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Sample records for massif calabria-peloritani orogen

  1. Miocene thrusting in the eastern Sila Massif: Implication for the evolution of the Calabria-Peloritani orogenic wedge (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignaroli, G.; Minelli, L.; Rossetti, F.; Balestrieri, M. L.; Faccenna, C.

    2012-05-01

    Alpine orogens in the central Mediterranean region have revealed the concomitance of crustal extension in back-arc domain and crustal shortening in frontal domain. Quantitative data of deformation in the frontal orogenic wedges are necessary to understand how the shortening-extension pair evolves in terms of structures, orogenic transport, timing, and exhumation rate. This paper deals with kinematics and ages of the frontal thrust systems of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc (Italy) exposed in the eastern Sila Massif. We first present structural fieldwork, onshore and offshore well log data, and new apatite fission-track (AFT) thermochronology. Then, we describe the structural architecture of the studied area as an ENE-verging stacking of thrust sheets involving basement units and syn-orogenic sediments. The AFT study documents that thrust sheets entered the partial annealing zone from 18 Ma to 13 Ma. This Early-Middle Miocene thrusting phase was coeval with exhumation of high-pressure/low temperature metamorphic rocks in the hinterland of the orogen (Coastal Chain area), mainly driven by top-to-the-W extensional tectonics. Opposite kinematic shear senses (contractional top-to-the-E and extensional top-to-the-W) and different exhumation rates (slow in the frontal, more rapid in the hinterland) are framed in a tectonic scenario of a critically tapered orogenic wedge during the eastward retreating of the Apennine slab.

  2. Oligocene-to-Early Miocene depositional and structural evolution of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern terrane (Italy) and geodynamic correlations with the Spain Betics and Morocco Rif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonardi, Glauco; de Capoa, Paola; Di Staso, Angelida; Estévez, Antonio; Martín-Martín, Manuél; Martín-Rojas, Iván; Perrone, Vincenzo; Tent-Manclús, José Enrique

    2003-11-01

    The Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern terrane is a stack of crystalline basement nappes, some of them provided with a widely outcropping Alpine sedimentary cover, sealed by clastics of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation (SCOF). New field observations in the Stilo area lead to define a Pignolo Formation as a sedimentary cycle predating the emplacement of the uppermost nappe (Stilo Unit) of the tectonic pile. It includes the well-known Lithothamnium and larger foraminifers bearing calcarenites, previously interpreted as a basal member of the SCOF. The biostratigraphic revision of both formations, together with recently published data about other preorogenic deposits, point to a stacking of the whole terrane between the Aquitanian and the middle-late Burdigalian. A comparison between the sedimentary cycles characterising the Calabria-Peloritani southern terrane during the Oligocene-Early Miocene and those almost coeval of the Betic-Rifian internal units highlights their quite similar evolution. Thus it is reliable that both the orogenic belts originated from contiguous paleogeographic realms. These considerations confirm that the present western Mediterranean Chains were originally segments of a continuous orogenic belt disrupted by the opening of the Balearic and Tyrrhenian basins.

  3. Lead isotope study of orogenic lherzolite massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Bruno; Allègre, Claude J.

    1988-12-01

    Orogenic lherzolites allow for almost "in-situ" observation of mantle isotopic heterogeneities on a restricted geographical scale, in contrast to basalts for which melting processes have averaged original mantle compositions over uncertain scales. Pb isotopes from whole rocks and clinopyroxenes from the massifs of Lherz (Pyrenees), Lanzo (Alps), Beni Bousera (Morocco) and Zabargad (Red Sea) show internal heterogeneities that encompass the entire range of variation observed in oceanic basalts. Some depleted lherzolites have a very unradiogenic composition similar to that of the most depleted ridge tholeiites. Pyroxenites from mafic layers generally have more radiogenic compositions, some of them comparable to the most radiogenic oceanic island results. The isotopic differences between lherzolites and pyroxenites vanish where layers are very closely spaced ( < 2 cm). In this case, the lherzolites may have equilibrated with the more Pb-rich pyroxenites through solid-state diffusion under mantle conditions. These results directly illustrate the smallest scales at which Pb isotopic heterogeneity may survive within the mantle. The genesis of these heterogeneities are discussed within the framework of the "marble cake" mantle model [1], where lherzolites are residues left over after oceanic crust extraction, whereas pyroxenites represent either basaltic or cumulate portions of the oceanic crust, reinjected by subduction and stretched by solid-state mixing during mantle convection. The Pb isotope data suggest that each massif was involved in several cycles of convective overturn, segregation and reinjection of the oceanic crust, during periods well over 1 Ga. If the upper mantle is made of interlayered radiogenic and unradiogenic layers, basalt heterogeneities may result from preferential melt-extraction from different layers depending on the degree of melting, as well as from large-scale, plume-related mantle heterogeneities. Orogenic lherzolites therefore allow direct

  4. Late-Proterozoic to Paleozoic history of the peri-Gondwana Calabria-Peloritani Terrane inferred from a review of zircon chronology.

    PubMed

    Fornelli, Annamaria; Micheletti, Francesca; Piccarreta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from ten samples of augen gneisses, eight mafic and intermediate metaigneous rocks and six metasediments from some tectonic domains along the Calabria-Peloritani Terrane (Southern Italy) contribute to knowledge of peri-Gondwanan evolution from Late-Proterozoic to Paleozoic times. All samples were equilibrated under amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism during the Variscan orogeny. The zircon grains of all considered samples preserve a Proterozoic memory suggestive of detrital, metamorphic and igneous origin. The available data fit a frame involving: (1) Neoproterozoic detrital input from cratonic areas of Gondwana; (2) Pan-African/Cadomian assemblage of blocks derived from East and West African Craton; (3) metamorphism and bimodal magmatism between 535 and 579 Ma, within an active margin setting; (4) rifting and opening of Ordovician basins fed by detrital input from the assembled Cadomian blocks. The Paleozoic basins evolved through sedimentation, metamorphism and magmatism during the Variscan orogeny involving Palaeozoic and pre-Paleozoic blocks. The Proterozoic zircon records decidedly decrease in the high grade metamorphic rocks affected by Variscan pervasive partial melting.

  5. A geophysical model of the Variscan orogenic root (Bohemian Massif): Implications for modern collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Edel, Jean-Bernard; Schulmann, Karel; Tomek, Čestmir; Lexa, Ondrej

    2011-05-01

    A new model of the structure and composition of the Variscan crust in the Bohemian Massif is proposed based on 3D gravity modelling, geological data, seismic refraction (CEL09) and reflection (9HR) sections. The Bohemian Massif crust is characterized by a succession of positive and negative anomalies of about 60-80 km wavelength for nearly constant Moho depths. The south-western part of the Bohemian Massif displays a large negative Bouguer anomaly corresponding to high grade rocks (granulites and migmatites) of the Palaeozoic crustal root represented by the Moldanubian domain. The adjacent Neo-Proterozoic Bruno-Vistulian microcontinent displays an important gravity high reflecting mafic and intermediate medium grade metamorphic and magmatic rocks. The deep crustal boundary between the root domain and the Bruno-Vistulian microcontinent is represented by a strong gradient located 50 to 70 km westwards from the surface boundary between these units indicating that the high density basement rocks are covered by a thin sheet of low density granulites and migmatites. North-west from the Moldanubian domain occurs an important gravity high corresponding to the Neo-Proterozoic basement of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit limited in the north by southeast dipping reflectors of the Teplá suture which is characterized by high density eclogites and ultramafics. The footwall of the suture corresponds to low density felsic crust of the Saxothuringian basement. The reflection and refraction seismics and gravity modelling suggest a complex lithological structure of the Moldanubian domain marked by a low density 5-10 km thick lower crustal layer located above the Moho, a 5-10 km thick heavy mafic layer, a 10 km thick mid-crustal layer of intermediate density and a locally developed 2-5 km thick low density layer at the surface. The low density lower crust correlates well with low P-wave velocities in the range 6.0-6.4 km s- 1 in the CEL09 section. This complex geophysical structure and

  6. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  7. A Lost Realm in the Internal Domains of the Betic-Rif Orogen (Spain and Morocco): Evidence from Conglomerates and Consequences for Alpine Geodynamic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Martín-Algarra; Messina; Perrone; Russo; Maate; Martín-Martín

    2000-07-01

    The Malaguide-Ghomaride Complex is capped by Upper Oligocene-Aquitanian clastic deposits postdating early Alpine orogenesis but predating the main tectonic-metamorphic evolution, end of nappe emplacement, unroofing, and exhumation of the metamorphic units of the Betic-Rif Orogen. Two conglomerate intervals within these deposits are characterized by clasts of sedimentary, epimetamorphic, and mafic volcanic rocks derived from Malaguide-Ghomaride units and by clasts of acidic magmatic and orthogneissic rocks of unknown provenance, here studied. Magmatic rocks originated from late-Variscan two-mica cordierite-bearing granitoids and, subordinately, from aplitic dikes. Orthogneisses derive from similar plutonic rocks but are affected by an Alpine metamorphic overprint evolving from greenschist (T=510&j0;-530 degrees C and P=5-6 kbar) to low-temperature amphibolite facies (T>550&j0;C and P<3 kbar). Such a plutonic rock suite is unknown in any Betic-Rif unit or in the basement of the Alboran Sea, and the metamorphic evolution in the orthogneisses is different from (and older than) that of Alpujarride-Sebtide rocks to which they were formerly ascribed. Magmatic and metamorphic rocks very similar to those studied characterize the basements of some Kabylia and Calabria-Peloritani units. Therefore, the source area is a currently lost continental-crust realm of Calabria-Peloritani-Kabylia type, located to the ESE of the Malaguide-Ghomaride Domain and affected by a pre-latest Oligocene Alpine metamorphism. Increasingly active tectonics transformed this realm into rising areas from which erosion fed small subsiding synorogenic basins formed on the Malaguide-Ghomaride Complex. This provenance analysis demonstrates that all these domains constituted a single continental-crust block until Aquitanian-Burdigalian times, before its dispersal around nascent western Mediterranean basins.

  8. The Arequipa Massif of Peru: New SHRIMP and isotope constraints on a Paleoproterozoic inlier in the Grenvillian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casquet, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Galindo, C.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Rapela, C. W.; Torres, P.

    2010-01-01

    The enigmatic Arequipa Massif of southwestern Peru is an outcrop of Andean basement that underwent Grenville-age metamorphism, and as such it is important for the better constraint of Laurentia-Amazonia ties in Rodinia reconstruction models. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating has yielded new evidence on the evolution of the Massif between Middle Paleoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic. The oldest rock-forming events occurred in major orogenic events between ca. 1.79 and 2.1 Ga (Orosirian to Rhyacian), involving early magmatism (1.89-2.1 Ga, presumably emplaced through partly Archaean continental crust), sedimentation of a thick sequence of terrigenous sediments, UHT metamorphism at ca. 1.87 Ga, and late felsic magmatism at ca. 1.79 Ga. The Atico sedimentary basin developed in the Late-Mesoproterozoic and detrital zircons were fed from a source area similar to the high-grade Paleoproterozoic basement, but also from an unknown source that provided Mesoproterozoic zircons of 1200-1600 Ma. The Grenville-age metamorphism was of low- P type; it both reworked the Paleoproterozoic rocks and also affected the Atico sedimentary rocks. Metamorphism was diachronous: ca. 1040 Ma in the Quilca and Camaná areas and in the San Juán Marcona domain, 940 ± 6 Ma in the Mollendo area, and between 1000 and 850 Ma in the Atico domain. These metamorphic domains are probably tectonically juxtaposed. Comparison with coeval Grenvillian processes in Laurentia and in southern Amazonia raises the possibility that Grenvillian metamorphism in the Arequipa Massif resulted from extension and not from collision. The Arequipa Massif experienced Ordovician-Silurian magmatism at ca. 465 Ma, including anorthosites formerly considered to be Grenvillian, and high-T metamorphism deep within the magmatic arc. Focused retrogression along shear zones or unconformities took place between 430 and 440 Ma.

  9. Extensional orogenic collapse captured by strike-slip tectonics: Constraints from structural geology and Usbnd Pb geochronology of the Pinhel shear zone (Variscan orogen, Iberian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rubén Díez; Pereira, Manuel Francisco

    2016-11-01

    The late Paleozoic collision between Gondwana and Laurussia resulted in the polyphase deformation and magmatism that characterizes the Iberian Massif of the Variscan orogen. In the Central Iberian Zone, initial continental thickening (D1; folding and thrusting) was followed by extensional orogenic collapse (D2) responsible for the exhumation of high-grade rocks coeval to the emplacement of granitoids. This study presents a tectonometamorphic analysis of the Trancoso-Pinhel region (Central Iberian Zone) to explain the processes in place during the transition from an extension-dominated state (D2) to a compression-dominated one (D3). We reveal the existence of low-dipping D2 extensional structures later affected by several pulses of subhorizontal shortening, each of them typified by upright folds and strike-slip shearing (D3, D4 and D5, as identified by superimposition of structures). The D2 Pinhel extensional shear zone separates a low-grade domain from an underlying high-grade domain, and it contributed to the thermal reequilibration of the orogen by facilitating heat advection from lower parts of the crust, crustal thinning, decompression melting, and magma intrusion. Progressive lessening of the gravitational disequilibrium carried out by this D2 shear zone led to a switch from subhorizontal extension to compression and the eventual cessation and capture of the Pinhel shear zone by strike-slip tectonics during renewed crustal shortening. High-grade domains of the Pinhel shear zone were folded together with low-grade domains to define the current upright folded structure of the Trancoso-Pinhel region, the D3 Tamames-Marofa-Sátão synform. New dating of syn-orogenic granitoids (SHRIMP Usbnd Pb zircon dating) intruding the Pinhel shear zone, together with the already published ages of early extensional fabrics constrain the functioning of this shear zone to ca. 331-311 Ma, with maximum tectonomagmatic activity at ca. 321-317 Ma. The capture and apparent cessation

  10. A geophysical model of lower crustal structure of the Palaezoic crustal root (Bohemian Massif): implications for modern collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Edel, Jean Bernard; Schulmann, Karel; Tomek, Cestmir; Lexa, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    A new model of the structure and composition of Variscan crust is proposed based on 3D gravity modelling, geological data, seismic refraction (CEL09) and reflection (9HR) sections. The Bohemian Massif crust is characterized by succession of positive and negative anomalies of about 60 - 80 km wavelength for nearly constant Moho depths. The southwestern part of the Bohemian Massif displays a large negative Bouguer anomaly corresponding to high grade rocks (granulites, migmatites) of the Palaeozoic crustal root represented by the Moldanubian domain. Adjacent Neo-Proterozoic Brunia microcontinent displays important gravity high corresponding to mafic and intermediate medium grade metamorphic and magmatic rocks. However, the strong gradient marking deep crustal boundary between the root domain and the Brunia microcontinent is located 50 to 70 km westwards from the surface boundary between these units suggesting that in this area the high density basement rocks are covered by thin sheet of low density granulites and migmatites. NW from the Moldanubain domain occurs an important gravity high corresponding to the Neo-Proterozoic basement of the Teplá-Barrandian Unit limited in the north by southeast dipping reflectors of the Teplá suture which is characterized by high density eclogites and ultramafics. The footwall of the suture corresponds to low density felsic crust of the Saxothuringian basement. The reflection and refraction seismics and gravity modelling suggest a complex lithological structure of the Moldanubian domain marked by low density 5 - 10 km thick lower crustal layer located above MOHO, 5 - 10 km thick heavy mafic layer, 10 km thick mid-crustal layer of intermediate density and locally developed 2 - 5 km thick low density layer at the surface. The low density lower crust correlates well with low P velocities in the range 6.0-6.4 km-sec in the CEL09 section. This complex geophysical structure and surface geology are interpreted as a result of partial

  11. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Dirk; van Roermund, Herman L M; Drury, Martyn R; Ottolini, Luisa; Mason, Paul R D; Davies, Gareth R

    2006-04-13

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the extraction of large amounts of melt. Models to explain highly melt-depleted but garnet-bearing rock compositions require multi-stage processes with garnet and clinopyroxene possibly of secondary origin. Here we report on orogenic peridotites (fragments of cratonic mantle incorporated into the crust during continent-continent plate collision) from Otrøy, western Norway. We show that the peridotites underwent extensive melting during upwelling from depths of 350 kilometres or more, forming a garnet-bearing cratonic root in a single melting event. These peridotites appear to be the residue after Archaean aluminium depleted komatiite magmatism.

  12. Dirty or Tidy ? Contrasting peraluminous granites in a collapsing Orogen: Examples from the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaros, Arnaud; Pichavant, Michel; Moyen, Jean-François; Cuney, Michel; Deveaud, Sarah; Gloaguen, Eric; Melleton, Jérémie

    2013-04-01

    Post collisional collapse commonly enhances crustal melting. Such melting typically produces peraluminous granitic magmas. In the French Massif Central, a mid-crustal segment of the western Variscan belt, two large granitic bodies were produced during the collapse of the Variscan Belt. The St Sylvestre Leucogranitic Complex (SSyL) in the western part of the Massif Central and the Velay Migmatitic Complex (VMC) in the Eastern part. Although these two complexes are formed in similar geodynamic context they present meaningful petrological and geochemical differences. The VMC (~305 Ma) is clearly intrusive in migmatitic terranes. The migmatitic host recorded two successive melting events M3 (720 °C and 5kb) dated between 335 and 315 Ma and M4 (850°C and 4 kb) dated at 305 Ma. The compositions of the VMC are strictly H2O-undersaturated and ranges from leucogranitic to granodioritic. Three main successive granite types have been distinguished (1) A heterogeneous banded biotite granite, (2) A main biotite-cordierite granite, where cordierite can be prismatic, as cockade or pseudomorphic (3) a late magmatic with large K-feldspar phenocryst and prismatic cordierite. The compositions of the VMC granites are quite similar to typical Australian S-type granites in the sense that they also show a positive correlation between ferromagnesian abundance and aluminosity. The SSyL (~320 Ma) is intrusive in upper greenschist facies to upper amphibolite migmatitic metasediment and orthogneiss (~3kb). The compositional variety observed in the SSyL suggests a continuous trend from a moderately mafic, peraluminous magma (cd- and sill- granite) to a H2O saturated granite ("two-mica" granite) facies and finally to an extremely felsic, H2O-saturated magma. Three granitic units have been recognized in the SSyL: (1) the western "Brame Unit" composed of the less evolved cd- and sill- granite facies (2) the central "St Sylvestre Unit", composed mainly by U-rich two-mica granite, intruded by two

  13. Progression from South-Directed to Orogen-Parallel Mid-Crustal Flow on the Southern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau, Ama Drime Massif, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, M. J.; Cottle, J. M.; Newell, D. L.; Berger, A. L.; Spotila, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    In the South Tibetan Himalaya, two major detachment systems are exposed in the Ama Drime and Mount Everest Massifs. These structures represent a fundamental shift in the dynamics of the Himalayan orogen, recording a progression from south-directed to orogen-parallel mid-crustal flow and exhumation. The South Tibetan detachment system (STDS) accommodated exhumation of the Greater Himalayan series (GHS) until the Middle Miocene. A relatively narrow mylonite zone that progressed into a brittle detachment accommodated exhumation of the GHS. Northward, in the down-dip direction (Dzakaa Chu and Doya La), a 1-km-wide distributed zone of deformation that lacks a foliation-parallel brittle detachment characterizes the STDS. Leucogranites in the footwall of the STDS range between 17-18 Ma. Previously published 40Ar/39Ar ages suggest that movement on the STDS ended by ~ 16 Ma in Rongbuk Valley and ~ 13 Ma near Dinggye. This once continuous section of the STDS is displaced by the trans- Himalayan Ama Drime Massif and Xainza-Dinggye graben. Two oppositely dipping normal faults and shear zones that bound the Ama Drime Massif record orogen-parallel extension. During exhumation, deformation was partitioned into relatively narrow (100-300-m-thick) mylonite zones that progressed into brittle faults/detachments, which offset Quaternary deposits. U(-Th-)Pb geochronology of mafic lenses suggests that the core of the ADM reached granulite facies at ~ 15 Ma. Leucogranites in the footwall of the detachment faults range between 12-11 Ma: significantly younger than those related to movement on the STDS. Previously published 40Ar/39Ar ages from the eastern limb of the Ama Drime Massif suggest that exhumation progressed into the footwall of the Nyüonno detachment between ~ 13-10 Ma. (U-Th)/He apatite ages record a minimum exhumation rate of ~ 1mm/yr between 1.5-3.0 Ma that was enhanced by focused denudation in the trans-Himalayan Arun River gorge. Together these bracket the timing (~ 12 Ma

  14. 40 Ma years of hydrothermal W mineralization during the Variscan orogenic evolution of the French Massif Central revealed by U-Pb dating of wolframite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaux, Matthieu; Romer, Rolf L.; Mercadier, Julien; Morlot, Christophe; Marignac, Christian; Cuney, Michel

    2017-03-01

    We present U-Pb thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS) ages of wolframite from several granite-related hydrothermal W±Sn deposits in the French Massif Central (FMC) located in the internal zone of the Variscan belt. The studied wolframite samples are characterized by variable U and Pb contents (typically <10 ppm) and show significant variations in their radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. The obtained U-Pb ages define three distinct geochronological groups related to three contrasting geodynamic settings: (i) Visean to Namurian mineralization (333-327 Ma) coeval with syn-orogenic compression and emplacement of large peraluminous leucogranites (ca. 335-325 Ma), (ii) Namurian to Westphalian mineralization (317-315 Ma) synchronous with the onset of late-orogenic extension and emplacement of syn-tectonic granites (ca. 315-310 Ma) and (iii) Stephanian to Permian mineralization (298-274 Ma) formed during post-orogenic extension contemporaneous with the Permian volcanism in the entire Variscan belt. The youngest ages (276-274 Ma) likely reflect the reopening of the U-Pb isotopic system after wolframite crystallization and may correspond to late hydrothermal alteration (e.g. ferberitization). Our results demonstrate that W(±Sn) mineralization in the FMC formed during at least three distinct hydrothermal events in different tectono-metamorphic settings over a time range of 40 Ma.

  15. The role of the Mesozoic orogen-parallel displacement in the kinematic history of the Strandja Massif (Thrace region, NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toraman, E.; Natalin, B.; Sunal, G.

    2003-04-01

    northward thrusting has been considerd as the main process responsible for the present day structure of the massif and relationships between its principle tectonic units. However, our calculation have shown that displacements along these thrusts hardly exceeds 2,5 km. The penetrative S1 foliation and L1 lineation which were not properly assessed in the previous studies played important role in the kinematic history of the Strandja massif. Their ubiquitous top-to-northwest sense of shear indicates predominance of orogen-parallel movements during the Mesozoic deformation of the Strandja massif.

  16. Post-Hercynian subvolcanic magmatism in the Serre Massif (Central-Southern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, V.; Cirrincione, R.; Fiannacca, P.; Mazzoleni, P.; Tranchina, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the Serre Massif (Central-Southern Calabria, Italy) dykes and subvolcanic bodies intrude diffusively both Hercynian metamorphic rocks and late-Hercynian granitoids. They range in composition from basaltic andesites to dacite-rhyodacites and can be ascribed to the extensive magmatic activity that affects the entire Hercynian orogenic belt in late Paleozoic - early Mesozoic time. The geodinamic framework of the magmatic activity is still matter of debate, nevertheless most authors agree in correlating magmatism both to the late-orogenic collapse of the Hercynian belt and to the lithosphere thinning responsible for the subsequent continental rifting. In this work, we propose a petrogenetic model for acidic to basic hypabissal bodies from southern Calabria in order to define the nature of sources, discriminate magmatic processes and supply a contribution in the geodynamic reconstruction of the Late Palaeozoic in the Calabria-Peloritani Orogen. In relation to their geochemical affinity, studied dykes have been divided in two groups: a medium- to high-K calc-alkaline and a tholeiitic one. Dykes belonging to the former group, andesitic and dacitic-rhyodacitic in composition, show typical features of subduction-related magmatism, such as LILE and LREE enrichments, depletions in HFSE, peaks in Rb, Th and Ce, accentuated troughs in Ba, Nb-Ta, P and Ti (White and Dupré, 1986; McCulloch and Gamble, 1991), contrasting with the late Hercynian collisional context. On the other side, features typical of intra-plate magmatic activity, such as a moderate enrichment in Ta, Nb, Ce, P, Zr, Hf and Sm relative to MORB composition are also present in studied rocks (Shimizu & Arculus, 1975; Pearce, 1982). REE-patterns are strongly to weakly fractionated for the andesitic rocks (Lan/Ybn = 10.03-13.98) and the dacitic-rhyodacitic ones (Lan/Ybn = 6.00 to 2.82), respectively. The latter rocks exhibit a very slight negative Eu anomaly, whereas no Eu anomaly is recognizable in the andesite

  17. Granitic magma emplacement and deformation during early-orogenic syn-convergent transtension: The Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří; Chadima, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The Late Devonian Staré Sedlo complex, Bohemian Massif, was emplaced as a subhorizontal sheeted sill pluton into a transtension zone. The transtensional setting is documented by strong constrictional fabric, corroborated by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), with variably developed subhorizontal magmatic to solid-state foliation suggesting vertical shortening. Intrusive contacts of the granitoids with metapelitic screens and tapered sill tips indicate that magma wedging was the dominant process of sill propagation. The sills exhibit two intrusive styles, ranging from thin lit-par-lit injections to widely spaced meter-thick sills. These two styles are interpreted as reflecting variable viscosities of intruding magma where low-viscosity magma percolated along foliation planes whereas high-viscosity magma produced more localized thicker sills. We propose that the magma/host rock system in transtension must have evolved from initial crack tip propagation and vertical expansion due to new magma additions through conduit flow to ductile thinning after the magma input had ceased. The sill emplacement and their subsequent deformation are then interpreted as recording early-orogenic syn-convergent sinistral transtension along the rear side of an upper-crustal wedge, which was extruded both upward and laterally in response to subduction and continental underthrusting.

  18. Ongoing compression triggered exhumation of the orogenic crust in the Variscan Maures-Tanneron Massif, France - Geological arguments and thermo-mechanical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Schneider, Julie; Reverso-Peila, Alexandre; Corsini, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The Maures-Tanneron Massif (MTM), together with Corsica and Sardinia, hosted the South-Eastern Variscan belt and record a continuous evolution from continental collision to exhumation. We present a synthesis of the available geological and geochronogical data that explores the transition from convergence to perpendicular Permean extension in the MTM (at ~ 325 Ma ± 25 My). The migmatitic Internal Zone that composes the Western MTM displays structural clues such as backthrusting and magmatic foliations, and metamorphic data indicating exhumation of deep seated partially molten rocks at an apparent heating rate of 1-2 °C/km/My from ca. 345 Ma to 320 Ma. This suggests vertical advective heat transport during continued N140° convergence (D2 phase). In contrast at the same time, the low grade External zone composing the Eastern part of the MTM recorded exhumation of more conductive patterns at an apparent rate of 0.3-0.6 °C/km/My. It is only from ca. 320 Ma that transcurrent motion dominates in the Internal zone and progressively leaves way to N-S strecthing (D3 phase), indicative of orogenic collapse and extension and in asociation with emplacement of larger volumes of magmatism in the crust. Thermo-mechanical modeling complements this synthesis in order to highlight the conditions under which deep seated HP units could melt and massively start to exhume during maintained convergence (phase D2). Accounting for temperature dependent elasto-visco-plastic rheologies, our models explore the dynamics of an orogenic prism starting from a dis-equilibrated state just after slab break-off or delamination, at ca. 350 Ma. We simulate the development of gravitational instabilities in partially melting crust, a process that is already well known to depend on strain-rate, heat sources and strength layering. In order to reproduce the exhumation patterns of rocks from ~50 km depth over the appropriate time-scale (>20 My) and spatial extent (>100 km), a best fit was obtained with a

  19. Protracted, coeval crust and mantle melting during Variscan late-orogenic evolution: U-Pb dating in the eastern French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Oscar; Couzinié, Simon; Zeh, Armin; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Gardien, Véronique; Chelle-Michou, Cyril

    2017-03-01

    The late stages of the Variscan orogeny are characterized by middle to lower crustal melting and intrusion of voluminous granitoids throughout the belt, which makes it akin to "hot" orogens. These processes resulted in the development of large granite-migmatite complexes, the largest of which being the 305-300-Ma-old Velay dome in the eastern French Massif Central (FMC). This area also hosts a wide range of late-Variscan plutonic rocks that can be subdivided into four groups: (i) cordierite-bearing peraluminous granites (CPG); (ii) muscovite-bearing peraluminous granites (MPG); (iii) K-feldspar porphyritic, calc-alkaline granitoids (KCG) and (iv) Mg-K-rich (monzo)diorites and lamprophyres ("vaugnerites"). New results of LA-SF-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon and monazite dating on 33 samples from all groups indicate that both granites and mafic rocks emplaced together over a long period of 40 million years throughout the Carboniferous, as shown by intrusion ages between 337.4 ± 1.0 and 298.9 ± 1.8 Ma for the granitoids, and between 335.7 ± 2.1 and 299.1 ± 1.3 Ma for the vaugnerites. Low zircon saturation temperatures and abundant inherited zircons with predominant late Ediacaran to early Cambrian ages indicate that the CPG and MPG formed through muscovite or biotite dehydration melting of ortho- and paragneisses from the Lower Gneiss Unit. The KCG and vaugnerites contain very few inherited zircons, if any, suggesting higher magma temperatures and consistent with a metasomatized lithospheric mantle source for the vaugnerites. The KCG can be explained by interactions between the CPG/MPG and the vaugnerites, or extensive differentiation of the latter. The new dataset provides clear evidence that the eastern FMC was affected by a long-lived magmatic episode characterized by coeval melting of both crustal and mantle sources. This feature is suggested here to result from a lithospheric-scale thermal anomaly, triggered by the removal of the lithospheric mantle root. The spatial

  20. Protracted, coeval crust and mantle melting during Variscan late-orogenic evolution: U-Pb dating in the eastern French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Oscar; Couzinié, Simon; Zeh, Armin; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Gardien, Véronique; Chelle-Michou, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The late stages of the Variscan orogeny are characterized by middle to lower crustal melting and intrusion of voluminous granitoids throughout the belt, which makes it akin to "hot" orogens. These processes resulted in the development of large granite-migmatite complexes, the largest of which being the 305-300-Ma-old Velay dome in the eastern French Massif Central (FMC). This area also hosts a wide range of late-Variscan plutonic rocks that can be subdivided into four groups: (i) cordierite-bearing peraluminous granites (CPG); (ii) muscovite-bearing peraluminous granites (MPG); (iii) K-feldspar porphyritic, calc-alkaline granitoids (KCG) and (iv) Mg-K-rich (monzo)diorites and lamprophyres ("vaugnerites"). New results of LA-SF-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon and monazite dating on 33 samples from all groups indicate that both granites and mafic rocks emplaced together over a long period of 40 million years throughout the Carboniferous, as shown by intrusion ages between 337.4 ± 1.0 and 298.9 ± 1.8 Ma for the granitoids, and between 335.7 ± 2.1 and 299.1 ± 1.3 Ma for the vaugnerites. Low zircon saturation temperatures and abundant inherited zircons with predominant late Ediacaran to early Cambrian ages indicate that the CPG and MPG formed through muscovite or biotite dehydration melting of ortho- and paragneisses from the Lower Gneiss Unit. The KCG and vaugnerites contain very few inherited zircons, if any, suggesting higher magma temperatures and consistent with a metasomatized lithospheric mantle source for the vaugnerites. The KCG can be explained by interactions between the CPG/MPG and the vaugnerites, or extensive differentiation of the latter. The new dataset provides clear evidence that the eastern FMC was affected by a long-lived magmatic episode characterized by coeval melting of both crustal and mantle sources. This feature is suggested here to result from a lithospheric-scale thermal anomaly, triggered by the removal of the lithospheric mantle root. The spatial

  1. Continental crust subducted deeply into lithospheric mantle: the driving force of Early Carboniferous magmatism in the Variscan collisional orogen (Bohemian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoušek, Vojtěch; Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Holub, František; Franěk, Jan; Vrána, Stanislav

    2014-05-01

    The vigorous Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous plutonic activity in the core of the Bohemian Massif was marked by a transition from normal-K calc-alkaline, arc-related (~375-355 Ma), through high-K calc-alkaline (~346 Ma) to (ultra-)potassic (343-335 Ma) suites, the latter associated with mainly felsic HP granulites enclosing Grt/Spl mantle peridotite bodies. The changing chemistry, especially an increase in K2O/Na2O and 87Sr/86Sri with decrease in 143Nd/144Ndi in the basic end-members, cannot be reconciled by contamination during ascent. Instead it has to reflect the character of the mantle sources, changing over time. The tectonic model invokes an oceanic subduction passing to subduction of the attenuated Saxothuringian crust under the rifted Gondwana margin (Teplá-Barrandian and Moldanubian domains). The deep burial of this mostly refractory felsic metaigneous material is evidenced by the presence of coesite/diamond (Massonne 2001; Kotková et al. 2011) in the detached UHP slices exhumed through the subduction channel and thrusted over the Saxothuringian basement, and by the abundance of felsic HP granulites (> 2.3 GPa), some bearing evidence for small-scale HP melt separation, in the orogen's core (Vrána et al. 2013). The subduction channel was most likely formed by 'dirty' serpentinites contaminated by the melts/fluids derived from the underlying continental-crust slab (Zheng 2012). Upon the passage through the orogenic mantle, the continental crust-slab derived material not only contaminated the adjacent mantle forming small bodies/veins of pyroxenites (Becker 1996), glimmerites (Becker et al. 1999) or even phlogopite- and apatite-bearing peridotites (Naemura et al. 2009) but the felsic HP-HT granulites also sampled the individual peridotite types at various levels. Eventually the subducted felsic material would form an (U)HP continental wedge under the forearc/arc region, to be later redistributed under the Moldanubian crust by channel flow and crustal

  2. Stable isotope and Ar/Ar evidence of prolonged multi-scale fluid flow during exhumation of orogenic crust: example from the Mont Blanc and Aar massifs (NW Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Rossi, Magali

    2015-04-01

    The spatial and temporal scales and the geometry of fluid pathways in a collisional orogen are investigated using stable isotope analysis (O, C, H) and 40Ar/39Ar dating of vein minerals formed at c. 11-16 Ma in the Mont Blanc and the Aar External Crystalline Massifs. In both massifs 40Ar/39Ar dating of veins adularia provides evidence for progressive crystallization from 16 to 9 Ma, and mainly at 11-12 Ma following veins opening during shear zone activity. The fluid flow duration thus ranges from 4 to 5 Ma in the two massifs. The δ18O values of vein quartz and calcite are similar to those of undeformed crystalline and sedimentary host-rocks, suggesting rock buffering, while carbon isotope ratios of vein calcites fall into three compositional groups. A-type veins have δ13C values that are buffered by the Helvetic metasediments, which suggests that these veins formed in a closed-system from a locally-derived CO2-rich fluid. The fluid in equilibrium with C-type veins has depleted δ13C values similar to mantle-CO2, while the intermediate δ13C values of B-type veins suggest mixing between the A-type and C-type fluids. These results are in agreement with crustal- to lithosphere-scale upward vertical fluid flow along vertical shear zones related to the strike-slip system bounding the Adriatic block since 16-20 Ma, connecting a deep-seated fluid to some downward flow in the sedimentary cover of External Crystalline Massifs.

  3. Late Visean thermal event in the northern part of the French Massif Central: new 40Ar/39Ar and Rb-Sr isotopic constraints on the Hercynian syn-orogenic extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Michel; Monié, Patrick; Pin, Christian; Maluski, Henri; Leloix, Christele

    2002-01-01

    The French Massif Central belongs to the central metamorphic domain of the European Hercynian Belt. 40Ar/39Ar mica and amphibole dates have been obtained on magmatic and metamorphic rocks from the northern part of the French Massif Central (Sioule and Brévenne-Violay series). The 336- to 337-Ma dates recorded by a granodiorite (the St. Gervais pluton) and its mylonitic border along the Ste Christine fault and the 337±5-Ma muscovite ages from the Brévenne series are consistent with the age of wrenching related to the late stage of the Hercynian compression. The remaining age spectra from the Sioule area provide ages ranging from 331 to 335 Ma that are interpreted as cooling ages related to rock exhumation after the main stages of metamorphism and deformation in the studied area. Late Visean dates widespread in North Massif Central correspond to a huge magmatic event characterized by the emplacement of "red granites", granophyres and sub-aerial acidic volcanics known as the "Tufs anthracifères" formation. Rb-Sr isotopic data from volcanic and hypovolcanic rocks from the Sioule and Montagne Bourbonnaise areas place constraints on the source of the magmas. Simple metapelite crustal melting or a major contribution from depleted mantle sources are ruled out, and instead, mantle-derived magmas were probably involved, at least as a heat source, during the Late Visean magmatism. Exhumation and cooling of metamorphic rocks below 300°C occurred contemporaneously with this Late Visean magmatism. In the geodynamic evolution of the Hercynian Belt, the Late Visean (ca. 335-330 Ma) magmatism corresponds to a major break marking the onset of post-collisional extension in the inner zone which had been thickened by collision in Latest Devonian-Earliest Carboniferous. This Late Visean extension in the inner zone which is synchronous to compression in the northern and southern forelands of the belt appears as a syn-orogenic process.

  4. Monazite U-Th-Pb EPMA and zircon U-Pb SIMS chronological constraints on the tectonic, metamorphic, and thermal events in the inner part of the Variscan orogen, example from the Sioule series, French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, Damien; Faure, Michel; Augier, Romain; Cocherie, Alain; Rossi, Philippe; Li, Xian-Hua; Lin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In the northern Variscan French Massif Central, the Sioule metamorphic series exposes from top to bottom the tectonic superposition of the Upper Gneiss Unit (UGU), Lower Gneiss Unit (LGU), and Para-autochthonous Unit (PAU). The nappe stacking developed throughout two prograde syn-metamorphic events: D1 is a top-to-the-SW shearing coeval with a probable Devonian migmatization and D2 is a top-to-the-NW shearing event. Both events were completed before the unconformable deposition of the undeformed and unmetamorphosed "Tufs anthracifères" formation, dated at ca 330 Ma (Late Visean). Furthermore, the UGU experienced a high-pressure metamorphism ascribed to a D0 event during which eclogite or granulite crystallized in several parts of the UGU. Monazite U-Th-Pb and zircon U-Pb SIMS datings were carried out in order to constrain the ages of these D0, D1, and D2 tectono-metamorphic events. These new geochronological results are placed in a P-T-t diagram constructed for the UGU, LGU, and PAU. Monazite sampled in UGU, LGU, and PAU rocks yields similar 365-350 Ma ages consistent with the D2 event dated in other places of the French Massif Central. A zoned monazite grain from a granulitic paragneiss yields 416 ± 15 and 362 ± 14 Ma ages interpreted as those of the D0 and D2 events, respectively. Zircon from the same granulitic paragneiss yields SIMS ages at 343 ± 2 and 328 ± 2 Ma that are interpreted as recrystallization processes associated with post-thickening thermal events, possibly recording the onset of orogenic collapse of the Northern Massif Central. It is worth to note that neither monazite nor zircon recorded the D1 event.

  5. Geochronology, geochemistry, and deformation history of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Erguna Massif, NE China: Constraints on the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Yu

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon and sphene U-Pb ages, biotite and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar ages, Hf isotopic data, and geochemical data for five Mesozoic plutons in the Erguna Massif of NE China. These data are used to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt. This new dating, when combined with previously published ages, indicates that the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (J3-K1) intrusive rocks can be subdivided into three stages that represent periods of magmatism during the Late Jurassic ( 155 Ma), early Early Cretaceous ( 137 Ma), and late Early Cretaceous ( 123 Ma). In addition, the rocks have undergone later deformation recorded by peak ages of 137 and 123 Ma. The Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the study area are dominantly syenogranites and are either A-type granites or are classified as alkaline series, suggesting that they formed in an extensional environment. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in this area are generally monzogranitic and were emplaced as dikes in an extensional environment, along with coeval bimodal volcanics. These data, combined with the presence of regional unconformities in the northern part of Hebei Province and western part of Liaoning Province, and the spatial distribution of coeval volcanic rocks in NE China, suggest the Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms and the early Early Cretaceous deformation in this area occurred in an extensional environment related to the delamination of a thickened part of the crust after closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. In comparison, the late Early Cretaceous deformation and magmatism occurred in an extensional environment related to either delamination of the previously thickened crust related to the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime or the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate, or the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  6. Paleoproterozoic crustal evolution in the East Sarmatian Orogen: Petrology, geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes and zircon U-Pb geochronology of andesites from the Voronezh massif, Western Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, R. A.; Savko, K. A.; Santosh, M.

    2016-03-01

    Andesites and related plutonic rocks are major contributors to continental growth and provide insights into the interaction between the mantle and crust. Paleoproterozoic volcanic rocks are important components of the East Sarmatian Orogen (ESO) belonging to the East European Craton, although their petrogenesis and tectonic setting remain controversial. Here we present petrology, mineral chemistry, bulk chemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes, and zircon U-Pb geochronological data from andesites and related rocks in the Losevo and Vorontsovka blocks of the ESO. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the andesites are depleted in LREE, and enriched in HFSE (Th, Nb, Zr, Hf, Ti) and LILE (Ba, Sr). Based on the chemistry of pyroxenes and whole rocks, as well as Fe-Ti oxides, we estimate a temperature range of 1179 to 1262 °С, pressures of 11.3 to 13.0 kbar, H2O content of 1-5 wt.%, and oxygen fu gacity close to the MH buffer for the melts of the Kalach graben (KG) and the Baygora area (BA) andesites. Our zircon U-Pb geochronological data indicate new zircon growth during the middle Paleoproterozoic as displayed by weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2047 ± 17 Ma and 2040 ± 16 Ma for andesite and dacite-porphyry of the BA, and 2050 ± 16 Ma from high-Mg basaltic andesite of the KG. The andesites and related rocks of the KG and BA are characterized by high magnesium contents (Mg # up to 0.68). All these volcanic rocks are depleted in LREE and HFSE, and display negative Nb and Ti anomalies relative to primitive mantle. The high-Mg bulk composition, and the presence of clinopyroxene phenocrysts suggests that the parent melts of the KG and BA suite were in equilibrium with the mantle rocks. The rocks show positive εNd(T) values and low initial 87Sr/86Sr, suggesting that the magmas were mostly derived from metasomatized mantle source. The geochemical differences between the two andesite types are attributed to: the predominance of fractional crystallization, and minor role of contamination in

  7. The tectonics of anorthosite massifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyfert, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    Anorthosite massifs developed approximately 1.4 to 1.5 billion years ago along an arch which developed parallel to a zone of continental separation as a block which included North America, Europe, and probably Asia separated from a block which included parts of South America, Africa, India, and Australia. Anorthosite massifs also developed at the same time along a belt which runs through the continents which comprise Gondwanaland (South America), Africa, India, Australia, and Antarctica. This was a zone of continental separation which subsequently became a zone of continental collision about 1.2 billion years ago. The northern anorthosite belt also parallels an orogenic belt which was active between 1.8 and 1.7 billion years ago. Heat generated during this mountain building period helped in the formation of the anorthosites.

  8. Acadian orogen Which Acadian orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludman, A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Acadian orogeny is widely viewed as the climactic event in much of the Northern Appalachians, resulting from the closing of one or more ocean basins and the accretion of the Avalonian continent to ancestral North America. Unconformities have traditionally dated the Acadian orogeny as Middle Devonian in the east and Late Middle to Late Devonian in the western part of the orogen. The recent recognition that several post-Acadian'' plutons are actually Late Silurian suggests that the tectonic models are too simplistic; that accretion previously attributed to a Devonian (Acadian) event may have been a two-stage process: Late Silurian (Salinic ) and Acadian sensu stricto; that orogenic activity may have been continuous from Taconian through Acadian'' times. Differences between the records of the Taconic (Ordovician) and Acadian orogenies suggest different plate interactions: near-orthogonal subduction for the former vs transcurrent faulting for the latter as the dominant mechanisms. Distribution of Salinic'' unconformities across the Northern Appalachian orogen in Maine suggests that accretion of Avalon may have been completed by that Silurian event, but faunal provincialities displayed by fossils as young as Early Devonian in terranes bordering the Fredericton Trough argue for later (Devonian) accretion. A further complication is the imprecise knowledge of the extent to which post-Devonian tectonism is responsible for the current terrane configuration in the Northern Appalachians. Alleghenian folding and thrusting is well-established in some areas where post-Acadian (Carboniferous) strata are present, and is now being documented in older rocks in eastern Maine as well: transcurrent faulting as young as post-Mesozoic( ) along the Norumbega Fault Zone; east-directed thrusting involving the Early Devonian Center Pond pluton.

  9. Mantle refertilization and magmatism in old orogenic regions: The role of late-orogenic pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Chazot, Gilles; Kornprobst, Jacques; Dallai, Luigi; Vannucci, Riccardo; Grégoire, Michel; Bertrand, Hervé; Boivin, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pyroxenites and garnet pyroxenites are mantle heterogeneities characterized by a lower solidus temperature than the enclosing peridotites; it follows that they are preferentially involved during magma genesis. Constraining their origin, composition, and the interactions they underwent during their subsequent evolution is therefore essential to discuss the sources of magmatism in a given area. Pyroxenites could represent either recycling of crustal rocks in mantle domains or mantle originated rocks (formed either by olivine consuming melt-rock reactions or by crystal fractionation). Petrological and geochemical (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd and O isotopes) features of xenoliths from various occurrences (French Massif-Central, Jordan, Morocco and Cameroon) show that these samples represent cumulates crystallized during melt percolation at mantle conditions. They formed in mantle domains at pressures of 1-2 GPa during post-collisional magmatism (possibly Hercynian for the French Massif-Central, and Panafrican for Morocco, Jordan and Cameroon). The thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric domains, typical of the late orogenic exhumation stages, is also recorded by the samples. Most of the samples display a metasomatic overprint that may be either inherited or likely linked to the recent volcanic activity that occurred in the investigated regions. The crystallization of pyroxenites during late orogenic events has implications for the subsequent evolution of the mantle domains. The presence of large amounts of mantle pyroxenites in old orogenic regions indeed imparts peculiar physical and chemical characteristics to these domains. Among others, the global solidus temperature of the whole lithospheric domain will be lowered; in turn, this implies that old orogenic regions are refertilized zones where magmatic activity would be enhanced.

  10. Craddock Massif and Vinson Massif remeasured

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gildea, Damien; Splettstoesser, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The highest peak in Antarctica, the Vinson Massif (78º35’S, 85º25’W), is at an elevation of 4892 m (16,046 ft), as determined in 2004. Measurements of the elevation have fluctuated over the years, from its earliest surveyed elevation of 5140 m (16,859 ft), to its present height. Vinson Massif and three of its near neighbors in the Sentinel Range of the Ellsworth Mountains are the highest peaks in Antarctica, making them a favorite objective of mountaineers. Well over 1,100 people have climbed Vinson since the first ascent by a team in the 1966-67 austral summer. The range is composed of Crashsite quartzite, making the Sentinel’s very resistant to erosion. Very accurate elevations have been achieved annually by GPS mapping done by a climbing team sponsored by the Omega Foundation, active in Antarctica since 1998. The Craddock Massif now includes Mt. Craddock, the ninth highest peak in Antarctica, at 4368 m (14,327 ft). Both are named for Campbell Craddock*, a U.S. geologist active in Antarctic research beginning in 1959-60.

  11. Orogenic, Ophiolitic, and Abyssal Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodinier, J.-L.; Godard, M.

    2003-12-01

    "Tectonically emplaced" mantle rocks include subcontinental, suboceanic, and subarc mantle rocks that were tectonically exhumed from the upper mantle and occur:(i) as dispersed ultramafic bodies, a few meters to kilometers in size, in suture zones and mountain belts (i.e., the "alpine," or "orogenic" peridotite massifs - De Roever (1957), Thayer (1960), Den Tex (1969));(ii) as the lower ultramafic section of large (tens of kilometers) ophiolite or island arc complexes, obducted on continental margins (e.g., the Oman Ophiolite and the Kohistan Arc Complex - Coleman (1971), Boudier and Coleman (1981), Burg et al. (1998));(iii) exhumed above the sea level in ocean basins (e.g., Zabargad Island in the Red Sea, St. Paul's islets in the Atlantic and Macquarie Island in the southwestern Pacific - Tilley (1947), Melson et al. (1967), Varne and Rubenach (1972), Bonatti et al. (1981)).The "abyssal peridotites" are samples from the oceanic mantle that were dredged on the ocean floor, or recovered from drill cores (e.g., Bonatti et al., 1974; Prinz et al., 1976; Hamlyn and Bonatti, 1980).Altogether, tectonically emplaced and abyssal mantle rocks provide insights into upper mantle compositions and processes that are complementary to the information conveyed by mantle xenoliths (See Chapter 2.05). They provide coverage to vast regions of the Earth's upper mantle that are sparsely sampled by mantle xenoliths, particularly in the ocean basins and beneath passive continental margins, back-arc basins, and oceanic island arcs.Compared with mantle xenoliths, a disadvantage of some tectonically emplaced mantle rocks for representing mantle compositions is that their original geodynamic setting is not exactly known and their significance is sometimes a subject of speculation. For instance, the provenance of orogenic lherzolite massifs (subcontinental lithosphere versus upwelling asthenosphere) is still debated (Menzies and Dupuy, 1991, and references herein), as is the original setting

  12. Cenozoic rejuvenation events of Massif Central topography (France): Insights from cosmogenic denudation rates and river profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivetti, Valerio; Godard, Vincent; Bellier, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The French Massif Central is a part of the Hercynian orogenic belt that currently exhibits anomalously high topography. The Alpine orogenesis, which deeply marked Western European topography, involved only marginally the Massif Central, where Cenozoic faulting and short-wavelength crustal deformation is limited to the Oligocene rifting. For this reason the French Massif Central is a key site to study short- and long-term topographic response in a framework of slow tectonic activity. In particular the origin of the Massif Central topography is a topical issue still debated, where the role of mantle upwelling is invoked by different authors. Here we present a landscape analysis using denudation rates derived from basin-averaged cosmogenic nuclide concentrations coupled with longitudinal river profile analysis. This analysis allows us to recognize that the topography of the French Massif Central is not fully equilibrated with the present base level and in transient state. Our data highlight the coexistence of out-of-equilibrium river profiles, incised valleys, and low cosmogenically derived denudation rates ranging between 40 mm/kyr and 80 mm/kyr. Addressing this apparent inconsistency requires investigating the parameters that may govern erosion processes under conditions of reduced active tectonics. The spatial distribution of denudation rates coupled with topography analysis enabled us to trace the signal of the long-term uplift history and to propose a chronology for the uplift evolution of the French Massif Central.

  13. Kondyor Massif, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is neither an impact crater nor a volcano. It is a perfect circular intrusion, about 10 km in diameter with a topographic ridge up to 600 m high. The Kondyor Massif is located in Eastern Siberia, Russia, north of the city of Khabarovsk. It is a rare form of igneous intrusion called alkaline-ultrabasic massif and it is full of rare minerals. The river flowing out of it forms placer mineral deposits. Last year 4 tons of platinum were mined there. A remarkable and very unusual mineralogical feature of the deposit is the presence of coarse crystals of Pt-Fe alloy, coated with gold. This 3-D perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER composite over an ASTER-derived digital elevation model.

    The image was acquired on June 10, 2006, and is located at 57.6 degrees north latitude, 134.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. The Galicia-Ossa-Morena Zone: Proposal for a new zone of the Iberian Massif. Variscan implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Ricardo; Díez Fernández, Rubén; Rubio Pascual, Francisco J.; Sánchez Martínez, Sonia; Martín Parra, Luis Miguel; Matas, Jerónimo; González del Tánago, José; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Fuenlabrada, Jose M.; Andonaegui, Pilar; Garcia-Casco, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Correlation of a group of allochthonous terranes (referred to as basal, ophiolitic and upper units) exposed in the NW and SW of the Iberian Massif, is used to propose a new geotectonic zone in the southern branch of the Variscan Orogen: the Galicia-Ossa-Morena Zone. Recent advances in SW Iberia identify most of the former Ossa-Morena Zone as another allochthonous complex of the Iberian Massif, the Ossa-Morena Complex, equivalent to the Cabo Ortegal, Órdenes, Malpica-Tui, Bragança and Morais complexes described in NW Iberia. The new geotectonic zone and its counterparts along the rest of the Variscan Orogen constitute an Internal Variscan Zone with ophiolites and units affected by high-P metamorphism. The Galicia-Ossa-Morena Zone includes a Variscan suture and pieces of continental crust bearing the imprint of Ediacaran-Cambrian events related to the activity of peri-Gondwanan magmatic arcs (Cadomian orogenesis). In the Iberian Massif, the general structure of this geotectonic zone represents a duplication of the Gondwanan platform, the outboard sections being juxtaposed on top of domains located closer to the mainland before amalgamation. This interpretation offers an explanation that overcomes some issues regarding the differences between the stratigraphic and paleontological record of the central and southern sections of the Iberian Massif. Also, equivalent structural relationships between other major geotectonic domains of the rest of the Variscan Orogen are consistent with our interpretation and allow suspecting similar configurations along strike of the orogen. A number of issues may be put forward in this respect that potentially open new lines of thinking about the architecture of the Variscan Orogen.

  15. Microdiamonds from the European Variscan Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotkova, J.; Jakubova, P.; Whitehouse, M.; Fedortchouk, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Diamond, along with coesite, has been discovered recently in the continental crustal rocks of the European Variscan orogenic belt, namely the Bohemian Massif (BM). In addition to the garnet-phengite gneiss in Germany, western BM, microdiamond occurs in major rock forming minerals - garnet, kyanite - and in zircon in ultrahigh-pressure rocks overprinted under high-pressure granulite facies conditions (c. 16-20 kbar, c. 1000°C) in the northern and eastern BM. Well-preserved 10-30 μm-sized microdiamonds from northern BM exhibit diverse morphologies (SEM data) depending upon the host rock type. Octahedral diamond occurs in felsic garnet-kyanite-feldspar-quartz rock (metasediment), whereas intermediate garnet-clinopyroxene-feldspar-quartz rock contains a cubo-octahedral variety. Diamond morphology can be thus controlled by solid impurities available in the medium of crystallization (K- vs. Ca-bearing fluids or melts), as shown by experiments. Pointed-bottom negatively oriented trigonal etch pits on the octahedral diamond faces developed due to diamond resorption at CO2-dominated environment (less than 50 wt % of H2O, experimental data), possibly by action of a residual fluid. SIMS determined δ13C values range from -22 to -21 ‰ for the felsic rock and from - 26 to - 33 for the intermediate one, corresponding to the typical range of organic carbon δ13C and inconsistent with a significant mantle carbon (δ13C ~ - 5 ‰) input. Diamond-bearing domains in zircon, also analysed by SIMS, yielded a Variscan U-Pb age of c. 340 Ma. The present stage of knowledge allows us to conclude that (i) metamorphic diamonds in the BM occur in lithologies of metasedimentary character, and their carbon source was organic; (ii) crustal-derived CO2-rich fluids with impurities played an important role in diamond formation and dissolution; (iii) diamonds formed during the Variscan orogenic cycle and (iv) diamonds are best preserved in the external domain of the Variscan orogenic belt.

  16. Accretionary orogens: definition, character, significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, P. A.; Kroener, A.; Windley, B. F.

    2003-04-01

    Classic models of orogens involve a Wilson cycle of ocean opening and closing with orogenesis related to continent-continent collision. Such models fail to explain the geological history of a significant number of orogenic belts throughout the world in which deformation, metamorphism and crustal growth took place in an environment of on-going plate convergence. These belts are termed accretionary orogens but have also been refereed to as non-collisional orogens, Pacific-type orogens, Turkic-type and exterior orogens. Accretionary orogens evolve in generally curvilinear belts comprising dominantly mafic to silicic igneous rocks and their sedimentary products and accumulated largely in marine settings. They are variably deformed and metamorphosed by tectono-thermal events aligned parallel to, and punctuating, facies trends. Accretionary orogens form at sites of subduction of oceanic lithosphere and consist of magmatic arcs systems along with material accreted from the downgoing plate and eroded from the upper plate. Deformational features include structures formed in extension and compressive environments during steady-state convergence (arc/backarc vs. accretionary prism) that are overprinted by short regional compressive orogenic events. Orogenesis takes place through coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion over-riding the downgoing plate. The Circum-Pacific region provides outstanding examples of accretionary orogens. The Pacific formed during breakup of Rodinia in the Neoproterozoic and has never subsequently closed, resulting in a series of overall ocean-ward younging orogenic systems that have always faced an open ocean, yet have been the sites of repeated tectono-thermal events and

  17. Crustal structure of the northern Menderes Massif, western Turkey, imaged by joint gravity and magnetic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Klaus; Gallardo, Luis A.; Wedin, Francis; Sener, Kerim

    2016-10-01

    In western Anatolia, the Anatolide domain of the Tethyan orogen is exposed in one of the Earth's largest metamorphic core complexes, the Menderes Massif. The Menderes Massif experienced a two-stage exhumation: tectonic denudation in the footwall of a north-directed Miocene extensional detachment, followed by fragmentation by E-W and NW-SE-trending graben systems. Along the northern boundary of the core complex, the tectonic units of the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture zone overly the stage one footwall of the core complex, the northern Menderes Massif. In this study, we explore the structure of the upper crust in the northern Menderes Massif with cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and aeromagnetic data along a series of 10-km-deep profiles. Our inversions, which are based on gravity and aeromagnetic measurements and require no geological and petrophysical constraints, reveal the salient features of the Earth's upper crust. We image the northern Menderes Massif as a relatively homogenous domain of low magnetization and medium to high density, with local anomalies related to the effect of interspersed igneous bodies and shallow basins. In contrast, both the northern and western boundaries of the northern Menderes Massif stand out as domains where dense mafic, metasedimentary and ultramafic domains with a weak magnetic signature alternate with low-density igneous complexes with high magnetization. With our technique, we are able to delineate Miocene basins and igneous complexes, and map the boundary between intermediate to mafic-dominated subduction-accretion units of the suture zone and the underlying felsic crust of the Menderes Massif. We demonstrate that joint gravity and magnetic inversion are not only capable of imaging local and regional changes in crustal composition, but can also be used to map discontinuities of geodynamic significance such as the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture and the West Anatolia Transfer Zone.

  18. Early Cretaceous extensional reworking of the Triassic HP-UHP metamorphic orogen in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Ji, W.; Faure, M.; Wu, L.; Li, Q. L.; Shi, Y.; Scharer, U.; Wang, F.; Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Corresponding to the Early Mesozoic continental subduction between the North China Block (NCB) and the South China Block (SCB), the Tongbaishan-Hong'an-Dabieshan-Sulu massifs are famous for their HP-UHP metamorphism. More than 50% of the HP-UHP Orogenic Belt was significantly reworked by Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics. This Early Cretaceous event with a fast cooling period, at 130-120 Ma, superimposed on the Early Mesozoic HP-UHP orogenic belt and intensively changed the architecture of this orogen. Each individual segment documents different Early Cretaceous extensional structures, namely the central Tongbaishan domain is a metamorphic core complex (MCC) represented by an A-type non-cylindrical antiform; the central Dabieshan domain is a typical Cordilleran-type migmatite-cored MCC; the Southern Sulu UHP domain is a "wedge-shaped" structure exhumed by a simple detachment fault. These late stage extensional structures expose the previous HP-UHP orogenic belt as fragments along the NCB-SCB boundary. The geodynamic setting of this Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics along the HP-UHP orogen is a part of a 1000 km-scale crustal extension belt that is widespread in eastern Eurasia continent from Trans-Baikal to the central part of the South China Block. Convective erosion or delamination of the mantle lithosphere might be considered as a possible mechanism for mantle removal.

  19. Early Cretaceous extensional reworking of the Triassic HP-UHP metamorphic orogen in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Ji, Wenbin; Faure, Michel; Wu, Lin; Li, Qiuli; Shi, Yonghong; Scharer, Urs; Wang, Fei; Wang, Qingchen

    2015-11-01

    Corresponding to the Early Mesozoic continental subduction between the North China Block (NCB) and the South China Block (SCB), the Tongbaishan-Hong'an-Dabieshan-Sulu massifs are famous for their HP-UHP metamorphism. More than 50% of the HP-UHP Orogenic Belt was significantly reworked by Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics. This Early Cretaceous event with a fast cooling period, at 130-120 Ma, superimposed on the Early Mesozoic HP-UHP orogenic belt and intensively changed the architecture of this orogen. Each individual segment documents different Early Cretaceous extensional structures, namely the central Tongbaishan domain is a metamorphic core complex (MCC) represented by an A-type non-cylindrical antiform; the central Dabieshan domain is a typical Cordilleran-type migmatite-cored MCC; the Southern Sulu UHP domain is a "wedge-shaped" structure exhumed by a simple detachment fault. These late stage extensional structures expose the previous HP-UHP orogenic belt as fragments along the NCB-SCB boundary. The geodynamic setting of this Early Cretaceous extensional tectonics along the HP-UHP orogen is a part of a 1000 km-scale crustal extension belt that is widespread in eastern Eurasia continent from Trans-Baikal to the central part of SCB. Convective erosion or delamination of the mantle lithosphere might be considered as a possible mechanism for mantle removal.

  20. Early Mesozoic granitoid and rhyolite magmatism of the Bureya Terrane of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Age and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Kotov, A. B.; Kudryashov, N. M.; Kovach, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Early Mesozoic granitoids and volcanic rocks are widespread throughout the structures of all of the continental massifs in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, although its tectonic setting is not yet clear. Generally, they are associated with subduction and plume processes or rifting. Such uncertainty is mostly explained by the unequal investigation of Early Mesozoic magmatism. This paper presents the results of geochemical, Sm-Nd isotope, and U-Pb geochronologic (ID-TIMS) studies of "key-type" Early Mesozoic magmatic rock complexes of the Bureya Terrane. This is one of the largest continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and knowledge of its geological structure is of fundamental importance in understanding the history of its formation. It has been established that the leucogranites of the Altakhtinsky Complex and the trachyrhyolites of the Talovsky Complex are practically coeval ( 209-208 Ma). The subalkaline leucogranites of the Kharinsky Complex have a slightly younger age of 199 Ma. These data correspond to the general stage of Early Mesozoic magmatic and metamorphic events (236-180 Ma) in most continental massifs in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. We believe that large-scale Early Mesozoic events were related to the amalgamation of the continental massifs of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt into a single continental structure (the Amur superterrane or microcontinent Amuria) and collision with the North Asian Craton. It should be noted that the collision processes were followed by crustal thickening, thus creating the conditions for metamorphism and formation of magmatic rock complexes of various geochemical types.

  1. Accretionary orogens through Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cawood, Peter A.; Kroner, A.; Collins, W.J.; Kusky, T.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Windley, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Accretionary orogens form at intraoceanic and continental margin convergent plate boundaries. They include the supra-subduction zone forearc, magmatic arc and back-arc components. Accretionary orogens can be grouped into retreating and advancing types, based on their kinematic framework and resulting geological character. Retreating orogens (e.g. modern western Pacific) are undergoing long-term extension in response to the site of subduction of the lower plate retreating with respect to the overriding plate and are characterized by back-arc basins. Advancing orogens (e.g. Andes) develop in an environment in which the overriding plate is advancing towards the downgoing plate, resulting in the development of foreland fold and thrust belts and crustal thickening. Cratonization of accretionary orogens occurs during continuing plate convergence and requires transient coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back-arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat-slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion overriding the downgoing plate. Accretionary orogens have been active throughout Earth history, extending back until at least 3.2 Ga, and potentially earlier, and provide an important constraint on the initiation of horizontal motion of lithospheric plates on Earth. They have been responsible for major growth of the continental lithosphere through the addition of juvenile magmatic products but are also major sites of consumption and reworking of continental crust through time, through sediment subduction and subduction erosion. It is probable that the rates of crustal growth and destruction are roughly equal, implying that net growth since the Archaean is effectively zero. ?? The Geological Society of London 2009.

  2. New insights into the history and origin of the southern Maya block, SE Mexico: U-Pb-SHRIMP zircon geochronology from metamorphic rocks of the Chiapas massif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, Bodo; Iriondo, Alexander; Premo, Wayne R.; Hecht, Lutz; Schaaf, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The histories of the pre-Mesozoic landmasses in southern México and their connections with Laurentia, Gondwana, and among themselves are crucial for the understanding of the Late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea. The Permian igneous and metamorphic rocks from the Chiapas massif as part of the southern Maya block, México, were dated by U–Pb zircon geochronology employing the SHRIMP (sensitive high resolution ion microprobe) facility at Stanford University. The Chiapas massif is composed of deformed granitoids and orthogneisses with inliers of metasedimentary rocks. SHRIMP data from an anatectic orthogneiss demonstrate that the Chiapas massif was part of a Permian (∼ 272 Ma) active continental margin established on the Pacific margin of Gondwana after the Ouachita orogeny. Latest Permian (252–254 Ma) medium- to high-grade metamorphism and deformation affected the entire Chiapas massif, resulting in anatexis and intrusion of syntectonic granitoids. This unique orogenic event is interpreted as the result of compression due to flat subduction and accretionary tectonics. SHRIMP data of zircon cores from a metapelite from the NE Chiapas massif yielded a single Grenvillian source for sediments. The majority of the zircon cores from a para-amphibolite from the SE part of the massif yielded either 1.0–1.2 or 1.4–1.5 Ga sources, indicating provenance from South American Sunsás and Rondonian-San Ignacio provinces.

  3. Petrogenesis of massif anorthosites: a perspective from St. Urbain, Quebec

    SciTech Connect

    Gromet, L.P.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The St. Urbain massif is a post-orogenic anorthosite pluton (approx. 500 km/sup 2/) emplaced within the central high-grade granulite terrain of the Grenville structural province. In contrast to other Grenville anorthosites, primary magmatic features are largely preserved. The massif consists predominantly of andesine anorthosite (AA) of remarkable purity containing abundant plagioclase megacrysts. AA has high K/sub 2/O (approx. 2 wgt.%), very high Sr contents (approx. 1200 ppm) and highly fractionated, low REE contents. Features of AA provide the following insights into anorthosite origins: (1) Crystallization from anorthositic magmas, as evidenced by early crystallization of abundant antiperthitic plag, and igneous emplacement of AA dikes and veins into older, unrelated labradorite anorthosite; (2) in situ crystallization of pyroxene after plag, with no direct evidence of earlier crystallization of mafic minerals from a basaltic parent magma; (3) limited differentiation during crystallization, indicated by small variation in plag and opx and limited variations in plag Sr and REE contents; (4) the involvement of water, suggested by the late igneous crystallization of biotite and the localized grain-boundary replacement of plag by calcic myrmekite (An/sub 80/ + qtz). (5) high temperature, relatively oxidizing conditions, indicated by magmatic hemoilmenite +/- rutile and rare ferropseudobrookite in AA and associated ores. AA crystallized from highly feldspathic, relatively oxidized, somewhat hydrous parent magma with little trapped melt. The development of a hyperfeldspathic parent magma with the requisite geochemical features can be ascribed to hydrous partial melting of mafic (to intermediate) rocks at deep crustal or greater depths, leaving a garnetiferous residue.

  4. Structural geology and sedimentology of the Sermat Quartzites, Strandja Massif, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazıcı, Müge; Natal'in, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    The Strandja Massif, NW Turkey, is the eastern continuation of the Rhodope Massif in Bulgaria. The massif is generally correlated with the Hercynian orogenic belt that was later modified by the Cimmerian orogeny. The basement of the massif is composed by various kinds of gneisses and schists, which are intruded by the metagranites. In the studied area, the Cambrian K-feldspar metagranites are unconformably overlain by metaclastics, where both units have fault contacts with volcano-sedimentary rocks. The metagranite intrusions yield Carboniferous U-Pb zircon ages (Natal'in et al., 2012a). All of them constitute the basement of the Strandja Massif. Cambrian age of metagranites and their subduction related nature as well as the subduction related nature of the Carboniferous igneous rocks suggest a prolong evolution of the Strandja Massif (Natal'in et al., 2012a). The Cambrian metagranites are unconformably overlain by a metasedimetary cover unit, which is known in the literature as the Şermat Quartzite of presumably Permo-Triassic age (Çağlayan and Yurtsever, 1998). In the studied region, detrital zircons extracted from quartzites show that their depositional age is not younger than the Ordovician (Natal'in et al., 2012a). The basement of the Strandja Massif is subjected to the epidote-amphibolite-greenschist facies of metamorphism and high strain deformation in the late Jurassic - early Cretaceous times. The Şermat Quartzite forms a transgressive sequence, which starts with metaconglomerates, metasandstones and grades up to quartz-sericite schists. The thickness of bedding changes from thin to medium with parallel bedding planes, containing lens-shaped bodies of massive quartzites. The late Jurassic - early Cretaceous foliation (S1) is generally parallel to the primary bedding plane. Foliations and lineations consistently dip to the northeast and kinematic indicators suggest a tectonic transport in the same direction. High strain in the Şermat Quartzite

  5. Coeval emplacement and orogen-parallel transport of gold in oblique convergent orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Phaedra; Craw, Dave

    2016-12-01

    Varying amounts of gold mineralisation is occurring in all young and active collisional mountain belts. Concurrently, these syn-orogenic hydrothermal deposits are being eroded and transported to form placer deposits. Local extension occurs in convergent orogens, especially oblique orogens, and facilitates emplacement of syn-orogenic gold-bearing deposits with or without associated magmatism. Numerical modelling has shown that extension results from directional variations in movement rates along the rock transport trajectory during convergence, and is most pronounced for highly oblique convergence with strong crustal rheology. On-going uplift during orogenesis exposes gold deposits to erosion, transport, and localised placer concentration. Drainage patterns in variably oblique convergent orogenic belts typically have an orogen-parallel or sub-parallel component; the details of which varies with convergence obliquity and the vagaries of underlying geological controls. This leads to lateral transport of eroded syn-orogenic gold on a range of scales, up to > 100 km. The presence of inherited crustal blocks with contrasting rheology in oblique orogenic collision zones can cause perturbations in drainage patterns, but numerical modelling suggests that orogen-parallel drainage is still a persistent and robust feature. The presence of an inherited block of weak crust enhances the orogen-parallel drainage by imposition of localised subsidence zones elongated along a plate boundary. Evolution and reorientation of orogen-parallel drainage can sever links between gold placer deposits and their syn-orogenic sources. Many of these modelled features of syn-orogenic gold emplacement and varying amounts of orogen-parallel detrital gold transport can be recognised in the Miocene to Recent New Zealand oblique convergent orogen. These processes contribute little gold to major placer goldfields, which require more long-term recycling and placer gold concentration. Most eroded syn-orogenic

  6. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of post-collisional ultrapotassic syenites and granites from southernmost Brazil: the Piquiri Syenite Massif.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Lauro V S; Plá-Cid, Jorge; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Stabel, Larissa Z

    2008-06-01

    The Piquiri Syenite Massif, southernmost Brazil, is part of the post-collisional magmatism related to the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogenic Cycle. The massif is about 12 km in diameter and is composed of syenites, granites, monzonitic rocks and lamprophyres. Diopside-phlogopite, diopside-biotite-augite-calcic-amphibole, are the main ferro-magnesian paragenesis in the syenitic rocks. Syenitic and granitic rocks are co-magmatic and related to an ultrapotassic, silica-saturated magmatism. Their trace element patterns indicate a probable mantle source modified by previous, subduction-related metasomatism. The ultrapotassic granites of this massif were produced by fractional crystallization of syenitic magmas, and may be considered as a particular group of hypersolvus and subsolvus A-type granites. Based upon textural, structural and geochemical data most of the syenitic rocks, particularly the fine-grained types, are considered as crystallized liquids, in spite of the abundance of cumulatic layers, schlieren, and compositional banding. Most of the studied samples are metaluminous, with K2O/Na2O ratios higher than 2. The ultrapotassic syenitic and lamprophyric rocks in the Piquiri massif are interpreted to have been produced from enriched mantle sources, OIB-type, like most of the post-collisional shoshonitic, sodic alkaline and high-K tholeiitic magmatism in southernmost Brazil. The source of the ultrapotassic and lamprophyric magmas is probably the same veined mantle, with abundant phlogopite + apatite + amphibole that reflects a previous subduction-related metasomatism.

  7. Tectonic and geochronology of the Rehamna massif (Morocco) in the frame of the Alleghanian-Variscan orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Francis; Corsini, Michel; Schulmann, Karel; El Houicha, Mohammed; Edel, Jean-Bernard; Ghienne, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    The Rehamna massif is situqted in the Morocco variscan belt, where there is a strong lack of modern geochonological datas. Furthermore, the timing and mode of formation of this massif remains highly debated. In a form of a metamorphic by weakly metamorphosed supracrustal units, its core presents amphibolite facies rocks pervasively deformed. In this study, are presented the structural pattern of the dome and the timing of its growth, in conjunction with syn- to late- variscan magmatism. According to this structural and 40Ar/39Ar geochronological study, a new tectonic model is proposed for this part of the orogen. It is then replaced at the orogenic scale. The first tectonometamorphic record is a SW-SSW vergent nappe stacking. In the core of the dome, it is expressed by top-to-the-south intense shearing in subhorizontal fabrics associated with prograde barrowian metamorphism, where it can reach the Std stability field within early Cambrian to Devono-Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks (Central and Eastern Rehamna), forming the orogenic infrastructure. Upon it, this SSW directed shortening is also well visible, developing an ~ E-W trending overturned anticline made of Lower Palaeozoic supracrustal sediments. This event, older than 295 Ma, is then associated with syn-convergent buckling and exhumation of the formerly orogenic infrastructure, whereas superstructure is detached from it. Then, an WNW-ESE shortening is responsible for an heterogeneous deformation orthogonal to the previous one. In the Central Rehamna, this superposition is marked by the development of a circular subdome, the folding of isogrades and development of subvertical clivage for which the intensity increases in front of the westward rigid Cambrian coastal block. More easterly, in the deeper part of the Eastern Rehamna, the Devono-Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks experienced heterogeneous reworking marked by localized NNE-SSW subvertical to moderaly dipping clivage. Associated metamorphic

  8. Subcontinental rift initiation and ocean-continent transitional setting of the Dinarides and Vardar zone: Evidence from the Krivaja-Konjuh Massif, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, Ulrich H.; Garapić, Gordana; Lugović, Boško

    2014-08-01

    The Dinaride and Vardar zone ophiolite belts extend from the south-eastern margins of the Alps to the Albanian and Greek ophiolites. Detailed sampling of the Krivaja-Konjuh massif, one of the largest massifs in the Dinaride belt, reveals fertile compositions and an extensive record of deformation at spinel peridotite facies conditions. High Na2O clinopyroxene and spinel-orthopyroxene symplectites after garnet indicate a relatively high pressure, subcontinental origin of the southern and western part of Krivaja, similar to orogenic massifs such as Lherz, Ronda and the Eastern Central Alpine peridotites. Clinopyroxene and spinel compositions from Konjuh show similarities with fertile abyssal peridotite. In the central parts of the massif the spinel lherzolites contain locally abundant patches of plagioclase, indicating impregnation by melt. The migrating melt was orthopyroxene undersaturated, locally converting the peridotites to massive olivine-rich troctolites. Massive gabbros and more evolved gabbro veins cross-cutting peridotites indicate continued melt production at depth. Overall we infer that the massif represents the onset of rifting and early stages of formation of a new ocean basin. In the south of Krivaja very localized chromitite occurrences indicate that much more depleted melts with supra-subduction affinity traversed the massif that have no genetic relationship with the peridotites. This indicates that volcanics with supra-subduction affinity at the margins of the Krivaja-Konjuh massif record separate processes during closure of the ocean basin. Comparison with published compositional data from other Balkan massifs shows that the range of compositions within the Krivaja-Konjuh massif is similar to the compositional range of the western massifs of the Dinarides. The compositions of the Balkan massifs show a west to east gradient, ranging from subcontinental on the western side of the Dinarides to depleted mid-ocean ridge/arc compositions in the Vardar

  9. Topography of the Variscan orogen in Europe: failed-not collapsed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    The Variscan orogenic collage consists of three subduction-collision systems (Rheno-Hercynian, Saxo-Thuringian and Massif Central-Moldanubian). Devonian to early Carboniferous marine strata are widespread not only in the individual foreland fold and thrust belts, but also in post-tectonic basins within these foreland belts and on the Cadomian crust of peri-Gondwanan microcontinental fragments, which represent the upper plates of the subduction/collision zones. These marine basins preclude high elevations in the respective areas and also in their neighbourhood. Widespread late Carboniferous intra-montane basins with their coal-bearing sequences are likewise incompatible with high and dry plateaus. While narrow belts with high elevations remain possible along active margins within the orogen, comparison of the Variscides with the Himalaya/Tibetan plateau is unfounded. Plausible reasons for the scarcity of high Variscan relief include subduction of oceanic and even continental crust, subduction erosion, orogen-parallel extension and—most important—lithospheric thinning accompanied by high heat flow and magmatism. In many areas, timing and areal array of magmatism and HT metamorphism are not compatible with a model of tectonic thickening and subsequent gravitational collapse. It is suggested, instead, that lithospheric thinning and heating are due to mantle activities caused by the Tethys rift. The lower and middle crust were thermally softened and rendered unfit for stacking and isostatic uplift: in terms of topography, the Variscides represent a failed orogen. The HT regime also explains the abundance of granitoids and HT/LP metamorphic rocks typical of the Variscides. Melting in the HT regime extracted mafic components from Variscan and Cadomian crust as well as from Cadomian metasomatized lithospheric mantle, thus mimicking subduction-related magmatism. The onset of the HT regime at c. 340 Ma may also have triggered the final ascent of HP/UHP felsic metamorphic

  10. Pyroxenites - Melting or Migration?: Evidence from the Balmuccia massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo; O'Neill, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    The recognition of pyroxenites in the mantle, combined with their lower solidus temperatures than peridotite, have been proposed as contributors to melting (Pertermann and Hirschmann, 2003; Sobolev et al, 2005; 2007). Geochemical fingerprints of this process invoke an unspecified 'pyroxenite' as the putative source. In reality, mantle pyroxenites are diverse (Downes, 2007), requiring that their mode of origin and compositional variability be addressed. Due to the excellent preservation and exposure of the Balmuccia massif, it has become an archetype for orogenic peridotites, providing information on their composition, field relationships and metamorphic history (Shervais and Mukasa, 1991; Hartmann and Wedepohl, 1993; Rivalenti et al., 1995; Mazzucchelli et al., 2009). The Balmuccia massif consists of fertile lherzolite with subordinate harzburgite and dunite and is riddled with pyroxenite bands, which fall into two suites - Chrome-Diopside (Cr-Di) and Aluminous-Augite (Al-Aug), a pairing present in most massif peridotites. Two-pyroxene thermometry gives temperatures of 850±25°C at 1-1.5 GPa, 500°C lower than asthenospheric mantle at that pressure, meaning they do not preserve their original, high temperature mineralogy. Decimetre-sized Cr-Di bands (≡75% CPX, 25% OPX) occur as initially Ol-free and bound by refractory dunite, but, as the bands are rotated into the plane of foliation, they mechanically incorporate olivine. Al-Aug veins (60% CPX, 25% OPX, 15% Sp) discordantly cut the body, intruding lherzolites which show enrichments in Fe, Al and Ti adjacent to the dykes. Both the Cr-Di suite and the Al-Aug series have indistinguishable Sr-, Nd-isotopic compositions to the host peridotite (Mukasa and Shervais, 1999). The major element compositions of pyroxenes in the Cr-Di bands and those in the surrounding peridotites are identical. Together with isotopic evidence, this suggests a local source, not only chemically but spatially, where a very low degree melt (

  11. Alpine thermal events in the central Serbo-Macedonian Massif (southeastern Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antić, Milorad D.; Kounov, Alexandre; Trivić, Branislav; Wetzel, Andreas; Peytcheva, Irena; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2016-07-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM) represents a crystalline belt situated between the two diverging branches of the Eastern Mediterranean Alpine orogenic system, the northeast-vergent Carpatho-Balkanides and the southwest-vergent Dinarides and the Hellenides. We have applied fission-track analysis on apatites and zircons, coupled with structural field observations in order to reveal the low-temperature evolution of the SMM. Additionally, the age and geochemistry of the Palaeogene igneous rocks (i.e. Surdulica granodiorite and dacitic volcanic rocks) were determined by the LA-ICPMS U-Pb geochronology of zircons and geochemical analysis of main and trace elements in whole-rock samples. Three major cooling stages have been distinguished from the late Early Cretaceous to the Oligocene. The first stage represents rapid cooling through the partial annealing zones of zircon and apatite (300-60 °C) during the late Early to early Late Cretaceous (ca. 110-ca. 90 Ma). It is related to a post-orogenic extension following the regional nappe-stacking event in the Early Cretaceous. Middle to late Eocene (ca. 48-ca. 39 Ma) cooling is related to the formation of the Crnook-Osogovo-Lisets extensional dome and its exhumation along low-angle normal faults. The third event is related to regional cooling following the late Eocene magmatic pulse. During this pulse, the areas surrounding the Surdulica granodiorite (36 ± 1 Ma) and the slightly younger volcanic bodies (ca. 35 Ma) have reached temperatures higher than the apatite closure temperature (120 °C) but lower than ca. 250 °C. The geochemistry of the igneous samples reveals late- to post-orogenic tectonic setting during magma generation.

  12. Evolution of the Late Mesoproterozoic Cordilleran-Type (not COLLISIONAL!) Sveconorwegian (grenville) Orogen in SW Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagstad, T.; Sauer, S.; Roberts, N. M.; Marker, M. K.; Røhr, T. S.; Schiellerup, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Late Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian orogen in SW Baltica is traditionally interpreted as the eastward continuation of the Grenville orogen in Canada, resulting from collision with Amazonia and forming a central part in the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. We challenge this conventional view based on results from recent work in SW Norway that demonstrate voluminous subduction-related magmatism from ca. 1070 to 990 Ma, encompassing the period when collision is purported to have taken place. The rocks form a >100 km long and 50 km wide belt referred to as the Sirdal Magmatic Belt, intruding ca. 1500 Ma crust. Coeval granitoid magmatism up to 200 km to the east into the orogen has transitional calc-alkaline/A-type to A-type compositions, which we interpret to reflect continental back-arc magmatism. High-grade metamorphism in the region started at 1035 Ma with a peak at 1000 Ma, indicating that metamorphism may have resulted from plutonic activity, but not the other way around as would be expected in a collision setting. Following Sveconorwegian orogenesis, widespread A-type granite magmatism between 970 and 930 Ma (Hornblende-Biotite Granite Suite), and anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite magmatism (Rogaland Igneous Complex) between 930 and 915 Ma, is recorded in the Sveconorwegian Province. We interpret this evolution to suggest that the cessation of subduction-related magmatism at ca. 990 Ma did not involve continent-continent collision, but instead reflects a period of horizontal subduction between 990 and 930 Ma (or ca. 950 Ma), during which hydration of the overlying lower continental crust induced widespread crustal melting and A-type magmatism. Subsequent foundering of this underthrust oceanic crust and delamination of the arc's mantle root between 950 and 930 Ma may have given rise to the Rogaland Igneous Complex, the youngest massif-type anorthosite complex in the Grenville-Sveconorwegian orogen. Isotope data on the Sirdal Magmatic Belt indicate a

  13. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David M.; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates. What supplies this mass flux and feeds this "tectonic aneurysm?" We show, using a simple 3-D model of oblique orogen convergence, that velocity/strain partitioning results in horizontal orogen-parallel (OP) crustal transport, and the same behavior is inferred for the Himalaya, with OP transport diverting converging crust toward the syntaxis. Model results also show that the OP flow rate decreases in the syntaxis, thereby thickening the crust and forming a structure like the NPHM. The additional crustal thickening, over and above that elsewhere in the Himalayan arc, sustains the rapid exhumation of this "aneurysm." Normally, velocity/strain partitioning would be minimal for the Himalayan arc where the convergence obliquity is no greater than ~40°. However, we show analytically that the Himalayan system can act both as a critical wedge and exhibit strain partitioning if both the detachment beneath the wedge and the bounding rear shear zone, which accommodates OP transport, are very weak. Corresponding numerical results confirm this requirement and demonstrate that a Nanga Parbat-type shortening structure can develop spontaneously if the orogenic wedge and bounding rear shear zone can strain rate soften while active. These results lead us to question whether the position of NPHM aneurysm is localized by river incision, as previously suggested, or by a priori focused tectonic shortening of the crust in the syntaxis region as demonstrated by our models.

  14. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  15. Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor massif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kravchenko, S.M.; Czamanske, G.; Fedorenko, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbonatites compose sheet bodies in a 300-m sequence of volcanic lamproites, as well as separate large bodies at depths of >250-300 m. An analysis of new high-precision data on concentrations of major, rare, and rare earth elements in carbonatites shows that these rocks were formed during crystallization differentiation of a carbonatite magma, which resulted in enrichment of the later melt fractions in rare elements and was followed by autometasomatic and allometasomatic hydrothermal processes. Some independent data indicate that the main factor of ore accumulation in the weathered rock zone (also known as the "lower ore horizon" comprising metasomatized volcanics with interbedded carbonatites) was hydrothermal addition of Nb and REEs. The giant size of the Tomtor carbonatite-nepheline syenite massif caused advanced magma differentiation, extensive postmagmatic metasomatism and recrystallization of host rocks, and strong enrichment of carbonatites in incompatible rare and rare earth elements (except for Ta, Zr, Ti, K, and Rb) compared to the rocks of many other carbonatite massifs. We suggest that a wide range of iron contents in carbonatites-2 can be related to extensive magnetite fractionation at the magmatic stage in different parts of the huge massif. Copyright ?? 2003 by MAIK "Nauka/Interperiodica" (Russia).

  16. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K. A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Kusky, T. M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R. J.; Viola, G.

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world´s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution of

  17. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution☆

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K.A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A.S.; Fowler, A.R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Johnson, P.R.; Kusky, T.M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R.J.; Viola, G.

    2013-01-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara–Congo–Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian–Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650–620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo–Tanzania–Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe–Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600–500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600–550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian–Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite–Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550–480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings

  18. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H; Abdelsalam, M; Ali, K A; Bingen, B; Collins, A S; Fowler, A R; Ghebreab, W; Hauzenberger, C A; Johnson, P R; Kusky, T M; Macey, P; Muhongo, S; Stern, R J; Viola, G

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world́s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution

  19. The anatomy of a deep intracontinental orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Tom; Collins, Alan S.; Hand, Martin; Walker-Hallam, Althea; Smithies, R. Hugh; Evins, Paul M.; Howard, Heather M.

    2010-08-01

    The crustal architecture of central Australia has been profoundly affected by protracted periods of intracontinental deformation. In the northwestern Musgrave Block, the Ediacaran-Cambrian (600-530 Ma) Petermann Orogeny resulted in pervasive mylonitic reworking of Mesoproterozoic granites and granitic gneisses at deep crustal levels (P = 10-14 kbar and T = 700-800°C). SHRIMP and LA-ICPMS dating of zircon indicate that peak metamorphic conditions were attained at circa 570 Ma, followed by slow cooling to ˜600-660°C at circa 540 Ma driven by exhumation along the Woodroffe Thrust. Strong links between regional kinematic partitioning, pervasive high shear strains and partial melting in the orogenic core, and an anomalous lobate thrust trace geometry suggest that north vergent shortening was accompanied by the gravitational collapse and lateral escape of a broad thrust sheet. Like the present-day Himalayan-Tibetan system, the macroscopic structural, metamorphic, and kinematic architecture of the Petermann Orogen appears to be dominantly shaped by large-scale ductile flow of lower crustal material. We thus argue that the anatomy of this deep intracontinental orogen is comparable to collisional orogens, suggesting that the deformational response of continental crust is remarkably similar in different tectonic settings.

  20. Thrust-related, diapiric, and extensional doming in a frontal orogenic wedge: example of the Montagne Noire, Southern French Hercynian Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soula, Jean-Claude; Debat, Pierre; Brusset, Stéphane; Bessière, Gilbert; Christophoul, Frédéric; Déramond, Joachim

    2001-11-01

    The Montagne Noire, which is situated at the toe of the orogenic wedge of the French Massif Central South European Variscides, appears to be a well-suited area for studying the origin and evolution of middle to upper crustal domes adjacent to foreland basins. The data reported in the present paper show that the Montagne Noire dome is a particular type of basement-involved frontal culmination in an orogenic wedge and foreland basin system. This frontal culmination is characterized by a syn-contractional HT decompression recorded by clockwise PTt paths and widespread strata overturning in thrust and fold structures, which controlled the sedimentation in the adjacent foreland basin. These unusual characteristics are interpreted to be a result of the succession of thrusting, diapirism and extensional collapse. Antiformal stacking of syn-metamorphic thrust sheets controlled the first stages of the foreland basin development. Diapirism was essentially responsible for the HT decompression and widespread strata overturning. Extensional doming was a result of late- to post-metamorphic collapse acting on the pre-existing high-amplitude dome. Diapirism and associated isothermal decompression metamorphism, which constitute the essential difference between the Montagne Noire and 'ordinary' frontal ridges in orogenic wedges, were probably enhanced by a local partial melting of the upper to middle crust. It is suggested that the occurrence of these phenomena in front of an orogenic wedge was related to local over-thickening due to the superposition of an upper crustal antiformal stack on top of a lower crustal ramp anticline.

  1. The early Cretaceous orogen-scale Dabieshan metamorphic core complex: implications for extensional collapse of the Triassic HP-UHP orogenic belt in east-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Shi, Yonghong; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-03-01

    The Dabieshan massif is famous as a portion of the world's largest HP-UHP metamorphic belt in east-central China that was built by the Triassic North-South China collision. The central domain of the Dabieshan massif is occupied by a huge migmatite-cored dome [i.e., the central Dabieshan dome (CDD)]. Origin of this domal structure remains controversial. Synthesizing previous and our new structural and geochronological data, we define the Cretaceous Dabieshan as an orogen-scale metamorphic core complex (MCC) with a multistage history. Onset of lithospheric extension in the Dabieshan area occurred as early as the commencement of crustal anatexis at the earliest Cretaceous (ca. 145 Ma), which was followed by primary (early-stage) detachment during 142-130 Ma. The central Dabieshan complex in the footwall and surrounding detachment faults recorded a consistently top-to-the-NW shearing. It is thus inferred that the primary detachment was initiated from a flat-lying detachment zone at the middle crust level. Removal of the orogenic root by delamination at ca. 130 Ma came into the extensional climax, and subsequently isostatic rebound resulted in rapid doming. Along with exhumation of the footwall, the mid-crustal detachment zone had been warped as shear zones around the CDD. After 120 Ma, the detachment system probably experienced a migration accommodated to the crustal adjustment, which led to secondary (late-stage) detachment with localized ductile shearing at ca. 110 Ma. The migmatite-gneiss with HP/UHP relicts in the CDD (i.e., the central Dabieshan complex) was product of the Cretaceous crustal anatexis that consumed the deep-seated part of the HP-UHP slices and the underlying para-autochthonous basement. Compared with the contemporaneous MCCs widely developed along the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent, we proposed that occurrence of the Dabieshan MCC shares the same tectonic setting as the "destruction of the North China craton". However, geodynamic trigger

  2. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1999-01-01

    This termination report covers the latter part of a single research effort spanning several grant cycles. During this time there was a single title, "Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites", but there were several contract numbers as the mode and location of NASA contract administration changed. Initially, the project was funded as an increment to the PI's other grant, "Early Differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and Modeling Studies", but subsequently it became an independent grant. Table 1 contains a brief summary of the dates and contract numbers.

  3. GEOPHYSICS. Layered deformation in the Taiwan orogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, T-Y; Gung, Y; Kuo, B-Y; Chiao, L-Y; Chen, Y-N

    2015-08-14

    The underthrusting of continental crust during mountain building is an issue of debate for orogens at convergent continental margins. We report three-dimensional seismic anisotropic tomography of Taiwan that shows a nearly 90° rotation of anisotropic fabrics across a 10- to 20-kilometer depth, consistent with the presence of two layers of deformation. The upper crust is dominated by collision-related compressional deformation, whereas the lower crust of Taiwan, mostly the crust of the subducted Eurasian plate, is dominated by convergence-parallel shear deformation. We interpret this lower crustal shearing as driven by the continuous sinking of the Eurasian mantle lithosphere when the surface of the subducted plate is coupled with the orogen. The two-layer deformation clearly defines the role of subduction in the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt.

  4. Compressional intracontinental orogens: Ancient and modern perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Tom; Hand, Martin; Collins, William J.

    2014-03-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens are major zones of crustal thickening produced at large distances from active plate boundaries. Consequently, any account of their initiation and subsequent evolution must be framed outside conventional plate tectonics theory, which can only explain the proximal effects of convergent plate-margin interactions. This review considers a range of hypotheses regarding the origins and transmission of compressive stresses in intraplate settings. Both plate-boundary and intraplate stress sources are investigated as potential driving forces, and their relationship to rheological models of the lithosphere is addressed. The controls on strain localisation are then evaluated, focusing on the response of the lithosphere to the weakening effects of structural, thermal and fluid processes. With reference to the characteristic features of intracontinental orogens in central Asia (the Tien Shan) and central Australia (the Petermann and Alice Springs Orogens), it is argued that their formation is largely driven by in-plane stresses generated at plate boundaries, with the lithosphere acting as an effective stress guide. This implies a strong lithospheric mantle rheology, in order to account for far-field stress propagation through the discontinuous upper crust and to enable the support of thick uplifted crustal wedges. Alternative models of intraplate stress generation, primarily involving mantle downwelling, are rejected on the grounds that their predicted temporal and spatial scales for orogenesis are inconsistent with the observed records of deformation. Finally, inherited mechanical weaknesses, thick sedimentary blanketing over a strongly heat-producing crust, and pervasive reaction softening of deep fault networks are identified as important and interrelated controls on the ability of the lithosphere to accommodate rather than transmit stress. These effects ultimately produce orogenic zones with architectural features and evolutionary

  5. Cenozoic denudation of the Menderes Massif and its geodynamic framework: slab tear or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Klaus; Gallardo, Luis; Markwitz, Vanessa; Ring, Uwe; Thomson, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Despite having experienced similar rates of convergence during the Alpine Orogeny, the Hellenides and Anatolides display fundamental differences in crust and mantle structure across a region that broadly coincides with the Aegean coastline of the Anatolian peninsula. The Menderes Massif experienced early Miocene tectonic denudation and surface uplift in the footwall of a north-directed extensional detachment system, followed by late Miocene to recent fragmentation by E-W and NW-SE trending graben systems, resulting in one of Earth's largest metamorphic core complexes. Based on the interpretation of geological and geophysical data we propose that the tectonic denudation of the Menderes Massif was caused by late Oligocene/early Miocene lithosphere scale transtension along the boundary of the Adriatic and Anatolian lithospheric domains, when rollback of the Aegean slab affected the Aegean-Menderes section of the Tethyan Orogen. In addition to previously hypothesized crustal discontinuities, gravity data, earthquake locations and seismic velocity anomalies highlight a north-south oriented boundary in the upper mantle between a fast slab below the Aegean and a slow asthenospheric region below western Turkey. As an alternative to the common interpretation of this discontinuity representing the western edge of a slab tear, we propose that the change in lithospheric structure is the result of how different lithosphere domains responded to roll-back: relatively slow removal of lithospheric mantle below western Anatolia versus trench retreat in the rapidly extending Aegean Sea region. Our findings highlight the significance of lateral variations in subduction-collision systems for the formation of continental plateaux and metamorphic core complexes.

  6. Fluid flow and polymetallic sulfide mineralization in the Kettara shear zone (Jebilet Massif, Variscan Belt, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'diaye, I.; Essaifi, A.; Dubois, M.; Lacroix, B.; Goodenough, K. M.; Maacha, L.

    2016-07-01

    The Kettara shear zone is a regional wrench shear zone within the Jebilet massif of Western Morocco, part of the Variscan orogenic belt. This massif is characterized by bimodal magmatism, largely intrusive, and by a number of polymetallic massive sulfide deposits. A syntectonic mafic-ultramafic intrusion and an adjacent, deformed pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide deposit are located within a 'compressional jog' of the shear zone. Hydrothermal alteration in both the intrusion and the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit is characterized by syntectonic replacement processes leading to formation of chlorite-schists and quartz ± calcite veins. Fluid inclusions in mineralized (pyrrhotite-bearing) quartz veins from the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit and in veins associated with chlorite-schists within the intrusion indicate a prevalence of H2O-CO2-CH4-N2 and H2O-salt fluid systems. In the mineralized veins the fluid shows reducing conditions, with gas dominated by CH4 and N2 and salinities around 7.5 wt% NaCl, whereas in the chlorite shear zones fluid is CO2 dominated and salinities are higher than 23 wt% NaCl. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of chlorite and quartz are similar and demonstrate involvement of metamorphic water in both the deposit and the intrusion. The data are consistent with a regional metamorphic fluid flow through the Kettara shear zone. The migrating metamorphic fluids were reduced in the organic matter-rich host rocks leading to deposition of sulfides in the mineralized veins. There are two possible hypotheses for the origin of these mineralized veins: either they were formed during deformation and remobilization of a syn-sedimentary massive sulfide deposit, or they were formed synchronously with the sulfide deposit during development of the Kettara shear zone.

  7. Flow of ultra-hot Precambrian orogens and the making of crustal layering in Phanerozoic orogenic plateaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Dominique; Gapais, Denis; Cagnard, Florence; Jayananda, Mudlappa; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Reassessment of structural / metamorphic properties of ultra-hot Precambrian orogens and shortening of model weak lithospheres support a syn-convergence flow mode on an orogen scale, with a large component of horizontal finite elongation parallel to the orogen. This orogen-scale flow mode combines distributed shortening, gravity-driven flow, lateral escape, and three-dimensional mass redistribution of buried supracrustal rocks, magmas and migmatites in a thick fluid lower crust. This combination preserves a nearly flat surface and Moho. The upper crust maintains a nearly constant thickness by real-time erosion and near-field clastic sedimentation and by ablation at its base by burial of pop-downs into the lower crust. Steady state regime of these orogens is allowed by activation of an attachment layer that maintains kinematic compatibility between the thin and dominantly plastic upper crust and a thick "water bed" of lower crust. Because very thin lithospheres of orogenic plateaux and Precambrian hot orogens have similar thermomechanical structures, bulk orogenic flow comparable to that governing Precambrian hot orogens should actually operate through today's orogenic plateaux as well. Thus, syn-convergence flow fabrics documented on exposed crustal sections of ancient hot orogens that have not undergone collapse may be used to infer the nature of flow fabrics that are imaged by geophysical techniques beneath orogenic plateaux. We provide a detailed geological perspective on syn-convergence crustal flow in relation to magma emplacement and partial melting on a wide oblique crustal transition of the Neoarchean ultra-hot orogen of Southern India. We document sub-horizontal bulk longitudinal flow of the partially molten lower crust over a protracted period of 60 Ma. Bulk flow results from the interplay of (1) pervasive longitudinal transtensional flow of the partially molten crust, (2) longitudinal coaxial flow on flat fabrics in early plutons, (3) distributed, orogen

  8. Metamorphic complexes in accretionary orogens: Insights from the Beishan collage, southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongfang; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Han, Chunming; Yang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The sources of ancient zircons and the tectonic attributions and origins of metamorphic complexes in Phanerozoic accretionary orogens have long been difficult issues. Situated between the Tianshan and Inner Mongolia orogens, the Beishan orogenic collage (BOC) plays a pivotal role in understanding the accretionary processes of the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), particularly the extensive metamorphic and high-strained complexes on the southern margin. Despite their importance in understanding the basic architecture of the southern CAOB, little consensus has been reached on their ages and origins. Our new structural, LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data from the Baidunzi, Shibandun, Qiaowan and Wutongjing metamorphic complexes resolve current controversial relations. The metamorphic complexes have varied lithologies and structures. Detrital zircons from five para-metamorphic rocks yield predominantly Phanerozoic ages with single major peaks at ca. 276 Ma, 286 Ma, 427 Ma, 428 Ma and 461 Ma. Two orthogneisses have weighted mean ages of 294 ± 2 Ma and 304 ± 2 Ma with no Precambrian inherited zircons. Most Phanerozoic zircons show positive εHf(t) values indicating significant crustal growth in the Ordovician, Silurian and Permian. The imbricated fold-thrust deformation style combined with diagnostic zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data demonstrate that the metamorphic rocks developed in a subduction-accretion setting on an arc or active continental margin. This setting and conclusion are supported by the nearby occurrence of Ordovician-Silurian adakites, Nb-rich basalts, Carboniferous-Permian ophiolitic mélanges, and trench-type turbidites. Current data do not support the presence of a widespread Precambrian basement in the evolution of the BOC; the accretionary processes may have continued to the early Permian in this part of the CAOB. These relationships have meaningful implications for the interpretation of the tectonic attributions and origins of other

  9. Lawsonite Blueschists in Recycled Mélange Involved in K-Rich Orogenic Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Prelevic, D.; Foley, S. F.; Buhre, S.; Galer, S. J. G.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of K-rich orogenic magmatism in the Alpine-Himalayan belt and its relationship to the large-scale elevations in several massifs of the orogen is controversial, particularly the significance of the widespread presence of a geochemical signal typical for recycled continental crust. Two competing scenarios invoke direct melting of continental crust during deep intercontinental subduction and removal of heavily metasomatised mantle lithosphere by delamination into the convecting mantle. Here we investigate the coupling of high Th/La ratio with crustal isotopic signatures in K-rich orogenic lavas that does not occur in volcanic rocks from other collisional environments to distinguish between these two models. High-pressure experimental results on a phyllite representing upper crustal composition and a detailed mineral and geochemical study of blueschists from Tavşanlı mélange, Turkey, indicate that this geochemical fingerprint originates by melting of subducted mélange. Melting of crust at the top of the subducted continental lithosphere cannot produce observed fingerprint, whereas lawsonites, especially those with terrigenous sediment origin from blueschists with high Th/La can. Lawsonites that grow in various components of a subduction mélange inherit the geochemical characteristics of either oceanic or continental protoliths. It is currently uncertain whether those carrying the high Th/La signature originate by direct melting of continental blocks in the mélange or by the introduction of supercritical fluids from lawsonite blueschist of continental origin that infiltrate oceanic sediment blocks. Either way, the high Th/La is later released into subsequently formed melts. This confirms the supposition that lawsonite is the main progenitor of the high Th/La and Sm/La ratio. However, lawsonite must break down completely to impart this unique feature to subsequent magmas. The source regions of the potassic volcanic rocks consist of blueschist facies m

  10. Sand fairway mapping as a tool for tectonic restoration in orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    geomorphology. The stratigraphic records are preserved in many parts of the Alpine-Mediterranean region. Examples are drawn from the Eo-Oligocene of the western Alps and the early Miocene of the Maghreb-Apennine system to illustrate how turbidite sedimentology, linked to studies of basin structure, can inform understanding of tectonic processes on regional and local scales. In both examples, sediment was delivered across deforming basin arrays containing contractional structures, sourced from beyond the immediate orogenic segments. The depositional systems show that multiple structures were active in parallel, rather than develop in any particular sequence. Both systems show that significant deformation occurs, emerging to the syn-orogenic surface ahead of the main orogenic wedge. The cycling of uplift and subsidence of "massifs" can be significantly more complex that the histories resolved from thermochronological data alone.

  11. Spatial thermal radiometry contribution to the Massif armoricain and the Massif central (France) litho-structural study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanvic, J. Y. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Although the limited number of images received did not permit construction of a thermal inertia map, important geological details were obtained in the areas of lithology and tectonics. Interpretation of day, night, and seasonal imagery resulted in differentiating broad calcareous and dolomitic units in the Causse Plateau. In the Massif amoricain, some granite massifs were delineated which were not observed by LANDSAT. Neotectonic faults were also revealed.

  12. Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic, and Mesozoic granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen, China: Constraints on orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Chengli

    2013-08-01

    The Qinling Orogen is one of the main orogenic belts in Asia and is characterized by multi-stage orogenic processes and the development of voluminous magmatic intrusions. The results of zircon U-Pb dating indicate that granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen mainly occurred in four distinct periods: the Neoproterozoic (979-711 Ma), Paleozoic (507-400 Ma), and Early (252-185 Ma) and Late (158-100 Ma) Mesozoic. The Neoproterozoic granitic magmatism in the Qinling Orogen is represented by strongly deformed S-type granites emplaced at 979-911 Ma, weakly deformed I-type granites at 894-815 Ma, and A-type granites at 759-711 Ma. They can be interpreted as the products of respectively syn-collisional, post-collisional and extensional setting, in response to the assembly and breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. The Paleozoic magmatism can be temporally classified into three stages of 507-470 Ma, 460-422 Ma and ˜415-400 Ma. They were genetically related to the subduction of the Shangdan Ocean and subsequent collision of the southern North China Block and the South Qinling Belt. The 507-470 Ma magmatism is spatially and temporally related to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in the studied area. The 460-422 Ma magmatism with an extensive development in the North Qinling Belt is characterized by I-type granitoids and originated from the lower crust with the involvement of mantle-derived magma in a collisional setting. The magmatism with the formation age of ˜415-400 Ma only occurred in the middle part of the North Qinling Belt and is dominated by I-type granitoid intrusions, and probably formed in the late-stage of a collisional setting. Early Mesozoic magmatism in the study area occurred between 252 and 185 Ma, with the cluster in 225-200 Ma. It took place predominantly in the western part of the South Qinling Belt. The 250-240 Ma I-type granitoids are of small volume and show high Sr/Y ratios, and may have been formed in a continental arc setting related to subduction

  13. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  14. Orogenic float of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monod, Bernard; Dhont, Damien; Hervouët, Yves

    2010-07-01

    The Venezuelan (or Mérida) Andes are a NE-trending intracontinental orogen that started to rise from the Middle Miocene due to the E-W far field convergence between the Maracaibo block to the northwest and the Guyana shield to the southeast. Oblique convergence is responsible for strain partitioning with thrusting along both foreland basins and right-lateral strike-slip faulting along the NE-SW Boconó fault cutting the Venezuelan Andes along-strike. The central part of the belt is also cut by the N-S left-lateral strike-slip Valera fault that connects the Boconó fault, both faults bounding the Trujillo block that escapes towards the NNE. Even though the regional geology of belt is well known, its structure at depth remains a matter of debate. Our work, based on the integration of geological and geophysical data aims to better constrain the deep geometry of faults and the tectonic evolution of the mountain belt. We used the orogenic float model to construct two NW-SE trans-Andean crustal scale balanced sections. The Late Neogene-Quaternary shortening varies from 40 km in the south to 30 km in the north across the Trujillo block, indicating that a quarter of the deformation seems to be absorbed by the tectonic escape process. More importantly, a major reorganization in the crust took place in the Early Pliocene. It is characterized by the imbrication of the Maracaibo crust into the Guyana crust. This resulted in the subduction of the Guyana lower crust and the formation of a NW-vergent basement thrust propagating upwards and surfacing along the Las Virtudes thrust. Rapid uplift of the northern flank of the belt subsequently occurred together with massive deposition of the Plio-Quaternary coarse grained Betijoque formation in the northwestern foreland basin.

  15. Ordovician chitinozoan biozonation of the Brabant Massif, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, J; Verniers, J

    2000-12-01

    Chitinozoans from seven Ordovician units (Abbaye de Villers, Tribotte, Rigenée, Ittre, Bornival, and Brutia formations and a new unnamed unit, here provisionally called the Asquempont unit) belonging to the mainly concealed Brabant Massif, Belgium are described herein. Fifty-six samples were taken from rocks cropping out at the south-eastern rim of the massif in the Orneau, Dyle-Thyle and Senne-Sennette valleys. Microfossil preservation is moderate to poor, and the chitinozoans occur in low numbers. Taxonomically, the recovered chitinozoans are distributed into 29 taxa, some placed under open nomenclature. Together with earlier published graptolite and acritarch data, the analysis of the chitinozoan assemblages resulted in an improved chronostratigraphy of the investigated formations. We propose a local chitinozoan biozonation with 11 zones for the Brabant Massif. The oldest investigated units yielded chitinozoans typical for North Gondwana, and younger units (starting in the middle Caradoc), yielded some taxa also common in Baltica. As the Brabant Massif formed part of the microcontinent Avalonia, the chitinozoan assemblages recovered from the massif support the inferred drifting of Avalonia from high latitudes towards middle latitudes in the Ordovician as was suggested earlier.

  16. Seismotectonic significance of the 2008-2010 Walloon Brabant seismic swarm in the Brabant Massif, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, Koen; Lecocq, Thomas; Shah, Anjana K.; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    Between 12 July 2008 and 18 January 2010 a seismic swarm occurred close to the town of Court-Saint-Etienne, 20 km SE of Brussels (Belgium). The Belgian network and a temporary seismic network covering the epicentral area established a seismic catalogue in which magnitude varies between ML -0.7 and ML 3.2. Based on waveform cross-correlation of co-located earthquakes, the spatial distribution of the hypocentre locations was improved considerably and shows a dense cluster displaying a 200 m-wide, 1.5-km long, NW-SE oriented fault structure at a depth range between 5 and 7 km, located in the Cambrian basement rocks of the Lower Palaeozoic Anglo-Brabant Massif. Waveform comparison of the largest events of the 2008-2010 swarm with an ML 4.0 event that occurred during swarm activity between 1953 and 1957 in the same region shows similar P- and S-wave arrivals at the Belgian Uccle seismic station. The geometry depicted by the hypocentral distribution is consistent with a nearly vertical, left-lateral strike-slip fault taking place in a current local WNW-ESE oriented local maximum horizontal stress field. To determine a relevant tectonic structure, a systematic matched filtering approach of aeromagnetic data, which can approximately locate isolated anomalies associated with hypocentral depths, has been applied. Matched filtering shows that the 2008-2010 seismic swarm occurred along a limited-sized fault which is situated in slaty, low-magnetic rocks of the Mousty Formation. The fault is bordered at both ends with obliquely oriented magnetic gradients. Whereas the NW end of the fault is structurally controlled, its SE end is controlled by a magnetic gradient representing an early-orogenic detachment fault separating the low-magnetic slaty Mousty Formation from the high-magnetic Tubize Formation. The seismic swarm is therefore interpreted as a sinistral reactivation of an inherited NW-SE oriented isolated fault in a weakened crust within the Cambrian core of the Brabant

  17. Zirconology of serpentinites from Nyashevo massif (Southern Urals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnobaev, A. A.; Valizer, P. M.; Anfilogov, V. N.; Medvedeva, E. V.; Busharina, S. V.; Murdasova, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Zircons in serpentinites from Nyashevo massif of the Ilmenogorskii complex were dated for the first time by means of the SHRIMP technique. The maximum date of 1892 ± 23 Ma for the zircons accounts for the minimum age of their mantle substrate probably constituting the restite residue. The date is comparable to those for metamorphic rocks of the Selyankino group, as well as of fenite-sand amphibolites of the Ilmenogorskii complex. The Upper Ordovician age limit of 443 ± 12 Ma is adequate for formation of the massif and conforms to the age of the Buldym massif and miaskites. The Early Permian dates of zircons (275.8 ± 2.1 Ma) represent late shear processes in the Ilmenogorskii complex.

  18. Massification to Marketization of Higher Education: Private University Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Jashim Uddin

    2016-01-01

    Massification of higher education is a contemporary phenomenon, and Bangladesh is an excellent example of massification in the sector. With increased alertness worldwide among nations, policy-makers and development bodies, massification of higher education is a requirement of time. Increasing number of youth also contribute to the phenomenon…

  19. Indentation as an extrusion mechanism of lower crustal rocks: Insight from analogue and numerical modelling, application to the Eastern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Schulmann, K.; Gapais, D.; Kermarrec, J.-J.

    2011-05-01

    Recent petrological, structural and geochronological studies of the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) suggest a conceptual geodynamical model to explain exhumation of lower crustal (20 kbar, 800 °C) felsic rocks. The model involves indentation of a weak orogenic lower crust by an adjacent rigid mantle lithosphere, resulting in crustal-scale buckling of the weak orogenic lower/middle crust interface followed by extrusion of a ductile nappe over the rigid promontory. The hypothesis has been investigated using both analogue and numerical models. Analogue experiments using a three layer sand-silicone setup were carried out in Rennes laboratory (France). Results show that the most important features of the conceptual model can be reproduced: extrusion of lowermost silicone over the indenter and flow of horizontal viscous channel underneath a rigid lid above the actively progressing promontory. Furthermore, experimental results show that a plateau develops above the channelling lower crust. Two sets of sandbox-scale numerical simulations were performed. The first set of experiments is designed to study the influence of viscosity stratification within the crust on the extrusion process. A second set of experiments were performed in order to quantify the influence of the viscosity and the geometry of the indentor. Non-dimensional scaling laws were derived to predict the maximum extrusion rates associated with the indentation mechanism. Such laws enable the computation vertical extrusion rates that are in good agreement with natural exhumation rates inferred from petrological data. Finally, we discuss the potential positive feedback of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on vertical extrusion for the case of Eastern Bohemian Massif.

  20. Ordovician magmatism in the Lévézou massif (French Massif Central): tectonic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotout, Caroline; Pitra, Pavel; Poujol, Marc; Van Den Driessche, Jean

    2017-03-01

    New U-Pb dating on zircon yielded ca. 470 Ma ages for the granitoids from the Lévézou massif in the southern French Massif Central. These new ages do not support the previous interpretation of these granitoids as syn-tectonic intrusions emplaced during the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous thrusting. The geochemical and isotopic nature of this magmatism is linked to a major magmatic Ordovician event recorded throughout the European Variscan belt and related to extreme thinning of continental margins during a rifting event or a back-arc extension. The comparable isotopic signatures of these granitoids on each side of the eclogite-bearing leptyno-amphibolitic complex in the Lévézou massif, together with the fact that they were emplaced at the same time, strongly suggest that these granitoids were originally part of a single unit, tectonically duplicated by either isoclinal folding or thrusting during the Variscan tectonics.

  1. Ordovician magmatism in the Lévézou massif (French Massif Central): tectonic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotout, Caroline; Pitra, Pavel; Poujol, Marc; Van Den Driessche, Jean

    2016-08-01

    New U-Pb dating on zircon yielded ca. 470 Ma ages for the granitoids from the Lévézou massif in the southern French Massif Central. These new ages do not support the previous interpretation of these granitoids as syn-tectonic intrusions emplaced during the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous thrusting. The geochemical and isotopic nature of this magmatism is linked to a major magmatic Ordovician event recorded throughout the European Variscan belt and related to extreme thinning of continental margins during a rifting event or a back-arc extension. The comparable isotopic signatures of these granitoids on each side of the eclogite-bearing leptyno-amphibolitic complex in the Lévézou massif, together with the fact that they were emplaced at the same time, strongly suggest that these granitoids were originally part of a single unit, tectonically duplicated by either isoclinal folding or thrusting during the Variscan tectonics.

  2. (222)Rn activity concentration differences in groundwaters of three Variscan granitoid massifs in the Sudetes (NE Bohemian Massif, SW Poland).

    PubMed

    Przylibski, Tadeusz A; Gorecka, Joanna

    2014-08-01

    Based on research conducted in three Variscan granitoid massifs located within the crystalline Bohemian Massif, the authors confirmed that the higher the degree of their erosional dissection, the smaller the concentration of (222)Rn in groundwaters circulating in these massifs. This notion implies that radon waters and high-radon waters, from which at least some of the dissolved radon should be removed before feeding them as drinking water to the water-supply system, could be expected in granitoid massifs which have been poorly exposed by erosion. At the same time, such massifs must be taken into account as the areas of possible occurrence of radon medicinal waters, which in some countries can be used for balneotherapy in health resorts. Slightly eroded granitoid massifs should be also regarded as very probable radon prone areas or areas of high radon potential.

  3. The magmatic history of the Vetas-California mining district, Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla Figueroa, Luis C.; Bissig, Thomas; Valencia, Víctor; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Vetas-California Mining District (VCMD), located in the central part of the Santander Massif (Colombian Eastern Cordillera), based on U-Pb dating of zircons, records the following principal tectono-magmatic events: (1) the Grenville Orogenic event and high grade metamorphism and migmatitization between ˜1240 and 957 Ma; (2) early Ordovician calc-alkalic magmatism, which was synchronous with the Caparonensis-Famatinian Orogeny (˜477 Ma); (3) middle to late Ordovician post-collisional calc-alkalic magmatism (˜466-436 Ma); (4) late Triassic to early Jurassic magmatism between ˜204 and 196 Ma, characterized by both S- and I-type calc-alkalic intrusions and; (5) a late Miocene shallowly emplaced intermediate calc-alkaline intrusions (10.9 ± 0.2 and 8.4 ± 0.2 Ma). The presence of even younger igneous rocks is possible, given the widespread magmatic-hydrothermal alteration affecting all rock units in the area. The igneous rocks from the late Triassic-early Jurassic magmatic episodes are the volumetrically most important igneous rocks in the study area and in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera. They can be divided into three groups based on their field relationships, whole rock geochemistry and geochronology. These are early leucogranites herein termed Alaskites-I (204-199 Ma), Intermediate rocks (199-198 Ma), and late leucogranites, herein referred to as Alaskites-II (198-196 Ma). This Mesozoic magmatism is reflecting subtle changes in the crustal stress in a setting above an oblique subduction of the Panthalassa plate beneath Pangea. The lower Cretaceous siliciclastic Tambor Formation has detrital zircons of the same age populations as the metamorphic and igneous rocks present in the study area, suggesting that the provenance is related to the erosion of these local rocks during the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous, implying a local supply of sediments to the local depositional basins.

  4. Geochemistry and tectonostratigraphy of the basal allochthonous units of SW Iberia (Évora Massif, Portugal): Keys to the reconstruction of pre-Pangean paleogeography in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rubén Díez; Fuenlabrada, José Manuel; Chichorro, Martim; Pereira, M. Francisco; Sánchez-Martínez, Sonia; Silva, José B.; Arenas, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The basal allochthonous units of NW and SW Iberia are members of an intra-Gondwana suture zone that spreads across the Iberian Massif and was formed during the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia in the late Paleozoic. This suture zone is made of allochthonous terranes and is currently preserved as a tectonically dismembered ensemble. A multi-proxy analysis is applied to the basal allochthonous units of Iberia to test their affinity and potential usage for tracing a suture zone. A comparison of the lithostratigraphy, tectonometamorphic evolution, geochronology, and geochemical characteristics of the Ediacaran series of these units reveals striking affinities. They derive from rather similar immature sedimentary successions, deposited along the same continental margin, and in relation to a Cadomian magmatic arc. Sm-Nd systematics indicates that the isotopic sources are among the oldest of the Iberian Massif (ca. 2.15-1.5 Ga), suggesting a very strong contribution from the West African Craton. These Ediacaran series were affected by high-P and low- to medium-T metamorphism (blueschist to eclogite facies) during the Late Devonian (ca. 370 Ma). They occur below allochthonous ophiolitic sequences, and on top of autochthonous or parautochthonous domains lacking of high-P and low- to medium-T Devonian metamorphism, i.e., tectonically sandwiched between lithosphere-scale thrusts. The combination of all these characteristics makes these particular Ediacaran series different from the rest of the terranes of the Iberian Massif. Such singularity could be useful for tracing more occurrences of the same suture zone along the Variscan orogen, particularly in cases where its preservation and recognition may be cryptic. It also contributes to improve the paleogeographic reconstruction of the margin of Gondwana during the Ediacaran.

  5. Pre-School Education in the Massif Central (France).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Emile

    This paper lists and tentatively assesses three experiments in preschool education in rural areas in France, and outlines the Massif Central development program which draws extensively on these experiments. In Experiment I, a peripatetic teacher worked with young children, concentrating on speech activities in four different single-class schools.…

  6. Massification and the Large Lecture Theatre: From Panic to Excitement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvanitakis, James

    2014-01-01

    In this article I examine the role of the contemporary university in light of the mass increase in class sizes that has occurred on an international scale. While we may look nostalgically back to a time when lectures numbered a few hundred students and tutorials had as few as ten, massification at undergraduate level is an inescapable fact of…

  7. Towards Responsible Massification: Some Pointers for Supporting Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertyn, Ruth M; Machika, Pauline; Troskie-de Bruin, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Teaching large classes poses many challenges to lecturers where massification is a reality in higher education. There are implications for both teaching and effective learning in this context. The need for accountability to learners in education provision served as motivation for a study of large classes in the largest faculty of one university…

  8. Massification in Higher Education: Large Classes and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsby, David J.; Osman, Ruksana

    2014-01-01

    In introducing the special issue on "Large Class Pedagogy: Opportunities and Challenges of Massification" the present editorial takes stock of the emerging literature on this subject. We seek to contribute to the massificaiton debate by considering one result of it: large class teaching in higher education. Here we look to large classes…

  9. Thermal evolution of a main detachment zone during late orogenic collapse: the pilat unit case (Variscan chain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardien, V.; Allemand, P.

    2003-04-01

    The high temperature uplift of deep seated nappes in different tectonic settings is a major question in orogenic domains. Detailed petrological and structural study were performed in the Pilat Unit (Eastern french Massif Central: Variscan chain) in order to discuss the thermal evolution of a main shear zone during late orogenic extension. The Pilat Unit is a 20 km long x 5 km large metamorphic unit and as a strain gradient within it perpandicular to the long axe of the unit. The mylonitic fabrics, in the strained zone are notherly directed. Geometrical and geochronological data indicate that these fabrics are associated with extesional regime that was a post-thickening event. Thermobarometrical determination supported by microstructural analyses indicate the develpoment of contrasting P-T-time evolution in the Pilat Unit. In the strongly mylonitized southern domain in which foliation and streching lineation show a top to the north normal slip, the calculated P-T conditions indicate an increase in temperature during decompression illustrated by the following mineral assemblages:1) Grt + Stau + Kya + Rut, 2) Bio + Sill + Cord, 3) And + Musco + K-feld and dated at 322 Ma. In the northern and less deformed domain, the calculated P-T conditions correspond to a cooling event during decompression illustrated by the following assemblages: 1) Grt + Stau + Kya + Rut, 2) Bio + Musco + Ilm, 3) And + Chlo + Pyro + Tour, dated at 313 Ma. The difference in T° between the southern and the northern domain is 200-250°C and Δ t is 10Ma. Based on these data, we have elaborated 1D numerical model simulating the thermal evolution of the continental crust during thinning associated or not with magma underplating.

  10. Paleozoic orogens in New England, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Tucker, R.D.; Bradley, D.; Berry, H.N.; Osberg, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Stratigraphy and isotope geochronology in the crystalline core of the Appalachians suggest revised interpretations of the extent, nature and timing of Paleozoic orogens in New England. Five major episodes of magmatism, deformation, and high-grade regional metamorphism are recognized: Taconian (455-442 Ma), Acadian (423-385 Ma), Neo-Acadian (366-350 Ma), Late Pennsylvanian (300-290 Ma) and Alleghanian (280-260 Ma). In the Taconian, the passive margin of Laurentia was subducted below a complex magmatic arc lasting from 480 to 442 Ma, founded in part on continental crust of a Medial New England terrane with possible affinities with Amazonia. Questions about Medial New England involve its coherence as a single plate, and the nature of its underlying crust. The Acadian began in Late Silurian as a collision between the amalgamated Laurentia-Medial New England and outer belts of Composite Avalon along a cryptic suture in coastal Maine, and progressed northwestward to the Connecticut Valley basin by mid-Devonian. Tonalitic-granitic magmatism and up to granulite-facies metamorphism culminated in Early Devonian, possibly tied to lithospheric detachment below the subducting northwestern plate and consequent asthenosphere upwelling. Newly discovered Neo-Acadian Late Devonian to Early Mississippian tonalitic-granitic magmatism, up to granulite-facies metamorphism, and severe deformation in central Massachusetts took place in a plate context poorly understood. Late Pennsylvanian effects include magmatism, metamorphism, and deformation near south New England gneiss domes and the Sebago batholith, and development of the right-lateral Norumbega fault system. Permian Alleghanian effects include penetrative deformation, granitic intrusions and up to sillimanite-grade metamorphism of Pennsylvanian beds in southeastern New England. These last two episodes relate to the arrival of Africa.

  11. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the Rhodope orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Kurt; Bauer, Christoph; Proyer, Alexander; KlöTzli, Urs; Hoinkes, Georg

    2010-08-01

    This study combines new data on tectonostratigraphy, macrostructures and microstructures, petrology, and geochronology to propose a comprehensive model for the tectonometamorphic evolution of the Rhodope orogen from the Jurassic to the early Paleogene. Rocks from two study areas in the central and eastern Greek Rhodope represent a continental suture zone (Rhodope Suture Zone), with the included material most likely forming an extensional allochthon south of the European continent during Permo/Triassic times that was subsequently subducted beneath Europe in the Early Jurassic (≥180 Ma). On the basis of comparable metamorphic ages and coherent structures but differences in metamorphic conditions and lithologies, the rocks of the Rhodope Suture Zone are subdivided into an upper and a lower part. The prograde history is linked with subduction-related structures in the lower part (uniaxial stretching, deformation stage D1). In metapelites, the earliest stage of metamorphism recorded at circa 180 Ma occurred at least under ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions. The rocks of the upper part experienced isothermal decompression with partial anatexis. Exhumation paths of both parts differ in temperature because of the relative tectonic position within the exhuming wedge. Exhumation was forced by the Nestos Shear Zone that controlled the early phase of normal displacement by SW shearing at the base (lower part) and NE shearing on top (upper part) from the Late Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous (deformation stage D2). An intervening stage of mineral recrystallization and thermal reequilibration in the upper part was followed by a common exhumation history of both parts at pressures lower than about 12 kbar (35-40 km depth). During this stage, exhumation was controlled by southwest directed shearing and folding (deformation stage D3). Slab retreat to the south led to subsequent extension (deformation stage D4) and final exhumation coeval with the formation of basement domes

  12. Stalled Orogen Linked to East Antarctic Craton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Y. M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Bell, R. E.; Jordan, T. A.; Damaske, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of East Antarctica is often regarded as a coherent Archean craton surrounded by Paleo to Neoproterozoic orogenic belts. Here we use recent aerogeophysical, satellite magnetic, satellite gravity and passive seismic results in central East Antarctica to challenge this view. Firstly, anomalously thick crust (compared to most other cratons) has been imaged in East Antarctica by both passive seismic and gravity modelling with values up to 60 km (Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; An et al., 2015, JGR). The thick crust underlies both the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and an elevated region between Lake Vostok and Dronning Maud Land, referred to as the East Antarctic Mountain Ranges plateau (An et al., 2015). Second, satellite magnetic data reveal that the Gamburtev Province lies in between the Ruker/Princess Elizabeth Land, Vostok, Nimrod/South Pole and Recovery provinces. The Nimrod/ South Pole province is a Paleo to Meso Proterozoic igneous province formed along the edges of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Mawson continent (e.g. Goodge and Fanning, 2010 JGR). Our aerogeophysical and sediment provenance data interpretations suggest that the Gamburtsev Province represents a distinct Grenvillian-age orogenic belt. A stalled orogen with thick crust (i.e. an orogen where widespread orogenic collapse and root delamination has not occurred)- is preserved in the interior of East Antarctica resembling e.g. the Paleoproterozoic Trans Hudson Orogen and segments of Grenvillian orogens in Laurentia. The stalled orogen may relate to widespread accretionary and collisional events within Rodinia. However, passive seismic interpretations (An et al., 2015) favour linking crustal thickening to the Pan-African age assembly of Greater India, East Antarctica and Australia within Gondwana (e.g. Aitken et al., 2014 GRL). Further aerogeophysical observations over Princess Elizabeth Land are timely to enable more robust correlations with geological observations and to help dating the

  13. Thin visous sheet modelling of orogen scale deformation. The Eastern Alps in plan view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, J.; Stuewe, K.

    2003-04-01

    We present first results of a new numerical model to describe the dynamic evolution of the eastern Alps in plan view on the orogen scale. We investigate the influence of boundary conditions, gravitational potential energy, rheology contrast of major tectonic units and internal structures on the deformation field. We aim at estimating the Argan number of the Eastern Alps and to calculate slip rates along big lineaments that represent the northern and southern border of the Austro-Alpine extrusion corridor. A further aim is to predict the position and the activity of major faults where they disappear below quartenary sediments. All calculation are perfomed with the mechanical finite element code BASIL that allows computation on a thin visous sheet. The starting conditons are controlled by the varying crustal thickness of the region and by the rheolgy of the Adriatic indenter in the south, the Bohemian massif in the north and the Eastern Alps inbetween. We assume that the Eastern Alps are fixed to the north and the west while the southern boundary moves northward at a rate of 6-8 mm /y. The geodynamic setting in the east changed over the last 5 my. While a roll back subduction zone beneath the Carparthian belt accompanied by extension, crustal thinning and basin formation controlled the deformation of the Eastern Alps until the Miocene. Later on subduction stopped and the overall stress field changed from extension to compression resulting in uplift of many basins and the lack sediments younger than Pliocene. This well known variation of plate tectonic scenarios over the last 5 my allows us to place tight constraints for the boundary conditions of our model. Although our work is only now in progress, we can report some promising results: some of the kinematics and mechaniscs predicted by our modelling are consistent with field observations of the structural geologists and geodeticists.

  14. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  15. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-11

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  16. Rotund versus skinny orogens: Well-nourished or malnourished gold?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Groves, D.I.; Gardoll, S.

    2001-01-01

    Orogenic gold vein deposits require a particular conjunction of processes to form and be preserved, and their global distribution can be related to broad-scale, evolving tectonic processes throughout Earth history. A heterogeneous distribution of formation ages for these mineral deposits is marked by two major Precambrian peaks (2800-2555 Ma and 2100-1800 Ma), a singular lack of deposits for 1200 m.y. (1800-600 Ma), and relatively continuous formation since then (after 600 Ma). The older parts of the distribution relate to major episodes of continental growth, perhaps controlled by plume-influenced mantle overturn events, in the hotter early Earth (ca. 1800 Ma or earlier). This worldwide process allowed preservation of gold deposits in cratons, roughly equidimensional, large masses of buoyant continental crust. Evolution to a less episodic, more continuous, modern-style plate tectonic regime led to the accretion of volcano-sedimentary complexes as progressively younger linear orogenic belts sorrounding the margins of the more buoyant cratons. The susceptibility of these linear belts to uplift and erosion can explain the overall lack of orogenic gold deposits at 1800-600 Ma, their exposure in 600-50 Ma orogens, the increasing importance of placer deposits back through the Phanerozoic since ca. 100 Ma, and the absence of gold deposits in orogenic belts younger than ca. 50 Ma.

  17. Fluid circulation systems in the Alpine External Crystalline Massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, Alexandre; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Verlaguet, Anne; Lacombe, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    At mid-crustal levels, rock permeability is believed to be very low except in active fault/shear zones. In sedimentary rocks undergoing tectonic burial during collisional shortening, fluid flow is thus considered to be a small-scale process restricted to the sedimentary unit, until the fluid system locally opens during strain localization in fault/shear zones. During the Alpine collision, the European proximal passive margin (Dauphinois/Helvetic domains, including the External Crystalline Massifs, ECM: Aar, Mont Blanc, Aiguilles Rouges, Oisans massifs) was buried at mid-crustal depth under the internal units and was subsequently shortened and exhumed with contrasting kinematics. Indeed, some of the main tectonic units are sedimentary nappes detached from their basement while other are linked to main basement shear zones. In this context, many studies of fluid system evolution have been published, mainly focused on the largest tectonic units (e.g., Morcles nappe) and/or on thrust/shear zones with large displacement (e.g., Glarus thrust). In this contribution, we focused on tectonic structures located in the Oisans massif where small amount of shortening occurred (smaller than in the northern ECM, Mont Blanc and Aar). We performed geochemical and microthermometric analyses on calcite + quartz vein and host-rock samples to document and discuss the fluid source and pathway, the scale of circulation and the fluid-rock interactions. The fluid system in the Oisans ECM is compared to the fluid systems in other ECM and can be considered as an early and/or less shortened analogue. In the Oisans massif cover, the fluid system is generally closed, except locally above the main basement shear zones where signatures of basement-derived fluids were identified by trace element analysis. In contrast, in the Mont Blanc massif, fluids were channelized in the main basement shear zones, while in the Morcles nappe (i.e., the presumable cover of the Mont Blanc), deep fluids may have been

  18. The Impact of Partial Melting in the Orogenic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, P. F.; Teyssier, C.; Whitney, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Open source, community driven numerical codes available at geodynamics.org allow geologists to model orogenic processes including partial melting and its consequences during orogenic cycles. Here we explore the role of partial melting during continental subduction and its impact on the evolution of orogenic plateaux and that of migmatite-cored metamorphic core complexes. Continental subduction and orogenic plateaux: Numerical experiments show that when continental slabs buried into the mantle meet their solidus, crustal melt is confined to the slab during its ascent and ponds at the Moho (Fig. 1a). The displaced overlying crust is extruded horizontally into the weak lower crust of the continent, resulting in Earth’s surface uplift to form an orogenic plateau, and Moho downward motion to accommodate the influx of material into the lower crust. This model suggests a link between continental subduction, melting and the build up of orogenic plateaux, and show that partial melting may be a significant process in exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks. Model results are consistent with the common association of UHP rocks and migmatite. Growth and destruction of orogenic plateaux: The lateral growth of orogenic plateaux is often attributed to the flow of the plateau weak partially melted lower crust into its foreland in some cases over a distance > 1500 km in 15 myr. Using pre-thickening temperatures compatible with Tibet’s uplift history, we show that mass redistribution processes are dynamically coupled, and that CFE velocities are limited to less than 1 cm.yr-1 (~150 km in 15 myr) by cooling and crystallization of the melted channel in the foreland and by any upward deviation into metamorphic domes of the melted channel by extension in the plateau (Fig. 1b). Gravitational collapse and metamorphic core complexes: Localization of extension in the upper crust triggers convergent flow in the partially molten deep crust channel. This convergent flow leads to the

  19. Melt localization and its relation to deformation in the subcontinental mantle: a case study from layered dunite-harzburgite-lherzolite bodies of the Ronda peridotite massif, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Karoly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Tommasi, Andrea; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Gervilla, Fernando; Marchesi, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The processes that take place during the transport of melts through the convecting mantle are the least understood and, therefore, state-of-the art problems among a series of processes of formation and evolution of mantle magmas. It is widely accepted that, dunite channels might be pathways by which mantle melts easily pass through the overlying mantle (e.g. Kelemen et al., 1997). The role of shear strain during the formation of dunite bodies in ophiolites was considered in details by Kelemen & Dick (1995). It was also shown that the stress field can control the melt migration paths marked by dunite bodies occurring oriented regularly relative to the hinge and axial plane of a harzburgite fold (Savelieva et al., 2008). The localization of melt flow and formation of channels under mechanical instability during the formation of dunites is expected to lead to a stronger olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in these rocks than in their surroundings. However, accepted models explain formation of dunitic lithology mostly in oceanic environment, but one would face several challenges trying to apply them to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. The Ronda massif (southern Spain) is the largest (ca. 300km2) of several orogenic peridotite massifs exposed in the Betic and Rif (northern Morocco) mountain belts in the westernmost part of the Alpine orogen that was tectonically emplaced during early Miocene times. One of the most remarkable features of the Ronda massif is the ‘recrystallization front' that represents the transition from the spinel-tectonite to the coarse granular peridotite domain corresponding to a narrow boundary of a partial melting domain caused by thinning and coeval asthenospheric upwelling formed at the expense of former subcontinental lithospheric mantle and associated with melting and kilometer-scale migration of melts by diffuse porous flow through the ‘asthenospherized' domain (Van der Wal & Bodinier, 1996; Lenoir et al., 2001

  20. Geochronology- and Geochemistry of Late Carboniferous-Middle Permian I- and A-Type Granites and Gabro-Diorites in the Eastern Jimausi Massif, NE, China: Implications for a Tectonic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Junhui; Ge, Wenchun

    2016-04-01

    The late Paleozoic magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif of northeast China, located in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), was dominated by an active continental margin environment due to subduction of the paleo-oceanic plate. Nevertheless, what deep geodynamic processes controlled the late Paleozoic evolution of the Jiamusi Massif are still poorly constrained. In this contribution, we present zircon U-Pb ages and geochemical data of late Carboniferous-middle Permian magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif, aiming to provide constraints on the question. Precise LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the granitoids and gabbro-diorites were emplaced in the late Carboniferous-middle Permian (302-267 Ma). The granites belong to a high-potassium calc-alkaline series, are weakly peraluminous I- and A-type granites, and show high SiO2 and K2O contents; they are depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), show weakly to mildly fractionated REE patterns, and on spidergrams show arc-type affinities with strong depletions in Nb, Ta, and Ti. The combination of heterogeneous values of ɛHf(t) for magmatic zircons in all granitoids (ranging from +7.9 to -5.6) and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 0.8-1.7 Ga suggests that the granites originated from partial melting of a predominantly "old" Meso-Neoproterozoic crustal source. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton are depleted in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and show flat distributions of most LILEs and HFSEs, except for marked large positive anomalies in Ba, K, and Pb. These features reflect limited degrees of crustal contamination associated with subduction-related magma processes. These data, together with previously reported data and the occurrence of arc magmatic rocks along the eastern part of the Jiamusi Massif, suggest that the intrusive rocks formed during westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean lithosphere

  1. K-alkaline rocks and lamproites of Tomtor massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Tomtor massif of the largest volcano-plutonic deep alkaline-carbonatite massifs world central type. Area of massif occupy 240 km2 and carbonatites stock is 40 km2. The super large deposit of Nb, TR, Y, Sc, Sr ,REE (Frolov et al. 2001)is found within the massif. The numerical publication are devoted to the ore mineralization there. But the geological struc-ture of the massif and the chemistry of its constituting rocks are not well understood. We obtained new ages based on U-Pb zircon and mica Ar-Ar method (Kotov, Vladykin et al. 2014 Vladykin et al. 2015). The massif was created in 2 stages: 700 and 400 Ma. We (Vla-dykin et al 1998) found rocks of lamproite series and proposed a new scheme of magmatism and the ore.genesis (Vladykin 2007, 2009). Biotite - pyroxenite, peridotite originated in first stage and then intruded iolites, nepheline and alkali syenite. Syenites occupy 70% of -massif and contain 12-13% K2O and 2-4% Na2O showing the K-alkaline-ultramafic nature of Tomtor volcano-plutonic massif (Vladykin 2009). The first stage was accomplished by nelsonitov calcite, dolomite and ankerite carbonatites. Second stage (400Ma) volcanics picrite - lamproite veins and eruptive breccias meli-lite, melanephelinites, tinguaites appered. These rocks are cut by carbonatites of second stage. It was finished by intensive explosive eruption of a silicate (lamproite) tuffs lavobrec-cia kimberlite formed Ebelyakhdiamondiferous placer, melilite rocks in diatremes (feeders), as well as carbonate-phosphate (kamaforite) explosive tuffs with siderite ores. This carbona-tite complex is preserved within the subsidence caldera. Tuff eruption in conjunction with gas and hydrothermal activity determined its rare metal mineralization. These rocks contain to: Nb- 21%, TR-15%, Y-1.5%, Sc-1%, Zr- 0,5% Zn-, Sr-6%, Ti-8%, Ba-4%, V - 8000 ppm, Be- 300 ppm, Ga- 80 ppm, Cr- 1200ppm, Ni- 230 ppm, Mo- 145 ppm, Pb- 4300 ppm, Th- 1500 ppm, U-193 ppm. Picrite - olivine (rare leucite) lamproite and

  2. The Apollo 17 samples: The Massifs and landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1992-01-01

    More than 50 kg of rock and regolith samples, a little less than half the total Apollo 17 sample mass, was collected from the highland stations at Taurus-Littrow. Twice as much material was collected from the North Massif as from the South Massif and its landslide (the apparent disproportionate collecting at the mare sites is mainly a reflection of the large size of a few individual basalt samples). Descriptions of the collection, documentation, and nature of the samples are given. A comprehensive catalog is currently being produced. Many of the samples have been intensely studied over the last 20 years and some of the rocks have become very familiar and depicted in popular works, particularly the dunite clast (72415), the troctolite sample (76535), and the station 6 boulder samples. Most of the boulder samples have been studied in Consortium mode, and many of the rake samples have received a basic petrological/geochemical characterization.

  3. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  4. The French Atlantic littoral and the Massif Armoricain, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Scanvic, J. Y.; Monget, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results: (1) An original map of lineaments of the Armorican Massif and the Vendean platform was prepared. (2) Validity of spatial information through comparison with maps of various kinds, such as geological, geophysical, morphological, etc., was verified. (3) It was confirmed that LANDSAT images, in many cases, reflect data on deep phenomena which were only accessible geophysically and by means of borings. Tectonic domains were outlined, and known lineaments were extended.

  5. The Lassell massif-A silicic lunar volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. Ray; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Giguere, T. A.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Lunar surface volcanic processes are dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, spectral anomalies, landform morphology, and granitic or rhyolitic components found in the Apollo sample suites indicate limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits. Recent thermal infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution imagery, and topographic data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show that most of the historic "red spots" and other, less well-known locations on the Moon, are indeed silica rich (relative to basalt). Here we present a geologic investigation of the Lassell massif (14.65°S, 350.96°E) near the center of Alphonsus A basin in Mare Nubium, where high-silica thermal emission signals correspond with morphological indications of viscous (possibly also explosive) extrusion, and small-scale, low-reflectance deposits occur in a variety of stratigraphic relationships. Multiple layers with stair-step lobate forms suggest different eruption events or pulsing within a single eruption. Absolute model ages derived from crater size-frequency distributions (CSFDs) indicate that the northern parts of the massif were emplaced at ∼4 Ga, before the surrounding mare. However, CSFDs also indicate the possibility of more recent resurfacing events. The complex resurfacing history might be explained by either continuous resurfacing due to mass wasting and/or the emplacement of pyroclastics. Relatively low-reflectance deposits are visible at meter-scale resolutions (below detection limits for compositional analysis) at multiple locations across the massif, suggestive of pyroclastic activity, a quenched flow surface, or late-stage mafic materials. Compositional evidence from 7-band UV/VIS spectral data at the kilometer-scale and morphologic evidence for possible caldera collapse and/or explosive venting support the interpretation of a complex volcanic history for the Lassell massif.

  6. Detachment Shear Zone of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J.; Fruh-Green, G.; Kelley, D.; Yoerger, D.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    Near-bottom investigations of the cross section of the Atlantis Massif exposed in a major tectonic escarpment along the Atlantis Transform Fault provide an unprecedented view of the internal structure of the footwall domain of an oceanic core complex. Integrated direct observations, photogeology, and imaging define a mylonitic, low-angle detachment shear zone (DSZ) along the crest of the massif. The shear zone may project beneath the nearby, corrugated upper surface of the massif. The DSZ and related structures are inferred to be responsible for the unroofing of lower crustal gabbros and upper mantle peridotites by extreme, localized tectonic extension during seafloor spreading over the past 2 m.y. Strongly foliated serpentinites and talc-amphibole schists of the DSZ are about 100 m thick and can be traced continuously for at least 3 km in the spreading direction. Foliated DSZ rocks grade structurally downward into more massive basement rocks that lack a pervasive low-temperature deformation fabric. The main DSZ and underlying basement rocks are cut by discrete, anastomosing normal-slip, shear zones. Widely spaced, steeply dipping, normal faults cut all the older structures and localize serpentinization-driven hydrothermal outflow at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. A thin (few meters) sequence of sedimentary breccias grading upward into pelagic limestones directly overlies the DSZ and may record a history of progressive rotation of the shear zone from an earlier moderately dipping attitude into its present, gently dipping orientation during lateral spreading and uplift.

  7. New Ar/Ar single grain mineral ages from Korean orogenic belts with implications for the Triassic cooling and exhumation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Koenraad; Ruffet, Gilles; Han, Seokyoung

    2013-04-01

    The Korean peninsula is located in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent where major late Palaeozoic to early Mesozoic continental collision zones, like the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu Belt, merge with circum-Pacific subduction-accretion systems. Deciphering the tectonic evolution of Korea is thus crucial for the understanding of the amalgamation of East Asia. Classically, research in Korea has focused on the search for (ultra)high-pressure metamorphic rocks and their isotopic dating, most recently applying SHRIMP on Th- and U-bearing accessory minerals, in order to substantiate links with the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu Belt across the Yellow Sea in China. Instead of trying to date peak pressure conditions we focused on 40Ar/39Ar laser-probe step-heating dating of single grains of the fabric-forming minerals muscovite, biotite and amphibole, formed during retrograde recrystallisation and exhumation. This is a big advantage as their growth can be straightforwardly correlated to major phases of the tectono-metamorphic evolution of rocks. This approach helps to meet the major geochronological challenge of obtaining age estimates for the timing of specific tectono-metamorphic events in the Korean orogenic belts. The Korean peninsula comprises a number of Palaeoproterozoic high-grade gneiss terranes; only one of which has been affected by Permo-Triassic metamorphism: the Gyeonggi Massif. We concentrated on the uppermost Gyeonggi Massif and the overlying Imjingang Belt, to the North, and the ill-defined Hongseong zone to the West, both constituted by younger metamorphic rocks. Both belts contain rare lenses of mafic rocks with relics of high-pressure metamorphism. Hornblende from a corona-textured amphibolite from the lowermost part of the Imjingang Belt yielded a U-shaped age spectrum, the base of which is formed by four concordant steps with a weighted mean age of 242.8 ± 2.4 Ma (15% 39Ar release). Muscovites from strongly retrogressed and

  8. Suturing and extensional reactivation in the Grenville orogen, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jay P.; Mezger, Klaus; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    1997-06-01

    Sutures are zones of weakness within orogenic belts that have the potential to become reactivated during orogenic evolution. The Robertson Lake shear zone marks a major tectonic boundary in the southeastern Grenville orogen of Canada that has been intermittently active for at least 130 m.y. The shear zone played a major role in the compressional stage of the orogenic cycle as well as during postorogenic collapse. The zone separates the Elzevir terrane to the west and the Frontenac terrane to the east. Sphene ages (U-Pb) indicate that these two terranes have distinct tectonothermal histories and that the shear zone represents a “cryptic suture.” In its current state, the shear zone is a low angle (30°ESE dip) plastic to brittle extensional shear zone that separates the Mazinaw (footwall) and Sharbot Lake (hanging wall) domains. Integration of structural, metamorphic, and chronologic data leads to a model that describes the complete evolution of this fundamental tectonic boundary that evolved from an early compressional zone (ca. 1030 Ma) to a late extensional zone (until at least 900 Ma).

  9. The Capricorn Orogen Passive source Array (COPA) in Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, K.; Yuan, H.; Murdie, R.; Dentith, M. C.; Johnson, S.; Brett, J.

    2015-12-01

    COPA is the passive source component of a multi-method geophysical program aimed at assessing the mineral deposits potential of the Proterozoic Capricorn Orogen. Previous results from the active source surveys, receiver functions and magnetotelluric studies show reworked orogenic crust in the orogen that contrasts with more simple crust in the neighbouring Archean cratons, suggesting progressive and punctuated collisional processes during the final amalgamation of the Western Australian craton. Previous seismic studies are all based on line deployment or single station analyses; therefore it is essential to develop 3D seismic images to test whether these observations are representative for the whole orogen. With a careful design that takes advantage of previous passive source surveys, the current long-term and short-term deployments span an area of approximately 500 x 500 km. The 36-month total deployment can guarantee enough data recording for 3D structure imaging using body wave tomography, ambient noise surface wave tomography and P- and S-wave receiver function Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking techniques. A successive instrument loan from the ANSIR national instrument pool, provided 34 broadband seismometers that have been deployed in the western half of the orogen since March 2014. We expect approximately 40-km lateral resolution near the surface for the techniques we propose, which due to low frequency nature of earthquake waves will degrade to about 100 km near the base of the cratonic lithosphere, which is expected at depths between 200 to 250 km. Preliminary results from the first half of the COPA deployment will be presented in the light of the hypotheses that 1) distinct crustal blocks can be detected continuously throughout the orogen (using ambient noise/body wave tomography); 2) distinct lithologies are present in the crust and upper mantle across the orogen (using receiver function CCP images); and 3) crustal and lithosphere deformation along

  10. Strain partitioning along the anatectic front in the Variscan Montagne Noire massif (southern French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Mickael; Trap, Pierre; Carry, Nicolas; Fréville, Kevin; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Lobjoie, Cyril; Goncalves, Philippe; Marquer, Didier

    2015-08-01

    We decipher late-orogenic crustal flow characterized by feedback relations between partial melting and deformation in the Variscan Montagne Noire gneiss dome. The dome shape and finite strain pattern of the Montagne Noire Axial Zone (MNAZ) result from the superimposition of three deformations (D1, D2 and D3). The early flat-lying S1 foliation is folded by D2 upright ENE-WSW folds and transposed in the central and southern part of the MNAZ into steep D2 high-strain zones consistent with D2 NW-SE horizontal shortening, in bulk contractional coaxial deformation regime that progressively evolved to noncoaxial dextral transpression. The D2 event occurred under metamorphic conditions that culminated at 0.65 ± 0.05 GPa and 720 ± 20°C. Along the anatectic front S1 and S2 foliations are transposed into a flat-lying S3 foliation with top-to-NE and top-to-SW shearing in the NE and SW dome terminations, respectively. These structures define a D3 transition zone related to vertical shortening during coaxial thinning with a preferential NE-SW to E-W directed stretching. Depending on structural level, the metamorphic conditions associated with D3 deformation range from partial melting conditions in the dome core to subsolidus conditions above the D3 transition zone. We suggest that D2 and D3 deformation events were active at the same time and resulted from strain partitioning on both sides of the anatectic front that may correspond to a major rheological boundary within the crust.

  11. European Variscan orogenic evolution as an analogue of Tibetan-Himalayan orogen: Insights from petrology and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierová, P.; Schulmann, K.; Lexa, O.; Guillot, S.; Štípská, P.; Janoušek, V.; Čadek, O.

    2016-07-01

    The European Variscan orogeny can be compared to the Tibetan-Himalayan system for three main reasons: (1) The Variscan belt originated through progressive amalgamation of Gondwanan blocks that were subsequently squeezed between the Laurussia and Gondwana continents. Similarly, the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen results from amalgamated Gondwanan blocks squeezed between Asia and India. (2) The duration of the collisional period and the scale of the two orogens are comparable. (3) In both cases the collisional process resulted in formation of a thick crustal root and long lasting high-pressure granulite facies metamorphism. Recent petrological data allow a more detailed comparison pointing to similarities also in the midcrustal re-equilibration of the granulites and their association with specific (ultra)potassic magmatic rocks. In both orogens, the origin of the granulites was attributed to relamination and thermal maturation of lower crustal allochthon below upper plate crust. Subsequent evolution was explained by midcrustal flow eventually leading to extrusion of the high-grade rocks. We propose that the lower and middle crustal processes in hot orogens are connected by gravity overturns. Such laterally forced gravity-driven exchanges of material in the orogenic root were already documented in the Variscides, but the recent data from Tibet and Himalaya show that this process may have occurred also elsewhere. Using numerical models, we demonstrate that the exchange of the lower and middle crust can be efficient even for a minor density inversion and various characteristics of the crustal layers. The modeled pressure-temperature paths are compatible with two-stage metamorphism documented in Tibet and Himalaya.

  12. Structural inversion of the Tamworth Belt: Insights into the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Robinson, J.; Glen, R.; Roberts, J.

    2016-05-01

    The middle to late Permian Hunter Bowen Event is credited with the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, yet contention surrounds the structural dynamics responsible for the development of this curvature. Debate is largely centred on the roles of orogen parallel strike-slip and orogen normal extension and contraction to explain the development of curvature. To evaluate the dynamic history of the Hunter Bowen Event, we present new kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt. The Tamworth Belt formed as a Carboniferous forearc basin and was subsequently inverted during the Hunter Bowen Event. Kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt are based on new maps and cross-sections built from a synthesis of best-available mapping, chronostratigraphic data and new interpretations of depth-converted seismic data. The following conclusions are made from our study: (i) the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly driven by margin normal contraction (east-west shortening; present-day coordinates), and; (ii) variations in structural style along the strike of the Tamworth Belt can be explained by orthogonal vs. oblique inversion, which reflects the angular relationship between the principal shortening vector and continental-arc margin. Given these conclusions, we suggest that curvature around the controversial Manning Bend was influenced by the presence of primary curvature in the continental margin, and that the Hastings Block was translated along a sinistral strike-slip fault system that formed along this oblique (with respect to the regional east-west extension and convergence direction) part of the margin. Given the available temporal data, the translation of the Hastings Block took place in the Early Permian (Asselian) and therefore preceded the Hunter Bowen Event. Accordingly, we suggest that the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly associated with enhancing curvature that was either primary in origin, or associated with fault block translation

  13. Syn-collapse eclogite metamorphism and exhumation of deep crust in a migmatite dome: The P-T-t record of the youngest Variscan eclogite (Montagne Noire, French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Donna L.; Roger, Françoise; Teyssier, Christian; Rey, Patrice F.; Respaut, J.-P.

    2015-11-01

    In many orogens, high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks such as eclogite occur as lenses in quartzofeldspathic gneiss that equilibrated at much lower pressures. The pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) history of eclogite relative to host gneiss provides information about mechanisms and timescales of exhumation of orogenic crust. The Montagne Noire of the southern Massif Central, France, is an eclogite-bearing gneiss (migmatite) dome located at the orogen-foreland transition of the Variscan belt. Results of our study show that it contains the youngest eclogite in the orogen, similar in age to migmatite and granite that crystallized under low-pressure conditions. P-T conditions for an exceptionally unaltered eclogite from the central Montagne Noire were estimated using a pseudosection supplemented by garnet-clinopyroxene and Zr-in-rutile thermometry. Results indicate peak P ∼ 1.4 GPa and T ∼ 725°C for Mg-rich garnet rim (50 mol% pyrope) + omphacite (36 mol% jadeite) + rutile + quartz. U-Pb geochronology (LA-ICP-MS) of 16 zoned zircon grains yielded ∼360 Ma (4 cores) and ∼315 Ma (12 rims and cores). Rare earth element abundances determined by LA-ICP-MS for dated zircon are consistent with crystallization of ∼315 Ma zircon under garnet-stable, plagioclase-unstable conditions that we interpret to indicate high pressure; in contrast, the ∼360 Ma zircon core corresponds to crystallization under lower pressure plagioclase-stable conditions. Based on garnet zoning and inclusion suites, rutile textures and Zr zoning, P-T results, and zircon petrochronology, we interpret the ∼315 Ma date as the age of eclogite-facies metamorphism that only slightly preceded dome formation and crystallization at 315-300 Ma. This age relation indicates that eclogite formation at high pressure and migmatite dome emplacement at low pressure were closely spaced in time. We propose that collapse-driven material transfer from the hot orogen to the cool foreland resulted in thickening of

  14. Mohorovicic discontinuity depth analysis beneath North Patagonian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Dacal, M. L.; Tocho, C.; Aragón, E.

    2013-05-01

    The North Patagonian Massif is a 100000 km2, sub-rectangular plateau that stands out 500 to 700 m higher in altitude than the surrounding topography. The creation of this plateau took place during the Oligocene through a sudden uplift without noticeable internal deformation. This quite different mechanical response between the massif and the surrounding back arc, the short time in which this process took place and a regional negative Bouguer anomaly in the massif area, raise the question about the isostatic compensation state of the previously mentioned massif. In the present work, a comparison between different results about the depth of the Mohorovicic discontinuity beneath the North Patagonian Massif and a later analysis is made. It has the objective to analyze the crustal thickness in the area to contribute in the determination of the isostatic balance and the better understanding of the Cenozoic evolution of the mentioned area. The comparison is made between four models; two of these were created with seismic information (Feng et al., 2006 and Bassin et al., 2000), another model with gravity information (Barzaghi et al., 2011) and the last one with a combination of both techniques (Tassara y Etchaurren, 2011). The latter was the result of the adaptation to the work area of a three-dimensional density model made with some additional information, mainly seismic, that constrain the surfaces. The work of restriction and adaptation of this model, the later analysis and comparison with the other three models and the combination of both seismic models to cover the lack of resolution in some areas, is presented here. According the different models, the crustal thickness of the study zone would be between 36 and 45 Km. and thicker than the surrounding areas. These results talk us about a crust thicker than normal and that could behave as a rigid and independent block. Moreover, it can be observed that there are noticeable differences between gravimetric and seismic

  15. Asymmetric exhumation across the Pyrenean orogen: implications for the tectonic evolution of a collisional orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, P. G.; Muñoz, J. A.; Coney, P. J.; Baldwin, S. L.

    1999-11-01

    The Pyrenees are a collisional mountain belt formed by convergence between the Afro-Iberian and European plates. Apatite fission track thermochronology from three vertical profiles along the ECORS seismic line constrain the exhumation history of the Pyrenean orogen and hence tectonic models for its formation. In the Eocene there is relatively uniform exhumation across the Pyrenees, but significantly more exhumation occurs on the southern flank of the axial zone in the Oligocene. The variation in exhumation patterns is controlled by a change in how convergence is accommodated within the Pyrenean double-wedge. Accommodation of thrusting on relict extensional features that leads to inversion dominated thrust stacking resulted in relatively slow exhumation in the Eocene. However, subsequent crustal wedging and internal deformation in the upper crust under the stacked duplex of antiformal nappes resulted in extremely rapid exhumation on the southern flank in the Oligocene. The Maladeta profile in the southern axial zone records extremely rapid Early Oligocene exhumation followed by dramatic slowing or cessation of exhumation in the middle Oligocene and the formation of an apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ). This PAZ has subsequently been exhumed 2-3 km since the Middle Miocene, supporting the observations of Coney et al. [J. Geol. Soc. London 153 (1996) 9-16] that the southern flank of the range was buried by ≤2-3 km of syntectonic conglomerates in the Oligocene and subsequently re-excavated from Late Miocene to Recent. The present-day topographic form of the Pyrenees is largely a relict of topography that formed in the Eocene and the Oligocene. Comparison with paleoclimatic records indicates that the Eocene-Oligocene exhumation patterns are controlled by tectonic forces rather than resulting from an orographic effect due to uplift of the Pyrenees.

  16. Massification without Equalisation: The Politics of Higher Education, Graduate Employment and Social Mobility in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Siu-yau

    2016-01-01

    This article explains why the massification of higher education in Hong Kong has, contrary to the predictions of received wisdom, failed to enhance the upward social mobility of the youth in the city. Building upon recent literature in political science, it argues that massification can take different forms, which in turn determine the effects of…

  17. Social Class Barriers of the Massification of Higher Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ru-Jer, Wang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the rapid growth of higher education in Taiwan has led to an essential shift from education for the elite to the massification of higher education. Although this massification is making higher education more accessible, one of the main concerns is whether opportunities for higher education are the same among all social classes in…

  18. Higher Education, Changing Labour Market and Social Mobility in the Era of Massification in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka Ho; Wu, Alfred M.

    2016-01-01

    This article attempts to investigate the relationship between the massification of higher education, labour market and social mobility in contemporary China. Though only a short period of time has elapsed from elite to mass education, China's higher education has been characterised as a wide, pervasive massification process. Similar to other East…

  19. Zirconology of ultrabasic rocks of the Karabash massif (Southern Urals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnobaev, A. A.; Valizer, P. M.; Anfilogov, V. N.; Sergeev, S. A.; Rusin, A. I.; Busharina, S. V.; Medvedeva, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    Dating of zircon (SHRIMP) from dunite and harzburgite of the Karabash massif was carried out for the first time. Relics of ancient crystals (1940 ± 30 Ma in harzburgite, 1860 ± 16 Ma in dunite) provide evidence for the Paleoproterozoic age of the protolith. The morphological peculiarities of zircon crystals allow us to assume differentiation of the magmatic source 1720 m. y. ago. The major variety of zircons indicates stages of metamorphic evolution in the Neoproterozoic (530-560 Ma) and Early-Late Ordovician (440-480 Ma).

  20. Himalayan-style escape tectonics vs late-orogenic extension in the Variscan Belt of Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebelin, A.; Brunel, M.; Ferre, E. C.

    2005-12-01

    The Variscan Orogenic Belt in Western Europe was formed mainly during the Carboniferous (Mississipian-Pennsylvanian) continental collision between the Gondwana and the Laurentia lithospheric plates. This major orogen, now deeply eroded, shows numerous geodynamic similarities with the Himalayan orogen, such as lateral continental-scale ductile wrench zones. New structural, geophysical and geochronological data on the NW Massif Central (France) provide new constrains on the timing and tectonic setting of late-Variscan granite magmatism during this orogeny. Previous investigations have emphasized the role of late-orogenic extension in the emplacement of granite plutons in the Limousin region. In contrast, the new dataset supports ascent and intrusion in a strike-slip regime. The Variscan granite plutons in the Limousin region are emplaced in a transpressive setting. They are spatially associated with major synmagmatic strike-slip shear zones that merge to the northwest with the South Armorican Shear Zone (SASZ). A continuous band of orthogneisses and mylonites attests of the right-lateral strike-slip deformation that affected plutons over a width of 1 to 5 km. The shear zones are characterized by steeply dipping foliation and shallowly plunging stretching lineations. A few granite plutons exhibit steep lineations suggesting local northward reverse movement. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) was used to delineate magmatic fabrics. The Millevaches pluton, a representative example of Limousin syntectonic granites, shows a sigmoidal map pattern of magnetic foliations and lineations consistent with right-lateral shearing. Magnetic lineations rotate gradually from NNW-SSE in the center of the shear zone to NW-SE outside. Magnetic foliations are steep in the center of the shear zone and gradually become sub-horizontal outside. New 40Ar/39Ar data shows that in Limousin, wrench tectonics started around 350 Ma and ended around 300 Ma. New U/Pb and microstructural

  1. Paleozoic tectonics of the Ouachita Orogen through Nd isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.D.; Patchett, P.J.; Dickinson, W.R.; Ruiz, J. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    A combined isotopic and trace-element study of the Late Paleozoic Ouachita Orogenic belt has the following goals: (1) define changing provenance of Ouachita sedimentary systems throughout the Paleozoic; (2) constrain sources feeding into the Ouachita flysch trough during the Late Paleozoic; (3) isolate the geochemical signature of proposed colliding terranes to the south; (4) build a data base to compare with possible Ouachita System equivalents in Mexico. The ultimate aim is to constrain the tectonic setting of the southern margin of North America during the Paleozoic, with particular emphasis on collisional events leading to the final suturing of Pangea. Nd isotopic data identify 3 distinct groups: (1) Ordovician passive margin sequence; (2) Carboniferous proto-flysch (Stanley Fm.), main flysch (Jackfork and Atoka Fms.) and molasse (foreland Atoka Fm.); (3) Mississippian ash-flow tuffs. The authors interpret the Ordovician signature to be essentially all craton-derived, whereas the Carboniferous signature reflects mixed sources from the craton plus orogenic sources to the east and possibly the south, including the evolving Appalachian Orogen. The proposed southern source is revealed by the tuffs to be too old and evolved to be a juvenile island arc terrane. They interpret the tuffs to have been erupted in a continental margin arc-type setting. Surprisingly, the foreland molasse sequence is indistinguishable from the main trough flysch sequence, suggesting the Ouachita trough and the craton were both inundated with sediment of a single homogenized isotopic signature during the Late Carboniferous. The possibility that Carboniferous-type sedimentary dispersal patterns began as early as the Silurian has important implications for the tectonics and paleogeography of the evolving Appalachian-Ouachita Orogenic System.

  2. Jurassic sedimentary basins in the Central Asian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1995-05-01

    The principal stages of development of Jurassic sedimentary basins (from their origin to the end of their existence) in the Central Asian orogenic belt are considered. The interrelations of the basins with the surrounding paleorises are investigated. Paleogeographic maps are compiled representing the evolution of paleolandscapes and revealing their interrelations in space and time for each stage. Areas with the highest prospects for coal are found.

  3. Orogenic gold and geologic time: A global synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Groves, D.I.; Gardoll, S.

    2001-01-01

    Orogenic gold deposits have formed over more than 3 billion years of Earth's history, episodically during the Middle Archean to younger Precambrian, and continuously throughout the Phanerozoic. This class of gold deposit is characteristically associated with deformed and metamorphosed mid-crustal blocks, particularly in spatial association with major crustal structures. A consistent spatial and temporal association with granitoids of a variety of compositions indicates that melts and fluids were both inherent products of thermal events during orogenesis. Including placer accumulations, which are commonly intimately associated with this mineral deposit type, recognized production and resources from economic Phanerozoic orogenic-gold deposits are estimated at just over one billion ounces gold. Exclusive of the still-controversial Witwatersrand ores, known Precambrian gold concentrations are about half this amount. The recent increased applicability of global paleo-reconstructions, coupled with improved geochronology from most of the world's major gold camps, allows for an improved understanding of the distribution pattern of orogenic gold in space and time.

  4. Nature and timing of large landslides within an active orogen, eastern Pamir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhaode; Chen, Jie; Owen, Lewis A.; Hedrick, Kathryn A.; Caffee, Marc W.; Li, Wenqiao; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Robinson, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale landsliding (involving ≫ 106 m3 in volume) is important in landscape development in high mountains. To assess the importance of large landslides in high mountains, four large landslides (Bulunkou, Muztagh, Taheman, and Yimake) were mapped in the NE Chinese Pamir at the westernmost end of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen and dated using 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides. The Bulunkou landslide at the southernmost end of Muji Valley is composed of ~ 1.7 × 107 m3 of landslide debris and has an age of 2.0 ± 0.1 ka. The Muztagh landslide, located on the SW side of the massif Muztagh Ata, is composed of ~ 4.7 × 108 m3 of debris, and has an age of 14.3 ± 0.8 ka. The Taheman landslide, located south of Muztagh Ata, is composed of ~ 2.6 × 108 m3 of landslide debris and has an age of 6.8 ± 0.2 ka. The Yimake landslide, on the northern frontal range of the Pamir at the southwestern end of the Tarim basin, is composed of ~ 1.4 × 109 m3 of landslide debris and has an age of 7.1 ± 0.6 ka. Two other large landslides are present in the region, the Aerpa Aigezi (on a tributary of the Gez River) and the Bile Jiyi (on the Yarkand River) landslides, and are composed of ~ 1.6 × 107 m3 and ~ 5.2 × 106 m3 of landslide debris, respectively. However, the Aerpa Aigezi and Bile Jiyi landslides were not studied in as much detail or dated because of their inaccessibility. Given the tectonically active nature of this region, with numerous active faults, and the morphology of the landslides, these landslides were likely triggered by earthquakes. However, other causes — including long-term increased precipitation and geologic bedrock structure — could be important contributing factors in their formation.

  5. Petrogenesis and geochemistry of circa 2.5 Ga granitoids in the Zanhuang Massif: Implications for magmatic source and Neoarchean metamorphism of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junpeng; Kusky, Timothy; Wang, Lu; Polat, Ali; Wang, Songjie; Deng, Hao; Fu, Jianmin; Fu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    The tectonic framework of the North China Craton (NCC) during late Archean to early Paleoproterozoic (circa 2.5 Ga) is still lacking comprehensive understanding due to subsequent strong deformation and metamorphic overprinting events. Circa 2.5 Ga magmatic and metamorphic activities are widely spread throughout the NCC, which can be used as an efficient target to better understand the tectonic evolution at this period. In this study, based on a detailed field, structural, geochemical, geochronological and Sm-Nd isotopic study, we focus our work on the Haozhuang granitoids in the Zanhuang Massif located at the eastern margin of the Central Orogenic Belt of the NCC. The granitoids mainly include undeformed pegmatite and granodiorite. One pegmatite and two granodiorite samples yield zircon 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2513 ± 29 Ma, 2511 ± 36 Ma and 2528 ± 18 Ma, respectively. The granodiorites show metaluminous and shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline series characteristics with A-type granite affinity. The circa 2.5 Ga granodiorites have highly negative εNd(t) values (- 29.22 - 33.12) and TDM model ages between 2671 Ma and 3151 Ma. This work shows clearly, from whole-rock major and trace elements and Sm-Nd isotopic studies, that the Haozhuang granodiorites were derived from partial melting of old and thickened TTG crust rather than mantle sources, and formed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. With geochemical comparison studies to other similar-aged granitic rocks in the Zanhuang Massif, we suggest that these granitic rocks possibly have a certain correlation during the magma evolution. Coupled with our previous geochemical and isotopic studies on circa 2.5 Ga mafic dike swarms, we propose that the similar-aged granitic rocks and mafic dike swarms were produced by an east-dipping subduction polarity reversal event following an arc-continent collision between the Fuping/Wutai island arc and Eastern Block of the NCC above a west-dipping slab. The east

  6. Evidence of Variscan and Alpine tectonics in the structural and thermochronological record of the central Serbo-Macedonian Massif (south-eastern Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antić, Milorad D.; Kounov, Alexandre; Trivić, Branislav; Spikings, Richard; Wetzel, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM) represents a composite crystalline belt within the Eastern European Alpine orogen, outcropping from the Pannonian basin in the north to the Aegean Sea in the south. The central parts of this massif (south-eastern Serbia) consist of the medium- to high-grade Lower Complex and the low-grade Vlasina Unit. Outcrop- and micro-scale ductile structures in this area document three major stages of ductile deformation. The earliest stage D1 is related to isoclinal folding, commonly preserved as up to decimetre-scale quartz-feldspar rootless fold hinges. D2 is associated with general south-eastward tectonic transport and refolding of earlier structures into recumbent metre- to kilometre-scale tight to isoclinal folds. Stages D1 and D2 could not be temporally separated and probably took place in close sequence. The age of these two ductile deformation stages was constrained to the Variscan orogeny based on indirect geological evidence (i.e. ca. 408-ca. 328). During this period, the SMM was involved in a transpressional amalgamation of the western and eastern parts of the Galatian super-terrane and subsequent collision with Laurussia. Outcrop-scale evidence of the final stage D3 is limited to spaced and crenulation cleavage, which are probably related to formation of large-scale open upright folds as reported previously. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology was applied on hornblende, muscovite, and biotite samples in order to constrain the age of tectonothermal events and activity along major shear zones. These 40Ar/39Ar data reveal three major cooling episodes affecting the central SMM. Cooling below greenschist facies conditions in the western part of the Vlasina Unit took place in a post-orogenic setting (extensional or transtensional) in the early Permian (284 ± 1 Ma). The age of activity along the top-to-the-west shear zone formed within the orthogneiss in the Božica area of the Vlasina Unit was constrained to Middle Triassic (246 ± 1 Ma). This

  7. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  8. Deformation during terrane accretion in the Saint Elias orogen, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruhn, R.L.; Pavlis, T.L.; Plafker, G.; Serpa, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Elias orogen of southern Alaska and adjacent Canada is a complex belt of mountains formed by collision and accretion of the Yakutat terrane into the transition zone from transform faulting to subduction in the northeast Pacific. The orogen is an active analog for tectonic processes that formed much of the North American Cordillera, and is also an important site to study (1) the relationships between climate and tectonics, and (2) structures that generate large- to great-magnitude earthquakes. The Yakutat terrane is a fragment of the North American plate margin that is partly subducted beneath and partly accreted to the continental margin of southern Alaska. Interaction between the Yakutat terrane and the North American and Pacific plates causes significant differences in the style of deformation within the terrane. Deformation in the eastern part of the terrane is caused by strike-slip faulting along the Fairweather transform fault and by reverse faulting beneath the coastal mountains, but there is little deformation immediately offshore. The central part of the orogen is marked by thrusting of the Yakutat terrane beneath the North American plate along the Chugach-Saint Elias fault and development of a wide, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt. Strike-slip faulting in this segment may he localized in the hanging wall of the Chugach-Saint Elias fault, or dissipated by thrust faulting beneath a north-northeast-trending belt of active deformation that cuts obliquely across the eastern end of the fold-and-thrust belt. Superimposed folds with complex shapes and plunging hinge lines accommodate horizontal shortening and extension in the western part of the orogen, where the sedimentary cover of the Yakutat terrane is accreted into the upper plate of the Aleutian subduction zone. These three structural segments are separated by transverse tectonic boundaries that cut across the Yakutat terrane and also coincide with the courses of piedmont glaciers that flow from

  9. Petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of granite hosted rhyodacites associated with a disseminated pyrite mineralization (Arnolz, Southern Bohemian Massif, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göd, Richard; Kurzweil, Johannes; Klötzli, Urs

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on a subvolcanic rhyodacite dyke intruding a fine grained biotite granite and paragneisses of the South Bohemian Massif, part of the Variscan Orogenic Belt in Central Europe. The subvertical dyke strikes NNE, displays a thickness of about 30 m and has been traced by boulder mapping for approximately 7 km. The rhyodacites have been affected by two hydrothermal fluids. An older one of oxidizing condition giving rise to a reddish to brownish type of rock (Type I) and a younger fluid of reducing condition causing a greenish variety (Type II). The hydrothermal alteration is associated with the formation of the clay minerals chlorite, sericite, kaolinite and smectite and a disseminated pyrite mineralization. Bulk chemistries of the rhyodacites emphasize the hydrothermal alterations to be isochemical with the exception of sulphur enriched up to a maximum of 0.6 wt%. Trace element composition of the rhyodacites points to a barren geochemical environment in terms of base and precious elements. Sulphur isotope investigations of pyrites from the rhyodacites and the hosting granites respectively yield d34S data ranging from +0.07 to -2.22 ‰, emphasizing a magmatic origin of the sulphur. Geochronological investigations yield in situ U/Pb zircon ages of 312 ± 4 Ma for the biotite granite and of 292 ± 4 Ma for the rhyodacitic dykes indicating a time gap of ≈ 20 Ma between these two intrusive events. A contemporaneous but geochemically specialized granitic intrusion associated with NW striking "felsitic" dykes occurs about 10 to 20 km to the NW of Arnolz. However, the rhyodacites around Arnolz differ significantly from these felsitic dykes in their geochemistry and alteration phenomena which points to a different magmatic source. This coincides with a change in the orientation of the dykes from a NW direction controlling the geochemically specialized intrusions in the NW to a dominating NNE direction mirrored by the studied rhyodacites at Arnolz.

  10. Structural, mineralogical, and paleoflow velocity constraints on Hercynian tin mineralization: the Achmmach prospect of the Moroccan Central Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubi, El Mahjoub; Chauvet, Alain; Badra, Lakhlifi; Sizaret, Stanislas; Barbanson, Luc; El Maz, Abdelkader; Chen, Yan; Amann, Méderic

    2016-03-01

    The Achmmach tin mineralization (NE of the Moroccan Central Massif) is associated with tourmaline-rich alteration halos, veins, and faults hosted in sandstones and metapelites of the Upper Visean-Namurian. These deposits are reported to be late Hercynian in age and related to the emplacement of late-orogenic granite not outcropping in the studied area. Structural and paragenetic studies of the Achmmach tin deposit were conducted in order to establish a general model of the mineralization. From field constraints, the late Hercynian phase is marked by a transition from transpression to extension with deformation conditions evolving from ductile to brittle environments. The transpression (horizontal shortening direction roughly trending E-W) is coeval with the emplacement of the first tourmaline halos along several conjugated trends (N070, N020, and N120). Thereafter, a tourmaline-rich breccia formed in response to the fracturing of early tourmaline-altered rocks. Subsequently, during the extensional phase, these structures were reactivated as normal faults and breccias, allowing the formation of the main tin mineralization (cassiterite) associated with a wide variety of sulfides (arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, pyrrhotite, bismuthinite, pyrite, and stannite). This evolution ends with fluorite and carbonate deposition. The hydrothermal fluid flow velocity, calculated by applying statistical measures on the tourmaline growth bands, varies with the lithology. Values are lower in metapelites and higher in breccia. In the general evolution model proposed here, tourmaline alteration makes the rock more competent, allowing for brittle fracturing and generation of open space where the main Sn mineralization was precipitated.

  11. Thermo-kinematic evolution of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal: The Composite Orogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Law, R. D.; Lloyd, G. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen represents a "Composite Orogenic System" in which channel flow, wedge extrusion, and thrust stacking operate in separate "Orogenic Domains" with distinct rheologies and crustal positions. We analyze 104 samples from the metamorphic core (Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS) and bounding units of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal. Optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses provide a record of deformation microstructures and an indication of active crystal slip systems, strain geometries, and deformation temperatures. These data, combined with existing thermobarometry and geochronology data are used to construct detailed deformation temperature profiles for the GHS. The profiles define a three-stage thermokinematic evolution from midcrustal channel flow (Stage 1, >700°C to 550-650°C), to rigid wedge extrusion (Stage 2, 400-600°C) and duplexing (Stage 3, <280-400°C). These tectonic processes are not mutually exclusive, but are confined to separate rheologically distinct Orogenic Domains that form the modular components of a Composite Orogenic System. These Orogenic Domains may be active at the same time at different depths/positions within the orogen. The thermokinematic evolution of the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya describes the migration of the GHS through these Orogenic Domains and reflects the spatial and temporal variability in rheological boundary conditions that govern orogenic systems.

  12. Late-orogenic, post-orogenic, and anorogenic granites: Distinction by major-element and trace-element chemistry and possible origins

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Granites classified into four categories based solely on tectonics of occurrence and associated rock types also have compositional characteristics that are consistent within groups and different among groups. Orogenically related granites include late-orogenic varieties (LO) associated with calc-alkaline batholiths, and post-orogenic varieties (PO), which occur in broad zones of isolated diapiric plutons in recently deformed orogenic belts. Inclined REE patterns, moderate Sr contents, and K{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} relationships show that late-orogenic granites formed by fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and amphibole from calcalkaline magmas. Flatter REE patterns and K{sub 2}O contents near 5%, plus the absence of associated magmatic rocks, indicate that the post-orogenic granites developed by partial melting of subduction-produced mafic/intermediate magmatic rocks. Both the late- and post-orogenic granites can be part of material newly added to continental crust as a result of orogeny. Anorogenic granites in anorthosite/rapakivi complexes (AR) or alkaline ring complexes (RC) have LIL contents too high to have been equilibrated with a mafic mineral assemblage. These anorogenic rocks probably formed by partial melting of preexisting sialic crust and do not represent new crustal increment.

  13. Intrusion level of granitic massifs along the Hercynian belt: balancing the eroded crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J. L.

    1999-06-01

    Hercynian granitoid intrusions form a long (3200 km) belt comparable in size to other batholiths in the world. Six massifs have been selected which encompass Cabeza de Araya (Extremadura, Spain), Guitiriz (Galicia, Spain), Pontivy and Mortagne (Brittany, France), La Marche (Massif Central, France) and Fichtelgebirge (Bavaria, Germany). Detailed gravity surveys over these massifs and subsequent inversion provide their shape at depth. Correlation of the deeper zones with internal structures determine the place of the root zones. The shape of the massifs is examined along the strike of the chain. The emplacement of individual massifs is controlled by local tectonics. Most granites are not deeply rooted, but one massif (Cabeza de Araya, Spain) shows a root zone presently as deep as 14 km. Most have about half of their volume in the first 3 km below the present surface. Estimates of the magma volume transferred result in 1500 km 3 issued from one specific feeder, yielding a total of 70,000 km 3 of magma intruded all along the chain. The depth of emplacement of the granitic massifs does not show any significant trend along the strike of the chain. The shallower massifs in the French Massif Central correspond to more deeply eroded areas in the center of the chain. Their root zone, as well as the change in the dip of the walls, are presently observed at depths ranging between 4 and 6 km in Hercynian granites. Both variations are interpreted as being related to the brittle/ductile transition at the time of emplacement. Gross thermal considerations place the transition at its former place during magma emplacement, indicating that the upper crust has not been eroded by more than 6-8 km. This estimate severely contrasts with models involving a doubled crust.

  14. Highly refractory peridotites in Songshugou, Qinling orogen: Insights into partial melting and melt/fluid-rock reactions in forearc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Song, Shuguang; Su, Li; Jung, Haemyeong; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-05-01

    The Songshugou ultramafic massif is located in the eastern segment of the Qinling orogenic belt, central China. It is a large spinel peridotite body dominated by coarse-grained, porphyroclastic, and fine-grained dunite with minor harzburgite, olivine clinopyroxenite, and banded/podiform chromitite. The compositions of the bulk-rock dunite and harzburgite, and the constituent olivine and spinel, together with the textures and chemical characteristics of multiphase mineral inclusions, point to the highly refractory nature of these rocks with complex histories of high-temperature boninite melt generation and boninitic melt-rock reaction, probably in a young, warm, and volatile-rich forearc lithospheric mantle setting. Additionally, a subsequent low-temperature fluid-rock reaction is also recorded by TiO2-rich spinel with Ti solubility/mobility enhanced by chloride- or fluoride-rich subduction-zone fluids as advocated by Rapp et al. (2010). The olivine clinopyroxenite, on the other hand, was likely crystallized from a residual boninitic melt that had reacted with harzburgitic residues. The ubiquitous occurrences of hydrous minerals, such as anthophyllite, tremolite, Cr-chlorite, and serpentine (stable at lower P-T crustal conditions) in the matrix, suggest that further low-temperature fluid-rock reaction (or retrograde metamorphism) has affected the original volatile-poor peridotites either in a mature and cool subduction zone, or in a continental crust during their exhumation into the Qinling collisional orogeny at early Paleozoic era, or both. The prolonged and intense ductile/brittle deformation can decrease the mineral grain size through dynamic recrystallization and fracturing, and thus aid the fluid-rock reaction or retrograde metamorphism and mineral chemical re-equilibration processes. Therefore, the Songshugou peridotites present a good example for understanding the petrogenesis and evolution of the mantle wedge, with the emphasis on the complex partial

  15. Sr-Nd isotope and trace-element geochemistry of late Variscan volcanism in the Pyrenees: Magmatism in post-orogenic extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocent, Christophe; Briqueu, Louis; Cabanis, Bruno

    1994-11-01

    We obtained Sr-Nd isotope and trace-element data on late Variscan volcanic rocks in the Pyrenees: felsic lavas and andesites from the Ossau and the Serra de Cadi massifs and calc-alkaline andesites and alkali basalts from the La Rhune and the Anayet volcanic massifs. The calc-alkaline volcanic rocks have crustal trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics. The andesites probably originated from melting of Pan-African paragneisses, with a limited contribution of mantle-derived sources having lithospheric characteristics. The andesitic lavas were more or less contaminated in magma chambers by Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks, which can be interpreted as a recycled Proterozoic crust. The felsic lavas are principally derived from anatexis of the Palaeozoic products, the rhyolites providing even peraluminous characteristics. The Anayet andesites show mantle-derived characteristics, and are interpreted as a mixture between a strongly undersaturated continental alkali basalt and a peraluminous end-member. However, Sr and Nd contents rale out any simple process. The late Anayet alkali basalts show typical asthenospheric Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics. The La Rhune basalts exhibit Sr and Nd sub-continental lithospheric isotopic characteristics, very similar to those of the Triassic Pyrenean continental basalts. It is thought that the granulite facies metamorphism dated at 310 Ma was caused by the ascent of the asthenosphere inducing a thermal anomaly. The mafic magmas ascending from the mantle are responsible for the crustal anatexis. This results in the emplacement of both the Pyrenean composite plutons, such as the Querigut massif, and the Ossau volcanic rocks. The Pyrenean late Variscan volcanic rocks were emplaced in either pull-apart basins opened by the reactivation of the major Variscan Pyrenean fault in a distensive setting or, better, in basins resulting from a post-orogenic collapse. Both these models involve a thinning of the subcontinental lithosphere

  16. Convergence rate controls seismicity styles in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, Luca; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal resulted from the unzipping of the previously locked Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) fault, along which the Himalayan wedge is thrust over India. Strong ground shaking caused the collapse of more than half a million homes, killing more than 8500 people. Can such a large magnitude event also occur within the populated European Alps? Or is there a distinctly different seismicity pattern in different orogens? We show that their long-term seismicity patterns are indeed different and that their differences can be explained by a single parameter: their convergence rate. To do so we present the first self-consistent seismic cycle model for continental collisional margins. We use the viscoelastoplastic continuum Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical model (STM) validated for seismic cycle applications against a laboratory model (van Dinther et al., 2013a) and natural observations (van Dinther et al., 2013b), which includes Drucker-Prager plasticity and spontaneous rupture events governed by strongly rate-dependent friction. The 2-D model setup consists of two continental plates separated by an oceanic plate, in which the incipient subduction phase is followed by collisional orogeny. Results show the physically consistent spontaneous emergence of complex rupture paths, both on and off the main frontal thrust. These off-main frontal thrust events within the upper and lower plate complement the main frontal thrust seismicity leading to a Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude distribution. This is a key observational feature of seismicity, which is typically not reproduced in seismic cycle models. The range of simulated b-values agrees with natural ranges, as we observe values from 0.97 up to 1.25 for convergence rates decreasing from 5 to 1 cm/yr. Decreasing convergence rates thus lead to relatively larger amounts of smaller earthquakes (increasing b-value) and lower maximum magnitudes. This change in b-value also observed to corresponds to

  17. Structural geology investigation on Massif Central and Parisian Basin (France)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weecksteen, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Band 5 gives the most information concerning the fracturing in the Massif Central and Parisian Basins. Band 6 and 7 show the fractures emphasized by forest boundaries and by the linear trace of water courses. The most remarkable information drawn from the preliminary investigation of two ERTS-1 images covering two different landscapes, a regular relief of shelving plateau bounded by cuestas having a sedimentary origin and a mountainous region built in crystalline and volcanic rocks, is that the deep structural elements under a thick sedimentary cover can be translated on the surface by indirect criteria. MSS imagery has permitted the Metz fault to be extended towards the west and shows clearly, through land use on the Rhone Valley fluvial deposit, the continuation towards the east of the carboniferous basin of St. Etienne.

  18. Structural investigations in the Massif-Central, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanvic, J. Y.

    1974-01-01

    This survey covered the French Massif-Central (where crystalline and volcanic rocks outcrop) and its surrounding sedimentaries, Bassin de Paris, Bassin d'Aquitaine and Rhodanian valley. One objective was the mapping of fracturing and the surveying of its relationship with known ore deposits. During this survey it was found that ERTS imagery outlines lithology in some sedimentary basins. On the other hand, in a basement area, under temperature climate conditions, lithology is rarely expressed. These observations can be related to the fact that band 5 gives excellent results above sedimentary basins in France and generally band 7 is the most useful in a basement area. Several examples show clearly the value of ERTS imagery for mapping linear features and circular structures. All the main fractures are identified with the exception of new ones found both in sedimentaries and basement areas. Other interesting findings concern sun elevation which, stereoscopic effect not being possible, simulates relief in a better way under certain conditions.

  19. Petrogenesis of late-Variscan high-K alkali-calcic granitoids and calc-alkalic lamprophyres: The Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant complex, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroff, Martial; Labry, Cyrill; Le Gall, Bernard; Authemayou, Christine; Grosjean, Denise Bussien; Guillong, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    The Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant Variscan granitoid complex in the Armorican Massif is an example of high-K alkali-calcic zoned pluton, c. 304 Ma in age. A first magmatic batch intruded through a northern EW-trending sinistral transcurrent shear zone, before injecting southwards as a huge horizontal zoned sill, with moderately peraluminous muscovite-free granitoids in the north and strongly peraluminous muscovite-bearing leucogranites to the south. The second magmatic stage resulted in the intrusion of a large two-mica leucogranitic body from a root zone along the same shear zone, prior to the end of crystallization of the first injection. Finally, ultrapotassic dykes, including calc-alkalic lamprophyres (leucominettes), intrude the complex. The strongly peraluminous granites are interpreted as pure melting products of crustal clay-rich pelitic material. All the other petrographic types, including leucominettes, are thought to result from mixing of crustal melts and mantle-derived mafic liquids. Highly silicic tourmaline-bearing leucogranites are significantly affected by a tetrad effect, in relation with REE complexing behavior. Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant granitoids probably formed during the Variscan late-orogenic stage associated with exhumation and lithospheric thinning, at low pressure and by advective heating of a ≤ 50 km-thick crust from hot metasomatized asthenosphere.

  20. Plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction recorded in the Haladala layered intrusion in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Li; Huang, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xue; Li, Wu-Xian

    2016-03-01

    The plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction may be common and important for the generation of large igneous provinces. The information regarding such a process is recorded by the Haladala gabbroic intrusion (~300 Ma), the largest layered ultramafic-mafic intrusion hosting V-Ti magnetite deposits in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China. The Haladala gabbros exhibit unfractionated chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns with negative Nb and Ta anomalies and positive Pb anomaly on the primitive mantle-normalized multielement variation diagram. They are characterized by low initial Sr isotopes, slightly decoupled but high positive bulk rock ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and high 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb relative to 206Pb/204Pb, delineating a DUPAL signature in the sources. The Haladala gabbros cannot be arc or postcollisional magmatism, given the lack of hydrous minerals and low K contents, respectively. This is further supported by the relatively low oxygen fugacity required for the gradual enrichment of V-Ti magnetite during the magma fractionation and by an overall anhydrous mantle source suggested by troctolite mineral assemblage (olivine + plagioclase). The emplacement age of the Haladala gabbros is identical to that of the Wajilitag kimberlites in the Tarim's interior, which have been interpreted as the first magmatic expression of the Tarim mantle plume. We thus propose that the Haladala gabbroic intrusion was generated in a hybrid geodynamic setting in which the Southwest Tianshan Orogen was impacted by an upwelling mantle plume. In this sense, the Haladala layered gabbroic intrusion records the early phase of magmatism of the Tarim plume, which was preferentially emplaced in a lithospheric weak zone.

  1. Orogen-scale L tectonite domain in the Tongbai orogenic belt, central China: Geological setting and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Lin, Shoufa; Song, Chuanzhong

    2017-01-01

    L tectonite is well developed and widely distributed in the Tongbai orogenic belt in central China. The orogenic belt as a whole has an antiformal geometry and the hinge of the antiform is subhorizontal and trends NW-SE. The L tectonite occurs in the core of the antiform, in a zone that is 10-30 km wide and over 100 km long. Lineations in the L tectonite are sub-horizontal, parallel to the hinge of the antiform. Sheath folds are also well developed associated with the L tectonite, with the hinges parallel to the lineations. Migmatite occurs in the core and structurally below the L tectonite and has a gradational relationship with the L tectonite. The domain of L tectonite is bounded by three ductile shear zones, on the north, at the top and on the south, respectively. Well-developed shear sense indicators indicate that the southern, the overlying and the northern shear zones have a dextral, top-to-NW and sinistral sense of shear, respectively. These geometrical and kinematic data indicate that the three shear zones are likely part of a single shear zone that wraps around the L-tectonite domain. The L-tectonite zone in the core moves southeast relative to the hanging wall. The development of the tectonite is interpreted to be a result of this special geometry and kinematics and reflects a post-collisional orogen-parallel extension synchronous with migmatization and the continuing convergence between the Yangtze Block and the North China Block in the Early Cretaceous.

  2. Lower Carboniferous post-orogenic granites in central-eastern Sierra de Velasco, Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina: U-Pb monazite geochronology, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Söllner, Frank; Báez, Miguel A.; Toselli, Alejandro J.; Rossi, Juana N.; de La Rosa, Jesus D.

    2009-07-01

    The central-eastern part of the Sierra de Velasco (Sierras Pampeanas, NW Argentina) is formed by the large Huaco (40 × 30 km) and Sanagasta (25 × 15 km) granite massifs and the small La Chinchilla stock (2 × 2 km). The larger granites intrude into Ordovician metagranitoids and crosscut Devonian (?) mylonitic shear zones, whereas the small stock sharply intrudes into the Huaco granite. The two voluminous granites are biotitic-muscovitic and biotitic porphyritic syeno- to monzogranites. They contain small and rounded tonalitic and quartz-dioritic mafic microgranular enclaves. The small stock is an equigranular, zinnwaldite- and fluorite-bearing monzogranite. The studied granites are silica-rich (SiO2 >70%), potassium-rich (K2O >4%), ferroan, alkali-calcic to slightly calk-alkalic, and moderately to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK: 1.06-1.18 Huaco granite, 1.01-1.09 Sanagasta granite, 1.05-1.06 La Chinchilla stock). They have moderate to strong enrichments in several LIL (Li, Rb, Cs) and HFS (Nb, Ta, Y, Th, U) elements, and low Sr, Ba and Eu contents. U-Pb monazite age determinations indicate Lower Carboniferous crystallization ages: 350-358 Ma for the Huaco granite, 352.7 ± 1.4 Ma for the Sanagasta granite and 344.5 ± 1.4 Ma for the La Chinchilla stock. The larger granites have similar ɛNd values between -2.1 and -4.3, whereas the younger stock has higher ɛNd of -0.6 to -1.4, roughly comparable to the values obtained for the Carboniferous San Blas granite (-1.4 to -1.7), located in the north of the sierra. The Huaco and Sanagasta granites have a mainly crustal source, but with some participation of a more primitive, possibly mantle-derived, component. The main crustal component can be attributed to Ordovician peraluminous metagranitoids. The La Chinchilla stock derives from a more primitive source, suggesting an increase with time in the participation of the primitive component during magma genesis. The studied granites were generated during a post-orogenic period

  3. Post-orogenic thermal evolution of newborn Archean continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The post-orogenic thermal evolution of newborn cratons in the Archean is marked by high-temperature metamorphism and plutonic activity that lag accretion by several tens of million years. The source of the heat that is required remains controversial. Here, we show that such late activity is consistent with the thermal evolution of new continental crust that adjusts to heat released by radioactive decay. Quantitative results depend on the total amount of radioactive elements in the newborn crust. Using heat flow and heat production data from the Archean Superior Province of the Canadian Shield, we show that temperatures ≈800-900 °C were reached in the lower crust a few tens of million years after the final accretion event. The timing of post-orogenic metamorphism is sensitive to the thermal structure acquired at the end of accretion. For the Superior Province, the relatively short time-lag between the end of accretion and metamorphism suggests that the lithosphere was thin or had been heated up by sustained magma percolation.

  4. Continuation of the New England Orogen, Australia, beneath the Queensland Plateau and Lord Howe rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortimer, N.; Hauff, F.; Calvert, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Greywacke, argillite, greyschist and hypabyssal igneous rocks have been obtained from an Ocean Drilling Program core on the Queensland Plateau and from xenoliths in a volcanic breccia dredged from the crest of the Lord Howe Rise. Low to intermediate detrital quartz contents, 260-240 Ma K-Ar ages, and only moderately radiogenic Sr and Nd isotope compositions, suggest a correlation with the New England Orogen of eastern Australia, rather than with Australia's Lachlan Orogen or other adjacent geological provinces. Our results indicate that the New England Orogen terranes continue towards New Zealand at least as far as the southern Lord Howe Rise. The projected offshore boundaries of the major east Australian orogens are now known with more confidence, and do not appear to require any major cross-orogen offsets.

  5. Structural and kinematic evolution of a Miocene to Recent sinistral restraining bend: the Montejunto massif, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    The Montejunto massif lies in the apex of a large-scale restraining bend at the southern termination of a sinistral transpressive fault system, in the Lusitanian basin of Portugal. Cenozoic deformation within the Montejunto massif initiated with southerly directed thrusting along the southern boundary of the massif, in association with the development of the E-W oriented Montejunto anticline, probably during the Langhian. Deformation switched to the northern boundary of the massif, in association with a change to NW-directed thrusting and continued development of the Montejunto anticline. The youngest set of structures within the massif is related to the sinistral reactivation of the Arieiro fault system, and steeply inclined bedding. This late phase of deformation represents the accommodation of a component of sinistral displacement across the restraining bend along mechanical anisotropies formed during this progressive Cenozoic deformation event. Variation in the kinematic style of the Main Arieiro fault is related to the angle ( α) between the fault plane and the displacement vector. Where α≈20°, abrupt pene-contemporaneous switches in displacement direction are recorded along the fault, whereas strike-slip kinematics predominate where α<20°. The timing of deformation events in the Montejunto massif is uncertain. However, correlation with the established Cenozoic Africa/Europe plate convergence directions may provide potential temporal constraints.

  6. Crustal Development in the Northeast Asian Orogenic Belt and its comparison with the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Bor-ming

    2016-04-01

    The Northeast Asian Orogenic Belt is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic accretionary orogenic collage, and it constitutes the northern and principal part of the "Nipponides" (Sengor and Natal'in, 1996). The tectonic framework was formed in Mesozoic and Cenozoic, and it continues to evolve along the modern Pacific arc-trench systems. Generally, a oceanward younging of tectonic units may be discerned, but such a simple pattern is disrupted in many places by extensive strike-slip faulting, most of which is left-lateral. In this talk, the issue of crustal development in the sector of Sikhote-Alin and Japanese Islands will be discussed based on the geochemical and isotopic analyses of granitoids that intruded in various tectonostratigraphic terrains. The majority of granitoids in the NE Asian Orogenic Belt formed from Jurassic to late Cenozoic, with Cretaceous as the dominant period of granitic magmatism and tectonothermal events. A few Early Paleozoic granitic rocks (500 to 450 Ma) have been identified in SW Japan (Kurosegawa Belt) as well as in NE Japan (Kitakami Belt), among them the ca. 500 Ma diorites and tonalites of southern Kitakami are the oldest rocks in Japan and interpreted as the first TTG crust of proto-Japan (Isozaki et al., 2015). Cretaceous granitoids are widespread in Sikhote-Alin and in NE and SW Japan. However, granitoids were emplaced only in the Cenozoic in Sakhalin (ca. 44 - 42 Ma) and Hokkaido (45, 37 and 18 Ma). Most granitoids from Sikhote-Alin are of I-type and have ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7083, and ɛNd(T) = +3.0 to -6.0 (mostly 0 to -5). The Sr-Nd isotopic data fall within the range of granitoids from SW Japan (0.704 to 0.712; +5.0 to -13.0), and the data of Cretaceous granitoids from Sikhote-Alin and SW Japan overlap almost completely. The Cenozoic granitoids of Hokkaido are characterized by ISr = 0.7044 - 0.7061, ɛNd(T) = +1.0 to +4.7, and Sm-Nd model-1 ages = 400-1000 Ma. This is remarkably similar to the Sakhalin granitoids with ISr = 0.7047 - 0.7050,

  7. Mineralogy and ore fluid chemistry of the Roc Blanc Ag deposit, Jebilet Hercynian massif, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essarraj, Samira; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel; Tarantola, Alexandre; Leisen, Mathieu; Hibti, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    The Roc Blanc Ag deposit is located about 20 km north of Marrakesh city (Morocco) in the Jebilet Hercynian massif. The ore bodies consist of N-S to NE-SW quartz (±carbonates) veins hosted by the Sarhlef marine sediments. These series, deposited in a Devonian-Carboniferous rift basin context, were deformed during the Hercynian orogeny, and submitted to low-grade regional metamorphism. Two major stages of fluid circulation and metal deposition are distinguished on the basis of mineralogical and paleo-fluid studies carried out on quartz and dolomite (microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, LA-ICP-MS on individual inclusions, and O, H stable isotope data): (i) an early Fe-As stage, characterized by the circulation of metamorphic aqueous-carbonic fluids, under P-T conditions lower than 200 MPa ± 20 MPa and 400 °C respectively, along N-S structures; (ii) the ore stage, characterized by the circulation of a Na-Mg-K ± Ca high salinity brine, poor in gas but rich in metals such as Fe, Sr, Ba, Zn, Pb, ± Cu (salinity ranging from 19.6 wt% to likely more than 30 wt% NaCl equiv.) and the deposition of a sphalerite/dolomite-calcite assemblage; such a fluid likely evolved to a Na-K-(Ca-Mg)-Ag brine, with significant Pb and Sb concentrations and lower Sr, Ba and Zn concentrations than in the preceding fluid (salinity up to 19.4 wt% NaCl equiv.). The Ag content of the second mineralizing brine ranges from 0.9 mmol/kg to 9.4 mmol/kg solution (100 ppm-1000 ppm), whereas the base metal brine is generally Ag poor (up to 1.3 mmol/kg solution: 140 ppm). Dilution of the Ag brine by low salinity fluids (<6 wt% NaCl equiv., and Th from 130° to 230 °C) seems to be the main driving mechanism for the Ag ore deposition at Roc Blanc, with a possible involvement of cooling and reduction reactions in black schists. Base metal and Ag fluids may have circulated at average temperatures around 200 ± 30 °C or slightly higher and under hydrostatic pressures, along dominant E-W structures. The ore

  8. P-wave Receiver Functions reveal the Bohemian Massif crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampfova Exnerova, Hana; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Vecsey, Ludek

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present initial results of P-wave Receiver Functions (RF) calculated from broad-band waveforms of teleseismic events recorded by temporary and permanent stations in the Bohemian Massif (BM, Central Europe). Temporary arrays BOHEMA I (2001-2003), BOHEMA II (2004-2005) and BOHEMA III (2005-2006) operated during passive seismic experiments oriented towards studying velocity structure of the lithosphere and the upper mantle. Receiver Functions show relative response of the Earth structure under a seismic station and nowadays represent frequently-used method to retrieve structure of the crust, whose knowledge is needed in various studies of the upper mantle. The recorded waveforms are composites of direct P and P-to-S converted waves that reverberate in the structure beneath the receiver (Ammon, 1997). The RFs are sensitive to seismic velocity contrast and are thus suited to identifying velocity discontinuities in the crust, including the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho). Relative travel-time delays of the converted phases detected in the RFs are transformed into estimates of discontinuity depths assuming external information on the vp/vs and P velocity. To evaluate RFs we use the Multiple-taper spectral correlation (MTC) method (Park and Levin, 2000) and process signals from teleseismic events at epicentral distances of 30 - 100° with magnitude Mw > 5.5. Recordings are filtered with Butterworth band-pass filter of 2 - 8 s. To select automatically signals which are strong enough, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in two steps. In the first step we calculate SNR for signals from intervals (-1s, 3s)/(-10s, -2s), where P-arrival time represent time zero. In the second step we broaden the intervals and calculate SNR for (-1s, 9s)/(-60s, -2s). We also employ forward modelling of the RFs using Interactive Receiver Functions Forward Modeller (IRFFM) (Tkalčić et al., 2010) to produce, in the first step, one-dimensional velocity models under

  9. Stress Dynamics of Magma Activity during Orogenic Evolution: An Example from Kinmen Island, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping-Chuan; Yeh, En-Chao; Lin, Jian-Wei; Lee, Chi-Yu; Chen, Rou-Fei; Lin, Wayne; Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Kuo; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    During orogeny, a mountain belt experienced different orogenic stages with various conditions of temperature, pressure, stress and fluid pressure. The speculation, that the orogenic stresses evolve from reverse faulting via strike-slip faulting to normal faulting stress regimes corresponding to syn-orogenic, post-orogenic and an-orogenic stage respectively, has been proposed but has not been proved yet. Here we report the study of dikes from Kinmen Island can shed light on understanding the stress evolution of orogeny. The Kinmen Island, located in the southeastern continental margin of Mainland China, cropped out the middle to lower crust of NE structural grain, which was experienced deformation and metamorphism during Late Yenshanian Orogeny(LYO). Based on previous studies of geochemistry, geochronology, and P-T conditions, various types of dike have been identified. They are syn-orognic dikes of amphibolite (130-110Ma), post-orogenic dikes of pegmatite and aplite (110-100Ma), and an-orogenic dike of gabbro (94-76Ma). During syn-orogenic stage of LYO, dike intrusion appeared as low-angle dip, which reflected that reverse faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress direction in E-W orientation. In post-orogenic stage, stress would be divided into two sub-stages. The early one was strike-slip faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress was in NW-SE orientation. The late one was normal faulting regime and horizontal maximum stress direction returned to E-W orientation. Finally, an-orogenic dike intrusion striked NE-SW with vertical dip, which displayed that normal faulting regime and NE-SW horizontal maximum stress direction. Our observation is consistent with the expected stress evolution during orogeny. Deviatoric stresses from new findings were decreased at early post-orogenic stage but increased after late post-orogenic stage, indicating the change of fluid pressure ratio with time. The spatiotemporal variation of stress field might be suggested the change

  10. Orogen parallel britlle extension in the Inner Northwestern Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, J. D.; Sue, C.; Delacou, B.; Burkhard, M.

    2003-04-01

    Rising attention has been recently paid to the latest extensional structures in the Alps, which took place under increasingly brittle conditions (e.g. Bistacchi, et al. 2000, Sue and Tricart 2002). Some of these structures seems to be still active . This brittle extension mainly occurs in the core of the arc, in the internal zones and could be linked to the ongoing extension observed under the light of seismotectonics studies (Sue, et al. 1999). Here we analyze the brittle deformation in the internal zone of the Northwestren Alps, from the Simplon fault zone (to the Northeast) to the Vanoise area (to the South). Our analysis is based on systematic mapping of the fault patterns, using remote sensing analysis combined with field work. The fault pattern we studied crosscuts all the ductile compression-related structures and piles of nappes. Thus, this brittle deformation postdates the ductile deformations, and is associated to one of the latter tectonic event in the belt during the recent-alpine history (Neogene times). The determination of paleostress field(s), based on the inversion of a large database of fault/stria measurements constrain the behaviour of this fault pattern: The results indicate a major large scale extensional paleostress field, in the NE-SW direction. In the South Valais, this orogen-parallel extension could be linked to the normal/dextral Simplon-Rhône fault zone dynamics. Further to the South, the paleostress fields also locally indicate NE-SW extension, but the driving forces remains a matter of debate. The orogen-parallel extension observed in this study have to be linked to the orogen-radial extension observed by (Sue and Tricart 2002) in the Briançonnais area, further to the South. We must also determine the relationship between the large scale brittle extension and the seismotectonics radial-to-the-arc extension. The geographic and/or temporal variations of the (paleo)stress fields remain to be constrain to precise the recent geodynamics

  11. Collision-Orogen provenance: Modern sands from big Himalayan rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, E.; Vezzoli, G.; Andò, S.; France-Lanord, C.; Singh, S. K.; Clift, P.

    2003-04-01

    The Himalayan orogen represents the most important source of terrigenous detritus on Earth. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system ranks first in terms of sediment load, and together with the Indus carried to the Indian Ocean ca 2 billion tons of sediments annually. Stored in the Bengal and Indus fans, the world's largest turbiditic cones by far, are ca 15*10^6km^3 of detritus derived from the Himalayas since the Paleogene. Nevertheless, petrographic and mineralogic composition of sediments transported by big Himalayan rivers has been poorly documented so far. This high-resolution actualistic study provides a key to interpret detrital modes of Tertiary foreland basin strata, and sheds light on diagnostic features of collision-orogen provenance. Composition of Himalayan-derived sands indicates dominant contribution from amphibolite-facies rocks exposed both south and north of the Indus-Tsangpo suture, reflecting extreme uplift and widespread exhumation of the deep roots of the orogen. Hornblende-dominated dense-mineral suites of both Indus and Brahmaputra sands are largely derived from Asian active-margin plutons. The Indus sands in particular reflect major supply from arc batholiths, widely exposed in Ladakh, Kohistan, and along the Karakorum and Hindukush belts. The Ganga sands are instead chiefly derived from High-Himalayan nappes with Tertiary metamorphism up to sillimanite-grade. Intermediate composition characterizes the Brahmaputra sands, shed largely from High Himalayan crystalline rocks subject to very rapid erosion around the Namche-Barwa syntaxis, and subordinately from Gangdese batholiths in the Tibetan tract and from plutonic rocks of the Mishmi hills farther downstream. Supply from sedimentary covers and recycling of accreted foreland-basin strata are significant, whereas volcanic and ophiolitic detritus is volumetrically negligible. Carbonate grains, common in the Indus sands and present in the Ganga sands, are negligible in the Brahmaputra sands

  12. Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic accretionary orogens exposed at different crustal levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, A.

    2002-12-01

    Accretionary orogens in the upper crust are dominated by trench and forearc deposits, obducted ophiolite fragments, exotic terranes and well defined structural boundaries such as major shear zones. The Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian shield (ANS) of western Arabia and NE Africa, the huge terrain of the Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic Central Asian mobile belt (CAMB) and the present Indonesian Archipelago are prime examples of such orogens. In the ANS and CAMB, field relationships, rock associations, differences in structural style and metamorphic grade, and geochronology have led to the recognition of terrane assemblages that are related to processes of lateral accretion as now observed in the southwest Pacific and lasting for several hundred my. In the ANS, ocean crust and arc formation began about 900 Ma ago, and terrane accretion was completed by ~600 Ma, whereas in the CAMB the oldest oceanic crust formed some 1000 Ma ago, and terrane accretion continued into the late Palaeozoic. Typical rock associations are trench and forearc sediments, island-arc volcanics, calc-alkaline granitoids, dismembered ophiolite suites and gneissic rocks (microcontinents?) constituting exotic terranes and mostly of distinctly older age and more complex tectono-metamorphic history than the surrounding lower grade rocks. Shear zones frequently separate the terranes and in the ANS also constitue seismic discontinuities extending to the lower crust. The middle to lower crustal high grade assemblages of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique belt (MB) of East Africa, Madagascar, southernmost India, Sri Lanka and East Antarctica are considered to be a deep crustal analogue to the upper crustal accretionary belts described above. Typical characteristics are (1) voluminous calc-alkaline granitoid suites, now layered gneisses, and interpreted as root zones of arc terranes, (2) tectonic interdigitation of Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic gneisses with Neoproterozoic rocks, probably brought about during

  13. Paleostress Analysis Using Calcite Twins in Carbonates - A key study on the Cretaceous Sava-Klepa Massif, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpping, Jonas; Peternell, Mark; Prelević, Dejan; Altmeyer, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    The Geological composition of the Balkan region has been predominantly shaped by the existence of two ophiolite belts originated after the closure of the Tethyan ocean(s) which are the Dinaride-Hellenide ophiolite belt in the south-west and the Vardar belt in the north-east. These two ophiolite belts are either relics of two separate major branches of the Neotethys ocean with intervening continental terranes (Karamata, 2006), or may represent a single thrust from the Triassic-Jurassic Vardar oceanic sequence onto the Adria passive (Schmid et al., 2008). A bulk of Balkan ophiolites are of Jurassic age, and available data on the metamorphic sole indicate that the major episode of convergence and the ocean closure happened not later than in the Upper Jurassic. Recently, the Sava-zone ophiolite of late Cretaceous age was differentiated in the northern Bosnia-Kozara ophiolite and more southerly in the Klepa Massif of Macedonia. Geochemistry of the lavas occurring within the Sava-zone ophiolites show an alkaline character similar to intracontinental rift zones, with no similarities to arc or MORB attributes. This may imply a re-opening of the Tethys during the Early Cretaceous until the Late Cretaceous and thus challenges the widely accepted model of a terminated Upper Jurassic ocean closure (Schmid et al., 2008). This study focuses on the basement sequences surrounding Klepa Massif in Macedonia. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that the Klepa Massif could represent a new ocean that rifted after the collision of Europe and Adria. Detailed structural mapping and paleostress reconstructions from calcite twins within Jurassic as well as Cretaceous carbonates were performed to constrain the evolution of the Cretaceous Sava-Klepa Massif. We use the Turbo Pascal program package of calcite paleostress analysis (Sperner & Ratschbacher, 1994) based on the P-B-T method, together with the numerical dynamic analysis method. Orientation of twin planes and c-axis orientations are

  14. Complexities of Lu-Hf geochronology in convergent orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, S. R.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction, terrane accretion, and arc magmatism leave a complex and sometimes incomplete record of metamorphism and deformation. The range of metamorphic temperatures and assemblages produced throughout the tectonic evolution of a single orogen often requires multiple isotopic systems to date distinct events. Lu-Hf geochronology, notably, has proven successful for dating metamorphism from a variety of bulk compositions spanning temperatures <350-850 C. We review the success of applying Lu-Hf geochronology in combination with other isotopic systems to date metamorphism from range of metamorphic conditions within convergent margins. We then discuss some complexities of Lu-Hf geochronology when dating samples with complicated metamorphic histories. Garnet and lawsonite isochrons often exhibit excess scatter (high MSWD's) that can be attributed to a number of factors: secondary mineral inclusions, prolonged garnet growth durations, disequilibrium at low temperatures, and polyphase metamorphic histories. Samples with high-Hf inclusions in isotopic equilibrium host phases can lead to decreased precision, but still produce meaningful ages. At high temperatures Lu-Hf ages may date peak metamorphism, cooling from peak temperatures, or result in spurious ages because of preferential retention of 176Hf over 176Lu in garnet. Despite these complexities, and perhaps because of them, new aspects of the metamorphic history may be revealed that are not readily recorded by other isotopic systems. Minerals other than garnet and lawsonite, particularly apatite, and perhaps epidote, offer exciting new possibilities for Lu-Hf geochronology. Careful fieldwork, detailed petrology and geochemistry, and collaborative efforts using multiple isotopic systems offer the best approach to solving tectonic problems in convergent orogens.

  15. Young upper crustal chemical composition of the orogenic Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, Shigeko; Imai, Noboru; Okuyama-Kusunose, Yasuko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi; Koma, Takeshi; Murata, Yasuaki

    2000-11-01

    A new geochemical estimate of the young (mainly Paleozoic age to present) upper crust of the Japan Arc shows a dacitic composition in contrast to the idea that andesite is predominant in active orogenic arcs. Temporal changes in composition are not significant from the Paleozoic age to the present for the Japan Arc. The major element composition is similar to previous models of old cratonic upper crusts. The coincidence in the major elements between young and old crusts indicates that essential mechanisms during crust formation have not changed from the Archean era to the present. In trace element compositions the average young upper crust of the Japan Arc has higher Sb and As concentrations and lower concentrations of alkaline, light rare earth, and high field strength elements with respect to previous models of continental upper crusts. The large degree of constancy of trace element composition in marine sedimentary rocks is in contrast to the large variety in igneous rocks. However, the averages for both accretionary and nonaccretionary sedimentary rocks are almost identical to the average for the igneous rocks of the Japan Arc, with the exceptions of high Sb and As concentrations in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The compositional homogeneity among different types of rocks on an arc scale implies that recycling processes mechanically mix the arc-derived igneous materials to homogenize the chemical composition during erosion, transportation, sedimentation, accretion, and uplifting. Since the contribution of oceanic crust to the composition of arc crust is small, the recycling processes have not changed the bulk upper crustal composition of the active continental margin except increase the Sb and As from sediments. Instead, the influx of differentiated acidic rocks from depth is essential to characterize the orogenic crust formation of the young Japan Arc. The characteristically low incompatible element content of the Japanese upper arc crust appears

  16. Vorticity analysis in the Zagros orogen, Shiraz area, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Heibati, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative vorticity analyses in orogenic belts are essential for studying the kinematics of deformation and can be performed using a range of methods. The combination of microstructural analysis for vorticity with other methods creates a more rigorous analysis. In order to determine the degree of non-coaxiality and spatial pattern of vorticity during deformation in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, a study area containing the boundary of the Zagros Folded Belt and the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt is selected. The study area is situated in the Shiraz region of E-Zagros in Iran. The kinematic vorticity analysis is carried out using 4 methods based on: (1) the degree of asymmetry of the calcite c-axis fabric, (2) the assumption that the orientation of the long axes of calcite within an oblique stylolite foliation delineates the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis, (3) the assumption that the tension gash tips determine the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis and (4) stylolite teeth determine the direction of the instantaneous stretching axis. C-axis data from calcite give a kinematic vorticity number between 0.68 and 0.83, and the orientation of the long axes of calcite grains yields a range between 0.5 and 0.84. Stylolites provide a kinematic vorticity number between 0.5 and 0.79, and tension gashes provide a kinematic vorticity number between 0.56 and 0.81. This range of vorticity numbers confirms the contributions of both simple (33-59%) and pure shear (41-67%). Twining of calcite also reveals that the last stage of deformation occurred at a temperature of 170-200 °C. Spatial analysis reveals an increase in the simple shear component from the SW of the Zagros Folded Belt to the NE of the Zagros Fold-and-Thrust Belt.

  17. Seismic anisotropy and mantle creep in young orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meissner, R.; Mooney, W.D.; Artemieva, I.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides evidence for the physical state and tectonic evolution of the lithosphere. We discuss the origin of anisotropy at various depths, and relate it to tectonic stress, geotherms and rheology. The anisotropy of the uppermost mantle is controlled by the orthorhombic mineral olivine, and may result from ductile deformation, dynamic recrystallization or annealing. Anisotropy beneath young orogens has been measured for the seismic phase Pn that propagates in the uppermost mantle. This anisotropy is interpreted as being caused by deformation during the most recent thermotectonic event, and thus provides information on the process of mountain building. Whereas tectonic stress and many structural features in the upper crust are usually orientated perpendicular to the structural axis of mountain belts, Pn anisotropy is aligned parallel to the structural axis. We interpret this to indicate mountain-parallel ductile (i.e. creeping) deformation in the uppermost mantle that is a consequence of mountain-perpendicular compressive stresses. The preferred orientation of the fast axes of some anisotropic minerals, such as olivine, is known to be in the creep direction, a consequence of the anisotropy of strength and viscosity of orientated minerals. In order to explain the anisotropy of the mantle beneath young orogens we extend the concept of crustal 'escape' (or 'extrusion') tectonics to the uppermost mantle. We present rheological model calculations to support this hypothesis. Mountain-perpendicular horizontal stress (determined in the upper crust) and mountain-parallel seismic anisotropy (in the uppermost mantle) require a zone of ductile decoupling in the middle or lower crust of young mountain belts. Examples for stress and mountain-parallel Pn anisotropy are given for Tibet, the Alpine chains, and young mountain ranges in the Americas. Finally, we suggest a simple model for initiating mountain parallel creep.

  18. A Reconsideration of Pan African Orogenic Cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefferan, K. P.; Soulaimani, A.; Samson, S. D.; Admou, H.; Inglis, J.; Saquaque, A.; Heywood, N. C.

    2013-12-01

    The term 'Pan African' orogeny was first proposed in 1964 for a tectonothermal event in Africa ~ 500+/- 50 Ma. Over the past 50 years, the Pan African orogeny has been extended to as much as ~1050-450 Ma and recognized in other Gondwanan continents where regional names such as Brasiliano (South America), Adelaidean (Australian) and Bearmore (Antarctica) have been applied. The Pan African time span of ~500 million years is much longer than any Phanerozoic orogeny. However, it does correlate with time ranges of well defined Phanerozoic orogenic cycles such as the Appalachian cycle, extending from ~1,100 to 250 Ma, and the Cordilleran cycle of ~350 Ma to the present. A significant difference of course is that the Appalachian orogenic cycle has long been recognized as consisting of separate Grenville, Taconic, Acadian and Alleghenian orogenies. Similarly, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Cordilleran orogenic cycle consists of distinct Antler, Sonoma, Nevadan, Sevier, Laramide and ongoing Cascadian-Andean orogenies. Until recently, the absence of precise geochronology in West Africa has prevented a more refined analysis of individual orogenic events within the Pan-African orogenic cycle. Since 2000, precision geochronologic dating by various researchers in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco, has provided critical data by which it is now appropriate to designate a Pan African orogenic cycle consisting of three separate orogenic events. We herein propose the following distinct orogenic events in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco: Iriri-Tichibanine orogeny (750-700 Ma), Bou Azzer orogeny (660-640 Ma) and the WACadomian orogeny (620-580 Ma). Generalized tectonic map of the Anti-Atlas Mountain inliers (Adapted from Ennih and Liégeois, 2008). Geodynamic model of the Pan African orogenic cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. Modified from Walsh et al. (2012) and incorporating ideas from Thomas et al. (2002) and El Hadi et al. (2012).

  19. Preliminary hydrochemical study of Ronda ultramafic massif (South Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo, Iñaki; Urresti, Begoña; Jiménez, Pablo; Martos, Sergio; José Durán, Juan; Benavente, José; Carrasco, Francisco; Pedrera, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    During 2015 more than 70 springs related to the peridotite outcrops of the Ronda mountainous massif, South Spain, have been identified. The field work included "in situ" measurements of physical-chemical parameters (T, EC, pH), and water sampling for major components and stable isotopes of water and DIC. The hydrogeochemical study allowed us to characterize different flow systems: (1) springs with very low to medium electrical conductivities (200-700 μS/cm) and pH below 9.0, and (2) springs with EC above 700 μS/cm and pH above 9.0. The first group of springs are supposed to be linked with surface and subsurface flows. The hydrogeochemical reactions that determine their composition are characterized by the low solubility of minerals, atmospheric CO2 (open system) and active serpentinization reactions that supplies hundreds of ppm of Mg2+. All of them are waters of HCO3-Mg or HCO3-Mg-Na type. The second group of springs drains water with EC above 700 μS/cm and pH over 9. In general, these springs are associated to deep flows connected to regional faults or major tectonic features. Deeper flow enhances water-rock interaction and time of contact, so this system evolves towards a closed system to O2 and CO2. All these waters are old or older than the first group and show reducing features and are of Na-Cl or OH-Ca type.

  20. Deforestation Along the Maya Mountain Massif Belize-Guatemala Border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicas, S. D.; Omine, K.; Arevalo, B.; Ford, J. B.; Sugimura, K.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years trans-boundary incursions from Petén, Guatemala into Belize's Maya Mountain Massif (MMM) have increased. The incursions are rapidly degrading cultural and natural resources in Belize's protected areas. Given the local, regional and global importance of the MMM and the scarcity of deforestation data, our research team conducted a time series analysis 81 km by 12 km along the Belize-Guatemalan border adjacent to the protected areas of the MMM. Analysis drew on Landsat imagery from 1991 to 2014 to determine historic deforestation rates. The results indicate that the highest deforestation rates in the study area were -1.04% and -6.78% loss of forested area per year in 2012-2014 and 1995-1999 respectively. From 1991 to 2014, forested area decreased from 96.9 % to 85.72 % in Belize and 83.15 % to 31.52 % in Guatemala. During the study period, it was clear that deforestation rates fluctuated in Belize's MMM from one time-period to the next. This seems linked to either a decline in deforestation rates in Guatemala, the vertical expansion of deforestation in Guatemalan forested areas and monitoring. The results of this study urge action to reduce incursions and secure protected areas and remaining forest along the Belize-Guatemalan border.

  1. Kinematics of the Torcal Shear Zone: transpressional tectonics shaping orogenic curves in the northern Gibraltar Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Expósito, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Structural trend line patterns of orogenic arcs depict diverse geometries resulting from multiple factors such as indenter geometry, thickness of pre-deformational sequences and rheology of major decollement surfaces. Within them, salient-recess transitions often result in transpressive deformation bands. The Gibraltar Arc results from the Neogene collision of a composite metamorphic terrane (Alboran Domain, acting as a relative backstop) against two foreland margins (Southiberian and Maghrebian Domains). Within it, the Western Gibraltar Arc (WGA) is a protruded salient, 200 km in length cord, closely coinciding with the apex zone of the major arc. The WGA terminates at two transpressional zones. The main structure in the northern (Betic) end zone is a 70 km long and 4-5 km wide brittle deformation band, the so-called Torcal Shear Zone (TSZ). The TSZ forms a W-E topographic alignment along which the kinematic data show an overall dextral transpression. Within the TSZ strain is highly partitioned into mainly shortening, extensional and strike-slip structures. The strain partitioning is heterogeneous along the band and, accordingly, four distinct sectors can be identified. i) The Peñarrubia-Almargen Transverse Zone (PATZ), located at the W-end of the TSZ presents WNW-ESE folds and dextral faults, together with normal faults that accommodate extension parallel to the dominant structural trend. WNW ESE dextral faults might be related with synthetic splays at the lateral end of the TSZ. ii) The Sierra del Valle de Abdalajís (SVA) is characterized by WSW-ENE trending folds and dextral-reverse faults dipping to SSE, and NW-SE normal faults. The southern boundary of the SVA is a dextral fault zone. iii) The Torcal de Antequera Massif (TAM) presents two types of structural domains. Two outer domains located at both margins characterized by E-W trending, dextral strike-slip structures, and an inner domain, characterized by en echelon SE-vergent open folds and reverse shear

  2. Timing and duration of partial melting and magmatism in the Variscan Montagne Noire gneiss dome (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trap, Pierre; Roger, Françoise; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    Unravelling the detailed pressure-temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-D) evolution of magmatic and metamorphic rocks provides essential insights into the timing and duration of partial melting and related plutonism during crustal flow and migmatitic dome formation. The Montagne Noire Axial Zone (MNAZ) is a migmatitic dome located within the Variscan orogen in the southern French Massif Central. The timing of the main thermal event that was responsible for intense partial melting is still highly debated. In this study we present new laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) age data on micaschists, migmatites and granites that clarify the P-T-t-D evolution of the MNAZ. Structurally controlled samples were collected in order to constrain the timing of metamorphism, migmatization and plutonism regarding the main structural pattern D1, D2 and D3. D1 and D2 correspond to nappe stacking and dextral transpression, respectively. D3 is related to vertical shortening and coaxial thinning with a preferential NE-SW- to E-W-directed stretching. LA-ICP-MS analyses on the syntectonic Anglès, Soulié and Martys granites yielded U-Th/Pb monazite ages of 305 ± 1.5, 306 ± 1.9 and 314 ± 2 Ma, respectively. Five migmatitic rocks sampled in the eastern and central Espinouse area yielded in situ ages ranging between 312 ± 2 and 301 ± 2 Ma. Along the dome envelope, two garnet-staurolite-bearing micaschists near Saint-Pons-de-Thomières village gave in situ U-Th-Pb ages of 312.1 ± 2.1 and 309.0 ± 3.1 Ma. A fine-grained gneiss with a D3 fabrics in the eastern dome envelope yield a 208Pb/232Th mean age at 305.7 ± 3.9 Ma. All ages obtained in this study for the micaschists, migmatites and granites range between 315 and 301 Ma. We interpret this time span as the record of the high thermal event responsible for intense crustal partial melting within the lower and middle crust. The onset of partial melting occurred at ca. 315 Ma that marked the beginning of

  3. Timing and duration of partial melting and magmatism in the Variscan Montagne Noire gneiss dome (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trap, Pierre; Roger, Françoise; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2016-11-01

    Unravelling the detailed pressure-temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-D) evolution of magmatic and metamorphic rocks provides essential insights into the timing and duration of partial melting and related plutonism during crustal flow and migmatitic dome formation. The Montagne Noire Axial Zone (MNAZ) is a migmatitic dome located within the Variscan orogen in the southern French Massif Central. The timing of the main thermal event that was responsible for intense partial melting is still highly debated. In this study we present new laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) age data on micaschists, migmatites and granites that clarify the P-T-t-D evolution of the MNAZ. Structurally controlled samples were collected in order to constrain the timing of metamorphism, migmatization and plutonism regarding the main structural pattern D1, D2 and D3. D1 and D2 correspond to nappe stacking and dextral transpression, respectively. D3 is related to vertical shortening and coaxial thinning with a preferential NE-SW- to E-W-directed stretching. LA-ICP-MS analyses on the syntectonic Anglès, Soulié and Martys granites yielded U-Th/Pb monazite ages of 305 ± 1.5, 306 ± 1.9 and 314 ± 2 Ma, respectively. Five migmatitic rocks sampled in the eastern and central Espinouse area yielded in situ ages ranging between 312 ± 2 and 301 ± 2 Ma. Along the dome envelope, two garnet-staurolite-bearing micaschists near Saint-Pons-de-Thomières village gave in situ U-Th-Pb ages of 312.1 ± 2.1 and 309.0 ± 3.1 Ma. A fine-grained gneiss with a D3 fabrics in the eastern dome envelope yield a 208Pb/232Th mean age at 305.7 ± 3.9 Ma. All ages obtained in this study for the micaschists, migmatites and granites range between 315 and 301 Ma. We interpret this time span as the record of the high thermal event responsible for intense crustal partial melting within the lower and middle crust. The onset of partial melting occurred at ca. 315 Ma that marked the beginning of

  4. Petrochronological and structural arguments for upper plate thickening and relamination of the lower plate buoyant material in the Variscan Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřestý, Vít; Holder, Robert; Lexa, Ondrej; Racek, Martin; Jeřábek, Petr

    2014-05-01

    indirect testimony of relamination mechanisms governing further evolution of the orogenic lower crust in the Bohemian massif.

  5. Tectonic Evolution of the Cretaceous Sava-Klepa Massif, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, based on field observations and microstructural analysis - Towards a new geodynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Tobias; Peternell, Mark; Prelević, Dejan; Köpping, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The Balkan Peninsula was formed during the Mesozoic collision of Gondwana and Eurasia, associated with the closure of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. As a result, two ophiolitic belts were formed: Dinaride-Hellenide ophiolitic belt in the southwest and the Vardar ophiolitic belt in the northeast. The bulk of Balkan ophiolites originated in the Jurassic (Robertson & Karamata, 1994), and only recently the Late Cretaceous Sava-zone ophiolites are discovered. Ophiolit-like outcrops of Mount Klepa in the Central Macedonia represents a part of Late Cretaceous oceanic lithosphere within the Sava Zone, comprising of pillow lavas, sheet flows, columns, hyaloclastites, dikes as well as cumulates. In this study we investigate the geodynamic setting and evolution of the Late Cretaceous Klepa Massif. Our working hypotheses we want to test is that Klepa Massif represents a new ocean opened through rifting after the closure of Tethyan ocean(s) and collision of Europe and Gondwana already in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. This hypothesis contradicts the accepted model suggesting that Sava ophiolites represent a relic of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean that closed in the Late Cretaceous. During detailed structural geology field studies, the ophiolitic rock sequence of Klepa Mountain area was mapped in several profiles and about 60 rock samples were taken. These field data in addition to the north-south trending outcrops of the Klepa ophiolite and the north-south trending shear zones which bound the Klepa basalt, lead to the assumption of the existence of a pull apart basin. With the help of microstructural analyses we will determine the deformation history and temperatures which also will be confirmed by the analyses of calcite twins (Ferril et al., 2004). Quartz grain size analysis of quartz bearing rocks, were used for stress piezometry. Furthermore, quartz crystal geometry and crystallographic orientations, which were measured with the Fabric Analyser G60 (Peternell et al., 2010), reveal

  6. A Treasure Chest of Nanogranites: the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, S.; O'Brien, P. J.; Walczak, K.; Wunder, B.; Ziemann, M. A.; Hecht, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite 150 years of investigation of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe), it is only recently that the investigation of old and new samples displayed the occurrence of tiny portions of crystallized anatectic melt in regional migmatites. These vestiges of magma, called "nanogranites", are natural probes of the partial melting processes in the crust. Original melt composition and water content can be directly analyzed after piston cylinder re-homogenization. When compared to classic re-melting experiments, nanogranites are ideal "natural" experimental charges of anatectic melt. They are encapsulated in peritectic garnet immediately after production - both phases are products of the same partial melting reaction. Sheltered inside garnet, they remain unaffected by the physico-chemical changes which affected the host migmatites during their slow cooling, unlike leucosomes and anatexis-related plutons. Five different case studies of nanogranite-bearing high-grade rocks have been identified so far: three in metapelites from the Moldanubian Zone, and two in metagranitoids from the Granulitgebirge and Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome. Their characterization provides insights into how the continental crust melts at different depths, from shallow levels to mantle depths, during different moments of its metamorphic history (prograde vs. decompressional melting). For example, the investigation and experimental re-melting of nanogranites from Grt+Ky leucogranulites (Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome) recently provided evidence of prograde melting of metagranitoids under eclogite-facies conditions (T≥875°C and P~2.7 GPa), close to the stability field of coesite. The melt generated is granitic, hydrous (6 wt% H2O) and metaluminous (ASI=1.03), and is at the moment the "deepest" glass obtained through re-homogenization of primary polycrystalline inclusions in natural rocks. This work confirms that nanogranites in migmatites 1) are a powerful tool to constrain anatexis in natural rocks, and 2) can

  7. Mechanisms of doubly-vergent vs. single-sided orogens: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, K.; Matenco, L. C.; Gerya, T.; Cloetingh, S.

    2014-12-01

    Zones of continent collision form mountain ranges with high topographies and complex geometries. Compressional stresses during ongoing convergence result in crustal thickening and localized deformation, where crustal material is transported and redistributed within the orogen. We use numerical high-resolution thermo-mechanical models to investigate the physical processes of continent collision zones and its implications on rock exhumation. We demonstrate that compression of two continental blocks, separated by a rheologically weak suture zone can result in (i) doubly-vergent (Fig. A) or (ii) single-sided orogens (Fig. B), with distinct geometries, deformation and exhumation patterns. The transition between these different modes of collision is strongly controlled by the rheology of the continental lithosphere and therefore its temperature distribution. Doubly-vergent orogens form at relatively high thermal gradients, while single-sided orogens are typical for lower ones. Doubly-vergent orogens (Fig. A) are formed in response to the gradual accretion of crustal material to the upper plate along retro-shears. In these models continental subduction results in upper plate deformation and nested exhumation against retro-shears. Typical examples include the collision recorded by the Swiss Alps and the Pyrenees. In contrast, single-sided orogens are characterized by large-scale lower plate deformation and are accompanied by the subduction of lower crustal material (Fig. B). Modeling infers that shortening and associated exhumation will gradually propagate towards the foreland. In this situation, no significant retro-shear formation is observed, which is in agreement with recent physical modelling studies on deformation of the continental lithosphere [Willingshofer et al., 2013]. Natural examples of such single sided orogens are common in the Mediterranean (Carpathians, Dinarides, Apennines, Betics) or the SE Asia subduction zones. We conclude that deformation and

  8. A Library Response to the Massification of Higher Education: The Case of the University of Zambia Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanyengo, Christine Wamunyima

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at the challenges that libraries in Africa face in responding to massification of higher education by discussing the University of Zambia library's response in library and information resources provision. As a result of massification of higher education, libraries have been forced not only to employ new and different strategies to…

  9. Critical Reflection on the Massification of Higher Education in Korea: Consequences for Graduate Employment and Policy Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeom, Min-ho

    2016-01-01

    The paper critically reviews the results of Korean massification in higher education (HE) and focuses on the consequences related to graduate employment. By analysing statistical data and reviewing related articles, this study explores the process of the massification of HE, investigates major factors influencing the expansion, and analyses and…

  10. Geomorphological and sedimentological evidences in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa since the Last Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesus; Oliva, Marc; Cruces, Anabela; Lopes, Vera; Conceição Freitas, Maria; García-Hernández, Cristina; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Gallinar, David; Geraldes, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    The Western Massif of Picos de Europa includes some of the highest peaks of the Cantabrian Mountains. However, the environmental evolution in this massif since the Last Glaciation is still poorly understood. This research provides a new geochronological approach to the sequence of environmental events occurred here since the maximum expansion of glaciers during the last Pleistocene glaciation. The distribution of the glacial landforms suggests four main stages regarding the environmental evolution in the massif: maximum glacial advance, phase of second maximum glacial expansion, Late Glacial and Little Ice Age. A 5.4-m long sedimentological section retrieved from the kame terrace of Belbín, in a mid-height area of the massif, complements the geomorphological interpretation and provides a continuous paleoenvironmental sequence from this area since the Last Glaciation until nowadays. This section suggests that the maximum glacial expansion occurred at a minimum age of 37.2 ka cal BP, significantly prior to the global Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequently, a new glacial expansion occurred around 18.7-22.5 ka cal BP. The melting of the glaciers after this phase generated a shallow lake in the Belbín depression. Lake sediments do not reveal the occurrence of a cold stage during the Late Glacial, whilst, at higher locations, moraine complexes were formed suggesting a glacier readvance. The terrestrification of this lake started at 8 ka cal BP, when Belbín changed to a peaty environment. At 5 ka cal BP human occupation started at the high lands of the massif according to the existence of charcoal particles in the section. The presence of moraines in the highest northern cirques evidences the last phase with formation of small glaciers in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa, corresponding to the Little Ice Age cold event. Since then, the warming climate has led to the melting of these glaciers.

  11. Relative strength of lithospheric mantle compared to granulite lower crust in orogenic roots: insight from field laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusbach, V.; Ulrich, S.; Schulmann, K.

    2009-04-01

    The continental lithosphere is composed by strong lithospheric mantle and weak lower crust for average and hot geotherms. However, some experiments and seismic studies show that the strength contrast between mantle and crust can vary in order of several magnitudes. The internal zone of the European Variscan orogen (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic) contains large complexes of Ky - K-feldspar granulites with incorporated spinel and garnet peridotites that can respond to question of mantle-lower crust strength contrast from the field perspective. The studied spinel-garnet harzburgite body (the Mohelno peridotite) represents probably a fragment of strongly depleted oceanic lithosphere showing peak conditions of 22,4-27,6 kbar and 1120-1275°C. The peridotite forms large folded sheet with steep hinge and vertical axial plane. It exhibits presence of spinel along the outer arc and the internal part of the fold and garnet along inner arc, both related to coarse-grained orthopyroxene - olivine microstructure. This coarse microstructure is dynamically recrystallized forming fine-grained matrix (~10 - 20 microns) and the EBSD measurements show presence of axial [100] LPO olivine pattern dominantly along the outer arc of the fold and in spinel harzburgite, while the inner arc of the fold and partly also garnet harzburgite reveals presence of axial [010] LPO pattern. Steep foliation and sub-horizontal to moderately plunging lineation determined from olivine EBSD data defines the shape of the megafold. Host rocks exhibit transposed mylonitic fabric S1-2 revealing peak conditions of 18 kbar, 800°C and heterogeneous D3 retrogression at about 10 - 7 kbar, 650°C. The foliation S2-3 is fully concordant with limbs of peridotite megafold, but close to the outer arc it is affected by asymmetrical folds with axial planar leucosomes coherent with the shape of the megafold hinge zone. In contrast, the S2 in the internal part of the megafold is affected by sinistral and dextral melt

  12. Final « pop-up » structural reactivation of the internal part of an orogenic wedge: west-central Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meresse, F.; Jolivet, M.; Labaume, P.; Teixell, A.

    2009-04-01

    Université Montpellier 2, INSU-CNRS, Laboratoire Géosciences Montpellier, cc060, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5, France florian.meresse@gm.univ-montp2.fr Tectonics-sedimentation relationships are often used to describe the tectonic evolution of orogenic wedges. However, does the sedimentary record associated to the build-up of the wedge recall the entire tectonic history? Numerous studies based on tectono-stratigraphic and thermochronological data, as well as numerical modeling, have demonstrated that on the large scale the growth of the Pyrenees is characterized by a southward propagation of the deformation (e.g., Muñoz, 1992; Morris et al., 1998; Fitzgerald et al., 1999; Beaumont et al., 2000). However, in the west-central Pyrenees, recent thermochronological data have suggested that the in-sequence propagation of the basement thrust system was followed by out-of-sequence (re)activation of hinterland structures after the South-Pyrenean Frontal Thrust had been sealed (Jolivet et al., 2007). To better describe the structural evolution of the Pyrenean prism, we focused our work on a NNE-SSW transect from the northern piedmont (Bagnères-de-Bigorre), through the Axial Zone and down to the Jaca basin where tectonics-sedimentation relationships have been extensively described (e.g., Teixell, 1996). A crustal scale cross-section combined with detailed apatite fission track analysis are used as a case study to unravel in detail the deformation history. Apatite fission track data from the Bagnères-de-Bigorre Paleozoic massif (central ages: 41-42 Ma) and the Lesponne Hercynian granite (central age: 31 Ma) located in the North-Pyrenean Zone and in the north of the Axial Zone, respectively, reveal Middle Eocene-Early Oligocene denudation ages of the northern part of the wedge. Immediately to the south, central ages around 24-20 Ma attest to a Latest Oligocene-Early Miocene denudation ages of the Chiroulet granite. According to the structural context, these results suggest a

  13. Geochemistry of alkali syenites from the Budun massif and their petrogenetic properties (Ol'khon Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrygina, V. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Zarubina, O. V.; Bryanskii, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    The first data on the geochemistry of the alkali syenite massif in Cape Budun of Ol'khon Island, where it makes contact in the south with the Khuzir gabbroid massif, are presented. Syenites occur among granite gneisses of the Sharanur dome and, like its granites, are enriched with Zr and REEs, but depleted in other trace elements. They contain anorthoclase, corundum, rare nepheline, zircon, and hercynite and are accompanied by desilicified pegmatites. Their unusual geochemical properties allow the assumption that alkaline magmas resulted from the interaction between basic and granitoid melts.

  14. How Orogen-scale Exhumed Strike-slip Faults Initiate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Neubauer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Orogen-scale strike-slip faults present one the most important geodynamic processes affecting the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. In specific subtypes, faulting is virtually initiated along hot-to-cool boundaries, e.g. at such of hot granite intrusions or metamorphic core complexes to cool country rocks. Such fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust and are stacked within each other ("telescoping"). Exhumation of rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such strike-slip faults implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion. The hot-to-cool thermal structure across the fault zone significantly influences the physical fault rock properties. One major question is how and where a major strike-slip initiates and further development. Here, we propose a model in which major continental exhumed strike-slip faults potentially evolve along rheologically weak zones such as plutons or margins of metamorphic complexes. As an example, we propose a model for the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, SE Asia, which initiated along the edge of a plutonic belt and evolved in response to India-Asia collision with four tectonic phases.

  15. Structural and Thermochronological Constraints on the Coupling Between Exhumation, Denudation and Tectonics in the Himalaya: Insights From the Ama Drime Massif, Tibet- Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, M. J.; Cottle, J. M.; Newell, D. L.; Berger, A. L.; Spotila, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Focused denudation and mid-crustal flow are coupled in many active tectonic settings, including the Himalaya where exhumation of mid-crustal rocks is accommodated by thrust faults and low-angle detachment systems during crustal shortening. New structural data demonstrates that the most recently active tectonic feature in the Mt. Everest region is the Ama Drime Massif (ADM), a trans-Himalayan antiformal structure that protrudes ~ 70 km north from the crest of the Himalaya and displaces the South Tibetan Detachment system. Previous investigations interpreted the N-S striking shear zones and fault systems that bound either side of the ADM as the Main Central thrust. Our data show that these are 100-300 m thick normal-sense shear zones that are kinematically linked to young brittle faults that offset Quaternary deposits and record active E-W extension. Geochemical tracers in hot springs along the western shear zone indicate devolatilization of crustal rocks suggesting active metamorphism and/or melting beneath the ADM. Integration of high-to low-T thermochronometric methods, including U(-Th-)Pb, Apatite Fission Track and (U-Th)/He, yield important information regarding the timing and rate of exhumation of the ADM. These data reveal that rapid exhumation of material from the mid-crust during E-W extension began in the mid-Miocene and that a high rate of uplift / denudation persisted into the Pliocene. The southern end of the ADM is centered on the Arun River gorge, which previous geomorphological instigations defined as a prime candidate for climate-tectonic coupling. We combine our results with these exiting data to propose that active exhumation of deep crustal rocks of the ADM during E-W extension is coupled with denudation in the Arun River gorge. This model provides important quantitative constraints on the dynamic feedbacks between climate and tectonics in collisional orogens as well as the evolution of trans-Himalayan rivers and antiformal structures.

  16. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia): Implications for crustal reworking and syn-orogenic uranium mineralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinger, Aurélien; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; André-Mayer, Anne-Sylvie; Goncalves, Philippe; Zeh, Armin; Durand, Cyril; Deloule, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    The internal zone of the Pan-African Lufilian orogenic belt (Zambia) hosts a dozen uranium occurrences mostly located within kyanite micaschists in a shear zone marking the contact between metasedimentary rocks attributed to the Katanga Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and migmatites coring domes developed dominantly at the expense of the pre-Neoproterozoic basement. The P-T-t-d paths reconstructed for these rocks combining field observations, microstructural analysis, metamorphic petrology and thermobarometry and geochronology indicate that they have recorded burial and exhumation during the Pan-African orogeny. Both units of the Katanga metasedimentary sequence and pre-Katanga migmatitic basement have underwent minimum peak P-T conditions of 9-11 kbar and 640-660 °C, dated at ca. 530 Ma by garnet-whole rock Lu-Hf isochrons. This suggests that this entire continental segment has been buried up to a depth of 40-50 km with geothermal gradients of 15-20 °C.km- 1 during the Pan-African orogeny and the formation of the West Gondwana supercontinent. Syn-orogenic exhumation of the partially molten root of the Lufilian belt is attested by isothermal decompression under P-T conditions of 6-8 kbar at ca. 530-500 Ma, witnessing an increase of the geothermal gradients to 25-30 °C·km- 1. Uranium mineralizations that consist of uraninite and brannerite took place at temperatures ranging from 600 to 700 °C, and have been dated at ca. 540-530 Ma by U-Pb ages on uraninite. The main uranium deposition thus occurred at the transition from the syn-orogenic burial to the syn-orogenic exhumation stages and has been then partially transposed and locally remobilized during the post-orogenic exhumation accommodated by activation of low-angle extensional detachment.

  17. Carboniferous magmatism in the Evora Massif (southwest Portugal, Ossa-Morena Zone): from typical arc calc-alkaline to adakitic-like magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Selma M.; Neiva, Ana M. R.; Ramos, Joao M. F.

    2014-05-01

    The Evora Massif is one of the subdivisions of western Ossa-Morena Zone. It is a dome-like structure mainly composed of Ediacaran, Cambrian and Ordovician country rocks, affected by medium- and high-grade metamorphism coeval with the emplacement of several mafic to felsic intrusive bodies. The last magmatic event recorded in this area (Carboniferous) consists of calc-alkaline volcanism and voluminous plutonism (mainly composed by tonalites, gabbros, diorites and late-orogenic granodiorites and granites) [1]. Detailed chemical and isotopic studies from Evora Massif plutons were performed in the last few years. Whole-rock chemical and isotopic data suggest that the Hospitais tonalite (HT), Alto de Sao Bento area (ASB) and Reguengos de Monsaraz pluton (RM) resulted from fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas followed by mixing with variable proportions of crustal melts [2-4]. U-Pb ID-TIMS data indicate an age of 337-335 for the RM [4]. The Pavia pluton is a multiphase granitic body constructed incrementally by the episodic emplacement of several batches of magma (at 328 Ma, ca. 324 Ma and 319-317 Ma) [5]. The main granitic phases range from tonalite to two-mica granite that contain rare surmicaceous and fine-grained enclaves, and granitic and amphibolitic xenoliths. On the other hand, they are cut by abundant rhyodacite porphyries, microgranites (s.l.) and pegmatite dikes, predominantly oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. Although each phase seems to represent a distinct batch of magma, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest a similar and fairly homogenous source for all the constituent phases. Initial 87Sr/86Sr varies between 0.70428 and 0.7058 and ɛ Ndt ranges from -3.4 to +0.4, pointing towards a mantle or juvenile crust origin. A higher variation is observed in whole-rock δ18O (5.6-9.6 o), consistent with assimilation of crust. The PP was interpreted as the result of assimilation-fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. Substantial differences between

  18. The Massification of Higher Education in the UK: Aspects of Service Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakis, Mihalis; Bullivant, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This article explores several aspects of service quality for the provision of higher education. Alongside the trend of the massification of higher education over the past two decades, higher education institutions are required to review quality across a range of outputs, besides teaching and learning. The study was undertaken within the…

  19. Unique paragenesis of cerium and yttrium allanites in tourmalinite of the Severny massif (Chukotka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. I.; Marin, Yu. B.

    2016-07-01

    A description of hydrothermal allanite-(Y) and its unique association with allanite-(Ce) from tourmaline metasomatic rock of the Severny granite massif in Chukotka is presented in the article. Examination of the composition of metasomatic rims in allanite-(Y) allowed us to estimate the limit of isomorphic replacement in allanite of Y and heavy lanthanides by LREE, reaching 25%.

  20. New Insights On The Seismotectonics of The French Central Massif and Western France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazabraud, Y.; Bethoux, N.; Guilbert, J.

    Nowadays, the increase of the number of seismological stations distributed through- out France, allows a re-evaluation of the regional sismotectonics, in particular by pre- cise localisation and computation of focal mecanisms even for small magnitude earth- quakes (Nicolas et al., 1998, Bethoux et al. 1998, Sue et al., 1999; Baroux et al., 2000; Rigo et al., 1999, Souriau et al.,1998). Thanks to the LDG code "FUSION", we have mixed the bulletin data available from several networks, for the French Central massif and Western France, from January 1962 to October 2001. Then, we have divided our study area in different zones: the western Central Massif, a volcanic province (Chaine des Puys), an eocene graben (Limagne), a sedimentary basin (Bassin de Paris), and also the Charente region and the Armorican massif. Using the VELEST code (Kissling et al., 1994), we have obtain for each of those areas, a minimum 1D model (Kissling et al., 1994) which allows to improve the location of the hypocenters. These new hypocenter distributions are correlated with geological structures, and it is possible to associate swarns of events to faults recognized on the field. Some new focal mecha- nisms are computed. Then, an inversion of focal solutions available for each zone al- lows to deduce the regional stress field. Those informations will allow a re-evaluation of the seismotectonics of the northern Central Massif and Western France. In particu- lar, we propose a qualitative analysis of the major faults activity.

  1. Higher Education "Massification" and Challenges to the Professoriate: Do Academics' Conceptions of Quality Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akalu, Girmaw A.

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring and assuring the quality of higher education have become dominant policy discourses in many jurisdictions across the globe. Yet, the pressures of massification and its attendant problems mean that academics now have increasingly demanding roles to improve student learning, particularly so in systems ravaged by a paucity of resources. The…

  2. Time of formation and genesis of yttrium-zirconium mineralization in the Sakharjok massif, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrin, V. R.; Skublov, S. G.; Balashov, Yu. A.; Lyalina, L. M.; Rodionov, N. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Kola geotectonic province in the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield accommodates a significant number of alkaline rock massifs differing in age. They are of mantle and mantle-crustal origin (alkali and nepheline syenites, carbonatites) and related to crustal sources (Neoarchean alkali granites). Among them, the Neoarchean Sakharjok nepheline syenite massif is related to the oldest intrusions of this kind bearing yttrium-zirconium mineralization. The crystallization of alkali syenite pertaining to the first intrusive phase of the intrusive Sakharjok massif is dated to 2645 ± 7 Ma, and this implies that this syenite postdated alkali granites (2.66-2.67 Ga). To date the yttrium-zirconium ore, we applied the local U-Pb method to zircon crystals occurring in the mineralized block hosted in nepheline syenite. The earliest fragments of zircon crystallized 1832 ± 7 Ma ago; the age of metamorphism is estimated at 1784 ± 13 Ma. These dates indicate the Paleoproterozoic age of the yttrium-zirconium mineralization, which was formed as a product of fluid reworking of the Neoarchean nepheline syenite of the Sakharjok massif.

  3. Reforming Higher Education in Hong Kong towards Post-Massification: The First Decade and Challenges Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Calvin

    2011-01-01

    The process of reforming Hong Kong's higher education sector commenced in 2001, and the system moved into the post-massification era. Within five years, the post-secondary participation rate for the 17-20 age cohort had increased to 66 per cent. This target was achieved much earlier than the Government had planned. More educational opportunities…

  4. The nature of orogenic crust in the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2002-10-01

    The central Andes (16°-22°S) are part of an active continental margin mountain belt and the result of shortening of the weak western edge of South America between the strong lithospheres of the subducting Nazca plate and the underthrusting Brazilian shield. We have combined receiver function and surface wave dispersion results from the BANJO-SEDA project with other geophysical studies to characterize the nature of the continental crust and mantle lithospheric structure. The major results are as follows: (1) The crust supporting the high elevations is thick and has a felsic to intermediate bulk composition. (2) The relatively strong Brazilian lithosphere is underthrusting as far west (65.5°W) as the high elevations of the western part of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) but does not underthrust the entire Altiplano. (3) The subcrustal lithosphere is delaminating piecemeal under the Altiplano-EC boundary but is not completely removed beneath the central Altiplano. The Altiplano crust is characterized by a brittle upper crust decoupled from a very weak lower crust that is dominated by ductile deformation, leading to lower crustal flow and flat topography. In contrast, in the high-relief, inland-sloping regions of the EC and sub-Andean zone, the upper crust is still strongly coupled across the basal thrust of the fold-thrust belt to the underthrusting Brazilian Shield lithosphere. Subcrustal shortening between the Altiplano and Brazilian lithosphere appears to be accommodated by delamination near the Altiplano-EC boundary. Our study suggests that orogenic reworking may be an important part of the "felsification" of continental crust.

  5. Propagation tectonics and multiple accretionary processes of the Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunpeng; Zhang, Xiaoning; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Hongfu; Yang, Zhao; Sun, Shengsi; Zhang, Feifei

    2015-05-01

    The Qinling Orogen was built through collision between the North China and South China Blocks. Previous detailed geological, geochemical and geochronological investigations revealed that the mountain range can be divided into four tectonic units with distinct tectono-lithostratigraphy, which are, from north to south, the southern sector of the North China Block, North Qinling Belt, South Qinling Belt and northern sector of the South China Block, separated by the Kuanping, Shangdan and Mianlue sutures. According to the petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of ophiolitic mélanges and related magmatic rocks, as well as the features of sedimentary units, we think that the North China Block, the North Qinling Belt and the South China Block were originally independent continental units while the South Qinling Belt had been the northern part of the South China Block. These units experienced three episodes of accretionary tectonic processes and amalgamation from south to north. The Neoproterozoic accretion took place along the Luonan-Luanchuan Fault and Kuanping ophiolitic mélange belt as a result of southward subduction and subsequent collision between the North Qinling and North China Blocks during ca. 1.0-0.8 Ga related to the formation of the supercontinent of Rodinia. The Paleozoic accretion occurred along the Shangdan suture resulted from northward subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the Early Paleozoic and subsequent continental subduction in the Late Paleozoic. Late Triassic accretion took place along the Mianlue suture between the South Qinling and South China Blocks due to northward subduction of the Mianlue oceanic lithosphere during the Permian-Early Triassic and subsequent collision in the Late Triassic. After the Late Triassic collision along the Mianlue suture the whole Qinling Mountain range entered the phase of intense intracontinental deformation.

  6. The Dongbo and Purang ultramafic massifs in the Yarlung Zangbo suture zone of Tibet: Prospects for large chromite deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, F.; Yang, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, F.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Many ultramafic massifs occur along the Neo-Tethyan Yarlung Zangbo suture zone between the Indian and Eurasian plates, and the Dongbo and Purang ultramafic massifs in the western part of the zone are two of the largest. Both of them consist mainly of high-Mg harzburgite (with low pyroxene contents) and dunite with minor lherzolite. Mineral compositions of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and chromite, as well as whole-rock petrochemistry indicate that these are typical Alpine-type mantle peridotites. Chromium spinels in the lherzolite have Cr#s (=100 x Cr/(Cr+Al)) of 20-30, showing an affinity with abyssal peridotites, whereas those in the harzburgites have Cr#s ranging from 20 to 75, implying later melt-rock reaction. Based on the mineralogy and geochemistry of the rocks, the Dongbo and Purang massifs are interpreted as fragments of MORB lithosphere that were modified in a later SSZ setting. Many massive chromite ores and zones of disseminated mineralization are present in the two massifs, and chromite ores have Cr#s 70-80, similar to those of the hosting dunite. The petrological features and metallogenic environment of the Dongbo and Purang massifs are very similar to those of the Luobusa peridotite massif, which hosts the largest chromite deposit in China. Thus, we propose that the Purang and Dongbo massifs are two potential locations for significant chromite deposits.

  7. Niklas - a Hitherto Unknown Deep Magmatic Massif in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M.; Voznesensky, V.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2004-12-01

    A Niklas massif was discovered recompiling the gravity and magnetic maps and interpreting in 3-D mode all the available data in the area around Eratosthenes Seamount (ESM). The updated datasets clearly show two partially superimposed magnetic dipoles, which also correspond well to disturbances in the gravity field. The pronounced Eratosthenes magnetic anomaly (EMA) is only the positive part of the southeastern dipole. There is no large gravity anomaly here, however the specific gravity pattern corresponds to the magnetic body. The northwestern `magnetic dipole coincides with a prominent (about of 100mGal) gravity high that was recently delineated by Russian geophysicists. Such grav/mag combination allowed us to interpret the anomalies as being caused by a hitherto unknown dense and magnetic body which we have named the Niklas massif. The parameters and depth of causative bodies were calculated by inverse programs and forward modeling using the seismic refraction and reflection constraints. The reliability of the final model was verified using forward modeling. The magnetic data were interpreted by assuming an induced magnetization as the main magnetizing factor. The final model consists of two large compact features oriented NE-SW and located south of the Cyprian arc,as the Eratosthenes and Niklas bodies. The gravity and magnetic pattern of the Niklas is typical for the ophiolite massifs of the Eastern Mediterranean and Southern Turkey (Troodos, Hatay, Antalya). Based on this likeness we assume the Niklas composed by dense and magnetic ophyolites. This large (~100*75km) deep-seated (~7km) thick (~7km) massif is located ~95km southwest of Cyprus. We consider the Niklas as the south-most fragment of the large allochthonous ophiolite thrust slab including the Troodos massif. The tectonic situations of the Niklas area and the central segment of the Cyprian Arc are similar to that of the Eastern Taurus, Bayer-Bassit and Hatay areas. Interaction of the large Late

  8. Crustal structure of the Bohemian Massif in the light of seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubcova, Pavla

    2010-05-01

    The Bohemian Massif is one of the largest stable outcrops of pre-Permian rocks in Central and Western Europe. It forms the easternmost part of the Variscan Belt, which developed approximately between 500 and 250 Ma during a stage of large-scale crustal convergence, collision of continental plates and microplates, and possibly also subduction. It consists mainly of low- to high-grade metamorphic and plutonic Palaeozoic rocks. The area of the Bohemian Massif can be subdivided into various tectonostratigraphic units separated by faults, shear zones or thrusts trending roughly in a SW-NE direction, and reflecting varying influence of the Cadomian and Variscan orogenies: the Saxothuringian, Teplá-Barrandian, Moldanubian and Moravo-Silesian. Geographically, it comprises the area of the Czech Republic, partly Austria, Germany and Poland. While the post-collisional history of the Variscan Bohemian Massif is relatively clear, the kinematics of plate movements before and during collision is still subject of debates. To investigate such a complex structure, the Bohemian Massif has been covered by a network of seismic experiments as a result of a massive international cooperative effort in central Europe. Detailed analyses of the data from the main profiles of the CELEBRATION 2000, ALP 2002, and SUDETES 2003 refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiments show crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the massif and delimit the continuation of various tectonic units in depth. The differences in seismic velocities reflect, to some extent, the structural variances and give some indications for tracing of crust-forming processes during individual tectonic events. Lower crust in the Saxothuringian exhibits complicated structure, ranging from a highly reflective lower crustal layer above Moho with a strong velocity contrast at the top of this layer. Another possible explanation can be a double Moho or the Moho with some lateral topography. This complicated lower crust

  9. Crustal Architecture along BABEL and FIRE profiles - Insight in the Growth of the Svecofennian Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-04-01

    The Precambrian Svecofennian orogen is characterized by LP- HT metamorphism and voluminous granitoid magmatism that usually develop in transitional to plateau stages of a collisional orogeny. Deep seismic reflection profiles BABEL and FIRE have been interpreted using PURC concepts: prowedge, retrowedg, uplifted plug, subduction conduit and elevated plateau. BABEL profiles image a transitional orogen with several nuclei displaying prowedge-uplifted plug-retrowedge architecture above paleo-subduction conduits. Prowedge and -continent are on the south-southwestern side and retrowedge and -continent on the north-northwestern side. This implies a long-lived southwesterly retreating convergent margin, where transitional accretionary orogens have developed. FIRE1-3 profiles images a hot orogen with a pronounced super-infra structure, typical of an elevated plateau stage, below the Central Finland Granitoid Complex. Large volumes of granitoid intrusions suggest large scale melting of the middle and/or lower crust. Reflection structures, analogue and numerical modeling suggest midcrustal flow. The plateau is flanked by prowedges that are characterized by HT-LP migmatite belts. The Svecofennian orogeny has progressed to an elevated plateau stage in the thickest core of the orogen, west of the arc-continent collision zone.

  10. Variations in erosional efficiency modulate orogenic growth of the Alborz Mountains (N Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballato, Paolo; Landgraf, Angela; Stockli, Daniel; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Strecker, Manfred; Kirby, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The recognition that redistribution of mass by erosion governs orogenic evolution has radically changed our perspective on the coupling between climate and mountain building processes. Climate modulates the efficiency of surface processes, which modifies crustal stresses and this is expected to produce the cessation of shortening at the orogenic front, onset of out-of-sequence thrusting, and increased rates of rock -uplift and sediment supply. Unambiguous characterization of these multiple responses through field-based studies, however, has remained challenging. Here, we show that coordinated changes in the rates and patterns of exhumation and deformation during the development of the Alborz Mountains (N Iran) were driven by abrupt, large magnitude (0.6 to 1.5 km) fluctuations in base level in the adjacent Caspian Sea. We argue that sustained regression of the paleoshoreline from ~6 to 3.2 Ma enhanced erosional efficiency of fluvial systems and increased exhumation within the axial orogenic zone and along the northern range flank which, in turn, drove coordinated retreat of the deformation fronts. When base level rose again at 3.2 Ma, exhumation in the orogen interior slowed and range-bounding faults were reactivated. This was associated with the progressive establishment of positive feedbacks loop between orographically-induced precipitation, focused erosion, exhumation, and rock uplift. Overall, these coordinated changes offer compelling evidence that enhanced erosion can indeed trigger a structural reorganization within an actively deforming orogen.

  11. Magnetotelluric imaging beneath the Taiwan orogen: An arc-continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Edward A.; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Chiang, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chow-Son; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wu, Francis T.; TürkoǧLu, Ersan; Hsu, Han-Lun; Hill, Graham J.

    2012-01-01

    The Taiwan orogen has formed since the late Miocene by oblique collision between the Luzon Volcanic Arc on the Philippine Sea Plate, and the Eurasian continental margin. This oblique collision has produced an orogen that decreases in age from north to south, and permits study of the temporal evolution of an arc-continent collision. These factors make Taiwan a favorable location to study the process of arc-continent collision. The first long-period magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were recorded in Taiwan as part of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER) project in 2006-7. Measurements were made at 82 sites on three transects across south, central and north Taiwan, that span the breadth of the orogen and cross all major tectonic boundaries. Robust, remote reference processing of the MT time series data resulted in high-quality soundings that were modeled in both 2 and 3-dimensions. These MT models support predictions of lithospheric deformation (i.e., thick-skinned tectonics) beneath the Central Ranges in south and central Taiwan, but are inconsistent with predictions of orogen-scale thin-skinned models. The MT resistivity model for northern Taiwan is consistent with dewatering of the subducting Philippine slab, and with deformation described by the subducting-indenter tectonic model. Modeling the TAIGER MT data has definitively shown that conductive, and seismically active crustal structures, exist to 30+ km beneath the orogen. These conductive regions, interpreted as interconnected fluid, map pervasive zones of collisional deformation that are lithospheric in scale.

  12. Evolution of stocks and massifs from burial of salt sheets, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Salt structures in a 4000-km{sup 2} region of the continental slope, the northeast Green Canyon area, include stocks, massifs, remnant structures, and an allochthonous sheet. Salt-withdrawal basins include typical semicircular basins and an extensive linear trough that is largely salt-free. Counterregional growth faults truncate the landward margin of salt sheets that extend 30-50 km to the Sigsbee Escarpment. The withdrawal basins, stocks, and massifs occur within a large graben between an east-northeast-trending landward zone of shelf-margin growth faults and a parallel trend of counterregional growth faults located 48-64 km basinward. The graben formed by extension and subsidence as burial of the updip portion of a thick salt sheet produced massifs and stocks by downbuilding. Differential loading segmented the updip margin of the salt sheet into stocks and massifs separated by salt-withdrawal basins. Initially, low-relief structures evolved by trap-door growth as half-graben basins buried the salt sheet. Remnant-salt structures and a turtle-structure anticline overlay a salt-weld disconformity in sediments formerly separated by a salt sheet. Age of sediments below the weld is inferred to be be late Miocene to early Pliocene (4.6-5.3 Ma); age of sediments above the weld is late Pliocene (2.8-3.5 Ma). The missing interval of time (1-2.5 Ma) is the duration between emplacement of the salt sheet and burial of the sheet. Sheet extrusion began in the late Miocene to early Pliocene, and sheet burial began in the late Pliocene in the area of the submarine trough to early Pleistocene in the area of the massifs.

  13. Geochronology and geochemistry of early Paleozoic igneous rocks of the Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Xu, Wen-liang; Pei, Fu-ping; Wang, Feng; Guo, Peng

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon U-Pb, Hf isotope, and whole-rock major and trace element data for early Paleozoic igneous rocks of the Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China, in order to constrain the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that early Paleozoic magmatic events within the northern Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif (SZM) can be subdivided into four stages: Middle Cambrian ( 505 Ma), Late Cambrian ( 490 Ma), Early-Middle Ordovician ( 470 Ma), and Late Ordovician (460-450 Ma). The Middle Cambrian monzogranites are K-rich, weakly to strongly peraluminous, and characterized by pronounced heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletions, high Sr/Y ratios, low Y concentrations, low primary zircon εHf(t) values (- 6.79 to - 1.09), and ancient two-stage model (TDM2) ages (1901-1534 Ma). These results indicate derivation from partial melting of thickened ancient crustal materials that formed during the amalgamation of the northern SZM and the northern Jiamusi Massif (JM). The Late Cambrian monzonite, quartz monzonite, and monzogranite units are chemically similar to A-type granites, and contain zircons with εHf(t) values of - 2.59 to + 1.78 and TDM2 ages of 1625-1348 Ma. We infer that these rocks formed from primary magmas generated by partial melting of Mesoproterozoic accreted lower crustal materials in a post-collisional extensional environment. The Early-Middle Ordovician quartz monzodiorite, quartz monzonite, monzogranite, and rhyolite units are calc-alkaline, relatively enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Rb, Th, and U), depleted in HREEs and high field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and contain zircons with εHf(t) values of - 7.33 to + 4.98, indicative of formation in an active continental margin setting. The Late Ordovician alkali-feldspar granite and rhyolite units have A-type granite affinities that suggest they formed in an

  14. Paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic volcanics of Lusatia, NW Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabl, P.; Cajz, V.; Tietz, O.; Buechner, J.; Suhr, P.; Pecskay, Z.; Cizkova, K.

    2013-05-01

    Lusatia is situated in the NE continuation of the Ohre Rift (OR) behind Lusatian Overtrust. Compared to the neighbouring volcanic complex of the České stredohorí Mts. (CS) inside the OR. The scattered occurrences of basaltic bodies in Lusatia are spread on wider area. This can be caused by different tectonic development of the regions and from derived erosional conditions. The Lusatian Overtrust, high-order tectonic structure running across the course of the OR, separates Lusatian region into two different geological areas where Cretaceous sediments or granodiorites of Lusatian Massif represent the country rock of the Cenozoic volcanism, respectively. The age of volcanic activity ranges from 19 to 33 Ma, it's proved by newly obtained Ar-Ar data from Freiberg and K-Ar data from Debrecen. Forty two scattered remnants of Cenozoic volcanic products were sampled to get paleomagnetic data. The superficial volcanics with detectable geological position and volcanology were chosen preferentially, several dykes and separate vents were sampled as well. Paleomagnetic research was processed on more than 500 samples which were demagnetized using alternate field in the range 0-80 mT. Q-ratio was counted to prevent the lightning influence - solitary volcanic occurrences build positive morphology and thus, they are prone to be targeted by lightnings. The values of Q-ratio predominantly span from 0.1 to 7.0; those samples having the value over 10, were excluded for evaluation. The mean paleomagnetic direction (MPD) was acquired from several samples on each sampling site. Declination and Inclination show values of 11.8 deg and 62.7 deg (α95 = 9.3 deg) for normal polarity, or 182.1 deg and -59.2 deg (α95 = 6.1 deg) for reverse polarity, respectively,The corresponding paleolatitude of 41.9 deg was counted from the Inclination. This is 1000 km to the South, compared to recent position. The dispersions of the MPD are relatively wide. This coincides well with the idea of long

  15. Occurrence of springs in massifs of crystalline rocks, northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando António Leal; Alencoão, Ana Maria Pires

    2002-02-01

    An inventory of artesian springs emerging from fractures (fracture springs) was conducted in the Pinhão River Basin and Morais Massif, northern Portugal, comprising an area of approximately 650 km2. Over 1,500 springs were identified and associated with geological domains and fracture sets. Using cross-tabulation analysis, spring distributions by fracture sets were compared among geological environments, and the deviations related to differences in rock structure and, presumably, to differences in deformational histories. The relation between spring frequencies and rock structures was further investigated by spectral determination, the model introduced in this study. Input data are the spring frequencies and fracture lengths in each geological domain, in addition to the angles between fracture strikes and present-day stress-field orientation (θ). The model's output includes the so-called intrinsic densities, a parameter indexing spring occurrence to factors such as fracture type and associated deformational regime and age. The highest densities (12.2 springs/km of lineament) were associated with young shear fractures produced by brittle deformation, and the lowest (0.1) with old tensional and ductile fractures. Spectral determination also relates each orientation class to a dominant structural parameter: where spring occurrence is controlled by θ, the class is parallel to the present-day stress-field orientation; where the control is attributed to the length of fractures, the spring occurrence follows the strike of large-scale normal faults crossing the region. Résumé. Un inventaire des sources artésiennes émergeant de fractures (sources de fractures) a été réalisé dans le bassin de la rivière Pinhão et dans le massif de Morais, dans le nord du Portugal, dans une région couvrant environ 650 km2. Plus de 1,500 sources ont été identifiées et associées à des domaines géologiques et à des ensembles de fractures. Grâce à une analyse de tableaux

  16. Orogen-perpendicular structures in the central Tasmanides and implications for the Paleozoic tectonic evolution of eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Rashed; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    The curvilinear E-W structures of the southern Thomson Orogen are approximately orthogonal to the general N-S structural trend of the Tasmanides of eastern Australia. The origin of these orogen-perpendicular structures and their implications to tectonic reconstructions of eastern Gondwana are not fully understood. Here we use geophysical data to unravel the geometry, kinematics and possible timing of major structures along the boundary between the Thomson Orogen and the southern Tasmanides (Delamerian and Lachlan orogens). Aeromagnetic data from the southern Thomson Orogen show WNW, E-W and/or ENE trending structural grains, corresponding to relatively long wavelength linear geophysical anomalies. Kinematic analyses indicate strike-slip and transpressional deformation along these geophysically defined faults. Structural relationships indicate that faulting took place during the Benambran (Late Ordovician to Middle Silurian) and Tabberabberan (late Early to Middle Devonian) orogenies. However, some of the described crustal-scale structures may have developed in the Cambrian during the Delamerian Orogeny. Interpretation of deep seismic data shows that the crust of the southern Thomson Orogen is substantially thicker than the Lachlan Orogen crust, which is separated from the Thomson Orogen by the north-dipping Olepoloko Fault. A major lithospheric-scale change across this boundary is also indicated by a contrast in seismic velocities. Together with evidence for the occurrence of Delamerian deformation in both the Koonenberry Belt and northeastern Thomson Orogen, and a significant contrast in the width of the northern Tasmanides versus the southern Tasmanides, it appears that the southern Thomson Orogen may represent the locus of orogen-perpendicular segmentation, which may have occurred in response to along-strike plate boundary variations.

  17. Architecture of orogenic belts and convergent zones in Western Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    Linear mountain belts in Ishtar Terra were recognized from Pioneer-Venus topography, and later Arecibo images showed banded terrain interpreted to represent folds. Subsequent analyses showed that the mountains represented orogenic belts, and that each had somewhat different features and characteristics. Orogenic belts are regions of focused shortening and compressional deformation and thus provide evidence for the nature of such deformation, processes of crustal thickening (brittle, ductile), and processes of crustal loss. Such information is important in understanding the nature of convergent zones on Venus (underthrusting, imbrication, subduction), the implications for rates of crustal recycling, and the nature of environments of melting and petrogenesis. The basic elements of four convergent zones and orogenic belts in western Ishtar Terra are identified and examined, and then assess the architecture of these zones (the manner in which the elements are arrayed), and their relationships. The basic nomenclature of the convergent zones is shown.

  18. Orogenic plateau magmatism of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Kheirkhah, M.; van Hunen, J.; Davidson, J. P.; Meliksetian, Kh.; Emami, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    generally applicable as melt triggers. Enigmatic lavas are erupted over the thick lithosphere of Kurdistan Province, Iran. These alkali basalts and basanites have the chemical characteristics of small degree (<1%) melts in the garnet stability field. Most possess supra-subduction zone chemistry (La/Nb = 1-3), but this signature is highly variable. Similar La/Nb variability occurs in the basic lavas of Damavand volcano in the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. Modelling suggests the depletion of residual amphibole during the progression of partial melting can explain the observed La/Nb range. This melting may occur as the result of lithospheric thickening. At depths of ~90 km, amphibole-bearing peridotite crosses an experimentally-determined "backbend" in its solidus. Melting can continue while the source remains hydrated. Such "compression" melting may apply to parts of other orogenic plateaux, including Tibet.

  19. Relating shortening, erosion, and exhumation to orogen width during Alpine collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Berger, Alfons; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Bousquet, Romain

    2014-05-01

    The width of orogens may change through time depending on the amount of shortening, on the efficiency of erosion, on the strength and thickness of the plates, or on the occurrence of pre-existing and newly formed weaknesses within the plates. The effect of erosion rates on the width of the Alps was controversially discussed, based on estimates of paleo-erosion rates and paleo-widths of the orogen. However, both parameters are difficult to reconstruct. In this contribution we investigate the causes of present-day, along-strike changes of width of the Eastern and the Central Alps to understand its width changes through time. Based on a series of 6 orogen-scale cross-sections and their retro-deformation we set the width of the thickened accreted lower plate in relation to the amount of collisional shortening and exhumation. We conclude that higher amounts of shortening systematically coincide with smaller widths of the thickened, accreted lower plate, i.e. the width of the mountain chain north of the South-Alpine indenters. Changes of width by a factor 2 along orogen segments of less than 200 km length cannot result from long-term climatic differences and sedimentary or paleontological evidences suggesting such differences are lacking. Therefore, erosional processes did not directly control the width of the orogen, which did not behave as a critical taper. Higher amounts of shortening coincide with larger amplitudes of orogen-scale, upright folds, with larger amounts of exhumation, and with higher exhumation rates. Hence, erosion did play a major role in reducing by up to 35 km the vertical crustal thickness in order to accommodate and allow shortening by folding, but along-strike changes of erosion rates were governed by different amounts of shortening, not by different climate.

  20. Research of dynamical Characteristics of slow deformation Waves as Massif Responses on Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The research of massif state with use of approaches of open system theory [1-3] was developed for investigation the criterions of dissipation regimes for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. For realization of that research we used the data of seismic catalogue of Tashtagol mine. As a result of the analyze of that data we defined character morphology of phase trajectories of massif response, which was locally in time in a stable state: on the phase plane with coordinates released by the massif during the dynamic event energy E and lg(dE/dt) there is a local area as a ball of twisted trajectories and some not great bursts from that ball, which are not greater than 105 joules. In some time intervals that burst can be larger, than 105 joules, achieving 106 joules and yet 109 joules. [3]. Evidently there are two reciprocal depend processes: the energy accumulation in the attracted phase trajectories area and resonance fault of the accumulated energy. But after the fault the system returns again to the same attracted phase trajectories area. For analyzing of the thin structure of the chaotic area we decided to add the method of processing of the seismic monitoring data by new parameters. We shall consider each point of explosion as a source of seismic or deformation waves. Using the kinematic approach of seismic information processing we shall each point of the massif response use as a time point of the first arrival of the deformation wave for calculation of the wave velocity, because additionally we know the coordinates of the fixed response and the coordinates of explosion. The use of additional parameter-velocity of slow deformation wave propagation allowed us with use method of phase diagrams identify their hierarchic structure, which allow us to use that information for modeling and interpretation the propagation seismic and deformation waves in hierarchic structures. It is researched with use of that suggested processing method the thin

  1. Basin-mountain structures and hydrocarbon exploration potential of west Junggar orogen in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Qi, X.; Zheng, M.

    2015-12-01

    Situated in northern Xinjiang, China, in NE-SW trend, West Junggar Orogen is adjacent to Altai fold belt on the north with the Ertix Fault as the boundary, North Tianshan fold belt on the south with the Ebinur Lake Strike-slip Fault as the boundary, and the Junggar Basin on the southeast with Zaire-Genghis Khan-Hala'alat fold belt as the boundary. Covering an area of about 10×104 km2 in China, there are medium and small intermontane basins, Burqin-Fuhai, Tacheng, Hefeng and Hoxtolgay, distributing inside the orogen. Tectonically West Junggar Orogen lies in the middle section of the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain where the Siberia, Kazakhstan and Tarim Plates converge, and is the only orogen trending NE-SW in the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain. Since the Paleozoic, the orogen experienced pre-Permian plate tectonic evolution and post-Permian intra-plate basin evolution. Complex tectonic evolution and multi-stage structural superimposition not only give rise to long term controversial over the basin basement property but also complex basin-mountain coupling relations, structures and basin superimposition modes. According to analysis of several kinds of geological and geophysical data, the orogen was dominated by compressive folding and thrust napping from the Siberia plate in the north since the Late Paleozoic. Compressive stress weakened from north to south, corresponding to subdued vertical movement and enhanced horizontal movement of crustal surface from north to south, and finally faded in the overthrust-nappe belt at the northwest margin of the Junggar Basin. The variation in compressive stress is consistent with the surface relief of the orogen, which is high in the north and low in the south. There are two kinds of basin-mountain coupling relationships, i.e. high angle thrusting and overthrusting and napping, and two kinds of basin superimposition modes, i.e. inherited and progressive, and migrating and convulsionary modes. West Junggar orogen has rich oil and gas

  2. Long lasting paleolandscapes stability of the French Massif Central during the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricordel-Prognon, C.; Thiry, M.; Theveniaut, H.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-04-01

    Regional geodynamical evolution is mainly constrained by the sedimentary record in the basins. Usually, little is known about geodynamics of the peripheral areas and even less on the evolution of the basement areas. Continental unconformities are essential to estimate erosion rates of basement and to model the crustal dynamics that control subsidence of surrounding sedimentary basins but also uplift and erosion on their edges. Dating such unconformities has always been the stumbling block while it is a prerequisite to constrain geodynamical models. Paleomagnetism has been proven as a suitable tool to date ferrugineous paleoweathering features. The method has been applied to paleoweathering occurrences resting on the Massif Central crystalline basement as well as to paleoweathering features affecting the crystalline basement itself. The remanence measurements were obtained at the Paleomagnetic Laboratory of the Institut Physique du Globe de Paris and data analyses were carried out using PaleoMac 5 software (Cogné, 2003). Relative dating of the paleoweathering profiles have been acquired by comparing the recorded paleomagnetic poles from the analysed samples to the apparent polar wandering path of the Eurasian plate (Edel et Duringer, 1997 ; Besse and Courtillot, 2003). Thick red kaolinitic formations rest locally on the Massif Central basement. They are generally bounded by the Tertiary grabens and buried by the Oligocene formations. Thus these azoic red formations have classically been ascribed to the "Siderolithic" formations of Eocene-Oligocene age. They show many pedogenic features (termites burrows, illuviation and hydromorphic features and nodules) and strong relationships with paleolandscape organisation (leaned against fault scarps, infilling paleovalleys, etc.). Macro and micromorphological arrangements show that these formations are in situ paleosols. Paleomagnetic ages range from 160 Ma (Late Jurassic) in the centre of the Massif Central to 140 Ma (Early

  3. Petrological and geochemical evolution of the Tolbachik volcanic massif, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churikova, Tatiana G.; Gordeychik, Boris N.; Iwamori, Hikaru; Nakamura, Hitomi; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Tatsuji; Haraguchi, Satoru; Miyazaki, Takashi; Vaglarov, Bogdan S.

    2015-12-01

    Data on the geology, petrography, and geochemistry of Middle-Late-Pleistocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic massif (Kamchatka, Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes) are presented and compared with rocks from the neighboring Mount Povorotnaya, Klyuchevskaya group basement, and Holocene-historical Tolbachik monogenetic cones. Two volcanic series of lavas, middle-K and high-K, are found in the Tolbachik massif. The results of our data analysis and computer modeling of crystallization at different P-T-H2O-fO2 conditions allow us to reconstruct the geochemical history of the massif. The Tolbachik volcanic massif started to form earlier than 86 ka based on K-Ar dating. During the formation of the pedestal and the lower parts of the stratovolcanoes, the middle-K melts, depleted relative to NMORB, fractionated in water-rich conditions (about 3% of H2O). At the Late Pleistocene-Holocene boundary, a large fissure zone was initiated and the geodynamical regime changed. Upwelling associated with intra-arc rifting generated melting from the same mantle source that produced magmas more enriched in incompatible trace elements and subduction components; these magmas are high-K, not depleted relative to N-MORB melts with island arc signatures and rift-like characteristics. The fissure opening caused degassing during magma ascent, and the high-K melts fractionated at anhydrous conditions. These high-K rocks contributed to the formation of the upper parts of stratovolcanoes. At the beginning of Holocene, the high-K rocks became prevalent and formed cinder cones and associated lava fields along the fissure zone. However, some features, including 1975-1976 Northern Breakthrough, are represented by middle-K high-Mg rocks, suggesting that both middle-K and high-K melts still exist in the Tolbachik system. Our results show that fractional crystallization at different water conditions and a variably depleted upper mantle source are responsible for all observed variations in rocks within

  4. Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America and Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen of Asia: Structural and thermal characteristics of the lower and upper plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, Marc R.; Searle, Michael P.; Wodicka, Natasha

    2006-08-01

    The Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) of North America and the Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen (HKTO) of Asia preserve a Paleoproterozoic and Cenozoic record, respectively, of continent-continent collision that is notably similar in scale, duration and character. In THO, the tectonothermal evolution of the lower plate involves (1) early thin-skinned thrusting and Barrovian metamorphism, (2) out-of-sequence thrusting and high-T metamorphism, and (3) fluid-localized reequilibration, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The crustal evolution of the Indian lower plate in HKTO involves (1) early subduction of continental crust to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) eclogite depths, (2) regional Barrovian metamorphism, and (3) widespread high-T metamorphism, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The shallow depths of the high-T metamorphism in HKTO are consistent with early to mid-Miocene ductile flow of an Indian lower plate midcrustal channel, from beneath the southern Tibetan Plateau to the Greater Himalaya. Melt weakening of the lower plate in THO is not observed at a similar scale probably due to the paucity of pelitic lithologies. Tectonothermal events in the upper plate of both orogens include precollisional accretion of crustal blocks, emplacement of Andean-type plutonic suites, and high-T metamorphism. Syncollisional to postcollisional events include emplacement of garnet-biotite-muscovite leucogranites, anatectic granites, and sporadic metamorphism (up to 90 Myr following the onset of collision in THO). Comparing the type and duration of tectonothermal events for THO and HKTO supports the notion of tectonic uniformitarianism for at least the later half of dated Earth history and highlights the complementary nature of the rock record in an older "exhumed" orogen compared to one undergoing present-day orogenesis.

  5. Scorpions from the Mitaraka Massif in French Guiana. II. Description of a new species of Ananteris Thorell, 1891 (Scorpiones: Buthidae).

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson R

    2016-01-01

    A new remarkable species belonging to the genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891 (Buthidae) is described from the Mitaraka Massif in French Guiana, a site located near the borders of French Guiana, Brazil, and Suriname. The description of this new species brings further evidence about the biogeographic patterns of distribution presented by most species of the genus Ananteris, which are highly endemic in most biogeographic realms of South America, including the Tepuys and Inselberg Massifs.

  6. Sulfur- and lead-isotope signatures of orogenic gold mineralisation associated with the Hill End Trough, Lachlan Orogen, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, P. M.; Seccombe, P. K.; Carr, G. R.

    2008-11-01

    The Hill End Trough (HET) is a deformed middle Silurian to Early Devonian sediment-dominated rift within the northeastern Lachlan Orogen. The HET hosts the Hill End, Hargraves, Napoleon Reefs, Stuart Town and Windeyer low-sulfide orogenic gold deposits. Adjacent to the HET are the Bodangora and Gulgong gold deposits. In this study we present 91 new sulfur- and 18 new lead-isotope analyses and collate a further 25 sulfur- and 32 lead-isotopes analyses from unpublished sources for these deposits. Larger gold deposits in the HET have near 0 δ34S‰ values indicating that sulfur in these systems was sourced from a magmatic reservoir. The dominant lead isotope signature for HET-hosted deposits reflects a crustal source however some mantle-derived lead has been introduced into the HET. Sulfur- and lead-isotopic results suggest that gold was sourced from mantle-derived magmatic units beneath the HET. The study supports earlier studies at Hill End by concluding that the majority of orogenic gold mineralisation in and adjacent to the HET formed during the Early Carboniferous period.

  7. Crustal structures from the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to the Taiwan orogen: The onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic experiments of the TAIGER and ATSEE projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yao-Wen; Wang, Chien-Ying; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Jin, Xin; Cai, Hui-Teng; Lin, Jing-Yi; Wu, Francis T.; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Okaya, David; Brown, Larry

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the crustal structure is important for understanding the tectonic framework and geological evolution of southeastern China and adjacent areas. In this study, we integrated the datasets from the TAIGER (TAiwan Integrated GEodynamic Research) and ATSEE (Across Taiwan Strait Explosion Experiment) projects to resolve onshore-offshore deep crustal seismic profiles from the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen to the Taiwan orogen in southeastern China. Three seismic profiles were resolved, and the longest profile was 850 km. Unlike 2D and 3D first arrival travel-time tomography from previous studies, we used both refracted and reflected phases (Pg, Pn, PcP, and PmP) to model the crustal structures and the crustal reflectors. In total, data from 40 shots, 2 earthquakes, and approximately 1,950 stations were used; 15,612 arrivals were selected among three transects. Using these data, we determined the complex crustal evolution since the Paleozoic era , involving the closed Paleozoic rift basin in central Fujian, the Cenozoic extension due to the South China Sea opening beneath the coastline of southern Fujian, and the on-going collision of the Taiwan orogen. The shape of the Moho, which also reflects the crustal evolution, can be summarized as follows: 30 km deep to the west of Fujian, deepening toward central Fujian ( 35 km), becoming shallower toward the Taiwan Strait ( 28 km), deepening again toward the mountain belt of Taiwan ( 42 km), and becoming shallower toward the Pacific Ocean ( 10 km).

  8. How does the mid-crust accommodate deformation in large, hot collisional orogens? A review of recent research in the Himalayan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, John M.; Larson, Kyle P.; Kellett, Dawn A.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of hot, weak crust is a central component of recent hypotheses that seek to explain the evolution of continent-continent collisions, and in particular may play an important role in accommodating the >3000 km of convergence within the Himalaya-Tibetan collision over the last ∼55 Myr. Models that implicate flow of semi-viscous midcrustal rocks south toward the front of the Himalayan orogen, 'channel flow', are able to account for many geologic observations in the Himalaya, while alternative models of collision, particularly 'thrust-wedge taper', demonstrate that much of the observed geology could have formed in the absence of a low-viscosity mid-crustal layer. Several recent studies, synthesized here, have prompted a shift from initial assumptions that channel flow and thrust-wedge taper processes are by definition mutually exclusive. These new studies reveal the presence of several tectonometamorphic discontinuities in the midcrust that appear to reflect a continuum of deformation in which both channel- and wedge-type processes operate in spatially and temporally distinct domains within the orogen, and further, that the system may migrate back and forth between these types of behavior. This continuum of deformation styles within the collisional system is of crucial importance for explaining the evolution of the Himalayan orogen and, hence, for understanding the evolution of Earth's many continent-continent collision zones.

  9. North Massif lithologies and chemical compositions viewed from 2-4 mm particles of soil sample 76503

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Kaylynn M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Korotev, Randy L.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    We identify the lithologic and compositional components of soil 76503 based on INAA of 243 2-4-mm particles and 72 thin sections from these and associated 1-2-mm particles (76502). We present a statistical distribution of the major compositional types as the first step of a detailed comparative study of the North and South Massifs. The soil sample was collected well away from any boulder and is more representative of typical North Massif material than any single large rock or boulder sample. So far, our examination of the 76503 particles has provided a better definition of precursor igneous lithologies and their petrogenetic relationships. It has enabled us to refine the nature of mixing components for the North Massif less than 1-mm fines. It has confirmed the differences in lithologies and their proportions between materials of the North and South Massifs; e.g., the North Massif is distinguished by the absence of a 72275-type KREEP component, the abundance of a highly magnesian igneous component, and the absence of certain types of melt compositions found in the South Massif samples.

  10. Two types of noble metal mineralization in the Kaalamo massif (Karelia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Ruchyev, A. M.; Golubev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Noble metal mineralization of the syngenetic (Southern Kaalamo) and epigenetic (Surisuo) types are defined in the Kaalamo massif. The ƩPt, Pd, Au content is as high as 0.9-1.1 g/t. Syngenetic mineralization started at the late magmatic stage (at around 800°C) gradually evolving to cease during the hydrothermal-metasomatic stage (<271°C). Epigenetic mineralization was formed at temperatures ranging from 500 to <230°C in zones of intense shear deformations and low-temperature metasomatosis during the collisional stage of the Svecofennian tectono-magmatic cycle (approximately 1.85 Ga ago). Taking into consideration the geological position of the Kaalamo massif in the Raakhe-Ladoga metallogenic zone with widely developed intense shear dislocations, the epigenetic mineralization type seems to be more promising with respect to noble metals.

  11. Metagenomic identification of active methanogens and methanotrophs in serpentinite springs of the Voltri Massif, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Christopher N.; Hyer, Alex; Twing, Katrina I.; Longino, August A.; Lang, Susan Q.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2017-01-01

    The production of hydrogen and methane by geochemical reactions associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks can potentially support subsurface microbial ecosystems independent of the photosynthetic biosphere. Methanogenic and methanotrophic microorganisms are abundant in marine hydrothermal systems heavily influenced by serpentinization, but evidence for methane-cycling archaea and bacteria in continental serpentinite springs has been limited. This report provides metagenomic and experimental evidence for active methanogenesis and methanotrophy by microbial communities in serpentinite springs of the Voltri Massif, Italy. Methanogens belonging to family Methanobacteriaceae and methanotrophic bacteria belonging to family Methylococcaceae were heavily enriched in three ultrabasic springs (pH 12). Metagenomic data also suggest the potential for hydrogen oxidation, hydrogen production, carbon fixation, fermentation, and organic acid metabolism in the ultrabasic springs. The predicted metabolic capabilities are consistent with an active subsurface ecosystem supported by energy and carbon liberated by geochemical reactions within the serpentinite rocks of the Voltri Massif. PMID:28149702

  12. The Sidi Mohamed peridotites (Edough Massif, NE Algeria): Evidence for an upper mantle origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobir, Soraya Hadj; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2013-12-01

    The Hercynian Edough massif is the easternmost crystalline massif of the Algerian coast. It consists of two tectonically superposed units composed of micaschists, gneisses, and peridotite. This study concentrates on the small and isolated Sidi Mohamed peridotite outcrop area (0.03 km2). The Sidi Mohamed peridotite is composed mainly of harzburgites (Mg-rich olivine and orthopyroxene as major minerals). The Ni (2051-2920 ppm), Cr (2368-5514 ppm) and MgO (~28-35 wt.%) whole-rock composition and the relative depletion in Nb make these harzburgites comparable to depleted peridotites related to a subduction zone. We suggest that the Sidi Mohamed ultramafic body was derived directly from the upper mantle and tectonically incorporated into the gneiss units of the Edough metamorphic core complex in a subduction environment.

  13. The role of radiogenic heat in prolonged intraplate reworking: The Capricorn Orogen explained?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Fawna J.; Johnson, Simon P.

    2015-10-01

    Links between intraplate crustal deformation and the thermal regime of the lithosphere have been investigated using numerical models, but these conceptual models must be tested using well-constrained natural systems. The Proterozoic Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia is ideally suited for such a study; after arc accretion, it records a protracted history of intracrustal differentiation and over one billion years of subsequent tectonic reworking. The early addition of juvenile arc material initially reduced the heat production of the crust, whereas subsequent recycling of the deep crust ultimately produced radiogenic granites in the shallow crust. Using whole rock and magmatic zircon compositions, we show that the shallow crust of the Capricorn Orogen has been progressively enriched in heat-producing elements with time. The high heat production is mainly controlled by thorium, concentrated in LREE-enriched phosphates that grew during the late stages of crystallization of crustally-derived granites. Using a numerical model, we investigate the thermal effects of this evolved crustal stratification and compare them with quantitative data on the pressure-temperature-time evolution of a non-magmatic Mesoproterozoic reworking event. The results provide new information concerning the process by which the thermal conditions necessary for the reworking of orogenic crust are generated and sustained for prolonged timescales (>110 Ma). Furthermore, we demonstrate that perturbations to the radiogenic crust lead to warmer geotherms and consequent lithospheric weakening, which has a fundamental control on intraplate reworking of long-lived orogens.

  14. Paleomagnetic data from the New England Orogen (eastern Australia) and implications for oroclinal bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaanan, Uri; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Pisarevsky, Sergei; Speranza, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Orogenic curvatures (oroclines) are common in modern and ancient orogens, but the geodynamic driving forces of many oroclines remain controversial. Here we focus on the New England oroclines of eastern Australia, the formation of which had been previously broadly constrained to the Early-Middle Permian. This time interval encompasses periods of both back-arc extension (at ~ 300-280 Ma) and subsequent contractional deformation (Hunter-Bowen Orogeny) that commenced at ~ 270 Ma along the paleo-Pacific and Gondwanan subduction plate boundary. We present new paleomagnetic data from volcanic rocks that were extruded during the transition from extension to contraction (at ~ 272 Ma), and we show that the oroclinal structure must have formed prior to the emplacement of the volcanic rocks. Our results thus indicate that oroclinal bending in the southernmost New England Orogen has been completed prior to the onset of Middle Permian contractional deformation. It is therefore concluded that the oroclines have likely formed during back-arc extension, and that a major contribution to the orogenic curvature was driven by trench retreat.

  15. Evidence of Early Cretaceous transpression in the Sulu orogenic belt, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chang, Su-Chin; Lin, Peijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Fu, Yongtao; Zhang, Haichun

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have documented marine turbidites with syn-sedimentary deformation features in the central Sulu orogenic belt of eastern China. These units preserve essential information on the Late Mesozoic evolution of the Sulu orogenic belt. Referred to as the Baxiandun Formation, the turbidites exhibit similar lithologic characteristics to nearby units such as the Lingshandao Formation that have been well studied even though precise geochronologic constraints are lacking for a more precise correlation. This study reports detrital zircon Usbnd Pb age data that correlate the Baxiandun Formation turbidites of the central Sulu orogenic belt to the Early Cretaceous Lingshandao Formation. We also report Al-in-hornblende emplacement depth estimates for granitic intrusions of the Sulu orogenic belt's Laoshan mountain. A sharp contact between the Laoshan granites and the marine Baxiandun Formation indicates that the Baxiandun basin rapidly subsided to the emplacement depth of the Laoshan plutons. Lateral correlation among the marine turbidites, the Lingshandao and Baxiandun Formations, combined with information established by previous studies indicates initiation of transpressional tectonics at 122-121 Ma. Transpression ceased with the emplacement of the Laoshan granites, whose A1-type composition indicates a return to extensional tectonics at ca. 111 Ma.

  16. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as 'cratonization', is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons. The majority of magmatic zircons from the main magmatic cycles have Hf isotopic compositions that are generally more evolved than CHUR, forming vertical arrays that extend to moderately radiogenic compositions. Complimentary O isotope data, also show a significant variation in composition. However, combined, these data define not only the source components from which the magmas were derived, but also a range of physio-chemical processes that operated during magma transport and emplacement. These data also identify a previously unknown crustal reservoir in the Capricorn Orogen.

  17. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  18. Orogen-parallel deformation of the Himalayan midcrust: Insights from structural and magnetic fabric analyses of the Greater Himalayan Sequence, Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Ferré, E. C.; Law, R. D.; Lloyd, G. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The metamorphic core of the Himalaya (Greater Himalayan Sequence, GHS), in the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri region, central Nepal, recorded orogen-parallel stretching during midcrustal evolution. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and field-based structural analyses suggest that midcrustal deformation of the amphibolite facies core of the GHS occurred under an oblate/suboblate strain regime with associated formation of low-angle northward dipping foliation. Magnetic and mineral stretching lineations lying within this foliation from the top of the GHS record right-lateral orogen-parallel stretching. We propose that oblate strain within a midcrustal flow accommodated oblique convergence between India and the arcuate orogenic front without the need for strain partitioning in the upper crust. Oblate flattening may have also promoted orogen-parallel melt migration and development of melt-depleted regions between km3 scale leucogranite culminations at 50-100 km intervals along orogen strike. Following the cessation of flow, continued oblique convergence led to upper crustal strain partitioning between orogen-perpendicular convergence on thrust faults and orogen-parallel extension on normal and strike-slip faults. In the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himalaya, orogen-parallel stretching lineations are interpreted as a record of transition from midcrustal orogen-perpendicular extrusion to upper crustal orogen-parallel stretching. Our findings suggest that midcrustal flow and upper crustal extension could not be maintained simultaneously and support other studies from across the Himalaya, which propose an orogen-wide transition from midcrustal orogen-perpendicular extrusion to upper crustal orogen-parallel extension during the mid-Miocene. The 3-D nature of oblate strain and orogen-parallel stretching cannot be replicated by 2-D numerical simulations of the Himalayan orogen.

  19. Re-Os isotopic evidence for a lower crustal origin of massif-type anorthosites

    PubMed

    Schiellerup; Lambert; Prestvik; Robins; McBride; Larsen

    2000-06-15

    Massif-type anorthosites are large igneous complexes of Proterozoic age. They are almost monomineralic, representing vast accumulations of plagioclase with subordinate pyroxene or olivine and Fe-Ti oxides--the 930-Myr-old Rogaland anorthosite province in southwest Norway represents one of the youngest known expressions of such magmatism. The source of the magma and geodynamic setting of massif-type anorthosites remain long-standing controversies in Precambrian geology, with no consensus existing as to the nature of the parental magmas or whether these magmas primarily originate in the Earth's mantle or crust. At present, massif-type anorthosites are believed to have crystallized from either crustally contaminated mantle-derived melts that have fractionated olivine and pyroxenes at depth or primary aluminous gabbroic to jotunitic melts derived from the lower continental crust. Here we report rhenium and osmium isotopic data from the Rogaland anorthosite province that strongly support a lower crustal source for the parental magmas. There is no evidence of significantly older crust in southwest Scandinavia and models invoking crustal contamination of mantle-derived magmas fail to account for the isotopic data from the Rogaland province. Initial osmium and neodymium isotopic values testify to the melting of mafic source rocks in the lower crust with an age of 1,400-1,550 Myr.

  20. Origin and significance of tourmalinites and tourmaline-bearing rocks of Menderes Massif, western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel-Öztürk, Yeşim; Helvacı, Cahit; Palmer, Martin R.; Ersoy, E. Yalçın; Freslon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    In the western central portion of Anatolia lies the Menderes Massif - a large metamorphic crystalline complex made of Neoproterozoic to Precambrian basement rocks overlain by Palaeozoic to early Tertiary metasedimentary rocks, and with a multistage metamorphic evolution developed from the late Neo-Proterozoic to Eocene. We have undertaken a study of the petrology, geochemistry and boron isotope composition of these tourmaline occurrences aiming to constrain the processes responsible for the enrichment of boron and other fluid mobile elements in the Menderes Massif. The dispersed tourmaline has chemical and boron isotope compositions typical of a continental crust setting, but while some of the tourmalinites display similar signatures, others have heavier boron isotope compositions (up to + 7.5‰). We suggest that the tourmalinites with continental characteristics formed part of the original Pan African basement rocks, whereas those with heavier δ11B signatures formed by later metamorphism during the Alpine orogeny, possibly through interaction with subduction-like fluids. This proposed process may also have been coincident with metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle beneath the massif, which is known to have experienced multistage metasomatism and enrichment history up to Neogene time.

  1. Crystal structure of modular sodium-rich and low-iron eudialyte from Lovozero alkaline massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, K. A.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Aksenov, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of the sodium-rich representative of the eudialyte group found by A.P. Khomyakov at the Lovozero massif (Kola Peninsula) is studied by X-ray diffraction. The trigonal cell parameters are: a = 14.2032(1) and c = 60.612(1) Å, V = 10589.13 Å3, space group R3m. The structure is refined to the final R = 5.0% in the anisotropic approximation of atomic displacement parameters using 3742|F| > 3σ( F). The idealized formula ( Z = 3) is Na37Ca10Mn2FeZr6Si50(Ti, Nb)2O144(OH)5Cl3 · H2O. Like other 24-layer minerals of the eudialyte group, this mineral has a modular structure. Its structure contains two modules, namely, "alluaivite" (with an admixture of "eudialyte") and "kentbrooksite," called according to the main structural fragments of alluaivite, eudialyte, and kentbrooksite. The mineral found at the Lovozero alkaline massif shows some chemical and symmetry-structural distinctions from the close-in-composition labyrinthite modular mineral from the Khibiny massif. The difference between the minerals stems from different geochemical conditions of mineral formation in the two regions.

  2. Lithosphere structure of the west Qinling orogenic belt revealed by deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2009-12-01

    The west Qinling orogen located in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, is transformation zone between the N-S-trending and E-W-trending tectonics in the Chinese continent. Further study of the fine crust structure of the west Qinling orogen and its relationships with surrounding basins have very important significance for understanding tectonic response of the northeastern margin of the plateau about collision convergence of the Indian block and Asian block and learning formation and evolution of the plateau. In 2009, we reprocessed the data of the Tangke-Hezuo deep seismic reflection profiles collected in 2004 across the west Qinling orogen and the northern Songpan block. The new results show the lithosphere fine structure of the west Qinling orogen. Reflection features indicate that an interface at 6.0-7.0s (TWT) divided the crust into the upper and lower crust, whose structural style and deformation are totally different. Integrating geological data, we deduce that the interface at 6.0-7.0s (depth with 18-21 km) was the basement detachment, which made deformation decoupled of the upper and lower crust. The multi-layered reflections in the upper crust reveal the sedimentary covers of the west Qinling orogen, disclose the thickness of the various structure layer and deformation degree, and provide a basis for the prospective evaluation of a multi-metallic mineral and energy exploration. The north dipping strong reflection characteristics of the lower crust in the west Qinling orogen constituted imbricate structure, such imbricate structural features provide seismology evidence for researching the west Qinling thrusting toward the northern Songpan block, and have great significance for studying formation and evolution of the Songpan-Garze structure. Moho reflections are observed around 17.0-17.2s, characterized by nearly horizontal reflections, which implies the west Qinling orogen underwent an intense extension post orogeny caused the lithosphere

  3. Shear-zone systems and melts: feedback relations and self-organization in orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael; Solar, Gary S.

    1998-03-01

    In orogenic belts, the common spatial and temporal association of granites with crustal-scale shear-zone systems suggests melt transfer from source to upper crust was the result of a feedback relation. In this relation, the presence of melt in the crust profoundly affects the rheology, and induces localization of strain within shear-zone systems. Consequently, melt is moved out of the source preferentially along high-strain zones, which helps the system to accommodate strain. Because actively deforming orogenic belts are non-equilibrium systems, they may generate dissipative structure by self-organization; we interpret crustal-scale shear-zone systems and their associated granites as the manifestation of this self-organization. The architecture and permeability structure are controlled by the type of shear-zone system (transcurrent, normal, reverse or oblique); this is the primary control on melt transfer in orogenic belts. During active deformation, movement of melt is by percolative flow and melt essentially is pumped through the system parallel to the maximum principal finite elongation direction. If a build-up of melt pressure occurs, melt-enhanced embrittlement enables tensile and dilatant shear fracturing, and transfer of melt is by channelized flow. We illustrate feedback relations between migmatites, crustal-scale shear-zone systems and granites using examples from the Cadomian belt of western France and the northern Appalachian orogen of the eastern U.S.A. In orogenic belts dominated by transcurrent shear, where the maximum principal finite elongation direction may have a shallow to subhorizontal plunge, granite arrested during ascent through the system commonly develops C- S fabrics. This suggests percolative flow is not effective in expelling melt from these systems; the resulting build-up of melt pressure enables fracturing and channelized transfer of melt, which crystallizes during persistent deformation (e.g. the St. Malo migmatite belt, Cadomian belt

  4. Lateral variations in lithospheric and landscape evolution at both ends of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Schmidt, J. L.; Meltzer, A.

    2015-12-01

    At the broadest scale, like many orogens the Himalaya encompass a range of orogenic features that are remarkably similar along much of the length of the mountain belt and its neighboring terranes. At one scale of consideration, these similarities appear to be a signal that fundamental processes associated with lithospheric collision have been active. However, the vast size of the Himalaya and Tibet, the different climate regimes experienced by the orogen across time and space, and the along-strike variations in the continental and arc margins that faced one another before collision, make it at once remarkable that any similarities exist, and important to more critically evaluate their nature. The eastern and western Himalayan syntaxes confound any attempt to generalize too much about the Himalaya-Tibet orogen. By area these features occupy at least 25% of the orogenic belt, and compared to the "main" portions of the arc they show clear differences in their lithospheric structures, landscapes, and evolution. The boundary and initial conditions that shaped the eastern and western indentor corners were and are different, as is the nature and timing of erosional exhumation. Some of the most active geologic processes on Earth have recently been in play within the syntaxes, and the evolution of landscapes and fluvial systems, important in developing the sedimentary record of the Himalaya-Tibet system, has been complex and variable in space and time. Southeasternmost Tibet and the Lhasa Block in particular exemplify this complexity both in its complex topographic evolution linked to surface processes and climate, and in lateral variability in lithospheric structure. Taking a system viewpoint, an important question to debate is the degree to which there are features in the Himalaya-Tibet system that are robustly emergent, given the broad boundary conditions of the continental collision plus the suite of local and regional geodynamical processes that have operated during

  5. Three Dimensional Spatial and Temporal Evolution of Rheology in Orogens: A Field Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Solar, G.

    2001-12-01

    To understand mountain building, we require knowledge of behavior and mechanics of deformation of lithosphere materials. Based on deformation experiments at high-strain-rates, including work by Mervyn Paterson, and data from field studies of rocks inferred to have been melt-bearing during deformation at natural strain rates, melt-bearing rocks generally are weaker than those at subsolidus conditions. Further, we require knowledge of how material behavior changes in 3-d during mountain building as geotherms evolve and rocks melt and melt migrates and ponds at shallower levels. Data to address this issue come from the field, where relations among melt flow (continuous vs. cyclic), rheological transitions [brittle-viscous transition zone (BVTZ) and anatectic front (AF)] and deformation (viscous vs. brittle) yield natural constraints for use in dynamic models of orogenesis. In the Acadian Orogen of New England, based on high-precision ages, Lower Paleozoic rocks were deformed synchronously with greenschist-granulite facies metamorphism and emplacement of plutons. Based on geochemistry, migmatites are residual and peraluminous leucogranite was derived from a similar source, implying a genetic relation. In middle crust, below the BVTZ [in part below the AF (in migmatite)] deformation involved non-coaxial non-plane strain flow in which the inclined vorticity vector was stretched along its length and deformation partitioned into steeply inclined S-L and L>>S tectonite zones. Metamorphic field gradient is of low dP/dT type, P-T paths are clockwise and thermal peak was late syntectonic, reflecting regionally elevated thermal gradients and pluton-driven thermal pulses. In migmatite, leucosome relations with tectonite fabrics and dilatant shear surfaces, and sheets and cylinders of cumulate-dominated granite, suggest cyclic failure and batch melt transport by shear surface and channel flow (conditional open-system behavior). Below the AF, differential stress is low and if melt

  6. Tectonic controls of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization in orogenic forelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the world's Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) zinc-lead deposits occur in orogenic forelands. We examine tectonic aspects of foreland evolution as part of a broader study of why some forelands are rich in MVT deposits, whereas others are barren. The type of orogenic foreland (collisional versus Andean-type versus inversion-type) is not a first-order control, because each has MVT deposits (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Pine Point, and Cevennes, respectively). In some MVT districts (e.g., Tri-State and Central Tennessee), mineralization took place atop an orogenic forebulge, a low-amplitude (a few hundred meters), long-wavelength (100-200 km) swell formed by vertical loading of the foreland plate. In the foreland of the active Banda Arc collision zone, a discontinuous forebulge reveals some of the physiographic and geologic complexities of the forebulge environment, and the importance of sea level in determining whether or not a forebulge will emerge and thus be subject to erosion. In addition to those on extant forebulges, some MVT deposits occur immediately below unconformities that originated at a forebulge, only to be subsequently carried toward the orogen by the plate-tectonic conveyor (e.g., Daniel's Harbour and East Tennessee). Likewise, some deposits are located along syn-collisional, flexure-induced normal and strike-slip faults in collisional forelands (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Daniel's Harbour, and Tri-State districts). These findings reveal the importance of lithospheric flexure, and suggest a conceptual tectonic model that accounts for an important subset of MVT deposits-those in the forelands of collisional orogens. The MVT deposits occur both in flat-lying and in thrust-faulted strata; in the latter group, mineralization postdated thrusting in some instances (e.g., Picos de Europa) but may have predated thrusting in other cases (e.g., East Tennessee).

  7. SVM-based base-metal prospectivity modeling of the Aravalli Orogen, Northwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porwal, Alok; Yu, Le

    2010-05-01

    The Proterozoic Aravalli orogen in the state of Rajasthan, northwestern India, constitutes the most important metallogenic province for base-metal deposits in India and hosts the entire economically viable lead-zinc resource-base of the country. The orogen evolved through near-orderly Wilson cycles of repeated extensional and compressional tectonics resulting in sequential opening and closing of intracratonic rifts and amalgamation of crustal domains during a circa 1.0-Ga geological history from 2.2 Ga to 1.0 Ga. This study develops a conceptual tectonostratigraphic model of the orogen based on a synthesis of the available geological, geophysical and geochronological data followed by deep-seismic-reflectivity-constrained 2-D forward gravity modeling, and links it to the Proterozoic base-metal metallogeny in the orogen in order to identify key geological controls on the base-metal mineralization. These controls are translated into exploration criteria for base-metal deposits, validated using empirical spatial analysis, and used to derive input spatial variables for model-based base-metal prospectivity mapping of the orogen. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm augmented by incorporating a feature selection procedure is used in a GIS environment to implement the prospectivity mapping. A comparison of the SVM-derived prospectivity map with the ones derived using other established models such as neural-networks, logistic regression, and Bayesian weights-of-evidence indicates that the SVM outperforms other models, which is attributed to the capability of the SVM to return robust classification based on small training datasets.

  8. Early tectonic evolution of the Thomson Orogen in Queensland inferred from constrained magnetic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, Giovanni P. T.; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Armit, Robin J.

    2015-05-01

    The crustal architecture as well as the kinematic evolution of the Thomson Orogen in Queensland is poorly resolved because the region is concealed under thick Phanerozoic sedimentary basins and the basement geology is known from limited drill holes. Combined potential field and seismic interpretation indicates that the Thomson Orogen is characterized by prominent regional NE- and NW-trending structural grain defined by long wavelength and low amplitude geophysical anomalies. The 'smooth' magnetic signature is interpreted to reflect deeply buried source bodies in the mid- to lower crust. Short wavelength positive magnetic features that correlate with negative gravity anomalies are interpreted to represent shallower granitic intrusions. They appear to be focused along major fault zones that might have controlled the locus for magmatism. The eastern Thomson Orogen is characterized by a prominent NE structural grain and orthogonal faults and fold interference patterns resulting in a series of troughs and highs. The western Thomson Orogen consists of a series of NW-trending structures interpreted to reflect reverse faults. Sedimentation and basin development are interpreted to have initiated in the Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian during E-W- to ENE-WSW extension, possibly related to the Rodinia break-up. This extensional event was followed by Late Cambrian shortening recorded in the Maneroo Platform and the Diamantina River Domain which possibly correlates with the Delamerian Orogeny. Renewed deposition and volcanism occurred during the Ordovician and may have continued until Late Silurian, resulting in thinned Proterozoic basement crust and extensive basin systems that formed in a distal continental back-arc environment. Our interpretation places the Thomson Orogen to the west of the Neoproterozoic passive margin preserved in the Anakie Inlier. The region is likely to represent the internal extensional architecture during the Rodinia break-up that has been

  9. Lateral thinking: 2-D interpretation of thermochronology in convergent orogenic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Geoffrey E.; Brandon, Mark T.

    2002-05-01

    Lateral motion of material relative to the regional thermal and kinematic frameworks is important in the interpretation of thermochronology in convergent orogens. Although cooling ages in denuded settings are commonly linked to exhumation, such data are not related to instantaneous behavior but rather to an integration of the exhumation rates experienced between the thermochronological 'closure' at depth and subsequent exposure at the surface. The short spatial wavelength variation of thermal structure and denudation rate typical of orogenic regions thus renders thermochronometers sensitive to lateral motion during exhumation. The significance of this lateral motion varies in proportion with closure temperature, which controls the depth at which isotopic closure occurs, and hence, the range of time and length scales over which such data integrate sample histories. Different chronometers thus vary in the fundamental aspects of the orogenic character to which they are sensitive. Isotopic systems with high closure temperature are more sensitive to exhumation paths and the variation in denudation and thermal structure across a region, while those of lower closure temperature constrain shorter-term behaviour and more local conditions. Discounting lateral motion through an orogenic region and interpreting cooling ages purely in terms of vertical exhumation can produce ambiguous results because variation in the cooling rate can result from either change in kinematics over time or the translation of samples through spatially varying conditions. Resolving this ambiguity requires explicit consideration of the physical and thermal framework experienced by samples during their exhumation. This can be best achieved through numerical simulations coupling kinematic deformation to thermal evolution. Such an approach allows the thermochronological implications of different kinematic scenarios to be tested, and thus provides an important means of assessing the contribution of

  10. Orogenic gold deposits: a proposed classification in the context of their crustal distribution and relationship to other gold deposit types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groves, D.I.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Gebre-Mariam, M.; Hagemann, S.G.; Robert, F.

    1998-01-01

    The so-called 'mesothermal' gold deposits are associated with reginally metamorphosed terranes of all ages. Ores were formed during compressional to transpressional deformation processes at convergent plate margins in accretionary and collisional orogens. In both types of orogen, hydrated marine sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been added to continental margins during tens to some 100 million years of collision. Subduction-related thermal events, episodically raising geothermal gradients within the hydrated accretionary sequences, initiate and drive long-distance hydrothermal fluid migration. The resulting gold-bearing quartz veins are emplaced over a unique depth range for hydrothermal ore deposits, with gold deposition from 15-20 km to the near surface environment. On the basis of this broad depth range of formation, the term 'mesothermal' is not applicable to this deposit types as a whole. Instead, the unique temporal and spatial association of this deposit type with orogeny means that the vein systems are best termed orogenic gold deposits. Most ores are post-orogenic with respect to to tectonism of their immediate host rocks, but are simultaneously syn-orogenic with respect to ongoing deep-crustal, subduction-related thermal processes and the prefix orogenic satisfies both these conditions. On the basis of their depth of formation, the orogenic deposits are best subdivided into epizonal (12 km) classes.

  11. Geological mapping of the Rainbow Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36°14'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Fouquet, Y.; Hoisé, E.; Dyment, J.; Gente, P.; Thibaud, R.; Bissessur, D.; Yatheesh, V.; Momardream 2008 Scientific Party*, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is one of the few known sites hosted in ultramafic basement. The Rainbow Massif is located along the non-transform offset between the AMAR and South AMAR second-order ridge segments, and presents the characteristic dome morphology of oceanic core complexes, although no corrugated surface has been observed so far. One of the objectives of Cruises MOMAR DREAM (July 2007, R/V Pourquoi Pas ?; Aug-Sept 2008, R/V Atalante) was to study the petrological and structural context of the hydrothermal system at the scale of the Rainbow Massif. Our geological sampling complements previous ones achieved during Cruises FLORES (1997) and IRIS (2001), and consisted in dredge hauls, and submersible dives by manned submersible Nautile and ROV Victor. The tectonics of the Rainbow Massif is dominated by a N-S trending fault pattern on the western flank of the massif, and a series of SW-NW ridges on its northeastern side. The active hydrothermal site is located in the area were these two systems crosscut. The most abundant recovered rock type is peridotite (harzburgite and dunite) that presents a variety of serpentinization styles and intensity, and a variety of deformation styles (commonly undeformed, sometimes displaying ductile or brittle foliations). Serpentinites are frequently oxidized. Some peridotite samples have melt impregnation textures. Massive chromitite was recovered in one dredge haul. Variously evolved gabbroic rocks were collected as discrete samples or as centimeter to decimeter-thick dikes in peridotites. Basalts and fresh basaltic glass were also sampled in talus and sediments on the southwestern and northeastern flanks of the massif. Our sampling is consistent with the lithological variability encountered in oceanic core complexes along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Southwest Indian Ridge. The stockwork of the hydrothermal system has been sampled on the western side of the present-day hydrothermal

  12. Evidence for Neotethys rooted within the Vardar suture zone from the Voras Massif, northernmost Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sally A. M.; Robertson, Alastair H. F.

    2004-03-01

    Three conflicting models are currently proposed for the location and tectonic setting of the Eurasian continental margin and adjacent Tethys ocean in the Balkan region during Mesozoic-Early Tertiary time. Model 1 places the Eurasian margin within the Rhodope zone relatively close to the Moesian platform. A Tethyan oceanic basin was located to the south bordering a large "Serbo-Pelagonian" microcontinent. Model 2 correlates an integral "Serbo-Pelagonian" continental unit with the Eurasian margin and locates the Tethys further southwest. Model 3 envisages the Pelagonian zone and the Serbo-Macedonian zone as conjugate continental units separated by a Tethyan ocean that was sutured in Early Tertiary time to create the Vardar zone of northern Greece and former Yugoslavia. These published alternatives are tested in this paper based on a study of the tectono-stratigraphy of a completely exposed transect located in the Voras Mountains of northernmost Greece. The outcrop extends across the Vardar zone, from the Pelagonian zone in the west to the Serbo-Macedonian zone in the east. Within the Voras Massif, six east-dipping imbricate thrust sheets are recognised. Of these, Units 1-4 correlate with the regional Pelagonian zone in the west (and related Almopias sub-zone). By contrast, Units 5-6 show a contrasting tectono-stratigraphy and correlate with the Paikon Massif and the Serbo-Macedonian zone to the east. These units form a stack of thrust sheets, with Unit 1 at the base and Unit 6 at the top. Unstacking these thrust sheets places ophiolitic units between the Pelagonian zone and the Serbo-Macedonian zone, as in Model 3. Additional implications are, first, that the Paikon Massif cannot be seen as a window of Pelagonian basement, as in Model 1, and, secondly, Jurassic andesitic volcanics of the Paikon Massif locally preserve a gneissose continental basement, ruling out a recently suggested origin as an intra-oceanic arc. We envisage that the Almopias (Vardar) ocean rifted

  13. Mapping of the Ronda peridotite massif (Spain) from AVIRIS spectro-imaging survey: A first attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinet, P. C.; Chabrillat, S.; Ceuleneer, G.

    1993-01-01

    In both AVIRIS and ISM data, through the use of mixing models, geological boundaries of the Ronda massif are identified with respect to the surrounding rocks. We can also yield first-order vegetation maps. ISM and AVIRIS instruments give consistent results. On the basis of endmember fraction images, it is then possible to discard areas highly vegetated or not belonging to the peridotite massif. Within the remaining part of the mosaic, spectro-mixing analysis reveals spectral variations in the peridotite massif between the well-exposed areas. Spatially organized units are depicted, related to differences in the relative depth of the absorption band at 1 micron, and it may be due to a different pyroxene content. At this stage, it is worth noting that, although mineralogical variations observed in the rocks are at a sub-pixel scale for the airborne analysis, we see an emerging spatial pattern in the distribution of spectral variations across the massif which might be prevailingly related to mineralogy. Although it is known from fieldwork that the Ronda peridotite massif exhibits mineralogical variations at local scale in the content of pyroxene, and at regional scale in different mineral facies, ranging from garnet-, to spinel- to plagioclase-lherzolites, no attempt has been done yet to produce a synoptic map relating the two scales of analysis. The present work is a first attempt to reach this objective, though a lot more work is still required. In particular, for the purpose of mineralogical interpretation, it is critical to relate the airborne observation to field work and laboratory spectra of Ronda rocks already obtained, with the use of image endmembers and associated reference endmembers. Also, the pretty rough linear mixing model used here is taken as a 'black-box' process which does not necessarily apply correctly to the physical situation at the sub-pixel level. One may think of using the ground-truth observations bearing on the sub-pixel statistical

  14. Tectonic evolution and crustal-scale structure of Kyrgyz Central Asian Orogenic Belt: new insights from the Darius programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Loury, Chloé; Guillot, Stéphane; Mikolaichuk, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Mechanisms and history of the Late Palaeozoic accretion followed by formation of trunscurrent strike-slip faults were studied in the southern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) within Kyrgyz South Tianshan. 1. South Tianshan Suture: ending accretion process after docking of Tarim craton This study gives insights into the crustal-scale structure and Upper Paleozoic history of this mountain belt, currently intensely reactivated by the India-Asia collision. Structural, petrological and geochronological studies were carried out within South Tianshan suture east of the Talas-Ferghana Fault (TFF). New data highlight a south-dipping structure featured by a HP metamorphic core complex comprised of c. 320 Ma continental and oceanic eclogites exhumed by top-to-North motion. A large massif (10 x 50 km) of continental HP rocks in the Atbashi Range is comprised of hectometric boudins of eclogites embedded in metapelites and gneissesMetamorphic units exhibit blueschist to eclogite facies conditions, with oceanic (MORB) rocks in the blueschist facies representing the accretionary oceanic prism being thrusted by oceanic rocks and a continental unit in the eclogite facies (510 ± 50°C and 24 ± 2 kbar). Evidence for eclogite facies both in metasediments and mafic lithologies and geological structure are in agreement with a previously thinned continental margin. Subduction of this thinned COT (Continent-Ocean Transition) probably occurred by slab pull in a south-dipping subduction zone, while another north-dipping subduction was active below Middle Tianshan. Final stacking of Middle and South Tianshan occurred at 320-310 Ma. These opposite subduction zones are still reflected in the main structures of Tianshan. Reactivation of the South-dipping structures since 30-25 Ma is ascribed to explain the current Tianshan intra-continental subduction from seismology. 2. Talas-Ferghana Fault (TFF) activity & Basin formation After this accretionary episode, the South Tianshan

  15. Geotectonics characteristics and their relation with gas-oil pool formation of the Dongsha fault-uplifted massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoshu; Wei, Changxing; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Shukang; Chen, Senqiang

    1992-09-01

    The Dongsha fault-uplifted massif (for convenience, Dongsha massif from here on) is located in the northern continental shelf-slope of the South China Sea, where the water depth is 100 400 m. The massif is considered to be a part of the large-scale fault-uplifted zone directed NE and separating the Pearl River Mouth Basin into northern and southern graben areas. The sedimentary cover of the Pearl River Mouth Graben consists mainly of a 7000 10000 m thick Tertiary system. A large-scale uplift occurred in the Dongsha fault-uplifted zone during Paleocene-Eocene, when the lower structural layer (lower Tertiary) existed only in the small depressions of the fault-uplifted zone. The formation and evolution of the Dongsha fault-uplifted zone could be divided into: 1) the base-ment formation stage (J2-K1); 2) the slowly uplifted stage (K2-E{2/2}; 3) the weathering and erosion stage (E{2/3}-E{3/1}) 4) the integrated subsidence stage (E{3/2}-N{1/2}) and 5) the last uplifted stage (N{1/3}-Q). The formation of the oil and gas pools of the Dongsha massif was obviously controlled by the formation and evolution of the massif. In the region of the massif, there are good reservoirs and caprocks, many channels for gas-oil migration, and a series of structural and organic reef traps. In addition, because the massif is higher than its adjacent depressions, it became a major place where the gas and oil concentrate from the surrounding depressions. All the above factors are favorable for the formation of large oil-gas pools in the Dongsha fault-uplifted zone.

  16. Garzon Massif basement tectonics: A geopyhysical study, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakioglu, Kadir Baris

    The mechanics and kinematics of basement tectonic uplifts, such as the Laramide Rocky Mountain orogeny, remain poorly understood and controversial. The debate continues in part because of the limited number of well-documented present day analogs. The Garzon Massif rising between the Upper Magdalena Valley and the Llanos Basin of Colombia is an active basement uplift with well, seismic, gravity, and magnetic data available. In the past 10 Ma, PreCambrian age granitic rocks of the Garzon Massif have been uplifted and displaced against Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments of the Upper Magdalena Valley along the Garzon fault. Aerogravimetric data calibrated by well data and 2D seismic data were used to model the geometry of the Garzon fault and the top of basement (Saldana Fm) in 2 dimensions. The density models provide an independent estimate of fault orientation. A high density airborne gravity and magnetic survey were flown over the Garzon fault in 2000, including 2,663 line km along 1 x 5 and 1 x 4 km flight lines at elevations of 2564 and 4589 m above mean sea level. An initial depth model was derived from the well logs, seismic reflection profile, and down-hole velocity surveys. Airborne gravity data was used to produce a Bouguer anomaly gravity map. Average rock densities were estimated from density logs, seismic velocities, and formation rock types. The regional gravity field was estimated and 2-dimensional forward models were constructed with average densities from the wells, seismic velocities, and rock types, and the initial depth model. Since the model fit is dependent on the density assumed for the Garzon Massif rocks, multiple densities and dip angles were tested. The gravity analysis indicates that the Garzon fault is a basement thrust fault dipping at a shallow angle under the Massif. Best-fit models show a true dip of 12 to 17 degrees to the southeast. A regional density and magnetic susceptibility model of the entire Massif is consistent with dense

  17. Laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar dating of strain fringes: Mid-Cretaceous synconvergent orogen-parallel extension in the interior of the Sevier orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Michael L.; Spell, Terry L.; Hoisch, Thomas D.; Arriola, Tonia; Zanetti, Kathleen A.

    2008-06-01

    UV and CO2 laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar in situ analyses of phlogopite and muscovite in fibrous strain fringes from greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks document mica growth ages at temperatures lower than their closure temperatures, and therefore directly date deformation. The new dates resolve the age of the earliest ductile fabric recorded in the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex of Utah and Idaho. Phlogopite was dated in quartz-calcite-phlogopite strain fringes around pyrite in Pennsylvanian-Permian rocks from the Grouse Creek Mountains (Utah) using both the UV and CO2 laser probe; muscovite was dated in quartz-muscovite strain fringes around pyrite in deformed Jurassic sills from the Black Pine Mountains (Idaho) using the CO2 laser probe. Phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes (Grouse Creek Mountains) range from 92 Ma to 110 Ma, with the most reliable ages ranging from 101 Ma to 110 Ma (mean age, 105.0 ± 5.8 Ma). Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes (Black Pine Mountains) range from 97 Ma to 112 Ma (mean age, 104.7 ± 5.8 Ma). Strain fringes are associated with a subhorizontal foliation and a generally N-trending elongation lineation exhibiting components of top-to-the-north simple shear and coaxial strain accommodating N-S extension and subvertical shortening. Midcrustal northward flow at 105 (±6) Ma within the interior of the Sevier orogen, coeval with east-directed shortening in the foreland and with plate convergence, records orogen-parallel synconvergent extension. We favor gravitational relaxation of structural culminations resulting from focused crustal shortening as a driving mechanism for orogen-parallel flow.

  18. Layered granitoids: Interaction between continental crust recycling processes and mantle-derived magmatism: Examples from the Évora Massif (Ossa-Morena Zone, southwest Iberia, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moita, Patrícia; Santos, José F.; Pereira, M. Francisco

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, field, petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic (Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd) information from three areas within the Évora Massif (Iberian Variscan Orogen) is presented and discussed aiming at to unravel the relationships between granitoids and units mapped as migmatites and also to evaluate the interplay between mantle and crustal derived magmas. One of the areas - Almansor - displays a well-developed compositional layering (concordant with the regional Variscan structure) which was considered, in previous works, as an alternation of leucosome and melanosome. In this study, the layering is described as intercalation of diatexites, weakly foliated granitoids and trondhjemitic veins. Diatexites have characteristics of crustal melts plus restitic material and, according to geochemical and isotopic evidence, result from anatexis of Ediacaran metasediments. Weakly foliated granitoids and trondhjemitic veins from Almansor have calc-alkaline signatures and may be related to each other by crystal fractionation processes; however, the mixing between mafic (mantle-derived) and felsic (diatexitic melt) magmas revealed by the isotopic data may also explain their genesis. In the Alto de São Bento area, several igneous lithologies (tonalites, granodiorites, porphyritic granites and leucogranites) are present and show typical isotropic igneous textures. Despite structural and textural differences, geochemical data support, for most rocks, an origin from the same calk-alkaline suite, also present at Almansor. The Alto de São Bento leucogranites have an isotopic signature that, although different from that obtained in the Almansor diatexites, is still compatible with an origin involving melting of Ediacaran metasediments; compositions, with very low contents of usually incompatible elements, flat normalized REE patterns and strong negative Eu anomalies, suggest that the anatectic melt has undergone crystal fractionation processes before reaching the composition

  19. Crustal Structure And Magmatism, Coast Mountains Orogen, Latitude 52-53 degrees North, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Gehrels, G.; Woodsworth, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    New geologic data and U-Pb ages reveal complex history of arc accretion, crustal thickening and migration of magmatic fronts during deformation. Plutonic ages define distinct western and eastern Jurassic - mid Cretaceous arcs that share a common history after ~90 Ma. Juxtaposition of these arcs occurred during mid- Cretaceous crustal shortening in a dominantly SW-vergent crustal-scale thrust belt. Significant crustal thickening buried 151 Ma granitic clasts to pressures > 6 kb, and mid-Cretaceous plutons were emplaced at this depth along the axis of the orogen. Thrusting continued after establishment of the 90 Ma arc; a regional SW-verging thrust emplaced high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Yukon-Tanana terrane and deep-seated plutons over low- grade rocks of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes. The shear zone is coincident with the western boundary of 82-89 Ma plutons and a regionally extensive, late-kinematic, sill-like pluton. Dextral shear zones preserved on the flanks of the orogen suggest a component of Late Cretaceous transpression. By 75 Ma, metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism had migrated central portions of the orogen and there is no evidence of ductile deformation and syn-kinematic metarmorphism younger than ~70 - 65 along the western flank of the orogen. The Coast shear zone localized 62-58 Ma synkinematic plutons during NE-side up displacement, creating a sharp western magmatic front. Sparse cooling ages suggest plutons and metamorphic rocks adjacent to the CSZ cooled through 500-600 deg between 54-58 Ma during exhumation along the shear zone. Voluminous granitic plutons were emplaced from ~55-50 Ma, but significant crustal extension that affected the eastern side of the orogen farther north is not evident along this transect. This history supports previous models of crustal subcretion and the generation of arc magmas in thickened crust. Definition of two pre-90 Ma arcs negates models calling for simple Andean-style orogen prior to mid

  20. The deep structure of Alpine-type orogens: how important is rift-inheritance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy

    2016-04-01

    Collisional belts are commonly thought to result from the closure of oceanic basins and subsequent inversion of former rifted margins. The formation and evolution of collisional belts should therefore be closely interlinked with the initial architecture of former rifted margins. Reflection and refraction seismic data from present-day magma-poor rifted margins show the omnipresence of hyperextended domains (severely thinned continental crust (<10 km) and/or exhumed serpentinized mantle with minor magmatic additions) between unequivocal continental and oceanic domains. Integrating these new observations and exploring their impact on mountain building processes may result in alternative interpretations of the lithospheric structure of collisional orogens. We focus on the Pyrenees and Western to Central Alps, respectively resulting from the inversion of a Late Jurassic to Mid Cretaceous and an Early to Mid Jurassic rift system eventually floored by hyperextended crust, exhumed mantle or proto-oceanic crust. The rift-related pre-collisional architecture of the Pyrenees shows many similarities with that proposed for the Alps; although the width of the hyperextended and in particular of the proto-oceanic domains is little constrained. Contrasting with the Pyrenees, remnants of these domains are largely affected by orogeny-related deformation and show a HP-LT to HT-MP metamorphic overprint in the Alps. Nevertheless, in spite of the occurrence of these highly deformed and metamorphosed rocks constituting the internal parts of the Alps, the overall crustal and lithospheric structure looks surprisingly comparable. High resolution tomographic images across both orogens unravel the occurrence of a velocity anomaly dipping underneath the internal domains and progressively attenuated at depth that we interpret as former hyperextended domains subducted/underthrusted during collision. This interpretation contrasts with the classical assumption that the subducted material is made of

  1. Biodiversity impact of the aeolian periglacial geomorphologic evolution of the Fontainebleau Massif (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, M.; Liron, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Landscape features The geomorphology of the Fontainebleau Massif is noteworthy for its spectacular narrow ridges, up to 10 km long and 0.5 km wide, armored by tightly cemented sandstone lenses and which overhang sandy depressions of about 50m. Denudation of the sandstone pans lead to a highly contrasted landscape, with sandstone ridges ("platières") towering sandy depressions ("vallées") and limestone plateaus ("monts"). This forms the geological frame of the spectacular sceneries of the Fontainebleau Massif (Thiry & Liron, 2007). Nevertheless, there is little know about the erosive processes that have built-up these landscapes. Periglacial processes, and among them aeolian ones, appear significant in the development of the Fontainebleau Massif physiography. The periglacial aeolian geomorphology Dunes and dune fields are known since long and cover about 15% to 25% of the Fontainebleau Massif. The aeolian dunes developed as well on the higher parts of the landscape, as well as in the lower parts of the landscape. The dunes are especially well developed in the whole eastern part of the massif, whereas the western part of the massif is almost devoid of dunes. Nevertheless, detailed mapping shows that dunes can locally be found in the western district, they are of limited extension, restricted to the east facing backslope of outliers. Loamy-sand covers the limestone plateaus of the "monts". The loam cover is of variable thickness: schematically thicker in the central part of the plateaus, where it my reach 3 m; elsewhere it may thin down to 0,20-0,30 m, especially at the plateau edges. Blowout hollows are "negative" morphologies from where the sand has been withdrawed. Often these blowouts are decametric sized and well-delimited structures. Others, more complex structures, are made up of several elongated hectometric hollows relaying each other from and which outline deflation corridor more than 1 km long. A characteristic feature of these blowout hollows is the

  2. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating of high-grade rocks from the Upper Allochthonous Terrane of Bragança and Morais Massifs (NE Portugal); geodynamic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, A.; Munhá, J.; Ribeiro, A.; Tassinari, C. C. G.; Sato, K.; Pereira, E.; Santos, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Bragança and Morais Massifs are part of the mega-klippen ensemble of NW Iberia, comprising a tectonic pile of four allochthonous units stacked above the Central-Iberian Zone autochthon. On top of this pile, the Upper Allochthonous Terrane (UAT) includes different high-grade metamorphic series whose age and geodynamic meaning are controversial. Mafic granulites provided U-Pb zircon ages at 399 ± 7 Ma, dating the Variscan emplacement of UAT. In contrast, U-Pb zircon ages of ky- and hb-eclogites, felsic/intermediate HP/HT-granulites and orthogneisses (ca. 500-480 Ma) are identical to those of gabbros (488 ± 10 Ma) and Grt-pyroxenites (495 ± 8 Ma) belonging to a mafic/ultramafic igneous suite that records upper mantle melting and mafic magma crustal underplating at these times. Gabbros intrude the high-grade units of UAT and did not underwent the HP metamorphic event experienced by eclogites and granulites. These features and the zircon dates resemblance among different lithologies, suggest that extensive age resetting of older events may have been correlative with the igneous suite emplacement/crystallisation. Accordingly, reconciliation of structural, petrological and geochronological evidence implies that the development and early deformation of UAT high-grade rocks should be ascribed to an orogenic cycle prior to ≈ 500 Ma. Undisputable dating of this cycle is impossible, but the sporadic vestiges of Cadomian ages cannot be disregarded. The ca. 500-480 Ma time-window harmonises well with the Lower Palaeozoic continental rifting that trace the Variscan Wilson Cycle onset and the Rheic Ocean opening. Subsequent preservation of the high heat-flow regime, possibly related to the Palaeotethys back-arc basin development (ca. 450-420 Ma), would explain the 461 ± 10 Ma age yielded by some zircon domains in felsic granulites, conceivably reflecting zircon dissolution/recrystallisation till Ordovician times, long before the Variscan paroxysm (ca. 400-390 Ma). This

  3. Cadomian magmatism and metamorphism at the Ossa Morena/Central Iberian zone boundary, Iberian Massif, Central Portugal: Geochemistry and P-T constraints of the Sardoal Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, S. B. A.; Neiva, A. M. R.; Tajčmanová, L.; Dunning, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    A well preserved Cadomian basement is exposed in the Iberian Massif, Central Portugal, at the Ossa Morena/Central Iberian zone boundary, which allows the determination of reliable geochemical data. A sequence of Cadomian and Variscan magmatic and tectonometamorphic events has been already described for this area and are documented in other areas of the Avalonian-Cadomian orogen. However, the geochemical information concerning the Cadomian basement for this area is still limited. We present whole rock geochemical and oxygen isotopic information to characterize the igneous protoliths of the Sardoal Complex, located within the Tomar-Badajoz-Córdoba Shear Zone, and identify their tectonic setting. We use detailed petrography, mineral chemistry and P-T data to characterize the final Cadomian tectonometamorphic event. The Sardoal Complex contains orthogneiss and amphibolite units. The protoliths of the orthogneiss are calc-alkaline magmas of acid composition and peraluminous character that were generated in an active continental margin in three different stages (ca. 692 Ma, ca. 569 Ma and ca. 548 Ma). The most significant processes in their petrogenesis are the partial melting of old metasedimentary and meta-igneous crust at different crustal levels and the crystal fractionation of plagioclase, alkali feldspars, apatite, zircon and Fe-Ti oxides. The protoliths of the amphibolite, older than ca. 540 Ma, are tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas of basic composition that display N-, T- and E-MORB affinities. They were generated in an active continental margin. Crustal contamination and fractional crystallization of hornblende and diopside were involved in their petrogenesis. However, the fractional crystallization was not significant. The magmatic activity recorded in the Sardoal Complex indicates the existence of a long-lived continental arc (ca. 692-540 Ma) with coeval felsic and mafic magmatism. The final stage of the Cadomian metamorphism is usually represented in other

  4. Provenance Ages of Protoliths From the Chiapas Massif Complex and Adjacent Strata of the Southern Maya Block - Implications on the Paleozoic Reconstruction of Middle America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, B.; Schaaf, P.; Valencia, V. A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.

    2007-05-01

    The basement of the Maya block is exposed in the Maya Mountains of Belize, the Chuacús Complex of Guatemala, and in the Chiapas Massif Complex (CMC) of SE Mexico. In the CMC medium- to high-grade metasedimentary rocks occur as isolated domains in mostly metaigneous crystalline rocks. The most important tectonothermal event in the entire CMC is of late Permian age, culminating in partial anatexis and the intrusion of the Chiapas batholith. In this work we present U-Pb data obtained by LA-MC-ICPMS from detrital zircon cores of metasediments from the CMC and from detrital zircons of Paleozoic strata exposed in SE Chiapas. The Pennsylvanian-Permian Santa Rosa Formation (SRF) contains mostly Pan-African (500-650 Ma) zircons, minor populations of Silurian-Early Devonian (400-420 Ma) and Grenville (1.0-1.25 Ga) zircons, and few Paleoproterozoic and Archean grains. The maximum sedimentation age is documented by ~320 Ma old zircons. Metagreywacke and metasandstones of the central CMC have inherited detrital zircon cores with age distributions indistinguishable from those of the SRF. High-grade metapelites and para-amphibolites from the CMC, instead, have inherited zircon cores with one single population of 1.0 Ga or with populations at 1.0, 1.2, and 1.5 Ga. In the southern part of the CMC leucocratic granites intrude sedimentary rocks whose detrital zircons yielded mostly 1.53 Ga ages with some grains in the range of 1.6-1.7 Ga, but no younger zircons. White mica grown in contact with the leucogranite has a 40Ar- 39Ar age of 406 ± 4 Ma, defining a minimum age for both deposition of the sediments and intrusion of the leucogranite. Our data indicate that the CMC has a composite pre-metamorphic basement, containing sedimentary protoliths from the Pennsylvanian-Permian SRF and from early Paleozoic strata intruded by Silurian-Early Devonian granites. This favors a similar pre-Permian geologic history for the CMC as for the Maya Mountains of Belize. The early Paleozoic

  5. Enhanced anatexis as a consequence of mantle-derived magma intrusion in the middle crust: a case study from the Eastern French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzinié, Simon; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Scarrow, Jane H.; Marignac, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The post-collisional stage of orogens corresponds to a dramatic change in mountain belts dynamics. During this period, large volumes of granitic melts are generated in the crust thus impacting its rheology and overall behavior. Evolving from compression/transpression to extension/transtension enhances exhumation of high-grade metamorphic rocks and subsequent decompression crustal melting. However, other processes can trigger anatexis such as heat or fluid fluxes from the mantle and the crust. The Early Carboniferous nappe stack of the Eastern French Massif Central (EFMC) underwent two successive low-pressure melting events at the end of its evolution, during the Late Carboniferous. They are particularily evident in the southern edge of the Velay Complex, a 100 km-diameter migmatite-granite dome. The M3 'pre-Velay' event corresponds to water-saturated melting in the amphibolite facies at T < 750 ° C, P ≥ 5 kbar. It is recorded by cordierite-free, stromatic migmatites and was quite long-lasting since available U-Th-Pb monazite ages span from 335 to 310 Ma. At that time, crustal melts mainly remained trapped in the source and few granite plutons were associated with this event. Contrarily, the M4 'Velay' anatexis occurred under granulite-facies conditions at 760 < T < 850 ° C and 2 < P < 5 kbar. The M4 cordierite-bearing migmatites are nebulitic to diatexitic as a consequence of biotite breakdown which led to disruption of the solid framework of melanosomes and enhanced melt extraction. This widespread melting event is synchronous with emplacement of the cordierite-bearing restite-rich S-type Velay granite at ca. 305 Ma. Then, the EFMC records an evolution in melting conditions with a clear heat input at the M3-M4 transition. The EFMC anatectic crust is intruded by widespread, Mg-K-rich biotite-rich diorites locally called 'vaugnerites'. These mantle-derived melts emplaced in a partially molten setting, as evidenced by mingling features between vaugnerites and

  6. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Carboniferous-middle Permian I- and A-type granites and gabbro-diorites in the eastern Jiamusi Massif, NE China: Implications for petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jun-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Wen-Liang; Yang, Jin-Hui; Xing, De-He; Chen, Hui-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Late Carboniferous-middle Permian magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif of northeast China, in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), provides critical evidence regarding the tectonic history and geodynamic processes in the region. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton and two groups of coeval granite in the study area comprise a bimodal magmatic suite. Precise LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the granitoids and gabbro-diorites were emplaced in the late Carboniferous-middle Permian (302-267 Ma). Group I granites have high SiO2 (70.75-77.04 wt.%) and K2O (3.65-5.89 wt.%) contents, are enriched in LILEs (e.g., Rb, Th, and U) relative to HFSEs and LREEs, and have negative Nb, Ta, P, and Ti anomalies, which collectively indicate affinities with subduction-related magmas. Group II granites are weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.03-1.07) and are characterized by enrichment in alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 8.22-8.90 wt.%), low MgO (0.04-0.09 wt.%) and P2O5 (0.01-0.04 wt.%) contents, high Zr and Nb contents, high 10,000 × Ga/Al ratios, and they are geochemically similar to aluminous A-type granites. All the magmatic zircons in these granitoids have great variations of εHf(t) (+ 7.89 to - 5.60) and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 0.8-1.7 Ga, which suggest that the precursor magmas originated from a heterogeneous source that involved juvenile components derived from a depleted mantle source during magma generation. The aluminous A-type granite magmas were probably derived by high-temperature partial melting of a felsic crustal source, whereas the other granite magmas probably resulted from partial melting of a mafic lower crust. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton are depleted in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and show flat distributions of most LILEs and HFSEs, except for large positive anomalies in Ba, K, and Pb. These features reflect a limited degree of crustal contamination associated with the subduction-related magmatic processes. These data

  7. Association of orogenic activity with the Ordovician radiation of marine life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. I.; Mao, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Ordovician radiation of marine life was among the most substantial pulses of diversification in Earth history and coincided in time with a major increase in the global level of orogenic activity. To investigate a possible causal link between these two patterns, the geographic distributions of 6576 individual appearances of Ordovician vician genera around the world were evaluated with respect to their proximity to probable centers of orogeny (foreland basins). Results indicate that these genera, which belonged to an array of higher taxa that diversified in the Middle and Late Ordovician (trilobites, brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, monoplacophorans), were far more diverse in, and adjacent to, foreland basins than they were in areas farther removed from orogenic activity (carbonate platforms). This suggests an association of orogeny with diversification at that time.

  8. Tectonic implications of U-Pb zircon ages of the himalayan orogenic belt in nepal

    PubMed

    DeCelles; Gehrels; Quade; LaReau; Spurlin

    2000-04-21

    Metasedimentary rocks of the Greater Himalaya are traditionally viewed as Indian shield basement that has been thrust southward onto Lesser Himalayan sedimentary rocks during the Cenozoic collision of India and Eurasia. Ages determined from radioactive decay of uranium to lead in zircon grains from Nepal suggest that Greater Himalayan protoliths were shed from the northern end of the East African orogen during the late Proterozoic pan-African orogenic event. These rocks were accreted onto northern Gondwana and intruded by crustal melts during Cambrian-Ordovician time. Our data suggest that the Main Central thrust may have a large amount of pre-Tertiary displacement, that structural restorations placing Greater Himalayan rocks below Lesser Himalayan rocks at the onset of Cenozoic orogenesis are flawed, and that some metamorphism of Greater Himalayan rocks may have occurred during early Paleozoic time.

  9. Axial Belt Provenance: modern river sands from the core of collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resentini, A.; Vezzoli, G.; Paparella, P.; Padoan, M.; Andò, S.; Malusà, M.; Garzanti, E.

    2009-04-01

    Collision orogens have a complex structure, including diverse rock units assembled in various ways by geodynamic processes. Consequently, orogenic detritus embraces a varied range of signatures, and unravelling provenance of clastic wedges accumulated in adjacent foreland basins, foredeeps, or remnant-ocean basins is an arduous task. Dickinson and Suczek (1979) and Dickinson (1985) recognized the intrinsically composite nature of orogenic detritus, but did not attempt to establish clear conceptual and operational distinctions within their broad "Recycled Orogenic Provenance". In the Alpine and Himalayan belts, the bulk of the detritus is produced by focused erosion of the central backbone of the orogen, characterized by high topography and exhumation rates (Garzanti et al., 2004; Najman, 2006). Detritus derived from such axial nappe pile, including slivers of thinned continental-margin lithosphere metamorphosed at depth during early collisional stages, has diagnostic general features, which allows us to define an "Axial Belt Provenance" (Garzanti et al., 2007). In detail, "Axial Belt" detrital signatures are influenced by metamorphic grade of source rocks and relative abundance of continental versus oceanic protoliths, typifying distinct subprovenances. Metasedimentary cover nappes shed lithic to quartzolithic detritus, including metapelite, metapsammite, and metacarbonate grains of various ranks; only amphibolite-facies metasediments supply abundant heavy minerals (e.g., almandine garnet, staurolite, kyanite, sillimanite, diopsidic clinopyroxene). Continental-basement nappes shed hornblende-rich quartzofeldspathic detritus. Largely retrogressed blueschist to eclogite-facies metaophiolites supply albite, metabasite and foliated antigorite-serpentinite grains, along with abundant heavy minerals (epidote, zoisite, clinozoisite, lawsonite, actinolitic to barroisitic amphiboles, glaucophane, omphacitic clinopyroxene). Increasing metamorphic grade and deeper

  10. Basin-mountain structures and hydrocarbon exploration potential of west Junggar orogen in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaozhi; He, Dengfa; Qi, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    Situated in northern Xinjiang, China, in NE-SW trend, West Junggar Orogen is adjacent to Altai fold belt on the north with the Ertix Fault as the boundary, North Tianshan fold belt on the south with the Ebinur Lake Strike-slip Fault as the boundary, and the Junggar Basin on the southeast with Zaire-Genghis Khan-Hala'alat fold belt as the boundary. Covering an area of about 10×104 km2 in China, there are medium and small intermontane basins, Burqin-Fuhai, Tacheng, Hefeng and Hoxtolgay, distributing inside the orogen. Tectonically West Junggar Orogen lies in the middle section of the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain where the Siberia, Kazakhstan and Tarim Plates converge, and is the only orogen trending NE-SW in the Palaeo-Asian tectonic domain. Since the Paleozoic, the orogen experienced pre-Permian plate tectonic evolution and post-Permian intra-plate basin evolution. Complex tectonic evolution and multi-stage structural superimposition not only give rise to long term controversial over the basin basement property but also complex basin-mountain coupling relations, structures and basin superimposition modes. According to analysis of several kinds of geological and geophysical data, the orogen was dominated by compressive folding and thrust napping from the Siberia plate in the north since the Late Paleozoic. Compressive stress weakened from north to south, corresponding to subdued vertical movement and enhanced horizontal movement of crustal surface from north to south, and finally faded in the overthrust-nappe belt at the northwest margin of the Junggar Basin. The variation in compressive stress is consistent with the surface relief of the orogen, which is high in the north and low in the south. There are two kinds of basin-mountain coupling relationships, i.e. high angle thrusting and overthrusting and napping, and two kinds of basin superimposition modes, i.e. inherited and progressive, and migrating and convulsionary modes. West Junggar orogen has rich oil and gas

  11. Geology of the Byrd Glacier Discontinuity (Ross Orogen): New survey data from the Britannia Range, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carosi, R.; Giacomini, F.; Talarico, F.; Stump, E.

    2007-01-01

    Field activities in the Britannia Range (Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica) highlighted new geological features around the so-called Byrd Glacier discontinuity. Recent field surveys revealed the occurrence of significant amounts of medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks, intruded by abundant coarse-grained porphyritic granitoids. Most of the granitoids are deformed, with foliation parallel to the regional foliation in the metamorphics. Two main episodes of deformation are observed. Tight to isoclinal folds and penetrative axial plane foliation are related to the D1 phase, open folds to the D2. The main foliation (D1) trends nearly E-W in agreement with the trend in the southern portion of the Byrd Glacier. In most outcrops, granitic dykes are folded and stretched by the D2 deformation, which shows similar characteristics with the D2 deformation south of the Byrd Glacier. This suggests the occurrence in the Ross orogen of an orogen-normal structure south and north of the Byrd Glacier.

  12. Metamorphic evolution of pelitic-semipelitic granulites in the Kon Tum massif (south-central Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tích, Vu Van; Leyreloup, Andrey; Maluski, Henry; Lepvrier, Claude; Lo, Chinh-hua; Vượng, Nguyễn V.

    2013-09-01

    Pelitic and semipelitic anatectic granulites form one of the major lithological units in Kan Nack complex of the Kon Tum massif (in south-central Vietnam), which comprises HT metamorphic and magmatic rocks including granulites and charnockites is classically regarded as the older part of the Gondwana-derived Indosinia terrain. Metamorphic evolution study of pelitic granulite, the most abundant among granulites exposed in this massif, facilitates to understand that tectonic setting take place during the Indosinian time. The paragenetic assemblages, mineral chemistry, thermobarometry and P-T evolution path of pelitic-semipelitic granulites from Kon Tum massif has been studied in detail. Petrographic feature demonstrates that the pelitic granulite experienced prograde history, from pregranulitic conditions in the amphibolite facies up to the peak granulitic assemblages. Successive prograde reactions led to the temperature-climax giving rise to assemblages with cordierite-hercynite and cordierite-hercynite-K-feldspar. Then, as attested by the mineralogic association occurring in cordieritic coronas, these rocks have been affected by retrograde conditions coeval with a decrease of the pressure. Thermobarometic results show that the highest temperature obtained by ksp/pl thermometry is 850 °C and the highest pressure obtained by GASP (Garnet Alumino-Silicate Plagioclase) is 7.8 kbar. The obtained clockwise P-T evolution path involving heating decompression, then nearly isothermal decompression and nearly isobar cooling conditions shows that high temperature-low pressure metamorphism of the studied pelitic anatectic granulites of Kan Nack complex occurred possibly in extensional setting during the Indosinian orogeny of 260-240 Ma in age.

  13. Catalog of Apollo 17 rocks. Volume 1: Stations 2 and 3 (South Massif)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1993-01-01

    The Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks is a set of volumes that characterize each of 334 individually numbered rock samples (79 larger than 100 g) in the Apollo 17 collection, showing what each sample is and what is known about it. Unconsolidated regolith samples are not included. The catalog is intended to be used by both researchers requiring sample allocations and a broad audience interested in Apollo 17 rocks. The volumes are arranged geographically, with separate volumes for the South Massif and Light Mantle, the North Massif, and two volumes for the mare plains. Within each volume, the samples are arranged in numerical order, closely corresponding with the sample collection stations. The present volume, for the South Massif and Light Mantle, describes the 55 individual rock fragments collected at Stations two, two-A, three, and LRV-five. Some were chipped from boulders, others collected as individual rocks, some by raking, and a few by picking from the soil in the processing laboratory. Information on sample collection, petrography, chemistry, stable and radiogenic isotopes, rock surface characteristics, physical properties, and curatorial processing is summarized and referenced as far as it is known up to early 1992. The intention has been to be comprehensive: to include all published studies of any kind that provide information on the sample, as well as some unpublished information. References which are primarily bulk interpretations of existing data or mere lists of samples are not generally included. Foreign language journals were not scrutinized, but little data appears to have been published only in such journals. We have attempted to be consistent in format across all of the volumes, and have used a common reference list that appears in all volumes. Where possible, ages based on Sr and Ar isotopes have been recalculated using the 'new' decay constants recommended by Steiger and Jager; however, in many of the reproduced diagrams the ages correspond with the

  14. The structure, stratigraphy, tectonostratigraphy, and evolution of the southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.W.; Atkins, R.L.; Crawford, T.J.; Crawford, R.F. III; Brooks, R.; Cook, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen is composed of three stacks of folded thrust sheets, which preserve rocks formed in a variety of environments that virtually spanned the Iapetus Ocean. All of the metamorphism, deformation, and plutonism in the southernmost Appalachians can be related to the movement of the thrust sheets and stacks. Thrusting took place continuously from Early Ordovician through Carboniferous time. An account is given of the origins, assembly, transport, and arrival of the thrust sheets and stacks.

  15. Early proterozoic evolution of the saskatchewan craton and its allochthonous coyer, trans-hudson Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiarenzelli, J.; Aspler, L.; Villeneuve, M.; Lewry, J.

    1998-01-01

    The composition, chronology, and structural relations of the Saskatchewan Craton and enveloping mylonitic rocks exposed in basement windows of the Glennie Domain, Trans-Hudson Orogen, have been determined by geochemical, geochronologic, and structural studies accompanying detailed field mapping. Basement windows lie along the hinge zone of a regional crustal culmination and consist mostly of 2.4-2.5 Ga felsic plutonic rocks enveloped by the Nistowiak Thrust. The Nistowiak Thrust is a folded, 1-2 km thick, upper amphibolite facie??s mylonite zone formed during emplacement of the Flin Flon-Glennie Complex across the Saskatchewan Craton. It is likely correlative to the Pelican Thrust, which envelops basement windows in the Hanson Lake Block -100 km to the east. An internal high strain zone within the overlying nappe pile, the Guncoat Thrust, is composed primarily of mylonitized porphyroclastic pelitic and psammitic migmatites. U-Pb geochronological results suggest calc-alkaline plutonism from 1889-1837 Ma, thrust stacking, peak metamorphism and associated anatexis between 1837 and 1809 Ma, isotopic closure of titanite at 1790-1772 Ma, and intrusion of late granitic rocks at 1770-1762 Ma. This is in agreement with ages from the Hanson Lake Block, and La Ronge, Kisseynew, and Flin-Flon domains in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and from the Ungava-Baffin portion of Trans-Hudson Orogen, suggesting broadly synchronous thermotectonic processes along a strike length of 2000 km. We speculate that the Saskatchewan Craton, rather than representing an exotic continental fragment, rifted from the Superior and/or Hearne Provinces at ca. 2.1 Ga and that the Trans-Hudson Orogen is an internal orogen. In this scenario the Maniwekan Ocean, developed between the Rae-Hearne and Superior cratons, opened and closed about similar pole(s) of plate motion. ?? 1998 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  16. Forearc basin correlations from around the Texas Orocline, New England Orogen, east Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Derek; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Shaanan, Uri; Wormald, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic New England Orogen occupies much of the eastern seaboard of Australia. The orogen formed by west-dipping subduction (present-day coordinates) of the paleo-Pacific plate beneath eastern Gondwana. The southern part of the orogen exhibits a series of tight bends (oroclines) that are evident in the curvature of a Devonian-Carboniferous subduction complex, in particular the forearc basin and accretionary complex. The Emu Creek Block is thought to be part of the forearc basin that is exposed in the eastern limb of the Texas Orocline, but until now the tectonostratigraphic origin of the Emu Creek Block has only been inferred from limited geological data. Here we present detrital zircon geochronology (U/Pb ICP-MS ages), a new geological map of the block, and a revised stratigraphic section. Lithological investigation of strata within the block and the age distribution of detrital zircons indicate that the sediments in the Emu Creek Block were derived from a Carboniferous magmatic arc and were most likely deposited in a forearc basin. Our new geochronological constraints indicate deposition during the late Carboniferous. We therefore propose that rocks in the Emu Creek Block are arc-distal correlatives of the forearc basin in the opposing (western) limb of the Texas Orocline, specifically the Willuri and Currabubula formations. Extensive orocline-parallel structures in the forearc basin indicate that the eastern limb of the Texas Orocline was rotated in the course of oroclinal bending by approximately 135 degrees relative to the western limb. The correlation of the forearc basin blocks on opposite limbs of the Texas Orocline provides an independent constraint on its geometry and further improves our understanding of New England Orogen tectonostratigraphy and the crustal structure of eastern Australia.

  17. Application of the Orogenic Float Model for the Structural Evolution of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, D.; Monod, B.; Hervouet, Y.; Klarica, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Venezuelan (or Mérida) Andes form a NE-SW-striking intracontinental orogen that started to uplift in the Middle Miocene due to E-W convergence between the Maracaibo block to the northwest and the Guyana shield to the southeast. Oblique collision resulted in strain partitioning accommodated by (1) transverse shortening along thrust faults bounding the belt on both flanks, (2) right-lateral slip along the Bocono fault running more or less along the chain axis and (3) tectonic escape of the Trujillo block moving towards the NE in between the Bocono and the N-S-striking sinistral Valera faults. Even though the surface geology of the Venezuelan Andes is well known, its structure at depth remains a matter of debate. Among the mechanisms that have proposed to account for the crustal architecture and evolution of the mountain belt, we develop the idea that the deformation process in this orogen is consistent with a model of orogenic float where the upper crust is decoupled from its underlying lithosphere above a large-scale mid-crustal detachment zone. According to this model, all the major faults involved in the strain partitioning sole into the detachment horizon and may therefore be considered as upper crustal faults. The integration of the orogenic float into a coherent evolutionary model provides further insight on both the crustal structure of the Venezuelan Andes and on the tectonic history of the region. A major reorganization in the crust occurred in the Early Pliocene when the Maracaibo block penetrated as a wedge into the Guyana crust. This event was accompanied by a rapid uplift of the Venezuelan Andes in association with the NE-ward crustal escape of the Trujillo block whose motion is accompanied by the lateral spreading of the upper crust.

  18. Topography and subduction geometry in the central Andes: Clues to the mechanics of a noncollisional orogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gephart, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The central Andeean orogen between 12 deg and 32 deg S latitude exhibits a high degree of spatial order: principally an extraordinary bilateral symmetry that is common to the Earth's surface, the underlying Wadati-Benioff zone, and the Nazca/South America plate kinematics, which has been stable since the mid-Tertiary. This spatial order must reflect the physical mechanisms of mountain building in this noncollisional orogen. The shapes of the topography and subduction zone can be reduced to symmetric and antisummeric components relative to any verical symmetry plane; the particular plaen which minimizes the antisymmetry (and maximizes the symmetry) is well resolved and is essentially coincident with the stable Euler equator of Nacza/South America relative motion since the mid-Tertiary. That the topography, subduction geometry, and persistent mid-Tertiary plate kinematics share common spatial and geometric elements suggests that he distribution of topography in this orogen depends strongly on the dynamics of subduction. Other factors that might affect the topography and underlying tectonics, such as climate and inherited strutura fabric, which have different spatial characterisitcs, must be of less significance at a continental scale. Furthermore, the small components of asymmetry among the various elements of the orogen appear to be mutually relate in a simple way; it is possible that this coupled asymmetry is associated with a late Teriary change in plate kinematics. These observations suggest that there is a close connection between plate tectonics and the form of the Earth's surface in this noncollisional setting. It follows hta the distribution of topography near convergent plate boundaries may provide a powerful constraing for understanding the dynamics of subduction.

  19. Thermal and structural evolution of the external Western Alps: Insights from (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology and RSCM thermometry in the Aiguilles Rouges/Mont Blanc massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Nanni, U.; Pik, R.; Verlaguet, A.; Rolland, Y.; Lacombe, O.

    2016-06-01

    In the Western Alps, the External Crystalline Massifs (ECM) are key places to investigate the kinematics and thermal structure of a collisional crustal wedge, as their paleo-brittle/ductile transition is now exhumed at the surface. New (U-Th-Sm)/He data on zircon and new Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) data from the Aiguilles Rouges and the Mont Blanc massifs, coupled to HeFTy thermal modeling, constrain the thermal evolution and exhumation of the massifs. In the cover of the Aiguilles Rouges massif, we found that the maximal temperature was about 320 °C (+/- 25 °C), close to the maximal temperature reached in the cover of the Mont Blanc massif ( 350 °C +/- 25 °C). We show that, after a fast heating period, the thermal peak lasted 10-15 Myrs in the Mont Blanc massif, and probably 5-10 Myrs in the Aiguilles Rouges massif. This thermal peak is synchronous with crustal shortening documented in the basement. (U-Th-Sm)/He data and thermal modeling point toward a coeval cooling of both massifs, like other ECM, at around 18 Ma +/- 1 Ma. This cooling was related to an exhumation due to the initiation of frontal crustal ramps below the ECM, quite synchronously along the Western Alps arc.

  20. Anatexis of mafic and felsic lower crust: Geochemistry and Nd, Sr and Pb isotopes of late-orogenic granodiorites and leucogranites (Damara orogen, Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterhus, Lennart; Jung, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    The Damara orogen (Namibia) represents a well-exposed and deeply eroded orogenic mobile belt consisting of the north-south trending Kaoko belt and the northeast-southwest trending intracontinental Damara belt. The latter has been subdivided into a Northern, a Central and a Southern Zone based on stratigraphy, metamorphic grade, structure and geochronology. The late-orogenic granodioritic to leucogranitic Gawib pluton is a cross-cutting, pear-shaped post-tectonic stock within the southern Central Zone which is elsewhere dominated by basement rocks, high-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Tinkas Formation and syn-orogenic granites (Salem-type). The non-foliated granodiorites consist of plagioclase, quartz, microcline, hornblende and biotite whereas the leucogranites consist of microcline, quartz, plagioclase and biotite. Major element variation of the granodiorites show two distinct magma types were some samples have high TiO2, MgO and Fe2O3 and low Al2O3 and others have low TiO2, MgO and Fe2O3 and high Al2O3. Based on high REE, Nb, Zr and Y concentrations some granodiorites can be classified as A-type granitoids. Strontium concentrations are high in the granodiorites (up to 939 ppm) and decrease to < 200 ppm in the leucogranites. Rb/Sr ratios are low (1) in the leucogranites. Granodiorites have moderately radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7088-0.7132), strongly negative initial ɛ Nd values (ca. -12) and comparatively unradiogenic Pb isotope data, the latter obtained on acid-leached feldspar separates. Leucogranites have more radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7223-0.7336) and more negative initial ɛ Nd values (ca. -18). Pb isotopes tend to be less radiogenic than in the granodiorites. The mean crustal residence ages of the granodiorites, expressed as depleted mantle Nd model ages, are ca. 2.0 Ga but the leucogranites tend to have older Nd model ages (2.5 Ga). Therefore, a likely source for the granodiorites and leucogranites is a sequence of mafic to

  1. Isotopic age and heterogeneous sources of gabbro‒anorthosites from the Patchemvarek massif, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrevsky, A. B.; Lvov, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    New U‒Pb (SHRIMP II) data on the age (2661.8 ± 7.1 Ma) and isotopic (Sm‒Nd) composition of the Patchemvarek gabbro‒anorthosite massif located in the junction zone between the Neoarchean Kolmozero-Voron'ya greenstone belt and Keivy paragneiss structure are discussed. The established age and geological‒tectonic position of gabbro‒anorthosites allow the prognostic metallogenic estimate of Ti‒V‒Fe mineralization to be extended to the entire Kolmozero-Voron'ya‒Keivy infrastructural zone of the Kola‒Norwegian province of the Fennoscandian shield.

  2. Recycled gabbro signature in Upper Cretaceous Magma within Strandja Massif: NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Basic magma intrusions within plate interiors upwelling mantle plumes have chemical signatures that are distinct from mid-ocean ridge magmas. When a basic magma interact with continental crust or with the felsic magma, the compositions of both magma changes, but there is no consensus as to how this interaction occurs. Here we analyse the mineral behavior and trace element signature of gabbroic rocks of the samples collected from the Strandja Massif. Srednogorie magmatic arc is a part of Apuseni- Banat-Timok-Srednogorie magmatic belt and formed by subduction and closure of the Tethys Ocean during Upper Cretaceous times. Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks cutting Strandja Massif in NW Turkey belong to eastern edge of Srednogorie Magmatic arc. Upper Cretacous magmatic rocks divided into four subgroup in Turkey part of Strandja massif: (I) granitic rocks, (II) monzonitic rock, (III) syenitic rocks and (IV) gabbroic rocks. Gabbroic rocks outcropped around study area in phaneritic - equigranular texture. According to mineralogic - petrographic studies gabbros have mainly holocrystalline texture and ophitic to subophitic texture composed of plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and rarely olivine and opaque minerals. Also because of special conditions there have been pegmatitic texture on mafic minerals with euhedral form up to 3 cm in size and orbicular texture which reach 15cm in size and rounded - elliptical form. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies reveals that plagioclase are ranging in composition from labradorite to bytownite, the pyroxene are ranging in composition from diopside to augite acting with uralitization processes and the olivine are generally in the composition of forsterite. Petrographic and mineralogical determination reveals some metasomatic magmatic epidote presence. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies on anhydrous minerals within gabbroic rocks shows affect of hydrous process because of magma mixing. The gabbroic rocks have tholeiitic and changed towards

  3. Deglaciation and post-glacial environmental evolution in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; García, Cristina; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Gallinar, David; Geraldes, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the process of deglaciation of the Western Massif of Picos de Europa through field work, geomorphological mapping, sedimentary records and absolute datings of 14C. This massif has several peaks over 2,400 m a.s.l. (Peña Santa de Castilla, 2,596 m; Torre Santa María, 2,486 m; Torre del Mediu, 2,467 m). It is composed mainly by Carboniferous limestones. This area has been intensively affected by karstic dissolution, Quaternary glaciers and fluvio-torrential processes (Miotke, 1968; Moreno et al, 2010; Ruiz-Fernández et al, 2009; Ruiz-Fernández, 2013). At present day, periglacial processes are active at the highest elevations (Ruiz-Fernández, 2013). We have identified four main glacial stages regarding the deglaciation of the massif: (i) maximum advance corresponding to the Last Glaciation, (ii) retreat and stabilization after the maximum advance, (iii) Late Glacial, and (iv) Little Ice Age. Sedimentological studies also contribute data to the understanding of the chronological framework of these environmental changes. The datings of the bottom sediments in two long sequences (8 and 5.4 m) provided a minimum age of 18,075 ± 425 cal BP for the maximum advance stage and 11,150 ± 900 cal BP for retreat and stabilization in the phase following the maximum advance. The ongoing analyses of these sequences at very high resolution will provide new knowledge about the environmental conditions prevailing since the deglaciation of the massif. References Miotke, F.D. (1968). Karstmorphologische studien in der glazial-überformten Höhenstufe der Picos de Europa, Nordspanien. Hannover, Selbtverlag der Geografischen Gessellschaft, 161 pp. Moreno, A., Valero, B.L., Jiménez, M., Domínguez, M.J., Mata, M.P., Navas, A., González, P., Stoll, H., Farias, P., Morellón, M., Corella, J.P. & Rico, M. (2010). The last deglaciation in the Picos de Europa National Park (Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain). Journal of Quaternary Science, 25 (7), 1076-1091. Ruiz

  4. Degassing and redox effects in the magma chamber of the Guli massif (Polar Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, I. D.; Kogarko, L. N.; Kuzmin, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    The Guli massif occupies a large area between the Maymecha and Kotui Rivers at the boundary of the Siberian platform with the Khatanga trough. It has a roughly oval shape of 35-45 km, and, including the two-thirds obscured by Quaternary deposits, has an area of 1500-1600 km2. The Guli massif, like many of the other alkaline-ultrabasic intrusions, is a composite, multi-stage pluton. The predominant rocks of the massif are dunites, which occupy about 60% of the total area, and a range of melanocratic alkaline rocks, which extend over about 30%. The other rock types, including melilitolite, ijolite, alkaline syenite and carbonatite, occupy less than 10% of the area. Dunite intrusives were cut by numerous bodies of Ti-Fe ore pyroxenite (kosvite) that are composed mainly of pyroxene and titanomagnetite with accessory apatite and titanite, and form about 10% of the volume of the dunites. Among the volcanics and dyke rocks in the area surrounding the Guli massif olvine-rich meimechites play substantial role. Variations of Mg# of olivines from dunite indicat presence of cryptic layering, whereas evolution of spinels from chromites to titanomagnetites in less magnesian varieties indicate gradual transition from dunites to kosvites. Original layering is obscured by intense folding. Trace-element diagram normalized to pyrolite and Lu shows that interstitial material present between olivines of dunites is identical to meimechites. This implies that primary magma of the Guli intrusion had meimechite composition. Some zoned olivines show regular decrease in Ni and increase in Mn from core to margin, whereas variation of Ca content in the same grains pass through several maxima and minima. This reflects accumulation of both Ca and CO2 in the residual melt with episodic loss of CO2 leading to the increase in the activity of CaO. Eventually this process leads to the formation of melilite-bearing rocks, alkaline magmas and carbonatites. In many samples of kosvites Ni content in

  5. An isotopic perspective on growth and differentiation of Proterozoic orogenic crust: From subduction magmatism to cratonization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Simon P.; Korhonen, Fawna J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Cliff, John B.; Belousova, Elena A.; Sheppard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The in situ chemical differentiation of continental crust ultimately leads to the long-term stability of the continents. This process, more commonly known as ‘cratonization’, is driven by deep crustal melting with the transfer of those melts to shallower regions resulting in a strongly chemically stratified crust, with a refractory, dehydrated lower portion overlain by a complementary enriched upper portion. Since the lower to mid portions of continental crust are rarely exposed, investigation of the cratonization process must be through indirect methods. In this study we use in situ Hf and O isotope compositions of both magmatic and inherited zircons from several felsic magmatic suites in the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia to highlight the differentiation history (i.e. cratonization) of this portion of late Archean to Proterozoic orogenic crust. The Capricorn Orogen shows a distinct tectonomagmatic history that evolves from an active continental margin through to intracratonic reworking, ultimately leading to thermally stable crust that responds similarly to the bounding Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons.

  6. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalayan front into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Along the length of the Himalayan arc, Quaternary rock exhumation rates are highest in the Himalayan syntaxes at the lateral ends of the arc. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, these rates may exceed 10 mm/a over the past 2 Ma, requiring an additional source of crustal mass into this region to maintain the high-elevation topography. We have previously demonstrated that strain partitioning of oblique convergence can produce a significant orogen-parallel mass flux into the syntaxis of a Himalaya-like orogen and balance the rapid rates of surface denudation. However, the magnitude of this orogen parallel mass flux and whether strain is partitioned across the Himalayan thrust front is affected by the strength of the material bounding and within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, the dip angle of the basal detachment and the convergence obliquity angle γ. Strain partitioning is expected for a finite-length Himalaya-like segmented linear orogen with an obliquity of γ = 30 - 40°, but the obliquity angle in the Himalayan arc varies from 0 at the center of the arc to ˜ 40° in the western Himalayan syntaxis region. Thus, the conditions in which strain partitioning will occur may not be met along much of the length of the arc. Though there is clear evidence of strain partitioning in the Himalaya, preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic models of an orogen with an arcuate geometry based on the Himalaya suggest strain partitioning does not occur for the same conditions observed in earlier models of segmented linear orogens or orogens with a smaller arc radius. In those models, the proportion of the orogen length with a high obliquity angle was greater, which favors strain partitioning. In numerical experiments of an arcuate Himalayan orogen with weak material (friction angle φ ≤ 5°) at the back of the orogenic wedge, strain partitioning is only observed in the toe of the orogenic wedge (10-15 km from the thrust front) at the western end of the arc, rather than for

  7. New species from the Galoka and Kalabenono massifs: two unknown and severely threatened mountainous areas in NW Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Callmander, Martin W.; Rakotovao, Charles; Razafitsalama, Jeremi; Phillipson, Peter B.; Buerki, Sven; Hong-Wa, Cynthia; Rakotoarivelo, Nivo; Andriambololonera, Sylvie; Koopman, Margaret M.; Johnson, David M.; Deroin, Thierry; Ravoahangy, Andriamandranto; Solo, Serge; Labat, Jean-Noël; Lowry, Porter P.

    2011-01-01

    The Galoka mountain chain, comprising principally the Galoka and Kalabenono massifs, situated at the northern edge of the Sambirano Region in NW Madagascar is an area that was virtually unknown botanically. It was visited three times between 2005 and 2007 as part of a floristic inventory. Both massifs contain the last remaining primary forests in the Galoka chain, which extends parallel to the coastline from South of Ambilobe to North of Ambanja. Several new species have been discovered amongst the collections, eight of which are described here. PMID:21857767

  8. Sources of Mesoproterozoic igneous rocks and formation time of the continental crust of the Kokchetav Massif (Northern Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, A. A.; Kovach, V. P.; Degtyarev, K. E.; Shatagin, K. N.

    2016-12-01

    Within the Kokchetav massif (Northern Kazakhstan), Mesoproterozoic granites and acid volcanics are widespread: these are the youngest Precambrian igneous rocks forming basement of the region. The Nd isotopic characteristics (ɛNd( t)-4.4 ÷-9.6, t Nd(DM) 2.1-2.6 Ga) obtained for these rocks indicate that the source of their melts was the Early Precambrian continental crust. Thus, the continental crust of the Kokchetav Massif had basically been formed by the beginning of the Mesoproterozoic and during the Late Precambrian: later it became a source for the granitoid melts.

  9. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A.; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined. PMID:26524320

  10. Utilization of digital LANDSAT imagery for the study of granitoid bodies in Rondonia: Case example of the Pedra Branca massif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Almeidafilho, R.; Payolla, B. L.; Depinho, O. G.; Bettencourt, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of digital multispectral MSS-LANDSAT images enhanced through computer techniques and enlarged to a video scale of 1:100.000, show the main geological and structura features of the Pedra Branca granitic massif in Rondonia. These are not observed in aerial photographs or adar images. Field work shows that LANDSAT photogeological units correspond to different facies of granitic rocks in the Pedra Branca massif. Even under the particular characteristics of Amazonia (Tropical Forest, deep weathering, and Quaternary sedimentary covers), an adequate utilization of orbital remote sensing images can be important tools for the orientation of field works.

  11. Window into the Caledonian orogen: Structure of the crust beneath the East Shetland platform, United Kingdom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; England, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Reprocessing and interpretation of commercial and deep seismic reflection data across the East Shetland platform and its North Sea margin provide a new view of crustal subbasement structure beneath a poorly known region of the British Caledonian orogen. The East Shetland platform, east of the Great Glen strike-slip fault system, is one of the few areas of the offshore British Caledonides that remained relatively insulated from the Mesozoic and later rifting that involved much of the area around the British Isles, thus providing an "acoustic window" into the deep structure of the orogen. Interpretation of the reflection data suggests that the crust beneath the platform retains a significant amount of its original Caledonian and older architecture. The upper to middle crust is typically poorly reflective except for individual prominent dipping reflectors with complex orientations that decrease in dip with depth and merge with a lower crustal layer of high reflectivity. The three-dimensional structural orientation of the reflectors beneath the East Shetland platform is at variance with Caledonian reflector trends observed elsewhere in the Caledonian orogen (e.g., north of the Scottish mainland), emphasizing the unique tectonic character of this part of the orogen. Upper to middle crustal reflectors are interpreted as Caledonian or older thrust surfaces that were possibly reactivated by Devonian extension associated with post-Caledonian orogenic collapse. The appearance of two levels of uneven and diffractive (i.e., corrugated) reflectivity in the lower crust, best developed on east-west-oriented profiles, is characteristic of the East Shetland platform. However, a north-south-oriented profile reveals an interpreted south-vergent folded and imbricated thrust structure in the lower crust that appears to be tied to the two levels of corrugated reflectivity on the east-west profiles. A thrust-belt origin for lower crustal reflectivity would explain its corrugated

  12. New radiocarbon chronology of a late Holocene landslide event in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Irka; Sojc, Ursula; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Akçar, Naki; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Ferret valley Arp Nouva peat bog located in the Mont Blanc massif was critically evaluated since previously published radiocarbon dates have led to controversial conclusions on the formation of the swamp. Radiocarbon dating of roots from three pits of up to 1 m depth was applied to discuss the question whether the historical documented rock avalanche occurring in AD 1717 overran the peat bog or formed it at a later stage. Our results indicate that the rock avalanche formed the Arp Nouva peat bog by downstream blockage of the Bellecombe torrent. Furthermore, careful sample preparation with consequent separation of roots from the bulk peat sample provides possible explanation for the too old 14C ages of bulk peat samples dated previously (Deline and Kirkbride, 2009 and references therein). This work demonstrates that a combined geomorphological and geochronological approach is the most reliable way to reconstruct landscape evolution, especially in light of apparent chronological problems. The key to successful 14C dating is a careful sample selection and the identification of material that might be not ideal for chronological reconstructions. References Deline, Philip, and Martin P. Kirkbride. "Rock avalanches on a glacier and morainic complex in Haut Val Ferret (Mont Blanc Massif, Italy)".Geomorphology 103 (2009): 80-92.

  13. Structure and metamorphism of the Gran Paradiso massif, western Alps, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, F. M.; Vissers, R. L. M.; Lamb, W. M.

    2002-05-01

    The pressure-temperature-time trajectory and structural history of high-pressure rocks presently exposed in the Gran Paradiso massif provide constraints on the processes that caused their thermal evolution and exhumation. High-pressure metamorphism of the rocks is found to have culminated at temperatures around 525 °C and pressures of 12 to 14 kbar. After high-pressure metamorphism, the rocks cooled during initial decompression, while undergoing top-to-the-west shear on chlorite-bearing shear bands and larger scale shear zones. Biotite-bearing shear bands and larger shear zones related to top-to-the-east deformation affected the Gran Paradiso massif during reheating to temperatures of around 550 °C at 6 to 7 kbar. Further exhumation occurred at relatively high temperatures. A potentially viable explanation of the observed stage of reheating before final cooling and exhumation is breakoff of a subducting slab in the upper mantle, allowing advective heat transfer to the base of the crust. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00410-001-0357-6.

  14. Deep structures and surface boundaries among Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks: Constraints from seismic tomography and aeromagnetic anomalies in the Central China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Li, Sanzhong; Liu, Xin; Santosh, M.; Zhao, Shujuan; Guo, Lingli; Cao, Huahua; Yu, Shan; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The Qinling-Qilian orogen preserves the records of Early Paleozoic convergence among the Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks. In this study, we analyze the seismic velocity structure and the aeromagnetic anomalies in the Qinling-Qilian orogen and its adjacent areas, showing that the northernmost boundaries of these Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks are defined by the Guyuan-Longshoushan Fault in the Qilian orogen and by the Luonan-Luanchuan Fault in the Qinling orogen, respectively. The lithosphere north of the Qinling-Qilian orogen subducted southward under the Qinling-Qilian orogen. The boundaries of the micro-blocks in the Qinling-Qilian orogen of the Proto-Tethys domain are mostly EW- or NE-trending. Combined with Early Paleozoic geological records, our results indicate that the south-dipping low-velocity anomaly under the Alxa block and the south-dipping high-velocity ones under the North Qilian orogen and the North China block might indicate that the Alxa block, the North Qilian Oceanic slab and the North China block subducted southward. The south-dipping high-velocity anomaly under the North Qilian orogen is interpreted as the remnant of the Proto-Tethys Ocean in that area. However, the north-dipping low-velocity anomaly under the South Qinling and the North Qinling orogens, the Qaidam block and the north-dipping high-velocity one under the Yangtze and the Bikou blocks suggest that the South Qinling and the North Qinling orogens, the Qaidam, the Yangtze and the Bikou blocks subducted northward. The present spatial framework of the Qinling-Qilian orogen is related to Early Paleozoic convergence among the Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks.

  15. The Rožná uranium deposit (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic): shear zone-hosted, late Variscan and post-Variscan hydrothermal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kříbek, Bohdan; Žák, Karel; Dobeš, Petr; Leichmann, Jaromír; Pudilová, Marta; René, Miloš; Scharm, Bohdan; Scharmová, Marta; Hájek, Antonín; Holeczy, Daniel; Hein, Ulrich F.; Lehmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Three major mineralization events are recorded at the Rožná uranium deposit (total mine production of 23,000 t U, average grade of 0.24% U): (1) pre-uranium quartz-sulfide and carbonate-sulfide mineralization, (2) uranium, and (3) post-uranium quartz-carbonate-sulfide mineralization. (1) K-Ar ages for white mica from wall rock alteration of the pre-uranium mineralization style range from 304.5 ± 5.8 to 307.6 ± 6.0 Ma coinciding with the post-orogenic exhumation of the Moldanubian orogenic root and retrograde-metamorphic equilibration of the high-grade metamorphic host rocks. The fluid inclusion record consists of low-salinity aqueous inclusions, together with H2O-CO2-CH4, CO2-CH4, and pure CH4 inclusions. The fluid inclusion, paragenetic, and isotope data suggest that the pre-uranium mineralization formed from a reduced low-salinity aqueous fluid at temperatures close to 300°C. (2) The uraniferous hydrothermal event is subdivided into the pre-ore, ore, and post-ore substages. K-Ar ages of pre-ore authigenic K-feldspar range from 296.3 ± 7.5 to 281.0 ± 5.4 Ma and coincide with the transcurrent reorganization of crustal blocks of the Bohemian Massif and with Late Stephanian to Early Permian rifting. Massive hematitization, albitization, and desilicification of the pre-ore altered rocks indicate an influx of oxidized basinal fluids to the crystalline rocks of the Moldanubian domain. The wide range of salinities of fluid inclusions is interpreted as a result of the large-scale mixing of basinal brines with meteoric water. The cationic composition of these fluids indicates extensive interaction with crystalline rocks. Chlorite thermometry yielded temperatures of 260°C to 310°C. During this substage, uranium was probably leached from the Moldanubian crystalline rocks. The hydrothermal alteration of the ore substage followed, or partly overlapped in time, the pre-ore substage alteration. K-Ar ages of illite from ore substage alteration range from 277.2 ± 5.5 to

  16. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to < 350 °C between ~ 266 Ma and ~ 225 Ma. Late Permian to Triassic cooling is also recorded in Early Palaeozoic granitoids and metasedimentary rocks in the Mérida Andes by numerous new muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar plateau dates spanning 257.1 ± 1.0 Ma to 205.1 ± 0.8 Ma. This episode of cooling is not recognised in the Santander Massif, where 40Ar/39Ar data suggest that some Early Palaeozoic rocks cooled below ~ 320 °C in the Early Palaeozoic. However, most data from pre-Jurassic rocks reveal a regional heat pulse at ~ 200 Ma during the intrusion of numerous shallow granitoids, resulting in temperatures in excess of ~ 520 °C, obscuring late Palaeozoic histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of

  17. High-pressure metamorphism in the southern New England Orogen: Implications for long-lived accretionary orogenesis in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Offler, R.; Rubatto, D.; Phillips, D.

    2015-09-01

    New geochemical, metamorphic, and isotopic data are presented from high-pressure metamorphic rocks in the southern New England Orogen (eastern Australia). Conventional and optimal thermobarometry are augmented by U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar phengite dating to define pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) histories for the rocks. The P-T-t histories are compared with competing geodynamic models for the Tasmanides, which can be summarized as (i) a retreating orogen model, the Tasmanides formed above a continuous, west dipping, and eastward retreating subduction zone, and (ii) a punctuated orogen model, the Tasmanides formed by several arc accretion, subduction flip, and/or transference events. Whereas both scenarios are potentially supported by the new data, an overlap between the timing of metamorphic recrystallization and key stages of Tasmanides evolution favors a relationship between a single, long-lived subduction zone and the formation, exhumation, and exposure of the high-pressure rocks. By comparison with the retreating orogen model, the following links with the P-T-t histories emerge: (i) exhumation and underplating of oceanic eclogite during the Delamerian Orogeny, (ii) recrystallization of underplated and exhuming high-pressure rocks at amphibolite facies conditions coeval with a period of rollback, and (iii) selective recrystallization of high-pressure rocks at blueschist facies conditions, reflecting metamorphism in a cooled subduction zone. The retreating orogen model can also account for the anomalous location of the Cambrian-Ordovician high-pressure rocks in the Devonian-Carboniferous New England Orogen, where sequential rollback cycles detached and translated parts of the leading edge of the overriding plate to the next, younger orogenic cycle.

  18. A Paleozoic anorthosite massif related to rutile-bearing ilmenite ore deposits, south of the Polochic fault, Chiapas Massif Complex, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, A.; Ortega-Gutiérrez, F.; Weber, B.; Solari, L.; Schaaf, P. E.; Maldonado, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Chiapas Massif Complex in the southern Maya terrane is mostly composed of late Permian igneous and meta-igneous rocks. Within this complex in southern Mexico and in the adjacent San Marcos Department of Guatemala, south of the Polochic fault, several small outcrops (~10 km2) of a Phanerozoic andesine anorthosite massif were found following an E-W trend similar to the Polochic-Motagua Fault System. Such anorthosites are related to rutile-bearing ilmenite ore deposits and hornblendite-amphibolite bands (0.1-3 meters thick). The anorthosites show recrystallization and metamorphic retrogression (rutile with titanite rims), but no relicts of high-grade metamorphic minerals such as pyroxene or garnet have been found. In Acacoyagua, Chiapas, anorthosites are spatially related to oxide-apatite rich mafic rocks; in contrast, further to the west in Motozintla, they are related to monzonites. Zircons from these monzonites yield a Permian U-Pb age (271.2×1.4 Ma) by LA-MC-ICPMS. Primary mineral assemblage of the anorthosites include mostly medium to fine-grained plagioclase (>90%) with rutile and apatite as accessory minerals, occasionally with very low amounts of quartz. Massive Fe-Ti oxide lenses up to tens of meters in length and few meters thick are an ubiquitous constituent of these anorthosites and their mineralogy include ilmenite (with exsolution lamellae of Ti-magnetite), rutile, magnetite, clinochlore, ×spinel, ×apatite, ×zircon and srilankite (Ti2ZrO6, first finding of this phase in Mexico). Rutile occurs within the massive ilmenite in two morphological types: (1) fine-grained (5-40 μm) rutile along ilmenite grain boundaries or fractures, and (2) coarse-grained rutile (<5 mm) as discrete grains, whereas magnetite and srilankite only appear as small grains along ilmenite boundaries. Zircon is present as discontinuously aligned small grains (10-40 μm) forming rims around many rutile and ilmenite grains. Attempts to date zircon rims by U-Pb using LA

  19. Possible petrogenetic associations among igneous components in North Massif soils: Evidence in 2-4 MM soil particles from 76503

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Bishop, Kaylynn M.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-12-01

    Studies of Apollo 17 highland igneous rocks and clasts in breccias from the North and South Massifs have described magnesian troctolite, norite, anorthositic gabbro, dunite, spinel cataclasites, and granulitic lithologies that may have noritic anothosite or anorthositic norite/gabbro as igneous precursors, and have speculated on possible petrogenetic relationships among these rock types. Mineral compositions and relative proportions of plagioclase and plagioclase-olivine particles in samples 76503 indicate that the precursor lithology of those particles were troctolitic anorthosite, not troctolite. Mineral and chemical compositions of more pyroxene-rich, magnesian breccias and granulites in 76503 indicate that their precursor lithology was anorthositic norite/gabbro. The combination of mineral compositions and whole-rock trace-element compositional trends supports a genetic relationship among these two groups as would result from differentiation of a single pluton. Although highland igneous lithologies in Apollo 17 materials have been described previously, the proportions of different igneous lithologies present in the massifs, their frequency of association, and how they are related are not well known. We consider the proportions of, and associations among, the igneous lithologies found in a North Massif soil, which may represent those of the North Massif or a major part of it.

  20. Has Massification of Higher Education Led to More Equity? Clues to a Reflection on Portuguese Education Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Massification is an undeniable phenomenon in the higher education arena. However, there have been questions raised regarding the extent to which a mass system really corresponds to an effective democratisation not only of access, but also of success. With regards to access, this article intends, through a brief analysis of the expansion of higher…

  1. Massification, Bureaucratization and Questing for "World-Class" Status: Higher Education in China since the Mid-1990s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngok, Kinglun

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review the latest developments of the higher education sector in China since the mid-1990s by focusing on the expansion of university education. Design/methodology/approach: It is argued that while massification of higher education is an important indication of the progress in China's higher education system, the…

  2. Possible petrogenetic associations among igneous components in North Massif soils: Evidence in 2-4 mm soil particles from 76503

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Bishop, Kaylynn M.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of Apollo 17 highland igneous rocks and clasts in breccias from the North and South Massifs have described magnesian troctolite, norite, anorthositic gabbro, dunite, spinel cataclasites, and granulitic lithologies that may have noritic anothosite or anorthositic norite/gabbro as igneous precursors, and have speculated on possible petrogenetic relationships among these rock types. Mineral compositions and relative proportions of plagioclase and plagioclase-olivine particles in samples 76503 indicate that the precursor lithology of those particles were troctolitic anorthosite, not troctolite. Mineral and chemical compositions of more pyroxene-rich, magnesian breccias and granulites in 76503 indicate that their precursor lithology was anorthositic norite/gabbro. The combination of mineral compositions and whole-rock trace-element compositional trends supports a genetic relationship among these two groups as would result from differentiation of a single pluton. Although highland igneous lithologies in Apollo 17 materials have been described previously, the proportions of different igneous lithologies present in the massifs, their frequency of association, and how they are related are not well known. We consider the proportions of, and associations among, the igneous lithologies found in a North Massif soil, which may represent those of the North Massif or a major part of it.

  3. The Dilemma and Solutions for the Conflicts between Equality and Excellence in the Massification of Higher Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiou-Huai, Wang

    2012-01-01

    Equality and excellence are two core values underlying many educational endeavors; however, they are often in conflict and controversy. This article intends to examine the dilemma created by such controversies in the context of massification of higher education in Taiwan and attempt to provide solutions from both the theoretical and policy…

  4. Comprenhensive Program of Engineering and Geologic Surveys for Designing and Constructing Radioactive Waste Storage Facilities in Hard Rock Massifs

    SciTech Connect

    Gupalo, T; Milovidov, V; Prokopoca, O; Jardine, L

    2002-12-27

    Geological, geophysical, and engineering-geological research conducted at the 'Yeniseisky' site obtained data on climatic, geomorphologic, geological conditions, structure and properties of composing rock, and conditions of underground water recharge and discharge. These results provide sufficient information to make an estimate of the suitability of locating a radioactive waste (R W) underground isolation facility at the Nizhnekansky granitoid massif

  5. An accreted micro-continent in the north of the Dabie Orogen, East China: Evidence from detrital zircon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Cheng; Gu, Chengchuan; Li, Yunjian

    2017-02-01

    Continent-continent collision between the North China Block (NCB) and South China Block (SCB) took place along the Qinling-Tongbai-Hong'an-Dabie orogens during the Triassic. A micro-continent with Paleozoic arc magmatism has been recognized in the northern Qinling-Tongbai orogens; however, it remains unclear whether the micro-continent extended to the Dabie Orogen to form a ribbon-shaped micro-continent, due to later burial by the Hefei Basin in the north. To solve this problem, we conducted LA-ICP-MS Usbnd Pb dating of zircons from Silurian to Cretaceous sandstones and volcanic rocks from the southern margin of the basin. The age spectra of detrital zircons suggest that the Dabie Orogen and later basin cover were the sources of the analyzed sandstones. The detrital and inherited zircons indicate Neoproterozoic, early and late Paleozoic magmatism in the Beihuaiyang unit in the north of the Dabie Orogen. The zircon and previous geophysical data show that a micro-continent bounded by the Feizhong Suture in the north and the Xiaotian-Mozitang Suture in the south existed between the NCB and the Triassic Dabie Orogen, and its northern half is buried by the Jurassic-Paleogene Hefei Basin. The Beihuaiyang micro-continent experienced early Paleozoic arc magmatism caused by southward subduction of the Erlangping oceanic crust and late Paleozoic magmatism related to northward subduction of the Paleotethyan oceanic crust. The micro-continent was accreted to the southern edge of the NCB at the end of the Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma) via arc-continent collision. Similarly to the Qinling-Tongbai orogens, the Dabie Orogen contains a Paleozoic accretionary system in the north and a Triassic collisional system in the south; thus, it is suggested that a ribbon-shaped micro-continent, > 900 km long and 50-100 km wide, was present along the entire Qinling-Tongbai-Hong'an-Dabie orogens prior to the middle Paleozoic. This micro-continent might have originated as a result of middle

  6. Physicochemical parameters of the melts participating in the formation of chromite ore hosted in the Klyuchevsky ultramafic massif, the Central Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, V. A.; Ivanov, K. S.; Smirnov, V. N.; Kovyazin, S. V.

    2009-04-01

    The results of melt inclusion study are reported for chromites of the Klyuchevsky ultramafic massif, which is the most representative of all Ural ultramafic massifs localized beyond the Main Ural Fault Zone. The massif is composed of a dunite-harzburgite complex (tectonized mantle peridotite) and a dunite-wehrlite-clinopyroxenite-gabbro complex (layered portion of the ophiolitic section). The studied Kozlovsky chromite deposit is located in the southeastern part of the Klyuchevsky massif and hosted in serpentinized dunite as a series of lenticular bodies and layers up to 7-8 m thick largely composed of disseminated and locally developed massive ore. Melt inclusions have been detected in chromites of both ore types. The heated and then quenched into glass melt inclusions and host minerals were analyzed on a Camebax-Micro microprobe. The glasses of melt inclusions contain up to 1.06 wt % Na2O + K2O and correspond to melts of normal alkalinity. In SiO2 content (49-56 wt %), they fit basalt and basaltic andesite. The melt inclusions are compared with those from chromites of the Nurali massif in the southern Urals and the Karashat massif in southern Tuva. The physicochemical parameters of magmatic systems related to the formation of disseminated and massive chromite ores of the Klyuchevsky massif are different. The former are characterized by a wider temperature interval (1185-1120°C) in comparison with massive chromite ore (1160-1140°C).

  7. Crustal segments in the North Patagonian Massif, Patagonia: An integrated perspective based on Sm-Nd isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.

    2011-03-01

    New insights on the Paleozoic evolution of the continental crust in the North Patagonian Massif are presented based on the analysis of Sm-Nd systematics. New evidence is presented to constrain tectonic models for the origin of Patagonia and its relations with the South American crustal blocks. Geologic, isotopic and tectonic characterization of the North Patagonian Massif and comparison of the Nd parameters lead us to conclude that: (1) The North Patagonian Massif is a crustal block with bulk crustal average ages between 2.1 and 1.6 Ga TDM (Nd) and (2) At least three metamorphic episodes could be identified in the Paleozoic rocks of the North Patagonian Massif. In the northeastern corner, Famatinian metamorphism is widely identified. However field and petrographic evidence indicate a Middle to Late Cambrian metamorphism pre-dating the emplacement of the ca. 475 Ma granitoids. In the southwestern area, are apparent 425-420 Ma (?) and 380-360 Ma metamorphic peaks. The latter episode might have resulted from the collision of the Antonia terrane; and (3) Early Paleozoic magmatism in the northeastern area is coeval with the Famatinian arc. Nd isotopic compositions reveal that Ordovician magmatism was associated with attenuated crust. On the southwestern border, the first magmatic recycling record is Devonian. Nd data shows a step by step melting of different levels of the continental crust in the Late Palaeozoic. Between 330 and 295 Ma magmatism was likely the product of a crustal source with an average 1.5 Ga TDM (Nd). Widespread magmatism represented by the 295-260 Ma granitoids involved a lower crustal mafic source, and continued with massive shallower-acid plutono volcanic complexes which might have recycled an upper crustal segment of the Proterozoic continental basement, resulting in a more felsic crust until the Triassic. (4) Sm-Nd parameters and detrital zircon age patterns of Early Paleozoic (meta)-sedimentary rocks from the North Patagonian Massif and those

  8. Rift inheritance in orogenes: a case study from the Western Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, E.; Manatschal, G.; Tugend, J.; Kusznir, N. J.; Flament, J.

    2012-12-01

    In plate tectonics, there is a general assumption that rifted margins represent most of the former material accreted into collisional orogenic prisms. In this regard, the former architecture, structures and composition of rifted margins, i.e. the pre-orogenic inheritances, play undoubtedly a major role during tectonic inversion. Studies have shown that rifted margins are more complex than a succession of tilted blocks. Indeed, the discovery of hyper-extended domains, where low-angle detachments replace high-angle normal faults and mantle material is exhumed to the seafloor implies a revision of the margin's template used in orogenic models. Because of overprint, the role of rift inheritance in orogenes remains often underestimated. The Pyrenees, located along the Iberian-European plate boundary, can be considered as one of the best places to study the reactivation of hyper-extended rifts. In this orogen, the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary convergence overprints a Latest Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intracontinental rift linked with the opening of the North Atlantic. There, Albian hyper-extended rift basins developed where deep crustal and mantle rocks were exhumed along low-angle detachments to the seafloor. In this work we discuss the example of the Mauléon-Arzacq domain, which escaped from the most pervasive deformation because of its specific location between the western termination of the chain and the Bay of Biscay oceanic domain. Combining field study with subsurface geophysical and drillhole data, we show that the overall rift domain is asymmetric. The northern European upper plate is on the hangingwall of low-angle detachment systems affecting the southern Iberian Lower plate. The upper plate records depth-dependent crustal thinning and the development of a syn-rift sag basin. In contrast, the lower plate resulted from the hyper-extension of Iberian continental crust accommodated at the surface by two diachronous top-basement detachment systems. The first

  9. Discriminating fluid source regions in orogenic gold deposits using B-isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert-Smith, James S.; Rocholl, Alexander; Treloar, Peter J.; Lawrence, David M.

    2016-12-01

    The genesis of orogenic gold deposits is commonly linked to hydrothermal ore fluids derived from metamorphic devolatilization reactions. However, there is considerable debate as to the ultimate source of these fluids and the metals they transport. Tourmaline is a common gangue mineral in orogenic gold deposits. It is stable over a very wide P-T range, demonstrates limited volume diffusion of major and trace elements and is the main host of B in most rock types. We have used texturally resolved B-isotope analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to identify multiple fluid sources within a single orogenic gold ore district. The Loulo Mining District in Mali, West Africa hosts several large orogenic gold ore bodies with complex fluid chemistry, associated with widespread pre-ore Na- and multi-stage B-metasomatism. The Gara deposit, as well as several smaller satellites, formed through partial mixing between a dilute aqueous-carbonic fluid and a hypersaline brine. Hydrothermal tourmaline occurs as a pre-ore phase in the matrix of tourmalinite units, which host mineralization in several ore bodies. Clasts of these tourmalinites occur in mineralized breccias. Disseminated hydrothermal and vein hosted tourmaline occur in textural sites which suggest growth during and after ore formation. Tourmalines show a large range in δ11B values from -3.5 to 19.8‰, which record a change in fluid source between paragenetic stages of tourmaline growth. Pre-mineralization tourmaline crystals show heavy δ11B values (8-19.8‰) and high X-site occupancy (Na ± Ca; 0.69-1 apfu) suggesting a marine evaporite source for hydrothermal fluids. Syn-mineralization and replacement phases show lighter δ11B values (-3.5 to 15.1‰) and lower X-site occupancy (0.62-0.88 apfu), suggesting a subsequent influx of more dilute fluids derived from devolatilization of marine carbonates and clastic metasediments. The large, overlapping range in isotopic compositions and a skew toward the

  10. Spatially Concentrated Erosion Focuses Deformation Within the Himalayan Orogenic Wedge: Sutlej Valley, NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, R. C.; Arrowsmith, J.; Bookhagen, B.; McWilliams, M.; Sobel, E. R.; Strecker, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    Long-term erosion processes in the NW-Himalaya have not only shaped the distribution of topography and relief, but may also exert a regional control on the kinematic history of the Himalayan orogenic wedge. The topographic front of the orogenic wedge forms the southern margin of the High Himalaya and may be related to subsurface structures such as a crustal ramp or a blind thrust. Drastic along- and across-strike erosional gradients characterize the modern Himalaya and range from high-erosion regions along the southern High Himalayan front where monsoonal precipitation is able to penetrate far into the range, to low-erosion sectors across the moderately elevated Lesser Himalaya to the south and the high-elevation, arid sectors to the north. Published paleo-elevation estimates from the Thakkhola Graben (Nepal) suggest that by ~11 Ma the southern Tibetan Plateau and probably the High Himalaya had been uplifted to elevations comparable to the recent conditions. Thus, the presently observed pronounced erosional gradients have likely existed across the orogen since then. However, the cause of high rock-uplift and exhumation rates along distinct segments of the southern front of the High Himalaya are still a matter of debate. New apatite fission track (AFT) and 40Ar/39Ar data sampled along an orogen-perpendicular transect following the Sutlej Valley, approximately perpendicular to the Himalayan orogen, constrain the distribution patterns of rapid cooling related to rock uplift and exhumation. Combined with published thermochronologic data, this comprehensive AFT dataset from south of the High Himalaya mountain front to the interior of the Tethyan Himalaya allows us to derive a regional uplift and exhumation scenario. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging between 17 and 4 Ma reveal diachronous exhumation of two crystalline nappes (Higher and Lesser Himalayan crystalline) during Miocene-Pliocene time. In contrast, the AFT data ranging from 1.3 to 4.6 Ma indicate synchronous, fast

  11. Exploring the Notion That Subduction Erosion Has Removed or Submerged Costa Rica's Early Tertiary Arc Massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, D. W.

    2007-05-01

    Arc igneous rocks of Paleocene, Eocene, and Oligocene age are widely exposed in the southern, coastal region of Panama (Lissinna et al., EGU abstract, 2006). These rocks intrude or overlie mafic basement rock of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) of Late Cretaceous age that extends to the east to underlie the Caribbean Basin and form the Caribbean plate. Immediately west of Panama, in coastal Costa Rica, exposures of CLIP basement are not intruded or overlain by arc magmatic rocks of early Tertiary age. EXPLANATIONS: Potentially, the early Tertiary subduction zone that dipped beneath the Pacific margin of Panama did not extend to the west, thus no arc magmatism occurred where Costa Rica presently exists. Alternatively, the subduction zone bordering the Pacific edge of the CLIP extended below Costa Rica but former exposures of early Tertiary arc magmatic rocks piled there have been erosionally removed or buried beneath Miocene and younger arc massifs of interior mountain belts. EXPLORING A SUBDUCTION EROSION EXPLANATION Onshore and offshore evidence documents that subduction erosion thins and truncates the submerged rock framework of the Middle and South America forearc. The eroded (removed) material is transported toward and into the mantle within the subduction channel separating the upper plate of the forearc and lower plate of the subducting oceanic crust. The long-term (greater than 10 Myr) rate of truncation (i. e., migration of the trench toward a fixed, onshore reference) averages 2 to 3 km/Myr. Because of the subduction of the aseismic Cocos Ridge beneath Costa Rica, during at least the past 4 to 5 Myr the rate of truncation at this margin has been much higher. It is proposed that during the past 50 Myr subduction erosion has truncated the Costa Rica forearc by at least 100 km and either obliterated or deeply submerged arc massifs of early Tertiary age. Their exposed presence to the east in neighboring Panama reflects the circumstance that since

  12. The Front of the Aar Massif: A Crustal-Scale Ramp Anticline?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Mock, Samuel; Wehrens, Philip; Baumberger, Roland; Berger, Alfons; Wangenheim, Cornelia; Glotzbach, Christoph; Kissling, Edi

    2015-04-01

    The front of the Aar Massif (Swiss Central Alps) is characterized by Paleozoic basement rocks exposed at altitudes of more than 4600m above sea level, followed by a steeply north dipping Mesozoic sedimentary cover and overlying Helvetic nappes. The sediments turn into subhorizontal orientations just few kilometers to the N, where the top of the basement is situated at depths of about 7000m below sea level. What is the origin of this vertical jump of about 12000m of the basement rocks over such short horizontal distances? Recent structural investigations at the Basement-Cover contact indicate a complex structural evolution involving reactivation of extensional faults and inversion of half-grabens during early compressional stages. In the internal parts of the Aar Massif a general steepening of the faults resulted with progressive compression. In the northern frontal part, however, a new spaced cleavage evolved, which is dipping with 20-30° to the SE. In places, the new cleavage in the basement rocks is intense and pervasive and correlates with a steepening of the basement-cover contact and its offsets of several tens to hundreds of meters. Hence strain is strongly partitioned in a large number of high strain zones, which cover a cumulative thickness of at least 2000m, eventually even much more considering subsurface continuation. The Mesozoic sediments affected by this large-scale deformation zone are either intensely ductile folded in the case of limestones or faulted and imbricated in the case of dolomites. These differences in deformation style result from the deformation conditions of about < 250-300°C, where calcite still deforms in a ductile manner, while dolomite and crystalline basement preferentially undergo brittle deformation in combination of dissolution-precipitation processes. In a large-scale point of view, we suggest that the high strain domain in the crystalline basement in fact represents a crustal-scale several kilometers wide shear zone, which

  13. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  14. Episodic early Miocene anatexis in the Ama Drime Massif, southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Zeng, L.; Liu, J.; Gao, L.; Xie, K.

    2010-12-01

    Cenozoic India-Asia collision resulted in profound crustal shortening and thickening that produced the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau. However, extensional tectonics, represented by the E-W trending south Tibetan detachment system (STDS) and N-S trending normal faults, has been a salient feature of Himalayan geology since the Miocene. To the north of the Ama Drime Massif, the STDS is crosscut by N-S trending normal faults, which indicates that the earlier extensional deformation was overprinted by the E-W extension. In response to the extension, the Ama Drime Massif has experienced rapid exhumation and partial melting of fertile rocks due to decompressional melting. Near the northern tip of the Ama Drime Massif, SHRIMP ziron U/Pb data from leucogranites indicate two episodes of melting at 21.0±0.7 Ma and 15.8±0.1 Ma, respectively. These leucogranites have (1) high SiO2 (>72 wt%), Al2O3 (>12 wt%), and A/CNK (>1.0); (2) high Rb and low Sr, thus high Rb/Sr ratios (>1.0); (3) high contents of total REE, and substantial negative Eu anomalies; and (4) high initial Sr (87Sr/86Sr =0.7621~0.8845) and low Nd (ɛNd(i) =-20.2~-13.0) isotopic compositions. As compared with those in the metapelite and granitic gneiss, these leucogranites could be produced from anatexis of a source mixed of metapelite with granitic gneiss. In addition, SHRIMP zircon U/Pb analyses on the granitic gneiss, garnet amphibolite and garnet pyroxenite yield 206Pb/238U ages at 22.6±1.6 Ma, 21.4±2.7 Ma and 16.0±0.2 Ma, respectively, which might represent timing of partial melting or retrograde metamorphic reaction due to the extension-related decompression. These new data suggest two episodes of crustal anatexis at ~21-22 Ma and ~16 Ma, respectively. The existence of two metamorphic episodes indicates that the older melting was associated with a high-grade metamorphism, whereas the younger was associated with a widespread retrograde metamorphism. Exhumation of deeply subducted crustal material not only

  15. The Triassic reworking of the Yunkai massif (South China): EMP monazite and U-Pb zircon geochronologic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Hong; Liu, Yung-Hsin; Lee, Chi-Yu; Sano, Yuji; Zhou, Han-Wen; Xiang, Hua; Takahata, Naoto

    2017-01-01

    Geohistory of the Yunkai massif in South China Block is important in understanding the geodynamics for the build-up of this block during the Phanerozoic orogenies. To investigate this massif, we conduct EMP monazite and U-Pb zircon geochronological determinations on mineral inclusions and separate for seventeen samples in four groups, representing metamorphic rocks from core domain, the Gaozhou Complex (amphibolite facies, NE-striking) and the Yunkai Group (greenschist facies, NW-striking) of this massif and adjacent undeformed granites. Some EMP monazite ages are consistent with the NanoSIMS results. Monazite inclusions, mostly with long axis parallel to the cleavage of platy and elongated hosts, give distinguishable age results for NW- and NE-trending deformations at 244-236 Ma and 236-233 Ma, respectively. They also yield ages of 233-230 Ma for core domain gneissic granites and 232-229 Ma for undefomed granites. Combining U-Pb zircon ages of the same group, 245 Ma and 230 Ma are suggested to constrain the time of two phases of deformation. Aside from ubiquity of Triassic ages in studied rocks, ages of detrital monazite in the meta-sandstone match the major U-Pb zircon age clusters of the metamorphic rock that are largely concentrated at Neoproterozoic (1.0-0.9 Ga) and Early Paleozoic (444-431 Ma). Based on these geochronological data, Triassic is interpreted as representing the time for recrystallization of these host minerals on the Early Paleozoic protolith, and the also popular Neoproterozoic age is probably inherited. With this context, Yunkai massif is regarded as a strongly reactivated Triassic metamorphic terrain on an Early Paleozoic basement which had incorporated sediments with Neoproterozoic provenances. Triassic tectonic evolution of the Yunkai massif is suggested to have been controlled by converging geodynamics of the South China and Indochina Blocks as well as mafic magma emplacement related to the Emeishan large igneous province (E-LIP).

  16. Detachment shear zone of the Atlantis Massif core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Kelley, D. S.; Williams, E. A.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2006-06-01

    Near-bottom investigations of the cross section of the Atlantis Massif exposed in a major tectonic escarpment provide an unprecedented view of the internal structure of the footwall domain of this oceanic core complex. Integrated direct observations, sampling, photogeology, and imaging define a mylonitic, low-angle detachment shear zone (DSZ) along the crest of the massif. The shear zone may project beneath the nearby, corrugated upper surface of the massif. The DSZ and related structures are inferred to be responsible for the unroofing of upper mantle peridotites and lower crustal gabbroic rocks by extreme, localized tectonic extension during seafloor spreading over the past 2 m.y. The DSZ is characterized by strongly foliated to mylonitic serpentinites and talc-amphibole schists. It is about 100 m thick and can be traced continuously for at least 3 km in the tectonic transport direction. The DSZ foliation arches over the top of the massif in a convex-upward trajectory mimicking the morphology of the top of the massif. Kinematic indicators show consistent top-to-east (toward the MAR axis) tectonic transport directions. Foliated DSZ rocks grade structurally downward into more massive basement rocks that lack a pervasive outcrop-scale foliation. The DSZ and underlying basement rocks are cut by discrete, anastomosing, normal-slip, shear zones. Widely spaced, steeply dipping, normal faults cut all the older structures and localize serpentinization-driven hydrothermal outflow at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. A thin (few meters) sequence of sedimentary breccias grading upward into pelagic limestones directly overlies the DSZ and may record a history of progressive rotation of the shear zone from a moderately dipping attitude into its present, gently dipping orientation during lateral spreading and uplift.

  17. Chemical remagnetization and paleomagnetic dating of fluid migration events: Testing the orogenic fluid hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, E.R. )

    1993-11-01

    Remagnetization, the acquisition of a secondary magnetization, is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon in sedimentary rocks. The recognition that many sedimentary rocks were remagnetized long after deposition has not only led to a reevaluation of the paleomagnetic database, but also has led to a new application of the paleomagnetic method to other areas of earth science. Many secondary magnetizations are tangible evidence of a chemical event caused by rock-fluid interactions. Recent studies demonstrate that isolation of a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) and comparison of the corresponding pole position to the apparent polar wander path can provide essential constraints on the timing of a diagenetic event. Many CRMs can be spatially correlated with orogenic belts and temporally related to orogeny. In this talk several case studies will be presented where paleomagnetic and geochemical results are used to date diagenetic events and test the role of orogenic fluids as agents of remagnetization. The Ordovician Viola Limestone contains a pervasive Pennsylvanian CRM and a localized Permian CRM that occurs in a halo around veins mineralized by saline radiogenic fluids. The Permian CRM can be related to alteration by the basinal fluids. The pervasive CRM, which is similar to many other CRMs that have been related to orogenic fluids, occurs in relatively unaltered limestone. The acquisition of this CRM was caused by an as yet unidentified chemical mechanism that was not triggered by externally-derived fluids. Preliminary results, however, suggest a connection between the CRM and organic matter in the limestone. Radiogenic Cambrian-Ordovician dolomites near the Ouachita Mountains in southern Oklahoma that have been altered by basinal fluids contain a late Paleozoic CRM. Understanding the origin of these CRMs will require tests of mechanisms that do not rely on externally-derived fluids.

  18. Noble gases fingerprint a metasedimentary fluid source in the Macraes orogenic gold deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R. J.; Burgess, Ray; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-02-01

    The world-class Macraes orogenic gold deposit (˜10 Moz resource) formed during the late metamorphic uplift of a metasedimentary schist belt in southern New Zealand. Mineralising fluids, metals and metalloids were derived from within the metasedimentary host. Helium and argon extracted from fluid inclusions in sulphide mineral grains (three crush extractions from one sample) have crustal signatures, with no evidence for mantle input (R/Ra = 0.03). Xenon extracted from mineralised quartz samples provides evidence for extensive interaction between fluid and maturing organic material within the metasedimentary host rocks, with 132Xe/36Ar ratios up to 200 times greater than air. Similarly, I/Cl ratios for fluids extracted from mineralised quartz are similar to those of brines from marine sediments that have interacted with organic matter and are ten times higher than typical magmatic/mantle fluids. The Macraes mineralising fluids were compositionally variable, reflecting either mixing of two different crustal fluids in the metasedimentary pile or a single fluid type that has had varying degrees of interaction with the host metasediments. Evidence for additional input of meteoric water is equivocal, but minor meteoric incursion cannot be discounted. The Macraes deposit formed in a metasedimentary belt without associated coeval magmatism, and therefore represents a purely crustal metamorphogenic end member in a spectrum of orogenic hydrothermal processes that can include magmatic and/or mantle fluid input elsewhere in the world. There is no evidence for involvement of minor intercalated metabasic rocks in the Macraes mineralising system. Hydrothermal fluids that formed other, smaller, orogenic deposits in the same metamorphic belt have less pronounced noble gas and halogen evidence for crustal fluid-rock interaction than at Macraes, but these deposits also formed from broadly similar metamorphogenic processes.

  19. Erosion and Sediment Transport Across Pronounced Topographic and Climatic Gradients in the Himalayan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Bookhagen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between the NW-directed trajectories of moisture transport associated with the Indian Summer Monsoon circulation and the high topography of the Himalayan orogen results in one of the most efficient orographic barriers on Earth. The steep topographic gradients, the impact of focused rainfall along the southern flank of the range, and northward shifts of rainfall during frequent intensified Indian Summer Monsoons are responsible for an efficient erosional regime, with some of the highest known erosion rates. The spatiotemporal correlation between various topographic, tectonic, climatic, and exhumational phenomena in this region has resulted in the formulation of models of possible long-term erosional and tectonic feedback processes that drive the lateral expansion and vertical growth of the mountain belt. However, despite an increase in thermochronologic, cosmogenic radionuclide, and sedimentological datasets that help explain the underlying mechanisms, the true nature of these relationships is still unclear and controversies particularly exist concerning the importance of the different forcing factors that drive exhumation and, ultimately, deformation. Here, we synthesize and assess these controversies with observations from studies conducted perpendicular to and along strike of the orogen, and combine them with our new basin-wide erosion-rate data from the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya. In our regional comparison we highlight the importance of large river systems and climate-controlled aspects of weathering concerning fluvial mass distribution as there appear to be positive feedbacks between tectonics and surface processes. In contrast, observations from smaller catchments along the orogenic front suggest a negative correlation. Similar to other environments with steep topographic and climatic gradients, our observations from the Sutlej catchments emphasize that erosional processes in the Himalayan realm are most efficient in geomorphic

  20. Porphyry molybdenum deposits in the Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingdong; Qin, Kezhang; Liu, Jianming; Li, Guangming; Zhai, Mingguo; Chu, Shaoxiong; Guo, Yunpeng

    2015-06-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) exploration activity in China has increased tremendously over the past decade, and China is now known to have the largest Mo reserves in the world. The Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt, the second largest Mo metallogenic belt, possesses over 8.2 Mt of Mo reserves. Porphyry Mo deposits contain 99 % of the Mo reserves in the Tianshan-Xingmeng orogenic belt; other Mo deposits contain 1 % of the Mo reserves. Five subtypes of the porphyry Mo deposits can be distinguished by deposit associations, such as Mo, Mo-Cu, Mo-W, Mo-Pb-Zn-Ag, and Cu-Mo deposits. These porphyry Mo deposits are formed at different stages: during the Ordovician, Devonian, Carboniferous, Late Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous Periods. The polystage porphyry Mo mineralizations indicate that polystage tectonic-magmatic activity occurred in the orogenic belt. The Ordovician-Carboniferous porphyry Cu-Mo deposits are formed in an island-arc setting; the Late Permian porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a syn-collisional tectonic setting; and the Triassic porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a syn-collisional to post-collisional tectonic setting. The Ordovician-Triassic porphyry deposits are related to the Paleo-Asian Ocean tectonic system. The Jurassic porphyry Mo deposits are formed at the eastern margin of the Asian continent and are associated with a Paleo-Pacific plate-subduction tectonic setting. Cretaceous porphyry Mo deposits are formed in a lithospheric thinning setting and are related to the rollback of the Paleo-Pacific subduction plate.

  1. Modification of the Himalayan Orogenic Wedge by Late Cenozoic Southeastward Flow of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; Whipple, K. X.; Kirby, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Shirzaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental plateaus are reservoirs of excess gravitational energy that can influence the late-stage geodynamic evolution of adjacent orogenic wedges. In the central Himalaya (80-88˚E), most late Cenozoic deformation has involved roughly N-S shortening within the Himalayan orogenic wedge. Within this region, all 1976-2014 Mw 5 and larger earthquakes had thrust mechanisms associated with slip along major arc-parallel structures within or at the base of the orogenic wedge. In contrast, the segment of the wedge between 88˚E and 91˚E - including easternmost Nepal, the Sikkim region of India, and Bhutan - is characterized by a complex deformation field that includes thrusting on arc-parallel wedge structures but also transcurrent faulting at high angles to the Himalayan arc. In fact, over the same 1976-2014 period, all but one of the Mw 5 and larger earthquakes in this region had transcurrent fault mechanisms, mostly consistent with dextral strike-slip along NW-striking faults. We refer to this region as the central-eastern Himalayan transition zone. Although direct field evidence of the surface breaks of these faults has not been established, the orientations of nodal planes of large earthquakes, as well as alignments of microearthquake arrays, suggest that they may connect northward to a discontinuous family of arc-parallel faults - most showing evidence for oblique slip, with variable normal and dextral-transcurrent components - which we interpret as the long-term structural manifestation of the boundary between the distinctive modern strain fields of Tibet (E-W extension) and the central Himalaya (N-S shortening). In addition, transverse faults of the central-eastern Himalayan transition zone may project southward, beneath sediments near the Ganges and Bhramaputra confluence, as dextral tear faults linking the active thrust front of the central Himalaya to the active thrust front of the Shillong Plateau in northeastern India. We hypothesize that the broadening of

  2. Flake tectonics in the Sulu orogen in eastern China as revealed by seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peifen; Liu, Futian; Ye, Kai; Wang, Qingchen; Cong, Bolin; Chen, Hui

    2002-05-01

    Seismic tomographic image reveals a crocodile-like P-waves velocity structure beneath the Sulu orogenic belt, which marks the subduction/collision zone between the Sino-Korean block (SK) and Yangtze block (YZ) in eastern China. It may imply that the upper crust of the YZ was detached from its lower crust and thrust over the SK for a maximum of ~400 km in the Sulu region, whereas the remnant of the subducted Yangtze lithosphere was lay beneath the SK. This crustal detached structure (flake tectonics) might have occurred after the Triassic subduction/collision.

  3. Orogenic Float Model: an Explanation for the Dynamics of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monod, B.; Dhont, D.; Hervouet, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Venezuelan (or Merida) Andes are a NE-trending intracontinental orogen that started to rise from the late Miocene due to the E-W far field convergence between the Maracaibo block to the northwest and the Guyana shield to the southeast. Oblique convergence is responsible for strain partitioning with thrusting along both foreland basins and right-lateral strike-slip faulting along the NE-SW Bocono fault cutting the Venezuelan Andes along-strike. The central part of the belt is also cut by the N-S left-lateral strike-slip Valera fault that branches the Bocono fault in the triple junction geometry, favoring the crustal escape of the Trujillo triangular block towards the NE. Onset of strike-slip motion along major faults and their geometry at depth remains a matter of debate. Our work, based on the integration of geologic and geophysical data aims to better constrain both the geometry and the tectonic evolution of the major tectonic structures. We use the orogenic float model (Oldow et al., 1990) as a first hypothesis to construct two NW-SE trans-Andean crustal scale balanced sections. The late Neogene-Quaternary shortening varies from 40 km in the south to 30 km in the north across the Trujillo block, indicating that a quarter of the deformation seems to be absorbed by the tectonic escape process. The cross-sections served also as the basis for the building of a 3-D geologic model of the Venezuelan Andes, permitting to clearly understand the link and geometry of the faults at depth. The decollement level used for the orogenic float model, located at 20 km depth, is crucial for the motion of the Trujillo block. Both the Bocono and Valera faults have listric shapes connecting to the decollement level. The connexion of the two fault surfaces forms a hinge line dipping towards the north in a geometry favoring the escape of the Trujillo block and allowing the gravity forces to play an important role in the process. Oldow J. S., Bally A. W., Ave Lallemant H. G., 1990

  4. Structural development of an Archean Orogen, Western Point Lake, Northwest Territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.

    1991-08-01

    The Point Lake orogen in the central Archean Slave Province of northwestern Canada preserves more than 10 km of structural relief through an eroded antiformal thrust stack and deeper anastomosing midcrustal mylonites. Fault restoration along a 25 km long transect requires a minimum of 69 km slip and 53 km horizontal shortening. In the western part of the orogen the basal decollement places mafic plutonic/volcanic rocks over an ancient tonalitic gneiss complex. Ten kilometers to the east in the Keskarrah Bay area, slices of gneiss unroofed on brittle thrusts shed molasse into several submerged basins. Conglomerates and associated thinly bedded sedimentary rocks are interpreted as channel, levee, and overbank facies of this thrust-related sedimentary fan system. The synorogenic erosion surface at the base of the conglomerate truncates premetamorphic or early metamorphic thrust faults formed during foreland propagation, while other thrusts related to hinterland-progressing imbrication displace this unconformity. Tightening of synorogenic depositional troughs resulted in the conglomerates' present localization in synclines to the west of associated thrust faults and steepening of structural dips. Eastern parts of the orogen consist of isoclinally folded graywackes composed largely of Mutti and Ricci-Lucchi turbidite facies B, C, and D, interpreted as submarine fan deposits eroded from a distant volcanic arc. Thrust faults in the metasedimentary terrane include highly disrupted slate horizons with meter-scale duplex structures, and recrystallized calcmylonites exhibiting sheath folds and boudin trains with very large interboudin distances. The sequence of fabric development and the overall geometry of this metasedimentary terrane strongly resembles younger forearc accretionary prisms. Conditions of deformation along the thrusts parallel the regional metamorphic zonation: amphibolite facies in the basal decollement through greenschist facies shear zones to cataclastic

  5. Carbonatitic metasomatism in orogenic dunites from Lijiatun in the Sulu UHP terrane, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bin; Chen, Yi; Guo, Shun; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Liu, Jing-Bo; Gao, Yi-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Among orogenic peridotites, dunites suffer the weakest crustal metasomatism at the slab-mantle interface and are the best lithology to trace the origins of orogenic peridotites and their initial geodynamic processes. Petrological and geochemical investigations of the Lijiatun dunites from the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terrane indicate a complex petrogenetic history involving melt extraction and multistage metasomatism (carbonatitic melt and slab-derived fluid). The Lijiatun dunites consist mainly of olivine (Fo = 92.0-92.6, Ca = 42-115 ppm), porphyroblastic orthopyroxene (En = 91.8-92.8), Cr-spinel (Cr# = 50.4-73.0, TiO2 < 0.2 wt.%) and serpentine. They are characterized by refractory bulk-rock compositions with high MgO (45.31-47.07 wt.%) and Mg# (91.5-91.9), and low Al2O3 (0.48-0.70 wt.%), CaO (0.25-0.44 wt.%) and TiO2 (< 0.03 wt.%) contents. Whole-rock platinum group elements (PGE) are similar to those of cratonic mantle peridotites and Re-Os isotopic data suggest that dunites formed in the early Proterozoic ( 2.2 Ga). These data indicate that the Lijiatun dunites were the residues of 30% partial melting and were derived from the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the North China craton (NCC). Subsequent carbonatitic metasomatism is characterized by the formation of olivine-rich (Fo = 91.6-92.6, Ca = 233-311 ppm), clinopyroxene-bearing (Mg# = 95.9-96.7, Ti/Eu = 104-838) veins cutting orthopyroxene porphyroblasts. Based on the occurrence of dolomite, mass-balance calculation and thermodynamic modeling, carbonatitic metasomatism had occurred within the shallow SCLM (low-P and high-T conditions) before dunites were incorporated into the continental subduction channel. These dunites then suffered weak metasomatism by slab-derived fluids, forming pargasitic amphibole after pyroxene. This work indicates that modification of the SCLM beneath the eastern margin of the NCC had already taken place before the Triassic continental subduction. Orogenic

  6. Thematic mapping of likely target areas for the occurence of cassiterite in the Serra do Mocambo (GO) granitic massifs using LANDSAT 2 digital imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeidofilho, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The applicability of LANDSAT/MSS images, enhanced by computer derived techniques, as essential tools in mineral research was investigated and the Serra do Mocambo granitic massif was used as illustration. Given the peculiar factors founded in this area, orbital imagery permitted the delineation of potential target areas of mineralization occurrences, associated to albitized/greisenized types. Follow up prospection for primary tin deposits in this granitic massif should be restricted to the delineated areas which are less than 5% of the total superficial area of the massif.

  7. Application of electron spin resonance (ESR) dating to ductile shearing: Examples from the Qinling orogenic belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shenglian; Song, Chuanzhong; Li, Jiahao

    2016-04-01

    Shear zones are common structures in orogenic belts and elucidation of the tectonic evolution of these orogenic belts to a large degree depends on understanding the kinematics and timing of shear deformation. However, there is a lack of an accurate, fast and convenient way to determine the timing of deformation. In this paper, we apply the ESR (electron spin-resonance spectroscopy) dating method to three syntectonic quartz veins from the Funiushan tectonic belt in the Qinling orogenic belt in central China. The results agree well with the available ages of deformation in the area obtained through other dating methods. This demonstrates the accuracy and feasibility of using the ESR method to date quartz crystals formed during deformation. The method is fast and convenient, and satisfies the accuracy requirement. It is an effective means for determining the timing of deformation, especially in areas with intensive fluid activity during deformation.

  8. Mineral compositions of plutonic rocks from the Lewis Hills massif, Bay of Islands ophiolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Susan E.; Elthon, Don

    1988-01-01

    Mineral compositions of residual and cumulate rocks from the Lewis Hills massif of the Bay of Islands ophiolite complex are reported and interpreted in the context of magnetic processes involved in the geochemical evolution of spatially associated diabase dikes. The mineral compositions reflect greater degrees of partial melting than most abyssal peridotites do and appear to represent the most depleted end of abyssal peridotite compositions. Subsolidus equilibration between Cr-Al spinal and olivine generally has occurred at temperatures of 700 to 900 C. The spinel variations agree with the overall fractionation of basaltic magmas producing spinels with progressively lower Cr numbers. The compositions of clinopyroxenes suggest that the fractionation of two different magma series produced the various cumulate rocks.

  9. Crystal structure of hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Lovozero alkaline massif

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.; Lykova, I. S.

    2011-05-15

    Hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Shkatulka hyperagpaitic pegmatite (the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula) was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The triclinic unit-cell parameters are as follows: a = 5.4712(1) Angstrom-Sign , b = 7.1626(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 14.3702(3) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 92.623(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 95.135(1) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 90.440(1) Degree-Sign , sp. gr. P1, R = 3.4%. The Na{sup +} cations and H{sub 2}O molecules are ordered in sites between the packets. The water molecules are hydrogen bonded to the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  10. Chemical dating of zircon from granitic pegmatite of the Shartash Massif (Central Urals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votyakov, S. L.; Pribavkin, S. V.; Zamyatin, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    Using techniques of microprobe analysis and Raman microspectroscopy, a study of the composition, structure, and age of high-uranium zircon from the Sharatash intrusion pegmatite was performed. The presence of a number of zones in crystals having different physicochemical characteristics has been revealed. The Id-e zones affected by a radiation dose of (30-130) × 1018 α-dec/g were completely amorphized, and their chemical isochron age was estimated at 311.4 ± 7.1 Ma: this is interpreted as the time of zircon formation in the pegmatite. The age of uraninite coupled with zircon is 317.1 ± 2.3 Ma. These dating results clarify the formation time of the final phase (pegmatite) of the Shartash intrusion and determine the upper age limit of hydrothermal gold mineralization (Berezovsk deposit) associated with the granite massif.

  11. Application of GIS technologies to monitor secondary radioactive contamination in the Delegen mountain massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipbeki, O.; Kabzhanova, G.; Kurmanova, G.; Alipbekova, Ch.

    2016-06-01

    The territory of the Degelen mountain massif is located within territory of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site and it is an area of ecological disaster. Currently there is a process of secondary radioactive contamination that is caused by geodynamic processes activated at the Degelen array, violation of underground hydrological cycles and as a consequence, water seepage into the tunnels. One of the methods of monitoring of geodynamic processes is the modern technology of geographic information systems (GIS), methods of satellite radar interferometry and high accuracy satellite navigation system in conjunction with radioecological methods. This paper discusses on the creation of a GIS-project for the Degelen array, facilitated by quality geospatial analysis of the situation and simulation of the phenomena, in order to maximize an objective assessment of the radiation situation in this protected area.

  12. Sm-Nd dating of fluorite from the worldclass Montroc fluorite deposit, southern Massif Central, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz, M.; Premo, W.R.; Courjault-Rade, P.

    2005-01-01

    A three-point Sm-Nd isotope isochron on fluorite from the very large Montroc fluorite vein deposit (southern Massif Central, France) defines an age of 111??13 Ma. Initial ??Nd of -8.6 and initial 87Sr/86Sr of ???0.71245 suggest an upper crustal source of the hydrothermal system, in agreement with earlier work on fluid inclusions which indicated a basinal brine origin. The mid-Cretaceous age of ???111 Ma suggests the Albian/Aptian transition as the most likely period for large-scale fluid circulation during a regional extensional tectonic event, related to the opening of the North Atlantic ocean. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  13. Geochemical characteristics of rare earth elements in soil of the Ditru Massif, Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Adriana

    2013-04-01

    The present paper describes the level of rare earth elements in soils developed from Ditrău massif area for evaluating of the background of these elements and accurate assessment of environmental impact. Also this paper contributed to understanding the important role of parent rocks in pedogenic processes. The Ditrău Alkaline Massif represent an intrusion body with a internal zonal structure, which was emplaced into pre-Alpine metamorphic rocks of the Bucovinian nappe complex close the Neogene - Quaternary volcanic arc of the Calimani-Guurghiu- Harghita Mountain chain. The center of massif was formed by nepheline syenite, which is surrounded by syenite and monazonite. North-western and north-eastern marginal sectors are composed of hornblende gabbro/hornblendite, alkali diorite, monzodiorite, monzosyenites and alkali granite. Small discrete ultramafic bodies (kaersutite-bearing peridotite, olivine, pyroxenite and hornblendite) and alkali gabbros occur in the Jolotca area. All this rocks are cut by late-stage dykes with a large variety of composition including tinguaite, phonolite, nepheline syenite, microsyenite, and aplite. The types of soils predominant in this zone are lithosoils. These soils are shallow developed, have low content in organic matter and reflects mineralogical and geochemical composition of the bedrock. The soil samples were collected from 70 location for all type of representative rocks (approximately 10 soil sampling points for each type of rock). The samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The pH values of these samples varied from 3.6 to 7.3, in general, the soils from massif area are acid or weakly acidic. The pH controls the abundance of REE in soil, the concentration of REE increases with decreasing pH values. In soil samples analyzed the contents of REE follow the order: Ce > La > Nd > Pr > Sm > Eu > Gd > Dy > Yb > Er > Tb > Ho >Tm. ∑ REE varied from 52.59 μg g-1 to 579.2 μg g-1 , the average

  14. Spatial coincidence of rapid inferred erosion with young metamorphic massifs in the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, David P.; Montgomery, David R.; Hallet, Bernard

    2002-03-01

    A spatially distributed rate-of-erosion index (EI) based on models of bedrock river incision documents a strong spatial correspondence between areas of high erosion potential and young metamorphic massifs as well as structural highs throughout the Himalayas. The EI is derived from slopes and drainage areas calculated from a hydrologically corrected digital elevation model (GTOPO30) combined with precipitation data (IIASA) to generate synthetic annual stream discharges. These variables drive three generalized process models to produce EI maps that, while differing in detail, provide an internally consistent, spatially continuous index of large-scale erosion rates. The large spatial variation in potential erosion rates in the Himalayas suggested by the EI patterns contrasts with the uniform convergence of the Indian subcontinent. If these EI gradients persist through time, they support the emerging view of a positive feedback between localized, rapid erosion and upward advection of lower crust.

  15. Physical-Chemical Factors Affecting the Low Quality of Natural Water in the Khibiny Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Maksimova, Viktoriia; Belkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    One peculiarity of the Khibiny Massif is its spatial location. Rising over 1000 m above the surrounding hilly land and thus obstructing the passage of air masses, it promotes condensation and accumulation of surface and underground water. Annual precipitation here amounts to 600-700 mm in the valleys and up to 1600 mm on mountainous plateaus. Using this water for drinking and household purposes is problematic due to excess Al and F concentrations and high pH values. Now it is known that in its profile, the Massif is represented by three hydrogeological subzones: the upper (aerated), medium and lower ones. The upper subzone spreads throughout the Massif and is affected by the local drainage network and climatic conditions. The medium subzone is permanently saturated with underground water flowing horizontally to sites of discharge at the level of local river valleys and lakes. The fissure-vein water in the lower subzone is confined to tectonic fractures and faults in the so far underexplored, deeper parts of the Massif. Being abundant, this water ascends under high pressure. At places, water has been observed spurting from as deep as 700 m, and even 960 m. In the latter case, the temperature of ascending water was higher than 18 centigrade (Hydrogeology of the USSR, V. 27, 1971). This work was undertaken to reveal the nature of the low quality of water in the Khibiny by using physical-chemical modeling (software package Selector, Chudnenko, 2010). Processes of surface and underground water formation in the Khibiny were examined within a physical-chemical model (PCM) of the "water-rock-atmosphere-hydrogen" system. In a multi-vessel model used, each vessel represented a geochemical level of the process interpreted as spatiotemporal data - ξ (Karpov, 1981). The flow reactor consisted of 4 tanks. In the first tank, water of the Kuniok River (1000 L) interacted with atmosphere and an organic substance. The resulting solution proceeded to tanks 2-4 containing with

  16. Oxidation state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Massif Central,France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenver-Thiele, L.; Woodland, A. B.; Downes, H.; Altherr, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Tertiary and Quaternary volcanism of the French Massif Central sampled the underlying subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) in the form of xenoliths over a wide geographic area of ~20.000km2. Such an extensive distribution of xenoliths provides an unique opportunity to investigate regional variations in mantle structure and composition. On the basis of textural and geochemical differences, Lenoir et al. (2000) and later Downes et al. (2003) identified two distinct domains in the SCLM lying north and south of latitude 45° 30' N, respectively. The northern domain is relatively refractory, but has experienced pervasive enrichment of LREE. The southern domain is generally more fertile, exhibiting depletion in LREE. A metasomatic overprint has developed to variable extents in many xenolith suites. The different histories of these two juxtaposed blocks of SCLM should also be reflected in their oxidation state, with local variations also to be expected due to metasomatic interactions. For example, if carbonate-melt metasomatism played a role in the LREE enrichment of the northern domain (Lenoir et al. 2000; Downes et al. 2003), then such mantle should be relatively oxidised. Since surprisingly little redox data are currently available, we are undertaking a study to determine the oxidation state of the SCLM beneath the Massif Central over the largest geographical area possible. All xenoliths investigated are spinel peridotites, mostly with protogranular textures (although some samples are porphyroclastic or equigranular). Most samples are nominally anhydrous although minor amphibole is present in some xenolith suites. Major element compositions of the individual minerals were determined by microprobe. Two-pyroxene temperatures (BKN) range from 750° to ~1200° C. Ferric iron contents of spinel were determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy and gave a range of Fe3+/ Fetot from 0.191 to 0.418, with a conservative uncertainty of ±0.02. These data were used to calculate

  17. Isotopic geochronology and biostratigraphy of Riphean deposits of the Anabar Massif, North Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, T. S.; Semikhatov, M. A.; Gorokhov, I. M.; Sergeev, V. N.; Kuznetsov, A. B.; Ivanovskaya, T. A.; Melnikov, N. N.; Konstantinova, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    The structure of Riphean deposits developed on the western slope of the Anabar Massif is described with analysis of their depositional environments, distribution of stromatolite assemblages and organic-walled and silicified microfossils through sections, and evolution of views on stratigraphic significance of some of these assemblages. The investigation included complex mineralogical, geochemical, structural, and isotopic‒geochronological study of globular phyllosilicates (GPS) of the glauconite‒illite series from paleontologically well substantiated Riphean sequences (Ust'-Il'ya and Yusmastakh formations of the Billyakh Group) of the Anabar Massif in the Kotuikan River basin. Isotopic dating of monomineral size and density fractions of GPS from the Billyakh Group was performed in combination with simulation of the distribution of octahedral cations and comparison of the results obtained with Mössbauer spectrometry data. The applied approach is based on an assumption that the formation and transformation of Rb‒Sr and K‒Ar systems in GPS are synchronous with stages in their structural evolution, which are determined by the geological and geochemical processes during depositional history. Such an approach combined with the mineralogical and structural analysis contributes to correct interpretation of stratigraphic significance of isotopic data. The results obtained provide grounds for the conclusion that isotopic dates of GPS from the Ust'-Il'ya (Rb‒Sr, 1485 ± 13 Ma; K‒Ar, 1459 ± 20 Ma) and Yusmastakh (Rb‒Sr, 1401 ± 10 Ma; K‒Ar, 1417 ± 44 Ma) formations mark the stage of early diagenesis of sediments and are suitable for estimating the age of formations in question.

  18. Fluid Evolution in the Nepheline Syenites of the Ditrau Alkaline Massif, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, A.; Bodnar, R. J.; Szabo, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Ditrau Alkaline Massif (Romania) is situated in the central part of the Eastern Carpathians, as an intrusion in the Bukovina nappe system of the Mesozoic crystalline zone. Nepheline syenites are the most abundant rocks occurring in the central and eastern part of the Massif, and representing the youngest intrusion of the complex. The nepheline syenite is composed of perthitic feldspars, nepheline, biotite, amphibole, pyroxene and titanite as primary minerals, and sodalite, cancrinite, calcite, analcite as secondary minerals formed at the expense of nepheline. Petrographic observations and fluid inclusion studies were performed on nepheline syenites in order to examine the effect of residual magmatic fluids on the alteration of nepheline to secondary minerals listed above. The alteration of nepheline to secondary minerals is obvious from textural relationships and comparison of the compositions of the minerals. Fluid inclusion studies provide evidence for the role of highly saline fluids in the incongruent transformation reactions (nepheline to sodalite and/or cancrinite and/or analcite). The fluids, in most cases, can be modeled by the H2O-NaCl system with various NaCl contents; however inclusions with more complex fluid (containing also K, Ca, CO3, etc. besides H2O and NaCl) composition are abundant in the nepheline. The alteration process is supported by the presence of fluid inclusions in cancrinite, showing lower salinity compared to those in nepheline. During the crystallization period of the nepheline syenites the rock was in equilibrium with a salty solution whose salinity increased with time, mostly by the loss of H2O to produce H2O-bearing minerals like amphiboles and micas. One possible interpretation of the fluid inclusions and textural observations is that nepheline alteration to sodalite, cancrinite and analcite was associated with increasing salinity of the fluids with time.

  19. Fluid evolution in the nepheline syenites of the Ditrău Alkaline Massif, Transylvania, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, András; Bodnar, Robert J.; Szabó, Csaba; Pál-Molnár, Elemér

    2007-05-01

    The Ditrău Alkaline Massif is an intrusion into the Bucovina nappe system that is part of the Mesozoic crystalline zone located in Transylvania, Romania, in the Eastern Carpathians. Nepheline syenites are the most abundant rocks in the central and eastern part of the Massif, and represent the last major intrusion of the complex. Fluid inclusions in nepheline, aegirine and albite were trapped at magmatic conditions on or below the H 2O-saturated nepheline syenite solidus at about 400-600 °C and 2.5-5 kbars. Early nepheline, and to a lesser extent albite, were altered by highly saline fluids to produce cancrinite, sodalite and analcime, during this process cancrinite also trapped fluid inclusions. The fluids, in most cases, can be modeled by the H 2O-NaCl system with varying salinity; however inclusions with more complex fluid composition (containing K, Ca, CO 3, etc., in addition to NaCl) are common. Raman spectroscopic analyses of daughter minerals confirm the presence of alkali-carbonate fluids in some of the earliest inclusions in nepheline, aegirine and albite. During crystallization, the melts exsolved a high salinity, carbonate-rich magmatic fluid that evolved to lower salinity as crystallization progressed. Phases that occur early in the paragenesis contain high-salinity inclusions while late phases contain low-salinity inclusions. The salinity trend is consistent with experimental data for the partitioning of chlorine between silicic melt and exsolved aqueous fluid at about 2.0 kbars. The activity of water ( aH 2O ) in the melt increases during crystallization, resulting in the formation of hydrous phases during late-stage crystallization of the nepheline syenites.

  20. Origin of mafic and ultramafic cumulates from the Ditrău Alkaline Massif, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál-Molnár, Elemér; Batki, Anikó; Almási, Enikő; Kiss, Balázs; Upton, Brian G. J.; Markl, Gregor; Odling, Nicholas; Harangi, Szabolcs

    2015-12-01

    Mafic-ultramafic cumulates enclosed in gabbroic-dioritic rocks form part of the Mesozoic Ditrău Alkaline Massif in the Eastern Carpathians, Romania. The poikilitic olivine- and pyroxene-rich and nearly mono mineralic hornblendite rocks display typical cumulate textures with early crystallised olivine (Fo75-73), diopside and augite. In the early stages of their genesis the amphibole was intercumulus whilst in later stages it acquired cumulus status as the fractionating magma evolved. Using major and trace element compositions of minerals and whole-rock samples the origin of these cumulates is determined and the parental magma composition and depth of emplacement are calculated. Cumulus clinopyroxene has more primitive composition than intercumulus amphibole suggesting closed system fractionation for the evolution of poikilitic olivine- and pyroxene-rich cumulates. The evolution of the amphibole-rich mesocumulates is more clearly the result of closed system crystallisation dominated by the precipitation of clinopyroxene and amphibole cumulus crystals. Lamprophyre dykes of the Ditrău Alkaline Massif are proposed to reflect multiple basanitic parental magma batches from which the cumulus olivine and clinopyroxene crystallised. Relative to these dykes the calculated equilibrium melts for intercumulus amphibole in the cumulates was more primitive whilst that for the cumulus amphibole was more evolved. The calculated crystallisation temperature and pressure of ~ 1000-1050 °C and ~ 0.7 GPa, based on the composition of the amphiboles, indicate crystallisation at lower crustal depths. Rare earth element compositions are consistent with an intra-plate tectonic setting.

  1. Investigating K-feldspar Luminescence Thermochronometry for Application in the Mont Blanc Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, R.; King, G. E.; Herman, F.; Valla, P.

    2015-12-01

    Luminescence dating has the potential to quantify the recent exhumation history of mountain ranges as a low-temperature thermochronometer. During rock exhumation, electrons get trapped through exposure to ionizing radiation whilst elevated temperatures cause thermally stimulated detrapping. The resulting luminescence signals measured in the laboratory can be used to constrain rock thermal histories through modelling of the kinetic parameters of electron trapping and detrapping. Here, we investigate and model laboratory kinetic processes of the luminescence of K-feldspar and assess their extrapolation over geological timescales. Samples were taken from the actively eroding Mont Blanc massif in the European Alps, along a 12 km long tunnel with ambient temperatures of 10-35 °C. In this setting rapid exhumation rates have been found during the last 2 million years (up to ~2 km/Myr), however, we intend to increase the temporal resolution to sub-Quaternary timescales using luminescence thermochronometry. Infra-red stimulated luminescence signals at 50 °C (IR50) and at 225 °C (post-IR IRSL225) of K-feldspar extracted from Mont Blanc tunnel samples were measured and our first results reveal a thermal signature from which rock cooling rates can be derived. Isothermal decay experiments show non-exponential decay, but interestingly, experiments with a range of regenerative doses reveal first-order kinetics. The observed thermal decay pattern is well-described by a model based on a physically plausible distribution of the density of states. Ultimately, we intend to use the IR50 and post-IR IRSL225 signals of K-feldspar as dual thermochronometers to determine the late-Quaternary cooling history of the Mont Blanc massif. Moreover, the luminescence signals may give insights into local thermal field evolution, before the influence of postglacial hydrothermal flow.

  2. Homogeneous /sup 18/O enrichment of the Marcy Anorthosite Massif, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.; Valley, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Marcy Anorthosite Massif in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, is a composite intrusion that was metamorphosed to granulite facies at approx. 1.1 Ga. The massif is dominantly anorthosite but ranges from anorthosite (1-10% mafics) to oxide-rich pyroxenite layers (up to 98% mafics). In the St Regis Quad (SRQ) systematic variations in the percentage of mafics (POM) roughly parallel the foliation and increase toward the contacts (Davis, 1971). In 47 SRQ samples studied the POM varies from 2-25%; garnet ranges from 0-11%, pyroxene from <1-16% and oxides from <1-8%. Percent phenocrysts varies between 1-80. The Port Kent-Westport Unit (PKW) and an associated hybrid unit show significantly greater textural variability. The POM Varies from 1-50%; garnet ranges from 0-18%, pyroxene from 0-15%, oxides from 0-3% and phenocrysts vary from 0-80%. A total of 28 unaltered plagioclase phenocrysts have been analyzed for delta/sup 18/O: in 13 SRQ samples delta/sup 18/O = 9.0-9.8 (x=9.4. sigma=0.2) and in 15 samples from the PKW and hybrid units values of delta/sup 18/O=8.5-10.5 (x=9.5.sigma0.5). No correlations exist between the modal parameters and delta/sup 18/O. The results from SRQ demonstrate an extreme homogeneity suggesting for the first time a pristine magmatic character which is supported by the virtual absence of metasedimentary inclusions. This contrasts with PKW where inclusions are common and delta/sup 18/O values are more heterogeneous. Further analyses will evaluate the possibility of an anomalous source region as a cause of the /sup 18/O enrichment in the anorthosite.

  3. Proterozoic massif anorthosites and related rocks in Labrador: the anorthosite-charnockite connection

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Massif anorthosites of Labrador are closely associated in space and time with voluminous, felsic, fayalite- and ferrous pyroxene-bearing igneous rocks. These include charnockites, monzonites, biotite-hornblende granites, and locally syenites. Igneous charnockites form major parts of some of the granitic complexes. In Mistastin batholith for example, charnockitic assemblages comprise about 35% of a total area of 6500 sq. km. Feldspar pairs and coexisting fayalite-opx-qtz in these rocks indicate P and T near 3.5 kb, 750/sup 0/C, assumed to represent near solidus equilibration. Diorites and monzonites intruded by charnockite have mesoperthites implying crystallization T>900/sup 0/C presumably recording earlier stages of crystallization. Oxide and silicate assemblages indicate redox conditions between FMQ and WM oxygen buffers and water pressures well below Ptotal. Younger biotite-hornblende granites and quartz syenites lack Ti-mt. but retain fayalite suggesting that magmatic crystallization was largely closed to water and oxygen. Initial Sr isotope ratios in charnockite-granite suites of central labrador support derivation of the magmas largely or entirely from crustal source rocks. Compositions of mafic silicates and plagioclase, associated Fe-Ti oxide concentrations, trace elements and Sr isotopes in massif anorthosites are in accord with the rocks being crystallization products of substantially fractionated, originally more mafic, mantle magmas. Close association of high temperature, water-poor, reduced crustal melts is consistent with a fusion process in which heat supply and oxygen buffering were controlled by fractional crystallization of a substantial body of mafic magma subjacent to continental crust.

  4. Cancrinite from nepheline syenite (mariupolite) of the Oktiabrski massif, SE Ukraine, and its growth history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Pieczka, Adam; Heflik, Wiesław; Sikorska, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Secondary cancrinite, (Na5.88K< 0.01)∑ 5.88(Ca0.62 Fe0.01Mn0.01Zn< 0.01 Mg< 0.01)∑ 0.64[Si6.44Al 5.56O24](CO3)0.67(OH)0.26(F< 0.01,Cl< 0.01)·2.04H2O), was found as accessory component of mariupolite (albite-aegirine nepheline syenite) from the Oktiabrski massif in the Donbass (SE Ukraine). It probably crystallized from a subsolidus reaction involving nepheline (and sodalite?) and calcite dissolved in the aqueous-carbonic fluid at the maximum temperature of 930 °C, decreasing to hydrothermal conditions. It is depleted in sodium, calcium and carbon, what results in the occurrence of vacant positions at both cationic and anionic sites. Ca-deficient cancrinite crystallized from the same hydrothermal Si-undersaturated fluids enriched in the ions such as Na+, Ca2 +, Cl-, F-, HCO3-, which formed calcite, sodalite, natrolite and fluorite. It has dark-red CL colours with patchy zoning, what indicates the variable/diverse fluid composition during its formation. In the CL spectrum of cancrinite only one broad emission band at 410 nm is observed, which can be attributed to O* center (the recombination of a free electron with an O- hole center). The formation of secondary CO3-rich species, i.e. cancrinite and calcite in mariupolite suggests that redox conditions in the Oktiabrski massif were oxidizing at the postmagmatic stage.

  5. Cancrinite from nepheline syenite (mariupolite) of the Oktiabrski massif, SE Ukraine, and its growth history.

    PubMed

    Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Pieczka, Adam; Heflik, Wiesław; Sikorska, Magdalena

    2016-03-15

    Secondary cancrinite, (Na5.88K<0.01)∑5.88(Ca0.62 Fe0.01Mn0.01Zn<0.01 Mg<0.01)∑0.64[Si6.44Al 5.56O24](CO3)0.67(OH)0.26(F<0.01,Cl<0.01)·2.04H2O), was found as accessory component of mariupolite (albite-aegirine nepheline syenite) from the Oktiabrski massif in the Donbass (SE Ukraine). It probably crystallized from a subsolidus reaction involving nepheline (and sodalite?) and calcite dissolved in the aqueous-carbonic fluid at the maximum temperature of 930 °C, decreasing to hydrothermal conditions. It is depleted in sodium, calcium and carbon, what results in the occurrence of vacant positions at both cationic and anionic sites. Ca-deficient cancrinite crystallized from the same hydrothermal Si-undersaturated fluids enriched in the ions such as Na(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), F(-), HCO3(-), which formed calcite, sodalite, natrolite and fluorite. It has dark-red CL colours with patchy zoning, what indicates the variable/diverse fluid composition during its formation. In the CL spectrum of cancrinite only one broad emission band at 410 nm is observed, which can be attributed to O* center (the recombination of a free electron with an O(-) hole center). The formation of secondary CO3-rich species, i.e. cancrinite and calcite in mariupolite suggests that redox conditions in the Oktiabrski massif were oxidizing at the postmagmatic stage.

  6. A lichenometric growth curve in the French Alps: Ailefroide and Veneon valleys; Massif des Ecrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, P.; Jomelli, V.; Baumgart-Kotarba, M.; Bravard, J. P.; Chardon, M.; Jacob, N.; Kedzia, S.; Kotarba, A.; Raczkowska, Z.; Tsao, C.

    2003-11-01

    Today there is only one lichenometric curve in the French Alps for the Haute Ubaye valley. This study presents a growth curve constructed for Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon of the Ailefroide and Veneon valleys, which are located in the Massif des Ecrins. In order to establish this curve, we used the modal values from tests carried out on the five largest lichens, the mean values of the five largest lichens and each single biggest lichen. The last two methods have been rejected for statistical and theoretical reasons. The 27 dated points on which the curve is based have a shared and homogeneous set-up on the period corresponding to the last 150 years. Fourteen points come from man-made structures and 13 from moraines. According to our results, two separate curves have been drawn corresponding to two climatic mountainous ranges: a low lichen factor (20.7 mm/100 years) for forest ranges and a mean lichen factor (28.47 mm/100 years) for alpine belts (above 2000 m a.s.l.). The differences in lichen growth rates are caused by methodological and environmental differences. In comparison with the two existing curves near the Massif des Ecrins, one in the Haute Ubaye and the other in the Val d'Aosta (Italian Alps), our lichen factors are very low. This may be due to the fine-grained texture of the local granites, low solar radiation and dry conditions during the summer. This variation in the lichen factor confirms the need to establish growth curves for each specific geographic and altitudinal range.

  7. A crustal model of the ultrahigh-pressure Dabie Shan orogenic belt, China, derived from deep seismic refraction profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Zeng, Rong-Sheng; Mooney, W.D.; Hacker, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new crustal cross section through the east-west trending ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) Dabie Shan orogenic belt, east central China, based on a 400-km-long seismic refraction profile. Data from our profile reveal that the cratonal blocks north and south of the orogen are composed of 35-km-thick crust consisting of three layers (upper, middle, and lower crust) with average seismic velocities of 6.0±0.2 km/s, 6.5±0.1 km/s, and 6.8±0.1 km/s. The crust reaches a maximum thickness of 41.5 km beneath the northern margin of the orogen, and thus the present-day root beneath the orogen is only 6.5 km thick. The upper mantle velocity is 8.0±0.1 km/s. Modeling of shear wave data indicate that Poisson's ratio increases from 0.24±0.02 in the upper crust to 0.27±0.03 in the lower crust. This result is consistent with a dominantly felsic upper crustal composition and a mafic lower crustal composition within the amphibolite or granulite metamorphic facies. Our seismic model indicates that eclogite, which is abundant in surface exposures within the orogen, is not a volumetrically significant component in the middle or lower crust. Much of the Triassic structure associated with the formation of the UHP rocks of the Dabie Shan has been obscured by post-Triassic igneous activity, extension and large-offset strike-slip faulting. Nevertheless, we can identify a high-velocity (6.3 km/s) zone in the upper (<5 km depth) crustal core of the orogen which we interpret as a zone of ultrahigh-pressure rocks, a north dipping suture, and an apparent Moho offset that marks a likely active strike-slip fault.

  8. Nouvelles données sur l'évolution géodynamique du secteur méridional de l'Arc Calabro-Péloritain (Italie)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonardi, Glauco; de Capoa, Paola; Di Staso, Angelida; Martín-Martín, Manuél; Martín-Rojas, Iván; Perrone, Vincenzo; Tent-Manclús, José Enrique

    New studies have been carried out on the Tertiary of the Stilo Unit, the uppermost of the Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern sector, and the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation, sealing the whole nappe stack. The Tertiary terrains linked to the Mesozoic cover of the Stilo Unit consist of the lowermost Oligocene Palizzi Formation and the Late Rupelian-Aquitanian Pignolo Formation. The possibility that they deposited before the emplacement of this unit as the highest tectonic sheet of the sector is suggested. The base of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation resulted of Burdigalian age in both type areas. This interpretation, together with the existing and new data, allows proposing an age close to the Aquitanian-Burdigalian boundary for the stacking of the whole Calabria-Peloritani Arc southern sector. To cite this article: G. Bonardi et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 423-430.

  9. Devonian sedimentation in the Xiqingshan Mountains: Implications for paleogeographic reconstructions of the SW Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Fu, Changlei; Guo, Xianqing; Xia, Wenjing; Niu, Manlan

    2016-08-01

    The Qinling Orogen between the North China and Yangtze plates comprises various accreted and collisional terranes, recording the evolution of the Proto-Tethyan Ocean and the formation of east Asia. Knowledge of the provenance and tectonic setting of a thick succession of E-W striking Devonian sedimentary rocks sandwiched tectonically between the Shangdan and Mianlue ophiolitic suture zones in this belt is essential to understanding the evolution of the Qinling Orogen and the assembly of the North China and Yangtze plates during the Late Paleozoic. Systematic studies of the Devonian sedimentary facies in the Xiqingshan Mountains indicate the northern margin of the South Qinling belt was uplifted prior to the Early Devonian. Lower Devonian sandstones are dominated by feldspathic litharenite (Q12-31F18-37L40-65), indicative of a continental arc derivation. Detrital zircon U-Pb data demonstrate that the Lower and Middle Devonian sandstones were derived respectively from ca. 770 Ma and ca. 400 Ma felsic arc-related magmatic sources. Devonian sedimentation in the Xiqingshan Mountains is interpreted to have occurred in a foreland basin between the Yangtze plate and the North Qinling continental arc.

  10. Ediacaran 2,500-km-long synchronous deep continental subduction in the West Gondwana Orogen.

    PubMed

    Ganade de Araujo, Carlos E; Rubatto, Daniela; Hermann, Joerg; Cordani, Umberto G; Caby, Renaud; Basei, Miguel A S

    2014-10-16

    The deeply eroded West Gondwana Orogen is a major continental collision zone that exposes numerous occurrences of deeply subducted rocks, such as eclogites. The position of these eclogites marks the suture zone between colliding cratons, and the age of metamorphism constrains the transition from subduction-dominated tectonics to continental collision and mountain building. Here we investigate the metamorphic conditions and age of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites from Mali, Togo and NE-Brazil and demonstrate that continental subduction occurred within 20 million years over at least a 2,500-km-long section of the orogen during the Ediacaran. We consider this to be the earliest evidence of large-scale deep-continental subduction and consequent appearance of Himalayan-scale mountains in the geological record. The rise and subsequent erosion of such mountains in the Late Ediacaran is perfectly timed to deliver sediments and nutrients that are thought to have been necessary for the subsequent evolution of sustainable life on Earth.

  11. Shallow, old, and hydrologically insignificant fault zones in the Appalachian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgrange, Juliette; Gleeson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The permeability of fault zones impacts diverse geological processes such as hydrocarbon migration, hydrothermal fluid circulation, and regional groundwater flow, yet how fault zones affect groundwater flow at a regional scale (1-10 km) is highly uncertain. The objective of this work is to determine whether faults affect regional patterns of groundwater flow, by using radioactive radon and chloride to quantify groundwater discharge to lakes underlain by faults and not underlain by faults. We sampled lakes overlying the Paleozoic Appalachian fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Townships in Québec, and compared our results to a previous study in a crystalline watershed in the Canadian Shield. The field data was analyzed with an analytical geochemical mixing model. The uncertainties of model parameters were assessed in a sensitivity analysis using Monte Carlo simulation, and the difference between lakes tested with statistical analysis. While the model results indicate non-negligible groundwater discharge for most of the lakes in the Paleozoic orogen, the difference between the groundwater discharge rate into the lakes located on faults and the other lakes is not statistically significant. However, the groundwater discharge rate to lakes in the Paleozoic orogeny is significantly higher than lakes that overlay crystalline bedrock, which is consistent with independent estimates of permeability. The rate of groundwater discharge is not significantly enhanced or diminished around the thrust fault zones, suggesting that in a regional scale, permeability of fault zones is not significantly different from the bedrock permeability at shallow depth in this old, tectonically- inactive orogen.

  12. Origin of unusual HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the Qinling orogen, China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenlei; Xu, Cheng; Smith, Martin P.; Kynicky, Jindrich; Huang, Kangjun; Wei, Chunwan; Zhou, Li; Shu, Qihai

    2016-01-01

    Carbonatites, usually occurring within intra-continental rift-related settings, have strong light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment; they rarely contain economic heavy REE (HREE). Here, we report the identification of Late Triassic HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the northernmost Qinling orogen. The rocks contain abundant primary HREE minerals and molybdenite. Calcite-hosted fluid inclusions, inferred to represent a magmatic-derived aqueous fluid phase, contain significant concentrations of Mo (~17 ppm), reinforcing the inference that these carbonatitic magmas had high Mo concentrations. By contrast, Late Triassic carbonatites in southernmost Qinling have economic LREE concentrations, but are depleted in HREE and Mo. Both of these carbonatite types have low δ26Mg values (−1.89 to −1.07‰), similar to sedimentary carbonates, suggesting a recycled sediment contribution for REE enrichment in their mantle sources. We propose that the carbonatites in the Qinling orogen were formed, at least in part, by the melting of a subducted carbonate-bearing slab, and that 10 Ma younger carbonatite magmas in the northernmost Qinling metasomatized the thickened eclogitic lower crust to produce high levels of HREE and Mo. PMID:27857170

  13. Origin of unusual HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the Qinling orogen, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenlei; Xu, Cheng; Smith, Martin P.; Kynicky, Jindrich; Huang, Kangjun; Wei, Chunwan; Zhou, Li; Shu, Qihai

    2016-11-01

    Carbonatites, usually occurring within intra-continental rift-related settings, have strong light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment; they rarely contain economic heavy REE (HREE). Here, we report the identification of Late Triassic HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the northernmost Qinling orogen. The rocks contain abundant primary HREE minerals and molybdenite. Calcite-hosted fluid inclusions, inferred to represent a magmatic-derived aqueous fluid phase, contain significant concentrations of Mo (~17 ppm), reinforcing the inference that these carbonatitic magmas had high Mo concentrations. By contrast, Late Triassic carbonatites in southernmost Qinling have economic LREE concentrations, but are depleted in HREE and Mo. Both of these carbonatite types have low δ26Mg values (‑1.89 to ‑1.07‰), similar to sedimentary carbonates, suggesting a recycled sediment contribution for REE enrichment in their mantle sources. We propose that the carbonatites in the Qinling orogen were formed, at least in part, by the melting of a subducted carbonate-bearing slab, and that 10 Ma younger carbonatite magmas in the northernmost Qinling metasomatized the thickened eclogitic lower crust to produce high levels of HREE and Mo.

  14. Sequential kinetic modelling: A new tool decodes pulsed tectonic patterns in early hot orogens of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Santanu Kumar; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2017-02-01

    Tectonic styles in an early hot Earth were different from the present-day situation governed by plate tectonics. Processes in such hot settings remain poorly understood because they often occur on timescales that are below the resolution of conventional isotopic clocks, the rock records are fragmentary, and these have been superposed by later high-temperature events. We have developed a tool based on diffusion kinetics to overcome these difficulties and reconstruct sequences of short-lived episodes. Application of the method to a rock from the ultra-hot c.1.6 Ga orogenic domain of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone, where additional data are available to verify the results, shows that pulses of approach and roll-back of colliding plates preceded the final closure and collision. We demonstrate that cooling from ultra-high temperature metamorphic conditions in the orogen took place in multiple pulses that occurred with a periodicity of about 10 Myr at rates that vary between 100's to 10's °C/Myr, and burial-/exhumation-rates that vary between 30 and 2 km/Myr, respectively. Such details of tectonic processes in the Precambrian, with quantification of variable heating-, cooling-, burial-, and exhumation-rates of individual stages, have not been accessible until now. Application of this method to other regions would provide a means of exploring the thermal viability of the inferred long durations (>100 Myr) for some ultra-high temperature orogenies.

  15. Origin of unusual HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the Qinling orogen, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlei; Xu, Cheng; Smith, Martin P; Kynicky, Jindrich; Huang, Kangjun; Wei, Chunwan; Zhou, Li; Shu, Qihai

    2016-11-18

    Carbonatites, usually occurring within intra-continental rift-related settings, have strong light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment; they rarely contain economic heavy REE (HREE). Here, we report the identification of Late Triassic HREE-Mo-rich carbonatites in the northernmost Qinling orogen. The rocks contain abundant primary HREE minerals and molybdenite. Calcite-hosted fluid inclusions, inferred to represent a magmatic-derived aqueous fluid phase, contain significant concentrations of Mo (~17 ppm), reinforcing the inference that these carbonatitic magmas had high Mo concentrations. By contrast, Late Triassic carbonatites in southernmost Qinling have economic LREE concentrations, but are depleted in HREE and Mo. Both of these carbonatite types have low δ(26)Mg values (-1.89 to -1.07‰), similar to sedimentary carbonates, suggesting a recycled sediment contribution for REE enrichment in their mantle sources. We propose that the carbonatites in the Qinling orogen were formed, at least in part, by the melting of a subducted carbonate-bearing slab, and that 10 Ma younger carbonatite magmas in the northernmost Qinling metasomatized the thickened eclogitic lower crust to produce high levels of HREE and Mo.

  16. Crustal structure of the alaska range orogen and denali fault along the richardson highway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Pellerin, L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of geophysical data obtained along the Richardson Highway crosses the eastern Alaska Range and Denali fault and reveals the crustal structure of the orogen. Strong seismic reflections from within the orogen north of the Denali fault dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal what is probably a shear zone that transects most of the crust and is part of a crustal-scale duplex structure that probably formed during the Late Cretaceous. These structures, however, appear to be relict because over the past 20 years, they have produced little or no seismicity despite the nearby Mw = 7.9 Denali fault earthquake that struck in 2002. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but we interpret modeled magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data to propose that the fault dips steeply to vertically. Modeling of MT data shows that aftershocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake occurred above a rock body that has low electrical resistivity (>10 ohm-m), which might signify the presence of fluids in the middle and lower crust. Copyright ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  17. Cenozoic landforms and post-orogenic landscape evolution of the Balkanide orogen: Evidence for alternatives to the tectonic denudation narrative in southern Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnell, Y.; Calvet, M.; Meyer, B.; Pinna-Jamme, R.; Bour, I.; Gautheron, C.; Carter, A.; Dimitrov, D.

    2017-01-01

    Continental denudation is the mass transfer of rock from source areas to sedimentary depocentres, and is typically the result of Earth surface processes. However, a process known as tectonic denudation is also understood to expose deep-seated rocks in short periods of geological time by displacing large masses of continental crust along shallow-angle faults, and without requiring major contributions from surface erosion. Some parts of the world, such as the Basin and Range in the USA or the Aegean province in Europe, have been showcased for their Cenozoic tectonic denudation features, commonly described as metamorphic core-complexes or as supradetachment faults. Based on 22 new apatite fission-track (AFT) and 21 helium (AHe) cooling ages among rock samples collected widely from plateau summits and their adjacent valley floors, and elaborating on inconsistencies between the regional stratigraphic, topographic and denudational records, this study frames a revised perspective on the prevailing tectonic denudation narrative for southern Bulgaria. We conclude that conspicuous landforms in this region, such as erosion surfaces on basement-cored mountain ranges, are not primarily the result of Paleogene to Neogene core-complex formation. They result instead from "ordinary" erosion-driven, subaerial denudation. Rock cooling, each time suggesting at least 2 km of crustal denudation, has exposed shallow Paleogene granitic plutons and documents a 3-stage wave of erosional denudation which progressed from north to south during the Middle Eocene, Oligocene, Early to Middle Miocene, and Late Miocene. Denudation initially prevailed during the Paleogene under a syn-orogenic compressional regime involving piggyback extensional basins (Phase 1), but subsequently migrated southward in response to post-orogenic upper-plate extension driven by trench rollback of the Hellenic subduction slab (Phase 2). Rare insight given by the denudation pattern indicates that trench rollback

  18. Volcanic evolution of the submarine super volcano, Tamu Massif of Shatsky Rise: New insights from Formation MicroScanner logging imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Iturrino, Gerardo; Evans, Helen F.

    2015-01-01

    Massif, the southernmost plateau of Shatsky Rise, is recently reported as the largest single volcano known on Earth. This work seeks to understand the type of volcanism necessary to form such an anomalously large single volcano by integrating core and high-resolution wireline logging data. In particular, resistivity imagery obtained by the Formation MicroScanner, in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole U1347A, located on the eastern flank of Tamu Massif, was used to construct a logging-based volcanostratigraphy. This model revealed two different volcanic stages formed Tamu Massif: (i) the core part of the massif's basaltic basement was formed by a "construction phase" of volcanism with cyclic eruption events from a steady state magma supply and (ii) the very topmost basaltic section was formed by a "depositional phase" of volcanism during which long-traveling lava flows were deposited from a distant eruption center.

  19. An Early Neoproterozoic gabbro-granite association in the Bureya Continental Massif (Central Asian fold belt): First geochemical and geochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Ovchinnikov, R. O.; Kudryashov, N. M.; Sorokina, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The fact that gneissose granites and gabbros of the Nyatygran Complex in the Bureya Continental Massif are not Palaeoproterozoic in age, as previously thought, but Neoproterozoic, 933 Ma is proved. New data with the first direct evidence of Early Neoproterozoic magmatism in continental massifs composing the Bureya-Jiamusi Superterrane are given. At the moment, the obtained age estimates are the oldest for the magmatic rocks of this superterrane.

  20. Petrological Characterization of the Triassic Paleosurface in the Northern Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Kouakou; Thiry, Medard; Szuszkiewicz, Adam; Turniak, Krzysztof

    2010-05-01

    ‘Albitization' is a widespread alteration process affecting sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks. Albitized facies usually show a pinkish to red colour, depending on the degree of alteration. The main mineralogical process of this phenomenon is the pseudomorphic replacement of the primary Ca-Na plagioclases by secondary albite (Na). During this replacement biotite is often transformed to chlorite and inclusions of hematite, apatite, titanite, and calcite develop. So far, albitization has been systematically regarded as caused by magmatic derived hydrothermal brines, alkaline metasomatism reactions (Cathelineau, 1986; Petersson and Eliasson, 1997), or as a low grade metamorphic facies (Boles and Coombs, 1977). Recent studies in the Morvan Massif granites (Ricordel et al., 2007; Parcerisa et al., 2009) showed that the albitization there is related to the Triassic paleosurface. The decrease of this alteration with depth and its paleomagnetic age support the link of the albitization to the Triassic paleosurface. Furthermore, the petrographic data suggest the import of sodium by weathering solutions. The enrichement in Na+ of the fluids that triggered this alteration is probably linked to the Triassic salt deposits. Albitised pinkish facies have been recognized in the northern part of the Bohemian Massif (Polish Sudetes). Typical igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Klodzko area (southern Poland) are granites, granodiorites, schists, amphibolite, and gneisses, mostly of Paleozoic age. Three sites in the Klodzko area were sampled in detail from N to S: (1) Laski quarry, (2) Laski village, and (3) Chwalislaw. Here, the occurrence of the albitization is well developed and specific in its mineralogical paragenesis. Throughout the sample sites different albitization stages can be observed. The most albitized and therefore reddish facies can be found at the Laski village granite that consists of primary quartz and K-feldspar, biotite, and development of secondary

  1. A MASSIF Effort To Determine The Mass-Luminosity Relation for Stars of Various Ages, Metallicities, and Evolution States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Beedict, G. Fritz; Gies, Douglas R.; Golimowski, David A.; Ianna, Philip A.; Mason, Brian; McArthur, Barbara; Nelan, Edmund; Torres, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    The MASSIF (Masses and Stellar Systems with Interferometry) Team will use SIM to investigate the mass content of the Galaxy - from huge stars to barely glimmering brown dwarfs, and from hot white dwarfs to exotic black holes. We will target various samples of the Galactic population to determine and relate the fundamental characteristics of mass, luminosity, age, composition, and multiplicity - attributes that together yield an extensive understanding of the stars. Our samples will include distant clusters that span a factor of 5000 in age, and commonplace stars and substellar objects that lurk near the Sun. The principal goals of the MASSIF Key Project are to (1) define the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars in five fundamental clusters so that effects of age and metallicity can be mapped (Trapezium, TW Hydrae, Pleiades, Hyades, and M67), and (2) determine accurate masses for representative examples of nearly every type of star, stellar descendant or brown dwarf in the Galaxy.

  2. New constraints on fluid sources in orogenic gold deposits, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bin; Kendrick, Mark A.; Fairmaid, Alison M.; Phillips, David; Wilson, Christopher J. L.; Mernagh, Terrence P.

    2012-03-01

    Fluid inclusion microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy and noble gas plus halogen geochemistry, complemented by published stable isotope data, have been used to assess the origin of gold-rich fluids in the Lachlan Fold Belt of central Victoria, south-eastern Australia. Victorian gold deposits vary from large turbidite-hosted `orogenic' lode and disseminated-stockwork gold-only deposits, formed close to the metamorphic peak, to smaller polymetallic gold deposits, temporally associated with later post-orogenic granite intrusions. Despite the differences in relative timing, metal association and the size of these deposits, fluid inclusion microthermometry indicates that all deposits are genetically associated with similar low-salinity aqueous, CO2-bearing fluids. The majority of these fluid inclusions also have similar 40Ar/36Ar values of less than 1500 and 36Ar concentrations of 2.6-58 ppb (by mass) that are equal to or much greater than air-saturation levels (1.3-2.7 ppb). Limited amounts of nitrogen-rich fluids are present at a local scale and have the highest measured 40Ar/36Ar values of up to 5,700, suggesting an external or distinct source compared to the aqueous fluids. The predominance of low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids with low 40Ar/36Ar values, in both `orogenic' and `intrusion-related' gold deposits, is attributed to fluid production from common basement volcano-sedimentary sequences and fluid interaction with sedimentary cover rocks (turbidites). Aqueous fluid inclusions in the Stawell-Magdala deposit of western Victoria (including those associated with N2) preserve mantle-like Br/Cl and I/Cl values. In contrast, fluid inclusions in deposits in the eastern structural zones, which contain more abundant shales, have elevated molar I/Cl ratios with maximum values of 5,170 × 10-6 in the Melbourne Zone. Br/I ratios in this zone range from 0.5 to 3.0 that are characteristic of fluid interaction with organic-rich sediments. The maximum I/Cl and characteristic

  3. Tectonic processes during oblique collision: Insights from the St. Elias orogen, northern North American Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlis, T.L.; Picornell, C.; Serpa, L.; Bruhn, R.L.; Plafker, G.

    2004-01-01

    Oblique convergence in the St. Elias orogen of southern Alaska and northwestern Canada has constructed the world's highest coastal mountain range and is the principal driver constructing all of the high topography in northern North America. The orogen originated when the Yakutat terrane was excised from the Cordilleran margin and was transported along margin-parallel strike-slip faults into the subduction-transform transition at the eastern end of the Aleutian trench. We examine the last 3 m.y. of this collision through an analysis of Euler poles for motion of the Yakutat microplate with respect to North America and the Pacific. This analysis indicates a Yakutat-Pacific pole near the present southern triple junction of the microplate and' predicts convergence to dextral-oblique convergence across the offshore Transition fault, onland structures adjacent to the Yakutat foreland, or both, with plate speeds increasing from 10 to 30 mm/yr from southeast to northwest. Reconstructions based on these poles show that NNW transport of the collided block into the NE trending subduction zone forced contraction of EW line elements as the collided block was driven into the subduction-transform transition. This suggests the collided block was constricted as it was driven into the transition. Constriction provides an explanation for observed vertical axis refolding of both earlier formed fold-thrust systems and the collisional suture at the top of the fold-thrust stack. We also suggest that this motion was partially accommodated by lateral extrusion of the western portion of the orogen toward the Aleutian trench. Important questions remain regarding which structures accommodated parts of this motion. The Transition fault may have accommodated much of the Yakutat-Pacific convergence on the basis of our analysis and previous interpretations of GPS-based geodetic data. Nonetheless, it is locally overlapped by up to 800 m of undeformed sediment, yet elsewhere shows evidence of young

  4. Kinematics of post-orogenic extension and exhumation of the Taku Schist, NE Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md Ali, M. A.; Willingshofer, E.; Matenco, L.; Francois, T.; Daanen, T. P.; Ng, T. F.; Taib, N. I.; Shuib, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies imply that the formation and evolution of many SE Asian basins was driven by extensional detachments or systems of low-angle normal faults that created significant crustal exhumation in their footwalls. In this context, the architecture of the Triassic Indosinian orogen presently exposed in Peninsular Malaysia is compatible with significant extension post-dating the orogenic event. In this study we performed a kinematic analysis based on fieldwork and microstructural observations in the Taku Schist, Kemahang granite and the surrounding Gua Musang sediments of northern Peninsular Malaysia in order to shed light on processes related to the build-up and subsequent demise of the Indosinian orogen. The first three phases of deformation were related to an overall period of E-W oriented contraction and burial metamorphism. These phases of deformation are characterized by isoclinal folding with flat lying axial plane cleavages (D1), asymmetrical folding, top-to-the-W-SW shearing (D2) and upright folding (D3). All are in general agreement with observations of the previously inferred Permo-Triassic Indosinian orogeny. During these times, the Taku Schist, a sequence of Paleozoic clastic sediments with mafic intercalations was metamorphosed to amphibolite facies. These rocks are most likely equivalent to the ones exposed in the Bentong-Raub suture zone. Structural relations suggest that the Triassic Kemahang pluton is syn-kinematic, which provides important constraints for the timing of these contractional events. We demonstrate that the overall shortening was followed by a hitherto undescribed extension in NW-SE direction resulting in the formation of a large-scale detachment, the Taku detachment, in northern Peninsular Malaysia. Extension probably reactivated the former subduction plane as a detachment and exhumed previously buried and metamorphosed rocks of similar lithological composition to the neighboring Bentong-Raub suture zone. Such a mechanism is

  5. Origin and structure of major orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    The formation of major exhumed strike-slip faults represents one of the most important dynamic processes affecting the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere and surface. Detailed models of the potential initiation and properties and architecture of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults and how these relate to exhumation are rare. In this study, we deal with key properties controlling the development of major exhumed strike-slip fault systems, which are equivalent to the deep crustal sections of active across fault zones. We also propose two dominant processes for the initiation of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults: (1) pluton-controlled and (2) metamorphic core complex-controlled strike-slip faults. In these tectonic settings, the initiation of faults occurs by rheological weakening along hot-to-cool contacts and guides the overall displacement and ultimate exhumation. These processes result in a specific thermal and structural architecture of such faults. These types of strike-slip dominated fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust during various stages of faulting. The high variety of distinctive fault rocks is a potential evidence for recognition of these types of strike-slip faults. Exhumation of mylonitic rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such reverse oblique-slip strike-slip faults, implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion during exhumation. Some orogen-scale strike-slip faults nucleate and initiate along rheologically weak zones, e.g. at granite intrusions, zones of low-strength minerals, thermally weakened crust due to ascending fluids, and lateral borders of hot metamorphic core complexes. A further mechanism is the juxtaposition of mechanically strong mantle lithosphere to hot asthenosphere in continental transform faults (e.g., San

  6. Alpine-type tectonics in the Paleoproterozoic Lapland-Kola Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudruk, S. V.; Balagansky, V. V.; Gorbunov, I. A.; Raevsky, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    The Kola region in the northeastern Baltic Shield is characterized by diverse Paleoproterozoic collision processes. The Keivy Terrane is one of the major tectonic units in the northeastern foreland of the Paleoproterozoic Lapland-Kola Collisional Orogen, which markedly differs in a number of parameters from other tectonic units of the Kola region. The study of the Keivy Terrane allowed us to unravel one more basic difference: the large Paleoproterozoic sheath synform of the Serpovidny (Crescentic) Range localized in this terrane. Its core is occupied by volcanic and sedimentary rocks, which correlate with the fill of the Imandra-Varzuga Rift; the limbs are composed of metamorphosed mature sedimentary rocks known as Keivy paraschists of Neoarchean or Paleoproterozoic age. The lower limb of the Serpovidny Synform is strongly squeezed, whereas the upper limb consists of almost undeformed rocks. The deformed rocks underwent ductile flow under conditions of simple or general shear. In the degree of its asymmetry and main parameters, the Serpovidny Synform is similar to the plunging and recumbent anticlines in the Helvetic nappes of the Alps. It is concluded that the Paleoproterozoic core of the Serpovidny Sheath Synform, or plunging anticline, is a fragment of the almost completely eroded deep Serpovidny Nappe of the Helvetic type. During the collision related to the Lapland-Kola Orogeny (1.9-2.0 Ga), this nappe was pushed out northward from the Paleoproterozoic Imandra-Varzuga Rift, which is situated 50 km south of the Serpovidny structure, and thrust over the Keivy paraschists. The latter, together with underlying the Lebyazhka Gneiss, were folded in the process of thrusting and were involved in the structure of the Serpovidny Synform. The Keivy paraschists make up a para-autochthon or a separate nappe of the Pennine type. The Archean Lebyazhka metafelsic volcanics underlie the Keivy paraschists and overlie granitoids of the Archean basement that remained undeformed

  7. Lateral flow in the middle crust - Analogue experiments from the Svecofennian orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkilä, Kaisa; Koyi, Hemin; Korja, Annakaisa; Eklund, Olav

    2013-04-01

    The exposed Svecofennian crust (50-65 km) has been suggested to have thickened in continental accretion between Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes, probably at a high convergence rate. It is likely that this thickened orogen experienced lateral spreading during its final stages. This post-orogenic event has reshaped the collisional framework and modified its bulk appearance. In this study, we have used scaled analogue centrifuge modeling to simulate extensional lateral flow at the Archean- Paleoproterozoic boundary zone during final stages of the Svecofennian orogeny. The analogue models simulate both the evolution of a mechanical boundary between two rheologically different tectonic blocks, and the role of pre-existing weaknesses at moderate angles (representing the old stacking structures). In models the upper layer is brittle, the middle layer is ductile, and the lower layer is more viscous. The layers represent upper, middle and lower crust, respectively. The Proterozoic layers have lower viscosity values than the Archean layers at similar depths. The materials are based on the plastilina modelling putty, which is mixed with acid oil, silicone, sweetener and/or barium sulphate to get the appropriate composition for each layer. Both the Archean and the Paleoproterozoic blocks have a low-viscous middle crust. The three layered models are extended unilaterally. The model results show that during extension the rheologically different layers deform and spread at different rates during the tectonic collapse. This results in 1) vertical rotation of the Archean and Proterozoic boundary; 2) the pre-existed faults become listric and discontinuous; and 3) the upward flow of the low viscosity middle layer to fill the newly-formed gaps between the upper layer blocks. The experiments show geometrically similar crustal-scale structures to those observed in the deep seismic reflection profiles (FIRE). Thus it is possible that lateral flow has taken place in the core of the

  8. Origin of allanite in gneiss and granite in the Dabie orogenic belt, Central East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haihao; Xiao, Yilin; Xu, Lijuan; Sun, He; Huang, Jian; Hou, Zhenhui

    2017-03-01

    Allanite is a common accessory mineral phase, representing an important carrier of rare earth elements, Th, U, Sr and other trace elements in most continental rocks. As Th and U can be incorporated into the allanite lattice, the mineral is a good geochronological tool for constraining geological events. Moreover, the trace element features δEu, Th/U ratio and common lead content of allanite are indicators of the forming conditions. Allanite and coexisting epidote-group minerals are abundant in ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks from the Dabie-Sulu orogen in central East China. However, if these minerals formed in the Neoproterozoic as magmatic phases, or in the Triassic as metamorphic phases is a matter of long-standing controversy. We report major and trace element analyses of whole rocks, allanite and coexisting epidote-group minerals, together with U-Th-Pb isotopic compositions of allanite in UHP gneiss from the Dabie-Sulu orogen, and allanite in the adjacent Jingshan granite. The granite is emplaced along the southeastern margin of the North China Craton and considered a product of partial melting of the subducted Dabie-Sulu gneiss. Trace elements (low Th/U and La/Sm, high δEu and high Sr) and high common lead concentrations indicate a metamorphic origin of allanite-epidote in the UHP gneiss. On the other hand, coarse-grained allanite from the Jingshan granite shows a corrosion core and a magmatic rim with common 208Pb up to 70% in the core and less than 30% in the rim. The allanite cores are of peritectic and the rims of magmatic origin with ages of ∼160 Ma, consistent with the granite crystallization age. In combination with previous studies, we conclude that the allanite of the Jingshan granite has form from the subducted and remolten Dabie-Sulu gneiss. Allanite records Triassic UHP metamorphic ages as well as Jurassic peritectic-magmatic ages as a part of the evolution of the Dabie-Sulu orogen.

  9. Scorpions from the Mitaraka Massif in French Guiana: Description of one new genus and species (Scorpiones: Chactidae).

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson R

    2016-01-01

    A new genus and species, Spinochactas mitaraka gen. n., sp. n. (Chactidae) are described from the Mitaraka Massif in French Guiana, a site located near the borders of French Guiana, Brazil, and Suriname. The description of the new genus and species brings further evidence of the biogeographic pattern of distribution presented by some elements of the family Chactidae endemic to the Tepuys or to the Inselberg formations of South America.

  10. Mass transfer and fluid evolution in late-metamorphic veins, Rhenish Massif (Germany): insight from alteration geochemistry and fluid-mineral equilibria modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsala, Achille; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Element mobility and fluid-rock interaction related to the formation of late-metamorphic quartz veins have been studied by combination of mineral chemistry, whole-rock geochemistry, mass balance analysis and fluid-mineral equilibria modeling. The quartz veins are hosted by very low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the fold-and-thrust belt of the Rhenish Massif (Germany). The veins record two stages of evolution, a massive vein filling assemblage with elongate-blocky quartz, chlorite, apatite and albite, and a later open space filling assemblage with euhedral crystals of quartz, ankerite-dolomite and minor calcite and sulfides. Detailed mass balance analysis of an alteration profile adjacent to a representative quartz vein demonstrates that element mobility is restricted to the proximal zone. The most important element changes are gain of Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and CO2, and loss of Si, K and Na. The data demonstrate that wall-rock carbonation is one of the main alteration features, whereas mobility of Si, K and Na are related to dissolution of quartz and destruction of detrital feldspar and muscovite. The whole-rock geochemical data, in conjunction with fluid composition data and pressure-temperature estimates, were used as input for fluid-mineral equilibria modeling in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-C-S-O-H-B-F-Cl. Modeling involved calculation of rock-buffered fluid compositions over the temperature interval 100-500 °C, and reaction-path simulations where a rock-buffered high-temperature fluid reacts with fresh host-rocks at temperatures of 400, 300 and 200 °C. Calculated rock-buffered fluid compositions demonstrate that retrograde silica solubility is a strong driving force for quartz leaching in the temperature-pressure window of 380-450 °C and 0.5 kbar. These conditions overlap with the estimated temperatures for the initial stage of vein formation. Reaction-path models show that high-temperature alteration can produce the observed silica leaching, suggesting that

  11. Climate Variability and Surface Processes in Tectonically Active Orogens: Insights From the Southern Central Andes and the Northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Bookhagen, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Southern Central Andes of NW Argentina and the NW Himalaya are important orographic barriers that intercept moisture-bearing winds associated with monsoonal circulation. Changes in both atmospheric circulation systems on decadal to millennial timescales fundamentally influence differences in the amount and location of rainfall in both orogens. In India, the eastern arm of the monsoonal circulation draws moisture from the Bay of Bengal and transports humid air masses along the southern Himalayan front to the northwest. There, at the end of the monsoonal conveyer belt, rainfall is diminished and moisture typically does not reach far into the orogen interior. Similar conditions apply to the NW Argentine Andes, which are located within the precipitation regime of the South American Monsoon. Here, pronounced local relief blocks humid air masses from the Amazon region, resulting in extreme gradients in rainfall that leave the orogen interior dry. However, during negative ENSO years (La Niña) and intensified Indian Summer Monsoon years, moisture penetrates farther into the Andean and Himalayan orogens, respectively. Structurally pre- conditioned valley systems may enhance this process and funnel moisture far into the orogen interior. The greater availability of moisture increases runoff, lateral scouring of mountin streams, and ultimately triggers intensified hillslope processes on decadal to centennial timescales. In both environments, the scenario of intensified present-day surface processes and rates is analogous to protracted episodes of enhanced mass removal from hillslopes via deep-seated landslides during the early Holocene and late Pleistocene. Apparently, these episodes were also associated with transient storage of voluminous conglomerates and lacustrine deposits in narrow intermontane basins. Subsequently, these deposits were incised, partly removed, and the fluvial systems adjusted themselves to the pre-depositional base levels through a readjustment and

  12. Lower Pliensbachian caldera volcanism in high-obliquity rift systems in the western North Patagonian Massif, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedini, Leonardo; Gregori, Daniel; Strazzere, Leonardo; Falco, Juan I.; Dristas, Jorge A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Cerro Carro Quebrado and Cerro Catri Cura area, located at the border between the Neuquén Basin and the North Patagonian Massif, the Garamilla Formation is composed of four volcanic stages: 1) andesitic lava-flows related to the beginning of the volcanic system; 2) basal massive lithic breccias that represent the caldera collapse; 3) voluminous, coarse-crystal rich massive lava-like ignimbrites related to multiple, steady eruptions that represent the principal infill of the system; and, finally 4) domes, dykes, lava flows, and lava domes of rhyolitic composition indicative of a post-collapse stage. The analysis of the regional and local structures, as well as, the architectures of the volcanic facies, indicates the existence of a highly oblique rift, with its principal extensional strain in an NNE-SSW direction (˜N10°). The analyzed rocks are mainly high-potassium dacites and rhyolites with trace and RE elements contents of an intraplate signature. The age of these rocks (189 ± 0.76 Ma) agree well with other volcanic sequences of the western North Patagonian Massif, as well as, the Neuquén Basin, indicating that Pliensbachian magmatism was widespread in both regions. The age is also coincident with phase 1 of volcanism of the eastern North Patagonia Massif (188-178 Ma) represented by ignimbrites, domes, and pyroclastic rocks of the Marifil Complex, related to intraplate magmatism.

  13. Pan-African high-pressure metamorphism in the Precambrian basement of the Menderes Massif, western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candan, O.; Dora, O. Ö.; Oberhänsli, R.; Çetinkaplan, M.; Partzsch, J. H.; Warkus, F. C.; Dürr, S.

    The Menderes Massif is made up of Pan-African basement and a Paleozoic to Early Tertiary cover sequence imbricated by Late Alpine deformation. The Precambrian basement comprises primarily medium- to high-grade schists, paragneisses, migmatites, orthogneisses, metagranites, charnockites, and metagabbros. High-pressure relics in the Pan-African basement are divided into two groups: eclogites and eclogitic metagabbros. The mineral assemblage in the eclogites is omphacite (Jd 44)-garnet-clinozoisite-rutile. The eclogites occur as pods and boudinaged layers in the basement schists and paragneisses. Inclusions found in the cores of the garnets indicate a medium-pressure protolith. The eclogitic metagabbros are closely related to Precambrian gabbroic stocks. The igneous texture and relic magmatic phases are preserved in these high-pressure rocks, which are characterized by the mineral assemblage omphacite (Jd 25)-garnet-rutile+/-kyanite. The P-T conditions of the Pan-African high-pressure metamorphism in the eclogites are estimated to be 644°C with a minimum pressure of approximately 15 kbar. The eclogites are partly to completely retrograded to garnet amphibolites by a Barrovian-type overprint which developed under isothermal decompression conditions. For this post-eclogitic event, the P-T estimates are 7 kbar and 623°C. The eclogite relics provide strong support for a correlation of the Menderes Massif with the Bitlis Massif in terms of common Pan-African high-pressure evolution.

  14. Geology and Tectonic Evolution of the Kazdaǧ Massif (NW Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, B.; Akay, E.; Hasözbek, A.; Satır, M.; Siebel, W.

    2009-04-01

    In the northwestern part of Anatolia along the Izmir-Ankara Suture Zone, the Kazdağ and Uludağ metamorphic massifs form an E-W trending belt between the Sakarya Continent in the north and the Menderes Massif in the south. Internal succession of these two massifs have been described as metamorphic complexes consisting of various kinds of micaschists, quartz mica schist, gneisses, amphibolites and marbles. In the Kazdağ metamorphics, metaophiolites have been described additionally (Okay et al., 1991; Yaltırak and Okay, 1994; Okay et al., 1996; Duru et al., 2004). These metamorphic complexes were considered to form the basement of the Sakarya Continent tectonically overlain by the Early Permian (Topuz et al., 2004) to Late Triassic (Okay and Monie, 1997; Okay et al., 2002) Karakaya Complex. This old basement and the Karakaya Complex were suggested to be unconformably overlain by Liassic and younger platform limestones and detritals (Altıner et al., 1991). In the literature, it has also been suggested that the Kazdağ Massif had experienced polyphase metamorphism, first during Carboniferous time, second during Early Triassic and third during Tertiary (Bingöl, 1971; Okay et al., 1996; Okay and Satır, 2000). In this study we mapped the Kazdağ Massif on 1/25000 scale, studied its internal stratigraphy and structures and performed some petrologic analyses and radiogenic age determinations. Stratigraphically in the lower part of the Kazdağ metamorphic sequence, there is a part of an oceanic crust represented by metaultramafic rocks and gabbroic metacumulates. Geochemistry of these banded metagabbros show a mid-oceanic affinity. This oceanic crust is overlain, along an unconformity, by a platform type marble succession. At the base of the marbles, there is a basal conglomerate, clasts of which derived from the underlying ultramafic sequence. Thick white marble sequence is overlain along a gradational boundary with a metadetrital succession consisting of quartz mica

  15. Hillslope response to knickpoint migration in the Southern Appalachians: Implications for the evolution of post-orogenic landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wegmann, S.F.G.; Franke, K.L.; Hughes, S.; Lewis, R.Q.; Lyons, N.; Paris, P.; Ross, K.; Bauer, J.B.; Witt, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The southern Appalachians represent a landscape characterized by locally high topographic relief, steep slopes, and frequent mass movement in the absence of significant tectonic forcing for at least the last 200 Ma. The fundamental processes responsible for landscape evolution in a post-orogenic landscape remain enigmatic. The non-glaciated Cullasaja River basin of south-western North Carolina, with uniform lithology, frequent debris flows, and the availability of high-resolution airborne lidar DEMs, is an ideal natural setting to study landscape evolution in a post-orogenic landscape through the lens of hillslope-channel coupling. This investigation is limited to channels with upslope contributing areas >2.7 km2, a conservative estimate of the transition from fluvial to debris-flow dominated channel processes. Values of normalized hypsometry, hypsometric integral, and mean slope vs elevation are used for 14 tributary basins and the Cullasaja basin as a whole to characterize landscape evolution following upstream knickpoint migration. Results highlight the existence of a transient spatial relationship between knickpoints present along the fluvial network of the Cullasaja basin and adjacent hillslopes. Metrics of topography (relief, slope gradient) and hillslope activity (landslide frequency) exhibit significant downstream increases below the current position of major knickpoints. The transient effect of knickpoint-driven channel incision on basin hillslopes is captured by measuring the relief, mean slope steepness, and mass movement frequency of tributary basins and comparing these results with the distance from major knickpoints along the Cullasaja River. A conceptual model of area-elevation and slope distributions is presented that may be representative of post-orogenic landscape evolution in analogous geologic settings. Importantly, the model explains how knickpoint migration and channel- hillslope coupling is an important factor in tectonically-inactive (i

  16. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  17. Carboniferous rifted arcs leading to an archipelago of multiple arcs in the Beishan-Tianshan orogenic collages (NW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Ji'en; Zhang, Zhiyong; Song, Dongfang

    2016-12-01

    The Beishan and East Tianshan Orogenic Collages in the southernmost Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) record the final stages of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. These collages and their constituent arcs have an important significance for resolving current controversies regarding their tectonic setting and age, consequent accretionary history of the southern CAOB, and the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. In this paper, we present our work on the southern Mazongshan arc and the northern Hongyanjing Basin in the Beishan Orogenic Collage (BOC), and our comparison with the Bogda arc and associated basins in the East Tianshan Orogenic Collage. Field relationships indicate that the Pochengshan fault defines the boundary between the arc and basin in the BOC. Volcanic rocks including basalts and rhyolites in the Mazongshan arc have bimodal calc-alkaline characteristics, an enrichment in large ion lithophile elements such as Rb, Ba, and Pb and depletion in high field-strength elements (e.g., Nb and Ta), which were probably developed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. We suggest that these bimodal calc-alkaline volcanic rocks formed in rifted arcs instead of post-orogenic rifts with mantle plume inputs. By making detailed geochemical comparisons between the Mazongshan arc and the Bogda arc to the west, we further propose that they are similar and both formed in arc rifts, and helped generate a Carboniferous archipelago of multiple arcs in the southern Paleo-Asian Ocean. These data and ideas enable us to postulate a new model for the tectonic evolution of the southern CAOB.

  18. Dichotomy of The Messada Pluton, Serbo-Macedonian Massif, Greece: From Rifting to Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilatos, Charalampos

    2016-10-01

    The Messada pluton is a mafic intrusion that is located about 12 km SW of Serres town, (Macedonia Greece) that intrudes the two mica, biotite and the augen gneisses of the Vertiskos formation (Serbo-Macedonian massif). The aim of this study is to investigate, define and evaluate the geochemical characteristics of the pluton in order to determine the geotectonic environment in which the parental magma has been formed. The Mesada pluton is a mid to coarse grained intrusion presenting petrographic variety from diorite and quartz diorite to tonalite and granodiorite. The variety in petrography reflects its chemical inhomogeneity in major and trace elements. It is suggested that parts of pluton have been formed by distinctly different types of magmas originated in diverse geotectonic settings. Those parts of quartz diorite and tonalite composition, present similar geochemical characteristics, LILE/HFSE ratios and negative Nb, but no Ti anomalies in their primitive mantle normalized trace elements spider grams. They exhibit higher HFS values than those of granodioritic composition. Moreover, their ORG normalized spider grams not only suggest that they have been evolved by a common parental magma, but also present the typical characteristics of a “crust dominated” within plate pluton that may have been formed in an early stage during rifting, prior to a subsequent subduction episode. This interpretation may be in accordance with the suggestion for the Gondwanian origin of the more silicic Triassic rift related meta-granites (e.g. Arnea plutonic complex) of the Serbo-Macedonian massif. In contrary; the parts of Mesada pluton of granodioritic composition, exhibit a calc-alkaline to high K calc-alkaline magmatic suite and present higher LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE ratios, related to a higher crustal component contribution for the magma genesis. Furthermore, their primitive mantle normalized spider grams’ present negative anomalies at Nb and Ti. These characteristics

  19. Sulfur mineralogy and geochemistry of serpentinites and gabbros of the Atlantis Massif (IODP Site U1309)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, Adélie; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2008-10-01

    In-situ uplifted portions of oceanic crust at the central dome of the Atlantis Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) were drilled during Expeditions 304 and 305 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) and a 1.4 km section of predominantly gabbroic rocks with minor intercalated ultramafic rocks were recovered. Here we characterize variations in sulfur mineralogy and geochemistry of selected samples of serpentinized peridotites, olivine-rich troctolites and diverse gabbroic rocks recovered from Hole 1309D. These data are used to constrain alteration processes and redox conditions and are compared with the basement rocks of the southern wall of the Atlantis Massif, which hosts the Lost City Hydrothermal Field, 5 km to the south. The oceanic crust at the central dome is characterized by Ni-rich sulfides reflecting reducing conditions and limited seawater circulation. During uplift and exhumation, seawater interaction in gabbroic-dominated domains was limited, as indicated by homogeneous mantle-like sulfur contents and isotope compositions of gabbroic rocks and olivine-rich troctolites. Local variations from mantle compositions are related to magmatic variability or to interaction with seawater-derived fluids channeled along fault zones. The concomitant occurrence of mackinawite in olivine-rich troctolites and an anhydrite vein in a gabbro provide temperature constraints of 150-200 °C for late circulating fluids along local brittle faults below 700 m depth. In contrast, the ultramafic lithologies at the central dome represent domains with higher seawater fluxes and higher degrees of alteration and show distinct changes in sulfur geochemistry. The serpentinites in the upper part of the hole are characterized by high total sulfide contents, high δ34S sulfide values and low δ34S sulfate values, which reflect a multistage history primarily controlled by seawater-gabbro interaction and subsequent serpentinization. The basement rocks at the central dome record lower

  20. Cl-rich hydrous mafic mineral assemblages in the Highiș massif, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard; Tatu, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    The Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) Highiș massif (Apuseni Mountains, Romania) displays a bimodal igneous suite of mafic (gabbro, diorite) and A-type felsic (alkali feldspar granite, albite granite, and hybrid granodiorite) rocks. Amphibole is widespread throughout the suite, and yields markedly high chlorine contents. Three groups are identified: Cl-rich potassic hastingsite (2.60-3.40 wt% Cl) within A-type felsic rocks and diorite, mildly Cl-rich pargasite to hornblende (0.80-1.90 wt% Cl) within gabbro, and low F-Cl hornblende within gabbro and hybrid granodiorite. Coexisting biotite is either Cl-rich within diorite, or F-Cl-poor to F-rich within A-type felsic rocks. Chlorine and fluorine are distributed in both mafic phases, according to the F-Fe and Cl-Mg avoidance rules. The low-Ti contents suggest subsolidus compositions. Cl-rich amphibole within diorite and A-type felsic rocks yields a restricted temperature range - from 575 °C down to 400 °C, whereas mildly Cl-rich amphibole within gabbro displays the highest range - from 675 to 360 °C. Temperatures recorded by Cl-rich biotite within diorite range from 590 to 410 °C. Biotite within A-type felsic rocks yields higher temperatures than amphibole: the highest values- from 640 to 540 °C - are recorded in low-F-Cl varieties, whereas the lowest values- from 535 to 500 °C - are displayed by F-rich varieties. All data point to halogen-rich hydrothermal fluids at upper greenschist facies conditions percolating through fractures and shear zones and pervasively permeating the whole Highiș massif, with F precipitating as interstitial fluorite and Cl incorporating into amphibole, during one, or possibly several, hydrothermal episodes that would have occurred during a ~ 150 My-long period of time extending from the Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) to the Albian (Mid-Cretaceous).

  1. CRE dating on the scarps of large landslides affecting the Belledonne massif ( French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrouc, V.; Baillet, L.; Schwartz, S.; Jongmans, D.; Gamond, J. F.; Bourles, D.; Le Roux, O.; Carcaillet, J.; Braucher, R.

    2012-04-01

    The southwestern edge of the Belledonne Massif (French Alps) consists of micaschists unconformably covered with Mesozoic sediments and Quaternary deposits. The morphology corresponds to a glacial plateau (Mont Sec plateau) bordered by steep slopes (around 40°), where moraines and peat bog subsist. The massif is incised by the East-West trending Romanche valley that was shaped by several cycles of quaternary glaciations and deglaciations. Slopes are affected by several active or past large scale rock mass instabilities. Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating was applied on the head scarps of three large landslides, one of which being the active Séchilienne landslide whose headscarp was already dated by Leroux et al. [2009]. Dating results suggest a concomitant initiation of these instabilities at about 7 ± 2 10Be ka, thousands years after the total downwastage of the valley. A different kinematic behaviour was however observed on two contiguous landslides for which continuous exposure profiles were obtained. On the Séchilienne landslide, 23 samples were collected from internal and lateral scarps, as well as on polished bedrock surfaces, with the aim of dating the internal kinematics of the landslide. Preliminary dating results obtained on polished surfaces and near the top of the scarps show unexpected low 10Be concentrations, suggesting the existence of thin moraine or peat bog deposits masking the bedrock, which have been subsequently eroded. The minimum thickness of these deposits was estimated assuming a constant denudation rate over time. Exposure date profiles show that the studied lateral and internal scarps were initiated at the same period as the Sechilienne headscarp. An increase in the exposure rate was also observed between 2 and 1 ka, in agreement with that evidenced along the headscarp. Forty other samples have been collected in the landslide to corroborate these results. Reference Le Roux, O., S. Schwartz , J.-F. Gamond, D. Jongmans, D. Bourles, R

  2. Methane Seepage at Hyperalkaline Springs in the Ronda Peridotite Massif (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Vadillo, I.; Whiticar, M. J.; Marques, J. M.; Carreira, P. M.; Tiago, I.; Benavente, J.; Jimenez, P.; Urresti, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane-rich, hyperalkaline spring waters and bubbling pools have been sampled in the Ronda peridotite massif in southern Spain. Water chemistry (T: 17.1-21.5 ºC; pH: 10.7-11.7; DO: <2 mg/L; Ca-OH facies) is characteristic of present-day serpentinization. Dissolved CH4 concentrations range from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L. CH4 stable C and H isotope ratios suggest a dominant abiotic origin in two natural spring sites (delta13C: -13 to -29 ‰ VPDB; delta2H: -309 to -333 ‰ VSMOW) and a mixed biotic-abiotic origin in springs with artificial water delivery systems (i.e., pipes or fountains; delta13C: -44 to -69 ‰; delta2H: -180 to -319 ‰). At the natural springs, gas is mainly released through bubbles close to the water outlet (CH4 flux ~1 kg/day by individual bubble trains), and subordinately by microseepage from the ground, even at distances of ~100 m from the bubble-spring site (flux of 10's, up to 97, mg CH4 m-2day-1). Gas seepage is strictly controlled by faults. Under-saturation of CH4 in water, bubbling and seepage location suggest that CH4 is not exclusively transported to the surface by hyperalkaline water, but it follows autonomous migration pathways along faults. Similar 'dry' seepage of abiotic gas was observed in the Philippines, New Zealand, Turkey and Italy. Like other land-based serpentinization systems, the Ronda peridotite massif is characterized by low heat flow (<40 mW/m2), with temperatures <60°C at depths of 1.5 km. At these low T and high pH conditions, CO32- is the only available carbon source dissolved in the water, and unlikely contributes to catalysed Fischer-Tropsch Type reactions. Methane production from CO2 hydrogenation in a gas phase system (unsaturated fractured rocks) cannot be excluded. The presence of ruthenium-enriched chromitites in the Ronda peridotites may support the hypothesis that CH4 is produced by CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by Ru minerals, even at temperatures below 100°C, as demonstrated in recent laboratory experiments

  3. Late Carboniferous remagnetisation of Palaeozoic rocks in the NE Rhenish Massif, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwing, A.; Bachtadse, V.; Soffel, H. C.

    During stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetisation experiments on Devonian and Lower Carboniferous carbonate and clastic rocks from the north-eastern part of the Rhenish Massif, Germany, three components of magnetisation (A, B, C) are identified. Component A is a recent viscous overprint that parallels the local present day geomagnetic field. Component B is mainly observed from 260 up to 550 °C during thermal demagnetisation and is carried by magnetite. In two localities, where red siltstones and red carbonate rocks were sampled, component B is stable up to 670 °C, indicating the presence of hematite. Three clusters of in situ B directions can be identified, which are controlled by the tectonic position of the sampling areas. These are from NW to SE: the Remscheid anticline (RA), the Lüdenscheid syncline (LS) and the Attendorn and Wittgenstein synclines (AS/WS). Standard and inclination-only fold tests, using parametric resampling, yield optimal statistical parameters at increasing amounts of untilting ranging from 0% in the South up to 57% in the North of the NE Rhenish Massif. Despite the variations in optimal untilting, the resulting site mean directions of component B do not differ significantly in inclination. These results are interpreted to reflect the acquisition of magnetisation during progressive northward migration of the deformation front in Late Carboniferous times. The resulting palaeolatitudes (RA: 1°S +2°-3°; LS: 2°S +3°-2°; AS/WS: 1°S +3°-4°) are in good agreement with the predicted position of the sampling area in the Late Carboniferous, as derived from a published Apparent Polar Wander Path for Baltica and Laurentia. The unblocking temperature spectra and the synfolding nature of B yield strong evidence that chemical processes, possibly driven by fluid migration during orogenesis, caused this remagnetisation. A third component C was observed in zones of tight folding with steeply dipping to overturned bedding planes and is

  4. Deep crustal structure and seismic expression of the central Appalachian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, G.C. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ )

    1992-03-01

    Deep-seismic reflection profiles across parts of the Central Appalachian orogenic belt indicate that the crust here includes an exposed Paleozoic fold-and-thrust belt that is mainly soled in Proterozoic Grenville basement. Translation strain in the foreland and Highlands resulting from Paleozoic orogenesis is as much as 25 km, exclusive of layer-parallel-shortening penetrative strains. This estimate is limited by the slight structural relief beneath the Pocono plateau and by the lack of extensive Cambrian-Ordovician cover beneath the sole thrust. Earlier estimates of translation strain are much higher. To the southwest, this parautochthonous region is separated by an unrecognized structural transition from the more allochthonous parts of the central and southern Appalachian overthrust belt, marked by significantly larger translation strains. Crustal architecture in the hinterland part of the region is poorly understood due to data gaps.

  5. Drainage Pattern, Along-Strike Topography and Three-Dimensional Construction of the Himalayan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, A.

    2005-12-01

    Past studies on the Himalayan orogen have mostly emphasized its 2-D evolution in cross-section view. As a result, how the orogen has grown in 3-D remains poorly understood. For example, it is not clear if the >1500-km long Main Central Thrust (MCT) and Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) were initiated synchronously along the whole orogen or started at one segment and then propagated laterally during subsequent fault motion. To clarify this issue, I examined the Himalayan drainage pattern, along-strike topography, and geometry and kinematics of growing contractional structures across both the Himalayan front and the Shillong Plateau. The main observations may be summarized as follows. (1) The five rivers that cut across the Himalaya are arranged approximately symmetric with respect to the Himalayan-arc axis (~85° E): the Arun River (87° E) is in the middle with the Sutlej (77° E) and Indus (72° E) Rivers in the west and the Subansiri (93° E) and Yalu-Brahmaputra (96° E) Rivers in the east. (2) Between the eastern and western syntaxes, south-flowing drainages east of 85.5° E are consistently deflected to the east by east-growing anticlines and thrusts, whereas drainages west of 85.5°E are deflected systematically to the west by west-growing anticlines and thrusts along the Himalayan front. The only region where no drainage deflection is observed is the Bhutan Himalaya. There all rivers flow straight across the Himalayan front. (3) The deflected drainage pattern indicates that the Shillong Plateau south of the eastern Himalaya has been growing westward. (4) The along-crest Himalayan topographic profile concaves downward, starting from ~5200 m just inside the two syntaxes and reaching 8848 m at Mt. Everest (~87° E). (5) There are a total of 17 major growing contractional structures in the Main Frontal Thrust Zone (MFTZ), with 10 in the west and 7 in the east. Each structure has a length between ~20 km and >150 km, but the west-growing structures in the west are

  6. Active Tectonics in crossroads of an evolving orogen and morphological consequences: Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Hayrettin

    2016-04-01

    Anatolia lies in a curved setting of the active Alpine Mountain Range and is located in crossroads of the European and Asian terrains. It is one of the fastest deforming land in the world, manifested by seismicity, characteristic landforms and GPS measurements. Active tectonics in Anatolia provides not only a comparable geological model for the past orogens, but also a laboratory case for morphological consequences of an orogenic processes. Anatolia comprise different tectonic subsettings with its own characteristics. Northern part is influenced by tectonic characteristics of the Black Sea Basin, the Pontides and the Caucasian Range; northwestern part by the Balkanides; eastern-southeastern part by the Bitlis-Zagros suture; and south-southwestern part by the eastern Mediterranean subduction setting. Much of its present tectonic complexity was inherited from the convergence dominant plate tectonic setting of the platelets prior to the Middle-Neogene. Beginning about 11 Ma ago, the deformed and uplifted landmass unable to accommodate further deformation in Anatolia and ongoing tectonic activity gave rise to rearrangement of tectonic forces and westerly translational movements. Formation of major strike-slip faults in Anatolia including the North and East Anatolian Faults and a new platelet called the Anatolian Plate are the consequences of this episode. Such change in the tectonic regime has led to modification of previously-formed landscape, modification and sometimes termination of previously-formed basins. Evidence is present in the Plio-Quaternary stratigraphy, tectonic characteristics and morphology of the well-studied areas. This presentation will discuss active tectonic features of the northwestern, southwestern and eastern Anatolian subsettings and their influence on morphology that is closely related to sites of pre-historical human settlement.

  7. Self-consistent orogenic wedge formation and shear zone propagation due to thermal softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    We present two dimensional numerical simulations of orogenic wedge formation for a viscoelastoplastic lithosphere under compression. The thermo-mechanical model is based on the principle of energy conservation and includes temperature-dependent rheologies. With this approach, shear zones caused by thermal softening develop spontaneously in the absence of strain softening. The initial locus of shear localization is controlled by either lateral temperature variations (100°C) at the model base or by lateral variations in crustal thickness. The first episode of strain localization occurs after 15% bulk shortening. With ongoing strain, a series of shear zones arise and propagate towards the foreland leading to the self-consistent formation of an orogenic wedge. We investigate the impact of bulk shortening rates, erosion and rheology on the dynamics of wedge formation, the associated topography and uplift rates. The maximum topography reaches up to 10 km and the surface morphology evolves according to shear zone activation and deactivation. Uplift rates are transient and peak values are maintained only on very short time scales. A running average of the uplift rate versus time curves with a time-window of 4 My provides average uplift rates in the order of a few millimeters per year. Erosion is an important parameter for the formation and the evolution of the wedge (e.g. can control the spacing of shear zones by modifying crustal thickness). Rheological parameters, such as the friction angle or the upper crustal viscosity, control the occurrence of strain localization. Bulk shortening rates between 10-15 and 10-16 s-1 do not have a major impact on the resulting wedge structure.

  8. Iberseis: A Deep Seismic Reflection Image of A Variscan Transpresive Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Simancas, F.; Juhlin, C.; Ayarza, P.; Gonzalez-Loderio, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Plata, J.; Iberseis Group

    As part of EUROPROBE's SW Iberia project a 303 km long deep seismic reflection profile was acquired along one of the most complete transects of the Variscan Oro- gen providing key knowledge on fundamental questions about the dynamics of the southwestern European lithosphere. The seismic profile (IBERSEIS) crosses two su- tures that separate three main tectonic terranes which are: South Portuguese Zone, Ossa-Morena Zone and Central Iberian Zone. A prominent mid- lower crustal seismic fabric is observed along the involved terranes. The geometry of the most prominent surface sutures such as the Beja-Acebuches ophiolite and the Badajoz-Córdoba shear zone are clearly identified. A well defined horizontal Moho reveals an approximately constant crustal thikness of 30-33 km along the entire profile. The South Portuguese Zone features a typical geometry of a thrust and fold belt architecture. The high res- olution achieved by the relatively close receiver and shot spacing has imaged very detailed structures within this thin skinned tectonic unit, including thust staks and du- plexes which implying a realtively large crustal shortning. Good structural detail has also been obtained in the Ossa-Morena Zone, which is characterized by the presence of folded recumbent folds and thrusts. At mid-crutal level a high 2-3 s thick band of high reflectivity has been identified across the Ossa-Morena and Central Iberian Zones which is a unique feature among tanspresive orogens. This seismic image provably re- veals the strain partitioning during the oblique transpression tectonics that build up the orogen.

  9. Retrodeformable cross sections for 3-dimensional structural analysis, Ouachita orogen, Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. E.; Wiltschko, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    A fundamental tectonic problem is how deformation proceeds from hinterland to foreland in a fold and thrust belt (FTB). Wedge models explain many of the first-order observations found in most FTBs such as the internal deformation of material, thickening of hinterland, presence of a basal décollement, and an overall wedge shape that tapers to the foreland. These models currently have not been tested at the scale of the individual folds and faults. Moreover, most of the data available on, for instance, the sequence of events is best dated in the syntectonic sediments. Timing of uplift and motion of interior structures are not clear when using dates from these syntectonic sediments to some extent because an absolute connection between them is lacking. The purpose of this project is to develop a model for the evolution of the Ouachita orogen through the construction of a series of retrodeformable cross sections. A novel aspect of these cross sections is the combination of new and published thermal (i.e., illite ‘crystallinity’) and thermochronologic (i.e., zircon fission track) data collected at a variety of stratigraphic depths along the lines of section. These data will help to determine the cessation of thrust motion as well as the initial depth from which the thrust sheet emerged. An Ordovician Mazarn sample in the eastern exposed orogenic core has zircon grains with 55% reset fission track ages, whereas an overlying Ordovician Blakely sample about ~30 km to the southwest along strike has 15% being reset. Illite ‘crystallinity’ (IC) values indicate maximum burial metamorphism temperatures of anchizone (~250-350°C) coinciding with the location of the Ordovician Mazarn sample. Regionally, IC decreases from the culmination of the Benton Uplift and to the southwest along regional strike for samples that have similar stratigraphic age. These new timing and thermal constraints on an improved kinematic model are the necessary first steps in testing wedge models

  10. Sand petrology and focused erosion in collision orogens: the Brahmaputra case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Andò, Sergio; France-Lanord, Christian; Singh, Sunil K.; Foster, Gavin

    2004-03-01

    The high-relief and tectonically active Himalayan range, characterized by markedly varying climate but relatively homogeneous geology along strike, is a unique natural laboratory in which to investigate several of the factors controlling the composition of orogenic sediments. Coupling of surface and tectonic processes is most evident in the eastern Namche Barwa syntaxis, where the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra River, draining a large elevated area in south Tibet, plunges down the deepest gorge on Earth. Here composition of river sands changes drastically from lithic to quartzofeldspathic. After confluence with the Lohit River, draining the Transhimalayan-equivalent Mishmi arc batholiths, sediment composition remains remarkably constant across Assam, indicating subordinate contributions from Himalayan tributaries. Independent calculations based on petrographical, mineralogical, and geochemical data indicate that the syntaxis, representing only ∼4% of total basin area, contributes 35±6% to the total Brahmaputra sediment flux, and ∼20% of total detritus reaching the Bay of Bengal. Such huge anomalies in erosion patterns have major effects on composition of orogenic sediments, which are recorded as far as the Bengal Fan. In the Brahmaputra basin, in spite of very fast erosion and detrital evacuation, chemical weathering is not negligible. Sand-sized carbonate grains are dissolved partially in mountain reaches and completely in monsoon-drenched Assam plains, where clinopyroxenes are selectively altered. Plagioclase, instead, is preferentially weathered only in detritus from the Shillong Plateau, which is markedly enriched in microcline. Most difficult to assess is the effect of hydraulic sorting in Bangladesh, where quartz, garnet and epidote tend to be sequestered in the bedload and trapped on the coastal plain, whereas cleavable feldspars and amphiboles are concentrated in the suspended load and eventually deposited in the deep sea. High-resolution petrographic and

  11. Seismological structure of the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Darbyshire, Fiona A.

    2016-06-01

    Precambrian tectonic processes are debated: what was the nature and scale of orogenic events on the younger, hotter, and more ductile Earth? Northern Hudson Bay records the Paleoproterozoic collision between the Western Churchill and Superior plates—the ˜1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogeny (THO)—and is an ideal locality to study Precambrian tectonic structure. Integrated field, geochronological, and thermobarometric studies suggest that the THO was comparable to the present-day Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibet Orogen (HKTO). However, detailed understanding of the deep crustal architecture of the THO, and how it compares to that of the evolving HKTO, is lacking. The joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave data provides new Moho depth estimates and shear velocity models for the crust and uppermost mantle of the THO. Most of the Archean crust is relatively thin (˜39 km) and structurally simple, with a sharp Moho; upper-crustal wave speed variations are attributed to postformation events. However, the Quebec-Baffin segment of the THO has a deeper Moho (˜45 km) and a more complex crustal structure. Observations show some similarity to recent models, computed using the same methods, of the HKTO crust. Based on Moho character, present-day crustal thickness, and metamorphic grade, we support the view that southern Baffin Island experienced thickening during the THO of a similar magnitude and width to present-day Tibet. Fast seismic velocities at >10 km below southern Baffin Island may be the result of partial eclogitization of the lower crust during the THO, as is currently thought to be happening in Tibet.

  12. Asymmetric vs. symmetric deep lithospheric architecture of intra-plate continental orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frédéric; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-08-01

    The initiation and subsequent evolution of intra-plate orogens, resulting from continental plate interior deformation due to transmission of stresses over large distances from the active plate boundaries, is controlled by lateral and vertical strength contrasts in the lithosphere. We present lithospheric-scale analogue models combining 1) lateral strength variations in the continental lithosphere, and 2) different vertical rheological stratifications. The experimental continental lithosphere has a four-layer brittle-ductile rheological stratification. Lateral heterogeneity is implemented in all models by increased crustal strength in a central narrow block. The main investigated parameters are strain rate and strength of the lithospheric mantle, both playing an important role in crust-mantle coupling. The experiments show that the presence of a strong crustal domain is effective in localizing deformation along its boundaries. After deformation is localized, the evolution of the orogenic system is governed by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere such that the final geometry of the intra-plate mountain depends on the interplay between crust-mantle coupling and folding versus fracturing of the lithospheric mantle. Underthrusting is the main deformation mode in case of high convergence velocity and/or thick brittle mantle with a final asymmetric architecture of the deep lithosphere. In contrast, lithospheric folding is dominant in case of low convergence velocity and low strength brittle mantle, leading to the development of a symmetric lithospheric root. The presented analogue modelling results provide novel insights for 1) strain localization and 2) the development of the asymmetric architecture of the Pyrenees.

  13. Southern Costa Rica: an Island-arc Segment That Behaves Like a Doubly Vergent Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Winsemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    Southern Central America is a Mesosoic/Cenozoic island-arc that evolved from the subduction of the Farallón Plate below the Caribbean Plate. The southern Costa Rican land-bridge comprises deformed fore-arc and back-arc basins in the west and east, respectively, separated by the up to 3.8 km high Talamanca Range. The structure of the southern Central American island-arc is similar to doubly vergent and asymmetric orogens. The deformed fore-arc basin in the west and the Limon fold-and-thrust belt in the east can be interpreted as pro-wedge and retro-wedge, respectively. The Talamanca Range represents the uplifted block in between. The pro-wedge is wider and has a lower slope angle than the retro-wedge. The uplift of the Talamanca Range is probably related to a system of conjugate shear zones. Precipitation is unevenly distributed, with orographic effects concentrating precipitation in SW Costa Rica, which has caused pro-wedge denudation, leading to exhumation of granitic rocks at in the interior of the mountain range. The large-scale structure of the Central American island-arc in southern Costa Rica can be described using models of continental collision zones. Previous studies attributed the deformation and uplift pattern to the subduction/collision of the Cocos Ridge. Another reasonable driving mechanism for the evolution of such an orogen in an oceanic island-arc setting is the basal traction due to long-term subduction of the Cocos Plate at a very low angle.

  14. Pb isotopic composition of Paleozoic sediments derived from the Appalachian orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Krogstad, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Differences in [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb at restricted ranges of [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb are robust indicators of differences in the earliest history of crust or mantle reservoirs, surviving later changes in U/Pb that may be due to melting, metamorphism, or sedimentary reworking. Ayuso and Bevier (1991) have used the [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb differences between Late Paleozoic granites in the N. Appalachians to trace their sources in either Laurentian (Grenville) lithosphere, or docked (Avalonian) lithosphere. If the Pb isotopic composition of Avalonian lithosphere is unique to that source among all lithospheric reservoirs in the Appalachian orogeny, the sediments shed off the orogen should record the first appearance of rocks with this extraneous Pb isotopic composition as they become accreted. The high [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb at similar [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb that may be indicative of all outboard terranes occurs in sedimentary rocks younger than middle Ordovician in New York and Maine, and younger than Ordovician in Virginia. Older sediments (Hadrynian, Cambrian), as well as autochthonous basement and paraautochonous basement slices, have lower [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb at similar [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb. The low [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb at similar [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb shown by these rocks may be a locally diagnostic signature of Late Proterozoic Laurentian lithosphere. The high [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb at similar [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb may be a locally diagnostic signature of Late Proterozoic accreted terranes. Rocks with accreted terrane Pb isotopic composition became dominant in the provenance of sediments along the strike of the Appalachian orogen by middle Ordovician time.

  15. Some comparisons of the structure and evolution of the southern Appalachian Ouachita orogen and portions of the Trans-European Suture Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. Randy; Hatcher, Robert D.

    1999-12-01

    Many aspects of the tectonic history of the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen and the Trans-European suture region are similar. In a tectonic sense, they are geographically linked, because at the end of the Paleozoic, one could travel from Texas to Poland following a continuous orogenic belt. Much of each of these orogenic belts is, however, buried by younger strata, and thus geophysical studies are a key element of efforts to better understand them. Many more geophysical data are needed to provide a comprehensive picture of the deep structure, but in several areas new models of the lithospheric structure are emerging. In this paper, we review some of these models and introduce two new ones for the southern Appalachians. In addition, we explore the implications of these models for the evolution of these orogenic belts, drawing attention to similarities and differences in their structure and evolution. The Appalachian and Caledonian orogens represent temporally parallel development along irregular Late Proterozoic continental margins, but the crustal structure is different because of different accretionary elements and complications in the geometry of the original margins. Lateral transport via thrusting can confuse efforts to tie geologic structures identified on the surface with deep structures. For example, in the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen, the thrust-related transport distance for major features such as the Blue Ridge-Piedmont sheet and the Benton uplift is at least 200 km. On a crustal scale, deformation in the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen varies greatly in style and intensity. In the Ouachita orogen, the Late Proterozoic continental margin seems to be preserved, while in the northern Appalachians crustal-scale deformation is intense. Along the US Appalachians, the major crustal structure variation is the thin, dense crust of Avalonia abutting the relatively thick crust of Laurentia. Along the Ouachita orogen, several large crustal blocks can be identified that are

  16. The Tyrrhenian stage geodinamic evolution of Apenninic-Maghrebian orogen (Southern Apennines and Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentini, F.; Carbone, S.; Barreca, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the Central Mediterranean region the foreland domains are represented by two continental blocks, the Apulian Block to the north and the Pelagian Block to the south, respectively belonging to the Adria and to the Africa plates. They are separated since Permo-Triassic times by the oceanic crust of the Ionian Sea. The Apenninic-Maghrebian orogen is located between two oceanic crusts: the old Ionian crust, at present time subducting beneath the Calabrian Arc, and the new crust of the opening Tyrrhenian Sea. The orogenic belt is represented by a multilayer allochthonous edifice, composed of the Calabride Chain (CC) tectonically overlying the Apenninic-Maghrebian Chain (AMC), which in turn overthrust onto the Upper Miocene and Pliocene top-levels of a deep seated thrust system, originating by the deformation of the innermost carbonates of the Pelagian/Apulian blocks (External Thrust System: ETS). The AMC tectonic units derive from the orogenic transport during Oligo-Miocene times of sedimentary sequences deposited in palaeogeographical domains located between the Europe and the Afro-Adriatic plates. These units are composed of Meso-Cenozoic shallow-water carbonate successions detached from a continental type crust sector, the Panormide/Apenninic Block, recognizable by means of seismic lines shot in the Tyrrhenian offshore of Southern Apennines and Northern Sicily. The Meso-Cenozoic basinal units, that compose the AMC, can be distinguished into two main groups of sequences, originally located on oceanic crusts separated by the Panormide/Apenninic Block: the external ones (Ionides) related to an original basin belonging to branches of the Ionian Palaeobasin involved in the orogenesis, and the internal ones ascribed to the Alpine Tethys (Sicilide Units). The terrigenous deposits of the basinal sequences belonging to the Ionides are represented by Tertiary foreland/foredeep deposits, whose relationships with the substratum are occasionally preserved, although large

  17. Internal structure of the Aar Massif: What can we learn in terms of exploration for deep geothermal energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Baumberger, Roland; Wehrens, Philip; Schubert, Raphael; Berger, Alfons; Maeder, Urs; Spillmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The successful use of deep geothermal energy requires 3D flow paths, which allow an efficient heat exchange between the surrounding host rocks and the circulating fluids. Recent attempts to exploit this energy resource clearly demonstrate that the new technology is facing sever problems. Some major problems are related to the prediction of permeability, the 3D structure of the flow paths and the mechanical responses during elevated fluid pressures at depths of several kilometers. Although seemingly new in a technical perspective, nature is facing and solving similar problems since the beginning of the Alpine orogeny. Based on detailed studies in the Hasli Valley (Aar Massif) we can demonstrate that deformation and fluid flow are strongly localized along mechanical anisotropies (e.g. lithological variations, brittle and ductile faults). Some of them already evolved during Variscan and post-Variscan times. Interestingly, these inherited structures are reactivated over and over again during the Alpine orogeny. Their reactivation occurred at depths of ~13-15 km with elevated temperatures (400-475°C) and involved both ductile and brittle deformation processes. Brittle deformation in form of hydrofracking was always present due to the circulating fluids. It is this process, which was and still is responsible for seismic activity. With progressive uplift and exhumation of the Aar Massif, ductile deformation structures became replaced by brittle cataclasites and fault gouges during fault activity at shallower crustal levels. Existing hydrotest data from the Grimsel Test Site (Nagra's underground research laboratory) indicate that these brittle successors of the ductile shear zones are domains of enhanced recent fluid percolation. Note that although being exposed today, the continuation of these fault structures are still active at depth in both brittle and ductile deformation modes, a fact that can be inferred from recent uplift rates and the active seismicity. On the

  18. Petrographic, geochemical and isotopic evidence of crustal assimilation processes in the Ponte Nova alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif, SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzone, Rogério Guitarrari; Montecinos Munoz, Patricio; Enrich, Gaston Eduardo Rojas; Alves, Adriana; Ruberti, Excelso; Gomes, Celsode Barros

    2016-09-01

    Crustal assimilation plus crystal fractionation processes of different basanite magma batches control the evolution of the Ponte Nova cretaceous alkaline mafic-ultramafic massif in SE Brazil. This massif is composed of several intrusions, the main ones with a cumulate character. Disequilibrium features in the early-crystallized phases (e.g., corrosion and sieve textures in cores of clinopyroxene crystals, spongy-cellular-textured plagioclase crystals, gulf corrosion texture in olivine crystals) and classical hybridization textures (e.g., blade biotite and acicular apatite crystals) provide strong evidence of open-system behavior. All samples are olivine- and nepheline-normative rocks with basic-ultrabasic and potassic characters and variable incompatible element enrichments. The wide ranges of whole-rock 87Sr/86Sri and 143Nd/144Ndi ratios (0.70432-0.70641 and 0.512216-0.512555, respectively) are indicative of crustal contribution from the Precambrian basement host rocks. Plagioclase and apatite 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70422-0.70927) obtained for the most primitive samples of each intrusion indicate disequilibrium conditions from early- to principal-crystallization stages. Isotope mixing-model curves between the least contaminated alkaline basic magma and heterogeneous local crustal components indicate that each intrusion of the massif is differentiated from the others by varied degrees of crustal contribution. The primary mechanisms of crustal contribution to the Ponte Nova massif involve the assimilation of host rock xenoliths during the development of the chamber environment and the assimilation of partial melts from the surrounding host rocks. Thermodynamic models using the melts algorithm indicate that parental alkaline basic magmas can be strongly affected by contamination processes subsequently to their initial stages of crystallization when there is sufficient energy to assimilate partial melts of crustal host rocks. The assimilation processes are considered to

  19. Isotope Sm-Nd age of the paleoproterozoic PGE-bearing Monchetundra massif trachytoid gabbronorites (Fennoscandian shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Bayanova, Tamara; Serov, Pavel; Borisenko, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Monchetundra massif is located in the central part of the Kola Peninsula (Russia) and it is the south-eastern part of the Main Ridge Intrusion. Monchetundra massif together with well-known layered mafic-ultramafic PGE-bearing intrusions in the Fennoscandian shield such as the Fedorovo-Pansky complex, the mt. Generalskaya, the Monchepluton is of interest as a target for the PGE prospecting (Mitrofanov et al. 2006; Nerovich et al., 2009; Grokhovskaya et al., 2003). According to some previously researchers (Nazimova, Rayan, 2008, Nerovich et al., 2009, Layered intrusions…p.1, 2004) rocks of the Monchetundra massif is subdivided into two to five syngenetic zones. Hence the last isotope-geochronological and isotope-geochemical data revealed that the massif includes at least four groups of mafic rocks distinguished by formation ages (Bayanova et al., 2010). The aim of this work is to present Sm-Nd dating results of trachytoid gabbronorites, which are the second mafic rocks group in the Monchetundra massif. The Sm-Nd investigations for these rocks were carried out for the first time. The second group of mafic rocks comprises of medium-grained and coarse-grained mesocratic gabbronorites of trachytoid texture, with they characterized by well-preserved primary magmatic minerals and gabbro-ophitic texture. The U-Pb ages on single zircon-baddeleyite for these rocks recently obtained (2505 ± 6 Ma, 2501 ± 8 Ma, 2504.4±2.7 Ma and 2507.5±7.7 Ma (Layered intrusions…p.1., 2004, Borisenko et al., 2013)). Two samples of trachytoid gabbronorites were selected to study these rocks by Sm-Nd isotopic method. Mineral isochrons plotted from plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene and whole-rock minerals gave ages of 2496±27 (MSWD = 0.9; ɛNd = -1.6±0.5) and 2492±55 Ma (MSWD = 0.5; ɛNd = -1.7±0.5). The new Sm-Nd ages obtained are close to the U-Pb data on zircons and baddeleyites for this rocks group and consider as oridin of second mafic rocks group. All investigations are

  20. Adjusting stream-sediment geochemical maps in the Austrian Bohemian Massif by analysis of variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.C.; Hausberger, G.; Schermann, O.; Bohling, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Austrian portion of the Bohemian Massif is a Precambrian terrane composed mostly of highly metamorphosed rocks intruded by a series of granitoids that are petrographically similar. Rocks are exposed poorly and the subtle variations in rock type are difficult to map in the field. A detailed geochemical survey of stream sediments in this region has been conducted and included as part of the Geochemischer Atlas der Republik O??sterreich, and the variations in stream sediment composition may help refine the geological interpretation. In an earlier study, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied to the stream-sediment data in order to minimize unwanted sampling variation and emphasize relationships between stream sediments and rock types in sample catchment areas. The estimated coefficients were used successfully to correct for the sampling effects throughout most of the region, but also introduced an overcorrection in some areas that seems to result from consistent but subtle differences in composition of specific rock types. By expanding the model to include an additional factor reflecting the presence of a major tectonic unit, the Rohrbach block, the overcorrection is removed. This iterative process simultaneously refines both the geochemical map by removing extraneous variation and the geological map by suggesting a more detailed classification of rock types. ?? 1995 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  1. Saldanha Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: A Controlled Source EM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, M. C.; Santos, F.; Dzhatieva, Z.; Dias, A.; Marques, A. F.; Silva, N.; de Nijs, I.

    2005-12-01

    In November-December 2004 a controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) survey was carried out on the axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during cruise Charles Darwin 167. The work is centred on a non-transform offset between the FAMOUS and AMAR segments, at 36 34' North. Here, a prominent feature is the Saldanha massif: a dome of unroofed mantle rocks, consisting largely of serpentised peridotites, and at whose summit significant low-temperature hydrothermal venting has been documented. Our objective is to determine the distribution of electrical resistivity and hence porosity over a volume of ~ 10 km x 10 km x 3 km vertically, in order to constrain the degree of penetration of seawater into the crust and uppermost mantle; to contrast the porosity structure here with volcanically hosted systems away from segment boundaries elsewhere on the MAR; and to constrain models of non-volcanic heat sources and hydrothermal circulation in ultramafic settings at slow spreading ridges. In addition to the CSEM survey we obtained swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data; water column physical properties and seafloor current data; and a number of dredge and gravity core samples. We shall present details of the data and samples, together with our preliminary analysis of the results.

  2. Boiling fluids in a region of rapid uplift, Nanga Parbat Massif, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Koons, P. O.; Winslow, D.; Chamberlain, C. P.; Zeitler, P.

    1994-12-01

    The Nanga Parbat massif of northern Pakistan is currently undergoing rapid uplift (approx. 5-10 mm/a), resulting in near-surface elevated temperatures. Numerous quartz veins cut geologically young structures (less than 2 Ma), attesting to widespread young fluid flow. Fluid inclusions in quartz veins are predominantly low density water vapor (down to 0.05 mg/cu m), with some low density carbon dioxide vapor, and the fluid is predominantly meteoric in origin. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for boiling near to the critical points for water and for 5 wt% NaCl solution (up to 410 C). Head-driven meteoric water was convecting in fracture permeability under hydrostatic pressures which followed the boiling point-depth curve and near-boiling springs emanate from the surface. Hydrostatic pressures persisted to depths of about 6 km below the topographic surface, or near to sea level, where the brittle-ductile transition is inferred to lie. Numerical modeling of conductive heat flow in an area of high relief during rapid uplift indicates that the shape of the near-surface conductive geotherm is significantly influenced by topographic relief. Reasonable approximations for topgraphy at Nanga Parbat produce a conductive geotherm which implies high, near-surface geothermal gradients (greater than 100 C/km, and the isotherms describe a giant pillar of heat. Above about 4 km, fluid temperature is greater than conductive rock temperature in permeable zones which carry convecting boiling meteoric fluid.

  3. The Montagne Noire migmatitic dome emplacement (French Massif Central): new insights from petrofabric and AMS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Nicolas; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan

    2009-11-01

    In the southern French Massif Central, the Montagne Noire axial zone is a NE-SW elongated granite-migmatite dome emplaced within Visean south-verging recumbent folds and intruded by syn- to late-migmatization granitoids. The tectonic setting of this dome is still disputed, thus several models have been proposed. In order to better understand the emplacement mechanism of this dome, petrofabric and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) studies have been carried out. In the granites and migmatites that form the dome core, magmatic texture and to a lesser extent weak solid-state texture are dominant. As a paramagnetic mineral, biotite is the main carrier of the magnetic susceptibility. On the basis of 135 AMS sites, the magnetic fabrics appear as independent of the lithology but related to the dome architecture. Coupling our results with previous structural and geochronological studies, allows us to propose a new emplacement model. Between 340-325 Ma, the Palaeozoic series underwent a compressional deformation represented by nappes and recumbent folds involving the thermal event leading to partial melting. Until ˜325-310 Ma, the dome emplacement was assisted by diapiric processes. An extensional event took place at ˜300 Ma, after the emplacement of the late to post-migmatitic granitic plutons. In the northeast side of the dome, a brittle normal-dextral faulting controlled the opening of the Graissessac coal basin.

  4. First insights on the molybdenum-copper Bled M'Dena complex (Eglab massif, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagraa, Karima; Salvi, Stefano; Béziat, Didier; Debat, Pierre; Kolli, Omar

    2017-03-01

    Molybdenum-Copper showings in the Eglab massif (eastern part of the Reguibat rise of Algeria), are found in quartz-monzodiorite and granodiorite of the Bled M'Dena complex, a Paleoproterozoic circular structure of ∼5 km in diameter, comprising volcanic and intrusive suites. The latter consist of quartz-diorite, quartz-monzodiorite and granodiorite with a metaluminous normative composition. They display an "adakitic character" with moderate light rare-earth element (LREE) enrichment, minor Eu anomalies, high Sr/Y ratio and low Yb concentration, suggestive of a hydrous, arc magma of volcanic-arc affinity. The mineralization occurs mostly in quartz + molybdenite + chalcopyrite stockwork veins marked by widespread propylitic alteration along the selvages. Molybdenite and chalcopyrite are commonly associated with calcite, which precipitated at relatively late stages of the hydrothermal alteration. Fluid inclusions related to the mineralization stage, range from aqueous to aqueous-carbonic to solid bearing. The latter inclusions have the highest homogenization temperature (up to ∼400 °C), are salt saturated, and commonly contain molybdenite and/or chalcopyrite crystals. The petrology and geochemistry of the host rocks, the style of the hydrothermal alteration, the ore mineral associations, and the characteristics of the fluid inclusions, are all coherent in indicating that the Bled M'Dena represents a Paleoproterozoic porphyry style Mo mineralization, which is far unreported in the African continent.

  5. Raman imaging of fluid inclusions in garnet from UHPM rocks (Kokchetav massif, Northern Kazakhstan).

    PubMed

    Korsakov, Andrey V; Dieing, Thomas; Golovin, Aleksandr V; Toporski, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Confocal Raman imaging of fluid inclusions in garnet porphyroblasts from diamond-grade metamorphic calc-silicate rocks from the Kumdy-Kol microdiamond deposit (Kokchetav Massif, Northern Kazakhstan) reveals that these fluid inclusions consist of almost pure water with different step-daughter phases (e.g., calcite, mica and rare quartz). These fluid inclusions are characterized by negative crystal shape of the host-garnet and they exclusively occur within the core of garnet porphyroblasts. These observations are consistent with their primary origin, most likely at ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic conditions. The euhedral newly formed garnet, different in color and composition, was found to be associated with these fluid inclusions. It is proposed that newly formed garnet and water fluid inclusions appear by reaction between the hydrous fluid and the garnet-host. These fluid inclusions provide an unequivocal record of almost pure H(2)O fluids, indicating water-saturated conditions within subducted continental crust during prograde stage and/or ultrahigh-P metamorphism.

  6. Polyphase wrench tectonics in the southern french Massif Central: kinematic inferences from pre- and syntectonic granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Jean-Yves; Faure, Michel; Ledru, Patrick

    1996-03-01

    In the Variscan French Massif Central, the South Limousin area consists of low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks intruded by two granitic bodies. The structural and textural analyses of these plutons undertaken in parallel with the structural analysis of their host rocks allow us to characterize and to date different stages in the tectonic evolution of this area. This study shows that the South Limousin area experienced successivelly two strike-slip events along two geographically distinct shear zones, from north to south the left-lateral Estivaux and the right-lateral South Limousin strike-slip faults, respectively. These ductile faults subdivide the South Limousin into three structural units, from north to south they are the Upper Gneiss unit, Thiviers-Payzac unit .and Génis unit. The two granitic bodies intrude the Thiviers-Payzac unit only. The younger Estivaux granite is a syntectonic pluton which emplaced during left-lateral wrenching. 40Ar/39Ar dates from biotites indicate an Early Carboniferous age (346 ± 3 Ma). The older granite is a pretectonic body. It is the Ordovician “Saut du Saumon” augen orthogneiss in which detailed structural analyses show the polyphase nature of the solid-state deformation. Our microtectonic data indicate that the right-lateral motions overprint the left-lateral ones and produce apparently symmetrical fabrics.

  7. Polyphase wrench tectonics in the southern french Massif Central: kinematic inferences from pre- and syntectonic granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Jean-Yves; Faure, Michel; Ledru, Patrick

    In the Variscan French Massif Central, the South Limousin area consists of low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks intruded by two granitic bodies. The structural and textural analyses of these plutons undertaken in parallel with the structural analysis of their host rocks allow us to characterize and to date different stages in the tectonic evolution of this area. This study shows that the South Limousin area experienced successivelly two strike-slip events along two geographically distinct shear zones, from north to south the left-lateral Estivaux and the right-lateral South Limousin strike-slip faults, respectively. These ductile faults subdivide the South Limousin into three structural units, from north to south they are the Upper Gneiss unit, Thiviers-Payzac unit and Génis unit. The two granitic bodies intrude the Thiviers-Payzac unit only. The younger Estivaux granite is a syntectonic pluton which emplaced during left-lateral wrenching. 40Ar/39Ar dates from biotites indicate an Early Carboniferous age (346+/-3Ma). The older granite is a pretectonic body. It is the Ordovician "Saut du Saumon" augen orthogneiss in which detailed structural analyses show the polyphase nature of the solid-state deformation. Our microtectonic data indicate that the right-lateral motions overprint the left-lateral ones and produce apparently symmetrical fabrics.

  8. A large and complete Jurassic geothermal field at Claudia, Deseado Massif, Santa Cruz, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Diego M.; Campbell, Kathleen A.

    2014-04-01

    Late Jurassic geothermal deposits at Claudia, Argentinean Patagonia, are among the largest (40 km2) and most varied in the Deseado Massif, a 60,000 km2 volcanic province hosting precious metals (Au, Ag) mineralization generated during diffuse back arc spreading and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Both siliceous sinter and travertine occur in the same stratigraphic sequence. Deposits range from those interpreted as fluvially reworked hydrothermal silica gels, to extensive apron terraces, to a clustering of high-temperature subaerial vent mounds. Paleoenvironmentally diagnostic textures of sinters include wavy laminated, bubble mat and nodular fabrics, and for travertines comprise fossil terracette rims, wavy laminated, bubble mat, spherulitic, oncoidal, and peloidal fabrics. Of special note is the presence of relatively large (to 25 cm high), inferred subaqueous "Conophyton" structures in travertines, which serve as analogs for some Precambrian stromatolites and imply the presence of relatively deep pools maintained by voluminous spring discharges. The Claudia geothermal field is geographically and geologically linked to the Cerro Vanguardia epithermal project (total resource of ~ 7.8 million ounces Au equivalent) via proximity, similar veins, and structural linkages, making it an especially large and relevant prospect for the region. The combined Claudia-Cerro Vanguardia hydrothermal system likely represents a fortuitous alignment of focused fluid flow and structure conducive to forming a giant epithermal ore deposit, with respect to size, ore concentration and potentially duration, in the Late Jurassic of Patagonia.

  9. The limnology and biology of the Dufek Massif, Transantarctic Mountains 82° South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Dominic A.; Convey, Peter; Verleyen, Elie; Vyverman, Wim; McInnes, Sandra J.; Sands, Chester J.; Fernández-Carazo, Rafael; Wilmotte, Annick; De Wever, Aaike; Peeters, Karolien; Tavernier, Ines; Willems, Anne

    2010-08-01

    Very little is known about the higher latitude inland biology of continental Antarctica. In this paper we describe the limnology and biology of the Dufek Massif, using a range of observational, microscopic and molecular methods. Here two dry valleys are home to some of the southernmost biota on Earth. Cyanobacteria were the dominant life forms, being found in lakes and ponds, in hypersaline brines, summer melt water, relict pond beds and in exposed terrestrial habitats. Their species diversity was the lowest yet observed in Antarctic lakes. Green algae, cercozoa and bacteria were present, but diatoms were absent except for a single valve; likely windblown. Mosses were absent and only one lichen specimen was found. The Metazoa included three microbivorous tardigrades ( Acutuncus antarcticus, Diphascon sanae and Echiniscus (cf) pseudowendti) and bdelloid rotifer species, but no arthropods or nematodes. These simple faunal and floral communities are missing most of the elements normally present at lower latitudes in the Antarctic which is probably a result of the very harsh environmental conditions in the area.

  10. AMS 14C Dates for Extinct Lemurs from Caves in the Ankarana Massif, Northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Elwyn L.; Burney, David A.; Chatrath, Prithijit S.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Jungers, William L.; Rakotosamimanana, Berthe

    1995-03-01

    An extensive late Quaternary fauna, including many extinct giant lemurs, has been collected recently in a 110+-km system of caves in the Ankarana Massif of northern Madagascar. AMS 14C dates for the acid-insoluble (collagen/gelatin) fraction of bones of the giant lemur Megaladapis (26,150 ± 400 and 12,760 ± 70 yr B.P.) confirm its presence in the area during the late Pleistocene and provide the first Pleistocene 14 C ages from bones of the extinct megafauna of the island. The first date from bones of the recently described extinct Babakotia radofilai (4400 ± 60 yr B.P.) shows that it was present in northern Madagascar in mid-Holocene times. A comparatively recent age of 1020 ± 50 yr B.P. for the extinct Archaeolemur indicates survival of this genus for at least a millennium after the first direct evidence for humans in Madagascar. This suggests that the island's "extinction window" may have represented a longer time span than would have been expected under the Blitzkrieg model of late Quaternary extinctions. A mid-Holocene age (4560 ± 70 yr B.P.) for a bone sample of the small extant lemur Hapalemur simus indicates that the disappearance of this now-restricted species from the Ankarana occurred after this date. New data from the Ankarana and other sites on the island add to the consensus that major biotic changes occurred on Madagascar in the late Holocene.

  11. Rivers, re-entrants, and 3D variations in orogenic wedge development: a case study of the NW Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A. G.; Yu, H.; Hendershott, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Orogenic wedges are standard elements of collisional plate tectonics, from accretionary prisms to retro-arc basins. Recent study of orogenic wedge development has focused on links between mechanisms of internal deformation and surface processes. Models of orogenic wedges are commonly presented in the cross-section plane, which is generally effective as wedges largely develop via plane strain. The 3rd dimension can be utilized to explore effects of differences in controlling parameters on wedge evolution. We are investigating a stretch of the western Himalayan orogenic wedge that has two prominent changes in along-strike morphology: (1) a tectonic window (the Kullu Window) that appears to be strongly influenced by erosion along the 3rd largest river in the Himalayan system, the Sutlej River and (2) the Kangra Re-entrant, the largest re-entrant along the Himalayan arc. In addition to the along-strike heterogeneity, a key advantage of the proposed study area is its rich stratigraphy, with the most known diversity in the Himalayan arc. The stratigraphic wealth, combined with the along-strike heterogeneity in exposure level, offers a high resolution view of regional structural geometry. Our preliminary reconstructions suggest that the Sutlej River erosion increases the exposure depth and shortening budget across a narrow segment of the orogen, strongly warping the Kullu Window. Previous models have suggested that the out-of-sequence Munsiari thrust is the main structure associated with Kullu window formation, while our work suggests that most of this uplift and warping is accomplished by antiformal stacking of basement thrust horses. Late Miocene ages (U-Pb ages of zircons and Th-Pb ages of monazites) from a leucogranite in the core of the Kullu Window along the Sutlej River further suggests that this segment of the orogen represents a middle ground between plane strain orogenic wedge development and a tectonic aneurysm model. We have constructed a palinspastic

  12. High-pressure granulites of the Podolsko complex, Bohemian Massif: An example of crustal rocks that were subducted to mantle depths and survived a pervasive mid-crustal high-temperature overprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faryad, Shah Wali; Žák, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The Podolsko complex, Bohemian Massif, is a mid-crustal migmatite-granite dome exposed along a tectonic boundary separating the upper crust from the deeply eroded interior of the Variscan orogen, referred to as the Moldanubian Zone. This study examines metamorphic history of mafic and felsic granulites that occur in this complex as minor lenses or layers hosted in pervasively anatectic rocks. The mafic granulite contains garnet with preserved high-Ca cores, which based on pseudosection modelling indicates pressure conditions near the coesite stability field at temperatures of ca. 550-600 °C. The relicts of an earlier eclogite-facies stage have been overprinted by a later granulite-facies assemblage consisting of ternary feldspar, orthopyroxene, and spinel in the mafic granulite and sillimanite and spinel in the felsic granulite. Composition of younger garnet (in rims and as smaller grains) in both granulites suggests that a near isothermal decompression of these rocks was followed by heating that reached temperature of ca. 900 °C at pressure of ca. 0.5 GPa. It is thus concluded that the granulites underwent at least two temporally separate tectonometamorphic events: they were first subducted to mantle depths and exhumed rapidly at relatively low temperatures and then near isobarically heated at mid-crustal levels. The preservation of earlier eclogite-facies garnet in the mafic granulite indicates that the latter event was short-lived and was followed by near isobaric cooling. The geologically brief granulite-facies metamorphism was previously explained as a result of slab break-off and mantle upwelling after the main phase of microplate convergence in the Bohemian Massif. To put the Podolsko complex into a broader tectonic context, we synthesize the available petrologic and structural data from the correlative (U)HP assemblages of the Moldanubian Zone to suggest that they typically do not preserve structural record of the subduction stage, only rarely preserve an

  13. Lithologic Distribution and Geologic History of the Apollo 17 Site: The Record in Soils and Small Rock Particles from the Highland Massifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Rockow, Kaylynn M.; Korotev, Randy L.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1996-01-01

    Through analysis by instrumental neutron activation (INAA) of 789 individual lithic fragments from the 2 mm-4 mm grain-size fractions of five Apollo 17 soil samples (72443, 72503, 73243, 76283, and 76503) and petrographic examination of a subset, we have determined the diversity and proportions of rock types recorded within soils from the highland massifs. The distribution of rock types at the site, as recorded by lithic fragments in the soils, is an alternative to the distribution inferred from the limited number of large rock samples. The compositions and proportions of 2 mm-4 mm fragments provide a bridge between compositions of less than 1 mm fines and types and proportions of rocks observed in large collected breccias and their clasts. The 2 mm-4 mm fraction of soil from South Massif, represented by an unbiased set of lithic fragments from station-2 samples 72443 and 72503, consists of 71% noritic impact-melt breccia, 7% Incompatible-Trace-Element-(ITE)-poor highland rock types (mainly granulitic breccias), 19% agglutinates and regolith breccias, 1% high-Ti mare basalt, and 2% others (very-low-Ti (VLT) basalt, monzogabbro breccia, and metal). In contrast, the 2 mm - 4 mm fraction of a soil from the North Massif, represented by an unbiased set of lithic fragments from station-6 sample 76503, has a greater proportion of ITE-poor highland rock types and mare-basalt fragments: it consists of 29% ITE-poor highland rock types (mainly granulitic breccias and troctolitic anorthosite), 25% impact-melt breccia, 13% high-Ti mare basalt, 31 % agglutinates and regolith breccias, 1% orange glass and related breccia, and 1% others. Based on a comparison of mass- weighted mean compositions of the lithic fragments with compositions of soil fines from all Apollo 17 highland stations, differences between the station-2 and station-6 samples are representative of differences between available samples from the two massifs. From the distribution of different rock types and their

  14. Late Precambrian Balkan-Carpathian ophiolite — a slice of the Pan-African ocean crust?: geochemical and tectonic insights from the Tcherni Vrah and Deli Jovan massifs, Bulgaria and Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Ryan, Jeff; Haydoutov, Ivan; Schijf, Johan

    2001-10-01

    The Balkan-Carpathian ophiolite (BCO), which outcrops in Bulgaria, Serbia and Romania, is a Late Precambrian (563 Ma) mafic/ultramafic complex unique in that it has not been strongly deformed or metamorphosed, as have most other basement sequences in Alpine Europe. Samples collected for study from the Tcherni Vrah and Deli Jovan segments of BCO include cumulate dunites, troctolites, wehrlites and plagioclase wehrlites; olivine and amphibole-bearing gabbros; anorthosites; diabases and microgabbros; and basalts representing massive flows, dikes, and pillow lavas, as well as hyaloclastites and umbers (preserved sedimentary cover). Relict Ol, Cpx and Hbl in cumulate peridotites indicate original orthocumulate textures. Plagioclase in troctolites and anorthosites range from An 60 to An 70. Cumulate gabbro textures range from ophitic to poikilitic, with an inferred crystallization order of Ol-(Plag+Cpx)-Hbl. The extrusive rocks exhibit poikilitic, ophitic and intersertal textures, with Cpx and/or Plag (Oligoclase-Andesine) phenocrysts. The major opaques are Ti-Magnetite and Ilmenite. The metamorphic paragenesis in the mafic samples is Chl-Trem-Ep, whereas the ultramafic rocks show variable degrees of serpentinization, with lizardite and antigorite as dominant phases. Our samples are compositionally and geochemically similar to modern oceanic crust. Major element, trace element and rare earth element (REE) signatures in BCO basalts are comparable to those of MORB. In terms of basalt and dike composition, the BCO is a 'high-Ti' or 'oceanic' ophiolite, based on the classification scheme of Serri [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 52 (1981) 203]. Our petrologic and geochemical results, combined with the tectonic position of the BCO massifs (overlain by and in contact with Late Cambrian island arc and back-arc sequences), suggest that the BCO may have formed in a mid-ocean ridge setting. If the BCO records the existence of a Precambrian ocean basin, then there may be a relationship

  15. Kinematics of back-arc extension driven by the interference of subduction and/or collisional zones: application to a number of Mediterranean orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matenco, L.; Cloetingh, S.

    2013-12-01

    The large number and distribution of roll-back systems in Mediterranean orogens infers the possibility of interacting extensional back-arc deformation driven by different slabs. Classical models of orogenic evolution assume that such back arc basins form in the hinterland of orogens, collapsing the upper plate above oceanic subduction zones. This is a common characteristic thought to apply to all low-topography orogens of Mediterranean type driven by the fast roll-back of genetically related slabs, or to other analogues such as the Miocene to recent evolution of the SE Asia subduction zones. This extension may take place far at the interior of the upper plate, as is the case in various segments of the Carpathians or in the core of the SE Asian domain, but in most cases of the Dinarides, Apennines or Hellenides it take place superposed or far into the foreland when compared with the position of oceanic suture zones. Mediterranean orogens often diverge from the typical scenario by widespread extensional deformation taking place during moments of continent-continent collision and by the interference of such deformation driven by different subduction zones. For instance, the formation of the Pannonian back-arc basin is generally related to the rapid Miocene roll-back of a slab attached to the European continent. The present-day extensional geometry of the Pannonian back-arc formed essentially during the Carpathians collision and was also driven by an additional Middle Miocene roll-back of a Dinaridic slab. In other orogenic systems, the back-arc extension takes place during continent-continent collision along major detachments that are located in the core of the orogen (Rif, Betics), in the accreted crustal material of the lower plate (Apennines, Dinarides) or even in a presumed former fore-arc (Aegean, Sunda-Banda arc). In all these subduction zones, collision has largely duplicated crustal blocks from the lower plate and has gradually shifted subduction zone far

  16. Deformation processes in orogenic wedges: New methods and application to Northwestern Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Christopher J.

    Permanent deformation records aspects of how material moves through a tectonic environment. The methods required to measure deformation vary based on rock type, deformation process, and the geological question of interest. In this thesis we develop two new methods for measuring permanent deformation in rocks. The first method uses the autocorrelation function to measure the anisotropy present in two-dimensional photomicrographs and three-dimensional X-ray tomograms of rocks. The method returns very precise estimates for the deformation parameters and works best for materials where the deformation is recorded as a shape change of distinct fabric elements, such as grains. Our method also includes error estimates. Image analysis techniques can focus the method on specific fabric elements, such as quartz grains. The second method develops a statistical technique for measuring the symmetry in a distribution of crystal orientations, called a lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). We show that in many cases the symmetry of the LPO directly constrains the symmetry of the deformation, such axial flattening vs. pure shear vs. simple shear. In addition to quantifying the symmetry, the method uses the full crystal orientation to estimate symmetry rather than pole figures. Pole figure symmetry can often be misleading. This method works best for crystal orientations measured in samples deformed by dislocation creep, but otherwise can be used on any mineral without requiring information about slip systems. In Chapter 4 we show how deformation measurements can be used to inform regional tectonic and orogenic models in the Pacific Northwestern United States. A suite of measurements from the Olympic Mountains shows that uplift and deformation of the range is consistent with an orogenic wedge model driven by subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate, and not northward forearc migration of the Oregon block. The deformation measurements also show that deformation within the Olympic Mountains

  17. Metamorphic evolution and geochronology of the Dunhuang orogenic belt in the Hongliuxia area, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao Y. C.; Wang, Juan; Wang, Guo-Dong; Lu, Jun-Sheng; Chen, Hong-Xu; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Hui C. G.; Zhang, Qian W. L.; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Hou, Quan-Lin; Yan, Quan-Ren; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Chun-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Garnet-bearing mafic granulites and amphibolites from the Hongliuxia area of the southern Dunhuang orogenic belt, northwestern China, commonly occur as lenses or boudinages enclosed within metapelite or marble, which represent the block-in-matrix feature typical of orogenic mélange. Three to four generations of metamorphic mineral assemblages are preserved in these rocks. In the high-pressure amphibolites, prograde mineral assemblages (M1) occur as inclusions (hornblende + plagioclase + quartz ± chlorite ± epidote ± ilmenite) preserved within garnet porphyroblasts, and formed at 550-590 °C and 7.7-9.2 kbar based on geothermobarometry. The metamorphic peak mineral assemblages (M2) are composed of garnet + hornblende + plagioclase + quartz + clinopyroxene, as well as titanite + zircon + rutile + apatite as accessory minerals in the matrix, and are estimated to have formed at 640-720 °C and 14.1-16.0 kbar. The first retrograde assemblages (M3) are characterized by "white-eye socket" symplectites (hornblende + plagioclase + quartz ± biotite ± epidote ± magnetite) rimming garnet porphyroblasts, which formed at the expense of the garnet rims and adjacent matrix minerals during the decompression stage under P-T conditions of 610-630 °C and 5.6-11.8 kbar. The second retrograde assemblages (M4) are intergrowths of actinolite and worm-like quartz produced by the breakdown of the matrix hornblendes, and formed under P-T conditions of ∼490 °C and ∼2.8 kbar. For the high-pressure mafic granulites, the prograde assemblages (M1) are represented by plagioclase + quartz preserved within the garnet porphyroblasts. The metamorphic peak assemblages (M2) are garnet + matrix minerals (clinopyroxene + plagioclase + quartz + hornblende + rutile + zircon) and were estimated to have formed at ∼680 °C and ∼15.4 kbar. The retrograde assemblages (M3) are characterized by fine-grained patches of hornblende + plagioclase + quartz rimming the garnet porphyroblasts, as well as

  18. Magma-assisted strain localization in an orogen-parallel transcurrent shear zone of southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, AndréA.; Vauchez, Alain; Femandes, Luis A. D.; Porcher, Carla C.

    1994-04-01

    In a lithospheric-scale, orogen-parallel transcurrent shear zone of the Pan-African Dom Feliciano belt of southern Brazil, two successive generations of magmas, an early calc-alkaline and a late peraluminous, have been emplaced during deformation. Microstructures show that these granitoids experienced a progressive deformation from magmatic to solid state under decreasing temperature conditions. Magmatic deformation is indicated by the coexistence of aligned K-feldspar, plagioclase, micas, and/or tourmaline with undeformed quartz. Submagmatic deformation is characterized by strain features, such as fractures, lattice bending, or replacement reactions affecting only the early crystallized phases. High-temperature solid-state deformation is characterized by extensive grain boundary migration in quartz, myrmekitic K-feldspar replacement, and dynamic recrystallization of both K-feldspar and plagioclase. Decreasing temperature during solid-state deformation is inferred from changes in quartz crystallographic fabrics, decrease in grain size of recrystallized feldspars, and lower Ti amount in recrystallized biotites. Final low-temperature deformation is characterized by feldspar replacement by micas. The geochemical evolution of the synkinematic magmatism, from calc-alkaline metaluminous granodiorites with intermediate 87Sr/86Sr initial ratio to peraluminous granites with very high 87Sr/86Sr initial ratio, suggests an early lower crustal source or a mixed mantle/crustal source, followed by a middle to upper crustal source for the melts. Shearing in lithospheric faults may induce partial melting in the lower crust by shear heating in the upper mantle, but, whatever the process initiating partial melting, lithospheric transcurrent shear zones may collect melt at different depths. Because they enhance the vertical permeability of the crust, these zones may then act as heat conductors (by advection), promoting an upward propagation of partial melting in the crust

  19. Clinoform deposition across a boundary between orogenic front and foredeep - an example from the Lower Cretaceous in Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Wartes, Marwan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Fortress Mountain Formation occupies a spatial and temporal niche between syntectonic deposits at the Brooks Range orogenic front and post-tectonic strata in the Colville foreland basin. The formation includes basin-floor fan, marine-slope and fan-delta facies that define a clinoform depositional profile. Texture and composition of clasts in the formation suggest progressive burial of a tectonic wedge-front that included older turbidites and mélange. These new interpretations, based entirely on outcrop study, suggest that the Fortress Mountain Formation spans the boundary between orogenic wedge and foredeep, with proximal strata onlapping the tectonic wedge-front and distal strata downlapping the floor of the foreland basin. Our reconstruction suggests that clinoform amplitude reflects the structural relief generated by tectonic wedge development and load-induced flexural subsidence of the foreland basin.

  20. The Kokchetav Massif, Kazakhstan: "Type locality" of diamond-bearing UHP metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertl, H.-P.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2013-02-01

    After the discovery of metamorphic coesite in crustal rocks from the Western Alps (Italy) and the Western gneiss region (Norway) in the mid 1980s of the last century, metamorphic diamond was observed only a few years later "in situ" in the Kokchetav Massif (Kazakhstan). Findings of such coesite- and diamond-bearing ultrahigh pressure metamorphic (UHP) rocks with protoliths formed or embedded in crustal levels and subsequently experienced PT-conditions within or even higher than the coesite stability field have dramatically changed our geodynamic view of orogenetic processes. These occurrences provide evidence that crustal rocks were subducted into mantle depths and exhumed to the surface. Recent studies even suggest continental subduction to depths exceeding 300 km. These rocks have been extensively studied and many new and important observations have been made. Thus far, more than 350 papers have been published on various aspects of Kokchetav UHP rocks. The Kokchetav Massif of northern Kazakhstan is part of one of the largest suture zones in Central Asia and contains slices of HP and UHP metamorphic rocks. Classical UHP rocks mainly occur in the Kumdy Kol, Barchi Kol and Kulet areas, and include a large variety of lithologies such as calcsilicate rocks, eclogite, gneisses, schists, marbles of various compositions, garnet-pyroxene-quartz rocks, and garnet peridotite. Most of them contain microdiamonds; some of which reach a grain size of 200 μm. Most diamond grains show cuboid shapes but in rare cases, diamonds within clinozoisite gneiss from Barchi Kol occur as octahhedral form. Microdiamonds contain highly potassic fluid inclusions, as well as solid inclusions like carbonates, silicates and metal sulfides, which favour the idea of diamond formation from a C-O-H bearing fluid. Nitrogen isotope data and negative δ13C values of Kokchetav diamonds indicate a metasedimentary origin. PT-estimates of Kokchetav UHP rocks yield peak metamorphic conditions of at least 43

  1. Garnet from diamondiferous metamorphic rocks of Kokchetav massif, Kazakhstan as a peak pressure recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, N. V.; Palyanov, Y. N.; Shatsky, V. S.; Sokol, A. G.; Tomilenko, A. A.

    2003-12-01

    Garnet is a key mineral coexisting with diamond both in kimberlite (as xenocrysts, in diamondiferous garnet peridotites and eclogites, as inclusions in diamond) and in UHP metamorphic rocks of Kokchetav massif (diamondiferous gneisses, garnet-pyroxene rocks, dolomitic marbles and diamond facies eclogites). In UHPM rocks garnets are of particular importance as inclusions in zircons protected from retrograde metamorphism. Diamond formation conditions in eclogitic (E-type) upper mantle environment are estimated based upon Grt-Cpx thermometry and coesite barometry (e.g. Sobolev et al., PNAS, 2000, 97:11875) at P=5.5-6.0 GPa and T=1000-1300° C. These data are supported by diamond synthesis in carbonate-silicate fluid (e.g. Palyanov et al., Nature, 1999, 400: 417). E-type garnet may dissolve up to 0.3 wt.% Na2O (Sobolev, Lavrentyev, Contr. Min. Petr., 1971, 31:1) depending on pressure and Na2O contents in coexisting pyroxene and melts (fluids). Majorite component (pyroxene solid solution) was reported in rare garnets from diamonds (e.g. Moore, Gurney, Nature, 1985, 318:553) and UHP conditions were experimentally confirmed for such garnets (Irifune, Phys. Eart. Pl. Int., 1987, 45:324; Gasparik, Phys. Chem. Min., 2002, 29:170; Luth, Am. Miner., 1997, 82:1198). Garnets from Kokchetav diamondiferous metamorphic rocks demonstrate considerably lower Na2O solubility (up to 0.2 wt.% in rare samples) and absence of majorite component. However, coexisting pyroxenes may contain up to 50 mol.% jadeite. Several UHP experiments performed with Kokchetav eclogites and dolomitic marbles using a split-sphere apparatus resulted in detection of up to 0.3-0.4 wt.% Na2O in newly formed eclogitic garnets at P=5.7 and 7.0 GPa, T=1400 and 1700° C respectively. Majorite component was also determined in newly formed garnets reaching about 5% with Si (pfu)=3.05-3.06. Similar garnets without Na2O were also obtained in UHP experiments with diamondiferous dolomitic marbles (e.g. Palyanov et al

  2. Serpentinite Carbonation in the Pollino Massif (southern Italy) for CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmela Dichicco, Maria; Mongelli, Giovanni; Paternoster, Michele; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic gas emissions are projected to change future climates with potentially nontrivial impacts (Keller et al., 2008 and references therein) and the impacts of the increased CO2 concentration are, among others, the greenhouse effect, the acidification of the surface of the ocean and the fertilization of ecosystems (e.g. Huijgen and Comans, 2003). Geologic Sequestration into subsurface rock formations for long-term storage is part of a process frequently referred to as "carbon capture and storage" or CCS. A major strategy for the in situ geological sequestration of CO2 involves the reaction of CO2 with Mg-silicates, especially in the form of serpentinites, which are rocks: i) relatively abundant and widely distributed in the Earth's crust, and ii) thermodynamically convenient for the formation of Mg-carbonates (e.g., Brown et al., 2011). In nature, carbonate minerals can form during serpentinization or during hydrothermal carbonation and weathering of serpentinites whereas industrial mineral carbonation processes are commonly represented by the reaction of olivine or serpentine with CO2 to form magnesite + quartz ± H2O (Power et al., 2013). Mineral carbonation occurs naturally in the subsurface as a result of fluid-rock interactions within serpentinite, which occur during serpentinization and carbonate alteration. In situ carbonation aims to promote these reactions by injecting CO2 into porous, subsurface geological formations, such as serpentinite-hosted aquifers. In the northern sector of the Pollino Massif (southern Italy) extensively occur serpentinites (Sansone et. al., 2012) and serpentinite-hosted aquifers (Margiotta et al., 2012); both serpentinites and serpentinite-hosted aquifers are the subject of a comprehensive project devoted to their possible use for in situ geological sequestration of CO2. The serpentinites derived from a lherzolitic and subordinately harzburgitic mantle, and are within tectonic slices in association with metadolerite dykes

  3. Distribution patterns, properties and ages of Pleistocene periglacial slope deposits in the eastern Rhenish Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Scholten, Thomas; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Kadereit, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Pleistocene periglacial slope deposits (PPSD) cover almost continuously the low mountain areas of Germany. They are interpreted as the result of frost weathering, gelisolifluction, cryoturbation, meltwater outwash processes and loess incorporation. Four types of PPSD are distinguished in the German classification system: A Basal Layer consists entirely of debris of the underlying rock, which it usually directly overlies. It occurs in almost every relief position, and several Basal Layers may have formed on top of each other. An Intermediate Layer contains varying proportions of loess. It is only found in relief positions favourable for loess accumulation and preservation. Its position within a vertical sequence of PPSD is usually on top of a Basal Layer. An Upper Layer consists of a mixture of rock debris and loess, and contains generally a lower amount of loess than a possibly underlying Intermediate Layer. It has a remarkably steady thickness of around 50 cm, as confirmed in many studies. The Top Layer is mostly restricted to the surroundings of outcrops of particularly resistant rock in higher regions and mainly consists of rock debris. PPSD were investigated in the eastern Westerwald area, at the eastern edge of the Rhenish Massif, Germany. Parent rock, exposition, position and shape of slope were expected to be factors influencing the occurrence, thickness and properties of the different types of PPSD. Therefore, profiles were excavated on the main rock types in the area, which are shale, quartzite and diabase. On each rock type, profiles were studied along catenas in NW, SW, SE and NE exposition, each catena including a profile in upper, middle and footslope position. In upper slope positions on shale an Upper Layer covers directly the rock, independent of exposition. In downslope direction, still above the mid slope profiles, a Basal Layer appears between the Upper Layer and the rock. In upper slope positions on quartzite, a Basal Layer is already present

  4. Orogenic gold mineralisation hosted by Archaean basement rocks at Sortekap, Kangerlussuaq area, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwell, D. A.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Butterworth, K. G.; Abraham-James, T.; Boyce, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    A gold-bearing quartz vein system has been identified in Archaean basement rocks at Sortekap in the Kangerlussuaq region of east Greenland, 35 km north-northeast of the Skaergaard Intrusion. This constitutes the first recorded occurrence of Au mineralisation in the metamorphic basement rocks of east Greenland. The mineralisation can be classified as orogenic style, quartz vein-hosted Au mineralisation. Two vein types have been identified based on their alteration styles and the presence of Au mineralisation. Mineralised type 1 veins occur within sheared supracrustal units and are hosted by garnet-bearing amphibolites, with associated felsic and ultramafic intrusions. Gold is present as native Au and Au-rich electrum together with arsenopyrite and minor pyrite and chalcopyrite in thin alteration selvages in the immediate wall rocks. The alteration assemblage of actinolite-clinozoisite-muscovite-titanite-scheelite-arsenopyrite-pyrite is considered to be a greenschist facies assemblage. The timing of mineralisation is therefore interpreted as being later and separate event to the peak amphibolite facies metamorphism of the host rocks. Type 2 quartz veins are barren of mineralisation, lack significant alteration of the wall rocks and are considered to be later stage. Fluid inclusion microthermometry of the quartz reveals three separate fluids, including a high temperature ( T h = 300-350 °C), H2O-CO2-CH4 fluid present only in type 1 veins that in interpreted to be responsible for the main stage of Au deposition and sulphidic wall rock alteration. It is likely that the carbonic fluids were actually trapped at temperatures closer to 400 °C. Two other fluids were identified within both vein types, which comprise low temperature (100-200 °C) brines, with salinities of 13-25 wt% eq. NaCl and at least one generation of low salinity aqueous fluids. The sources and timings of the secondary fluids are currently equivocal but they may be related to the emplacement of

  5. Syn-Uralian orogenic heavy mineral provenance analysis from southeastern Taimyr, Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pease, V.; Scott, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Taimyr peninsula is on the northern margin of the Siberian craton and divides into the southern, central and northern NE - SW trending domains. The southern Taimyr domain represents the passive margin of Siberia and is dominated by a Paleozoic, extending into the early Mesozoic, succession. The central Taimyr domain accreted to the southern domain during Late Precambrian time, followed by collision with the northern Taimyr domain of Baltican affinity during the Late Paleozoic as part of Uralian orogenesis. The Carboniferous - Permian sedimentary succession, which was deposited during the later stage of Uralian Orogeny, can provide crucial information about the extent of contemporaneous Uralian orogensis and its influence on the tectonic evolution of southern Taimyr. Three Carboniferous - Permian samples from southeastern Taimyr were analyzed for petrography and heavy mineral analysis to define their sedimentary and provenance characteristics. The Upper Carboniferous to Lower Permian sample (VP10-25, Turuzovskya Formation, C2-P1tr), the Lower Permian sample (VP10-14, Sokolinskaya Formation, P1sk) and the Upper Permian sample (VP10-12, Baykurskaya Formation, P2bk)) classify as subarkose, lithic arkose and feldspathic litharenite, respectively- they record decreasing sediment maturity through time. While all the samples represent a 'recycled orogen' source based on QtFL plots, the C2-P1tr sample represents a recycled quartzite, while the P1sk sample plots within the mixed field, and the P2bk sample is transitional on QmFLt plots. According to the heavy mineral analysis results, the C2-P1tr sample and P1sk sample show great similarity in heavy mineral assemblage, dominated by zircon, apatite and rutile. The P2bk sample shows distinct differences, containing apatite, tourmaline, garnet and zircon. The prominent increase of garnet suggests a metamorphic source. These similarities and variations among the three samples are also shown in other discrimination diagrams

  6. Intraplate geodynamics and magmatism in the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Kuzmin, M. I.; Ernst, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) was produced as a consequence of the successive closure of the Paleoasian Ocean and the accretion of structures formed within it (island arcs, oceanic islands, and backarc basins) to the Siberian continent. The belt started developing in the latest Late Neoproterozoic, and this process terminated in the latest Permian in response to the collision of the Siberian and North China continents that resulted in closure of the Paleoasian ocean (Metcalfe, 2006; Li et al., 2014; Liu et al., 2009; Xiao et al., 2010; Didenko et al., 2010). Throughout the whole evolutionary history of this Orogenic Belt, a leading role in its evolution was played by convergent processes. Along with these processes, an important contribution to the evolution of the composition and structure of the crust in the belt was made by deep geodynamic processes related to the activity of mantle plumes. Indicator complexes of the activity of mantle plumes are identified, and their major distribution patterns in CAOB structures are determined. A number of epochs and areas of intraplate magmatism are distinguished, including the Neoproterozoic one (Rodinia breakup and the origin of alkaline rock belt in the marginal part of the Siberian craton); Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian (origin of oceanic islands in the Paleoasian Ocean); Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician (origin of LIP within the region of Early Caledonian structures in CAOB); Middle Paleozoic (origin of LIP in the Altai-Sayan rift system); Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic (origin of the Tarim flood-basalt province, Central Asian rift system, and a number of related zonal magmatic areas); Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic (origin of continental volcanic areas in Central Asia). Geochemical and isotopic characteristics are determined for magmatic complexes that are indicator complexes for areas of intraplate magmatism of various age, and their major evolutionary trends are discussed. Available data indicate that mantle plumes

  7. Orogenic superstructure behaviour and mid-crustal plastic flow in the central Nepal Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, L.; Kellett, D. A.; Larson, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    In the central Nepal Himalaya, the Tethyan sedimentary sequence (TSS) forms the superstructure to mid-crustal infrastructure rocks of the Greater Himalayan sequence (GHS); the top-to-the-north South Tibetan detachment system (STDS) defines their contact. North-verging folds, opposite to the main orogenic vergence, structurally dominate the TSS. Although the absolute age of this folding is unknown, structural observations and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicate that it formed between 50-23 Ma, predating the dominant Miocene motion on the STDS. The GHS records a two-stage post-collisional history, marked by ca. 35 Ma burial metamorphism, followed by high-T, low-P, ca. 22 Ma metamorphism. Dominant top-to-the-south shear fabrics developed at peak temperatures at ca. 22 Ma pervasively transpose linear and planar features within the GHS. Vorticity analyses yield kinematic vorticity numbers between 0.29 and 0.80 (81-41% pure shear), with a significant amount of stretch parallel to the flow plane (34-53%). 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological data indicate that southward extrusion of the GHS terminated with cessation of movement on the STDS at 19 Ma. Our data suggest that the orogenic superstructure actively influenced the behaviour of the infrastructure in the early stages of orogenesis through fold-thrust belt formation leading to prograde 35 Ma metamorphism in the GHS. Associated melt weakening in the infrastructure allowed the initiation of southward plastic flow of the GHS, locally modifying the vergence of superstructural folds towards the north. As melt weakening in the middle crust intensified and the rheological contrast between superstructure and infrastructure increased, the upper crust decoupled from the middle crust and deformation in the upper crust temporarily ceased. By 17 Ma the extruded mid-crustal rocks cooled sufficiently to require the upper, brittle component of the STDS to become active. As cooling continued (17-14 Ma), the superstructure and underlying

  8. A Late Cretaceous Orogen Triggering the Tertiary Rifting of the West Sunda Plate; Andaman Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, B.; Pubellier, M. F.; Menier, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rifted Basins often develop in internal zones of orogenic belts, although the latter may not be easy to unravel. We chose the example of the super-stretched Andaman sea region affected by several stages of rifting in the internal zone of a composite collage of allochthonous terranes. We made use of a set of geophysical, geochronological and structural data to analyze the rifting evolution and reconstruct the previous compressional structures. - Starting in the late Oligocene the East Andaman Basin opened as a back arc in a right-lateral pull- apart. The rifting propagated Westward to the central Andaman basin in the Middle Miocene, and to the oceanic spreading stage in the Pliocene. - An early extension occurred in the Paleogene, marked by widespread opening of isolated continental basins onshore Malay Peninsula and offshore Andaman Shelf and Malacca Straits. The rifting was accommodated by LANF's along preexisting weakness zones such as hinges of folds and granitic batholiths. Continuous extension connected the isolated basins offshore, whereas onshore, the grabens remained confined. There, AFT data show an uplift phase around 30Ma. In the Late Cretaceous, a major deformation occurred oblique to the pre-existing Indosinian basement fabrics. The convergence was partitioned into thrusting and uplift of the Cretaceous volcanic arc in Thailand and Myanmar, inversion of Mesozoic basins, and coeval wrenching responsible for large phacoid-shaped crustal slivers bounded by wide strike slip fault zones. The slivers share similar characteristics: a thick continental core of lower Paleozoic sedimentary basins units surrounded by Late Cretaceous granitoids. Radiometric data and fission tracks indicate a widespread thermal anomaly in all West Sunda Plate synchronous to a strong uplift. In the Latest Mesozoic, the Western Margin of Sunda plate was subjected to a major E-W compression, accommodated by oblique conjugate strike slip faults, leading to the formation of a large

  9. Magnetic signatures of the orogenic crust of the Patagonian Andes with implication for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Michelena, Marina; Kilian, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    The Patagonian Andes represent a good scenario of study because they have outcrops of diverse plutonic rocks representative of an orogenic crust on Earth and other planets. Furthermore, metamorphic surface rocks provide a window into deeper crustal lithologies. In such remote areas, satellite and aerial magnetic surveys could provide important geological information concerning exposed and not exposed rocks, but they integrate the magnetic anomalies in areas of kilometres. For the southernmost Andes long wavelength satellite data show clear positive magnetic anomalies (>+100 nT) for the Patagonian Batholith (PB), similar as parts of the older martian crust. This integrated signal covers regions with different ages and cooling histories during magnetic reversals apart from the variability of the rocks. To investigate the complex interplay of distinct magnetic signatures at short scale, we have analysed local magnetic anomalies across this orogen at representative sites by decimeter-scale magnetic ground surveys. As expected, the investigated sites have positive and negative local anomalies. They are related to surface and subsurface rocks, and their different formation and alternation processes including geomagnetic inversions, distinct Curie depths of the magnetic carriers, intracrustal deformation among other factors. Whole rock chemistry (ranging from 45 to >80 wt.% SiO2 and from 1 to 18 wt.% FeOtot.), magnetic characteristics (susceptibilities, magnetic remanence and Königsberger ratios) as well as the composition and texture of the magnetic carriers have been investigated for representative rocks. Rocks of an ultramafic to granodioritic intrusive suite of the western and central PB contain titanomagnetite as major magnetic carrier. Individual magnetic signatures of these plutonic rocks reflect their single versus multidomain status, complex exolution processes with ilmenite lamella formations and the stoichiometric proportions of Cr, Fe and Ti in the oxides. At

  10. The Andes as a peripheral orogen of the breaking-up Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomize, M. G.

    2008-05-01

    Formation conditions of the peripheral orogen are expressed most fully in the Central Andes, a mountain system almost not yielding in height to the Himalayan-Tibetan system but formed at the margin of ocean without any relations to intercontinental collision. The marine transgression and rejuvenation of subduction in the Early Jurassic during the origination of foldbelt at the margin of Pangea marked the transition to a new supercontinental cycle, and the overall further evolution began and continues now in the frame of the first half of this cycle. The marginal position of this belt above the subduction zone, the rate and orientation of convergence of the lithospheric plates, the age of “absolute” movement of the continental plate, variation in slab velocity, and subduction of heterogeneities of the oceanic crust were the crucial factors that controlled the evolution of the marginal foldbelt. At the stage of initial subsidence (Jurassic-Mid-Cretaceous), during extension of the crust having a moderate thickness (30-35 km), the Andean continental margin comprises the full structural elements of an ensialic island arc that resembled the present-day Sunda system. These conditions changed with the separation and onset of the western drift of the South American continent. Being anchored in the mantle and relatively young, the slab of the Andean subduction zone served as a stop that brought about compression that controlled the subsequent evolution. Due to the contribution of deep magma sources along with marine sediments and products of tectonic erosion removed to a depth, the growth of crust above the subduction zone was favorable for heating of the crust. By the middle Eocene, when compression enhanced owing to the acceleration of subduction, the thermal evolution of the crust had already prepared the transition to the orogenic stage of evolution, i.e., to the progressive viscoplastic shortening and swelling of the mechanically weakened lower crust and the

  11. The structural evolution of dunite and chromite ore from the Kharcheruz Massif, the Polar Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, A. I.; Yurichev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The Kharcheruz block of the Syumkeu ultramafic massif is a southern fragment of the Khadata ophiolitic belt, which closes the ophiolites of the Polar Urals in the north. The block, striking in the latitudinal direction, is sheetlike in shape and primarily composed of dunite with nearly latitudinal zones of chromite mineralization. The dunites are subject to ductile deformation various in intensity, and this variability is displayed in their heterogeneous structure and texture. The following microstructural types are distinguished by the variety and intensity of their deformation: protogranular → mesogranular → porphyroclastic → porphyrolath → mosaic. The petrostructural patterns of olivines pertaining to the above types reflect conditions of ductile deformation. Protogranular dunite is formed as a product of pyroxene decomposition in mantle harzburgite accompanied by annealing recrystallization at a temperature above 1000°C. Mesogranular dunite is formed as a product of high-temperature plastic flow by means of translation sliding in olivine and diffuse creep at a temperature dropping from 1000 to 650°C and at a low rate (<10-6 s-1). Cr-spinel segregates into linear zones of disseminated chromite mineralization within zones of bedding-plane plastic flow. Porphyroclastic and mosaic dunites are formed under conditions of intense deformation at a temperature of 500-750°C and at a significant rate (>10-6 s-1). Dunite is deformed by means of syntectonic recrystallization and subordinate translation gliding. Linear zones of disseminated mineralization undergo destruction thereby, with the formation of lenticular chromitite bodies from which ductile olivine is squeezed out with the formation of densely impregnated and massive ores.

  12. The rare earth element potential of kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhn, S.; Frimmel, H. E.; Pašava, J.

    2014-12-01

    Four kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif were studied in order to assess the potential for the recovery of rare earth elements (REE) as by-products from the residue after extraction and refining of the raw kaolin. The behaviour of REE + Y during kaolinitization was found to be largely a function of pre-alteration mineralogy. In the examples studied, i.e. granite-derived deposits of Kriechbaum (Austria) and Božičany, and arkose-derived deposits of Kaznějov and Podbořany (all Czech Republic), the REE + Y are predominantly hosted by monazite which has remained unaffected by kaolinitization. The overall REE + Y content of the variably kaolinitized rocks is strongly dependent on their genesis. While ion adsorption plays only a minor role in the concentration of REE + Y in the studied kaolinitized rocks, the processing and refining of the raw kaolin leads to residues that are enriched in REE + Y by a factor of up to 40. The use of a magnetic separator and a hydrocyclone in the processing of the raw material can yield REE + Y contents of as much as 0.77 wt%. Although this value compares well with the REE + Y concentration in some potentially economic REE + Y projects elsewhere, the overall tonnage of the (REE + Y)-enriched residue is by far not sufficient to consider economic extraction of REE + Y as by-product. Our results are most probably applicable also to other kaolin deposits derived from the weathering of Hercynian basement granites elsewhere (e.g. in Saxonia and Bavaria, Germany). Overall, the potential for REE + Y production as by-product from kaolin mining has to be regarded as minimal.

  13. Variable viral and grazer control of prokaryotic growth efficiency in temperate freshwater lakes (French Massif Central).

    PubMed

    Ram, A S Pradeep; Palesse, S; Colombet, J; Sabart, M; Perriere, F; Sime-Ngando, T

    2013-11-01

    The effects of viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing (top down forces) on prokaryotic mortality and their subsequent impact on their metabolism were estimated in the upper euphotic and deeper aphotic depth of 11 freshwater lakes located in the French Massif Central. The standing stocks of viruses (VA) and heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) varied significantly (p < 0.05) with sampled depth. VA was substantially (twofold on an average) and significantly higher (p < 0.03) at the aphotic compared to euphotic depth, whereas the reverse was true (p < 0.02) for HNF. Among the prokaryote subgroup, high nucleic acid content prokaryotes explained for significant variability in the total VA and served as principle host target for viral proliferation. Like standing stocks, flagellate grazing and viral infection rates also followed similar patterns. In the investigated lakes, the mechanism for regulating prokaryotic production varied with sampled depth from grazing control in the euphotic to control due to viral lysis in the aphotic. We also tested the hypothesis of top down control on prokaryotic growth efficiency (PGE, which we used as an index of prokaryotic physiological and energetic status at the community level) at both depths. Overall, among the studied lakes, PGE varied widely (4-51 %) with significantly (p < 0.05) lower values in the aphotic (mean = 18 ± 4 %) than euphotic depth (mean = 32 ± 9 %). Contrasting observations on the top down control of PGE between sampled depths were observed. The presence of grazers was found to stimulate PGE at the euphotic, whereas viruses through their lytic infection had a strong negative impact on PGE at the aphotic depth. Such observed differences in PGE and the mechanism controlling prokaryotic production with depth could eventually have strong implication on carbon and nutrient flux patterns in the studied lakes.

  14. Microstructural evolution of the Yugu peridotites in the Gyeonggi Massif, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Jung, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Yugu peridotite is the largest and freshest ultramafic body in the Gyeonggi Massif, Korean Peninsula, which potentially has a tectonic affinity to the eastward extension of the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu collision belt in China. In spite of its tectonic and rheological importance, only few mineralogical and petrological studies have been reported from Yugu peridotite. In order to understand the microstructural evolution of the Yugu peridotites, we conducted a detailed analysis of the microstructures and petro-fabrics. The majority of Yugu peridotite body is significantly serpentinized, and it consists predominantly of spinel harzburgite together with minor lherzolite, dunite, and clinopyroxenite. We collected peridotites from mainly two areas (northwestern and southwestern parts) of the Yugu ultramafic body, and all samples are spinel harzburgites consisting of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel, and amphibole. These samples have similar mineralogy except for the varied amount of clinopyroxene and amphibole. These mineral contents are generally increasing from proto-mylonite peridotites to mylonite peridotites. Based on microstructural characteristics of highly deformed peridotites (especially grain-size of olivine), we classified the samples into four textural types, which are proto-mylonite, proto-mylonite to mylonite transition, mylonite, and ultra-mylonite. Depending on the texture of specimen, it is found that the lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine varies from A-type (proto-mylonite) via D-type like (mylonite) to E-type (ultra-mylonite). The fabric strength of olivine (M-index and J-index) systematically decreases with decreasing grain-size of olivine from proto-mylonite via mylonite to ultra-mylonite. The cause of fabric evolution in the Yugu peridotites will be discussed.

  15. Conventional U-Pb dating versus SHRIMP of the Santa Barbara Granite Massif, Rondonia, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparrenberger, I.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Santa Ba??rbara Granite Massif is part of the Younger Granites of Rondo??nia (998 - 974 Ma) and is included in the Rondo??nia Tin Province (SW Amazonian Craton). It comprises three highly fractionated metaluminous to peraluminous within-plate A-type granite units emplaced in older medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Sn-mineralization is closely associated with the late-stage unit. U-Pb monazite conventional dating of the early-stage Serra do Cicero facies and late-stage Serra Azul facies yielded ages of 993 ?? 5 Ma and 989 ?? 13 Ma, respectively. Conventional multigrain U-Pb isotope analyses of zircon demonstrate isotopic disturbance (discordance) and the preservation of inherited older zircons of several different ages and thus yield little about the ages of Sn-granite magmatism. SHRIMP U-Pb ages for the Santa Ba??rbara facies association yielded a 207Pb/206Pb weighted-mean age of 978 ?? 13 Ma. The textural complexity of the zircon crystals of the Santa Ba??rbara facies association, the variable concentrations of U, Th and Pb, as well as the mixed inheritance of zircon populations are major obstacles to using conventional multigrain U-Pb isotopic analyses. Sm-Nd model ages and ??Nd (T) values reveal anomalous isotopic data, attesting to the complex isotopic behaviour within these highly fractionated granites. Thus, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon and conventional U-Pb monazite dating methods are the most appropriate to constrain the crystallization age of the Sn-bearing granite systems in the Rondo??nia Tin Province.

  16. Geology and structure of diamond-bearing rocks of the Kokchetav massif (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa F.; Braun, Tatjana V.; Sheshkel, Georgy G.; Podkuiko, Yuri A.

    1994-05-01

    Two crustal settings for microdiamond formation have been described from eclogite-bearing metamorphic areas: (1) the economic concentration of microdiamonds in metasedimentary gneisses and calc-silicate rocks (northern Kazakhstan); and (2) microdiamonds recently found in eclogite, garnet-pyroxenite and jadeitite from Dabie Shan Mountain, eastern China. The latter occurrence is interpreted to be the product of ultra-high-pressure metamorphism in a Mesozoic collision zone. There are, however, a number of discrepancies between the geological, structural and geochemical data for Kazakhstan microdiamond deposits and an interpretation in terms of a deep subduction zone model. The geodynamic setting of the Kokchetav massif can be defined as a continental rise prism environment related to a passive continental margin where rifting predominated during early Palaeozoic orogeny. The Kumdikol microdiamond province is closely associated with a tectonic melange zone involved in ductile to semi-ductile shearing abundant in graphite. Microdiamonds of the Kumdikol area have a dual setting in the rocks. They appear to be included not only in refractory garnet and zircon but also in almost all rock-forming minerals as biotite, phlogopite, diopside, quartz and secondary sericite-chlorite and sericite-chlorite-calcite aggregates after garnet, pyroxene and plagioclase (?), and in spite of "softness" of the host phases microdiamonds are well preserved. On the other hand, the ore body extends along the shear zone and high concentrations of the microdiamonds within it are distributed without any lithological control along the local S-C surfaces of the main Kumdikol strike-slip shear zone. This duality of microdiamond settings in absence of practically all ultra-high-pressure minerals except diamond itself, weakens the interpretation of this occurrence in terms of very deep subduction and very fast uplift and exhumation during 15-10 Ma according to recent geochronological data. These

  17. Geometry and thermal structure of the Menderes Massif Core Complex (Western Turkey), implications for thermal evolution of Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Vincent; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Tuduri, Johann; Bouchot, Vincent; Beccaletto, Laurent; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2016-04-01

    The eastern Mediterranean region is one of the most promising geothermal areas, with more than 250 geothermal fields discovered in Turkey (Parlaktuna, 2013), in a region of active tectonics and volcanism. Although the potential of these deep geothermal resources has not been systematically investigated yet, the geothermal activity of the western Turkey area is the most recent signature of the high heat flow (120-140 mW/m²; Aydin, 2005, from Teczan, 1995). Based on Turkish data, 2084 MWt are being utilized for direct applications and most of the energy originates from the Menderes Massif (Baba et al., 2015). This large-scale thermal anomaly at the surface is correlated to a long wavelength east-west increase of surface heat flow that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. In order to better understand and characterize the possible connections between large-scale mantle dynamics and surface processes in space and time, we study the structure and thermal evolution of the Menderes Massif. Both the acceleration of the Aegean extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea. These events have triggered the formation of metamorphic complexes with contrasted exhumation P-T paths. While the extension in the Aegean domain is well-characterized with high-temperature domes in the center and east, the succession of several metamorphic events in the Menderes Massif and their significance in terms of geodynamics is still debated. Hence, the exhumation history is key to understanding the temporal and spatial distribution of the thermal signature of the Hellenic slab and its tearing/detachment. The Menderes Massif displays a large variety of metamorphic facies, from the Barrovian type metamorphism in the Eocene (the Main Menderes Metamorphism) to the coeval (?) HP-LT metamorphism on the southernmost

  18. Rockfall hazard assessment by means of the magnitude-frequency curves in the Montserrat Massif (central Catalonia, Spain): first insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeras, Marc; Domènech, Guillem; Pons, Judit; Prat, Elisabet; Buxó, Pere

    2016-04-01

    Montserrat Massif is located about 50 km North-West of Barcelona (Catalonia, North-Eastern Spain). The rock massif is constituted by an intercalation of conglomerate and fine layers of siltstones due to the Montserrat fan-delta sedimentation within the Eocene age. The current relief is consequence of the several depositional episodes and the later tectonic uplift, leading to stepped slopes up to 250 m high, and a total height difference close to 1000 m. Montserrat Mountain has been a pilgrimage place since the settlement of the monastery, around the year 1025, and a spot of touristic interest, mostly within the last 150 years, when the first rack railway was inaugurated to reach the sanctuary. The amount of 2.4 M visitors in 2014 reveals the potential risk derived from rockfalls. To assess and mitigate this risk, a plan funded by the Catalan government is currently under development. Three rockfall mechanisms and magnitude ranges have been identified (Janeras et al. 2011): 1) physicochemical weathering causing the detachment of pebbles and aggregates (0.0001 - 0.1 m3); 2) thermic-induced tensions responsible for the generation of slabs and plates (0.1 - 10 m3); and 3) intersection of structural joints within the rock mass resulting in blocks of 10 - 10,000 m3. In order to quantify the rockfall hazard, a magnitude-frequency analysis has been performed starting from an event-based inventory gathered from field surveillance and historical research. A methodology has been applied to take the maximum profit of only 30 registers with information on volume and date. The massif has been split into several domains with sampling homogeneity. For each one, there have been defined several periods of time during which, all the rockfall events of a given volume have been recorded. Thus, the magnitude-frequency relationship, for each domain, has been calculated. Results show that the curves are well fitted by a power law with exponents ranging from -0.59 to -0.68 for magnitudes

  19. Using large dynamite shots to image the structure of the Moho from deep seismic reflection experiment between the Sichuan basin and Qinling orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongqiang; Gao, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Wenhui; Xiong, Xiaosong

    2016-12-01

    The Qinling orogen was formed as a result of the collision between the North and South China blocks. The Qinling orogen represents the location at which the southern and northern parts of the Chinese mainland collided, and it's also the intersection of the Central China orogen and the north-south tectonic belt. There is evidence of strong deformation in this orogen, and it has had a long and complex geological history. We investigated the structure of the Moho in the southern Qinling orogen using large dynamite shot imaging techniques. By integrating the analysis of the single-shot and the move-out corrections profile, we determined the structure of the Moho beneath the northern Dabashan thrust belt and the southern Qinling orogen, including the mantle suture beneath Fenghuang mountain. The Moho is divided into two parts by the mantle suture zone beneath Fenghuang mountain: (1) from Ziyang to Hanyin, the north-dipping Moho is at about 45-55 km depth and the depth increases rapidly; and (2) from Hanyin to Ningshan, the south-dipping Moho is at about 40-45 km depth and shallows slowly. The mantle suture is located beneath Fenghuang mountain, and the Moho overlaps at this location: the shallower Moho is connected to the northern part of China, and the deeper Moho is connected to the southern part. This may indicate that the lithosphere in the Sichuan basin subducts to the Qinling block and that the subduction frontier reaches at least as far as Fenghuang mountain.

  20. Mass elevation and lee effects markedly lift the elevational distribution of ground beetles in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Joachim; Böhner, Jürgen; Brandl, Roland; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Mass elevation and lee effects markedly influence snow lines and tree lines in high mountain systems. However, their impact on other phenomena or groups of organisms has not yet been quantified. Here we quantitatively studied their influence in the Himalaya–Tibet orogen on the distribution of ground beetles as model organisms, specifically whether the ground beetle distribution increases from the outer to the inner parts of the orogen, against latitudinal effects. We also tested whether July temperature and solar radiation are predictors of the beetle’s elevational distribution ranges. Finally, we discussed the general importance of these effects for the distributional and evolutionary history of the biota of High Asia. We modelled spatially explicit estimates of variables characterizing temperature and solar radiation and correlated the variables with the respective lower elevational range of 118 species of ground beetles from 76 high-alpine locations. Both July temperature and solar radiation significantly positively correlated with the elevational ranges of high-alpine beetles. Against the latitudinal trend, the median elevation of the respective species distributions increased by 800 m from the Himalayan south face north to the Transhimalaya. Our results indicate that an increase in seasonal temperature due to mass elevation and lee effects substantially impact the regional distribution patterns of alpine ground beetles of the Himalaya–Tibet orogen and are likely to affect also other soil biota there and in mountain ranges worldwide. Since these effects must have changed during orogenesis, their potential impact must be considered when biogeographic scenarios based on geological models are derived. As this has not been the practice, we believe that large biases likely exist in many paleoecological and evolutionary studies dealing with the biota from the Himalaya-Tibet orogen and mountain ranges worldwide. PMID:28339461

  1. Orogeny processes of the western Jiangnan Orogen, South China:Insights from Neoproterozoic igneous rocks and a deep seismic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jinbao; Dong, Shuwen; Zhang, Yueqiao; Li, Yong; Chen, Xuanhua; Ma, Licheng; Chen, Jiansheng

    2017-01-01

    The Jiangnan Orogen is a collisional suture belt between the Yangtze and Cathaysia Blocks in South China, with many unanswered questions regarding its tectonic evolution. Using the basement structure of the Jiangnan Orogen, we investigate the granite and dacite exposed along the western Jiangnan Orogen and present new LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages, Hf isotopes, and whole rock geochemistry data. The results suggest that the granite plutons belong to the calc-alkaline series and are typical S-type granites. It yields a mean U-Pb age of 854 ± 2 Ma, which is determined from the core of zircon and possibly inherited from its source or wall rocks. The initial emplacement age of granite may be 826-805 Ma, whereas the dacites yield an age of 805 ± 1.6 Ma and belong to the shoshonite series. The initial Hf-isotope ratios (176Hf/177Hf) in the granite sample are mostly negative εHf(t), with a few of positive value with 1.38-1.6 Ga TDM and 1.67-2.06 Ga TDM2, whereas the dacite samples have mostly positive εHf(t), with a 0.78-1.6 Ga TDM and 0.83-2.2 Ga TDM2t. A comparison of the εHf(t) and TDM2t with the corresponding intruded strata, helps illustrate the origin of the magma and the finals stages ofcollision. Based on our results, we conclude that the western Jiangnan Orogen was a back-arc foreland basin that developed on the margin of the Yangtze continent and collided with the Cathaysia Block, forming a continent-arc-continent accretionary orogeny between 860 and 800 Ma.

  2. Large along-strike variations in the onset of Subandean exhumation: Implications for Central Andean orogenic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lease, Richard O.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Enkelmann, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Plate tectonics drives mountain building in general, but the space-time pattern and style of deformation is influenced by how climate, geodynamics, and basement structure modify the orogenic wedge. Growth of the Subandean thrust belt, which lies at the boundary between the arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau and its humid, low-elevation eastern foreland, figures prominently into debates of orogenic wedge evolution. We integrate new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometer data with previously published apatite fission-track data from samples collected along four Subandean structural cross-sections in Bolivia between 15° and 20°S. We interpret cooling ages vs. structural depth to indicate the onset of Subandean exhumation and signify the forward propagation of deformation. We find that Subandean growth is diachronous south (11 ± 3 Ma) vs. north (6 ± 2 Ma) of the Bolivian orocline and that Subandean exhumation magnitudes vary by more than a factor of two. Similar north-south contrasts are present in foreland deposition, hinterland erosion, and paleoclimate; these observations both corroborate diachronous orogenic growth and illuminate potential propagation mechanisms. Of particular interest is an abrupt shift to cooler, more arid conditions in the Altiplano hinterland that is diachronous in southern Bolivia (16-13 Ma) vs. northern Bolivia (10-7 Ma) and precedes the timing of Subandean propagation in each region. Others have interpreted the paleoclimate shift to reflect either rapid surface uplift due to lithosphere removal or an abrupt change in climate dynamics once orographic threshold elevations were exceeded. These mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and both would drive forward propagation of the orogenic wedge by augmenting the hinterland backstop, either through surface uplift or spatially variable erosion. In summary, we suggest that diachronous Subandean exhumation was driven by piecemeal hinterland uplift, orography, and the outward

  3. Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic Geological Evolution of Mongolia: Constraints on Modes of "Crustal Growth" in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Bold, U.; Smith, E.; Olin, P. H.; Crowley, J. L.; Schmitz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is widely considered the largest area of Phanerozoic juvenile crustal growth on Earth. However, the timing and nature of the orogenic events in the core of the CAOB in Mongolia has remained poorly constrained due to a dearth of detailed geological and geochronological studies. To bridge this gap and test models of crustal growth, here we refine the sequencing of geological events by focusing on the formation and destruction of Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic tectonic basins. Mongolia's basins record a complete Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Wilson cycle with rifting of the Mongolian continent at ca. 700 Ma, the development of a Cryogenian to Ediacaran thermally subsiding passive margin, an arc-continent collision at ca. 520 Ma, and a continent-arc-continent collision at ca. 500 Ma. During this collisional orogeny, that is the Cambrian Altaids, crustal growth occurred largely through the obduction of ophiolites. Rifting of the southern margin occurred during the Ordovician Period, with the development of a Silurian passive margin. Oblique northwest-dipping subduction was initiated during the Devonian and resulted in a transpressional accretionary orogen. The CAOB culminated with a continent-arc-continent collision and the accretion of the North China and Tarim Blocks in the latest Permian. The Devonian to early Permian accretionary orogen is associated not only with voluminous plutonism, but also, major translational structures oblique to the margin resulting in the appearance of many accreted terranes. These data are consistent with existing coarse Hf and Nd isotopic data, but also provide a framework for future detailed studies. Although our geological constraints suggest distinct periods of apparent crustal growth through either collisional or accretionary orogenies, net crustal growth after accounting for recycling is equivocal.

  4. Role of Neogene Exhumation and Sedimentation on Critical-Wedge Kinematics in the Zagros Orogenic Belt, Northeastern Iraq, Kurdistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshnaw, R. I.; Horton, B. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Barber, D. E.; Tamar-Agha, M. Y.; Kendall, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt and foreland basin formed during the Cenozoic Arabia-Eurasia collision, but the precise histories of shortening and sediment accumulation remain ambiguous, especially at the NW extent of the fold-thrust belt in Iraqi Kurdistan. This region is characterized by well-preserved successions of Cenozoic clastic foreland-basin fill and deformed Paleozoic-Mesozoic hinterland bedrock. The study area provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the linkage between orogenic wedge behavior and surface processes of erosion and deposition. The aim of this research is to test whether the Zagros orogenic wedge advanced steadily under critical to supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting with minimal erosion or propagated intermittently under subcritical condition involving out-of-sequence deformation with intense erosion. These endmember modes of mountain building can be assessed by integrating geo/thermochronologic and basin analyses techniques, including apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, stratigraphic synthesis, and seismic interpretations. Preliminary apatite (U-Th)/He data indicate activation of the Main Zagros Fault (MZF) at ~10 Ma with frontal thrusts initiating at ~8 Ma. However, thermochronometric results from the intervening Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), located between the MZF and the frontal thrusts, suggest rapid exhumation at ~6 Ma. These results suggest that the MFF, represented by the thrust-cored Qaradagh anticline, represents a major episode of out-of-sequence deformation. Detrital zircon U-Pb analyses from the Neogene foreland-basin deposits show continuous sediment derivation from sources to the NNE in Iraq and western Iran, suggesting that out-of-sequence thrusting did not significantly alter sedimentary provenance. Rather, intense hinterland erosion and recycling of older foreland-basin fill dominated sediment delivery to the basin. The irregular distribution of

  5. Mass elevation and lee effects markedly lift the elevational distribution of ground beetles in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Joachim; Böhner, Jürgen; Brandl, Roland; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Mass elevation and lee effects markedly influence snow lines and tree lines in high mountain systems. However, their impact on other phenomena or groups of organisms has not yet been quantified. Here we quantitatively studied their influence in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen on the distribution of ground beetles as model organisms, specifically whether the ground beetle distribution increases from the outer to the inner parts of the orogen, against latitudinal effects. We also tested whether July temperature and solar radiation are predictors of the beetle's elevational distribution ranges. Finally, we discussed the general importance of these effects for the distributional and evolutionary history of the biota of High Asia. We modelled spatially explicit estimates of variables characterizing temperature and solar radiation and correlated the variables with the respective lower elevational range of 118 species of ground beetles from 76 high-alpine locations. Both July temperature and solar radiation significantly positively correlated with the elevational ranges of high-alpine beetles. Against the latitudinal trend, the median elevation of the respective species distributions increased by 800 m from the Himalayan south face north to the Transhimalaya. Our results indicate that an increase in seasonal temperature due to mass elevation and lee effects substantially impact the regional distribution patterns of alpine ground beetles of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen and are likely to affect also other soil biota there and in mountain ranges worldwide. Since these effects must have changed during orogenesis, their potential impact must be considered when biogeographic scenarios based on geological models are derived. As this has not been the practice, we believe that large biases likely exist in many paleoecological and evolutionary studies dealing with the biota from the Himalaya-Tibet orogen and mountain ranges worldwide.

  6. A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt Yuan-Hsi Lee1, Wei Lo2, Wei-Hau Wang1, Tim-Byrne 3, Ruey-Juen Rau 41. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2. Department of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Taipei, National Taipei University of Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 3. Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA 4. Department of Earth Science, National Chen-Kung University, Taiwan, R.O.C. Taiwan mountain belt results from collision between Eurasia continental crust and Philippine Sea plate that result in exposing the metamorphic complex with high exhumation rate in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. In this study we combine with field survey, zircon fission track (ZFT), metamorphic grade, and tomography data to identify there exists a major out of sequence fault (MOSF) in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. This MOSF extends from north to south of eastern central Range with several segments and the total length is more than 250 km. The ZFT shows total annealing age of ca.1-3 Ma on the hanging wall and partial annealing ages on the foot wall. The seismicity data indicates the MOSF is still active from central to southern central Range. We consider that the MOSF is related with crustal channel flow in depth. To the western side of crustal flow it shows thrusting mechanism associated with MOSF and the normal faults (or normal shearing zone) develop in eastern side of the crustal channel flow. This crustal channel flow is also related with exposing the metamorphic complex in Central Range that is important mechanism for the mountain building process of Taiwan orogenic belt.

  7. Prolonged high relief in the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during middle and late Eocene extension based on stable isotope paleoaltimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Majie; Constenius, Kurt N.; Dettman, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The paleoelevation and size of the North America Cordilleran orogen during the late Cretaceous-Paleogene contractional and subsequent extensional tectonics remain enigmatic. We present new estimates of paleorelief of the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during the middle and late Eocene using oxygen isotope compositions of unaltered molluscan fossils and paleosol carbonates in the Kishenehn basin. Bounded by several mountains ranges to the east, the Kishenehn basin was a half graben developed during middle Eocene to early Miocene collapse of the Cordilleran orogen. These mollusk taxa include three sympatric groups with affinities to wet tropical, semi-arid subtropical, and temperate environments. Our reconstructed surface water δ18O values vary between -19.8‰ and -6.3‰ (VSMOW) during the middle and late Eocene. The large differences in paleoenvironments and surface water δ18O values suggest that the catchment of the Kishenehn basin was at variable elevation. The estimated paleorelief between the basin and the surrounding mountains, based on both Rayleigh condensation model and predictions of Eocene precipitation isotope values using an isotope-enabled global climate model, is ∼4 km, and the basin floor was <1.5 km high. This high topography and high relief paleogeography suggest that the Cordilleran orogenic front reached an elevation of at least 4 km, and the crust thickness may have reached more than 55 km before Eocene gravitational collapse. We attribute the maintenance of high Eocene topography to the combination of an inherited thick crust, thermal uplift caused by mantle upwelling, and isostatic uplift caused by removing lower lithosphere or oceanic slab.

  8. Relationship between Bajo Pobre and Chon Aike formations (Deseado Massif, Patagonia, Argentina):a melt inclusions study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busà, T.; Bellieni, G.; Fernandez, R.; Hecheveste, H.; Piccirillo, E. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Deseado Massif covers the centre-east of the Santa Cruz Province, in the extra-Andean Patagonia. Although the Deseado Massif is mainly composed of silicic volcanic rocks (Chon Aike Formation, CA; 151.5 ±0.5 - 177.8 ±0.4 Ma), mafic and intermediate volcanites (Bajo Pobre Formation, BP; 152.7 ±0.5 and 164 ±0.3 Ma) outcrop largely in the central part of the Massif. In this paper quarz-trapped melt inclusions (rhyolitic in composition) from selected samples of the BP and the CA are analysed. On the basis of major elements content, for BP the sequence from andesite (BP whole rock) to ryholite (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be modelled by simple fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz and apatite. As regards trace elements, a good calculated/measured ratio (around 1 ±0.2) is obtained assuming only a relatively high apatite fractionation. Since the apatite fractionation amount is not acceptable for major elements, the evolution of BP Formation cannot be modelled by a simple process of fractional crystallisation, and a contamination process probably occurred. The sequence from BP to CA cannot be modelled by fractional crystallisation. 30% batch melting of BP andesite (BP whole rock) produces a magma from which the CA ryholites (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be obtained by Rayleigh fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, quartz, apatite and small amounts of zircon and minor allanite. Since the latter one was not observed in the analysed sample, a contamination process during magma evolution cannot be completely excluded. Finally, on the basis of the different trace elements concentration (Nb anomaly, different content in LILE, B/Be and B/Nb), it is possible to suppose that, at the time of the BP and CA emplacement, a changing in the tectonic setting, from subduction to a lithospheric extension, was active.

  9. Drilling constraints on lithospheric accretion and evolution at Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.; Ildefonse, B.; John, B. E.; Ohara, Y.; Miller, D. J.; Abe, N.; Abratis, M.; Andal, E. S.; Andreani, M.; Awaji, S.; Beard, J. S.; Brunelli, D.; Charney, A. B.; Christie, D. M.; Collins, J.; Delacour, A. G.; Delius, H.; Drouin, M.; Einaudi, F.; EscartíN, J.; Frost, B. R.; Früh-Green, G.; Fryer, P. B.; Gee, J. S.; Godard, M.; Grimes, C. B.; Halfpenny, A.; Hansen, H.-E.; Harris, A. C.; Tamura, A.; Hayman, N. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Hirose, T.; Hirth, J. G.; Ishimaru, S.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Karner, G. D.; Linek, M.; MacLeod, C. J.; Maeda, J.; Mason, O. U.; McCaig, A. M.; Michibayashi, K.; Morris, A.; Nakagawa, T.; Nozaka, T.; Rosner, M.; Searle, R. C.; Suhr, G.; Tominaga, M.; von der Handt, A.; Yamasaki, T.; Zhao, X.

    2011-07-01

    Expeditions 304 and 305 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program cored and logged a 1.4 km section of the domal core of Atlantis Massif. Postdrilling research results summarized here constrain the structure and lithology of the Central Dome of this oceanic core complex. The dominantly gabbroic sequence recovered contrasts with predrilling predictions; application of the ground truth in subsequent geophysical processing has produced self-consistent models for the Central Dome. The presence of many thin interfingered petrologic units indicates that the intrusions forming the domal core were emplaced over a minimum of 100-220 kyr, and not as a single magma pulse. Isotopic and mineralogical alteration is intense in the upper 100 m but decreases in intensity with depth. Below 800 m, alteration is restricted to narrow zones surrounding faults, veins, igneous contacts, and to an interval of locally intense serpentinization in olivine-rich troctolite. Hydration of the lithosphere occurred over the complete range of temperature conditions from granulite to zeolite facies, but was predominantly in the amphibolite and greenschist range. Deformation of the sequence was remarkably localized, despite paleomagnetic indications that the dome has undergone at least 45° rotation, presumably during unroofing via detachment faulting. Both the deformation pattern and the lithology contrast with what is known from seafloor studies on the adjacent Southern Ridge of the massif. There, the detachment capping the domal core deformed a 100 m thick zone and serpentinized peridotite comprises ˜70% of recovered samples. We develop a working model of the evolution of Atlantis Massif over the past 2 Myr, outlining several stages that could explain the observed similarities and differences between the Central Dome and the Southern Ridge.

  10. Downward continued multichannel seismic refraction analysis of Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, 30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Canales, J.-P.; Kent, G. M.

    2012-05-01

    Detailed seismic refraction results show striking lateral and vertical variability of velocity structure within the Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex (OCC), contrasting notably with its conjugate ridge flank. Multichannel seismic (MCS) data are downward continued using the Synthetic On Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method, providing unprecedented detail in tomographic models of the P-wave velocity structure to subseafloor depths of up to 1.5 km. Velocities can vary up to 3 km/s over several hundred meters and unusually high velocities (˜5 km/s) are found immediately beneath the seafloor in key regions. Correlation within situand dredged rock samples, video and records from submersible dives, and a 1.415 km drill core, allow us to infer dominant lithologies. A high velocity body(ies) found to shoal near to the seafloor in multiple locations is interpreted as gabbro and is displaced along isochrons within the OCC, indicating a propagating magmatic source as the origin for this pluton(s). The western two-thirds of the Southern Ridge is capped in serpentinite that may extend nearly to the base of our ray coverage. The distribution of inferred serpentinite indicates that the gabbroic pluton(s) was emplaced into a dominantly peridotitic host rock. Presumably the mantle host rock was later altered via seawater penetration along the detachment zone, which controlled development of the OCC. The asymmetric distribution of seismic velocities and morphology of Atlantis Massif are consistent with a detachment fault with a component of dip to the southeast. The lowest velocities observed atop the eastern Central Dome and conjugate crust are most likely volcanics. Here, an updated model of the magmatic and extensional faulting processes at Atlantis Massif is deduced from the seismic results, contributing more generally to understanding the processes controlling the formation of heterogeneous lithosphere at slow-rate spreading centers.

  11. Episodic exhumation and relief growth in the Mont Blanc massif, Western Alps from numerical modelling of thermochronology data