that jointly produce bite force and jaw motion. Understanding the covariations among these three components is of interest to understand the processes driving the evolution of the feeding apparatus. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively compare interactions between these three components in shrews from populations known to differ in shape and bite force. Bite force was measured in the field using a force transducer and skull shape was quantified using surface geometric morphometric approaches based on µCT-scans of the skulls of same individuals. The masseter, temporalis, pterygoideus, and digastricus muscles of these individuals were dissected and their cross sectional areas determined. Our results show strong correlations between bite force and muscle cross sectional areas as well as between bite force and skull shape. Moreover, bite force explains an important amount of skull shape variation. We conclude that interactions between bone shape and muscle characteristics can produce different morpho-functional patterns that may differ between populations and may provide a suitable target for selection to act upon.

  16. Waking-state oral parafunctional behaviors: specificity and validity as assessed by electromyography.

    PubMed

    Ohrbach, Richard; Markiewicz, Michael R; McCall, Willard D

    2008-10-01

    In contrast to sleep-related oral parafunctional behaviors, little is known about waking oral parafunctional behaviors. The Oral Behaviors Checklist contains terms referring to a variety of non-observable behaviors that are reliable when prompted (e.g. 'clench') but validity data are absent. Our goal was to assess whether (i) each behavioral term is distinct electromyographically, and (ii) temporomandibular disorder (TMD) subjects differ from non-TMD subjects in their performance. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was used to measure bilateral masseter, temporalis, and suprahyoid muscles while subjects (27 patients with TMD; 27 healthy controls) performed ten oral behaviors without explanation. Electromyographic data were averaged between bilateral muscles and two trials. A multivariate construct (jaw muscle activity) was analyzed using Wilks lambda within multivariate analysis of variance (manova). Obvious behaviors (e.g. clench, read, tongue press) exhibited expected EMG patterns, and patients and controls produced identical profile plots of the EMG data. Of 10 tested behaviors, nine were found to be associated with significantly differing proportions of amplitudes across muscles and were thus unique. Behaviors with similar terms were associated with different EMG patterns. The present data support the specificity of behavioral terms and performances. Implications include causation related to TMD based on subtle behaviors that occur at a high frequency.

  17. The projection of jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents to fifth nerve motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Appenteng, K; O'Donovan, M J; Somjen, G; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1978-06-01

    1. By spike-triggered averaging of intracellular synaptic noise it has been shown in pentobarbitone anaesthetized cats that jaw elevator muscle spindle afferents with their cell bodies in the mid-brain have a relatively weak monosynaptic projection to masseter and temporalis motoneurones. 2. Extending the spike-triggered averaging method to recording extracellular excitatory field potentials it has been shown that virtually all the spindles do project monosynaptically to the motoneurone pool. It is concluded that the general weakness of the projection is due to its restriction to a small proportion of the motoneurones, possibly those concerned most with tonic postural functions. 3. The shape of individual intracellular e.p.s.p.s together with the spatial distribution of extracellular excitatory potential fields provide some evidence for a dentrically weighted distribution of the synapses. 4. Evidence is presented that both primary- and secondary-type spindle afferents project monosynaptically, the secondary effects being some 71% of the strength of the primary ones.

  18. Modulation of jaw reflexes by remote noxious stimulation and mental state: possible association with psychological measurements of mental stress and occupation.

    PubMed

    Cadden, S W; Van Der Glas, H W; Van Der Bilt, A

    1999-12-01

    Combined electrophysiological and psychophysical experiments were performed on 15 human subjects to investigate the possible effects of perceived stress or mental occupation on jaw reflexes. Electromyographic recordings were made from the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, of the series of excitatory and inhibitory reflexes evoked by tapping on an upper incisor tooth. The reflexes were modified by application of painful cold (3 degrees C) stimuli to the subject's hand (remote noxious stimulation) or by the subject undertaking mental exercises (the 17 times table). The resulting changes in the reflexes usually involved transient increases in EMG activity around the interfaces between successive inhibitory and excitatory responses. Both the remote noxious stimuli and the mental exercises usually produced increases in both stress and mental occupation as assessed using visual analogue scales. However, correlations between these psychological effects and the effects on the reflexes were generally weak or absent. We conclude that the modulation of jaw reflexes by remote noxious stimuli or mental activity is not likely to be dependent on an individual's conscious awareness of a change in mental state. On the other hand, data from a related study suggest that the effects on the reflex may be more closely related to the autonomic responses to stress.

  19. Anxiety and personality traits in patients with muscle related temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Pallegama, R W; Ranasinghe, A W; Weerasinghe, V S; Sitheeque, M A M

    2005-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain exhibit greater degree of psychological distress compared with patients without cervical muscle pain and controls. Thirty-eight muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients including 10 patients with cervical muscle pain and 41 healthy individuals as controls participated in the study. State and trait anxiety levels were assessed with the Spielberger's state and trait anxiety inventory. Personality traits (extroversion, neuroticism, psychoticism and social desirability) were assessed using the Eysenck's personality questionnaire, and the pain intensities described over the muscles were recorded using a 100 mm visual analogue scale. The muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients, in general, exhibited significantly higher degrees of neuroticism and trait anxiety. The patients with cervical muscle pain demonstrated a significantly higher level of psychoticism compared with the patients without cervical muscle pain and the controls and a significantly higher state anxiety level than the controls. They also demonstrated higher pain intensities in masseter and temporalis muscles compared with patients without cervical muscle pain. It has been suggested that either subjects with psychological distress are prone to temporomandibular disorders, or psychological distress is a manifestation of existing chronic pain conditions. The present findings demand further investigations and broader approach in management, as muscle related temporomandibular disorder patients with cervical muscle pain were both physically and psychologically compromised to a greater degree compared with patients without cervical muscle pain.

  20. Clinical outcomes of Botox injections for chronic temporomandibular disorders: do we understand how Botox works on muscle, pain, and the brain?

    PubMed

    Connelly, S T; Myung, J; Gupta, R; Tartaglia, G M; Gizdulich, A; Yang, J; Silva, R

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of this retrospective review was to analyze the clinical outcomes following the use of botulinum toxin (onabotulinumtoxinA, Botox) injections to relieve the symptoms of chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Seventy-one patients with a diagnosis of TMD (according to the RDC/TMD international consortium) associated with or without bruxism and refractory to conventional treatment (e.g. oral appliances, physiotherapy, etc.) received Botox injections into the temporalis and masseter muscles. Subjective responses to Botox were categorized as 'beneficial' or 'not beneficial', as patient-reported outcomes based on the subjective reduction in pain and/or improvement in function. Fifty-five of the 71 subjects (77%) reported beneficial effects with Botox. Subjects with a concomitant bruxism diagnosis reported significant improvement over subjects without bruxism (87% vs. 67%; P=0.042). Subjects with stress-related psychiatric comorbidities and bruxism had a significantly higher benefit than those with stress-related psychiatric comorbidities alone (P=0.027). Patients reported less improvement if the time between the initial Botox injection and follow-up was less than an average of 5 weeks, compared to an average follow-up of 5-10 weeks (P=0.009). The subgroup TMD diagnosis and time interval post-injection are important predictors of patient-reported beneficial outcomes.

  1. Tenderness perception of poultry major pectoralis muscle during mastication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Owens, C M; Meullenet, J F

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between textural perception of poultry meat and the masticatory activity and chewing behavior of 7 subjects were investigated. A total of 90 broilers were slaughtered at 7 wk of age and deboned at either 1.25, 4, or 24 h postmortem (PM). Sensory analysis on cooked meat was conducted by 7 trained meat descriptive panelists. Panelists were asked to evaluate initial hardness, hardness of mass, cohesiveness of mass, and number of chews related to meat tenderness. Tenderness of cooked meat was also predicted instrumentally by both the Meullenet-Owens razor shear (MORS) and Blunt-Meullenet-Owens razor shear (BMORS). Masticatory muscle (anterior-temporalis and masseter) activities during chewing were measured by electromyography (EMG) and 19 parameters were used to characterize muscle activity during mastication. Jaw movement velocity and trajectory to characterize the chewing behavior was also recorded by electrognathography (EGN) during mastication. Significant differences among fillets deboned at various times PM were found in all sensory attributes. Significant differences in sensory attributes, muscle activities, and jaw movements among subjects were also observed. It was found that poultry meat texture was better predicted by muscle activity parameters (EMG) than by chewing behavior (EGN). Overall, EMG parameters calculated from mid and late chewing cycles were better predictors of poultry texture perception than initial cycles, indicating that comminuting of poultry meat is an important aspect of its texture perception.

  2. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; SILVA, Rafael dos Santos; de ARAUJO, Carlos dos Reis Pereira; ROSSETI, Leylha Maria N.; YASSUDA, Shigueharu; da SILVA, Renato Oliveira Ferreira; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressurepain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS) every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. Results Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76%) and no change (24%) on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. Conclusion The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls. PMID:21437467

  3. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy.

  4. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  5. Neonatal Satellite Cells Form Small Myotubes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Monroy, P L; Grefte, S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W; Wagener, F A D T G

    2017-03-01

    Although palatal muscle reconstruction in patients with cleft palate takes place during early childhood, normal speech development is often not achieved. We hypothesized that the intrinsic properties of head satellite cells (SCs) and the young age of these patients contribute to the poor muscle regeneration after surgery. First, we studied the fiber type distribution and the expression of SC markers in ex vivo muscle tissue from head (branchiomeric) and limb (somite-derived) muscles from neonatal (2-wk-old) and young (9-wk-old) rats. Next, we cultured SCs isolated from these muscles for 5, 7, and 9 d, and investigated the in vitro expression of SC markers, as well as changes in proliferation, early differentiation, and fusion index (myotube formation) in these cells. In our ex vivo samples, we found that virtually all myofibers in both the masseter (Mass) and the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscles contained fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and a small percentage of digastric (Dig) and extensor digitorum longus myofibers also contained slow MyHC. This was independent of age. More SCs were found in muscles from neonatal rats as compared with young rats [17.6 (3.8%) v. 2.3 (1.6%); P < 0.0001]. In vitro, young branchiomeric head muscle (BrHM) SCs proliferated longer and differentiated later than limb muscle SCs. No differences were found between SC cultures from the different BrHMs. SC cultures from neonatal muscles showed a much higher proliferation index than those from young animals at 5 d (0.8 v. 0.2; P < 0.001). In contrast, the fusion index in neonate SCs was about twice as low as that in SCs from young muscles at 9 d [27.6 (1.4) v. 62.8 (10.2), P < 0.0001]. In conclusion, SCs from BrHM differ from limb muscles especially in their delayed differentiation. SCs from neonatal muscles form myotubes less efficiently than those from young muscles. These age-dependent differences in stem cell properties urge careful consideration for future clinical applications in

  6. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    PubMed

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-03

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (p<0.05). Electrophysiology experiments were conducted in anaesthetized rats to determine the effect of intraganglionic injections of glutamate on the response properties of ganglion neurons that innervated either the temporalis or masseter muscle. Intraganglionic injection of glutamate (500 mM, 3 μl) evoked afferent discharge and significantly reduced muscle afferent mechanical threshold. Glutamate-evoked discharge was attenuated bythe N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) and increased by TFB-TBOA, whereas mechanical sensitization was only sensitive to APV. Antidromic invasion of muscle afferent fibers by electrical stimulation of the caudal brainstem (10 Hz) or local anesthesia of the brainstem with lidocaine did not alter glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. These findings provide a novel mechanism whereby dysfunctional trigeminal SGCs could contribute to cranial muscle tenderness in

  7. In vivo MRI quantification of individual muscle and organ volumes for assessment of anabolic steroid growth effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ed X; Tang, Haiying; Tong, Christopher; Heymsfield, Steve B; Vasselli, Joseph R

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to develop a quantitative and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to investigate the muscle growth effects of anabolic steroids. A protocol of MRI acquisition on a standard clinical 1.5 T scanner and quantitative image analysis was established and employed to measure the individual muscle and organ volumes in the intact and castrated guinea pigs undergoing a 16-week treatment protocol by two well-documented anabolic steroids, testosterone and nandrolone, via implanted silastic capsules. High correlations between the in vivo MRI and postmortem dissection measurements were observed for shoulder muscle complex (R=0.86), masseter (R=0.79), temporalis (R=0.95), neck muscle complex (R=0.58), prostate gland and seminal vesicles (R=0.98), and testis (R=0.96). Furthermore, the longitudinal MRI measurements yielded adequate sensitivity to detect the restoration of growth to or towards normal in castrated guinea pigs by replacing circulating steroid levels to physiological or slightly higher levels, as expected. These results demonstrated that quantitative MRI using a standard clinical scanner provides accurate and sensitive measurement of individual muscles and organs, and this in vivo MRI protocol in conjunction with the castrated guinea pig model constitutes an effective platform to investigate the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth effects of other potential anabolic steroids. The quantitative MRI protocol developed can also be readily adapted for human studies on most clinical MRI scanner to investigate the anabolic steroid growth effects, or monitor the changes in individual muscle and organ volume and geometry following injury, strength training, neuromuscular disorders, and pharmacological or surgical interventions.

  8. Skeletal fiber types and spindle distribution in limb and jaw muscles of the adult and neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Sciote, J J; Rowlerson, A

    1998-08-01

    The South American opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is very immature at birth, and we wished to assess its potential for studies of jaw muscle development. Given the lack of prior information about any Monodelphis fiber types or spindles, our study aimed to identify for the first time fiber types in both adult and neonatal muscles and the location of spindles in the jaw muscles. Fiber types were identified in frozen sections of adult and 6-day-old jaw and limb muscles by using myosin ATPase and metabolic enzyme histochemistry and by immunostaining for myosin isoforms. The distribution of fiber types and muscle spindles throughout the jaw-closer muscles was identified by immunostaining of sections of methacarnoy-fixed, wax-embedded heads. Most muscles contained one slow (type I) and two fast fiber types (equivalent to types IIA and IIX), which were similar to those in eutherian muscle, and an additional (non-IIB) fast type. In jaw-closer muscles, the main extrafusal fiber type was IIM (characteristic of these muscles in some eutherians), and almost all spindles were concentrated in four restricted areas: one in masseter and three in temporalis. Six-day neonatal muscles were very immature, but future spindle-rich areas were revealed by immunostaining and corresponded in position to the adult areas. Extrafusal and spindle fiber types in Monodelphis share many similarities with eutherian mammalian muscle. This finding, along with the immaturity of myosin isoform expression observed 6 days postnatally, indicates that Monodelphis could provide a valuable model for studying early developmental events in the jaw-closer muscles and their spindles.

  9. Electric toothbrush application is a reliable and valid test for differentiating temporomandibular disorders pain patients from controls

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Hemmaty, Azar; Look, John O; Schiffman, Eric L; John, Mike T

    2009-01-01

    Background Current methods for identifying patients with pain hypersensitivity are sufficiently complex to limit their widespread application in clinical settings. We assessed the reliability and validity of a simple multi-modal vibrotactile stimulus, applied using an electric toothbrush, to evaluate its potential as a screening tool for central sensitization. Methods Fourteen female temporomandibular disorders (TMD) subjects with myofascial pain (RDC/TMD Ia or Ib) and arthralgia (RDC/TMD IIIa) were compared to 13 pain-free controls of matched age and gender. Vibrotactile stimulus was performed with an electric toothbrush, applied with 1 pound pressure for 30 seconds in four locations: over the lateral pole of the temporomandibular joint, masseter, temporalis, and mid-ventral surface of forearm. Pain intensity (0–10) was recorded following the stimulus at 0, 15, 30, and 60 seconds. Test-retest reliability was assessed with measurements from 8 participants, taken 2–12 hours apart. Case versus control differentiation involved comparison of area under the curve (AUC). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine cutoff AUC scores for maximum sensitivity and specificity for this multi-modal vibrotactile stimulus. Results Test-retest reliability resulted in an ICC of 0.87 for all 4 pooled sites. ROC-determined AUC cutoff scores resulted in a sensitivity of 57% and specificity of 92% for all 4 pooled sites. Conclusion The electric toothbrush stimulus had excellent test-retest reliability. Validity of the scores was demonstrated with modest sensitivity and good specificity for differentiating TMD pain patients from controls, which are acceptable properties for a screening test. PMID:19643013

  10. NON-INVASIVE 3D FACIAL ANALYSIS AND SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY DURING FUNCTIONAL PRE-ORTHODONTIC THERAPY: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Grandi, Gaia; Mian, Fabrizio; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. Material and Methods: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears) were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. Results: The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. Conclusions: Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches) and extraoral (face) morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles. PMID:19936531

  11. Neuromuscular evaluation of post-orthodontic stability: an experimental protocol.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Marciandi, Paolo V; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Dellavia, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella

    2002-01-01

    To prevent relapse after orthodontic treatment, retention is often considered indispensable. Soft tissues are thought to have a significant influence on dental movements. To quantify the influence of masticatory muscles on post-treatment relapse, and in an attempt to avoid unnecessary procedures, 2 male orthodontic patients (13 and 30 years old at debonding) were followed up. The patients completed 2 years of fixed orthodontic treatment and received no post-orthodontic retention. After 1 week and again after 6 months, alginate impressions of dental arches and a surface electromyographic (EMG) assessment of the masseter and temporalis muscles during maximum voluntary clenching were performed. The younger patient received surface EMG monitoring once a month for the first 6 months and at the 1-year follow-up appointment. Arch dimensions and the 3-dimensional inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) were measured using a computerized digitizer. Symmetry in muscular contraction was measured by the percentage overlapping coefficient (POC), and potential lateral displacing components were assessed by the torque coefficient (TC). At the 6-month follow-up, no clinical modifications were observed. Quantitative evaluation assessed that arch dimensions had changed slightly (up to 1 mm). While the adolescent patient had no modifications in FACC inclinations, the 30-year-old patient showed significant alterations (up to 18 degrees). In all examinations of the adolescent patient, POC was higher than 86% and TC was lower than 10%. In the adult, POC was inside the normal range, while all TCs were higher than 10.5%. The larger TC measured in the adult may explain the larger modifications in the 3-dimensional position of his dental crowns. In conclusion, a surface EMG assessment may help in the detection of patients who might need post-orthodontic retention.

  12. Cardiovascular responses in humans to experimental chewing of gums of different consistencies.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Marotta, G; Martina, R

    1999-10-01

    Although the cardiovascular effects of exercise have been extensively investigated in man, little attention has been paid to such responses to jaw muscle activity. The aim here was to investigate the general cardiovascular effects of chewing activity in a single-blind, cross-over design. Ten healthy individuals performed one of the following chewing tasks in four separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a moderately hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and "empty chewing" without a bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 20 min on the participant's most convenient chewing side at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, heart rate and arterial blood pressure were recorded together with electromyographic activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles on the chewing side. Ratings of perceived masticatory fatigue were recorded with visual analogue scales. The heart rate and blood pressure were significantly increased (ANOVA; p < or= 0.01) during the chewing tasks and the increases were, in parallel with the muscle activity, more pronounced the harder the gum. With the very hard gum, heart rate increased by up to 11 beats/min, the systolic blood pressure was 14 mmHg (1.9kPa) higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was 11 mmHg (1.5kPa) higher. The perceived fatigue was proportional to the level of muscle activity. After 10 min of recovery from exercise, heart rate and arterial blood pressures were slightly but still significantly elevated. The results demonstrate that chewing is associated with general circulatory effects proportional to the bolus resistance.

  13. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, laser therapy and LED therapy on the masticatory system and the impact on sleep variables in cerebral palsy patients: a randomized, five arms clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies demonstrate effectiveness of therapies for oral rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy (CP), given the difficulties in chewing, swallowing and speech, besides the intellectual, sensory and social limitations. Due to upper airway obstruction, they are also vulnerable to sleep disorders. This study aims to assess the sleep variables, through polysomnography, and masticatory dynamics, using electromiography, before and after neuromuscular electrical stimulation, associated or not with low power laser (Gallium Arsenide- Aluminun, =780 nm) and LED (= 660 nm) irradiation in CP patients. Methods/design 50 patients with CP, both gender, aged between 19 and 60 years will be enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria are: voluntary participation, patient with hemiparesis, quadriparesis or diparetic CP, with ability to understand and respond to verbal commands. The exclusion criteria are: patients undergoing/underwent orthodontic, functional maxillary orthopedic or botulinum toxin treatment. Polysomnographic and surface electromyographic exams on masseter, temporalis and suprahyoid will be carry out in all sample. Questionnaire assessing oral characteristics will be applied. The sample will be divided into 5 treatment groups: Group 1: neuromuscular electrical stimulation; Group 2: laser therapy; Group 3: LED therapy; Group 4: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and laser therapy and Group 5: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and LED therapy. All patients will be treated during 8 consecutive weeks. After treatment, polysomnographic and electromiographic exams will be collected again. Discussion This paper describes a five arm clinical trial assessing the examination of sleep quality and masticatory function in patients with CP under non-invasive therapies. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials - ReBEC RBR-994XFS Descriptors Cerebral Palsy. Stomatognathic System

  14. Characteristics of EMG frequency bands in temporomandibullar disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Politti, Fabiano; Casellato, Claudia; Kalytczak, Marcelo Martins; Garcia, Marilia Barbosa Santos; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether any specific frequency bands of surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals are more susceptible to alterations in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), when compared with healthy subjects. Twenty-seven healthy adults (19 women and eight men; mean age: 23±6.68years) and 27 TMD patients (20 women and seven men; mean age: 24±5.89years) voluntarily participated in the experiment. sEMG data were recorded from the right and left masseter muscles (RM and LM) and the right and left anterior temporalis muscles (RT and LT) as the participants performed tests of chewing (CHW) and maximal clenching effort (MCE). Frequency domain analysis of the sEMG signal was used to analyze differences between TMD patients and healthy subjects in relation to the Power Spectral Density Function (PSDF). The analysis focused on the median frequency (MDF) of the sEMG signal and PSDF frequency bands after the EMG spectrum was divided into twenty-five frequency band of 20Hz each. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare MDF between TMD patients and healthy subjects and the frequency bands were analyzed using three-way ANOVA with three factors: frequency band, muscle and group. The results of the analysis confirmed that the median frequency values in TMD patients were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those recorded for healthy subjects in the two experimental conditions (MCE and CHW), for all of the muscles assessed (RM, LM, RT and LT). In addition, frequency content between 20 and 100Hz of the normalized PSDF range was significantly lower (p<0.05) in TMD patients than in healthy. This study contributes to quantitatively identify TMD dysfunctions, by non-invasive sEMGs; this assessment is clinically important and still lacking nowadays.

  15. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  16. Electromyographic examination of jaw muscles in relation to symptoms and occlusion of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z J; Yamagata, K; Kasahara, Y; Ito, G

    1999-01-01

    Clinical/occlusal scores and jaw-muscle EMGs were recorded in 24 TMD symptomatic (group S) and 20 normal (group N) subjects to evaluate the significance of EMG parameters and their clinical associations. Results indicated: (1) integrated EMG activity (IEMG) was larger at the rest position (RP) in anterior temporalis (Ta) but smaller at maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) in masseter (Ma) and Ta, and the ratios of IEMG at 70%MVC to the corresponding bite force (70%BF) were greater in group S; (2) mean power frequency (MPF) were almost the same in both groups but its shift was more rapid in group S; (3) silent period duration (SPD) was longer in group S; (4) asymmetry indices for SPD and silent period latency (SPL) were larger in group S; (5) muscle pain was associated negatively with IEMG at MVC and 70%BF but positively with IEMGs at RP and 70%MVC, and impaired jaw movements were associated negatively with the above EMG values; (6) muscle pain was positively associated with SPD in Ma, while joint pain and sound showed positive and negative associations with SPD, respectively; (7) associations between occlusion and EMG parameters were found more in group N. These findings verify: (1) jaw elevators in TMD may have hyper-tonic activities and a weak functional efficiency; (2) jaw muscles in TMD may become easily fatigued following a functional effort, and less relaxed following a muscle twitch; (3) the severity of pain could not be reflected in EMG activities, but impaired jaw movement may increase tonic activity and decrease functional effort; (4) TMD symptoms may alter the functional adaptation of jaw-muscle activities and occlusion.

  17. [Jaw opening reflex: a new electrophysiologic method for objective assessment of trigeminal sensory disorders. I. Method and normal values].

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, S; Meinck, H M

    1992-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of trigeminal nerve evoked potentials in 40 consecutive patients, most of them with traumatic nerve lesions, showed that in 12 cases no trigeminal nerve SEP were obtainable, and 11 of the remaining 28 patients had normal trigeminal nerve SEP. Therefore the jaw-opening reflex was investigated as a potential tool for electrophysiologic analysis of facial sensory disturbances. The jaw-opening reflex was investigated in 60 healthy subjects (31 female, 29 male) aged 23-82 years. It was elicited by electrical 0.1 ms square wave pulses delivered to the lower and upper lips and to the infraorbital region on either side at a rate below 1 per 5s. The EMG responses were recorded from the bilateral masseter and temporalis muscles at a moderate voluntary activation. Under these conditions, the jaw-opening reflex reveals itself as two inhibitory pauses of the ongoing EMG on both sides, the onset latency of the first EMG-suppression being 10-15 ms, and of the second 35-50 ms. Particular attention was paid to the stimulus strength at threshold (TR) to evoke the jaw-opening reflex. We found that the jaw-opening reflex was constantly evoked by weak stimuli applied to the 2nd and 3rd trigeminal branches. Bilateral reflex responses with unilateral stimulation were a regular finding. The reflex responses increase with increasing stimulus strength (Fig. 1). Moderate to forcible activation of the jaw closing muscles is a prerequisite for optimum recordings of the jaw-opening reflex (Fig. 2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Chewing behaviour and bolus formation during mastication of meat with different textures.

    PubMed

    Mioche, Laurence; Bourdiol, Pierre; Monier, Sandra

    2003-03-01

    During chewing, meat is mashed under compression and shear bite forces whilst saliva is incorporated. The resulting mixture is shaped into a cohesive bolus by agglomeration of small particles, and triggers a swallow. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chewing behaviour and bolus formation of meat with different textures. Twenty-five consenting young adults participated in this study. Electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes on the elevator muscles (masseter and temporalis) during mastication of cold beef. Two different textures (T(1): tough and dry; T(2): tender and juicy) were studied, and subjects were asked to chew the beef and then spit out the bolus either: (1) after a constant chewing period of 7s or (2) when the bolus was ready to be swallowed. Meat samples were weighed before and after chewing to determine weight changes due to saliva incorporation and the release of meat juice. Cutting tests were applied to measure the maximum shear force. The mechanical shear force was maximal for meat before chewing (T(1)=124 N/cm(2); T(2)=83 N/cm(2)) and decreased with increased chewing duration. Texture differences analysed from mechanical measurements remained significant even when the boli were ready for swallowing (T(1)=39 N/cm(2); T(2)=32 N/cm(2)); the toughest meat gave the toughest bolus. Muscular activity adapted to the texture of the meat as soon as chewing began, and remained constant over the observed chewing period. Mean muscular activity was higher during the chewing of tough meat than during the chewing of tender meat. As a consequence, by the time a bolus was ready to be swallowed, more saliva had been incorporated into the tough meat samples (mean weight increase: 36%) than the tender meat samples (mean weight increase: 30%).

  19. Review of clinical EMG studies related to muscle and occlusal factors in healthy and TMD subjects.

    PubMed

    Suvinen, T I; Kemppainen, P

    2007-09-01

    Several electronic instruments have been developed as adjuncts to objectively record the dysfunctional features of temporomandibular disorders and to study the effectiveness of various treatment interventions. The aim of this review was to assess the value and contribution of clinical electromyographic research in the understanding of asymptomatic and dysfunctional muscle function and the therapeutic effects of interocclusal appliances. For this purpose MedLine and PubMed searches were conducted with the following main keywords alone and in various combinations: electromyography, muscles of mastication, masseter, temporalis, temporomandibular, TMD, utility, validity, repeatability, rest, postural, vertical dimension, occlusal, splint, treatment. The review includes critical evaluation, discussion and conclusions regarding electromyographic studies in asymptomatic and dysfunctional muscles, rest position, occlusal parameters and interocclusal appliances, as well as a critical summary and proposals for further research. Much of earlier critique of many electromyographic studies still applies regarding comparative sample selections, research designs, analyses and conclusions. The areas not well-understood include normal biological variation, capacity for adaptation, fluctuations regarding the clinical course and multidimensional features of temporomandibular disorders and long-term follow-up data, especially in studies that evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic measures. Considering the required improvements in technical and research designs features and critical appraisal electromyographic research could have value as an adjunct research tool to study features of craniofacial muscle-related dysfunction. Until electromyographic measures are correlated with other multidimensional, especially subjective and pain-related methods, the clinical use of this method for diagnostic purposes of temporomandibular disorders remains in doubt, and is not at present recommended.

  20. Occlusion, sternocleidomastoid muscle activity, and body sway: a pilot study in male astronauts.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Solimene, Umberto; Morgun, Valery; Kaspranskiy, Rustem R; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2006-01-01

    The modifications induced by microgravity on the coordinated patterns of movement of the head, trunk, and limbs are reported on extensively. However, apparently there is little data on the masticatory muscles. In normal gravitational conditions, information from the neck and stomatognathic apparatus play a role in maintaining the body's balance and equilibrium. The current pilot study used normal gravity conditions to investigate the hypothesis of a functional coupling between occlusion and neck muscles and body postural oscillations. The immediate effect of modified occlusal surfaces on the contraction pattern of the sternocleidomastoid muscles during maximum voluntary clenching and on the oscillation of the center of foot pressure was analyzed in 11 male astronauts (aged 31-54 yrs). All subjects were healthy and free from pathologies of the neck and stomatognathic apparatus. Occlusal splints were prepared using impressions of their dental arches. The splints were modeled on the mandibular arch, had only posterior contacts, and were modified to obtain a more symmetric, standardized contraction of the masseter and temporalis muscles during teeth clenching. Surface EMG activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles was recorded during a maximal voluntary clench with and without the splint. Sternocleidomastoid potentials were standardized as percent of the mean potentials recorded during a maximum contralateral rotation of the head, and the symmetry of the EMG waves of left- and right-side muscles was measured. Body sway was assessed with and without the splint, either with eyes open or closed. The variations of the center of foot pressure were analyzed through bivariate analysis, and the area of the 90% standard ellipse was computed. Within each visual condition (eyes open or closed), the difference between the areas of oscillation measured with and without the splint was computed. Muscular activity was more symmetric with the splint. The area of oscillation of the

  1. Relationship of active trigger points with related disability and anxiety in people with tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Ceña, María; Castaldo, Matteo; Wang, Kelun; Catena, Antonella; Torelli, Paola; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the differences in the presence of trigger points (TrPs) and their association with headache-related disability and mood disorders in people with frequent episodic tension-type headache (TTH) (FETTH) and chronic TTH (CTTH). One hundred twenty-two individuals with TTH participated. Clinical features of headache (i.e., intensity, duration, and frequency) were recorded on a headache diary. Headache-related disability was assessed with the Headache Disability Inventory, trait and state anxiety levels with State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and depression with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TrPs were bilaterally explored in the temporalis, masseter, suboccipital, upper trapezius, splenius capitis, and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Sixty-two (51%) patients were classified as FETTH, whereas 60 (49%) were classified as CTTH. Individuals with CTTH showed higher burden of headache and depression than FETTH (P < 0.001). Subjects with FETTH showed similar number of TrPs (total number: 5.9 ± 3.1, active TrPs: 4.7 ± 2.5, and latent TrPs: 1.2 ± 1.9) than those with CTTH (total number: 5.7 ± 3.2, active TrPs: 4.2 ± 3.0, and latent TrPs: 1.5 ± 1.8). The number of active TrPs was significantly associated with the burden of headache (r = 0.189; P = 0.037) and trait anxiety (r = 0.273; P = 0.005): the higher the number of active TrPs, the greater the physical burden of headache or the more the trait anxiety level. No association with the depression was observed. The presence of active TrPs in head and neck/shoulder muscles was similar between individuals with FETTH and CTTH and associated with the physical burden of headache and trait anxiety levels independently of the subgroup of TTH. PMID:28353618

  2. Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Jaffe, Debra M.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Van Daele, Douglas J.; Luschei, Erich S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tongue-to-palate pressure and the electromyography (EMG) measured from the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, medial pterygoid, velum, genioglossus, and intrinsic tongue muscles. Methods: Seven healthy adults performed tongue-to-palate pressure…

  3. Short and long latency jaw-opening reflex responses elicited by mechanical stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Stohler, C S; Shimada, K; Ash, M M

    1985-01-01

    Jaw-opening reflex responses elicited by tapping the chin during maximum clenching in incisal edge-to-edge contact position were studied in 10 healthy subjects. Stimuli were also delivered during weak clenching on a rubber stamp, separating the incisors by approx. 10 mm and protruding the mandible to the edge-to-edge incisor relationship. All four central incisors were stimulated simultaneously. With weak stimuli, there was a short-latency (9.5 ms) digastric response which may have had a disynaptic pathway. Taps of moderate strength produced long-latency (20 ms) responses, and sometimes a short-latency (9.5 ms) component as well. Strong (non-painful) taps produced an even longer-latency digastric response, 30 ms or more following the stimulus with less synchronization than earlier responses. Jaw-jerk reflexes occurred 8.5 ms following the tap, independently of the magnitude of the stimulus. Local anaesthesia of the upper and lower incisors abolished the digastric muscle response. Thus large periodontal afferents may be responsible for the early digastric reflex activity and smaller fibres for later effects. Temporal summation of the reflex response probably occurred when all incisors were stimulated simultaneously.

  4. Effective Botulinum Toxin Injection Guide for Treatment of Temporal Headache

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang-Woo; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hu, Kyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    This study involved an extensive analysis of published research on the morphology of the temporalis muscle in order to provide an anatomical guideline on how to distinguish the temporalis muscle and temporalis tendon by observing the surface of the patient’s face. Twenty-one hemifaces of cadavers were used in this study. The temporalis muscles were dissected clearly for morphological analysis between the temporalis muscle and tendon. The posterior border of the temporalis tendon was classified into three types: in Type I the posterior border of the temporalis tendon is located in front of reference line L2 (4.8%, 1/21), in Type II it is located between reference lines L2 and L3 (85.7%, 18/21), and in Type III it is located between reference lines L3 and L4 (9.5%, 2/21). The vertical distances between the horizontal line passing through the jugale (LH) and the temporalis tendon along each of reference lines L0, L1, L2, L3, and L4 were 29.7 ± 6.8 mm, 45.0 ± 8.8 mm, 37.7 ± 11.1 mm, 42.5 ± 7.5 mm, and 32.1 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. BoNT-A should be injected into the temporalis muscle at least 45 mm vertically above the zygomatic arch. This will ensure that the muscle region is targeted and so produce the greatest clinical effect with the minimum concentration of BoNT-A. PMID:27618099

  5. Sternocleidomastoid muscle additionally innervated by the facial nerve: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, Erika

    2015-01-01

    An aberrant nerve branch from the facial nerve, additionally to the accessory nerve and cervical rami C2 and C3, was observed innervating the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in a 75-year-old male cadaver. We consider that the anomaly occurred as the result of a fusion of the muscular compartment from the digastric and SCM muscles during development. The aberrant innervation may be the source of the misinterpretation of electromyographic findings.

  6. Moebius syndrome. Case report was a 30-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Morello, D C; Converse, J M

    1977-09-01

    Moebius syndrome is uncommon, as reported in the literature. A patient with Moebius syndrome is reported, showing a 30-year follow-up after initial surgical treatment by bilateral partial transfers of the Masseter muscles.

  7. Predictability of jaw muscle pains from surface electromyograms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T

    1996-04-01

    In seven (88%) of eight healthy subjects, weak to moderate pains were elicited in the masseter muscles through the isometric contractions of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Integrated surface electromyograms of the right and left masseter muscles were used to quantify the absolute and relative contractile activities of the two muscles. The risk (relative probability) of inducing pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the larger amount of isometric activity was 2.5 times the risk of eliciting pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the lesser amount of isometric activity. However, as an aid in the diagnosis of pain onset, the method of masseteric surface electromyography had a false diagnostic ratio of 0.67.

  8. PubMed Central

    Mahieu, R.; Russo, S.; Gualtieri, T.; Colletti, G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this report is to highlight how an unusual, outdated, unpopular and overlooked reconstructive method such as the masseter flap can be a reliable, straightforward and effective solution for oral reconstruction in selected cases. We report the transposition of the masseter crossover flap in two previously pre-treated patients presenting a second primary oral squamous cell carcinoma; excellent functional results with satisfactory cosmetic appearance were obtained in both cases. In the literature, only 60 cases of oral cavity and oropharyngeal reconstructions using the masseter flap have been reported. The possible clinical utility of this flap, even in modern head and neck reconstructive surgery, is presented and discussed. We believe that the masseter flap should enter in the armamentarium of every head and neck surgeon and be kept in mind as a possible solution since it provides an elegant and extremely simple procedure in suboptimal cases for microvascular reconstruction. PMID:27196079

  9. The Anatomical Basis of Paradoxical Masseteric Bulging after Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Jin; Kang, In-Won; Seo, Kyle K.; Choi, You-Jin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the detailed anatomical structures of the superficial part of the masseter and to elucidate the boundaries and locations of the deep tendon structure within the superficial part of the masseter. Forty-four hemifaces from Korean and Thai embalmed cadavers were used in this study. The deep tendon structure was located deep in the lower third of the superficial part of the masseter. It was observed in all specimens and was designated as a deep inferior tendon (DIT). The relationship between the masseter and DIT could be classified into three types according to the coverage pattern: Type A, in which areas IV and V were covered by the DIT (27%, 12/44); Type B, in which areas V and VI were covered by the DIT (23%, 10/44); and Type C, in which areas IV, V, and VI were covered by the DIT (50%, 22/44). The superficial part of the masseter consists of not only the muscle belly but also the deep tendon structure. Based on the results obtained in this morphological study, we recommend performing layer-by-layer retrograde injections into the superficial and deep muscle bellies of the masseter. PMID:28042813

  10. The role of peripheral 5HT2A and 5HT1A receptors on the orofacial formalin test in rats with persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Imbe, H; Tashiro, A; Kimura, A; Donishi, T; Tamai, Y; Senba, E

    2005-01-01

    The role of peripheral serotonin (5HT) 2A and 5HT1A receptors on the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by the injection of formalin into the masseter muscle was evaluated in the rats with persistent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation evoked by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by the injection of formalin into masseter muscle were significantly enhanced at 1 day (CFA day 1 group) or 7 days (CFA day 7 group) during TMJ inflammation. Pretreatment with local administration of 5HT2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (0.01, 0.1 mg/rat) into the masseter muscle or systemic administration of ketanserin via i.p. injection (1 mg/kg) reduced the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities of the late phase evoked by formalin injection into masseter muscle on the side of TMJ inflammation (CFA day 7 group). However, local (0.001-0.1 mg/rat) or systemic (1 mg/kg) administration of 5HT1A receptor antagonist, propranolol, into masseter muscle did not produce the antinociceptive effect in CFA day 7 group. Moreover, local administration of ketanserin (0.1 mg) or propranolol (0.1 mg) into masseter muscle did not inhibit nocifensive orofacial behavior in rats without TMJ inflammation. These data suggest that persistent TMJ inflammation causes the elevation of the orofacial nocifensive behavior, and peripheral 5HT2A receptors play an important role in mediating the deep craniofacial tissue nociception in rats with TMJ inflammation.

  11. Recycle of temporal muscle in combination with free muscle transfer in the treatment of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Masakazu; Takushima, Akihiko; Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Mikio; Ozaki, Mine; Harii, Kiyonori

    2013-07-01

    We experienced three patients with long-standing unilateral complete facial paralysis who previously underwent temporalis muscle transfer to the cheek for smile reconstruction. All patients complained of insufficient and uncomfortable buccal motion synchronised with masticatory movements and incomplete eyelid closure with ptotic eyebrow. To attain a near-natural smile and reliable eyelid closure, temporalis muscle was displaced from the cheek to the eyelid, and a neurovascular free latissimus dorsi muscle was transferred for the replacement of cheek motion. As a result, cheek motion synchronised with the contralateral cheek upon smiling and sufficient eyelid closure were obtained in all cases. Smile reconstruction using the temporal muscle is an easy and a versatile way in general. However, spontaneous smile is not achieved and peculiar movement of the cheek while eating is conspicuous in some cases. Replacement with neurovascular free latissimus dorsi muscle and recycling previously used temporalis muscle for eyelid closure are considered to be valuable for such cases.

  12. Incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak following petrosectomy and analysis of avoidance techniques.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Sarpong, Yaw; Kahle, Kristopher T; Sekhar, Laligam N; Ferreira, Manuel J

    2012-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak following skull base surgery can lead to meningitis, impaired wound healing, and often requires re-operation and/or CSF diversion. Thirty-two patients underwent a presigmoid, transpetrosal approach to skull base aneurysms and tumors. A vascularized temporalis muscle flap was utilized during the closure of the initial skull base reconstruction in 18 of the 32 patients. A temporary CSF diversion was utilized in 23 of the 32 patients. A permanent shunt was placed in eight patients. One patient developed a postoperative CSF leak from the contralateral ear due to a congenital abnormality in the middle ear. Another patient, who did not have a vascularized temporalis muscle flap reconstruction, developed a postoperative CSF leak in the context of an operation for recurrent tumor and prior radiation treatment. CSF diversion and vascularized temporalis muscle flaps are effective in preventing the development of postoperative CSF leaks following petrosectomy.

  13. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles: short- and long-term effects on muscle, bone, and craniofacial function in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Katherine L; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Navarrete, Alfonso L; Nguyen, Thao Tuong; Salamati, Atriya; Herring, Susan W

    2012-03-01

    Paralysis of the masticatory muscles using botulinum toxin (BTX) is a common treatment for cosmetic reduction of the masseters as well as for conditions involving muscle spasm and pain. The effects of this treatment on mastication have not been evaluated, and claims that the treatment unloads the jaw joint and mandible have not been validated. If BTX treatment does decrease mandibular loading, osteopenia might ensue as an adverse result. Rabbits received a single dose of BTX or saline into one randomly chosen masseter muscle and were followed for 4 or 12 weeks. Masticatory muscle activity was assessed weekly, and incisor bite force elicited by stimulation of each masseter was measured periodically. At the endpoint, strain gages were installed on the neck of the mandibular condyle and on the molar area of the mandible for in vivo bone strain recording during mastication and muscle stimulation. After termination, muscles were weighed and mandibular segments were scanned with micro CT. BTX paralysis of one masseter did not alter chewing side or rate, in part because of compensation by the medial pterygoid muscle. Masseter-induced bite force was dramatically decreased. Analysis of bone strain data suggested that at 4 weeks, the mandibular condyle of the BTX-injected side was underloaded, as were both sides of the molar area. Bone quantity and quality were severely decreased specifically at these underloaded locations, especially the injection-side condylar head. At 12 weeks, most functional parameters were near their pre-injection levels, but the injected masseter still exhibited atrophy and percent bone area was still low in the condylar head. In conclusion, although the performance of mastication was only minimally harmed by BTX paralysis of the masseter, the resulting underloading was sufficient to cause notable and persistent bone loss, particularly at the temporomandibular joint.

  14. Bilateral Automated Continuous Distraction Osteogenesis in a Design Model: Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Zachary S.; Tricomi, Brad J.; Faquin, William C.; Magill, John C.; Murphy, Brian A.; Kaban, Leonard B.; Troulis, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that automated, continuous, curvilinear distraction osteogenesis (DO) in a minipig model is effective when performed bilaterally, at rates up to 3mm/day, to achieve clinically relevant lengthening. A Yucatan minipig in the mixed dentition phase, underwent bilateral, continuous DO at a rate of 2 mm/day at the center of rotation; 1.0 and 3.0 mm/day at the superior and inferior regions, respectively. The distraction period was 13 days with no latency period. Vector and rate of distraction were remotely monitored without radiographs, using the device sensor. After fixation and euthanasia, the mandible and digastric muscles were harvested. The ex-vivo appearance, stability, and radiodensity of the regenerate were evaluated using a semi-quantitative scale. Percent surface area (PSA) occupied by bone, fibrous tissue, cartilage, and hematoma were calculated using histomorphometrics. The effects of DO on the digastric muscles and mandibular condyles were assessed via microscopy and degenerative changes were quantified. The animal was distracted to 21 mm and 24 mm on the right and left sides, respectively. Clinical appearance, stability, and radiodensity were scored as ‘3’ bilaterally indicating osseous union. The total PSA occupied by bone (right = 75.53±2.19%; left PSA = 73.11±2.18%) approached that of an unoperated mandible (84.67±0.86%). Digastric muscles and condyles showed negligible degenerative or abnormal histologic changes. This proof of principle study is the first report of osseous healing with no ill-effect on associated soft tissue and the mandibular condyle using bilateral, automated, continuous, curvilinear DO at rates up to 3 mm/day. The model approximates potential human application of continuous automated distraction with a semiburied device. PMID:26594967

  15. Multiple muscular variations in the neck, upper extremity, and lower extremity biased toward the left side of a single cadaver.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jong-Ho; Gil, Young-Chun; Yang, Hee-Jun; Jin, Jeong-Doo; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous reports have found accessory or supernumerary muscles throughout the human body, multiple appearances of these variations biased toward one side of body are rare. We report a 76-yr-old male cadaver with an accessory head of the biceps brachii and palmaris profundus, and a muscular slip between the biceps femoris and semitendinosus on the left side in addition to a bilateral accessory belly of the digastric muscle. No remarkable nervous, vascular, or visceral variation accompanied these variations. An interruption of normal somitogenesis or myogenesis may be a cause of these variations.

  16. Use of autologous grafts in the treatment of acquired penile curvature: An experience of 33 cases

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Abdul Rouf; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Zahur, Suhael; Tariq, Sheikh; Hamid, Arf; Wani, M. S.; Wazir, B. S.; Iqbal, Arsheed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective was to compare the use of autologous dermal and temporalis fascia grafts in the treatment of acquired penile curvatures. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective observational study of 33 cases, conducted in Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar from March 2007 to September 2013. All the patients had stable Peyronies disease (PD). Dorsal, dorsolateral and vental curvatures with good preoperative erections were included. PD index with visual analog scales for curvature was used preoperatively. An informed written consent was taken from all the patients with main emphasis on erectile dysfunction. Results: After an average follow up of 2 years, complete straightening of penis was observed in all patients with satisfactory sexual intercourse in 30 patients (90%). Three patients (10%) required frequent use of type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors for adequate erections. Overall 91% of patients and partners were satisfied with the procedure and cosmetically donor site was better in temporalis fascia graft site. No rejection of any graft was noted and glans hypoesthesia was noticed in 4 patients (12%). None of the patients required penile prosthesis. Total operative time for harvesting and application of the graft was more in dermal grafts (>3 hrs) than for temporalis fascia graft (2 hrs). Conclusion: Tunical lengthening procedures by autologous free grafts represents a safe and reproducible technique. A good preoperative erectile function is required for tunical lengthening procedure. Temporalis fascia graft is thin, tough membrane and effective graft for PD with good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:27141196

  17. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  18. Contributions of peripheral and central opioid receptors to antinociception in rat muscle pain models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Eva Ma; Bagües, Ana; Martín, Ma Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Administration of hypertonic saline (HS) is an accepted model to study muscular pain. HS-induced nociceptive responses were tested in masseter, already described, and in two new pain models of spinally innervated muscles (gastrocnemius and triceps) developed in rats at our laboratory. HS administration in the masseter induced vigorous hindpaw shaking and in the gastrocnemius or triceps, paw withdrawal or flexing. Participation of the central and peripheral opioid receptors in HS-induced pain is compared in these muscles: masseter, innervated by trigeminal nerve, and gastrocnemius and triceps by spinal nerves. Morphine and loperamide were used to reveal peripheral and central components of opioid analgesia. Both agonists reduced HS-induced nociceptive behaviours in the masseter and were antagonised by the opioid antagonist naloxone and by naloxone methiodide, an opioid receptor antagonist that poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, in the gastrocnemius and triceps, morphine, but not loperamide, decreased the nociceptive behaviour and this effect was only reversed by naloxone. So, peripheral opioid receptors seem to participate in HS-induced masseter pain, whereas only central opioid receptors reduced the nociception in gastrocnemius and triceps. Our results suggest that the use of peripheral opioids can be more advantageous than central opioids for treatment of orofacial muscular pain.

  19. Histological, Histochemical, and Protein Changes after Induced Malocclusion by Occlusion Alteration of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Guerra, Carolina; Carla Lara Pereira, Yamba; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Del Bel Guimarães, Elaine A.; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki

    2014-01-01

    Although disorders of the stomatognathic system are common, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Our objective was to study the changes in the masseter muscles after unilateral exodontia. Molar extraction was performed on Wistar rats (left side), and the animals were sacrificed after either 14 or 26 days. The masseter muscle was processed for histological analysis, conventional and in situ zymography, and immunohistochemistry. The morphological analysis showed unique and specific characteristics for the experimental group. By conventional zymography no significant values of 72 kDa MMP-2 (P < 0.05) were found in both of the sides of masseter muscle after 14 and 26 days of unilateral extraction. The in situ zymography showed gelatinolytic activity on all deep masseter muscles, with significant increase on the contralateral side after 14 and 26 days (P < 0.05). The immunohistochemistry demonstrated greater expression of MMP-2 than MMP-9 and MMP-14 in all masseter muscles and there were few differences in the staining of 4 TIMPs. This knowledge about morphology and molecular masticatory muscle remodeling following environmental interventions can be used to develop clinically successful treatments. PMID:25028660

  20. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit; Komiyama, Osamu; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Kawara, Misao; Sessle, Barry; Svensson, Peter

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41 min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two pressure levels (5 kPa and 10 kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5. EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5 kPa, 10 kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during maximum voluntary contractions. The amplitudes and thresholds of tongue and masseter MEPs after TLT on Day 5 were respectively higher and lower than before TLT on Day 1 (P<0.005), and there was also a significant increase in tongue and masseter MEP areas; no significant changes occurred in MEP onset latencies. FDI MEP parameters (amplitude, threshold, area, latency) were not significantly different between the four sessions. Our findings suggest that repeated TLT can trigger neuroplasticity reflected in increased excitability of the corticomotor representation of not only the tongue muscles but also the masseter muscles.

  1. Variability and reliability of muscle activity measurements during chewing.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, A; Weiser, A; Hugger, S; Kordass, B; Hugger, A; Wanke, E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test masseter muscle activity and its variability and reliability in terms of repeatable measurements in fully dentate and healthy volunteers during habitual chewing and deliberate unilateral chewing. Three sessions were performed on three consecutive days, each time recording kinematic data and masseter muscle EMG activities through a series of defined jaw exercises, including maximum voluntary contraction, habitual chewing, and left and right unilateral chewing. Asymmetry index (AI) and deliberate chewing index (DCI) scores were used to evaluate the activities of the left and right masseter muscles, which were separately recorded during each of these chewing exercises. DCI scores were side-specific, including two sets of values for left and right unilateral chewing. Reproducibility testing of the values obtained for all parameters revealed good to excellent reproducibility of masseter muscle activity under standardized recording conditions across the consecutive study sessions, with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) ranging from 0.68 to 0.93. Different individuals were found to utilize different strategies of bilateral masseter activation during both habitual chewing and deliberate unilateral chewing.

  2. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance (MORA) on Forearm Muscle Activation and Grasping Power during Pinch and Hook Grip

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Park, Yi-Jeong; Park, Hye-Min; Bae, Hae-Jin; Yu, Min-Ji; Choi, Hee-Won; Hwang, Na-Young

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study verified the changes in muscle activities and grasping power during maximal isometric exercise of the forearm and masseter muscle with and without a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance (MORA). It also offers basic data for defining the correlation of function of hand with mouth. [Methods] EMG was used to measure masticatory muscle, flexor bundle and extensor bundle activities with or without MORA while subjects performed the hook grip and pinch grip. The measuring tool used for measuring grip strength was the same as that used for measuring pinch and hook strength. The subjects were 28 healthy young adults. [Result] Muscle activity and grasping power significantly increased when wearing the MORA. [Conclusion] The result indicates that wearing MORA can increase muscle activity and grasping power of forearm and masseter muscle. We think wearing MORA might help improve the function of the forearm because it activates the function of the masseter. PMID:24648630

  3. Peripheral mGluR5 antagonist attenuated craniofacial muscle pain and inflammation but not mGluR1 antagonist in lightly anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Jeong; Choi, Hyo Soon; Ju, Jin Sook; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Sung Kyo; Yoon, Young Wook; Ahn, Dong Kuk

    2006-10-16

    The present study investigated the role of peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the masseter muscles of lightly anesthetized rats. Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 300-400 g. After initial anesthesia with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.), one femoral vein was cannulated and connected to an infusion pump for intravenous infusion of sodium pentobarbital. The rate of infusion was adjusted to provide a constant level of anesthesia. Mustard oil (MO, 30 microl) was injected into the mid-region of the left masseter muscle via a 30-gauge needle over 10s. After 30 microl injection of 5, 10, 15, or 20% MO into the masseter muscle, the total number of hindpaw shaking behaviour and extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration in the masseter muscle were significantly higher in the MO-treated group in a dose-dependent manner compared with the vehicle (mineral oil)-treated group. Intramuscular pretreatment with 3 or 5% lidocaine reduced MO-induced hindpaw shaking behaviour and increases in extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration. Intramuscular pretreatment with 5 mM MCPG, non-selective group I/II mGluR antagonist, or MPEP, a selective group I mGluR5 antagonist, produced a significant attenuation of MO-induced hindpaw shaking behaviour and increases in extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration in the masseter muscle while LY367385, a selective group I mGluR1 antagonist, did not affect MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the masseter muscle. These results indicate that peripheral mGluR5 plays important role in mediating MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the craniofacial muscle.

  4. Effect of changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide tension on oral tissue blood flow during dexmedetomidine infusion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Okada, Reina; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Kasahara, Masataka; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    A decrease in arterial carbon dioxide tension induces an increase in masseter muscle blood flow and a decrease in mandibular bone marrow blood flow during general anesthesia. In addition, dexmedetomidine infusion reduces oral tissue blood flow. In this study we investigated how end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (ET-CO2 ) changes influence on oral tissue blood flow during continuous dexmedetomidine infusion in rabbits. Eleven male Japan White rabbits were anesthetized with sevoflurane. Then, ET-CO2 was set at 30 mmHg and adjusted to 40 and 60 mmHg, and heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, common carotid artery blood flow, mandibular bone marrow blood flow, masseter muscle blood flow, and blood flow in other oral tissues were measured. Following this, the ET-CO2 was returned to 30 mmHg and dexmedetomidine was infused over 60 min. The measurements were repeated. Most parameters increased, regardless of whether or not dexmedetomidine was present, and heart rate and masseter muscle blood flow decreased in an ET-CO2 -dependent manner. Dexmedetomidine infusion suppressed ET-CO2 -dependent masseter muscle blood flow change. Masseter muscle blood flow during ET-CO2 at 30 mmHg with dexmedetomidine was the same as that during ET-CO2 at 40 mmHg without dexmedetomidine. Our findings suggest that dexmedetomidine infusion and slight hypocapnia under general anesthesia suppress an increase in masseter muscle blood flow as well as reducing mandibular bone marrow blood flow. These results may be of significance for decreasing bleeding during oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  5. Temporoparietal-occipital flap for facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E; Garcia, F G

    2001-04-01

    Eight patients with an extensive facial defect of the masseter region were reconstructed with a temporoparietal- occipital rotation flap. This flap is vascularized by both the arteria auricularis posterior and the arteria occipitalis lateralis. These vessels have been sufficient to ensure viability of the entire flap. It is elevated and easily transposed to the masseter region because of the distensibility obtained from the posterior neck. This approach avoided the need for an unsightly skin graft at the site while providing tissue with hair follicles that blend well with the surrounding hair. This large flap offers cosmetic advantages over other techniques for coverage of facial defects in men.

  6. The temporal bones from Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). A phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez, I; Arsuaga, J L

    1997-01-01

    Three well-preserved crania and 22 temporal bones were recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site up to and including the 1994 field season. This is the largest sample of hominid temporal bones known from a single Middle Pleistocene site and it offers the chance to characterize the temporal bone morphology of an European Middle Pleistocene population and to study the phylogenetic relationships of the SH sample with other Upper and Middle Pleistocene hominids. We have carried out a cladistic analysis based on nine traits commonly used in phylogenetic analysis of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominids: shape of the temporal squama superior border, articular eminence morphology, contribution of the sphenoid bone to the median glenoid wall, postglenoid process projection, tympanic plate orientation, presence of the styloid process, mastoid process projection, digastric groove morphology and anterior mastoid tubercle. We have found two autapomorphies on the Home erectus temporal bone: strong reduction of the postglenoid process and absence of the styloid process. Modern humans, Neandertals and the Middle Pleistocene fossils from Europe and Africa constitute a clade characterized by a convex superior border of the temporal squama. The European Middle Pleistocene fossils from Sima de los Huesos, Petralona, Steinheim, Bilzingsleben and Castel di Guido share a Neandertal apomorphy: a relatively flat articular eminence. The fossils from Ehringsdorf, La Chaise Suardi and Biache-Saint-Vaast also display another Neandertal derived trait: an anteriorly obliterated digastric groove. Modern humans and the African Middle Pleistocene fossils share a synapomorphy: a sagittally orientated tympanic plate.

  7. Interactions between the jaw-opening reflex and mastication.

    PubMed

    Lund, J P; Rossignol, S; Murakami, T

    1981-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the anterior hard palate or upper lip was used to evoke the jaw-opening reflex in rabbits lightly anesthetized with urethane. The amplitude of each excitatory response recorded in the digastric electromyogram during mastication was compared with the mean amplitude of 10 prior control responses. When weak stimuli were used, the mean amplitude of the reflex dropped markedly during mastication and was smallest when the digastric muscle was inactive (closing and occlusal phases of the masticatory cycle). As the stimulus strength was increased, the size of the response during closing rose progressively until it exceeded values obtained during the control period or the jaw-opening phase. In addition, strong stimuli altered the total cycle length and the duration and amplitude of muscle activity in a phase-dependent manner. Stimuli given during closing were particularly effective in causing inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity and in reducing the velocity and amplitude of closure. It is concluded that the cyclical gain changes of the reflex response to noxious stimuli are controlled to a large extent by premotoneuronal mechanisms and that the overall effect on the masticatory cycle structure is phase dependent.

  8. Evaluation of Efficacy of Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Subjects with Myositis and Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Seema; Iyengar, Asha R; B V, Subash; Joshi, Revan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to determine if ultrasonography of masseter can be used to evaluate the outcome of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) such as myositis and myofascial pain. Methods Fifteen TMD subjects with myofascial pain/myositis who satisfied the RDC/McNeil criteria were included in the study. All the subjects were administered TENS therapy for a period of 6 days (30 minutes per session). The mouth opening (in millimeters) and severity of pain (visual analogue scale score) and ultrasonographic thickness of the masseter (in millimeters) in the region of trigger/tender areas was assessed in all the subjects both prior and post TENS therapy. A comparison of the pre-treatment and post-treatment values of the VAS score, mouth opening and masseter thickness was done with the help of a t-test. Results There was a significant reduction in the thickness of masseter muscle (P = 0.028) and VAS scores (P < 0.001) post TENS therapy. There was also a significant improvement in the mouth opening (P = 0.011) post TENS therapy. Conclusions In the present study, ultrasonography was found to be an effective measuring tool in the assessment of TENS therapy in subjects with myositis and myofascial pain. PMID:26839665

  9. Effects of citalopram on jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep and wakefulness in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Yasuha; Mochizuki, Ayako; Katayama, Keisuke; Kato, Takafumi; Ikeda, Minako; Abe, Yuka; Nakamura, Shiro; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Tomio

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram on sleep/wake cycles and masseter (jaw-closing) muscle electromyogram (EMG) activity over a 24-h period. From the dark to the light period, the times of wakefulness decreased, while those of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep increased. Citalopram did not induce major alterations in the temporal changes of sleep-wake distributions, except for leading to a decrease in the time of NREM sleep during the light period and an increase in the durations of REM sleep episodes. Moreover, citalopram did not modify mean masseter EMG activity during any of the vigilance states and did not affect the temporal changes related to the shifts between dark/light periods. However, citalopram increased the time engaged in masseter EMG activation during NREM sleep in the second and the first halves of the dark and light periods, respectively. These results suggest that chronic citalopram treatment does not affect the temporal changes of sleep-wake distributions, but has a limited facilitatory influence that fails to increase the number of epochs of high levels of masseter muscle activation.

  10. Utility of Electromyographic Biological Feedback in Chronic Stuttering: A Clinical Study with Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manschreck, Theo C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Eight chronic adult stutterers underwent an electromyographic (EMG) biological feedback training program to reduce masseter muscle tension in an effort to improve fluency. All subjects mastered the program within 10 30-minute sessions. Measures of muscle tension and fluency indicated improvements that were maintained three to six months later.…

  11. [Response properties of the jaw-closing muscle spindle during decreased occlusal vertical dimension in rats].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koichi

    2008-03-01

    The masseter-muscle spindle is regarded as being highly adaptable to increases in the occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD), it is hypothesized that spindle function would adapt to a decrease in occlusal vertical dimension (dOVD) as well. Seventy-five 5-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into Control (n = 25) and Experimental (n = 50) groups; those in the Experimental group received a 2.0-mm composite resin build-up to the maxillary molars. The Experimental group was divided into the resin-removal group (n = 25, build-up resin was removed) and the non resin-removal group (n = 25) 8 weeks later; i. e., when the animals were 13 weeks old. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from masseter-muscle spindle afferents in 13, 14, 15, 19, 21-week-old rats (n = 5 rats each) under general anesthesia Masseter-muscle spindle sensitivity was significantly lower in the resin-removal group 1 week after resin-removal and for the rest of the observation period. The present results indicate that masseter-muscle spindles may not completely adapt to dOVD and may affect jaw function.

  12. [The dynamic complex of the temporomandibular meniscus].

    PubMed

    Couly, G; Hureau, J; Vaillant, J M

    1975-12-01

    The existence of meniscocapsular insertions of the temporal, masseter and external pterygoid muscles complicates the scheme of capsulo-meniscal dynamics. Our findings do indeed agree with those of DUBECQ (Bordeaux); but we think that the insertions of the masseter and the temporal are not only fine tracts. In the embryon, the meniscus is the preglossal mekelian conjunctival blastema, which receives the 3 masticatory muscles on its anterior border. In the adult, menisco-capsulo-muscular relationships are not modified; inspite of considerable functional adaptation of the articulation to varied stimuli, the menisco-capsular apparatus seems to be triply controlled by 3 musculo-masticatory bands, owing to the anterior premeniscal tendinous lamina, in histological continuity with the meniscus and rich in corpuscles of deep sensitivity. The resultant of the tridirectional muscular traction of the masseter, external pterygoid and temporal is a force in the postero-anterior oblique direction, downwards and forwards, which allows the meniscus to stretch, as was shown by Pr Delaire, and thus to have a sub-temporal sliding pathway of 8 to 12 mm. The three muscle bundles external pterygoid, temporal and masseter constitute the dynamic complex of the meniscus.

  13. IGF and myostatin pathways are respectively induced during the earlier and the later stages of skeletal muscle hypertrophy induced by clenbuterol, a β₂-adrenergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Abo, Tokuhisa; Iida, Ryo-Hei; Kaneko, Syuhei; Suga, Takeo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamane, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Clenbuterol, a β₂-adrenergic agonist, increases the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) is reported to work as a potent positive regulator in the clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy of skeletal muscles. However, the precise regulatory mechanism for the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle induced by clenbuterol is unknown. Myostatin, a member of the TGFβ super family, is a negative regulator of muscle growth. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the function of myostatin and IGF in the hypertrophy of rat masseter muscle induced by clenbuterol. To investigate the function of myostatin and IGF in regulatory mechanism for the clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy of skeletal muscles, we analysed the expression of myostatin and phosphorylation levels of myostatin and IGF signaling components in the masseter muscle of rat to which clenbuterol was orally administered for 21 days. Hypertrophy of the rat masseter muscle was induced between 3 and 14 days of oral administration of clenbuterol and was terminated at 21 days. The expression of myostatin and the phosphorylation of smad2/3 were elevated at 21 days. The phosphorylation of IGF receptor 1 (IGFR1) and akt1 was elevated at 3 and 7 days. These results suggest that myostatin functions as a negative regulator in the later stages in the hypertrophy of rat masseter muscle induced by clenbuterol, whereas IGF works as a positive regulator in the earlier stages.

  14. [DIAGNOSTICS OF POSITION OF THE MOTOR AND TRIGGER POINTS: OF THE CHEWING MUSCLES FOR ZYGOMATIC COMPLEX FRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V O; Volovar, O S; Timoshchenko, N M; Kostiuk, T M

    2015-01-01

    Existing treatment methods of zygomatic complex fractures, which are complicated by contrac- ture of the masseter as a result of displaced bone fragments, have to be improved. Lack of muscle relaxation leads to the formation of local hypertonicity. In spasmodic muscle fibers varies perfusion and hypoxia occurs, which is accompanied by the release of inflammatory mediators and activation of pain receptors. Over time, areas formed local hypertonicity specific trigger points that contain multiple sensory loci and include one or more sensitive nerve endings. A device for the effective electromyographic study of masseters as a source of their condition and the dynamics of changes in masticatory muscles during patient treatment by improving the fixation system on the face of the patient and the introduction of more perfect spatial coordinate system for mathematical calculations masseter motor position (or triggered) point. Patients were examined before and in the dynamics of treatment according to our methodology, which included proper masseter relaxation, reposition and fixation of bone fragments and further medical therapy.

  15. Expression profiling reveals heightened apoptosis and supports fiber size economy in the murine muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Marianna; Morine, Kevin; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2008-09-17

    Distinctions between craniofacial and axial muscles exist from the onset of development and throughout adulthood. The masticatory muscles are a specialized group of craniofacial muscles that retain embryonic fiber properties in the adult, suggesting that the developmental origin of these muscles may govern a pattern of expression that differs from limb muscles. To determine the extent of these differences, expression profiling of total RNA isolated from the masseter and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of adult female mice was performed, which identified transcriptional changes in unanticipated functional classes of genes in addition to those attributable to fiber type. In particular, the masseters displayed a reduction of transcripts associated with contractile and cytoskeletal load-sensing and anabolic processes, and heightened expression of genes associated with stress. Associated with these observations was a significantly smaller fiber cross-sectional area in masseters, significantly elevated load-sensing signaling (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase), and increased apoptotic index in masseters compared with TA muscles. Based on these results, we hypothesize that masticatory muscles may have a fundamentally different strategy for muscle design, compared with axial muscles. Specifically there are small diameter fibers that have an attenuated ability to hypertrophy, but an increased propensity to undergo apoptosis. These results may provide insight into the molecular basis for specific muscle-related pathologies associated with masticatory muscles.

  16. Effects of experimental craniofacial pain on fine jaw motor control: a placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that experimental pain in the masseter muscle or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) would perturb the oral fine motor control, reflected in bigger variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, during repeated splitting of food morsels. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in four sessions. An intervention was made by injection of either 0.2 ml of monosodium glutamate/isotonic saline (MSG/IS) (randomized) in either the masseter or TMJ (randomized). The participants were asked to hold and split a flat-faced placebo tablet with their anterior teeth, thirty times each at baseline, during intervention and post-intervention. Pain was measured using a 0-10 visual analog scale. The force applied by the teeth to "hold" and "split" the tablet along with the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw muscles and subject-based reports on perception of pain was recorded. The data analysis included a three-way analysis of variance model. The peak pain intensity was significantly higher during the painful MSG injections in the TMJ (6.1 ± 0.4) than the injections in masseter muscle (5.5 ± 0.5) (P = 0.037). Variability of hold force was significantly smaller during the MSG injection than IS injection in the masseter (P = 0.024). However, there was no significant effect of intervention on the variability of split force during the masseter injections (P = 0.769) and variability of hold and split force during the TMJ injections (P = 0.481, P = 0.545). The variability of the EMG activity of the jaw muscles did not show significant effects of intervention. Subject-based reports revealed that pain did not interfere in the ability to hold the tablet in 57.9 and 78.9 %, and the ability to split the tablet in 78.9 and 68.4 %, of the participants, respectively, during painful masseter and TMJ injections. Hence, experimental pain in the masseter muscle or TMJ did not have any robust effect in terms of bigger

  17. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Paulo Valério Presser; Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Ioppi, Letícia; Hoffmann, Renata da Rocha

    2011-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is one of the most significant disorders of the stomatognathic system because it causes pain associated with severe functional limitations, such as difficulty in chewing and psychological and clinical problems due to poor oral hygiene. These disorders are quite significant in children, since the treatment is even more complex due to the fact that the condylar region is a site of active growth. The earlier the diagnosis is established, the better the treatment prognosis. Ankylosis can be treated by interposition arthroplasty of the temporalis muscle fascia in conjunction with ipsilateral coronoidectomy. The purpose of the present study was to report a clinical case of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a pediatric patient treated by interposition arthroplasty of the temporalis muscle fascia associated with coronoidectomy.

  18. Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) decreases the mechanical sensitivity of nociceptors and inhibits neurogenic vasodilation in a craniofacial muscle targeted for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Au, Sammy; Dong, Xudong; Kumar, Ujendra; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cairns, Brian E

    2010-12-01

    The mechanism by which intramuscular injection of BoNTA into the craniofacial muscles decreases migraine headaches is not known. In a blinded study, the effect of BoNTA on the mechanical and chemical responsiveness of individual temporalis muscle nociceptors and muscle neurogenic vasodilation was investigated in female rats. Mechanical threshold was measured for 3h following intramuscular injection of BoNTA or vehicle, and for 10 min after a subsequent injection of the algogen glutamate. Injection of BoNTA significantly increased the mechanical threshold of muscle nociceptors without altering the muscle surface temperature and blocked glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization and neurogenic vasodilation. None of these effects were reproduced by pancuronium-induced muscle paralysis. Western blot analysis of temporalis muscles indicated that BoNTA significantly decreased SNAP-25. Measurement of interstitial glutamate concentration with a glutamate biosensor indicated that BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate concentrations. The mechanical sensitivity of muscle nociceptors is modulated by glutamate concentration through activation of peripheral NMDA receptors. Immunohistochemical experiments were conducted and they indicated that half of the NMDA-expressing temporalis nerve fibers co-expressed substance P or CGRP. Additional electrophysiology experiments examined the effect of antagonists for NMDA, CGRP and NK1 receptors on glutamate-induced effects. Glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization was only blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist, but muscle neurogenic vasodilation was attenuated by NMDA or CGRP receptor antagonists. These data suggest that injection of BoNTA into craniofacial muscles acts to decrease migraine headaches by rapidly decreasing the mechanical sensitivity of temporalis muscle nociceptors through inhibition of glutamate release and by attenuating the provoked release of CGRP from muscle nociceptors.

  19. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Table 1. The sham-operated rats were not subjected to TBI. Values of the experimental parameters were similar for all treatment groups. Importantly...Oxal (n=9) 326 ± 21 2.15 ± 0.02 36.0 ± 0.33 35.5 ± 0.92 37.3 ± 0.35 37.2 ± 0.54 Table 1. Groups, Sample size, Body weight, ATM, Temporalis and

  20. An Osteolytic Meningioma en Plaque of the Sphenoid Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin-Uk; Yoo, Jae-Chul

    2008-01-01

    Meningioma en plaque (MEP) is a rare tumor characterized more by its clinical and biological behavior than its histological appearance. Hyperostosis of the skull is one of the characteristic signs of MEP. This bony change can produce clinical symptoms and signs in MEP by pressing against adjacent structures. The authors report a rare case of an osteolytic MEP extending from the sphenoid wing into the orbital wall, middle fossa, and temporalis muscle. PMID:19096543

  1. Craniectomy for a bilobed dermoid cyst in the temporal fossa and greater wing of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Nevrekar, Dipti; Abdu, Emun; Selden, Nathan R

    2009-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are common periorbital lesions. They usually occur near the superolateral orbital rim, indenting but not extending within the bony outer table. We present an unusual case of a dumbbell-shaped dermoid cyst underlying the temporalis muscle with extension into the lateral wing of the greater sphenoid bone, approaching the optic canal. The cyst was successfully removed en bloc via a small skull base craniectomy without spillage of cyst contents. The patient recovered well without neurological or visual sequelae.

  2. Chronic Facial Pain: A Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Joseph T.

    1983-01-01

    Facial pain is a common presenting complaint requiring patience and diagnostic acumen. The proliferation of eponyms attached to various syndromes complicates the subject. The most frequent cause of pain is likely to be muscle spasm in masticatory or temporalis muscles. This article presents a rank order for the common causes of facial pain that present diagnostic difficulty, such as temporomandibular joint pain, trigeminal neuralgia, giant cell arteritis, and post-herpetic neuralgia. PMID:21286580

  3. The effect of intermittent use of occlusal splint devices on sleep bruxism: a 4-week observation with a portable electromyographic recording device.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, H; Tsukiyama, Y; Kuwatsuru, R; Koyano, K

    2015-04-01

    This randomised controlled study investigated the effect of intermittent use of occlusal splints on sleep bruxism compared with that of continuous use by measuring masseter muscle electromyographic activity using a portable electromyographic recording system. Twenty bruxers were randomly allocated to the continuous group and intermittent group. Subjects in the continuous group wore stabilisation splints during sleep for 29 nights continuously, whereas those in the intermittent group wore splints during sleep every other week, that is they used splints on the 1st-7th, 15th-21st and 29th nights. Electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during sleep was recorded for the following six time points: before (baseline), immediately after, and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the insertion of a stabilisation splint. The number of nocturnal masseter electromyographic events, duration and the total activity of sleep bruxism were analysed. In the continuous group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events were significantly reduced immediately and 1 week after the insertion of the stabilisation splint, and duration was reduced immediately after the insertion (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test), but no reduction was observed at 2, 3 and 4 weeks after insertion. In the intermittent group, nocturnal masseter electromyographic events and duration were significantly reduced immediately after and also 4 weeks after insertion of the stabilisation splint (P < 0·05, Dunnett's test). The obtained results of the present exploratory trial indicate that the intermittent use of stabilisation splints may reduce sleep bruxism activity for a longer period compared with that of continuous use.

  4. Effect of clenching with a mouthguard on head acceleration during heading of a soccer ball.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Keishiro; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Konno, Michiyo; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are acceleration-deceleration injuries that occur when biomechanical forces are transmitted to the cerebral tissues. By limiting acceleration of the head, enhanced cervical muscle activity derived from clenching with a mouthguard (MG) may reduce the incidence or severity of concussions following impact. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of voluntary clenching with a proper MG on acceleration of the head during "heading" of a soccer ball. Eleven male high school soccer players (mean age, 16.8 years) participated in the study. Each player was given a customized MG. An automated soccer machine was used to project the ball at the participants at a constant speed. The participants headed the ball under 3 different oral conditions: drill 1, heading freely performed without instruction and without the MG; drill 2, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench the masseter muscles tightly while not wearing the MG; drill 3, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench tightly while wearing the MG. Each participant repeated each drill 5 times. Linear acceleration of the head was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Activity of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles was measured by wireless electromyography. Weak masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity was observed during drill 1. After the soccer players had been instructed to clench their masseter muscles (drills 2 and 3), statistically significant decreases in head acceleration and increases in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity were observed (P < 0.05; paired t test). The effect was stronger when the players wore the MG. Dentists should encourage soccer players to habitually clench while wearing a proper mouthguard to strengthen cervical muscle resistance as a way to mitigate the damage caused by heading.

  5. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome.

  6. Design, fabrication, and in vitro testing of novel three-dimensionally printed tympanic membrane grafts.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Elliott D; Black, Nicole L; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Cotler, Max J; McKenna, Michael J; Lee, Daniel J; Lewis, Jennifer A; Rosowski, John J; Remenschneider, Aaron K

    2016-10-01

    The tympanic membrane (TM) is an exquisite structure that captures and transmits sound from the environment to the ossicular chain of the middle ear. The creation of TM grafts by multi-material three-dimensional (3D) printing may overcome limitations of current graft materials, e.g. temporalis muscle fascia, used for surgical reconstruction of the TM. TM graft scaffolds with either 8 or 16 circumferential and radial filament arrangements were fabricated by 3D printing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), flex-polyactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) materials followed by uniform infilling with a fibrin-collagen composite hydrogel. Digital opto-electronic holography (DOEH) and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) were used to measure acoustic properties including surface motions and velocity of TM grafts in response to sound. Mechanical properties were determined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Results were compared to fresh cadaveric human TMs and cadaveric temporalis fascia. Similar to the human TM, TM grafts exhibit simple surface motion patterns at lower frequencies (400 Hz), with a limited number of displacement maxima. At higher frequencies (>1000 Hz), their displacement patterns are highly organized with multiple areas of maximal displacement separated by regions of minimal displacement. By contrast, temporalis fascia exhibited asymmetric and less regular holographic patterns. Velocity across frequency sweeps (0.2-10 kHz) measured by LDV demonstrated consistent results for 3D printed grafts, while velocity for human fascia varied greatly between specimens. TM composite grafts of different scaffold print materials and varied filament count (8 or 16) displayed minimal, but measurable differences in DOEH and LDV at tested frequencies. TM graft mechanical load increased with higher filament count and is resilient over time, which differs from temporalis fascia, which loses over 70% of its load bearing properties during mechanical testing. This study

  7. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    PubMed

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  8. Suppression of jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes during swallowing in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Ishiwata, Y; Kuroda, T; Nakamura, Y

    1999-11-01

    Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes can be evoked by innocuous as well as noxious afferents from intra-oral structures. It has been reported that the amplitude of the jaw-opening reflex evoked by weak electrical stimulation of the upper lip is subject not only to tonic suppression but also to phase-linked modulation during mastication. In this study, we investigated whether the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes are modulated during swallowing. Data were obtained from 8 chloralose-anesthetized cats. Reflexes were monitored by electromyographic activities recorded from the anterior digastric, genioglossus, and styloglossus muscles and, after paralysis, by the efferent discharge in the digastric and hypoglossal nerves. Swallowing was elicited either by water dropped on the tongue or by repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes were evoked by stimulation of the lingual nerve, and the evoked afferent volley was recorded from the Gasserian ganglion so that the threshold of the lingual nerve could be determined. The following results were obtained: (1) The jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by stimulation of the low-threshold, but not high-threshold, lingual afferents were remarkably suppressed during swallowing; and (2) both the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents were suppressed during fictive swallowing after the animals were paralyzed. We conclude that the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents are suppressed during swallowing by a central motor program.

  9. Determinants of masticatory performance in dentate adults.

    PubMed

    Hatch, J P; Shinkai, R S; Sakai, S; Rugh, J D; Paunovich, E D

    2001-07-01

    Masticatory performance results from a complex interplay of direct and indirect effects, yet most studies employ univariate models. This study tested a multivariate model of masticatory performance for dentate subjects. Explanatory variables included number of functional tooth units, bite force, sex, age, masseter cross-sectional area, presence of temporomandibular disorders, and presence of diabetes mellitus. The population-based sample consisted of 631 dentate subjects aged 37-80 years. Covariance structure analysis showed that 68% of the variability in masticatory performance could be explained by the combined effects of the explanatory variables. Age and sex did not show a strong effect on masticatory performance, either directly or indirectly through masseter cross-sectional area, temporomandibular disorders, and bite force. Number of functional tooth units and bite force were confirmed as the key determinants of masticatory performance, which suggests that their maintenance may be of major importance for promoting healthful functional status.

  10. Dielectric elastomer actuators for facial expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have the advantage of mimicking the salient feature of life: movements in response to stimuli. In this paper we explore application of dielectric elastomer actuators to artificial muscles. These artificial muscles can mimic natural masseter to control jaw movements, which are key components in facial expressions especially during talking and singing activities. This paper investigates optimal design of the dielectric elastomer actuator. It is found that the actuator with embedded plastic fibers can avert electromechanical instability and can greatly improve its actuation. Two actuators are then installed in a robotic skull to drive jaw movements, mimicking the masseters in a human jaw. Experiments show that the maximum vertical displacement of the robotic jaw, driven by artificial muscles, is comparable to that of the natural human jaw during speech activities. Theoretical simulations are conducted to analyze the performance of the actuator, which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  11. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation of the trigeminal roots, analysis of the jaw jerk reflex, recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex, and a magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain. Results The neuromuscular responses of the left- and right-side bilateral trigeminal motor potentials showed a high degree of symmetry in latency (1.92 ms and 1.96 ms, respectively) and amplitude (11 mV and 11.4 mV, respectively), whereas the jaw jerk reflex amplitude of the right and left masseters was 5.1 mV and 8.9 mV, respectively. The test stimulus for the recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex evoked both silent periods at an interstimulus interval of 150 ms. The duration of the second silent period evoked by the test stimulus was 61 ms and 54 ms on the right and left masseters, respectively, which was greater than that evoked by the conditioning stimulus (39 ms and 35 ms, respectively). Conclusions We found evidence of activation and peripheral sensitization of the nociceptive fibers, the primary and secondary nociceptive neurons in the central nervous system, and the endogenous pain control systems (including both the inhibitory and facilitatory processes), in the tested subject. These data suggest that bruxism and central orofacial pain can coexist, but are two independent symptoms, which may explain why numerous experimental and clinical studies fail to reach unequivocal conclusions. PMID:24165294

  12. Jaw-opening reflex after CO2 laser stimulation of the perioral region in man.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Romaniello, A

    1998-02-01

    CO2 laser pulses selectively excite A-delta and C mechano-thermal nociceptors in the superficial layers of the skin. To study the jaw-opening reflex elicited by a purely nociceptive input, we delivered laser pulses to the perioral region in 15 subjects. Sensory threshold was very low (9 mJ/mm2). High-intensity noxious laser pulses (more than 4 x sensory threshold) evoked a single phase of electromyogram suppression (laser silent period, LSP) at an onset latency of 70 ms in the contracted masseter and temporal muscles, bilaterally. Even maximum-intensity laser pulses failed to activate the suprahyoid muscles. The recovery curves to paired laser stimuli showed that at short interstimulus intervals the test LSP was strongly suppressed. At about 380 ms it recovered to 50%, i.e. its recovery curve resembled that of the masseter late silent period after electrical mental nerve stimulation (SP2). In experiments studying the interaction with heterotopic stimuli and non-nociceptive responses, chin-taps or electrical shocks delivered to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerves before laser stimulation strongly suppressed the LSP. A preceding perioral laser pulse strongly suppressed the masseter SP evoked by supraorbital stimulation and the SP2 evoked by mental stimulation, but left SPI unaffected. We conclude that the perioral A-delta fibre input elicits a jaw-opening reflex simply by inhibiting the jaw-closers. The LSP response is mediated by a multisynaptic chain of brainstem interneurons and shares with the masseter SP2 part of the central circuit in the ponto-medullary region. We also propose that a common centre processes the various inputs for jaw opening.

  13. [Orbito-fronto-temporal approach to tumors at the base of the skull. Our experience in the creation of orbito-zygomatic-malar flap].

    PubMed

    Iriarte Ortabe, J I; Thauvoy, C; Reychler, H

    1993-10-01

    The authors describe the technique of mobilization of the osseous orbito-zygomatico-malar complex pedicled to the masseter muscle. In some affections it is justiciable to use this approach which provides an excellent view of the lateral region of the medial cranial fossa and orbit and permits the access to the base of the tumor by a intra- and extracranial approach without traumatic injury for the brain and easy reconstruction.

  14. Nocturnal bruxing events in healthy geriatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P; Phillips, B A; Berry, D T; Cook, Y; Paesani, D; Galante, J

    1990-09-01

    Thirty healthy geriatric subjects were studied during a single night of sleep in a sleep laboratory. Unilateral masseter muscle activity was recorded in addition to the standard polysomnographic study. The geriatric subjects in this study exhibited fewer bruxing events than other subjects reported in the literature. Certain conditions that have not been previously investigated, such as sleep position, type of bruxing event, and relationship to the state of the dentition, are reported.

  15. [Clinical features of malignant hyperthermia crisis].

    PubMed

    Cornet, C; Moeller, R; Laxenaire, M C

    1989-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder. It is classically described as a hypermetabolic state triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and/or depolarizing muscle relaxants. In fact, since Denborough and Lovel's case, it has been shown that MH has a great number of clinical forms. The overwhelming picture of muscular hypercatabolism with fulminating hyperthermia and generalized rigidity is becoming rare. A better knowledge of the first symptoms explains in part the better prognosis: masseter spasm after suxamethonium, an increase in expired CO2 concentration, unexplained tachycardia, ventricular arrhythmias. The use of dantrolene reduced the mortality of MH. The different types of clinical manifestations are due to genetic differences, the concentration of the anaesthetic agent, and the length of time of exposure to the drug. The severity of the episode is linked to environmental factors such as stress, physical exercise, ambient temperature, concomitant use of other drugs. Masseter spasm after suxamethonium is specific for MH, but not pathognomonic. It occurs in 1% of cases in children when using halothane with suxamethonium. However, in those patients who displayed such a spasm, more than 50% had a positive contracture test. Masseter spasm is often associated with severe rhabdomyolysis in patients with muscle dystrophy, especially Duchenne's dystrophy. In the latter case, major cardiac problems may occur at the time of anaesthetic induction. Even if there are no other signs of MH, all patients who have had a masseter spasm must be considered as open to doubt, and should be further explored. MH is often difficult to diagnose in medium severity types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Expression of eight distinct MHC isoforms in bovine striated muscles: evidence for MHC-2B presence only in extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, L; Maccatrozzo, L; Patruno, M; Caliaro, F; Mascarello, F; Reggiani, C

    2005-11-01

    This study aimed to analyse the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in bovine muscles, with particular attention to the MHC-2B gene. Diaphragm, longissimus dorsi, masseter, several laryngeal muscles and two extraocular muscles (rectus lateralis and retractor bulbi) were sampled in adult male Bos taurus (age 18-24 months, mass 400-500 kg) and analysed by RT-PCR, gel electrophoresis and immunohistochemistry. Transcripts and proteins corresponding to eight MHC isoforms were identified: MHC-alpha and MHC-beta/slow (or MHC-1), two developmental isoforms (MHC-embryonic and MHC-neonatal), three adult fast isoforms (MHC-2A, MHC-2X and MHC-2B) and the extraocular isoform MHC-Eo. All eight MHC isoforms were found to be co-expressed in extrinsic eye muscles, retractor bulbi and rectus lateralis, four (beta/slow, 2A, 2X, neonatal) in laryngeal muscles, three (beta/slow, 2A and 2X) in trunk and limb muscles and two (beta/slow and alpha) in masseter. The expression of MHC-2B and MHC-Eo was restricted to extraocular muscles. Developmental MHC isoforms (neonatal and embryonic) were only found in specialized muscles in the larynx and in the eye. MHC-alpha was only found in extraocular and masseter muscle. Single fibres dissected from masseter, diaphragm and longissimus were classified into five groups (expressing, respectively, beta/slow, alpha, slow and 2A, 2A and 2X) on the basis of MHC isoform electrophoretical separation, and their contractile properties [maximum shortening velocity (v(0)) and isometric tension (P(0))] were determined. v(0) increased progressively from slow to fast 2A and fast 2X, whereas hybrid 1-2A fibres and fibres containing MHC-alpha were intermediate between slow and fast 2A.

  17. Myositis ossificans traumatica of the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Hitoshi; Sumiya, Noriyoshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Naohiro; Akizuki, Ayako; Maruyama, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    Myositis ossificans traumatica (MOT) is a disease in which muscular ossification develops following trauma. Almost all cases of MOT are found in skeletal muscle. The authors report in a 39-year-old man MOT involving several muscles in the head and neck, namely, bilateral masseter muscles, the left temporal muscle, the left lateral pterygoid muscle, and the left frontal muscle. Involvement of the lateral pterygoid muscle is especially rare.

  18. The expression of myogenic regulatory factors and muscle growth factors in the masticatory muscles of dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice.

    PubMed

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lucke, Silke; Pavlovic, Dragan; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2011-06-01

    The activities of myogenic regulatory factors (MRF) and muscle growth factors increase in muscle that is undergoing regeneration, and may correspond to some specific changes. Little is known about the role of MRFs in masticatory muscles in mdx mice (the model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) and particularly about their mRNA expression during the process of muscle regeneration. Using Taqman RT-PCR, we examined the mRNA expression of the MRFs myogenin and MyoD1 (myogenic differentiation 1), and of the muscle growth factors myostatin, IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor) and MGF (mechano-growth factor) in the masseter, temporal and tongue masticatory muscles of mdx mice (n = 6 to 10 per group). The myogenin mRNA expression in the mdx masseter and temporal muscle was found to have increased (P < 0.05), whereas the myostatin mRNA expressions in the mdx masseter (P < 0.005) and tongue (P < 0.05) were found to have diminished compared to those for the controls. The IGF and MGF mRNA amounts in the mdx mice remained unchanged. Inside the mdx animal group, gender-related differences in the mRNA expressions were also found. A higher mRNA expression of myogenin and MyoD1 in the mdx massterer and temporal muscles was found in females in comparison to males, and the level of myostatin was higher in the masseter and tongue muscle (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Similar gender-related differences were also found within the control groups. This study reveals the intermuscular differences in the mRNA expression pattern of myogenin and myostatin in mdx mice. The existence of these differences implies that dystrophinopathy affects the skeletal muscles differentially. The finding of gender-related differences in the mRNA expression of the examined factors may indicate the importance of hormonal influences on muscle regeneration.

  19. Talin, vinculin and nestin expression in orofacial muscles of dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Pavlovic, Dragan; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lehmann, Christian; Lucke, Silke; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2012-04-01

    The activity of cytoskeletal proteins like talin, vinculin and nestin increases in muscle that regenerates. Little is known about their role or at least their expression in the process of regeneration in masticatory muscles of mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To determine a potential role of cytoskeletal proteins in the regeneration process of mdx masticatory muscles, we examined the expression of talin 1, talin 2, vinculin and nestin in 100-day-old control and mdx mice using quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot analyses and histochemistry. The protein expression of talin 1, talin 2, nestin and vinculin in mdx muscles remained unchanged as compared with normal mice. However, in mdx masseter it was found a relative increase of nestin compared to controls. The protein expression of talin 1 and vinculin tended to be increased in mdx tongue and talin 2 to diminish in mdx masseter and temporal muscle. In mdx mice, we found significantly lower percentage of transcripts coding for nestin, talin 1, talin 2 and vinculin in masseter (p < 0.05) and temporal muscle (p < 0.001). In contrast, the mRNA expression of nestin was found to be increased in mdx tongue. Activated satellite cells, myoblasts and immature regenerated muscle fibres in mdx masseter and temporal revealed positive staining for nestin. The findings of the presented work suggest dystrophin-lack-associated changes in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins in mdx masticatory muscles could be compensatory for dystrophin absence. The expression of nestin may serve as an indicator for the regeneration in the orofacial muscles.

  20. Sleep bruxism is related to decreased inhibitory control of trigeminal motoneurons, but not with reticulobulbar system.

    PubMed

    İnan, Rahşan; Şenel, Gülçin Benbir; Yavlal, Figen; Karadeniz, Derya; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2017-01-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) is a stereotyped movement disorder characterized by grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep. We aimed to understand the abnormal networks related to the excitability of masticatory pathways in patients with SB. Eleven patients with SB and age- and gender-matched 20 healthy subjects were prospectively enrolled in our study. The masseter inhibitory reflex (MIR) after electrical stimulation and auditory startle reaction (ASR) were examined. For MIR responses, durations of early and late silent period (SP) were shorter and the degree of suppression of SPs was significantly lower in SB group in comparison to those obtained in healthy subjects. The ASR responses even of the masseter muscle, however, were similar between patients with SB and healthy individuals. Abnormal MIR provides support for the decreased inhibitory control of the central masticatory circuits in SB whereas normal ASR suggests the integrity and normal functioning of brainstem pathways mediating startle reaction. Although the sample size is small, our results are in line with previous findings and suggest an abnormally decreased inhibition in trigeminal motoneurons to masseter muscle rather than reticulobulbar pathways in patients with SB.

  1. Activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 leads to muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jin Y; Lee, Jong-Seok; Zhang, Youping

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in mediating craniofacial muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, we confirmed the expression of TRPV1 in masseter afferents in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG), and provided new data that TRPA1 is also expressed in primary afferents innervating masticatory muscles in double-labeling immunohistochemistry experiments. We then examined whether the activation of each TRP channel in the masseter muscle evokes acute nocifensive responses and leads to the development of masseter hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation using the behavioral models that have been specifically designed and validated for the craniofacial system. Intramuscular injections with specific agonists for TRPV1 and TRPA1, capsaicin and mustard oil (MO), respectively, produced immediate nocifensive hindpaw responses followed by prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, effectively attenuated the capsaicin-induced muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia. Similarly, pretreatment of the muscle with a selective TRPA1 antagonist, AP18, significantly blocked the MO-induced muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia. We confirmed these data with another set of selective antagonist for TRPV1 and TRPA1, AMG9810 and HC030031, respectively. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that TRPV1 and TRPA1 can functionally contribute to muscle nociception and hyperalgesia, and suggest that TRP channels expressed in muscle afferents can engage in the development of pathologic muscle pain conditions.

  2. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Patients and methods: Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Results: Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15–20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Conclusion: Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both. PMID:15314112

  3. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles.

  4. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice. PMID:27689088

  5. Cortical silent period reveals differences between adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), like other focal dystonias, is largely unknown. Objective The purposes of this study were to determine 1) cortical excitability differences between AdSD, muscle tension dysphonia (MTD) and healthy controls 2) distribution of potential differences in cranial or skeletal muscle, and 3) if cortical excitability measures assist in the differential diagnosis of AdSD and MTD. Methods 10 participants with adductor spasmodic dysphonia, 8 with muscle tension dysphonia and 10 healthy controls received single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the primary motor cortex contralateral to tested muscles, first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and masseter. We tested the hypothesis that cortical excitability measures in AdSD would be significantly different than in MTD and healthy. In addition, we hypothesized there would be a correlation between cortical excitability measures and clinical voice severity in AdSD. Results Cortical silent period (CSP) duration in masseter and FDI was significantly shorter in AdSD than MTD and healthy controls. Other measures failed to demonstrate differences. Conclusion There are differences in cortical excitability between AdSD, MTD and healthy controls. These differences in the cortical measure of both the FDI and masseter muscles in AdSD suggest widespread dysfunction of the GABAB mechanism may be a pathophysiologic feature of AdSD, similar to other forms of focal dystonia. Further exploration of the use of TMS to assist in the differential diagnosis of AdSD and MTD is warranted. PMID:26089309

  6. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF MASTICATION AND SWALLOWING IN ELDERLY INDIVIDUALS WITH MANDIBULAR FIXED IMPLANTSUPPORTED PROSTHESES

    PubMed Central

    Berretin-Felix, Giédre; Nary, Hugo; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Trindade, Alceu Sergio; Machado, Wellington Monteiro

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of implant-supported oral rehabilitation in the mandible on the electromyographic activity during mastication and swallowing in edentulous elderly individuals. Fifteen patients aged more than 60 years were evaluated, being 10 females and 5 males. All patients were edentulous, wore removable complete dentures on both dental arches, and had the mandibular dentures replaced by implant-supported prostheses. All patients were submitted to electromyographic evaluation of the masseter, superior orbicularis oris muscles, and the submental muscles, before surgery and 3, 6 and 18 months postoperatively, using foods of different textures. The results obtained at the different periods were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Statistical analysis showed that only the masseter muscle had a significant loss in electromyographic activity (p<0.001), with a tendency of similar response for the submental muscles. Moreover, there was an increase in the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during rubber chewing after treatment, yet without statistically significant difference. Mandibular fixed implant-supported prostheses in elderly individuals revealed a decrease in electromyographic amplitude for the masseter muscles during swallowing, which may indicate adaptation to new conditions of stability provided by fixation of the complete denture in the mandibular arch. PMID:19089202

  7. Role of the lateral hypothalamus in submandibular salivary secretion during feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Ryuji; Kobashi, Motoi; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Masako

    2015-01-30

    To evaluate the role of the lateral hypothalamic area (LH) in the masticatory-salivary reflex, we investigated submandibular salivary secretion and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw-closer masseter muscle in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral LH lesions. One week prior to surgery and recording, the rats were given daily experience of eating pellets; powder; or hard, medium or soft mash, all of which were composed of laboratory chow. Salivary secretion was induced during eating and grooming behavior. During eating, the powdered food induced the highest salivary flow rate, and the soft (wet) mash induced the lowest salivary flow rate. Conversely, the amount of food consumed (dry weight) was greatest when soft mash was provided and lowest when the powder or pellets (a dry diet) were provided. The EMG activity of the masseter muscle during eating was greatest during consumption of the pellets and weakest during consumption of the powder. LH lesions that were ipsilateral to the examined submandibular gland reduced salivary secretion to about 20-30% of the control value, whereas contralateral LH lesions reduced it to about 40-50% of the control value. Neither masseter muscle EMG activity nor food consumption was markedly affected by the presence of an LH lesion. These results suggest that the texture of food, especially its water content, affects the flow rate of saliva and that the LH is heavily involved in the masticatory-salivary reflex.

  8. Value of EMG analysis of mandibular elevators in open-close-clench cycle to diagnosing TMJ disturbance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chong-Shan, S; Hui-Yun, W

    1989-01-01

    The EMGs of the temporal and masseter muscle, in sixty patients with temporomandibular joint disturbance syndrome (TMJDS) and thirty normal controls, were recorded during rhythmical open-close-clench cycle movement and before and after occlusal splint therapy. The duration of the muscle contraction before initial tooth contact (DMC), the latent period (LP) and the silent period (SP) of the myoelectrical activity were used as indices for exploring their diagnostic value. In contrast with the controls, DMC, LP and SP lengthened in the patients. The DMC was prolonged in those patients where there were TMJ sounds, the inter-cuspated position did not coincide with the muscular contact position and there was deviated mandibular movement. An increase of the SP was related to tooth contact on the balancing side. After treatment, the DMC and SP in the patients returned to the level of the controls. It was found that the internal correction rate of Fisher's linear discriminate function established for the DMC and SP of the temporal and masseter muscles was 80.9% and 85.1% respectively. The results show that the DMC and SP of the temporal and masseter muscles have some value in diagnosing muscular dysfunction and discriminating therapeutic effectiveness.

  9. Changes in masticatory muscle activity according to food size in experimental human mastication.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, S; Ohkochi, N; Kawakami, T; Sugimura, M

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in masticatory muscle activity according to food size in human mastication. Sixteen subjects performed deliberate unilateral chewing of similarly cone shaped hard gummy jellies weighing 5 and 10 g. The masseter and anterior temporal muscle activity on both sides was recorded for the first 10 strokes. The normalized muscle activity during the chewing of the 10 g jelly was significantly higher than that of the 5-g jelly, and there was a considerably high significant correlationship between the muscle activity during the chewing of the 10- and 5-g jellies in each muscle on each side. The 10 g/5 g jelly ratio for the masseter muscle activity on the non-chewing side almost coincided with the theoretical energy ratio required to shear, although that of the chewing side was lower than the ratio. The 10 g/5 g jelly ratio for the temporal muscle activity on both sides almost coincided with the food height ratio. The results suggest that anterior temporal and masseter muscle activity changes according to the rate of change in the height of hard coherent food bolus and food resistance required to shear, respectively, during mastication.

  10. Treatment of chronic pain associated with nocturnal bruxism with botulinum toxin. A prospective and randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wayli, Hessa

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the treatment of pain associated with nocturnal bruxism. Material and Methods Fifty subjects reporting nocturnal bruxism were recruited for a randomized clinical trial. Twenty five bruxers were injected with botulinum toxin in both masseters, and twenty five were treated with traditional methods of treating bruxism. Patients were evaluated at 3rd week, 2nd and 6th month and one year after injection and then used to calculate bruxism events. Bruxism symptoms were investigated using questionnaires. Results Mean pain score due to Bruxism events in the masseter muscle decreased significantly in the botulinum toxin injection group A (P =0.000, highly significant). However, in the conventional treatment group, mean pain score does not show improvement with time (p>0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that botulinum toxin injection reduced the mean pain score and number of bruxism events, most likely by decreasing the muscle activity of masseter rather than affecting the central nervous system. Key words:Temporomandibular pain, nocturnal bruxism, botulinum toxin. PMID:28149474

  11. Evaluation of silent period on masticatory cycles of different muscles in dentate oral contraceptives users and nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Garcia, Alício Rosalino; Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Guiotti, Aimée Maria; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of oral contraceptive use on the silent period (SP) of anterior temporal and masseter muscles during the menstrual cycle. Materials and Methods: Totally, 28 women on reproductive age were selected including 15 nonusers of any hormone and 13 contraceptive users. All patients were dentate without muscular temporomandibular disorders. Electromyography (SP test) of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles was conducted every week during three consecutive menstrual cycles at 1st day of menstruation (P1), 7th day (P2), 14th day (P3) and 21st day (P4). Results: The SP values in the anterior temporal and masseter muscles were measured at both sides. The SP values of the right side (13.49 ms) at P2 were significantly different compared to the left side (12.28 ms). However, there was no significant difference on the interactions among the three factors. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the SP values in healthy women in reproductive age may not be influenced by the menstrual cycle with similar results for both muscles. PMID:26038645

  12. Anxiety's Effect on Muscle Activation and Fatigue in Trumpet Players: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, Hannah E; Aggarwal, Sahil; Hobson, Erin M; Park, Jeeyn; Pidcoe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Due to the high percentage of musicians who suffer from musculoskeletal disorders, there is a need for more research in the field of music and medicine. The purpose of this study was to analyze the possible relationship between anxiety, muscle activation, and muscle fatigue in undergraduate trumpet players. Assessment tools included surface electromyography (sEMG) data, State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) of perceived anxiety. Data were collected from 27 undergraduate music students across five universities (22 males, 5 females) aged 18 to 24 years. The three muscles targeted by the sEMG were the upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and masseter muscles. Participants were randomly divided into two single-blinded groups: (1) anxiety-induction and (2) control. The anxiety-induction group was instructed to play as accurately as possible and informed that mistakes were being counted and evaluated, while the control group was instructed to play without any concern for possible mistakes. The anxiety-induction group was shown to have more masseter muscle activation than the control; the anxiety-induction group also displayed a higher fatigue rate in all three muscles versus the controls. Subjects with high perceived-anxiety (as measured by VAS) displayed higher masseter activation and higher fatigue rates in the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid than non-anxious participants. Despite these notable trends, there was no statistical significance for any of the muscle groups for muscle activation or fatigue.

  13. Blockade of peripheral 5HT3 receptor attenuates the formalin-induced nocifensive behavior in persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation of rat.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Imbe, Hiroki; Tashiro, Akimasa; Kumabe, Shunji; Senba, Emiko

    2004-09-02

    The role of peripheral 5HT3 receptors in the orofacial nocifensive behavior induced by the injection of formalin into masseter muscle was evaluated. The behavioral activities evoked by the formalin injection exhibited a biphasic response in the rats with or without temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation (CFA group or non-CFA group). The orofacial nocifensive behavioral activity was enhanced after TMJ inflammation. Systemic administration of tropisetron, 5HT3 receptor antagonist, reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the late phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group. Local administration of tropisetron into the masseter muscle in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group also attenuated the behavioral activities in the late phase. Unexpectedly, low dose of local tropisetron reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the early phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group. These data suggest that induction of TMJ inflammation causes the elevation of the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by formalin injection into masseter muscle, and that peripheral 5HT3 receptors may play a critical role in nociception and the transmission of orofacial pain.

  14. Effect of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion on masticatory muscle activity: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sverzut, Cássio E.; Martorelli, Karinna; Jabur, Roberto; Petri, Alice D.; Trivellato, Alexandre E.; Siéssere, Selma; Regalo, Simone C. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masseter and temporal muscles of adult patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) before and after the surgery. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 19 adults, with ages ranging from 20 to 47 years (mean 25.4 years), with bilateral posterior cross bite requiring SARME treatment. The electromyographic activity of masseter and temporal muscles was analyzed before treatment (T1) and after the surgical procedure (T2). The mean interval between the two electromyographic analyses was 15 days. Results: The muscular active was electromyographically analyzed during the clinical situation of habitual gum chewing (10 sec), dental clenching (4 sec), mouth opening and closing (10 sec), rest (10 sec), protrusion (10 sec), and right and left laterality (10 sec). The measured differences between T1 and T2 data were evaluated using the paired t-test (SPSS 17.0 for Windows). The electromyographic analysis showed that the activity of the masseter and temporal muscles decreased significantly after the SARME in all the clinical situations after the surgery. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, individuals after SARME surgery presented patterns of electromyographic contraction similar to those developed by dentate individuals during the movements of mandibular excursion. PMID:23482404

  15. Evaluation of masticatory activity during unilateral single tooth clenching using muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Okada, C; Yamaguchi, S; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, M; Hattori, Y

    2016-08-01

    Masticatory muscle activity during teeth clenching is affected by occlusal pattern. However, few studies have performed simultaneous evaluation of all masticatory activities during teeth clenching under various occlusal conditions. The aim of this study was to use muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) to evaluate the effects of changes in occlusal point on masticatory activity during single tooth clenching. Changes in mean proton transverse relaxation time (∆T2) as an index of activity in all masticatory muscles during left unilateral clenching at the first molar or first premolar for 1 min were examined in nine healthy volunteers. Bite force was maintained at 40% of the maximum voluntary clenching force. The ∆T2 values of the masseter and lateral pterygoid muscles were analysed separately for superficial and deep layers, and for superior and inferior heads. The ∆T2 values for the ipsilateral deep masseter were significantly lower, and for the superior head of the ipsilateral lateral pterygoid muscles were significantly higher, after left first premolar clenching compared to left first molar clenching. These results quantitatively demonstrate a significant increase in activity of the superior head of the ipsilateral lateral pterygoid muscle and a significant decrease in activity of the ipsilateral deep masseter muscle with forward displacement of the occlusal contact point during unilateral tooth clenching.

  16. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  17. Bone and cartilage changes in rabbit mandibular condyles after a single injection of botulinum toxin

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, Tori; Ho Dang, Hong An; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Herring, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary paralysis of the masseter muscle using botulinum toxin is a common treatment for temporomandibular disorders, bruxism, and muscle hypertrophy. Loss of masseter force is associated with decreased mandibular mineral density. Our objectives were (1) to establish whether bone loss at the mandibular condyle is regionally specific, and (2) to ascertain whether the treatment affects the condylar cartilage. Methods Young adult female rabbits received a unilateral masseter injection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A, n=31), saline (n=19) or no injection (n=3) and were also injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a replication marker. Termination occurred 4 or 12 weeks following treatment. Condyles were processed by paraffin histology. Cortical thickness, cartilage thickness and trabecular bone areal density were measured, and replicating cells were counted after BrdU reaction. Results BoNT/A rabbits exhibited a high frequency of defects in the condylar bone surface, occurring equally on injected and uninjected sides. Bone loss was seen only on the side of the BoNT/A injection. Cortical as well as trabecular bone was severely affected. The midcondylar region lost the most bone. Recovery at 12 weeks was insignificant. Condylar cartilage thickness showed no treatment effect but did increase with time. Numbers of proliferating cells were similar in treatment groups, but BoNT/A animals showed more side asymmetry in association with the condylar defects. Conclusion Bone loss may be a risk factor for the use of botulinum toxin in jaw muscles. PMID:26672706

  18. Correlation between distribution of muscle weakness, electrophysiological findings and CTG expansion in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Khoshbakht, Roya; Soltanzadeh, Akbar; Zamani, Babak; Abdi, Siyamak; Gharagozli, Kourosh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Khoshbakht, Rahem; Nafissi, Shahriar

    2014-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM-1) is a multi-system disorder affecting the muscles, brain, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, eyes and skin. Diagnosis is made by clinical, electrodiagnostic and genetic studies. This study aimed to determine the correlation between CTG expansion and distribution of muscle weakness and clinical and electrophysiological findings. Genetically confirmed DM-1 patients presenting to Shariati Hospital between 2005 and 2011 were included in this study. Clinical, electrodiagnostic and genetic testing was performed and the correlation between CTG expansion and distribution of muscle weakness and clinical and electromyographic findings was studied. Thirty-three genetically confirmed DM-1 patients were enrolled. Myotonia, bifacial weakness and distal upper limb weakness were seen in all patients. Diabetes mellitus was found in one patient (3%), cardiac disturbance in eight (24.2%), cataracts in eight (24.2%), hypogonadism in five (15.2%), frontal baldness in 13 (39.4%), temporalis wasting in 14 (42.4%), temporomandibular joint disorder in seven (21.2%) and mental retardation in eight (24.2%). The mean number of CTG repeats, measured by Southern blot, was 8780 (range 500-15,833). A negative correlation was found between CTG expansion and age of onset. Temporalis wasting and mental retardation were positively correlated with CTG expansion. No relationship was found between weakness distribution, electromyographic findings, other systemic features and CTG expansion. In this study of DM-1 in Iran, we found a correlation between CTG expansion and age of onset, temporalis wasting and mental disability. No correlation between CTG expansion and electrodiagnostic and other clinical findings were detected.

  19. Bilateral Coronoidectomy by Craniofacial Approach for Hecht Syndrome-Related Trismus.

    PubMed

    Balkin, Daniel M; Chen, Isaac; Oberoi, Snehlata; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-01

    Hecht Syndrome is an autosomal dominant distal arthrogryposis caused by mutation in the MYH8 locus characterized by trismus and pseudocamptodactyly. Hecht-associated trismus is thought to result from bilateral hyperplasia of the mandibular coronoid processes. Although several interventions to address trismus have been pursued, no consensus exists regarding optimal management. In this report, the authors present a 7-month-old male with Hecht Syndrome referred for management of trismus. By age 2, interincisal opening had progressively decreased from 12 to 5 mm despite physical therapy. Nutrition was limited to liquids, oral hygiene was compromised, and aspiration risk was present. Computed tomography examination revealed enlarged coronoid processes extending medially and superiorly to the zygomatic arches. To release bony impaction of the coronoid processes against the zygoma and to prevent reossification of the temporalis tendon insertion, resection of the enlarged coronoids and distal temporalis muscles as well as placement of Alloderm spacers were performed via an open craniofacial transzygomatic approach. Jaw motion rehabilitation was used following surgery. Two years postoperatively, the patient had no signs of recurrence and good functional stability of jaw excursion. He was able to chew and swallow solid foods, protrude his tongue, use utensils, and perform regular oral hygiene, none of which were possible before surgery. This case demonstrates that open bilateral coronoidectomy can be a successful and durable management option for trismus in patients with Hecht Syndrome. The open transzygomatic approach is safe, has low morbidity, and provides direct access and adequate exposure for coronoid resection, spacer placement, and prevention of temporalis reinsertion.

  20. Surgical anatomy and blood supply of the fascial layers of the temporal region.

    PubMed

    Abul-Hassan, H S; von Drasek Ascher, G; Acland, R D

    1986-01-01

    In 15 fresh cadavers (30 sides), we studied the two layers of fascia in the temporal region, with particular regard to their blood supply and to their usefulness--together or separately--as microvascular free-tissue autografts. The superficial temporal fascia (temporoparietal fascia, epicranial aponeurosis) lies immediately deep to the hair follicles. It is part of the subcutaneous musculoaponeurotic system and is continuous in all directions with other structures belonging to that layer--including the galea above and the SMAS layer of the face below. The deep temporal fascia (temporalis fascia, investing fascia of temporalis) is separated from the superficial fascia by an avascular plane of loose areolar tissue. It completely invests the superficial aspect of the temporalis muscle down to (but not beyond) the zygomatic arch. It is firmly attached to periosteum all around the margin of the muscles. Below it is attached to the upper border of the zygomatic arch. We found the deep temporal fascia to be supplied solely by the middle temporal artery, a constant branch of the superficial temporal. The middle temporal artery arises 1 to 3 cm below the upper border of the zygomatic arch, runs always superficial to the arch, and enters the deep temporal fascia immediately above that layer's attachment to the zygomatic arch. If the middle temporal vessels are protected, the two layers of temporal fascia can be raised together as a fully vascularized tissue island. This island can be fashioned as a bilobed or a double-layered flap, depending on the manner of dissection. The potential surgical usefulness of these findings is discussed.

  1. The relationship between skull morphology, masticatory muscle force and cranial skeletal deformation during biting.

    PubMed

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Zapata Muñoz, Víctor; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human skull is gracile when compared to many Middle Pleistocene hominins. It has been argued that it is less able to generate and withstand high masticatory forces, and that the morphology of the lower portion of the modern human face correlates most strongly with dietary characteristics. This study uses geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the relationship between skull morphology, muscle force and cranial deformations arising from biting, which is relevant in understanding how skull morphology relates to mastication. The three-dimensional skull anatomies of 20 individuals were reconstructed from medical computed tomograms. Maximal contractile muscle forces were estimated from muscular anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs). Fifty-nine landmarks were used to represent skull morphology. A partial least squares analysis was performed to assess the association between skull shape and muscle force, and FEA was used to compare the deformation (strains) generated during incisor and molar bites in two individuals representing extremes of morphological variation in the sample. The results showed that only the proportion of total muscle CSA accounted for by the temporalis appears associated with skull morphology, albeit weekly. However, individuals with a large temporalis tend to possess a relatively wider face, a narrower, more vertically oriented maxilla and a lower positioning of the coronoid process. The FEAs showed that, despite differences in morphology, biting results in similar modes of deformation for both crania, but with localised lower magnitudes of strains arising in the individual with the narrowest, most vertically oriented maxilla. Our results suggest that the morphology of the maxilla modulates the transmission of forces generated during mastication to the rest of the cranium by deforming less in individuals with the ability to generate proportionately larger temporalis muscle forces.

  2. Interdigitated craniotomy: a simple technique to fix a bone flap with only a single plate.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noboru; Fujiwara, Kazunori; Saito, Keiichi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-10-01

    In pterional craniotomy, fixation plates cause artifacts on postoperative radiological images; furthermore, they often disfigure the scalp in hairless areas. The authors describe a simple technique to fix a cranial bone flap with only a single plate underneath the temporalis muscle in an area with hair, rather than using a plate in a hairless area. The key to this technique is to cut the anterior site of the bone flap at alternate angles on the cut surface. Interdigitation between the bone flap and skull enables single-plate fixation in the area with hair, which reduces artifacts on postoperative radiological images and provides excellent postoperative cosmetic results.

  3. Refinement in reanimation of the lower face.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A

    2004-01-01

    Both the temporalis muscle transfer and the static sling procedure are techniques that improve deglutition, speech, and aesthetics in patients who are afflicted with paralysis of the lower part of the face. A refinement that is applicable to either of these procedures is described. By bringing the perioral attachment of either the muscle or the static sling exactly to the midline of the upper and lower lips, the surgeon can make the patient's mouth more symmetrical. This simple refinement will improve the results obtained with either procedure and has not been associated with any increased perioperative risks or complications.

  4. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete.

  5. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  6. Management of facial paralysis in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason Y K; Byrne, Patrick J

    2011-08-01

    Facial paralysis is a clinical entity associated with significant morbidity, which has a treatment paradigm that is continually evolving. Surgical management of the paralyzed face poses significant challenges to achieve the goal of returning patients to their premorbid states. Here we attempt to review the advances in facial reanimation, in particular with regards to chronic facial paralysis. These include recent developments in static and dynamic rehabilitation including advances like artificial muscles for eyelid reconstruction, dynamic muscle transfer for the eye, and orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer.

  7. [Lucja Frey (1889-1943) in the 50th anniversary of her tragic death and 70th anniversary of the auriculotemporal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bennet, J D; Pietruski, J

    1993-01-01

    Lucja Frey was a Polish neurologist born and lived in Lwów, former east Polish town, and died during the war in Lwów's ghetto. In 1923 she described the auriculo-temporalis syndrome, at present well known all over the world. But personality and history of the extraordinary Polish scientist remains obscure. The aim of this paper is to present her silhouette. Because a great number of Polish scientists are also not known abroad, the authors tried to explain the causes of their absence in the world bibliography.

  8. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinggong; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Li, Jian; Yan, Quanmei

    2013-08-01

    Mouth opening limitation after the neurosurgical procedures is a common complication and usually resolves within 3 months. If limited mouth opening remains unresolved on the long term, an intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint may develop eventually. The possible mechanisms base on the myositis and atrophy of the masticatory muscles for these craniotomies are often involved in the temporalis. This article reports two unusual cases with the intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury, who received a modified surgical treatment for joint ankylosis. Therefore, the early diagnosis and intervention are important to minimize these complications.

  9. Isolated Non-Traumatic Bilateral Coronoid Process Fracture of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Krishna; Acosta, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Isolated bilateral fractures of the coronoid processes of the mandible occurred in this patient without any significant trauma. The definite etiology of this case is unknown, but possible causes or contributing factors may include acute reflex contraction of the patient’s temporalis muscles leading to bilateral stress fractures, coronoid process hyperplasia, or the patient’s long-term use of omeprazole. The planned treatment for this patient included pain control with Mobic and tramadol and splint fabrication followed by arch bar placement with training elastics for six weeks. PMID:27882276

  10. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  11. Facial reanimation procedures depicted on radiologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, D T; Bhama, P; Cunnane, M E; Hadlock, T A

    2014-09-01

    Various facial reanimation procedures can be performed for treating patients with chronic facial nerve paralysis. The radiologic imaging features of static and dynamic techniques are reviewed in this article with clinical correlation, including brow lift, eyelid weights and springs, gracilis free flaps, fascia lata grafts, temporalis flaps, and Gore-Tex suspension slings. Although the anatomic alterations resulting from facial reanimation surgery may not necessarily be the focus of the imaging examination, it is important to recognize such changes and be familiar with MR imaging compatibility of the associated implanted materials. Furthermore, imaging is sometimes used to specifically evaluate the postoperative results, such as vessel patency following free gracilis transfer.

  12. Full-thickness skin graft interposition after temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery. A study of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Chossegros, C; Guyot, L; Cheynet, F; Blanc, J L; Cannoni, P

    1999-10-01

    Recurrence is a major problem after release of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Early physiotherapy and choice of interpositional material are important in preventing recurrence. Currently, the most used technique is gap arthroplasty associated with coronoidectomy, temporalis muscle flap interposition and reconstruction of the condylar unit with a costochondral graft. Full-thickness skin graft interposition, using the technique described by Popescu & Vasiliu, can also be used. This retrospective review of 31 patients confirms the reliability of full-thickness skin graft interposition. Results were successful in 90% of the 20 patients with follow-up longer than one year.

  13. Nucleotide and protein sequences for dog masticatory tropomyosin identify a novel Tpm4 gene product

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Jaw-closing muscles of several vertebrate species, including members of Carnivora, express a unique, “masticatory”, isoform of myosin heavy chain, along with isoforms of other myofibrillar proteins that are not expressed in most other muscles. It is generally believed that the complement of myofibrillar isoforms in these muscles serves high force generation for capturing live prey, breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting. A unique isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm) was reported to be expressed in cat jaw-closing muscle, based upon two-dimensional gel mobility, peptide mapping, and immunohistochemistry. The objective of this study was to obtain protein and gene sequence information for this unique Tpm isoform. Samples of masseter (also a jaw-closing muscle), tibialis (with predominantly fast-twitch fibers), and the deep lateral gastrocnemius (predominantly slow-twitch fibers) were obtained from adult dogs. Expressed Tpm isoforms were cloned and sequencing yielded cDNAs that were identical to genomic predicted striated muscle Tpm1.1St(a,b,b,a) (historically referred to as αTpm), Tpm2.2St(a,b,b,a) (βTpm) and Tpm3.12St(a,b,b,a) (cTpm) isoforms (nomenclature reflects predominant tissue expression (“St”—striated muscle) and exon splicing pattern), as well as a novel 284 amino acid isoform observed in jaw-closing muscle that is identical to a genomic predicted product of the Tpm4 gene (δTpm) family. The novel isoform is designated as Tpm4.3St(a,b,b,a). The myofibrillar Tpm isoform expressed in dog masseter exhibits a unique electrophoretic mobility on gels containing 6 M urea, compared to other skeletal Tpm isoforms. To validate that the cloned Tpm4.3 isoform is the Tpm expressed in dog masseter, E. coli-expressed Tpm4.3 was electrophoresed in the presence of urea. Results demonstrate that Tpm4.3 has identical electrophoretic mobility to the unique dog masseter Tpm isoform and is of different mobility from that of muscle Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2 and Tpm3

  14. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  15. Trans trochanteric approach with coronal osteotomy of the great trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Steffann, Francois; Prudhon, Jean-Louis; Puch, Jean-Marc; Ferreira, André; Descamps, Loys; Verdier, Régis; Caton, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Several surgical approaches could be used in hip arthroplasty or trauma surgery: anterior, anterolateral, lateral, posterior (with or without trochanterotomy), using or not an orthopedic reduction table. Subtrochanteric and extra-capsular trochanteric fractures (ECTF) are usually treated by internal fixation with mandatory restrictions on weight bearing. Specific complications have been widely described. Mechanical failures are particularly high in unstable fractures. Hip fractures are a major public health issue with a mortality rate of 12%–23% at 1 year. An alternative option is to treat ECTF by total hip arthroplasty (THA) to prevent decubitus complications, to help rapid recovery, and to permit immediate weight bearing as well as quick rehabilitation. However, specific risks of THA have to be considered such as dislocation or cardiovascular failure. The classical approach (anterior or posterior) requires the opening of the joint and capsule, weakening hip stability and the repair of the great trochanter is sometimes hazardous. For 15 years, we have been treating unstable ECTF by THA with cementless stem, dual mobility cup (DMC), greater trochanter (GT) reattachment, and a new surgical approach preserving capsule, going through the fracture and avoiding joint dislocation. Bombaci first described a similar approach in 2008; our trans fractural digastric approach (medial gluteus and lateral vastus) is different. A coronal GT osteotomy is performed when there is no coronal fracture line. It allows easy access to the femoral neck and acetabulum. The THA is implanted without femoral internal rotation to avoid extra bone fragment displacement. With pre-operative planning, cup implantation is easy and stem positioning is adjusted referring to the top of the GT after trial reduction and preoperative planning. The longitudinal osteotomy and trochanteric fracture are repaired with wires and the digastric incision is closed. This variant of Bombaci approach could be

  16. [Characteristics of opening movement in patients with unilateral mastication].

    PubMed

    Jia, Ling; Wang, Yun; Wang, Mengya

    2016-08-01

    目的:分析偏侧咀嚼患者在最大张闭口运动中的下颌运动特性。方法:采用整群抽样的方法对皖南医学院口腔医学专业2011~2012级在校本科学生进行偏侧咀嚼的口腔流行病学调查,偏侧咀嚼者30名,双侧咀嚼者30名。通过下颌运动轨迹描记(electrognathography,EGN)和咀嚼肌表面肌电图(electromyogram,EMG)同步检测技术,比较偏侧咀嚼和双侧咀嚼人群在大开口运动中的运动轨迹和肌电情况;并进行相关统计学分析。结果:偏侧咀嚼组左二腹肌前腹(left anterior digastric muscle,LDA)、右二腹肌前腹(right anterior digastric muscle,RDA)平均肌电峰值(the average electromyogram peak,Amp)低于双侧咀嚼组(P<0.05)。偏侧咀嚼组在大张口运动时开闭口轨迹多数分离,开口型与与双侧咀嚼组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。偏侧咀嚼组张闭口运动时垂直向和矢状向位移明显低于双侧咀嚼组(P<0.01)。咬肌Amp与右侧方位移呈正相关。结论:最大张口运动中偏侧咀嚼组LDA,RDA,左咬肌的Amp降低;开口型多数偏向工作侧,50%的人群开闭口轨迹分离,开口度减小;偏侧咀嚼导致肌肉性能改变的同时引起运动轨迹的异常。.

  17. Social motivation and conflict resolution tactics as potential building blocks of sociality in cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Balshine, Sigal; Wong, Marian Y L; Reddon, Adam R

    2017-01-03

    Even closely related and ecologically similar cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika exhibit an impressive diversity of social systems, and therefore these fishes offer an excellent opportunity to examine the evolution of social behaviour. Sophisticated social relationships are thought to have evolved via a building block design where more fundamental social behaviours and cognitive processes have been combined, incrementally modified, and elaborated over time. Here, we studied two of these putative social building blocks in two closely related species of cichlids: Neolamprologus pulcher, a group-living species, and Telmatochromis temporalis, a non-grouping species. Otherwise well matched in ecology, this pair of species provide an excellent comparison point to understand how behavioural processes may have been modified in relation to the evolution of sociality. Using social assays in both the laboratory and in the field, we explored each species' motivation to interact with conspecifics, and each species' conflict resolution tactics. We found that individuals of the group living species, N. pulcher, displayed higher social motivation and were more likely to produce submission displays than were individuals of the non-grouping species, T. temporalis. We argue that the motivation to interact with conspecifics is a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of group living, and that the use of submission reduces the costs of conflict and facilitates the maintenance of close social proximity. These results suggest that social motivation and conflict resolution tactics are associated with social complexity, and that these behavioural traits may be functionally significant in the evolution and maintenance of sociality.

  18. Ongoing Ecological Divergence in an Emerging Genomic Model

    PubMed Central

    Arnegard, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    Much of Earth’s biodiversity has arisen through adaptive radiation. Important avenues of phenotypic divergence during this process include the evolution of body size and life history (Schluter 2000). Extensive adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes have occurred in the Great Lakes of Africa, giving rise to behaviors that are remarkably sophisticated and diverse across species. In Tanganyikan shell-brooding cichlids of the tribe Lamprologini, tremendous intraspecific variation in body size accompanies complex breeding systems and use of empty snail shells to hide from predators and rear offspring. A study by Takahashi et al. (2009) in this issue of Molecular Ecology reveals the first case of genetic divergence between dwarf and normal-sized morphs of the same nominal lamprologine species, Telmatochromis temporalis. Patterns of population structure suggest that the dwarf, shell-dwelling morph of T. temporalis might have arisen from the normal, rock-dwelling morph independently in more than one region of the lake, and that pairs of morphs at different sites may represent different stages early in the process of ecological speciation. The findings of Takahashi et al. are important first steps toward understanding the evolution of these intriguing morphs, yet many questions remain unanswered about the mating system, gene flow, plasticity, and selection. Despite these limitations, descriptive work like theirs takes on much significance in African cichlids due to forthcoming resources for comparative genomics. PMID:19570143

  19. Addition of Resection of Temporal Muscle and Fascia in Decompressive Craniectomy in the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seung Han; Kim, Byung Chul; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Il; Cho, Won Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a widely used surgical procedure for control of severely increased intracranial pressure in various conditions. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of resection of temporalis muscle and fascia in DC particularly in the treatment of traumatic brain injury. Methods Twenty patients underwent temporalis muscle and fascia resection in addition to conventional DC and duroplasty due to massive brain swelling in a single tertiary hospital from 2013 to 2015 were enrolled. Twenty other patients who received the standard techniques by other neurosurgeons in the same period were gathered for the control group. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) as well as functional outcome in both groups were analyzed retrospectively. Results CT volumetry showed a significant increase of 85.19 mL (p<0.001) of extracranial herniation volume in the research group compared with the control group. Using modified Rankin Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale, there was no statistically significant difference in functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion Although preliminary, the procedure appears to show a meaningful increase in extracranial herniation volume with minimal masticatory and cosmetic impairment. PMID:27857913

  20. Audiological and graft take results of cartilage reinforcement tympanoplasty (a new technique) versus fascia.

    PubMed

    Tek, Arman; Karaman, Murat; Uslu, Celil; Habeşoğlu, Tülay; Kılıçarslan, Yasin; Durmuş, Ruhi; Esen, Senem; Egeli, Erol

    2012-04-01

    Our objective is to compare hearing and graft take results of temporal muscle fascia tympanoplasty and cartilage reinforcement tympanoplasty. Seventy seven patients are classified into two groups: Group 1 included 37 patients for whom cartilage graft, harvested from symba concha, is used as reinforcement under temporalis muscle fascia anteriorly and Group 2 included 40 patients for whom only temporalis muscle fascia is used in type 1 tympanoplasty. A pure-tone audiometry is done within 1 week prior to surgery and at 6 months postoperatively. There is statistically significant difference between postoperative graft take results among groups. In both groups postoperative anterior TM perforation is encountered most commonly. Success rate of cartilage reinforcement tympanoplasty in revision patients is 100% but temporal muscle fascia tympanoplasty's is 66%. There is no statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative air conduction gain of TM intact patients. The results indicated that Cartilage reinforcement myringoplasty technique under anterior of the temporal muscle fascia significantly increases the graft take ratios in high-risk perforations and it also does not affect hearing levels. Therefore, the authors suggest usage of cartilage reinforcement tympanoplasty technique under anterior of the temporal muscle fascia which is an easy and applicable technique to increase graft take ratios, particularly in patients with preoperative anterior and subtotal TM perforations.

  1. Phylogenetically Informative Length Polymorphism and Sequence Variability in Mitochondrial DNA of Australian Songbirds (Pomatostomus)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, S. V.; Wilson, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    A combination of restriction analysis and direct sequencing via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to build trees relating mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) from 50 individuals belonging to five species of Australian babblers (Pomatostomus). The trees served as a quantitative framework for analyzing the direction and tempo of evolution of an intraspecific length polymorphism from a third mitochondrial ancestor. The length polymorphism lies between the cytochrome b and 12S rRNA (srRNA) genes. Screening of mtDNAs within and between the five species with restriction enzymes showed that Pomatosomus temporalis was polymorphic for two smaller size classes (M and S) that are completely segregated geographically, whereas mtDNAs from the other four species were exclusively of a third, larger size (L). Inter- and intraspecific phylogenetic trees relating mtDNAs based on restriction maps, cytochrome b sequences obtained via PCR, and the two data sets combined were compared to one another statistically and were broadly similar except for the phylogenetic position of Pomatosomus halli. Both sets of phylogenies imply that only two deletion events can account for the observed intraspecific distribution of the three length types. High levels of base-substitutional divergence were detected within and between northern and southern lineages of P. temporalis, which implies a low level of gene flow between northern and southern regions as well as a low rate of length mutation. These conclusions were confirmed by applying coalescent theory to the statistical framework provided by the phylogenetic analyses. PMID:1979038

  2. Limited mouth opening of unknown cause cured by diagnostic coronoidectomy: a new clinical entity?

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Fleissig, Y; Abid-el-raziq, D; Nitzan, D W

    2015-03-01

    Limited mouth opening is a constant annoyance and can be life-threatening should intubation be needed. The causes are numerous and are categorised as intra-articular or extra-articular, which are often difficult to distinguish. We present what we regard as a new clinical entity - long-standing limited mouth opening of unknown cause - and describe our treatment. Four female patients presented with limited mouth opening and lateral and protrusive movements within normal limits, which were typical of restriction of extra-articular origin. However, the radiological findings were within normal limits, with no visible cause of the restriction. All four were treated by bilateral coronoidectomy that resulted in the immediate return of mouth opening to within normal limits that was preserved over subsequent years. Histopathological examination showed atrophy and degenerative changes in the temporalis band that had been attached to the coronoid, which accounts for the stiffness of the temporalis muscle but does not explain the pathogenesis. In the light of this "diagnostic coronoidectomy" further studies are required to document the underlying pathological changes and to develop more accurate imaging that will enable correct diagnosis in future.

  3. Somatic mosaicism for a DMD gene deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kayoko; Ikeya, Kiyoko; Kondo, Eri

    1995-03-13

    Mosaicism is a mixed state, with two cell populations of different genetic origins caused by a cell mutation occurring after fertilization. In the present case, DNA analysis of lymphocytes led to a DMD diagnosis before death. Postmortem immunocytochemical and DNA analysis showed somatic mosaicism. At age 18 years, blood lymphocyte DNA analysis showed a DMD gene deletion, upstream from exon 7 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. As the patient`s mother and elder sister had no deletions, he was considered to have a new mutation. Immunocytochemical studies of postmortem tissues showed that dystrophin was absent from the tongue, deltoid, intercostal, psoas and rectus femoris muscles, but there was a mix of dystrophin-positive and negative fibers in the rectus abdominis, cardiac, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. All diaphragm cells were dystrophin positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification from all tissues except the temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles, diaphragm and kidney, in which no deletion was found, showed the deletion from at least exon 6 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. In this case, a genomic deletion of the DMD gene contributed to the formation of tissues derived from both ectoderm and endoderm, and cells of mesodermal origin showed genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Our results indicate a mutation of the present case may have occurred just before the period of germ layer formation. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Genetic contribution of catechol-O-methyltransferase polymorphism (Val158Met) in children with chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Rivas-Martínez, Inés; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the relationship between Val158Met polymorphisms, headache, and pressure hypersensitivity in children with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). A case-control study with blinded assessor was conducted. Seventy children with CTTH associated with pericranial tenderness and 70 healthy children participated. After amplifying Val158Met polymorphism by polymerase chain reactions, we assessed genotype frequencies and allele distributions. We classified children according to their Val158Met polymorphism: Val/Val, Val/Met, Met/Met. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were bilaterally assessed over the temporalis, upper trapezius, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscles. The distribution of Val158Met genotypes was not significantly different (p = 0.335), between children with CTTH and healthy children, and between boys and girls (p = 0.872). Children with CTTH with the Met/Met genotype showed a longer headache history compared with those with Met/Val (p = 0.001) or Val/Val (p = 0.002) genotype. Children with CTTH with Met/Met genotype showed lower PPT over upper trapezius and temporalis muscles than children with CTTH with Met/Val or Val/Val genotype (p < 0.01). The Val158Met catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism does not appear to be involved in predisposition to suffer from CTTH in children; nevertheless, this genetic factor may be involved in the phenotypic expression, as pressure hypersensitivity was greater in those CTTH children with the Met/Met genotype.

  5. Autologous Diced Cartilage in Nasal Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sersar, Sameh Ibrahim; Yassin, Ibrahim; Eldin Aly, Mohammed Saad

    2016-01-01

    Diced rib cartilage is an acceptable option in severe nasal deformities. We present our preliminary experience in KAMC in nasal septoplasties using the autologous diced costal cartilage. This is a retrospective study of the 22 cases who needed the autologous diced costal cartilage in our centre in 4 years. All our patients needed autologous diced rib cartilages. Twelve were wrapped with temporalis fascia, eight needed rectus fascia and perichondrium was used in only 2 cases. The naso-frontal angle for the whole series decreased by a mean of 4.41° (p=0.008) for the group using the rectus fascia diced cartilage graft. From the aesthetic point of view, all cases were satisfied except 3 (13.6%); two in the group of diced cartilage temporalis fascia; group 1. From the functional breathing view, only 1 case was not satisfied. He was in group 1. Autologous rib cartilage was shown to be a good graft in nasal septoplasty especially if wrapped with rectus fascia. PMID:27853694

  6. The digestive morphophysiology of wild, free-living, giraffes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G; Roberts, D G; van Sittert, S J

    2015-09-01

    We have measured rumen-complex (rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum) and intestine (small and large combined) mass in 32 wild giraffes of both sexes with body masses ranging from 289 to 1441 kg, and parotid gland mass, tongue length and mass, masseter and mandible mass in 9 other giraffes ranging in body mass from 181 to 1396 kg. We have estimated metabolic and energy production rates, feed intake and home range size. Interspecific analysis of mature ruminants show that components of the digestive system increase linearly (Mb(1)) or positively allometric (Mb(>1)) with body mass while variables associated with feed intake scale with metabolic rate (Mb(.75)). Conversely, in giraffes ontogenetic increases in rumen-complex mass were negatively allometric (Mb(<1)), and increases in intestine mass, parotid gland mass, masseter mass, and mandible mass were isometric (Mb(1)). The relative masseter muscle mass (0.14% of Mb) and the relative parotid mass (0.03% of Mb) are smaller than in other ruminants. Increases in tongue length scale with head length(0.72) and Mb(.32) and tongue mass with Mb(.69). Absolute mass of the gastrointestinal tract increased throughout growth but its relative mass declined from 20% to 15% of Mb. Rumen-complex fermentation provides ca 43% of daily energy needs, large intestine fermentation 24% and 33% by digestion of soluble carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. Dry matter intake (kg) was 2.4% of body mass in juveniles and 1.6% in adults. Energy requirements increased from 35 Mj/day to 190 Mj/day. Browse production rate sustains a core home range of 2.2-11.8 km(2).

  7. Specific Diurnal EMG Activity Pattern Observed in Occlusal Collapse Patients: Relationship between Diurnal Bruxism and Tooth Loss Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Shigehisa; Kumazaki, Yohei; Manda, Yosuke; Oki, Kazuhiro; Minagi, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Aim The role of parafunctional masticatory muscle activity in tooth loss has not been fully clarified. This study aimed to reveal the characteristic activity of masseter muscles in bite collapse patients while awake and asleep. Materials and Methods Six progressive bite collapse patients (PBC group), six age- and gender-matched control subjects (MC group), and six young control subjects (YC group) were enrolled. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter muscles were continuously recorded with an ambulatory EMG recorder while patients were awake and asleep. Diurnal and nocturnal parafunctional EMG activity was classified as phasic, tonic, or mixed using an EMG threshold of 20% maximal voluntary clenching. Results Highly extended diurnal phasic activity was observed only in the PBC group. The three groups had significantly different mean diurnal phasic episodes per hour, with 13.29±7.18 per hour in the PBC group, 0.95±0.97 per hour in the MC group, and 0.87±0.98 per hour in the YC group (p<0.01). ROC curve analysis suggested that the number of diurnal phasic episodes might be used to predict bite collapsing tooth loss. Conclusion Extensive bite loss might be related to diurnal masticatory muscle parafunction but not to parafunction during sleep. Clinical Relevance: Scientific rationale for study Although mandibular parafunction has been implicated in stomatognathic system breakdown, a causal relationship has not been established because scientific modalities to evaluate parafunctional activity have been lacking. Principal findings This study used a newly developed EMG recording system that evaluates masseter muscle activity throughout the day. Our results challenge the stereotypical idea of nocturnal bruxism as a strong destructive force. We found that diurnal phasic masticatory muscle activity was most characteristic in patients with progressive bite collapse. Practical implications The incidence of diurnal phasic contractions could be used for the prognostic

  8. ACTN3 R577X Genotypes Associate with Class II and Deep Bite Malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Zebrick, Brian; Teeramongkolgul, Teesit; Nicot, Romain; Horton, Michael J.; Raoul, Gwenael; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Sciote, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction α-actinins are myofibril anchor proteins which influence contractile properties of skeletal muscle. ACTN2 is expressed in slow type I and fast type II fibers whereas ACTN3 is expressed only in fast fibers. ACTN3 homozygosity for the 577X stop codon (i.e. changing 577RR to 577XX - the R577X polymorphism) results in the absence of α-actinin-3 in about 18% of Europeans, diminished fast contractile ability, enhanced endurance performance and reduced bone mass or bone mineral density. We have examined ACTN3 expression and genetic variation in masseter muscle of orthognathic surgery patients to determine genotype associations with malocclusion. Methods Clinical information, masseter muscle biopsies and saliva samples were obtained from 60 subjects. Genotyping for ACTN3 SNPs, RT-PCR quantitation of muscle gene message and muscle morphometric fiber type properties were compared to determine statistical differences between genotype and phenotype. Results Muscle mRNA expression level was significantly different for ACTN3 SNP genotypes (p<0.01). The frequency of ACTN3 genotypes was significantly different for sagittal and vertical classifications of malocclusion with the clearest association being elevated 577XX genotype in skeletal class II malocclusion (p = 0.003). This genotype also resulted in significantly smaller diameter of fast type II fibers in masseter muscle (p = 0.002). Conclusion ACTN3 577XX is overrepresented in skeletal class II malocclusion, suggesting a biologic influence during bone growth. ACTN3 577XX is underrepresented in deep bite malocclusion, suggesting muscle differences contribute to variations in vertical facial dimensions. PMID:25439211

  9. Sex differences in the contribution of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in trigeminal ganglia under an acute muscle pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Katelyn; Saloman, Jami L.; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether functional subunits of the ATP-dependent K+ channel (KATP) are expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG), which contains sensory neurons that innervate oral and facial structures. We also investigated whether direct activation of the KATP effectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the context of an acute orofacial muscle pain condition. The KATP expression in TG and behavioral studies were conducted in age matched male and female Sprague Dawley rats. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for the inwardly rectifying pore-forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, as well as the regulatory sulphonylurea subunits, SUR1 and SUR2, were reliably detected in TG. Subsequent western blot analysis confirmed that proteins for all 4 subunits are expressed in TG, and showed that Kir6.2 is expressed at a significantly higher level in male TG compared to that of female rats. This observation was confirmed by the immunohistochemical demonstration of higher percentages of Kir6 positive masseter afferents in female rats. Masseteric injection of capsaicin evokes a time dependent increase in masseter sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimulation. A specific KATP agonist, pinacidil, dose-dependently attenuated the capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male rats. The dose of pinacidil (20µg) that completely blocked the capsaicin responses in male rats was ineffective in female rats regardless of their estrus phases. Only at the highest dose (300µg) we used, pinacidil was partially effective in female rats. Similarly, another KATP agonist, diazoxide which targets different KATP subunits also showed sex specific responses in attenuating capsaicin-induced masseter hypersensitivity. These data suggested that sex differences in functional KATP expression in TG may underlie sex specific responses to KATP agonists. The present study provided novel information on sex differences in KATP expression in TG and its contribution under an orofacial

  10. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed objectively by surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Archer, Sally K; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Objective swallowing assessment is indicated in the management of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Surface electromyography (sEMG) provides a non-invasive, objective method of quantifying muscle activity. It was hypothesised that the measurement of sEMG activity during swallowing would distinguish between preserved and disordered swallow function in DMD. This comparative study investigated the peak, duration, and relative timing of muscle activity during swallowing of four muscle groups: orbicularis oris, masseter, submental, and infrahyoid. The study included three groups of participants: Nine DMD patients with dysphagia (mean age = 21.7 ± 4.2 years), six DMD patients with preserved swallow function (21.0 ± 3.0 years), and 12 healthy controls (24.8 ± 3.1 years). Dysphagic DMD participants produced significantly higher normalised peak amplitude measurements than the healthy control group for masseter (61.77 vs. 5.07; p ≤ 0.01) and orbicularis oris muscles (71.87 vs. 26.22; p ≤ 0.05). Intrasubject variability for masseter peak amplitude was significantly greater for dysphagic DMD participants than the other groups (16.01 vs. 5.86 vs. 2.18; p ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in timing measurements between groups. Different characteristic sEMG waveforms were observed for the three groups. sEMG provides useful physiological information for the evaluation of swallowing in DMD patients, justifying further study.

  11. Verification of runaway migration in a massive disk

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    Runaway migration of a proto-planet was first proposed and observed by Masset and Papaloizou (2003). The semi-major axis of the proto-planet varies by 50% over just a few tens of orbits when runaway migration happens. More recent work by D'Angelo et al. (2005) solved the same problem with locally refined grid and found that the migration rate is sharply reduced and no runaway occurs when the grid cells surrounding the planet are refined enough. To verify these two seemly contradictory results, we independently perform high-resolution simulations, solving the same problem as Masset and Papaloizou (2003), with and without self-gravity. We find that the migration rate is highly dependent on the softening used in the gravitational force between thd disk and planet. When a small softening is used in a 2D massive disk, the mass of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) increases with time with enough resolution in the CPD region. It acts as the mass is continually accreted to the CPD, which cannot be settled down until after thousands of orbits. If the planet is held on a fixed orbit long enough, the mass of CPD will become so large that the condition for the runaway migration derived in Masset (2008) will not be satisfied, and hence the runaway migration will not be triggered. However, when a large softening is used, the mass of the CPD will begin to decrease after the initial increase stage. Our numerical results with and without disk-gravity confirm that the runaway migration indeed exists when the mass deficit is larger than the total mass of the planet and CPD. Our simulations results also show that the torque from the co-orbital region, in particular the planet's Hill sphere, is the main contributor to the runaway migration, and the CPD which is lagged behind by the planet becomes so asymmetric that it accelerates the migration.

  12. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Eliane H.; O’ Brien, Mara H.; Lima, Alexandro; Kalajzic, Zana; Tadinada, Aditya; Nanda, Ravindra; Yadav, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and subchondral bone. Materials and Methods Botox (0.3 unit) was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry) at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF. Results Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected) when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side. Conclusion Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the

  13. Influence of a scheduled-waiting task on EMG reactivity and oral habits among facial pain patients and no-pain controls.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, R A; Townsend, D R; Gramling, S E

    2000-12-01

    Recent research has strongly implicated the role of psychological stress in the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It is widely reported that oral habits (e.g., teeth grinding) probably provide a behavioral link between stress and the development of TMD symptomatology. Extrapolation of research in the field of adjunctive behavior to the TMD disorders suggests that oral behaviors may develop conjointly with fixed-time (FT) stimulus presentation. The current experiment extended previous research examining this possibility by assessing the influence of experimental stress on masseter EMG and oral habits among persons who met broadband criteria for TMD and no-pain controls. Oral habit activity was assessed via self-report questionnaire whereas masseter muscle activity was measured continuously via electromyography across four phases (Adaptation, Free-Play, Scheduled-Play, Recovery). The Scheduled-Play phase was designed as a stress-reactivity task that included an FT schedule. Results indicated that, consistent with the stress-reactivity model, the Scheduled-Play phase resulted in a significant increase in masseter EMG levels relative to Free-Play and Adaptation, and that this effect was significantly larger for the TMD group relative to controls. The results suggest an adjunctive behavior effect although the effect was not specific to those with facial pain. Oral habit data showed a significant phase effect with oral habits that was significantly higher during the Scheduled-Play phase relative to Adaptation. The findings are the impetus for further study regarding the mechanisms whereby oral habits are developed and maintained despite their painful consequences.

  14. Comparison of immediate complete denture, tooth and implant-supported overdenture on vertical dimension and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Farhan Khalid; Gebreel, Ashraf; Elshokouki, Ali hamed; Habib, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the changes in the occlusal vertical dimension, activity of masseter muscles and biting force after insertion of immediate denture constructed with conventional, tooth-supported and Implant-supported immediate mandibular complete denture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were selected and treatment was carried out with all the three different concepts i.e, immediate denture constructed with conventional (Group A), tooth-supported (Group B) and Implant-supported (Group C) immediate mandibular complete dentures. Parameters of evaluation and comparison were occlusal vertical dimension measured by radiograph (at three different time intervals), Masseter muscle electromyographic (EMG) measurement by EMG analysis (at three different positions of jaws) and bite force measured by force transducer (at two different time intervals). The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA-F test at 5% level of significance. If the F test was significant, Least Significant Difference test was performed to test further significant differences between variables. RESULTS Comparison between mean differences in occlusal vertical dimension for tested groups showed that it was only statistically significant at 1 year after immediate dentures insertion. Comparison between mean differences in wavelet packet coefficients of the electromyographic signals of masseter muscles for tested groups was not significant at rest position, but significant at initial contact position and maximum voluntary clench position. Comparison between mean differences in maximum biting force for tested groups was not statistically significant at 5% level of significance. CONCLUSION Immediate complete overdentures whether tooth or implant supported prosthesis is recommended than totally mucosal supported prosthesis. PMID:22737309

  15. Neuromuscular control of balancing side contacts in unilateral biting and chewing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Daniela; Pröschel, Peter; Schwarz, Christiane; Wichmann, Manfred; Morneburg, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    When jaw gape in unilateral biting or chewing narrows, the working/balancing side activity ratio (W/B ratio) of masseter muscles increases due to decrease of balancing side (BS) activity. This was interpreted as a neuromuscular strategy to delimit the impact of BS contacts during chewing. To test this hypothesis, we studied whether W/B ratios are associated with incidence of BS tooth contacts. In 40 healthy subjects, bilateral masseter activity was recorded during unilateral biting with different jaw gapes and during various chewing tasks. Biting was performed with absence and with deliberate avoidance or generation of BS tooth contacts. Subjects were divided into three groups according to jaw gapes of 2, 1, and 0.5 mm for which BS contact was first noticed in strong biting. The smaller this gape was, the higher were the mean W/B ratios. In biting with contact avoidance, the W/B ratios in each group increased with decreasing gape. In biting with generation of BS contacts, W/B ratios were smaller than with contact avoidance. W/B ratios in chewing with minimum interocclusal distances below 0.5 mm were bigger than in biting with contact generation and were mostly bigger than in biting with contact avoidance. The findings confirm that increasing the masseter W/B ratio is a neuromuscular measure suitable to avoid BS contacts and support the idea that motor control uses jaw gape-related activation to limit the impact of BS contacts. Clarification of this protection mechanism might contribute to uncover the etiology of functional disorders and occlusal malfunctions.

  16. Electromyography analysis of natural mastication behavior using varying mouthful quantities of two types of gels.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Kaoru; Gao, Zhihong; Ishihara, Sayaka; Funami, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of mouthful quantities and mechanical properties of gels on natural mastication behaviors using electromyography (EMG). Two types of hydrocolloid gels (A and K) with similar fracture loads but different moduli and fracture strains were served to eleven normal women in 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-g masses in a randomized order. EMG activities from both masseter muscles were recorded during natural mastication. Because of the similar fracture loads, the numbers of chews, total muscle activities, and entire oral processing times were similar for similar masses of both gel types. Prior to the first swallow, the more elastic K gel with a higher fracture strain required higher muscle activities than the brittle A gel, which had higher modulus. Majority of subjects had preferred sides of chewing, but all subjects with or without preferred sides used both masseters during the consumption of gels. Similar effects of masses and types of gels were observed in EMG activities of both sides of masseters. Contributions of the dominant side of chewing were diminished with increasing masses of gels, and the mass dependency on ratio of the dominant side was more pronounced with K gel. More repetitions of smaller masses required greater muscle activities and longer periods for the consumption of 24-g gel portions. Reduction in the masses with an increased number of repetitions necessitated slower eating and more mastication to consume the gel portions. These observations suggest that chewing using both sides is more effective and unconsciously reduces mastication times during the consumption of gels.

  17. Influence of pre-orthodontic trainer treatment on the perioral and masticatory muscles in patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Tancan; Yagci, Ahmet; Kara, Sadik; Okkesim, Sukru

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this follow-up study was to evaluate the effects of Pre-Orthodontic Trainer (POT) appliance on the anterior temporal, mental, orbicularis oris, and masseter muscles through electromyography (EMG) evaluations in subjects with Class II division 1 malocclusion and incompetent lips. Twenty patients (mean age: 9.8 ± 2.2 years) with a Class II division 1 malocclusion were treated with POT (Myofunctional Research Co., Queensland, Australia). A group of 15 subjects (mean age: 9.2 ± 0.9 years) with untreated Class II division 1 malocclusions was used as a control. EMG recordings of treatment group were taken at the beginning and at the end of the POT therapy (mean treatment period: 7.43 ± 1.06 months). Follow-up records of the control group were taken after 8 months of the first records. Recordings were taken during different oral functions: clenching, sucking, and swallowing. Statistical analyses were undertaken with Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U-tests. During the POT treatment, activity of anterior temporal, mental, and masseter muscles was decreased and orbicularis oris activity was increased during clenching and these differences were found statistically significant when compared to control. Orbicularis oris activity during sucking was increased in the treatment group (P < 0.05). In the control group, significant changes were determined for anterior temporal (P < 0.05) and masseter (P < 0.01) mus