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Sample records for massive haemoptysis due

  1. Massive haemoptysis on veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Meredith; Cowan, Scott; Cavarocchi, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    A 49-year old female presented with severe heart failure with end-organ dysfunction and was placed on veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to a decision for end-organ recovery. While on ECMO, the patient developed massive haemoptysis after a Swan-Ganz catheter manipulation. The haemoptysis was not controllable by conventional methods including bronchoscopy with cold saline and epinephrine lavage, bronchial blocker or angiography. The endotracheal tube was clamped to provide tamponade and the patient relied on full ECMO support for 36 h. After the haemoptysis resolved, the endotracheal tube was unclamped. The patient developed adult respiratory distress syndrome and was ventilated using the ARDSnet protocol with continued support from ECMO. On post-ECMO day 20, the patient underwent a successful ECMO wean and a Heart Mate II left ventricular assist device placement.

  2. Management of massive haemoptysis with the rigid bronchoscope and cold saline lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, A A; Hurwitz, S S

    1980-01-01

    Twelve successive patients with massive haemoptysis were treated by emergency rigid bronchoscopy and lavage of the bleeding lung with cold saline. All patients stopped bleeding during the procedure and all blood and clot was evacuated from the accessible airways. The bleeding source was localised to a lobe in seven cases, and lateralised in the remaining five patients. Five patients had a second haemorrhage during that hospital stay and cold saline lavage again terminated it. Further therapy, either surgical or medical was based on information obtained during the respite from haemorrhage achieved with this technique. There was no hospital mortality in the series. PMID:7268664

  3. Teflon haemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Aboudara, Matthew; Krimsky, William; Harley, Daniel

    2012-03-20

    Teflon-coated pledgeted sutures can be used to reinforce the bronchial anastomosis site following a pulmonary resection in order to prevent bronchopleural fistula formation. The authors describe the case of a 42-year-old woman with recurrent haemoptysis secondary to the erosion of a pledgeted suture through the distal trachea. The pledgeted suture was used to reinforce a defect in the wall of the distal trachea after a right upper lobectomy for stage 2a squamous cell carcinoma. Surgically, a completion pneumonectomy with carinal reconstruction was thought necessary to treat the haemoptysis. Given her age and potential surgical morbidities, the decision was made to perform serial bronchoscopies with careful pruning and eventual removal of the pledget by using the cryoprobe and a flexible scissors. This resulted in the eventual removal of the suture. Follow-up bronchoscopy 4 weeks postremoval demonstrated no residual defect on the airway wall.

  4. Massive ovarian edema, due to adjacent appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Callen, Andrew L; Illangasekare, Tushani; Poder, Liina

    2017-04-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a benign clinical entity, the imaging findings of which can mimic an adnexal mass or ovarian torsion. In the setting of acute abdominal pain, identifying massive ovarian edema is a key in avoiding potential fertility-threatening surgery in young women. In addition, it is important to consider other contributing pathology when ovarian edema is secondary to another process. We present a case of a young woman presenting with subacute abdominal pain, whose initial workup revealed marked enlarged right ovary. Further imaging, diagnostic tests, and eventually diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that the ovarian enlargement was secondary to subacute appendicitis, rather than a primary adnexal process. We review the classic ultrasound and MRI imaging findings and pitfalls that relate to this diagnosis.

  5. Bronchial haemangioma: exceptionally rare cause of haemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Scott; Tharion, John; Jones, Peter; Brown, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Bronchial haemangioma is an exceptionally rare cause of haemoptysis in the adult. There are currently less than 10 recorded cases in the literature. Airway haemangiomas are generally seen in infants with coexistent cutaneous haemangiomas. The incidence of bronchial haemangioma in adults remains unknown. This case reports the diagnosis and treatment of a bronchial haemangioma in a 56 year-old male presenting with a one-month history of haemoptysis. Bronchial haemangioma diagnosis was confirmed and excision performed by bronchoscopy without complication. Bronchial haemangioma should be a considered differential diagnosis in the presence of meaningful haemoptysis when an endoluminal lesion is visualised on computed tomography scan. This case also demonstrates that bronchial haemangiomas can be successfully removed via bronchoscopy with minimal risk and discomfort to the patient.

  6. Respiratory failure due to a massive rheumatoid pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J D; Jensen, W A; Yenokida, G G; Kirsch, C M; Fainstat, M

    1990-05-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic obstructive lung disease was admitted with respiratory failure due to a massive pleural effusion. An extensive evaluation proved the effusion to be of rheumatoid origin. The effusion resolved with prednisone and penicillamine therapy. Although pleural effusions associated with RA are common, massive effusions are rare and respiratory failure from a rheumatoid pleural effusion has not been reported.

  7. Efficacy and safety of super selective bronchial artery coil embolisation for haemoptysis: a single-centre retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hideo; Hara, Masahiko; Ryuge, Misaki; Takafuji, Jun; Youmoto, Mihoko; Akira, Masanori; Nagasaka, Yukio; Kabata, Daijiro; Yamamoto, Kouji; Shintani, Ayumi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Evidence on the safety and long-term efficacy of super selective bronchial artery embolisation (ssBAE) using platinum coils in patients with haemoptysis is insufficient. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the safety and the 3-year postprocedure haemoptysis-free survival rate of de novo elective ssBAE using platinum coils rather than particles for the treatment of haemoptysis. Design A single-centre retrospective observational study. Setting Hemoptysis and Pulmonary Circulation Center in Japan. Participants A total of 489 consecutive patients with massive and non-massive haemoptysis who underwent de novo elective ssBAE without malignancy or haemodialysis. Interventions ssBAE using platinum coils. All patients underwent CT angiography before the procedure for identifying haemoptysis-related arteries (HRAs) and for procedural planning. Primary and secondary outcome measures The composite of the 3-year recurrence of haemoptysis and mortality from the day of the last ssBAE session. Each component of the primary end point and procedural success defined as successful embolisation of all target HRAs were also evaluated. Results The median patient age was 69 years, and 46.4% were men. The total number of target vessels was 4 (quartile 2–7), and the procedural success rate was 93.4%. There were 8 (1.6%) major complications: 1 aortic dissection, 2 symptomatic cerebellar infarctions and 5 mediastinal haematoma cases. The haemoptysis-free survival rates were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier analysis at 86.9% (95% CI 83.7% to 90.2%) at 1 year, 79.4% (74.8% to 84.3%) at 2 years and 57.6% (45.1% to 73.4%) at 3 years. Although not statistically significant by the adjusted analysis of variance with multiple imputation of missing variables, cryptogenic haemoptysis tended to show the most favourable outcome and non-tuberculous mycobacterium showed the worst outcome (adjusted p=0.250). Conclusions We demonstrated the safety and long-term efficacy of

  8. [Massive traumatic hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Bourdereau, J M; Mathé, D; Voultoury, J C

    1985-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who suffered a rupture of one lung as result of thoracic trauma. This gave rise to respiratory distress with massive haemoptysis which was initially treated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube, with separate lung ventilation, a chest drain and massive transfusion. A haemostatic pneumonectomy had to be performed because of the persisting and profuse bleeding.

  9. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  10. Thick lung wedge resection for acute life-threatening massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Tomomi; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Matsuzaki, Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis from an aortobronchial fistula due to thoracic aortic dissection is an extremely rare symptom, but is a potentially life-threatening condition. We report a case of acute massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula that was successfully controlled by a simple and rapid thick wedge resection of the lung with hematoma by using the black cartilage stapler. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute massive hemoptysis. After tracheal intubation, chest computed tomography revealed hematoma in the left lung and ruptured aortic dissection from the distal arch to the descending aorta. He was diagnosed with aortobronchial fistula and underwent an emergency surgery on the same day. We performed posterolateral thoracotomy. A dissecting aortic aneurysm (diameter, ~80 mm) with adhesion of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the lower lobe was found. The lung parenchyma expanded with the hematoma. We stapled the upper and lower lobes by using the black cartridge stapler along the aortopulmonary window. Massive hemoptysis disappeared, and the complete aortic dissection appeared. Aortic dissection with adherent lung was excised, and graft replacement of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta was performed. Proximal lung wedge resection using black cartridge stapler is a simple and quick method to control massive hemoptysis from aortic dissection; hence, this procedure is an effective option to control massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula. This technique could rapidly stop massive hemoptysis and prevent dissection of the adherent lung tissue and intra-thoracic bleeding. PMID:27747035

  11. Bronchoscopy as a supplement to computed tomography in patients with haemoptysis may be unnecessary

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Klaus; Gottlieb, Magnus; Colella, Sara; Saghir, Zaigham; Larsen, Klaus R.; Clementsen, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemoptysis is a common symptom and can be an early sign of lung cancer. Careful investigation of patients with haemoptysis may lead to early diagnosis. The strategy for investigation of these patients, however, is still being debated. Objectives We studied whether the combination of computed tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy had a higher sensitivity for malignant and non-malignant causes of haemoptysis than CT alone. Methods The study was a retrospective, non-randomised, two-centre study and included patients who were referred from primary care for the investigation of haemoptysis. Results A total of 326 patients were included in the study (mean age 60.5 [SD 15.3] years, 63.3% male). The most common aetiologies of haemoptysis were cryptogenic (52.5%), pneumonia (16.3%), emphysema (8.0%), bronchiectasis (5.8%) and lung cancer (4.0%). In patients diagnosed with lung cancer, bronchoscopy, CT and the combination of bronchoscopy and CT had a sensitivity of 0.61, 0.92 (p<0.05) and 0.97 (p=0.58), respectively. In patients with non-malignant causes of haemoptysis, most aetiologies were diagnosed by CT and comprised mainly pneumonia, emphysema and bronchiectasis. Bronchoscopy did not reveal these conditions and the sensitivity to these conditions was not increased by combining CT and bronchoscopy. Conclusions CT can stand alone as a diagnostic workup for patients with haemoptysis referred to an outpatient clinic. Bronchoscopy does not identify any malignant aetiologies not already diagnosed by CT. Combining the two test modalities does not result in a significant increase in sensitivity for malignant or non-malignant causes of haemoptysis. PMID:27343164

  12. Triaxial system in bronchial arterial embolization for haemoptysis using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Abematsu, Saori; Hashizume, Takuya; Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Keita; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The application of bronchial artery embolization (BAE) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for haemoptysis was recently reported to be useful. A triple co-axial (triaxial) system consisting of a 4-Fr catheter, 2.7-Fr microcatheter and 1.9-Fr no-taper microcatheter has been developed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of the triaxial system in BAE using NBCA. Methods: 12 patients with haemoptysis, 8 males and 4 females with a median age of 64 years (range, 49–88 years), underwent BAE between August 2012 and October 2014. Medical records and images were reviewed, and the technical success rate, clinical success rate, haemoptysis-free rate and complications were evaluated. Technical success was defined as the complete cessation of the target artery as confirmed by digital subtraction angiography, whereas clinical success was defined as the cessation of haemoptysis within 24 h of BAE. Recurrent haemoptysis was defined as a total of >30 ml of bleeding per day. Results: The target artery was embolized successfully in all patients, and the technical success rate was 100% (12/12). The cessation of haemoptysis was achieved in 11 out of 12 patients within 24 h, and thus, the clinical success rate was 92% (11/12). The 6-, 12- and 24-month haemoptysis-free rates were 89%, 89% and 76%, respectively. No patients exhibited any signs of complications such as spinal ischaemia. Conclusion: BAE using the triaxial system and NBCA appears to be a useful and safe procedure for haemoptysis. Advances in knowledge: The triaxial system contributes to safe and effective BAE using NBCA. PMID:26423598

  13. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to 'Dieulafoy's vascular malformation' of the jejunum: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Chatman, D. M.; Kaviani, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Dieulafoy reported three cases of massive gastric hemorrhage due to a dilated submucosal artery in 1898, and since then, more than 100 cases of this gastric vascular malformation have been reported in the literature. These same pathologic lesions are even a rarer occurrence in the small bowel. This article reports a 38-year-old hypotensive male who presented to the hospital after an acute onset of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage; superior mesenteric angiography demonstrated an actively bleeding lesion in a proximal jejunal branch. Intraoperative small bowel endoscopy via an enterotomy demonstrated a 4 mm bleeding submucosal lesion 30 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A literature review revealed six other cases of Dieulafoy's vascular malformation that occurred in the small bowel, with the lesions located in the proximal jejunum between 15 cm and 45 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. The cause of these lesions is unknown. This case demonstrates the importance of preoperative angiography and intraoperative endoscopy when massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is suspected to be from a small bowel source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7473854

  14. Effectiveness of milrinone for cardiogenic shock due to massive pulmonary aspiration: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Heon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Seok-Kon; Jeon, Dae Geun; Song, Jaegyok; Ji, Seung Heon; Lee, Gwan Woo; Kang, Bong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents is one of the most frightening complications during anesthesia. Although pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents in general surgical patients is not common and resulting long-term morbidity and mortality are rare, severe hypoxemia and other sequelae of pulmonary aspiration continue to be reported. We report a case of massive aspiration of gastric contents during induction of general anesthesia, resulting in cardiac arrest due to severe pulmonary hypertension and myocardial infarction. Sustained cardiac arrest and shock that did not respond the conventional resuscitation was successfully treated using milrinone. The patient was discharged without complications in 20 days. PMID:25006374

  15. Outcomes of partial splenic embolization in patients with massive splenomegaly due to idiopathic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Omer; Eldem, Gonca; Peynircioglu, Bora; Kav, Taylan; Görmez, Aysegul; Cil, Barbaros Erhan; Balkancı, Ferhun; Sokmensuer, Cenk; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the outcomes of partial splenic embolization (PSE) for massive splenomegaly due to idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). METHODS In this prospective study, we evaluated the characteristics and prognosis of consecutive patients with IPH who underwent PSE for all indications at a single medical center between June 2009 and January 2015. The inclusion criteria were: presence of hypersplenism, massive splenomegaly, and resultant pancytopenia. The exclusion criteria were: presence of other diseases causing portal hypertension. During the post-PSE period, the patients were hospitalized. All patients underwent abdominal computed tomography imaging 4 wk post-PSE to determine total splenic and non-infarcted splenic volumes. RESULTS A total of 11 patients, with median age of 33.27 ± 4.8 years, were included in the study. Mean spleen size was 22.9 cm (21-28 cm), and severe hypersplenism was diagnosed in all patients before PSE. Post-PSE, leukocyte and platelet counts increased significantly, reaching peak levels in the second week with gradual decreases thereafter. Liver function tests did not exhibit significant changes during post-intervention follow-up. All patients developed post-embolization syndrome, and one patient experienced serious complications; all complications were successfully treated with conservative therapy and no death occurred. CONCLUSION Our findings showed that PSE has a lower complication rate than previously-reported surgical complication rates, which supports this intervention as a viable alternative for high-risk operable patients with severe hypersplenism. PMID:27920483

  16. Tracheal Lobular Capillary Haemangioma: A Rare Benign Cause of Recurrent Haemoptysis

    PubMed Central

    Kotidis, Konstantinos; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH), previously known as pyogenic granuloma, is a benign vascular lesion commonly found within the oral and nasal cavity. However, it is rarely encountered within the trachea, where presenting features include recurrent haemoptysis, cough, and wheeze. We here describe a case of a 7 mm tracheal LCH in a 56-year-old woman, which was successfully resected at interventional bronchoscopy using biopsy forceps. Clinicians should be aware of tracheal LCH in the differential diagnosis for recurrent haemoptysis. PMID:27747126

  17. Exercise-induced haemoptysis as a rare presentation of a rare lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mihalek, Andrew D; Haney, Carissa; Merino, Maria; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Moss, Joel; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid primarily affecting the lungs is a seldom seen clinical entity. This case discusses the work-up of a patient presenting with exercise-induced haemoptysis and diffuse cystic lung disease on radiographic imaging. The common clinical and radiographic findings of diffuse cystic lung diseases as well as a brief overview of pulmonary amyloid are presented.

  18. Massive Hemoptysis due to Endotracheal Hemangioma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yeonsil; Lee, Suhyeon; An, Jinyoung; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Youngkyung; Jung, Eunah; Song, Sookhee; Kim, Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumor in adults. We reported a case of massive hemoptysis caused by a cavernous hemangioma in a 75-year-old man. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a tracheal cavernous hemangioma that presented with massive hemoptysis. The lesion was removed with a CO2 laser under rigid laryngoscopy. Endovascular tumors, such as tracheobronchial hemangiomas, should be considered a diagnostic option in cases of massive hemoptysis without a significant underlying lung lesion. PMID:25861344

  19. [Bleeding during central venous catheterization : Cannot intubate, cannot ventilate due to massive cervical hematoma].

    PubMed

    Engelen, C; Trebes, C; Czarnecki, S; Junger, A

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is an invasive procedure which can be associated with severe complications. These include in particular unsuccessful arterial puncture and vascular injuries, which in addition to loss of blood can lead to massive soft tissue swelling. A 63-year-old female patient developed massive cervical bleeding during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein puncture and the rapidly enlarging hematoma led to compromisation of the airway. A cannot intubate, cannot ventilate situation developed and the subsequent hypoxia led to cardiac arrest that was only resolved after emergency surgical tracheotomy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  20. Successful treatment of massive ascites due to lupus peritonitis with hydroxychloroquine in old- onset lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Sonia; Bdioui, Fethia; Ouaz, Afef; Loghmari, Hichem; Mahjoub, Sylvia; Saffar, Hamouda

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an auto-immune disease with multiple organ involvements that occurs mainly in young women. Literature data suggest that serositis is more frequent in late-onset SLE. However, peritoneal serositis with massive ascites is an extremely rare manifestation. We report a case of old-onset lupus peritonitis treated successfully by Hydroxychloroquine. A 77-year-old Tunisian woman was hospitalized because of massive painful ascites. Her family history did not include any autoimmune disease. She was explored 4 years prior to admission for exudative pleuritis of the right lung without any established diagnosis. Physical examination showed only massive ascites. Laboratory investigations showed leucopenia: 3100/mm3, lymphopenia: 840/mm3 and trace protein (0.03 g/24 h). Ascitic fluid contained 170 cells mm(3) (67% lymphocytes), 46 g/L protein, but no malignant cells. The main etiologies of exudative ascites were excluded. She had markedly elevated anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) titer of 1/1600 and a significantly elevated titer of antibody to double-stranded DNA (83 IU/mL) with hypo-complementemia (C3 levl was at 67 mg/dL). Antibody against the Smith antigen was also positive. Relying on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with SLE and treated with Hydroxychloroquine 200 mg daily in combination with diuretics. One month later, there was no detectable ascitic fluid and no pleural effusions. Five months later she remained free from symptoms while continuing to take chloroquine. This case was characterized by old age of onset of SLE, the extremely rare initial presentation with lupus peritonitis and massive painful ascites with dramatic response to only hydroxychloroquine treatment.

  1. Massive outbreaks of Noctiluca scintillans blooms in the Arabian Sea due to spread of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    do Rosário Gomes, Helga; Goes, Joaquim I; Matondkar, S G P; Buskey, Edward J; Basu, Subhajit; Parab, Sushma; Thoppil, Prasad

    2014-09-09

    In the last decade, the northern Arabian Sea has witnessed a radical shift in the composition of winter phytoplankton blooms, which previously comprised mainly of diatoms, the unicellular, siliceous photosynthetic organisms favoured by nutrient-enriched waters from convective mixing. These trophically important diatom blooms have been replaced by widespread blooms of a large, green dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans, which combines carbon fixation from its chlorophyll-containing endosymbiont with ingestion of prey. Here, we report that these massive outbreaks of N. scintillans during winter are being facilitated by an unprecedented influx of oxygen deficient waters into the euphotic zone and by the extraordinary ability of its endosymbiont Pedinomonas noctilucae to fix carbon more efficiently than other phytoplankton under hypoxic conditions. We contend that N. scintillans blooms could disrupt the traditional diatom-sustained food chain to the detriment of regional fisheries and long-term health of an ecosystem supporting a coastal population of nearly 120 million people.

  2. Multiple esophageal variceal ruptures with massive ascites due to myelofibrosis-induced portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Koichi; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year old man had been diagnosed at 42 years of age as having polycythemia vera and had been monitored at another hospital. Progression of anemia had been recognized at about age 70, and the patient was thus referred to our center in 2008 where secondary myelofibrosis was diagnosed based on bone marrow biopsy findings. Hematemesis due to rupture of esophageal varices occurred in January and February of 2011. The bleeding was stopped by endoscopic variceal ligation. Furthermore, in March of the same year, hematemesis recurred and the patient was transported to our center. He was in irreversible hemorrhagic shock and died. The autopsy showed severe bone marrow fibrosis with mainly argyrophilic fibers, an observation consistent with myelofibrosis. The liver weighed 1856 g the spleen 1572 g, indicating marked hepatosplenomegaly. The liver and spleen both showed extramedullary hemopoiesis. Myelofibrosis is often complicated by portal hypertension and is occasionally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to esophageal varices. A patient diagnosed as having myelofibrosis needs to be screened for esophageal/gastric varices. Myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully decide the therapeutic strategy in consideration of the patient’s concomitant conditions, treatment invasiveness and quality of life. PMID:22851873

  3. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, S; Sarkar, S; Verma, R; Dubey, Sk; Roy, Mk

    2010-07-01

    "Haemosuccus pancreaticus" is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  4. [Elbow reconstruction with massive total osteoarticular allograft: early failure due to instability].

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Dubuc, J-E; Vincent, A; Barbier, O

    2004-06-01

    Total elbow allografts were implanted for the treatment of trauma-induced bone defects in three patients between 1986 and 1990. Six allografts were implanted and finally explanted. The longest follow-up for an implanted allograft was five years. Allografts had to be removed because of nonunion in one patient and gross instability in the others. A constrained elbow prosthesis was implanted in all three patients. This short series illustrates mid-term failure to be expected with total elbow allografts, mainly due to instability. Accordingly, we no longer recommend the use of total elbow allografts alone as a salvage procedure for bony defects. If an allograft is needed, it should be implanted with a prosthesis.

  5. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  6. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nathan G.; Williams, A.P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.J.; Mackay, D.S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Allen, Craig D.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J.D.; Breshears, D.D.; Rauscher, Sara A.; Koven, C.

    2016-01-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests1, 2and their associated climatic feedbacks3, 4. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain5, 6 in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April–August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted ≥50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  7. Haemoptysis in a teenager: late diagnosis of unnoticed foreign body aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kargl, Simon; Frechinger, Bettina; Pumberger, Wolfgang

    2014-12-22

    Chest X-ray in a 17-year-old boy, presenting with haemoptysis, revealed a radiopaque foreign body (FB) in the right lower lobe. There was no history of aspiration. CT located the needle-shaped FB in the right posterobasal lower lobe segment bronchus. In bronchoscopy, the FB turned out to be a pin, of which the radiolucent plastic head was embedded in the peribronchial tissue. Extraction by flexible and rigid bronchoscopy failed; finally, thoracotomy and bronchotomy had to be performed to remove the pin. In delayed diagnosis of a tracheobronchial FB, CT scan is not only necessary to localise the FB but also to depict or rule out secondary pulmonary changes. Nevertheless, radiolucent components of a metallic FB might be invisible even in CT, leading to underestimation of its size and extension. Late diagnosis complicates removal of tracheobronchial foreign bodies and may even necessitate open surgery, including pulmonary resections.

  8. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  9. A 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea: cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengxi; Zhang, Nuofu; Zhou, Ying; Li, Jinhui; Gu, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chunli

    2017-03-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. Here we described a case of a 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea, who was diagnosed with cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension. The extremely high pulmonary artery pressure achieved, in this case, is alarming and should alert the physicians that the cholesterol pneumonia may be one of the underlying causes of pulmonary artery hypertension. After a treatment of methylprednisolone, her clinical symptoms were significantly improved, which suggested that steroid might be a promising therapeutic for patients with cholesterol pneumonia.

  10. Massively parallel rRNA gene sequencing exacerbates the potential for biased community diversity comparisons due to variable library sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Gihring, Thomas; Green, Stefan; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    Technologies for massively parallel sequencing are revolutionizing microbial ecology and are vastly increasing the scale of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene studies. Although pyrosequencing has increased the breadth and depth of possible rRNA gene sampling, one drawback is that the number of reads obtained per sample is difficult to control. Pyrosequencing libraries typically vary widely in the number of sequences per sample, even within individual studies, and there is a need to revisit the behaviour of richness estimators and diversity indices with variable gene sequence library sizes. Multiple reports and review papers have demonstrated the bias in non-parametric richness estimators (e.g. Chao1 and ACE) and diversity indices when using clone libraries. However, we found that biased community comparisons are accumulating in the literature. Here we demonstrate the effects of sample size on Chao1, ACE, CatchAll, Shannon, Chao-Shen and Simpson's estimations specifically using pyrosequencing libraries. The need to equalize the number of reads being compared across libraries is reiterated, and investigators are directed towards available tools for making unbiased diversity comparisons.

  11. Massive neonatal adrenal enlargement due to cytomegaly, persistence of the transient cortex, and hyperplasia of the permanent cortex: findings in Cushing syndrome associated with hemihypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Carney, J Aidan; Ho, Josephine; Kitsuda, Kazuteru; Young, William F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-10-01

    Described in this article is the massive enlargement of both adrenal glands in 3 newborns-2 girls and 1 boy. Two had hemihypertrophy and other congenital abnormalities but no identified genetic mutation; the third had genetically proven Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Two had severe Cushing syndrome, the third had hypercortisolemia but no clinical Cushing syndrome. Bilateral adrenalectomy cured Cushing syndrome in the 2 with severe symptoms; total adrenal weight in these patients was 44 and 53 g, respectively. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the third patient: the gland weighed 52 g; postoperatively, the patient's hypercortisolemia normalized, and, concomitantly, the enlarged contralateral adrenal gland had a 5-fold decrease in size with slight enlargement 6 years postoperatively. Microscopically, the 3 patients had similar pathology: massive adrenal enlargement due to a combination of cytomegaly, persistence of the transient cortex, and hyperplasia of the permanent cortex. The pathologic findings were most likely the result of the genetic mutation identified in 1 patient and of an unknown mutation in the remaining 2 patients.

  12. “REBOA” – Is it Really Safe? A Case with Massive Intracranial Hemorrhage Possibly due to Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA)

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Hayaki; Tamura, Nobuichiro; Echigoya, Ryosuke; Ikegami, Tetsunori; Fukuoka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 86 Final Diagnosis: Polytrauma Symptoms: Shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Non-compressible torso hemorrhage continues to be the leading cause of preventable death in trauma patients. Recent case series report that resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in the trauma population is a technically feasible method to manage the patients with exsanguinating hemorrhage. On the other hand, it seems that REBOA is being widely promoted prematurely. Complications due to REBOA haven’t been reported much in the literature, and they could have been underestimated. Case Report: An 86-year-old female presented to our emergency department following a pedestrian-vehicle accident. On admission, she was hemodynamically unstable with systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 78 mm Hg. She responded to fluid administration, and computed tomography (CT) scan showed cerebral contusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pelvic fracture with contrast extravasation, and thoracic spine fracture. Her condition deteriorated after the CT scan, and she became hemodynamically unstable. REBOA was inserted and inflated. Her blood pressure recovered and even became as high as SBP of 180 mm Hg. Transarterial embolization for pelvic fracture was successfully performed. A subsequent head CT scan showed massive intracranial hemorrhage with penetration to the ventricle, which was fatal. She died on the same day due to cerebral herniation. Conclusions: REBOA is now considered as an alternative to resuscitative thoracotomy or even widely indicated to control hemorrhage. We should be more cautious about using REBOA for polytrauma patients since it could make hemorrhage worse. Further research, assessing its potential complications and safety, will be required to elucidate clear indications for REBOA in trauma

  13. Case with a Nonreassuring Fetal Status Induced by Massive Hematemesis due to Mallory-Weiss Tear That Required Emergency Cesarean Section at 38 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Wagata, Maiko; Konno, Hiroko; Ito, Takahiro; Torii, Yuichi; Murakoshi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of Mallory-Weiss tear with massive hematemesis at 38 weeks' gestation. A 35-year-old woman presented with epigastralgia followed by massive hematemesis. An emergency endoscopy indicated active pulsatile bleeding at the esophagocardial junction. Although an emergency endoscopic hemostasis was successful, late decelerations without acceleration on cardiotocogram were observed. Therefore, the patient underwent emergency cesarean section, along with blood transfusion, following the endoscopic hemostasis. The hemoglobin level just before the operation was 5.1 g/dL. We suspected that massive hematemesis induced maternal acute anemia and hypovolemia, which resulted in a nonreassuring fetal status. Hence, urgent endoscopic hemostasis, adequate blood transfusion, and emergency cesarean section were needed. Mallory-Weiss tear during the third trimester may have a possibility of massive hematemesis and urgent blood transfusion, emergency endoscopic hemostasis, and emergency cesarean section may be needed. PMID:26881157

  14. [Massive Upper Airway Bleeding: A Rare Case of Aortobronchial Fistula].

    PubMed

    Gudiel Arriaza, Paola; Sánchez Serrano, Amparo; Marques do Vale, Jorge; Gil Pereira, Isabel; Simões Torres, António; Martín Sánchez, Maria José

    2016-06-01

    Clinical presentation of haemoptysis and haematemesis often generates confusion, becoming a difficult task to determine the source of upper airway bleeding. Aortobronchial fistula is a rare entity, but has been a reported complication in patients that have undergone aortic vascular surgery. A high clinical suspicion is fundamental to making this diagnosis. A 69 year old male, with a previous diagnosis of chronic gastritis, is admitted to the emergency room for vomiting blood. In the first 24 hours after admission, the patient develops respiratory insufficiency after an episode of massive bleeding from his mouth. A computed tomography is performed, which shows a descending thoracic aortic aneurism and signs of aortobronchial fistula. Urgent thoracic endovascular repair was performed. Early symptoms of aortobronchial fistulae are nonspecific which complicates the diagnosis and can lead to treatment delay. The use of bronchoscopy in these cases is controversial.

  15. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  16. Massively Parallel Sequencing Detected a Mutation in the MFN2 Gene Missed by Sanger Sequencing Due to a Primer Mismatch on an SNP Site.

    PubMed

    Neupauerová, Jana; Grečmalová, Dagmar; Seeman, Pavel; Laššuthová, Petra

    2016-05-01

    We describe a patient with early onset severe axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) with dominant inheritance, in whom Sanger sequencing failed to detect a mutation in the mitofusin 2 (MFN2) gene because of a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2236057) under the PCR primer sequence. The severe early onset phenotype and the family history with severely affected mother (died after delivery) was very suggestive of CMT2A and this suspicion was finally confirmed by a MFN2 mutation. The mutation p.His361Tyr was later detected in the patient by massively parallel sequencing with a gene panel for hereditary neuropathies. According to this information, new primers for amplification and sequencing were designed which bind away from the polymorphic sites of the patient's DNA. Sanger sequencing with these new primers then confirmed the heterozygous mutation in the MFN2 gene in this patient. This case report shows that massively parallel sequencing may in some rare cases be more sensitive than Sanger sequencing and highlights the importance of accurate primer design which requires special attention.

  17. Massive Hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Tariq, Cheema

    2016-01-01

    Hemoptysis, or coughing of blood, oftentimes triggers anxiety and fear for patients. The etiology of hemoptysis will determine the clinical course, which includes watchful waiting or intensive care admission. Any amount of hemoptysis that compromises the patient's respiratory status is considered massive hemoptysis and should be considered a medical emergency. In this article, we review introduction, definition, bronchial circulation anatomy, etiology, and management of massive hemoptysis.

  18. Massive Rock Detachments from the Continental slope of the Balsas River Submarine Delta that occur due to Instability of Sediments which Produce Turbidity Currents and Tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Ochoa, J.; Aguayo-Camargo, J.

    2007-05-01

    During the NOAA oceanographic delivery cruise of the US R/V "Roger Revelle" to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California in San Diego, California USA, in July 1996; a well calibrated bathymetric equipment, the SeaBeam* 2012, was tested. Good resolutions in data allowed bathymetric mapping to visualize the sea floor relief. Detailed colorful chartographic images showed a portion of the continental slope between the Balsas River Delta and the Middle America Trench and between the Balsas Canyon and La Necesidad Canyon. The surveyed area covered more than 3 000 square kilometers. After the delivery cruise, one of the goals was to measure and analyze the Morphobathymetry of the uneven lower portion of the Balsas River Submarine Delta. So far some of the findings with the morphometric analyses consist of several isolated slump scars that each comprise more than 12 cubic kilometers in volume and a multiple slump scar with an evident steep hollow about 200 cubic kilometers absent of rock. These volumes of rock apparently underwent a remobilization from the slope during the Late Quaternary. The rock detachments occured in relatively small portions but in instantaneous massive displacements because of their instability as well as other identified factors in the region. Over time more and more authors have accepted that coastal cuts or submarine slump scars have been left by sudden movements of rock and fluids. The phenomena that occur in the region in general, are accompanied on one side by potential and kinetic energies like falling bodies, flows and gravity waves, and on the other side, by mass transfer of rock and fluid mobilization like turbidity currents, accumulations, sea wave surges or tsunamis. In some cases the phenomena is produced by another natural triggering forces or by an earthquake. We propose that events like these, i.e. massive detachments and their products such as accumulations, turbidity currents and depositional debrites

  19. The Discovery of Periodic Modulations in the Optical Spectra of Galaxies, Possibly due to Ultrarapid Light Bursts from Their Massive Central Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Ermanno F.

    2013-09-01

    A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the SDSS survey was carried out to detect periodic modulations contained in the intensity versus frequency spectrum. A statistically significant signal was found for 223 galaxies, while the spectra of 0.9 million galaxies were observed. A plot of the periods as a function of redshift clearly shows that the effect is real without any doubt, because the modulations are quantized at two base periods that increase with redshift in two very tight parallel linear relations. We suggest that this result could be caused by light bursts separated by times on the order of 10-13 s, but other causes may be possible. We investigate the hypothesis that the modulation is generated by the Fourier transform of spectral lines, but conclude that this hypothesis is not valid. Although the light burst suggestion implies absurdly high temperatures, it is supported by the fact that the Crab pulsar also has extremely short unresolved pulses (<0.5 ns) that imply similarly high temperatures. Furthermore, the radio spectrum of the Crab pulsar also has spectral bands similar to those that have been detected. Finally, decreasing the signal-to-noise threshold of detection gives results consistent with beamed signals having a small beam divergence, as expected from non-thermal sources that send a jet, like those seen in pulsars. Considering that galaxy centers contain massive black holes, exotic black hole physics may be responsible for the spectral modulation. However, at this stage, this idea is only a hypothesis to be confirmed with further work.

  20. THE DISCOVERY OF PERIODIC MODULATIONS IN THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF GALAXIES, POSSIBLY DUE TO ULTRARAPID LIGHT BURSTS FROM THEIR MASSIVE CENTRAL BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, Ermanno F.

    2013-09-10

    A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the SDSS survey was carried out to detect periodic modulations contained in the intensity versus frequency spectrum. A statistically significant signal was found for 223 galaxies, while the spectra of 0.9 million galaxies were observed. A plot of the periods as a function of redshift clearly shows that the effect is real without any doubt, because the modulations are quantized at two base periods that increase with redshift in two very tight parallel linear relations. We suggest that this result could be caused by light bursts separated by times on the order of 10{sup -13} s, but other causes may be possible. We investigate the hypothesis that the modulation is generated by the Fourier transform of spectral lines, but conclude that this hypothesis is not valid. Although the light burst suggestion implies absurdly high temperatures, it is supported by the fact that the Crab pulsar also has extremely short unresolved pulses (<0.5 ns) that imply similarly high temperatures. Furthermore, the radio spectrum of the Crab pulsar also has spectral bands similar to those that have been detected. Finally, decreasing the signal-to-noise threshold of detection gives results consistent with beamed signals having a small beam divergence, as expected from non-thermal sources that send a jet, like those seen in pulsars. Considering that galaxy centers contain massive black holes, exotic black hole physics may be responsible for the spectral modulation. However, at this stage, this idea is only a hypothesis to be confirmed with further work.

  1. Transport de particules massives dans un fluide turbulent: Application a l'erosion due au sable sur les parois d'une turbine hydraulique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Stephen

    Le transport de particules massives par un champ turbulent est un vaste domaine de la mécanique des fluides. Il possède de nombreuses applications comme par exemple le transport de sable dans une turbine hydraulique. En raison de la dureté des grains de quartz et des grandes vitesses de collision avec les parois métalliques, un phénomène d'érosion intensif se produit. Les dommages résultants peuvent diminuer le rendement de la turbine au cours des quelques mois suivant la mise en opération. L'objectif de cette thèse est de mettre au point un outil permettant de prédire ces zones d'érosion. Ce projet de recherche en contexte industriel a été réalisé en collaboration avec la compagnie General Electric Hydro du Canada. Dans un régime hautement turbulent, il est possible d'obtenir une expression suffisamment générale en utilisant une formulation partiellement empirique: l'équation de Basset- Boussinesq-Oseen modifiée. Ce choix de modèle tient compte du niveau de précision recherché et de la méthode numérique employée afin de résoudre la phase fluide. Il permet aussi d'éliminer plusieurs ambiguïtés fréquemment rencontrées dans la littérature et implementées dans certains codes commerciaux courants. La formulation mathématique du problème est effectuée dans un espace mixte Euler-Lagrange. Les paramètres dynamiques sont relies au type de particules et à l'intensité de la turbulence. Le code numérique résultant est le plus performant développé à ce jour (août 1998). Les trajectoires de plusieurs centaines de milliers de particules peuvent être simulées et visualisées de manière interactive sur une station de travail (SGI R4K, R8K et R10K). L'utilisateur du logiciel est libre de se déplacer dans l'espace à l'aide d'un environnement similaire a un ``simulateur de vol''. Il peut ainsi analyser les détails du processus d'érosion de même que l'écoulement du fluide dans la turbine. Les zones d'érosion obtenues à l

  2. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  3. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  4. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  5. Occurrence of pneumomediastinum due to dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Aslaner, Mehmet Ali; Kasap, Gül Nihal; Demir, Cihat; Akkaş, Meltem; Aksu, Nalan M

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of pneumomediastinum and massive subcutaneous emphysema due to dental procedures is quite rare. We present a case of pneumomediastinum and massive subcutaneous emphysema that occurred during third molar tooth extraction with air-turbine handpiece.

  6. Chronic pneumonia due to Klebsiella oxytoca mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gera, Kamal; Roshan, Rahul; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Shah, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella species infrequently cause acute community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The chronic form of the disease caused by K. pneumoniae (Friedlander's bacillus) was occasionally seen in the pre-antibiotic era. K. oxytoca is a singularly uncommon cause of CAP. The chronic form of the disease caused by K. oxytoca has been documented only once before. A 50-year-old immunocompetent male smoker presented with haemoptysis for 12 months. Imaging demonstrated a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe with emphysematous changes. Sputum stains and cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were negative. However, three sputum samples for aerobic culture as well as bronchial aspirate cultured pure growth of K. oxytoca. A diagnosis of chronic pneumonia due to K. oxytoca was established and with appropriate therapy, the patient was largely asymptomatic. The remarkable clinical and radiological similarity to pulmonary tuberculosis can result in patients with chronic Klebsiella pneumonia erroneously receiving anti-tuberculous therapy.

  7. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  8. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  9. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  10. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  11. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  12. Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    date of determination). DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). "Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators" August... electromechanical systems) processes are used to manufacture reliable and reproducible stators and sliders for the actuators. These processes include

  13. Recovery From Giant Eruptions in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, A.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We perform radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study how very massive stars recover from giant eruptions. The post eruption star experience strong mass loss due to strong winds, driven by radial pulsations in the star*s interior, that operate by the κ-mechanism. The mass loss history obtained in our simulations resembles η Car*s history.

  14. Massive edema of the ovary associated with androgenic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Siller, B S; Gelder, M S; Alvarez, R D; Partridge, E E

    1995-11-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a rare tumor-like condition of the ovary characterized by marked enlargement of one or both ovaries due to marked accumulation of edema fluid in the ovarian stroma. This paper reviews the literature on massive ovarian edema and presents a case associated with androgenic manifestations.

  15. Massively Parallel Genetics.

    PubMed

    Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Human genetics has historically depended on the identification of individuals whose natural genetic variation underlies an observable trait or disease risk. Here we argue that new technologies now augment this historical approach by allowing the use of massively parallel assays in model systems to measure the functional effects of genetic variation in many human genes. These studies will help establish the disease risk of both observed and potential genetic variants and to overcome the problem of "variants of uncertain significance."

  16. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  17. Phases of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei L.

    2004-10-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity is described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff ~ (mMPl)1/2. This theory is free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of arbitrary higher dimension operators without assuming any fine-tunings among the coefficients of these operators, besides those enforced by the symmetries. These theories can be thought of as generalizations of the ghost condensate model with a smaller residual symmetry group. We briefly discuss what kind of cosmology can one expect in massive gravity and argue that the allowed values of the graviton mass may be quite large, affecting growth of primordial perturbations, structure formation and, perhaps, enhancing the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe.

  18. Inconsistency of topologically massive hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.; Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    The coupled topologically massive spin-5/2 gravity system in D = 3 dimensions whose kinematics represents dynamical propagating gauge invariant massive spin-5/2 and spin-2 excitations, is shown to be inconsistent, or equivalently, not locally hypersymmetric. In contrast to D = 4, the local constraints on the system arising from failure of the fermionic Bianchi identities do not involve the 'highest spin' components of the field, but rather the auxiliary spinor required to construct a consistent massive model.

  19. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same ‘minimal’ bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new ‘minimal massive gravity’ has both a positive energy graviton and positive central charges for the asymptotic AdS-boundary conformal algebra.

  20. Are All Magnetic White Dwarf Stars Massive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Kulebi, B.; Koester, D.; Kleinman, S. J.; Winget, D. E.; Castanheira, B. G.; Corsico, A. H.

    2017-03-01

    We obtained follow-up spectra on 25 white dwarf stars identified in our white dwarf catalog of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as massive or magnetic. We identified over 300 magnetic white dwarf stars from SDSS with some uncertainties due to the low S/N of the spectra. With much higher S/N Gemini data, our sample should be able to help us confirm accuracy of our determinations. We present here our results so far from the follow up observations.

  1. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  2. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  3. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  4. Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

    1999-05-06

    The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

  5. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  6. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  7. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  8. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  9. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  10. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  11. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  12. Topologically massive gravity and Ricci-Cotton flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Nima; Maloney, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    We consider topologically massive gravity (TMG), which is three-dimensional general relativity with a cosmological constant and a gravitational Chern-Simons term. When the cosmological constant is negative the theory has two potential vacuum solutions: anti-de Sitter space and warped anti-de Sitter space. The theory also contains a massive graviton state which renders these solutions unstable for certain values of the parameters and boundary conditions. We study the decay of these solutions due to the condensation of the massive graviton mode using Ricci-Cotton flow, which is the appropriate generalization of Ricci flow to TMG. When the Chern-Simons coupling is small the AdS solution flows to warped AdS by the condensation of the massive graviton mode. When the coupling is large the situation is reversed, and warped AdS flows to AdS. Minisuperspace models are constructed where these flows are studied explicitly.

  13. ATLASGAL - towards a complete sample of massive star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Bronfman, L.; Pfalzner, S.; König, C.; Wienen, M.

    2014-09-01

    By matching infrared-selected, massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions in the Red MSX Source survey to massive clumps found in the submillimetre ATLASGAL (APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy) survey, we have identified ˜1000 embedded young massive stars between 280° < ℓ < 350° and 10° < ℓ < 60° with | b | < 1.5°. Combined with an existing sample of radio-selected methanol masers and compact H II regions, the result is a catalogue of ˜1700 massive stars embedded within ˜1300 clumps located across the inner Galaxy, containing three observationally distinct subsamples, methanol-maser, MYSO and H II-region associations, covering the most important tracers of massive star formation, thought to represent key stages of evolution. We find that massive star formation is strongly correlated with the regions of highest column density in spherical, centrally condensed clumps. We find no significant differences between the three samples in clump structure or the relative location of the embedded stars, which suggests that the structure of a clump is set before the onset of star formation, and changes little as the embedded object evolves towards the main sequence. There is a strong linear correlation between clump mass and bolometric luminosity, with the most massive stars forming in the most massive clumps. We find that the MYSO and H II-region subsamples are likely to cover a similar range of evolutionary stages and that the majority are near the end of their main accretion phase. We find few infrared-bright MYSOs associated with the most massive clumps, probably due to very short pre-main-sequence lifetimes in the most luminous sources.

  14. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  15. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  16. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  17. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Antonio De; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-15

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  18. Holographically viable extensions of topologically massive and minimal massive gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altas, Emel; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Recently [E. Bergshoeff et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 145008 (2014)], an extension of the topologically massive gravity (TMG) in 2 +1 dimensions, dubbed as minimal massive gravity (MMG), which is free of the bulk-boundary unitarity clash that inflicts the former theory and all the other known three-dimensional theories, was found. Field equations of MMG differ from those of TMG at quadratic terms in the curvature that do not come from the variation of an action depending on the metric alone. Here we show that MMG is a unique theory and there does not exist a deformation of TMG or MMG at the cubic and quartic order (and beyond) in the curvature that is consistent at the level of the field equations. The only extension of TMG with the desired bulk and boundary properties having a single massive degree of freedom is MMG.

  19. Positive signs in massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  20. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  1. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  2. Processing massive datasets in genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiguenave, F.

    2011-02-01

    Life science researches have been profoundly impacted by technological advances allowing faster and cheaper DNA sequencing. Opening a wide range of applications in medical and biology, the last generation sequencing platforms raised new challenges, in particular in processing, analysing and interpreting massive data. In this talk, the growing role of bioinformatics will be illustrated by providing some figures about genome sequencing and others applications aimed at unravelling biological mechanisms. Methods to gather insights from massive amount of data will be illustrated by the genome annotation process, by which genes are identified in the genome sequence.

  3. Broadbeam for Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Deli; Qian, Haifeng; Li, Geoffrey Ye

    2016-05-01

    Massive MIMO has been identified as one of the promising disruptive air interface techniques to address the huge capacity requirement demanded by 5G wireless communications. For practical deployment of such systems, the control message need to be broadcast to all users reliably in the cell using broadbeam. A broadbeam is expected to have the same radiated power in all directions to cover users in any place in a cell. In this paper, we will show that there is no perfect broadbeam. Therefore, we develop a method for generating broadbeam that can allow tiny fluctuations in radiated power. Overall, this can serve as an ingredient for practical deployment of the massive MIMO systems.

  4. Massive photons and Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiaso, Mauro; Lehnert, Ralf; Potting, Robertus

    2012-04-01

    All quadratic translation- and gauge-invariant photon operators for Lorentz breakdown are included into the Stueckelberg Lagrangian for massive photons in a generalized Rξ gauge. The corresponding dispersion relation and tree-level propagator are determined exactly, and some leading-order results are derived. The question of how to include such Lorentz-violating effects into a perturbative quantum-field expansion is addressed. Applications of these results within Lorentz-breaking quantum-field theories include the regularization of infrared divergences as well as the free propagation of massive vector bosons.

  5. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  6. A Study on the Pedagogical Components of Massive Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raposo-Rivas, Manuela; Martínez-Figueira, Esther; Campos, Jose Antonio Sarmiento

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the first decade of the 21st century, the rapid growth in the MOOCs offering brought about a new educational landscape, posing new challenges to teaching and learning, mainly due to massive participation, ubiquity and free enrollment. These courses embody a confluence of technological and pedagogical mediations yet to be fully…

  7. Massive scrotal edema as a complication of abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Girardeau, J T; Young, V L

    1985-10-01

    Massive scrotal edema is an unreported complication of abdominoplasty. This patient's postoperative decompensation of medial thigh and scrotal lymphatic return may well have been due to an occult lymphedema tarda or previously compromised lymphatics from the fibrosis of venous stasis disease and obesity.

  8. Decision-making in massive rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Thès, André; Hardy, Philippe; Bak, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of massive rotator cuff tears has developed over many years ranging from conservative treatment to open and arthroscopic repair, muscle transfers and reversed arthroplasty. The evolution of more advanced techniques in arthroscopic repair has changed the treatment approach and improved the prognosis for functional outcome despite low healing rates. Due to this rapid development, our evidence-based knowledge today is mainly founded in Level 3 and Level 4 studies. Based on the literature, the current knowledge on treatment of symptomatic massive rotator cuff tears is proposed in an algorithm. Level of evidence V.

  9. Two cases of asymptomatic massive fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Peedin, Alexis R; Mazepa, Marshall A; Park, Yara A; Weimer, Eric T; Schmitz, John L; Raval, Jay S

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) in the immediate postpartum period is critical for the timely administration of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) prophylaxis to minimize the risk of alloimmunization in D-negative mothers of D-positive newborns. We report a series of two clinically-unsuspected cases of massive FMHs identified at our university medical center. Retrospective records of two cases of massive FMH were investigated using the electronic medical record. After positive fetal bleed screens, flow cytometric analysis for hemoglobin F was performed to quantify the volume of the hemorrhages in both cases. Flow cytometric enumeration with anti-D was also performed in one case. The two patients had 209.5 and 75 mL of fetal blood in circulation, resulting in 8 and 4 doses of RhIG administered, respectively. For the former patient, flow cytometric analysis with anti-D ruled out hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and supported the fetal origin of the red cells. Due to the clinically-silent nature of both hemorrhages, further evaluation of the newborns' blood was not performed. These cases highlight the importance of rapidly obtaining accurate measurements of fetal blood loss via flow cytometric analysis in cases of FMH, particularly in clinically-unsuspected cases, to ensure timely administration of adequate immunoprophylaxis to D-negative mothers.

  10. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous time-dependent solutions of massive gravity generalise the plane wave solutions of the linearised Fierz-Pauli equations for a massive spin-two particle, as well as the Kasner solutions of General Relativity. We show that they also allow a clear counting of the degrees of freedom and represent a simplified framework to work out the constraints, the equations of motion and the initial value formulation. We work in the vielbein formulation of massive gravity, find the phase space resulting from the constraints and show that several disconnected sectors of solutions exist some of which are unstable. The initial values determine the sector to which a solution belongs. Classically, the theory is not pathological but quantum mechanically the theory may suffer from instabilities. The latter are not due to an extra ghost-like degree of freedom.

  11. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  12. New branches of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Crisostomi, M.; Koyama, K.; Pilo, L.; Tasinato, G.

    2015-06-01

    The basic building block for Lorentz-invariant and ghost-free massive gravity is the square root of the combination g-1η , where g-1 is the inverse of the physical metric and η is a reference metric. Since the square root of a matrix is not uniquely defined, it is possible to have physically inequivalent potentials corresponding to different branches. We show that around the Minkowski background, the only perturbatively well-defined branch is the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley. On the other hand, if Lorentz symmetry is broken spontaneously, other potentials exist with a standard perturbative expansion. We show this explicitly building new Lorentz-invariant, ghost-free massive gravity potentials for theories that in the background preserve rotational invariance but break Lorentz boosts.

  13. Black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Brito, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We review the black hole (BH) solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension, and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact BH solutions, analogous to those of general relativity (GR). In addition to these solutions, hairy BHs—solutions with no correspondent in GR—have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of Birkhoff’s theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these BHs richer and more complex than those of GR. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild BH exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical BHs are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability of the Kerr solution imposes stringent bounds on the graviton mass.

  14. Topologically massive higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Lal, Shailesh; Saha, Arunabha; Sahoo, Bindusar

    2011-10-01

    We look at the generalisation of topologically massive gravity (TMG) to higher spins, specifically spin-3. We find a special "chiral" point for the spin-three, analogous to the spin-two example, which actually coincides with the usual spin-two chiral point. But in contrast to usual TMG, there is the presence of a non-trivial trace and its logarithmic partner at the chiral point. The trace modes carry energy opposite in sign to the traceless modes. The logarithmic partner of the traceless mode carries negative energy indicating an instability at the chiral point. We make several comments on the asymptotic symmetry and its possible deformations at this chiral point and speculate on the higher spin generalisation of LCFT2 dual to the spin-3 massive gravity at the chiral point.

  15. Spin-3 topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wu, Jun-bao

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the spin-3 topologically massive gravity (TMG), paying special attention to its properties at the chiral point. We propose an action describing the higher spin fields coupled to TMG. We discuss the traceless spin-3 fluctuations around the AdS3 vacuum and find that there is an extra local massive mode, besides the left-moving and right-moving boundary massless modes. At the chiral point, such extra mode becomes massless and degenerates with the left-moving mode. We show that at the chiral point the only degrees of freedom in the theory are the boundary right-moving graviton and spin-3 field. We conjecture that spin-3 chiral gravity with generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary condition is holographically dual to 2D chiral CFT with classical W3 algebra and central charge cR = 3 l / G.

  16. WHAT SETS THE INITIAL ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    The physical mechanisms that set the initial rotation rates in massive stars are a crucial unknown in current star formation theory. Observations of young, massive stars provide evidence that they form in a similar fashion to their low-mass counterparts. The magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disk may be sufficient to spin down low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to well below breakup at the end stage of their formation when the accretion rate is low. However, we show that these magnetic torques are insufficient to spin down massive PMS stars due to their short formation times and high accretion rates. We develop a model for the angular momentum evolution of stars over a wide range in mass, considering both magnetic and gravitational torques. We find that magnetic torques are unable to spin down either low-mass or high-mass stars during the main accretion phase, and that massive stars cannot be spun down significantly by magnetic torques during the end stage of their formation either. Spin-down occurs only if massive stars' disk lifetimes are substantially longer or their magnetic fields are much stronger than current observations suggest.

  17. Cosmological stability bound in massive gravity and bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2013-12-01

    We give a simple derivation of a cosmological bound on the graviton mass for spatially flat FRW solutions in massive gravity with an FRW reference metric and for bigravity theories. This bound comes from the requirement that the kinetic term of the helicity zero mode of the graviton is positive definite. The bound is dependent only on the parameters in the massive gravity potential and the Hubble expansion rate for the two metrics. We derive the decoupling limit of bigravity and FRW massive gravity, and use this to give an independent derivation of the cosmological bound. We recover our previous results that the tension between satisfying the Friedmann equation and the cosmological bound is sufficient to rule out all observationally relevant FRW solutions for massive gravity with an FRW reference metric. In contrast, in bigravity this tension is resolved due to different nature of the Vainshtein mechanism. We find that in bigravity theories there exists an FRW solution with late-time self-acceleration for which the kinetic terms for the helicity-2, helicity-1 and helicity-0 are generically nonzero and positive making this a compelling candidate for a model of cosmic acceleration. We confirm that the generalized bound is saturated for the candidate partially massless (bi)gravity theories but the existence of helicity-1/helicity-0 interactions implies the absence of the conjectured partially massless symmetry for both massive gravity and bigravity.

  18. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  19. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  20. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  1. Voids in massive neutrino cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Sutter, P.M. E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: sutter@oats.inaf.it

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic voids are a promising environment to characterize neutrino-induced effects on the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. We perform a comprehensive numerical study of the statistical properties of voids, identified both in the matter and galaxy distributions, in massive and massless neutrino cosmologies. The matter density field is obtained by running several independent N-body simulations with cold dark matter and neutrino particles, while the galaxy catalogs are modeled by populating the dark matter halos in simulations via a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to reproduce the clustering properties observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7. We focus on the impact of massive neutrinos on the following void statistical properties: number density, ellipticities, two-point statistics, density and velocity profiles. Considering the matter density field, we find that voids in massive neutrino cosmologies are less evolved than those in the corresponding massless neutrinos case: there is a larger number of small voids and a smaller number of large ones, their profiles are less evacuated, and they present a lower wall at the edge. Moreover, the degeneracy between σ{sub 8} and Ω{sub ν} is broken when looking at void properties. In terms of the galaxy density field, we find that differences among cosmologies are difficult to detect because of the small number of galaxy voids in the simulations. Differences are instead present when looking at the matter density and velocity profiles around these voids.

  2. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  3. Modification of gravity due to torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, V. P.; Nikiforova, V.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity have been considered as one of the possible ways of addressing some of the outstanding problems related to the large scale gravitational physics. In this contribution we review some of the recent results which are due to the inclusion of dynamical torsion. More specifically we shall discuss the propagation of massive spin-2 particles in flat and curved space times. We shall show that, contrary to what is generally believed, spinning matter is not the sole source of torsion field. A symmetric energy momentum tensor can also couple to torsion degrees of freedom. The massive and massless spin-2 particles mix giving rise to an infrared modification of gravity.

  4. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  5. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  6. Solid holography and massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  7. Evolution and Nucleosynthesis of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschi, Raphael

    In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M > 100 M_{odot } ) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M_{odot } . A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of neon and magnesium at the surface of WC stars. At solar metallicity, mass loss is so strong that even if a star is born with several hundred solar masses, it will end its life with less than 50 M_{odot } (using current mass loss prescriptions). At the metallicity of the LMC and lower, on the other hand, mass loss is weaker and might enable stars to undergo pair-instability supernovae.

  8. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  9. [Massive localized lymphoedema (MLL) in the mons pubis].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-08-01

    Massive localized lymphoedema (MLL) is a relatively frequent complication in obesity. MLL is present as a giant swelling and associated with characteristic skin changes. Due to the pathologic and morphologic similarity to sarcoma, MLL is also called "pseudosarcoma". MLL can degenerate into angiosarcoma without surgery. We present a case of MLL of the mons pubis in a 54-year-old man with a BMI of 48.6.

  10. The limiting factors on volcanism on massive stagnant lid planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2012-04-01

    As the number of discovered exoplanets is increasing, the question whether these planets could harbor life becomes more relevant. Chemoautotrophs, which live from thermal disequilibrium due to volcanic activity, are believed to have been the first organisms on Earth and maybe on planets in general. Furthermore, volcanism influences the atmosphere, and therefore the habitability of the planet. Therefore, we investigate weather volcanism could occur on massive stagnant lid planets in dependence of their mass, age, surface temperature or their relative mantle thickness.

  11. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission.

  12. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  13. Observational studies of regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Heather Danielle Blythe

    2013-03-01

    Massive stars have a profound influence on their surroundings. However, relatively little is known about their formation. The study of massive star formation is hindered by a lack of observational evidence, primarily due to difficulties observing massive stars at early stages in their development. The Red MSX Source survey (RMS survey) is a valuable tool with which to address these issues. Near-infrared H- and K-band spectra were taken for 247 candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), selected from the RMS survey. 195 (∼80%) of the targets are YSOs, of which 131 are massive YSOs (LBOL>5E3L⊙, M>8 M⊙). This is the largest spectroscopic study of massive YSOs to date. This study covers minimally obscured objects right through to very red, dusty sources. Almost all YSOs show some evidence for emission lines, though there is a wide variety of observed properties, with HI, H2 Fe II, and CO among the most commonly observed lines. Evidence for disks and outflows was frequently seen. Comparisons of Brγ and H2 emission with low mass YSOs suggest that the emission mechanism for these lines is the same for low-, intermediate-, and high-mass YSOs, i.e. high-mass YSOs appear to resemble scaled-up versions of low-mass YSOs. It was found that the YSOs form an evolutionary sequence, based on their spectra, consistent with the existing theoretical models. Type I YSOs have strong H2 emission, no ionized lines, and are redder than the other two subtypes. As such, these are considered to be the youngest sources. The Type III sources are bluest, and therefore considered to be the oldest subtype. They have strong H I lines and fluorescent Fe II 1.6878 μm emission. They may also have weak H2 emission. Type III sources may even be beginning to form a mini-H II region. XSHOOTER data from 10 Herbig Be stars were analysed. The evidence suggests that winds and disks are common among Herbig stars, as they are among their main sequence classical Be star counterparts. Line

  14. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  15. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  16. Derivative couplings in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xian; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: lavinia.heisenberg@eth-its.ethz.ch

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity in the presence of non-minimal derivative couplings. For this purpose we consider a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions that live on the unique composite effective metric. For the viability of the model both metrics have to be dynamical. Nevertheless, the number of allowed kinetic terms is crucial. We adapt to the restriction of having one single kinetic term. After deriving the full set of equations of motion for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker background, we study linear perturbations on top of it. We show explicitly that only four tensor, two vector and two scalar degrees of freedom propagate, one of which being the Horndeski scalar, while the Boulware-Deser ghost can be integrated out.

  17. BFKL Pomeron with massive gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Eugene; Lipatov, Lev; Siddikov, Marat

    2014-04-01

    We solve the BFKL equation in the leading logarithmic approximation numerically in the Yang-Mills theory with the Higgs mechanism for the vector boson mass generation. It can be considered as a model for the amplitude with the correct behavior of the s-channel partial waves at large impact parameters. The Pomeron spectrum of the massive BFKL kernel in the ω space for t=0 coincides with the continuous spectrum for the massless case although the density of its eigenvalues is 2 times smaller for ω>ω0, where ω0 is a negative number. We find a simple parametrization for the corresponding eigenfunctions. Because the leading singularity in the ω plane in this Higgs model for t=0 is a fixed cut, the Regge pole contributions could be only for nonphysical positive t. Hence we can state that the correct behavior at large b does not influence the main properties of the BFKL equation.

  18. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  19. Influence of binary fraction on the fragmentation of young massive clusters—a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Sinha, Abisa; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A stochastic model has been developed to study the hierarchical fragmentation process of young massive clusters in external galaxies considering close binary components along with individual ones. Stellar masses for individual ones have been generated from truncated Pareto distribution and stellar masses for close binary components have been generated from a truncated Bi-variate Gumbel Exponential distribution. The above distribution is identified by fitting the observed bi-variate distribution of masses of eclipsing binary stars computed from the light curves catalogued in the package Binary Maker 3.0. The resulting mass spectra computed at different projected distances, show signature of mass segregation. Degree of mass segregation becomes reduced due to the inclusion of binary fraction. This might be due to the reduction of massive stars and inclusion of less massive stars rather than inclusion of single massive stars and the effect of line of sight length projected to an observer.

  20. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  1. Atypical: Analysis of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) with a Relatively High Rate of Program Completers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemán de la Garza, Lorena Yadira; Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa; Gómez Zermeño, Marcela Georgina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have raised great expectations due to their potential for changing the relationship between students and professors, academy and the general community. To conceptualize, the terms "course", "online", "massive" and "open" have been redefined and reinvented so many…

  2. Remark on massive particle's de Sitter tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Chen, De-You; Wen, Dan E-mail: deyouchen@126.com

    2013-11-01

    In the work [J. Y. Zhang and Z. Zhao, Massive particles's black hole tunneling and de Sitter tunneling, Nucl. Phys. B 725 (2005) 173.], the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon has been first described in the tunneling framework. However, the geodesic equation of the massive particle was unnaturally and awkwardly defined there by investigating the relation between the group and phase velocity. In this paper, we start from the Lagrangian analysis on the action to naturally produce the geodesic equation of the tunneling massive particle. Then, based on the new definition for the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon. It is noteworthy that, the highlight of our work is a new and important development of the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method, which can make it more physical.

  3. Pancreaticopleural Fistula Causing Massive Right Hydrothorax and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Esther Ern-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothorax secondary to a pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF) is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. In patients with a history of pancreatitis, diagnosis is made by detection of amylase in the pleural exudate. Imaging, particularly magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, aids in the detection of pancreatic ductal disruption. Management includes thoracocentesis and pancreatic duct drainage or pancreatic resection procedures. We present a case of massive right hydrothorax secondary to a PPF due to recurrent acute pancreatitis. Due to respiratory failure, urgent thoracocentesis was done. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The patient remains well at one-year follow-up. PMID:27747128

  4. Unusual cause of massive hemothorax: spontaneous rupture of nonfunctioning mediastinal paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Liu, Chengwu; Ma, Lin; Pu, Qiang; Zhu, Yunke; Xiao, Zhilan; Guo, Chenglin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Mediastinal paraganglioma is a rare neurogenic tumor with a hypervascular feature. The spontaneous rupture of mediastinal paraganglioma is an unusual cause of massive hemothorax. Here we present a case of 39-year-old man with massive hemothorax due to the spontaneous rupture of a mediastinal paraganglioma. The man underwent successful resection of tumor and had an uneventful recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous rupture of nonfunctioning mediastinal paraganglioma. PMID:28149584

  5. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  6. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Thushara

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom-made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  7. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, G. S. Thushara

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom--made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  8. Massive chondroma of pelvis - case report.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Jerzy; Stańkowski, Andrzej; Plaza, Jan; Chrobok, Adam; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Tomasik, Patryk; Matysiakiewicz, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    The case of a massive pelvis chondroma in a 15-year-old male is described. The patient was previously treated operatively due to multiple chondro-osseous exostoses. An extensive chondrous tumour was detected in the patient's pelvis and abdomen during a follow-up visit. This was accompanied by symptoms of intestinal obstruction and impaired micturition. CT scans showed an extensive tumour filling the entire minor pelvic cavity and proximal femur with impression and infiltration of the femoral blood vessels, and displacement of both ureters, colon and urinary bladder causing urinary retention. The tumour caused severe disturbances of anatomical relations leading to dysfunction of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems. After appropriate preparation, the patient underwent surgery by a multidisciplinary team comprising an orthopaedic surgeon, a general surgeon and a urologist. After laparotomy and exposure of the retroperitoneal space, a giant (about 3.5 dm3) chondro-osseous tumour was resected. After 5 weeks another operation was made and another tumour, greater than an adult man's fist, was removed from the medial aspect of the right hip. The postoperative course was uncomplicated, the patient felt immediate relief as regards the urinary and gastrointestinal disturbances. His locomotion became noticeably better. A histological examination confirmed the preliminary diagnoses of a chondroma and a chondro-osseous lesion. Outpatient follow-up and additional work-up (ultrasound, CT) showed resolution of urine retention with an appropriate urinary bladder position and tumour-free minor pelvis cavity and proximal femur.

  9. Mining knowledge in astrophysical massive data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, Massimo; Longo, Giuseppe; Pasian, Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Modern scientific data mainly consist of huge data sets gathered by a very large number of techniques and stored in much diversified and often incompatible data repositories. More in general, in the e-science environment, it is considered as a critical and urgent requirement to integrate services across distributed, heterogeneous, dynamic “virtual organizations” formed by different resources within a single enterprise. In the last decade, Astronomy has become an immensely data-rich field due to the evolution of detectors (plates to digital to mosaics), telescopes and space instruments. The Virtual Observatory approach consists of the federation under common standards of all astronomical archives available worldwide, as well as data analysis, data mining and data exploration applications. The main drive behind such an effort is that once the infrastructure is complete, it will allow a new type of multi-wavelength, multi-epoch science, which can only be barely imagined. Data mining, or knowledge discovery in databases, while being the main methodology to extract the scientific information contained in such Massive Data Sets (MDS), poses crucial problems since it has to orchestrate complex problems posed by transparent access to different computing environments, scalability of algorithms, reusability of resources, etc. In the present paper we summarize the present status of the MDS in the Virtual Observatory and what is currently done and planned to bring advanced data mining methodologies in the case of the DAME (DAta Mining and Exploration) project.

  10. Linear growth of structure in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Adam R.; Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S. E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no

    2014-10-01

    The ghost-free theory of massive gravity with two dynamical metrics has been shown to produce viable cosmological expansion, where the late-time acceleration of the Universe is due to the finite range of the gravitational interaction rather than a nonzero cosmological constant. Here the cosmological perturbations are studied in this theory. The full perturbation equations are presented in a general gauge and analyzed, focusing on subhorizon scales in the quasistatic limit during the matter-dominated era. An evolution equation for the matter inhomogeneities and the parameters quantifying the deviations from general relativistic structure formation are expressed in terms of five functions whose forms are determined directly by the coupling parameters in the theory. The evolution equation has a similar structure to Horndeski-type scalar-tensor theories, exhibiting a modified growth rate and scale-dependence at intermediate wavenumbers. Predictions of the theory are confronted with observational data on both background expansion and large-scale structure, although care must be taken to ensure a model is stable. It is found that while the stable models fit the data well, they feature deviations from the standard cosmology that could be detected or ruled out by near-future experiments.

  11. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  12. Inside-out formation of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    A significant fraction of the present day massive galaxies have compact cores embedded inside their disks or halos. Strikingly, those compact cores are similar to the massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies, nicknamed red-nuggets. We present observational evidence supporting an inside-out formation scenario, where present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red-nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disk are accreted later. This contribution is based on the paper by de la Rosa et al. (2016).

  13. Fluid/gravity correspondence for massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid/gravity correspondence in the framework of massive Einstein gravity. Treating the gravitational mass terms as an effective energy-momentum tensor and utilizing the Petrov-like boundary condition on a timelike hypersurface, we find that the perturbation effects of massive gravity in bulk can be completely governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation living on the cutoff surface under the near horizon and nonrelativistic limits. Furthermore, we have concisely computed the ratio of dynamical viscosity to entropy density for two massive Einstein gravity theories, and found that they still saturate the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound.

  14. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  15. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  16. Evolution of Massive Stars at Low Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Walborn, Nolan R.; Hunter, Ian; Martayan, Christophe; van Marle, Allard Jan; Marchenko, Sergey; Vink, Jorick S.; Limongi, Marco; Levesque, Emily M.; Modjaz, Maryam

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports the contributions made on the occasion of the Special Session entitled “Evolution of Massive Stars at Low Metallicity” which was held on Sunday, December 9, 2007 in Kauai (USA).

  17. Dwarf Galaxies with Active Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, J. E.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the birth and growth of the first supermassive BH "seeds" is far from understood. While direct observations of these distant BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, massive BHs in present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on the masses, formation path, and hosts of supermassive BH seeds. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting active massive BHs to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known.

  18. Massive-Star Magnetospheres: Now in 3-D!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard

    Magnetic fields are unexpected in massive stars, due to the absence of a dynamo convection zone beneath their surface layers. Nevertheless, kilogauss-strength, ordered fields were detected in a small subset of these stars over three decades ago, and the intervening years have witnessed the steady expansion of this subset. A distinctive feature of magnetic massive stars is that they harbor magnetospheres --- circumstellar environments where the magnetic field interacts strongly with the star's radiation-driven wind, confining it and channelling it into energetic shocks. A wide range of observational signatures are associated with these magnetospheres, in diagnostics ranging from X-rays all the way through to radio emission. Moreover, these magnetospheres can play an important role in massive-star evolution, by amplifying angular momentum loss in the wind. Recent progress in understanding massive-star magnetospheres has largely been driven by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. However, these have been restricted to two- dimensional axisymmetric configurations, with three-dimensional configurations possible only in certain special cases. These restrictions are limiting further progress; we therefore propose to develop completely general three-dimensional models for the magnetospheres of massive stars, on the one hand to understand their observational properties and exploit them as plasma-physics laboratories, and on the other to gain a comprehensive understanding of how they influence the evolution of their host star. For weak- and intermediate-field stars, the models will be based on 3-D MHD simulations using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP code. For strong-field stars, we will extend our existing Rigid Field Hydrodynamics (RFHD) code to handle completely arbitrary field topologies. To explore a putative 'photoionization-moderated mass loss' mechanism for massive-star magnetospheres, we will also further develop a photoionization code we have recently

  19. Self-protection of massive cosmological gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhahn, Felix; Dietrich, Dennis D.; Hofmann, Stefan E-mail: dietrich@cp3.sdu.dk

    2010-11-01

    Relevant deformations of gravity present an exciting window of opportunity to probe the rigidity of gravity on cosmological scales. For a single-graviton theory, the leading relevant deformation constitutes a graviton mass term. In this paper, we investigate the classical and quantum stability of massive cosmological gravitons on generic Friedman backgrounds. For a Universe expanding towards a de Sitter epoch, we find that massive cosmological gravitons are self-protected against unitarity violations by a strong coupling phenomenon.

  20. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  1. Shifting from Stewardship to Analytics of Massive Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Doyle, R.; Law, E.; Hughes, S.; Huang, T.; Mahabal, A.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the analysis of large data collections is executed through traditional computational and data analysis approaches, which require users to bring data to their desktops and perform local data analysis. Data collection, archiving and analysis from future remote sensing missions, be it from earth science satellites, planetary robotic missions, or massive radio observatories may not scale as more capable instruments stress existing architectural approaches and systems due to more continuous data streams, data from multiple observational platforms, and measurements and models from different agencies. A new paradigm is needed in order to increase the productivity and effectiveness of scientific data analysis. This paradigm must recognize that architectural choices, data processing, management, analysis, etc are interrelated, and must be carefully coordinated in any system that aims to allow efficient, interactive scientific exploration and discovery to exploit massive data collections. Future observational systems, including satellite and airborne experiments, and research in climate modeling will significantly increase the size of the data requiring new methodological approaches towards data analytics where users can more effectively interact with the data and apply automated mechanisms for data reduction, reduction and fusion across these massive data repositories. This presentation will discuss architecture, use cases, and approaches for developing a big data analytics strategy across multiple science disciplines.

  2. Three-dimensional Casimir piston for massive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S.C. Teo, L.P.

    2009-08-15

    We consider Casimir force acting on a three-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massive scalar field subject to periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Exponential cut-off method is used to derive the Casimir energy. It is shown that the divergent terms do not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus render a finite well-defined Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit expressions for the total Casimir force acting on the piston is derived, which show that the Casimir force is always attractive for all the different boundary conditions considered. As a function of a - the distance from the piston to the opposite wall, it is found that the magnitude of the Casimir force behaves like 1/a{sup 4} when a{yields}0{sup +} and decays exponentially when a{yields}{infinity}. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force is always a decreasing function of a. On the other hand, passing from massless to massive, we find that the effect of the mass is insignificant when a is small, but the magnitude of the force is decreased for large a in the massive case.

  3. Tracing the Formation and Evolution of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Roozbeh

    Massive galaxies at higher redshift, z > 2, show different characteristics than their local counterparts. They are compact and most likely have a disk. Understanding the evolutionary path of these massive galaxies can give us some clues on how the universe has been behaving in the last 10 billion years. How well can we measure the bulge and disk properties of these systems? We perform two sets of comprehensive simulations in order to systematically quantify the effects of non-homology in structures and the methods employed. For the first set of simulations, by accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. For the second set of simulations, we employ empirical scaling relations to produce realistic-looking two-component local galaxies with a uniform and wide range of bulge-to-total ratios (B/T), and then rescale them to mimic the signal-to-noise ratios and sizes of observed galaxies at z ≈ 2. This provides the first set of simulations for which we can examine the robustness of two-component decomposition of compact disk galaxies at different B/T . We can measure B/T accurately without imposing any constraints on the light profile shape of the bulge, but, due to the small angular sizes of bulges at high redshift, their detailed properties can only be recovered for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.2. The disk component, by contrast, can be measured with little difficulty. Next, we trace back the evolution of local massive galaxies but performing detailed morphological analysis: namely, single Swrsic fitting and bulge+disk decomposition. CANDELS images and catalogues offer an ideal dataset for this study. We

  4. THE ROLE OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Kagan, Daniel; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across ''boundaries'' from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed ''initial'' rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ∼10{sup 12} G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M {sub ☉} model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  5. Massive gas gangrene secondary to occult colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrew S; Crawford, Matthew D; Gupta, Rajan T

    2016-06-01

    Gas gangrene is a rare but often fatal soft-tissue infection. Because it is uncommon and the classic symptom of crepitus does not appear until the infection is advanced, prompt diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We present a case report of a middle-aged man who presented with acute onset lower-extremity pain that was initially thought to be due to deep vein thrombosis. After undergoing workup for pulmonary embolism, he was found to have massive gas gangrene of the lower extremity secondary to an occult colon adenocarcinoma and died within hours of presentation from multisystem organ failure.

  6. Impact of massive neutrinos on the nonlinear matter power spectrum.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Takada, Masahiro; Taruya, Atsushi

    2008-05-16

    We present the first attempt to analytically study the nonlinear matter power spectrum for a mixed dark matter model containing neutrinos of total mass ~0.1 eV, based on cosmological perturbation theory. The suppression in the power spectrum amplitudes due to massive neutrinos is enhanced in the weakly nonlinear regime. We demonstrate that, thanks to this enhanced effect, the use of such a nonlinear model may enable a precision of sigma(m(nu,tot)) ~ 0.07 eV in constraining the total neutrino mass for the planned galaxy redshift survey, a factor of 2 improvement compared to the linear regime.

  7. How can young massive clusters reach their present-day sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Context. The classic question of how young massive star clusters attain the shapes and sizes, as we find them today, is still a difficult one. Both observational and computational studies of star-forming massive molecular gas clouds suggest that massive cluster formation is primarily triggered along the small-scale (≲0.3 pc) filamentary substructures within the clouds. Aims: The present study investigates the possible ways in which a filament-like, compact, massive star cluster (effective radius 0.1-0.3 pc) can expand more than 10 times, still remaining massive enough (≳ 104M⊙) to become the young massive star cluster that we observe today. Methods: To this end, model massive clusters (initially 104-105M⊙) are evolved using Sverre Aarseth's state-of-the-art N-body code NBODY7. Apart from the accurate calculation of two-body relaxation of the constituent stars, these evolutionary models take into account stellar-evolutionary mass loss and dynamical energy injection due to massive, tight primordial binaries and stellar-remnant black holes and neutron stars. These calculations also include a solar-neighbourhood-like external tidal field. All the computed clusters expand with time, and their sizes (effective radii) are compared with those observed for young massive clusters (≲ 100 Myr) in the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies. Results: In this study, it is found that beginning from the above compact sizes, a star cluster cannot expand on its own, i.e., due to two-body relaxation, stellar mass loss, and dynamical heating by primordial binaries and compact stars up to the observed sizes of young massive clusters; star clusters always remain much more compact than the observed ones. Conclusions: This calls for additional mechanisms that boost the expansion of a massive cluster after its assembly. Using further N-body calculations, it is shown that a substantial residual gas expulsion with ≈ 30% star formation efficiency can indeed swell the newborn embedded

  8. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  9. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) and 1.3 mm continuum survey of 32 high-mass surface density regions of seven infrared dark clouds, with the aim of finding massive starless cores that may form the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C18O(2-1), DCN(3-2), and DCO+(3-2). Over 100 {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm, based on connected structures in position–velocity space. The most massive core has ∼ 70 {M}ȯ (potentially ∼ 170 {M}ȯ ) and so may be representative of the initial conditions or early stages of massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores with strongest {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) line emission, finding results that are generally consistent with virial equilibrium of pressure confined cores.

  10. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  11. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  12. HST Infrared Imaging of MASSIVE Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Goullaud, Charles; Blakeslee, John; Mitchiner, Casey; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Jens

    2017-01-01

    We have recently obtained high-resolution HST WFC3/IR F110W (J-band) images of 34 early-type galaxies in the MASSIVE study sample. These galaxies are among the most massive in the local universe, and were chosen to study the connection between supermassive central black holes and their host galaxies. To determine accurate masses for the black holes, we are measuring high-precision surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distances to the galaxies. The WFC3/IR data also allow us to measure high spatial resolution central surface brightness profiles to understand better the nuclear structure and dynamics of the galaxies. We present a first look at the IR images, profiles, and SBF magnitudes for 34 galaxies in the MASSIVE sample.

  13. Gyromagnetic ratio of a massive body.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Tiomno, J.; Wald, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    It is well known that the gyromagnetic ratio (g factor) of a classical, slowly rotating body whose charge density is proportional to its mass density must be equal to unity. However, if the body is very massive, the spacetime curvature effects of general relativity become important and the result g = 1 is no longer valid. We calculate here the gyromagnetic ratio of a slowly rotating, massive shell with uniform charge density. When the shell is large compared with the Schwarzschild radius we have g = 1, but as the shell becomes more massive the g factor increases. In the limit as the shell approaches its Schwarzschild radius we obtain g approaching 2 (the same value as for an electron).

  14. Massive Particle Reflection from Moving Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarti, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the reflection of massive particles from moving mirrors. The adoption of the formalism based on the energy-momentum allowed us to derive the most general set of formulas, valid for massive and, in the limit, also for massless particles. We show that the momentum change of the reflecting particle always lies along the normal to the mirror, independent of the mirror speed. The subject is interesting not only to physicists designing concentrators for fascicles of massive particles and electron microscopes but also to computer scientists working in raytracing operating in the photon sector. The paper, far from being only theoretical, has profound and novel practical applications in both domains of engineering design and computer science.

  15. Thermographic inspection of massive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Guimaraes, Maria; Scott, David B.

    2014-02-18

    Nondestructive Evaluation of concrete structures is a growing concern for the nuclear industry as well as for many other industries. As critical concrete components continue to age, the ability to assess the health and suitability for continued service has become a key consideration. In some cases, repair of these structures is difficult and expensive, while replacement is prohibitively expensive or, in some cases, not feasible. Therefore, the ability to inspect these key assets is a primary concern, especially in the nuclear industry. Due to the large size of containment buildings, cooling towers, and other large concrete assets, the ability to rapidly inspect for defects of concern is very desirable. Thermographic inspection appears to have the required ability to rapidly inspect large structures to ascertain the location and size of many of the defects of concern. This ability was demonstrated by performing a thermographic inspection of a large concrete dam in 2 days.

  16. Massive Hemorrhage From Multiple Hepatic Artery Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S Lowell; McClain, Jonathan; Kaufman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    A 66-year-old man, with an abnormal porta hepatis, consistent with tumor or inflammation, developed massive bleeding from one of numerous hepatic artery aneurysms, and coil embolization achieved control of bleeding. He died of subsequent multisystem organ failure, and the most likely diagnosis was either polyarteritis nodosa or segmental arterial mediolysis. Although the dual hepatic blood supply allows a degree of arterial embolization, this case demonstrates the risks associated with large territory hepatic arterial embolization in the presence of hemodynamic instability. We discuss the management issues related to massive hepatic bleeding when no surgical approach is possible.

  17. Factors associated with massive fibrosis in silicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Chan, S L

    1991-01-01

    Data on 1432 patients with silicosis on a register in Hong Kong were analysed to examine the association of massive fibrosis with possible predisposing factors. Detailed occupational and clinical histories, clinical records, radiographic readings according to the International Standard Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses, and environmental dust measurements from hygiene surveys were used to obtain information for several variables--namely, age at first exposure, relative dust exposure level, duration of exposure, smoking, previous recorded history of tuberculosis, and background profusion of small opacities. The most significant risk factors associated with massive fibrosis were high relative dust exposure level, a history of tuberculosis, and increased background profusion of small opacities. PMID:2038729

  18. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  19. Physics of Mass Loss in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Markova, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We review potential mass-loss mechanisms in the various evolutionary stages of massive stars, from the well-known line-driven winds of O-stars and BA-supergiants to the less-understood winds of Red Supergiants. We discuss optically thick winds from Wolf-Rayet stars and Very Massive Stars, and the hypothesis of porosity-moderated, continuum-driven mass loss from stars formally exceeding the Eddington limit, which might explain the giant outbursts from Luminous Blue Variables. We finish this review with a glance on the impact of rapid rotation, magnetic fields and small-scale inhomogeneities in line-driven winds.

  20. NON-AQUEOUS DISSOLUTION OF MASSIVE PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Walsh, K.A.

    1959-05-12

    A method is presented for obtaining non-aqueous solutions or plutonium from massive forms of the metal. In the present invention massive plutonium is added to a salt melt consisting of 10 to 40 weight per cent of sodium chloride and the balance zinc chloride. The plutonium reacts at about 800 deg C with the zinc chloride to form a salt bath of plutonium trichloride, sodium chloride, and metallic zinc. The zinc is separated from the salt melt by forcing the molten mixture through a Pyrex filter.

  1. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  2. Massive Bone Loss Due to Orchidectomy and Localized Disuse: Preventive Effects of a Biosphonsphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libouban, H.; Moreau, M. F.; Chappard, D.

    2008-06-01

    Orchidectomy (ORX) and hindlimb paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) were combined to see if their effects were cumulative and if bone loss could be prevented by an antiresorptive agent (risedronate) or testosterone. Four groups of mature rats were studied for 1 month: SHAM operated; ORX and right hindlimb immobilization (BTX); ORX+BTX+risedronate or testosterone. Bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration were maximized on the immobilized bone. Risedronate but not testosterone prevented trabecular bone loss but was less effective on cortical bone loss. ORX and BTX had additive effects on bone loss which can be prevented by risedronate but not testosterone.

  3. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; ...

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observedmore » magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  4. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; Desai, S.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; von der Linden, A.; Liu, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Strazzullo, V.; Stubbs, C. W.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  5. Interactions in Massive Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.

    2012-01-01

    The most massive stars (M> 60 Solar Mass) play crucial roles in altering the chemical and thermodynamic properties of their host galaxies. Stellar mass is the fundamental stellar parameter that determines their ancillary properties and which ultimately determines the fate of these stars and their influence on their galactic environs. Unfortunately, stellar mass becomes observationally and theoretically less well constrained as it increases. Theory becomes uncertain mostly because very massive stars are prone to strong, variable mass loss which is difficult to model. Observational constraints are uncertain too. Massive stars are rare, and massive binary stars (needed for dynamical determination of mass) are rarer still: and of these systems only a fraction have suitably high orbital inclinations for direct photometric and spectroscopic radial-velocity analysis. Even in the small number of cases in which a high-inclination binary near the upper mass limit can be identified, rotational broadening and contamination of spectral line features from thick circumstellar material (either natal clouds or produced by strong stellar wind driven mass loss from one or both of he stellar components) biases the analysis. In the wilds of the upper HR diagram, we're often left with indirect and circumstantial means of determining mass, a rather unsatisfactory state of affairs.

  6. Evolutionary tracks of massive stars during formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. We investigate specified accretion histories of constant, decelerating and accelerating forms and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disc accretion, respectively. Diagnostic tools for the interpretation of the phases of massive star formation and testing the evolutionary models are then developed. Evolutionary tracks able to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations, thus being consistent with clump star formation efficiencies of 10-15 per cent. However, for these cold Herschel clumps, the bolometric temperature is not a good diagnostic to differentiate between accretion models. We also find that neither spherical nor disc accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hotspots covering less than 10 per cent of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. We show that these conclusions are independent of the imposed accretion history. This suggests that massive stars form via gas accretion through discs which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  7. Embeddings of the "New Massive Gravity"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Here we apply different types of embeddings of the equations of motion of the linearized "New Massive Gravity" in order to generate alternative and even higher-order (in derivatives) massive gravity theories in D=2+1. In the first part of the work we use the Weyl symmetry as a guiding principle for the embeddings. First we show that a Noether gauge embedding of the Weyl symmetry leads to a sixth-order model in derivatives with either a massive or a massless ghost, according to the chosen overall sign of the theory. On the other hand, if the Weyl symmetry is implemented by means of a Stueckelberg field we obtain a new scalar-tensor model for massive gravitons. It is ghost-free and Weyl invariant at the linearized level around Minkowski space. The model can be nonlinearly completed into a scalar field coupled to the NMG theory. The elimination of the scalar field leads to a nonlocal modification of the NMG. In the second part of the work we prove to all orders in derivatives that there is no local, ghost-free embedding of the linearized NMG equations of motion around Minkowski space when written in terms of one symmetric tensor. Regarding that point, NMG differs from the Fierz-Pauli theory, since in the latter case we can replace the Einstein-Hilbert action by specific f(R,Box R) generalizations and still keep the theory ghost-free at the linearized level.

  8. Massive Open Online Courses and Economic Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu R.; Lundqvist, Karsten O.; Williams, Shirley A.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of users around the world have registered on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offered by hundreds of universities (and other organizations) worldwide. Creating and offering these courses costs thousands of pounds. However, at present, revenue generated by MOOCs is not sufficient to offset these costs. The sustainability of MOOCs is a…

  9. Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huisman, Bart; Pilli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lecture content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in…

  10. A Taxonomy of Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilli, Olga; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a new approach to distance education, which originated from the open education resources (OER) movement, are becoming widespread throughout the world. Over time, early versions of cMOOCs have undergone changes in terms of use, name and structure. In their short life, MOOCs have been categorized into different…

  11. The Fate of Massive Closed Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Li Miao; She Jianhuang

    2005-12-02

    We calculate the semi-inclusive decay rate of an average string state with toroidal compactification in the the superstring theory. We also apply this calculation to a brane-inflation model in a warped geometry and find that the decay rate is greatly suppressed if the final strings are both massive and enhanced for massless radiation.

  12. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  13. NOTE: Circular symmetry in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Franklin, J.

    2010-05-01

    We re-derive, compactly, a topologically massive gravity (TMG) decoupling theorem: source-free TMG separates into its Einstein and Cotton sectors for spaces with a hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector, here concretely for circular symmetry. We then generalize the theorem to include matter; surprisingly, the single Killing symmetry also forces conformal invariance, requiring the sources to be null.

  14. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Kong, S.; Butler, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Progress towards resolving a decade-long debate about how massive stars form can be made by determining if massive starless cores exist in a state of near virial equilibrium. These are the initial conditions invoked by the Core Accretion model of McKee & Tan (2003). Alternatively, the Competitive Accretion model of Bonnell et al. (2001) requires sub-virial conditions. We have identified 4 prime examples of massive ( 50 Msun) cores from mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping (Butler & Tan 2009, 2012) of Infrared Dark Clouds. We have found spectacularly high deuterated fractions of N_2H+ of 0.5 in these objects with the IRAM 30m telescope (Fontani et al. 2011). Thus N_2D+ is expected to be an excellent tracer of the kinematics of these cold, dark cores, where most other molecular tracers are thought to be depleted from the gas phase. We report on ALMA Cycle 0 Compact Configuration Band 6 observations of these 4 cores that probe the N_2D+(3-2) line on scales from 9" down to 2.3", well-matched to the structures we see in MIR extinction and discuss their implications for massive star formation theories.

  15. Modeling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brott, I.

    2011-02-01

    Massive stars can be considered as cosmic engines. With their high luminosities, strong stellar winds and violent deaths they drive the evolution of galaxies through-out the history of the universe. Despite the importance of massive stars, their evolution is still poorly understood. Two major issues have plagued evolutionary models of massive stars until today: mixing and mass loss On the main sequence, the effects of mass loss remain limited in the considered mass and metallicity range, this thesis concentrates on the role of mixing in massive stars. This thesis approaches this problem just on the cross road between observations and simulations. The main question: Do evolutionary models of single stars, accounting for the effects of rotation, reproduce the observed properties of real stars. In particular we are interested if the evolutionary models can reproduce the surface abundance changes during the main-sequence phase. To constrain our models we build a population synthesis model for the sample of the VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive stars, for which star-formation history and rotational velocity distribution are well constrained. We consider the four main regions of the Hunter diagram. Nitrogen un-enriched slow rotators and nitrogen enriched fast rotators that are predicted by theory. Nitrogen enriched slow rotators and nitrogen unenriched fast rotators that are not predicted by our model. We conclude that currently these comparisons are not sufficient to verify the theory of rotational mixing. Physical processes in addition to rotational mixing appear necessary to explain the stars in the later two regions. The chapters of this Thesis have been published in the following Journals: Ch. 2: ``Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars I: Grids of Evolutionary Models and Isochrones'', I. Brott, S. E. de Mink, M. Cantiello, N. Langer, A. de Koter, C. J. Evans, I. Hunter, C. Trundle, J.S. Vink submitted to Astronomy & Astrop hysics Ch. 3: ``The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive

  16. Positivity constraints for pseudolinear massive spin-2 and vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, James; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2016-11-01

    We derive analyticity constraints on a nonlinear ghost-free effective theory of a massive spin-2 particle known as pseudolinear massive gravity, and on a generalized theory of a massive spin-1 particle, both of which provide simple IR completions of Galileon theories. For pseudolinear massive gravity we find that, unlike de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley massive gravity, there is no window of parameter space which satisfies the analyticity constraints. For massive vectors which reduce to Galileons in the decoupling limit, we find that no two-derivative actions are compatible with positivity but that higher derivative actions can be made compatible.

  17. The Rb problem in massive AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, O.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2017-03-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is formed by low- and intermediate-mass stars (0.8 M_{⊙} < M < 8 M_{⊙}) in their last nuclear-burning phase, when they develop thermal pulses (TP) and suffer extreme mass loss. AGB stars are the main contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, the more massive AGB stars (M > 4 M_{⊙}) are expected to produce light (e.g., Li, N) and heavy neutron-rich s-process elements (such as Rb, Zr, Ba, Y, etc.), which are not formed in lower mass AGB stars and Supernova explosions. Classical chemical analyses using hydrostatic atmospheres revealed strong Rb overabundances and high [Rb/Zr] ratios in massive AGB stars of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds (MC), confirming for the first time that the ^{22}Ne neutron source dominates the production of s-process elements in these stars. The extremely high Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios observed in the most massive stars (specially in the low-metallicity MC stars) uncovered a Rb problem; such extreme Rb and [Rb/Zr] values are not predicted by the s-process AGB models, suggesting fundamental problems in our present understanding of their atmospheres. We present more realistic dynamical model atmospheres that consider a gaseous circumstellar envelope with a radial wind and we re-derive the Rb (and Zr) abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars. The new Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios derived with these dynamical models significantly resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the theoretical predictions of the more massive AGB stars.

  18. Cosmic Magnetic Fields from Torsion Modes and Massive Photon Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2014-09-01

    Earlier Barrow & Tsagas (2008) showed that a slower decay of magnetic fields are present in open Friedmann universes, with traditional Maxwell equations. In their paper magnetic fields of the order of B˜10-33 G which are far below the value required to seed galactic dynamos were obtained. In this paper galactic dynamo seeds of the order of B˜10-23 G are obtained from massive electrodynamics in Einstein-Cartan-Proca (ECP) expanding universe of de Sitter type. Slow decay of magnetic fields in photon-torsion coupling in QED (Garcia de Andrade 2011b) have been recently shown by Garcia de Andrade (2012) also not be able to seed galactic dynamos. Torsion modes are constrained by the field equations. Space-time torsion is shown to be explicitly responsible for the slow decay of cosmic magnetic field. In the absence of massive photon torsion coupling the magnetic field decay is of the order B˜t-3/2, while when torsion is turn on B˜t-1.2. The pure massive-photon-torsion contribution amplifies the magnetic field by Btorsion˜t0.1 which characterizes an extremely slow magnetic dynamo action due to purely torsion gravitational effects. Recently, Barrow et al. (2012) have obtained superadiabatic amplification of B-fields in the Friedmann open cosmology which lies within 10-20 G and 10-12 G which falls very comfortable within limits to seed galactic dynamos. Other simple solutions where B-field decays as B˜a-1, relatively weak photon-torsion coupling approximation. These solutions are obtained for the de Sitter and Friedmann metrics.

  19. HCN hyperfine ratio analysis of massive molecular clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, W. J.; Barnes, P. J.; Ordoñez, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Yonekura, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new analysis protocol for HCN hyperfine data, based on the PYSPECKIT package, and results of using this new protocol to analyse a sample area of seven massive molecular clumps from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) survey, in order to derive maps of column density for this species. There is a strong correlation between the HCN integrated intensity, IHCN, and previously reported I_HCO+ in the clumps, but I_N_{2H+} is not well correlated with either of these other two 'dense gas tracers'. The four fitted parameters from PYSPECKIT in this region fall in the range of VLSR = 8-10 km s-1, σV = 1.2-2.2 km s-1, Tex = 4-15 K, and τ = 0.2-2.5. These parameters allow us to derive a column density map of these clouds, without limiting assumptions about the excitation or opacity. A more traditional (linear) method of converting IHCN to total mass column gives much lower clump masses than our results based on the hyperfine analysis. This is primarily due to areas in the sample region of low I, low Tex, and high τ. We conclude that there may be more dense gas in these massive clumps not engaged in massive star formation than previously recognized. If this result holds for other clouds in the CHaMP sample, it would have dramatic consequences for the calibration of the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws, including a large increase in the gas depletion time-scale in such regions.

  20. Renormalization of massive Feynman amplitudes and homogeneity (based on a joint work with Raymond Stora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay M.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new renormalization procedure to all orders in perturbation theory, which is formulated on an extended position space. This allows us to apply methods from massless Quantum Field Theory to models of massive fields. These include the technique of homogeneous and associate homogeneous distributions for the extension problem contained in the renormalization theory on position space. This also makes it possible to generalize the notion of residues of Feynman amplitudes, which characterize the presence of additional scales due to renormalization, to the massive case.

  1. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  2. Massively Parallel Algorithms for Solution of Schrodinger Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Barhen, Jacob; Toomerian, Nikzad

    1994-01-01

    In this paper massively parallel algorithms for solution of Schrodinger equation are developed. Our results clearly indicate that the Crank-Nicolson method, in addition to its excellent numerical properties, is also highly suitable for massively parallel computation.

  3. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  4. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  5. Luminous Infrared Sources in the Local Group: Identifying the Missing Links in Massive Star Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic survey of dusty massive stars (RSGs, LBVs, sgB[e]) in nearby galaxies, with the goal of understanding their importance in massive star evolution. Using the fact that these stars are bright in mid-infrared colors due to dust, we provide a technique for selecting and identifying dusty evolved stars based on the results of Bonanos et al. (2009, 2010), Britavskiy et al. (2014), and archival Spitzer/IRAC photometry. We present the results of our spectroscopic follow-up of luminous infrared sources in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies: Pegasus, Phoenix, Sextans A and WLM. The survey aims to complete the census of dusty massive stars in the Local Group.

  6. Massive higher spins from BRST and tractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Waldron, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    We obtain the higher spin tractor equations of motion conjectured by Gover et al. from a BRST approach and use those methods to prove that they describe massive, partially massless and massless higher spins in conformally flat backgrounds. The tractor description makes invariance under local choices of unit systems manifest. In this approach, physical models are described by conformal, rather than (pseudo-)Riemannian geometry. In particular masses become geometric quantities, namely the weights of tractor fields. Massive models can therefore be handled in a unified and simple manner mimicking the gauge principle usually employed for massless models. From a holographic viewpoint, these models describe both the bulk and boundary theories in terms of conformal geometry. This is an important advance, because tying the boundary conformal structure to that of the bulk theory gives greater control over a bulk-boundary correspondence.

  7. Superdense massive galaxies in the nearby universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    At high-z the most superdense massive galaxies are supposed to be the result of gas-rich mergers resulting in compact remnant (Khochfar & Silk (2006); Naab et al. (2007)). After this, dry mergers are expected to be the mechanism that moves these very massive galaxies towards the current stellar mass size relation. Whitin these merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the past universe.Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (DR6), we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re ≤ 1.5 kpc and M* ≥ 8x1010M⊙ in the local Universe (z~0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2Gyr) and metal rich ([Z/H]~0.2) These results have been published in Trujillo et al. (2009)

  8. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  9. Stable FLRW solutions in generalized massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia; Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2014-12-01

    We present exact Friedmann Lemaítre Robertson Walkers (FLRW) solutions in generalized massive gravity where the mass parameters are naturally promoted to Lorentz-invariant functions of the Stückelberg fields. This new dependence relaxes the constraint that would otherwise prevent massive gravity from possessing exact FLRW solutions. It does so without the need to introduce additional degrees of freedom. We find self-accelerating cosmological solutions and show that, with a mild restriction on the region of phase space, these cosmological solutions exhibit full stability, i.e. absence of ghosts and gradient instabilities for all the tensor, vector and scalar modes, for all cosmic time. We perform the full decoupling limit analysis, including vector degrees of freedom, which can be used to confirm the existence of an active Vainshtein mechanism about these solutions.

  10. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  11. Biomimetic Models for An Ecological Approach to Massively-Deployed Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2005-01-01

    Promises of ubiquitous control of the physical environment by massively-deployed wireless sensor networks open avenues for new applications that will redefine the way we live and work. Due to small size and low cost of sensor devices, visionaries promise systems enabled by deployment of massive numbers of sensors ubiquitous throughout our environment working in concert. Recent research has concentrated on developing techniques for performing relatively simple tasks with minimal energy expense, assuming some form of centralized control. Unfortunately, centralized control is not conducive to parallel activities and does not scale to massive size networks. Execution of simple tasks in sparse networks will not lead to the sophisticated applications predicted. We propose a new way of looking at massively-deployed sensor networks, motivated by lessons learned from the way biological ecosystems are organized. We demonstrate that in such a model, fully distributed data aggregation can be performed in a scalable fashion in massively deployed sensor networks, where motes operate on local information, making local decisions that are aggregated across the network to achieve globally-meaningful effects. We show that such architectures may be used to facilitate communication and synchronization in a fault-tolerant manner, while balancing workload and required energy expenditure throughout the network.

  12. The cosmic assembly of stellar haloes in massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Fernando; Trujillo, Ignacio; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Montes, Mireia; Cooper, Andrew P.; Bruce, Victoria A.; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Using the exquisite depth of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF12 programme) dataset, we explore the ongoing assembly of the outermost regions of the most massive galaxies (M_stellar≥5× 1010 M⊙) at z ≤ 1. The outskirts of massive objects, particularly Early-Types Galaxies (ETGs), are expected to suffer a dramatic transformation across cosmic time due to continuous accretion of small galaxies. HUDF imaging allows us to study this process at intermediate redshifts in 6 massive galaxies, exploring the individual surface brightness profiles out to ˜25 effective radii. We find that 5-20% of the total stellar mass for the galaxies in our sample is contained within 10 Massive Early-Type Galaxies increases with decreasing redshift, being 28.7% at = 0.1, 15.1% at = 0.65 and 3.5% at = 2. The fraction of mass in diffuse features linked with ongoing minor merger events is > 1-2%, very similar to predictions based on observed close pair counts. Therefore, the results for our small albeit meaningful sample suggest that the size and mass growth of the most massive galaxies have been solely driven by minor and major merging from z = 1 to today.

  13. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' Multiplication-Sign 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of {approx}20-70 pixel{sup -1} in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} > 150 km s{sup -1}, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by {approx}50%, and only a weak correlation between {sigma}{sub *} and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are {approx} an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 R{sub e} , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high {alpha}-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  14. Massive Multi-Agent Systems Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campagne, Jean-Charles; Gardon, Alain; Collomb, Etienne; Nishida, Toyoaki

    2004-01-01

    In order to build massive multi-agent systems, considered as complex and dynamic systems, one needs a method to analyze and control the system. We suggest an approach using morphology to represent and control the state of large organizations composed of a great number of light software agents. Morphology is understood as representing the state of the multi-agent system as shapes in an abstract geometrical space, this notion is close to the notion of phase space in physics.

  15. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors.

  16. The Stellar Halos of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' × 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of ~20-70 pixel-1 in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions σ* > 150 km s-1, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by ~50%, and only a weak correlation between σ* and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are ~ an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 Re , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high α-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  17. On 3D minimal massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M.; Naseh, Ali; Shirzad, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    We study linearized equations of motion of the newly proposed three dimensional gravity, known as minimal massive gravity, using its metric formulation. By making use of a redefinition of the parameters of the model, we observe that the resulting linearized equations are exactly the same as that of TMG. In particular the model admits logarithmic modes at critical points. We also study several vacuum solutions of the model, specially at a certain limit where the contribution of Chern-Simons term vanishes.

  18. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Tannus, Maria Claudia; Kaper, Lex

    2015-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Formation timescales are short, the corresponding accretion rates very high, and the forming stars are hidden from view due to vast amounts of interstellar extinction. On top of that, massive stars are rare, are located at relatively large distances, and play a major role in shaping the interstellar medium due to their strong UV radiation fields and stellar winds. Although massive stars show most spectral features in the UV and optical range, so far only for a handful of massive Young Stellar Objects (mYSOs) optical and near-infrared spectra have been obtained. For some of these their pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature has now been firmly established (e.g. Ochsendorf et al. 2011, Ellerbroek et al. 2013). The objective of our project is to determine the physical properties of mYSOs, to search for signatures remnant of their formation process and to better understand the feedback on their environment.To this aim the optical to near-infrared (300-2500 nm) spectra of six candidate mYSOs (Hanson et al. 1997), deeply embedded in the massive star forming region M17, have been obtained with X-Shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. These mYSO candidates have been identified based on their infrared excess and spectral features (double-peaked emission lines, CO band-head emission) indicating the presence of a disk. In most cases, we detect a photospheric spectrum allowing us to measure the physical properties of the mYSO and to confirm its PMS nature. We also uncover many emission features, including forbidden lines, providing information on the (active) formation process of these young (massive) stars.

  19. Spatial Disrtribution and Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghakhanlootakanloo, Mojgan; Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    2017-01-01

    Observations show that luminous blue variables (LBVs) are far more dispersed than other massive stars, and Smith & Tombleson (2015) suggested that these large separations are inconsistent with the standard single-star evolution model of LBVs. Instead, they suggest that the large distances are most consistent with some sort of binary evolution. To test these suggestions, we modeled young stellar clusters and their passive dissolution, and we find that, indeed, the single-star evolution model is inconsistent with observations. Most importantly, we find two binary scenario models that are consistent. Our crude models suggest that LBVs are either the result of mergers and are rejuvenated stars, or they are mass gainers and received a kick when the primary star exploded. In the merger scenario, LBVs have more time to disperse because they are the merger of two lesser mass, in which the primary has a mass of about 19 solar masses. In the mass gainer and kick scenario, we find that LBV isolation is consistent with an average kick of 200 km/s. In either scenario, binarity plays a major role in the isolation of LBVs. In addition to constraining the evolution of LBVs, we suggest that careful scrutiny of the spatial distribution of massive stars in general will lead to a greater understanding for the evolution of massive stars.

  20. Massive-Star Nucleosynthesis: Lessons from INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland; Lang, Michael; Kretschmer, Karsten; Martin, Pierrick; Ohlendorf, Henrike; Voss, Rasmus

    2010-08-01

    Gamma-ray line observations with INTEGRAL measure decay of unstable isotopes which are ejected from sites of nucleosynthesis. Massive stars are believed to be producers of gamma-ray emitting isotopes 44Ti, 26Al, 60Fe. Measurements with the Ge spectrometer have shown that (1) inner core-collapse supernova ejecta from the Cas A supernova remnant appear to still travel at velocities beyond a few hundred km/sec (2) 26Al synthesis occurs throughout the Galaxy corresponds to a supernova rate from core collapses of about one every 50 years; (3) 60Fe synthesis expected from massive stars is above the constraints from gamma-ray observations; 26Al synthesis in the Cygnus region appears on the high side of predictions from models; 26Al emission from the nearby Sco-Cen group of stars has been identified demonstrates massive-star activity close to the Sun. 26Al gamma-rays have been used to determine a longitude-velocity distribution of the presumably hot tenuous ISM which carries 26Al, which can be compared to molecular-gas star motions to help understand the Galaxy's bar spiral-arm structure. Implications of the above nucleosynthesis constraints suggest that INTEGRAL's observed positron annihilation gamma-rays need a contribution from another source located in the central regions of our Galaxy, and/or positrons may propagate kpc-distances away from their sources before annihilating.

  1. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  2. Massive star formation at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-05-01

    This thesis studies the early phases of massive stars and their impact on the surrounding. The capabilities of continuum radiative transfer (RT) codes to interpret the observations are also investigated. The main results of this work are: 1) Two massive star-forming regions are observed in the infrared. The thermal emission from the ultra-compact H II regions is resolved and the spectral type of the ionizing stars is estimated. The hot cores are not detected thus implying line-of-sight extinction larger than 200 visual magnitude. 2) The first mid-infrared interferometric measurements towards a young massive star resolve thermal emission on scales of 30-50 AU probing the size of the predicted disk. The visibility curve differs from those of intermediate-mass stars. 3) The close vicinity of Θ1C Ori are imaged using the NACO adaptive optics system. The binary proplyd Orion 168-326 and its interaction with the wind from Θ1C Ori are resolved. A proplyd uniquely seen face-on is also identified. 4) Five RT codes are compared in a disk configuration. The solutions provide the first 2D benchmark and serve to test the reliability of other RT codes. The images/visibilities from two RT codes are compared for a distorted disk. The parameter range in which such a distortion is detectable with MIDI is explored.

  3. The feeding and feedback of massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. The framework requires the accretion rate from the clump to be specified. We investigate constant, decelerating and accelerating accretion rate scenarios and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disk accretion, respectively. We find that accelerated accretion is not favoured on the basis of the often-used diagnostic diagram which correlates the bolometric luminosity and clump mass. Instead, source counts as a function of the bolometric temperature can distinguish the accretion mode. Specifically, accelerated accretion yields a relatively high number of lowtemperatureob jects. On this basis, we demonstrate that evolutionary tracks to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations. Neither spherical nor disk accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hot spots covering less than 20% of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. This suggest that massive stars form via gas accretion through disks which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  4. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, L.; Ellerbroek, L.; Ochsendorf, B.; Bik, A.

    2012-12-01

    The birth process and (early) evolution of massive stars is still poorly understood. Heavy extinction hides their birthplaces from view and the short formation timescale limits the sample of objects to be studied. So far, our physical knowledge of massive YSOs has been derived from near-IR imaging and spectroscopy, revealing populations of young OB-type stars, some still surrounded by a disk, others apparently ‘normal’ main sequence stars powering H II regions. The most important spectral features of OB-type stars are, however, located in the UV and optical range. With the new optical/near-infrared spectrograph X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope it is possible to extend the spectral coverage of these massive YSOs into the optical range. Our first results are very promising: the discovery of a jet demonstrates that one of our mYSOs is still actively accreting. Furthermore, the first firm spectral classification of another mYSO results in the precise location on a pre-main-sequence track.

  5. Observational constraints on massive-star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina

    1997-07-01

    Massive stars are important constitutents of galaxies and are increasingly used as probes of galaxy evolution out to high redshifts. Yet, a very basic problem remains in understanding the distribution of massive stars across the Hertzsprung- Russell Diagram. This is known as the problem of the blue-to- red supergiant ratios in galaxies of different metallicities, a very sensitive indicator of the evolutionary paths that massive stars in different chemical environments appear to follow. Observations suggest a trend that the numbers of red supergiants increase with decreasing metallicity, but stellar- evolution models predict the opposite. We discuss various limitations of ground-based observations which have so far restricted accurate star counts to a few, nearby galaxies. We then argue that the HST archive contains a perfect set of photometric data to determine number counts of red supergiants in galaxies out to 5 Mpc. We propose to analyze WFPC2 observations in F555W {V} and F814W {I} filters to derive color-magnitude diagrams and complete luminosity functions of the red supergiant populations in 6 galaxies spanning a factor of 60 in metallicity. This systematic approach will put the functional form of the blue-to-red supergiant ratio with metallicity on firm observational footing.

  6. Mass Lost from the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Kerstin

    2004-02-01

    The structure and evolution of galaxies is noticeably influenced by the energy input of very massive stars. They are not only the supply of heavier elements, they also influence the distribution and structure of the interstellar medium through their strong stellar winds and supernova explosions. Losing more than 50% of their ZAMS-mass during their life, stars more massive than ~ 50 M⊙ substantially contribute to the mass and energy input which can drive large scale outflows from galaxies. In this presentation I will mainly concentrate on a short but violent phase of mass loss of the most massive stars, known as Luminous Blue Variables. In only a few thousand years a large amount of mass is released (in some cases several solar masses), forming a nebula around the LBV. Besides of a general overview of the LBVs special concern will be given to the nebula around eta Carinae for which new results from CHANDRA observations show the shocks emitting in the X-ray band. Finally I will briefly address the question of the role of LBV type stars in the early phase of galaxy formation and in connection with the first stars formed.

  7. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  8. Massive graph visualization : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Brian Neil; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2007-10-01

    Graphs are a vital way of organizing data with complex correlations. A good visualization of a graph can fundamentally change human understanding of the data. Consequently, there is a rich body of work on graph visualization. Although there are many techniques that are effective on small to medium sized graphs (tens of thousands of nodes), there is a void in the research for visualizing massive graphs containing millions of nodes. Sandia is one of the few entities in the world that has the means and motivation to handle data on such a massive scale. For example, homeland security generates graphs from prolific media sources such as television, telephone, and the Internet. The purpose of this project is to provide the groundwork for visualizing such massive graphs. The research provides for two major feature gaps: a parallel, interactive visualization framework and scalable algorithms to make the framework usable to a practical application. Both the frameworks and algorithms are designed to run on distributed parallel computers, which are already available at Sandia. Some features are integrated into the ThreatView{trademark} application and future work will integrate further parallel algorithms.

  9. Hydrodynamical simulations of realistic massive cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, David J.; Henson, Monique A.; Kay, Scott T.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Bahe, Yannick M.; Eagle Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Galaxy clusters are seeded by density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow via hierarchical collapse to become the most massive virialised objects we observed today. They are powerful probes that study both cosmology and astrophysical processes. Their internal structure at the current epoch is the result of a non-trivial interplay between gravitational collapse and the energy fed into the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). These processes shape the ICM during its formation at high redshift, but current observations of galaxy clusters are limited to z<0.5. The resolution and sensitivity of textit{Athena+} will allow it to study galaxy clusters in unprecedented detail. It will constrain cluster properties, such as its entropy, temperature and gas fraction, out to z˜2, enabling it to investigate the progenitors of today's massive clusters and observing the evolution of the properties of the ICM for the first time. Athena+ will produce a significant change in our understanding of the formation of galaxy clusters. Recently the theoretical modelling of clusters has advanced significantly and issues, such as the 'cooling catastophea', have been overcome by including feedback from star formation and AGN. We present the MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures (MACSIS) project. The MACSIS project is a representative sample of 390 of galaxy clusters, with M_{FOF} > 10(15} M_{⊙) , re-simulated using the cosmo-OWLS model (Le Brun et al. 2014, McCarthy et al. in prep.) to extend it to the most massive and rarest objects. We demonstrate that this sample reproduces the scaling relations, with intrinsic scatter, observed with current instruments at low redshift. Under the hierarchical paradigm, the progenitors of these systems will be the first objects to collapse at high redshift and we examine to z=2 how the scaling relations of these massive objects evolve with redshift. Finally, we investigate methods of defining a

  10. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enander, Jonas; Akrami, Yashar; Mörtsell, Edvard; Renneby, Malin; Solomon, Adam R.

    2015-04-01

    We study the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in ghost-free, massive bigravity. We focus on the infinite-branch bigravity (IBB) model which exhibits viable cosmic expansion histories and stable linear perturbations, while the cosmological constant is set to zero and the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe is due solely to the gravitational interaction terms. The ISW contribution to the CMB auto-correlation power spectrum is predicted, as well as the cross-correlation between the CMB temperature anisotropies and large-scale structure. We use ISW amplitudes as inferred from the WMAP 9-year temperature data together with galaxy and AGN data provided by the WISE mission in order to compare the theoretical predictions to the observations. The ISW amplitudes in IBB are found to be larger than the corresponding ones in the standard Λ CDM model by roughly a factor of 1.5, but are still consistent with the observations.

  11. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  12. Pre-heating in the framework of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debaprasad

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a mechanism of natural pre-heating of our universe by introducing an inflaton field dependent mass term for the gravitational wave for a specific class of massive gravity theory. For any single field inflationary model, the inflaton must go through the oscillatory phase after the end of inflation. As has recently been pointed out, if the gravitational fluctuation has inflaton dependent mass term, there will be a resonant amplification of the amplitude of the gravitational wave during the oscillatory phase of inflaton. Because of this large enhancement of the amplitude of the gravitational wave due to parametric resonance, we show that universe can naturally go through the pre-reheated phase with minimally coupled matter field. Therefore, during the reheating phase, there is no need to introduce any arbitrary coupling between the matter field and the inflaton.

  13. Acute renal failure following massive attack by Africanized bee stings.

    PubMed

    Bresolin, Nilzete L; Carvalho, Lígia C; Goes, Eduardo C; Fernandes, Regina; Barotto, Adriana M

    2002-08-01

    Bee venom is a complex substance, which acts in several tissues. Although severe allergic reactions have occurred after one or more stings, several deaths have been reported without allergic manifestations, emphasizing the toxic effects of massive poisoning. A number of about 500 stings have been considered necessary to cause death by direct toxicity, but as few as 30-50 stings have proved fatal in children. Among the major toxic effects are hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure (ARF), and shock. ARF may be due to a common toxic-ischemic mechanism with hypovolemic or anaphylactic shock, pigment tubulopathy (myoglobinuria and hemoglobinuria), or acute tubular necrosis (ATN) from a direct kidney toxicity of the venom. We present a case of rhabdomyolysis and hemolysis with consequent ARF which developed after about 800 bee stings. The patient recovered completely after peritoneal dialysis.

  14. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  15. Molecular Outflows in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol

    2015-11-01

    This thesis presents millimetre continuum and molecular line observations exploring the properties of molecular outflows towards massive star forming regions. Massive stars produce some of the most energetic phenomena in the Galaxy, yet we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of how they actually form. Outflows are known to play a key role in this formation process and their properties, particularly how they change depending on the mass, luminosity and evolution of the driving source can shed light on how massive stars actually form. This thesis presents observations at both high (SMA 3 arcsecond) and low (JCMT 15 arcsecond) spatial resolution of the known jet/outflow tracers, SiO and 12CO, towards a sample massive star forming region drawn from the RMS survey. Furthermore, the presence of infall signatures is explored through observations of HCO+ and H13CO+, and the hot core nature of the regions is probed using tracers such as CH3CN, HC3N and CH3OH. SiO is detected towards approximately 50% of the massive young stellar objects and HII regions in the JCMT sample. The detection of SiO appears to be linked to the age of the RMS source, with the likely younger sources showing a stronger dependence with SiO. The presence of SiO also appears to be linked to the CO velocity, with SiO more efficiently tracing sources with higher velocity dispersions. In the MOPRA observations towards a sample of 33 RMS sources, CH3CN is detected towards 66% of the sources, with the redder likely younger sources having the largest rotational temperatures. This thesis presents the first interferometric SiO (5-4) and 12CO (2-1) observations, taken with the SMA, towards the massive star forming region G203.3166/NGC 2264-C. In this intermediate/massive star forming cluster, SiO is again tracing the youngest sources. Both the SiO and 12CO emission trace two bipolar, high velocity outflows towards the mm brightest, IR-dark, likely youngest sources in this reg! ion. In contrast the IR

  16. Hyper-Eddington accretion flows on to massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2016-07-01

    We study very high rate, spherically symmetric accretion flows on to massive black holes (BHs; 102 ≲ MBH ≲ 106 M⊙) embedded in dense metal-poor clouds, performing one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. We find solutions from outside the Bondi radius at hyper-Eddington rates, unimpeded by radiation feedback when (n∞/105 cm-3) > (MBH/104 M⊙)-1(T∞/104 K)3/2, where n∞ and T∞ are the density and temperature of ambient gas. Accretion rates in this regime are steady, and larger than 5000LEdd/c2, where LEdd is the Eddington luminosity. At lower Bondi rates, the accretion is episodic due to radiative feedback and the average rate is below the Eddington rate. In the hyper-Eddington case, the solution consists of a radiation-dominated central core, where photon trapping due to electron scattering is important, and an accreting envelope which follows a Bondi profile with T ≃ 8000 K. When the emergent luminosity is limited to ≲ LEdd because of photon trapping, radiation from the central region does not affect the gas dynamics at larger scales. We apply our result to the rapid formation of massive BHs in protogalaxies with a virial temperature of Tvir ≳ 104K. Once a seed BH forms at the centre of the galaxy, it can grow to a maximum ˜105(Tvir/104 K) M⊙ via gas accretion independent of the initial BH mass. Finally, we discuss possible observational signatures of rapidly accreting BHs with/without allowance for dust. We suggest that these systems could explain Lyα emitters without X-rays and nearby luminous infrared sources with hot dust emission, respectively.

  17. Transverse Instability of Line Solitary Waves in Massive Dirac Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry; Shimabukuro, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Working in the context of localized modes in periodic potentials, we consider two systems of the massive Dirac equations in two spatial dimensions. The first system, a generalized massive Thirring model, is derived for the periodic stripe potentials. The second one, a generalized massive Gross-Neveu equation, is derived for the hexagonal potentials. In both cases, we prove analytically that the line solitary waves are spectrally unstable with respect to periodic transverse perturbations of large periods. The spectral instability is induced by the spatial translation for the generalized massive Thirring model and by the gauge rotation for the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model. We also observe numerically that the spectral instability holds for the transverse perturbations of any period in the generalized massive Thirring model and exhibits a finite threshold on the period of the transverse perturbations in the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model.

  18. Hawking radiation and the boomerang behavior of massive modes near a horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Jannes, G.; Maiessa, P.; Rousseaux, G.; Philbin, T. G.

    2011-05-15

    We discuss the behavior of massive modes near a horizon based on a study of the dispersion relation and wave packet simulations of the Klein-Gordon equation. We point out an apparent paradox between two (in principle equivalent) pictures of black-hole evaporation through Hawking radiation. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the emission of positive-energy modes, one immediately obtains a threshold for the emission of massive particles. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the absorption of negative-energy modes, such a threshold apparently does not exist. We resolve this paradox by tracing the evolution of the positive-energy massive modes with an energy below the threshold. These are seen to be emitted and move away from the black-hole horizon, but they bounce back at a 'red horizon' and are reabsorbed by the black hole, thus compensating exactly for the difference between the two pictures. For astrophysical black holes, the consequences are curious but do not affect the terrestrial constraints on observing Hawking radiation. For analogue-gravity systems with massive modes, however, the consequences are crucial and rather surprising.

  19. Thrombolytic treatment (alteplase; rt-Pa) in acute massive pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Adem; Ozkaya, Sevket; Atas, Ali Ekber; Ulu, Esra Kayahan; Kitapci, Ilknur; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) often decompensate suddenly, and once hemodynamic compromise has developed, mortality is extremely high. Currently, thrombolytic therapy for PE is still controversial. We retrospectively evaluated 34 patients with PE between January 2010 and December 2013 in the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical Park Samsun Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. The demographic and disease characteristics of patients who received thrombolytic treatment were retrospectively analyzed. The female to male ratio was 19/15 and the mean age was 63.1±13.2 years. PE diagnosis was made using echocardiography (64.7%) or contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography with echocardiography (32.4%). Twenty-two (64.7%) patients went into the cardiopulmonary arrest due to massive PE and 17 (50%) patients recovered without sequelae. Eleven (32.4%) patients were diagnosed with massive PE during cardiopulmonary arrest with clinical and echocardiographic findings. Alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rt-PA]) was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and four (36.3%) patients responded and survived without sequelae. The complications of rt-PA treatment were hemorrhage in five (14.7%) patients and allergic reactions in two (5.9%) patients. There was no mortality due to rt-PA treatment complications. In conclusion, mortality due to massive PE is much more than estimated and alteplase can be used safely in patients with massive PE. This thrombolytic treatment was not associated with any fatal hemorrhage complication. If there is any sign of acute PE, echocardiography should be used during cardiopulmonary arrest/instability. Alteplase should be given to patients with suspected massive PE.

  20. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    Far down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Centaurus, a diffuse spot of light can be perceived with the unaided eye. It may be unimpressive, but when seen through a telescope, it turns out to be a beautiful, dense cluster of innumerable stars [1]. Omega Centauri, as this object is called, is the brightest of its type in the sky. We refer to it as a "globular cluster", due to its symmetric form. It belongs to our Milky Way galaxy and astrophysical investigations have shown that it is located at a distance of about 16,500 light-years (1 light-year = 9,460,000,000,000 km). Nobody knows for sure how many individual stars it contains, but recent estimates run into the millions. Most of these stars are more than 10,000 million years old and it is generally agreed that Omega Centauri has a similar age. Measurements of its motion indicate that Omega Centauri plows through the Milky Way in an elongated orbit. It is not easy to understand how it has managed to keep its stars together during such an extended period. MEASURING STELLAR VELOCITIES IN OMEGA CENTAURI A group of astronomers [2] have recently carried through a major investigation of Omega Centauri. After many nights of observations at the ESO La Silla observatory, they now conclude that not only is this globular cluster the brightest, it is indeed by far the most massive known in the Milky Way. The very time-consuming observations were made during numerous observing sessions over a period of no less than 13 years (1981-1993), with the photoelectric spectrometer CORAVEL mounted on the 1.5-m Danish telescope at La Silla. The CORAVEL instrument (COrelation RAdial VELocities) was built in a joint effort between the Geneva (Switzerland) and Marseilles (France) observatories. It functions according to the cross-correlation technique, by means of which the spectrum of the observed star is compared with a "standard stellar spectrum" [3]. HOW HEAVY IS OMEGA CENTAURI? In the present study, a total of 1701

  1. VLA 7-mm Observations of Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Hendrik; Hofner, Peter; Araya, Esteban; Stecklum, Bringfried

    2003-07-01

    The early stages during the formation of massive stars are deeply enshrouded due to the presence of dense and dusty natal material. This prevents observations in the optical and often also in the near-infrared. The emission of the star-forming regions peaks in the far-infrared and sub-mm regime, but at these wavelengths, single-dish observations are restricted in spatial resolution and can give only upper limits on the energetics of the objects of interest. Interferometry at mm wavelengths is one appropriate technique to overcome these limitations. We have started an extensive programme to observe pre-selected massive star-forming regions. Our tool is the VLA and its 7-mm receiver system. The VLA can be operated in several antenna configurations delivering resolutions from 1.5 arcsec down to 0.05 arcsec, which is superior to other current mm-interferometers. Sub-arcsec resolution is strongly needed to disentangle the often crowded regions of high-mass star formation and to clearly separate our objects of interest from the adjacent ultracompact HII regions. At 7 mm we are on the save ground of the Rayleigh-Jeans limit even for emission of cold dust (a fact that is not always true for observations at smaller wavelengths). Almost all circumstellar density configurations are optically thin at 7 mm, thus, the observations will trace the total dust content. However, at 7 mm also the free-free emission from ionised gas (caused by the UV emission of the young massive stars) can contribute to the observed signal. Therefore, we have to identify and remove these "parasitic" constituents by extrapolating interferometric data obtained at cm-wavelengths. The targets are either taken from the list of Molinari (Molinari et al. 2000, A&A, 355, 617) or are well-known massive star-forming complexes, for which we have already acquired additional data at other wavelengths. We have started with observations at lower and medium resolution (1.5 - 0.5 arcsec) to distinguish candidates for

  2. Molecular Outflows from Newly Formed Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2015-12-01

    We map 6 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the CO J=2-1 line and survey 18 massive YSOs, including the six, in the hcopj, sioj, water 6_{16}-5_{23} maser, and methanol 7_{0}-6_{1} A^{+} maser lines. We detect CO bipolar outflows in all the six mapped sources. Four of them are newly discovered (ifive, ieight, inine, iten), while itwo is mapped in the CO J=2-1 line for the first time. The detected outflows are much more massive and energetic than outflows from low-mass YSOs with masses >20 M_⊙ and momenta >300 M_⊙ km/s. They have mass outflow rates (3-6)×10^{-4} M_⊙ yr^{-1}, which are at least one order of magnitude greater than those observed in low-mass YSOs. We detect hcop and SiO line emission in 18 (100%) and 4 (22%) sources, respectively. The hcop spectra show high-velocity wings in 11 (61%) sources. We detect water maser emission in 13 (72%) sources and 44 GHz methanol maser emission in 8 (44%) sources. Of the detected sources, 5 water and 6 methanol maser sources are new discoveries. iseven shows high-velocity (>30 kms) water maser lines. We find good correlations of the bolometric luminosity of the central (proto)star with the mechanical force, mechanical luminosity, and mass outflow rate of molecular outflow %L_{bol} with F_{m}, L_{m}, and dot{M}_{out} in the bolometric luminosity range of 10^{-1}-10^6 lsol, and identified 3 intermediate- or high-mass counterparts of Class O objects.

  3. Birth of Massive Black Hole Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Dotti, M.; Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-19

    If massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in galaxies and galaxies experience multiple mergers during their cosmic assembly, then BH binaries should be common albeit temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observationally, the paucity of active BH pairs points toward binary lifetimes far shorter than the Hubble time, indicating rapid inspiral of the BHs down to the domain where gravitational waves lead to their coalescence. Here, we review a series of studies on the dynamics of massive BHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers that underscore the vital role played by a cool, gaseous component in promoting the rapid formation of the BH binary. The BH binary is found to reside at the center of a massive self-gravitating nuclear disc resulting from the collision of the two gaseous discs present in the mother galaxies. Hardening by gravitational torques against gas in this grand disc is found to continue down to sub-parsec scales. The eccentricity decreases with time to zero and when the binary is circular, accretion sets in around the two BHs. When this occurs, each BH is endowed with it own small-size ({approx}< 0.01 pc) accretion disc comprising a few percent of the BH mass. Double AGN activity is expected to occur on an estimated timescale of {approx}< 1 Myr. The double nuclear point-like sources that may appear have typical separation of {approx}< 10 pc, and are likely to be embedded in the still ongoing starburst. We note that a potential threat of binary stalling, in a gaseous environment, may come from radiation and/or mechanical energy injections by the BHs. Only short-lived or sub-Eddington accretion episodes can guarantee the persistence of a dense cool gas structure around the binary necessary for continuing BH inspiral.

  4. Due process traditionalism.

    PubMed

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2008-06-01

    In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and they might have joined a cascade. An alternative defense sees due process traditionalism as a second-best substitute for two preferable alternatives: a purely procedural approach to the Due Process Clause, and an approach that gives legislatures the benefit of every reasonable doubt. But it is not clear that in these domains, the first-best approaches are especially attractive; and even if they are, the second-best may be an unacceptably crude substitute. The most plausible defense of due process traditionalism operates on rule-consequentialist grounds, with the suggestion that even if traditions are not great, they are often good, and judges do best if they defer to traditions rather than attempting to specify the content of "liberty" on their own. But the rule-consequentialist defense depends on controversial and probably false assumptions about the likely goodness of traditions and the institutional incapacities of judges.

  5. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  6. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  7. New Cosmological Solutions in Massive Gravity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, S. S. A.; Pereira, S. H.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present some new cosmological solutions in massive gravity theory. Some homogeneous and isotropic solutions correctly describe accelerated evolutions for the universe. The study was realized considering a specific form to the fiducial metric and found different functions and constant parameters of the theory that guarantee the conservation of the energy momentum tensor. Several accelerating cosmologies were found, all of them reproducing a cosmological constant term proportional to the graviton mass, with a de Sitter type solution for the scale factor. We have also verified that when the fiducial metric is close to the physical metric the solutions are absent, except for some specific open cases.

  8. Massive phytoplankton blooms under Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Kevin R; Perovich, Donald K; Pickart, Robert S; Brown, Zachary W; van Dijken, Gert L; Lowry, Kate E; Mills, Matthew M; Palmer, Molly A; Balch, William M; Bahr, Frank; Bates, Nicholas R; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Bowler, Bruce; Brownlee, Emily; Ehn, Jens K; Frey, Karen E; Garley, Rebecca; Laney, Samuel R; Lubelczyk, Laura; Mathis, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Atsushi; Mitchell, B Greg; Moore, G W K; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Pal, Sharmila; Polashenski, Chris M; Reynolds, Rick A; Schieber, Brian; Sosik, Heidi M; Stephens, Michael; Swift, James H

    2012-06-15

    Phytoplankton blooms over Arctic Ocean continental shelves are thought to be restricted to waters free of sea ice. Here, we document a massive phytoplankton bloom beneath fully consolidated pack ice far from the ice edge in the Chukchi Sea, where light transmission has increased in recent decades because of thinning ice cover and proliferation of melt ponds. The bloom was characterized by high diatom biomass and rates of growth and primary production. Evidence suggests that under-ice phytoplankton blooms may be more widespread over nutrient-rich Arctic continental shelves and that satellite-based estimates of annual primary production in these waters may be underestimated by up to 10-fold.

  9. Massively-Parallel Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V; Pierce, T G; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Bartelt, M; Tang, M

    2003-06-18

    Prediction of the plastic strength of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of the existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, in order to be statistically representative and to reproduce experimentally observed microstructures. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss the general aspects of this code that make such large scale simulations possible, as well as a few initial simulation results.

  10. A massive early atmosphere on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nolan, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of an early greenhouse atmosphere for Triton is presented and the conditions under which it may have been sustained are quantified. The volatile content of primordial Triton is modeled, and tidal heating rates are assessed to set bounds on the available energy. The atmospheric model formalism is presented, and it is shown how a massive atmosphere could have been raised by modest tidal heating fluxes. The implications of the model atmospheres for the atmospheric escape rates, the chemical evolution, and the cratering record are addressed.

  11. A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    We present a new quasidilaton theory of Poincare invariant massive gravity, based on the recently proposed framework of matter coupling that makes it possible for the kinetic energy of the quasidilaton scalar to couple to both physical and fiducial metrics simultaneously. We find a scaling-type exact solution that expresses a self-accelerating de Sitter universe, and then analyze linear perturbations around it. It is shown that in a range of parameters all physical degrees of freedom have non-vanishing quadratic kinetic terms and are stable in the subhorizon limit, while the effective Newton's constant for the background is kept positive.

  12. Instability considerations for massive star eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of 'supernova imposters' such as {eta} Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be very deep-seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core grow slowly to sufficient amplitude to cause an episode of mixing. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy deep in the star that is responsible for the observed large mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  13. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  14. Massive hydrothorax following subclavian vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of central venous catheterization for monitoring of the venous pressure, fluid infusion and hyperalimentation, the literature has been full of serious life-threatening complications. Of these complications is the false positioning of the central venous catheter and subsequent development of pleural effusion. In this report we are describing a case of iatrogenic massive pleural effusion following subclavian vein catheterization necessitating intercostal tube drainage and mechanical ventilation. The case highlights the importance of ensuring adequate positioning of the catheter after insertion through aspiration of venous blood, immediate post insertion X-ray and the utilization of ultrasound guidance in cases with expected difficult catheterization. PMID:21073758

  15. Pattern recognition and massively distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Davies, E Keith; Glick, Meir; Harrison, Karl N; Richards, W Graham

    2002-12-01

    A feature of Peter Kollman's research was his exploitation of the latest computational techniques to devise novel applications of the free energy perturbation method. He would certainly have seized upon the opportunities offered by massively distributed computing. Here we describe the use of over a million personal computers to perform virtual screening of 3.5 billion druglike molecules against protein targets by pharmacophore pattern matching, together with other applications of pattern recognition such as docking ligands without any a priori knowledge about the binding site location.

  16. AIMS: Asteroseismic Inference on a Massive Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel R.

    2016-11-01

    AIMS (Asteroseismic Inference on a Massive Scale) estimates stellar parameters and credible intervals/error bars in a Bayesian manner from a set of seismic frequency data and so-called classic constraints. To achieve reliable parameter estimates and computational efficiency it searches through a grid of pre-computed models using an MCMC algorithm; interpolation within the grid of models is performed by first tessellating the grid using a Delaunay triangulation and then doing a linear barycentric interpolation on matching simplexes. Inputs for the modeling consists of individual frequencies from peak-bagging, which can be complemented with classic spectroscopic constraints.

  17. Drag phenomena from holographic massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Brattan, Daniel K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the motion of point particles in a strongly coupled field theory with broken translation invariance. We obtain the energy and momentum loss rates and drag coefficients for a class of such particles by solving for the motion of classical strings in holographic massive gravity. At low temperatures compared to the graviton mass the behaviour of the string is controlled by the appearance of an exotic ground state with non-zero entropy at zero temperature. Additionally, we find an upper bound on the diffusion constant for a collection of these particles which is saturated when the mass of the graviton goes to zero.

  18. UV spectroscopy of the most massive overcontact binary known to date: on the verge of coalescence ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars. Because of the abundance of short period systems, about a quarter of all massive stars are thought to merge with their companion. The short-lived contact phase preceding coalescence is poorly understood due to the lack of observational constraints: only two overcontact O-type binaries are known so far. Yet, these systems provide crucial observational testbeds to understand the elusive formation and evolution of the most massive stars, the complex physics of stellar mergers and the role that the coalescence products play as progenitors of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. We recently discovered VFTS 352, the most massive, earliest spectral type and shortest period (P = 1.12 d) overcontact O-type binary known to date. With an estimated combined mass of 130 Msun, this truly unique system is expected to merge into a rapidly rotating, very massive, single star. Initial estimates of the physical parameters were derived from high-quality ground-based optical spectra and photometry. Yet, optical analyses of overcontact systems can overestimate the radial-velocity amplitudes, hence the masses, by up to 40% because optical lines are susceptible to irradiation effects. Here we propose a limited 8-epochs COS monitoring of VFTS 352. The G130M and G160M spectra will allow us to side step the uncertainties affecting optical determination of the masses and to constrain the mass loss rate and CNO surface abundances. These constraints are crucial to identify the complex mixing processes, to reveal signs of mass exchange and mass loss from the system, and to enable a comparison with massive binary evolution models.

  19. Spitzer view of massive star formation in the tidally stripped Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan P.; Shiao, Bernie; Sewiło, Marta; Whitney, Barbara A.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Fukui, Yasuo; Madden, Suzanne C.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2014-04-20

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., in situ, current massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using Spitzer mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are ∼10 M {sub ☉}, <<45 M {sub ☉} found in the LMC. The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears to be decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given H I column density, N(H I). We found that the LMC has ∼3 × higher probability than the Bridge for N(H I) >12 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2}, but the trend reverses at lower N(H I). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to H I is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation or to less efficient cloud collapse, or to both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.

  20. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: laviniah@kth.se

    2015-12-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  1. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  2. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  3. Seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.A.; Womble, D.E.; Mosher, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    A key to reducing the risks and costs associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Pre-stack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar-wave equation using finite differences. Current industry computational capabilities are insufficient for the application of finite-difference, 3-D, prestack, depth-migration algorithms. High performance computers and state-of-the-art algorithms and software are required to meet this need. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, the authors have developed a finite-difference, 3-D prestack, depth-migration code for massively parallel computer systems. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers (thousands of processors) can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite-difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration.

  4. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  5. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Schryver, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  6. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity.

  7. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective.

  8. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  9. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Bieging, J.; Araya, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  10. Massive Ascites and Pleural Effusion in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Deveer, Ruya; Camuzcuoglu, Aysun; Kasap, Burcu; Camuzcuoglu, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia is defined as new onset hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation and complicates approximately 2-8% of all pregnancies. Release of vasoconstrictive agents, endothelial damage, hyperpermeability of the capillaries and microangiopathic haemolysis involves the basic pathophysiology. It has variable clinical presentation. Here, we report a case of severe preeclampsia who developed postpartum massive ascites and pleural effusion. Primigravid patient was admitted to our clinic at 35 weeks of gestation with very high blood pressure. In biochemical analysis, Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was 401 U/L, Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was 292 U/L. An emergency caesarean section was performed because of fetal distress. On the 2nd post-operative day, abdominal distension and severe abdominal pain occurred. On the 3rd post-operative day, her abdominal distension increased and Ultrasonography (USG) revealed massive ascites. Abdominal drainage was performed and albumin infusion was administered. On postoperative day 4, she still had abdominal distension and concomitant respiratory distress. Computed Tomography (CT) showed ascites and bilateral pleural effusion. Her complaint regressed on the following days.

  11. Massive Contingency Analysis with High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw

    2009-07-26

    Contingency analysis is a key function in the Energy Management System (EMS) to assess the impact of various combinations of power system component failures based on state estimates. Contingency analysis is also extensively used in power market operation for feasibility test of market solutions. Faster analysis of more cases is required to safely and reliably operate today’s power grids with less marginal and more intermittent renewable energy sources. Enabled by the latest development in the computer industry, high performance computing holds the promise of meet the need in the power industry. This paper investigates the potential of high performance computing for massive contingency analysis. The framework of "N-x" contingency analysis is established and computational load balancing schemes are studied and implemented with high performance computers. Case studies of massive 300,000-contingency-case analysis using the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model are presented to illustrate the application of high performance computing and demonstrate the performance of the framework and computational load balancing schemes.

  12. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  13. Constraints on shear and rotation with massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ahmad; Pace, Francesco; Malekjani, Mohammad; Del Popolo, Antonino

    2017-03-01

    A precise determination of the mass function is an important tool to verify cosmological predictions of the Λ cold dark matter (CDM) model and to infer more precisely the better model describing the evolution of the Universe. Galaxy clusters have been currently used to infer cosmological parameters, in particular the matter density parameter Ωm, the matter power spectrum normalization σ8 and the equation of state parameter wde of the dark energy fluid. In this work, using data on massive galaxy clusters (M > 8 × 1014 h-1 M⊙) in the redshift range 0.05 ≲ z ≲ 0.83, for the first time we put constraints on the parameter α introduced within the formalism of the extended spherical collapse model to quantify deviations from sphericity due to shear and rotation. Since at the moment there is no physical model describing its functional shape, we assume it to be a logarithmic function of the cluster mass. By holding σ8 fixed and restricting our analysis to a ΛCDM model, we find, at 1σ confidence level, Ωm = 0.284 ± 0.0064, h = 0.678 ± 0.017 and β =0.0019^{+0.0008}_{-0.0015}, where β represents the slope of the parameter α. This result translates into a 9 per cent decrement of the number of massive clusters with respect to a standard ΛCDM mass function, but better data are required to better constrain this quantity, since at the 2σ and 3σ confidence level we are only able to infer upper limits.

  14. Geochemistry of a naturally occurring massive marine gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.; Threlkeld, C.N.; Dendy, Sloan E.

    1984-01-01

    During Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 84 a core 1 m long and 6 cm in diameter of massive gas hydrate was unexpectedly recovered at Site 570 in upper slope sediment of the Middle America Trench offshore of Guatemala. This core contained only 5-7% sediment, the remainder being the solid hydrate composed of gas and water. Samples of the gas hydrate were decomposed under controlled conditions in a closed container maintained at 4??C. Gas pressure increased and asymptotically approached the equilibrium decomposition pressure for an ideal methane hydrate, CH4.5-3/4H2O, of 3930 kPa and approached to this pressure after each time gas was released, until the gas hydrate was completely decomposed. The gas evolved during hydrate decomposition was 99.4% methane, ???0.2% ethane, and ???0.4% CO2. Hydrocarbons from propane to heptane were also present, but in concentrations of less than 100 p.p.m. The carbon-isotopic composition of methane was -41 to -44 permil(( 0 00), relative to PDB standard. The observed volumetric methane/water ratio was 64 or 67, which indicates that before it was stored and analyzed, the gas hydrate probably had lost methane. The sample material used in the experiments was likely a mixture of methane hydrate and water ice. Formation of this massive gas hydrate probably involved the following processes: (i) upward migration of gas and its accumulation in a zone where conditions favored the growth of gas hydrates, (ii) continued, unusually rapid biological generation of methane, and (iii) release of gas from water solution as pressure decreased due to sea level lowering and tectonic uplift. ?? 1984.

  15. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  16. Salvage intraosseous thrombolysis and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for massive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Northey, Luke Cameron; Shiraev, Timothy; Omari, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous access is an alternative route of pharmacotherapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides cardiac and respiratory support when conventional therapies fail. This case reports the use of intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO in a patient with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). A 34-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset severe shortness of breath. Due to difficulty establishing intravenous access, an intraosseous needle was inserted into the left tibia. Echocardiography identified severe right ventricular dilatation with global systolic impairment and failure, indicative of PE. Due to the patient's hemodynamic compromise a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) bolus was administered through the intraosseous route. After transfer to the intensive care unit, venous-arterial ECMO was initiated as further therapy. The patient recovered and was discharged 36 days after admission. This is the first report of combination intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO as salvage therapy for massive PE.

  17. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae.

  18. Idiopathic massive myocardial calcification: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shackley, Brit S; Nguyen, Thao P; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Finn, Paul J; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of massive myocardial calcification in a 42-year-old male who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Myocardial calcification is most commonly associated with myocardial infarction or, less commonly, hypercalcemia. This case is particularly unusual due to the lack of any known predisposing risk factors, including normal coronary arteries, normal renal function, and normal serum calcium levels. Alternative etiologies are discussed accompanied by a review of the literature.

  19. An Autopsy Case of Acute Massive Hematochezia Caused by Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis: A First Report in Forensic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Unuma, Kana; Makino, Yohsuke; Noritake, Kanako; Yamada, Atsushi; Iwase, Hirotaro; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT) is an uncommon cause of intestinal ischemia and massive gastrointestinal bleeding. This report describes a man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, who died of massive hematochezia due to SMVT. A medicolegal autopsy disclosed a thrombus at the superior mesenteric vein and hemorrhagic infarction of the bowel wall, an area also within the territory of the superior mesenteric vein. Liver cirrhosis, an enlarged spleen, and esophageal varices without rupture were also observed, but ulcers and variceal bleeding were not. Other organs showed no significant findings. His blood alcohol level was 0.14% w/v. Thus, this man died from severe hematochezia associated with SMVT due to liver cirrhosis and alcohol dehydration, which can lead to coagulopathy and rapid progress of thrombus formation. This is the first report on an alternate cause for massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a cirrhotic patient in a forensic autopsy.

  20. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  1. Exact solutions in 3D new massive gravity.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Haji; Aliev, Alikram N

    2011-01-14

    We show that the field equations of new massive gravity (NMG) consist of a massive (tensorial) Klein-Gordon-type equation with a curvature-squared source term and a constraint equation. We also show that, for algebraic type D and N spacetimes, the field equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) can be thought of as the "square root" of the massive Klein-Gordon-type equation. Using this fact, we establish a simple framework for mapping all types D and N solutions of TMG into NMG. Finally, we present new examples of types D and N solutions to NMG.

  2. Exact Solutions in 3D New Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmedov, Haji; Aliev, Alikram N.

    2011-01-14

    We show that the field equations of new massive gravity (NMG) consist of a massive (tensorial) Klein-Gordon-type equation with a curvature-squared source term and a constraint equation. We also show that, for algebraic type D and N spacetimes, the field equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) can be thought of as the 'square root' of the massive Klein-Gordon-type equation. Using this fact, we establish a simple framework for mapping all types D and N solutions of TMG into NMG. Finally, we present new examples of types D and N solutions to NMG.

  3. Exact Solutions in 3D New Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, Haji; Aliev, Alikram N.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the field equations of new massive gravity (NMG) consist of a massive (tensorial) Klein-Gordon-type equation with a curvature-squared source term and a constraint equation. We also show that, for algebraic type D and N spacetimes, the field equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) can be thought of as the “square root” of the massive Klein-Gordon-type equation. Using this fact, we establish a simple framework for mapping all types D and N solutions of TMG into NMG. Finally, we present new examples of types D and N solutions to NMG.

  4. Connecting the Dots: MUSE Unveils the Destructive Effect of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. F.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P.; Mottram, J.; Ramsay, S.; Testi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Throughout their entire lives, massive stars have a substantial impact on their surroundings, such as via protostellar outflows, stellar winds, ionising radiation and supernovae. Conceptually this is well understood, but the exact role of feedback mechanisms on the global star formation process and the stellar environment, as well as their dependence on the properties of the star-forming regions, are yet to be understood in detail. Observational quantification of the various feedback mechanisms is needed to precisely understand how high mass stars interact with and shape their environment, and which feedback mechanisms dominate under given conditions. We analysed the photo-evaporative effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their surrounding molecular clouds using MUSE integral field data. This allowed us to determine the mass-loss rate of pillar-like structures (due to photo-evaporation) in different environments, and relate it to the ionising power of nearby massive stars. The resulting correlation is the first observational quantification of the destructive effect of ionising radiation from massive stars.

  5. Two-Loop QCD correction to massive spin-2 resonance → 3 gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Taushif; Mahakhud, Maguni; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present the virtual QCD corrections to the process h → g + g + g due to interference of born and two-loop amplitudes, where h is a massive spin-2 particle and g is the gluon. We assume that the SM fields couple to h through the SM energy momentum tensor. Our result constitutes one of the ingredients to full NNLO QCD contribution to production of a massive spin-2 particle along with a jet in the scattering process at the LHC. In particular, this massive spin-2 could be a KK mode of a ADD graviton in large extra dimensional model or a RS KK mode in warped extra dimensional model or a generic massive spin-2. In addition, it provides an opportunity to study the ultraviolet and infrared structures of QCD amplitudes involving tensorial coupling resulting from energy momentum operator. Using dimensional regularization, we find that infrared poles of this amplitude are in agreement with the proposal by Catani confirming the factorization property of QCD amplitudes with tensorial insertion.

  6. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in galaxy nuclei mergers - I. Numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Numerical effects are known to plague adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes when treating massive particles, e.g. representing massive black holes (MBHs). In an evolving background, they can experience strong, spurious perturbations and then follow unphysical orbits. We study by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a pair MBHs in the rapidly and violently evolving gaseous and stellar background that follows a galaxy major merger. We confirm that spurious numerical effects alter the MBH orbits in AMR simulations, and show that numerical issues are ultimately due to a drop in the spatial resolution during the simulation, drastically reducing the accuracy in the gravitational force computation. We therefore propose a new refinement criterion suited for massive particles, able to solve in a fast and precise way for their orbits in highly dynamical backgrounds. The new refinement criterion we designed enforces the region around each massive particle to remain at the maximum resolution allowed, independently upon the local gas density. Such maximally resolved regions then follow the MBHs along their orbits, and effectively avoids all spurious effects caused by resolution changes. Our suite of high-resolution, AMR hydrodynamic simulations, including different prescriptions for the sub-grid gas physics, shows that the new refinement implementation has the advantage of not altering the physical evolution of the MBHs, accounting for all the non-trivial physical processes taking place in violent dynamical scenarios, such as the final stages of a galaxy major merger.

  7. Cluster of cases of massive hemorrhage associated with anticoagulant detection in race horses.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Francisco R; Poppenga, Robert; Kinde, Hailu; Diab, Santiago S; Nyaoke, Akinyi C; Hill, Ashley E; Arthur, Rick M; Uzal, Francisco A

    2015-01-01

    Five horses originating from 4 different California race tracks were submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory for necropsy and diagnostic workup. The 5 horses had a history of sudden collapse and death during exercise. In all of them, massive hemoperitoneum and hemorrhages in other cavities or organs were observed. The liver from these 5 animals and from 27 horses that had been euthanized due to catastrophic leg injuries (controls) were subjected to a rodenticide anticoagulant screen. Traces of brodifacoum, diphacinone, or bromadiolone were detected in the 5 horses with massive bleeding (5/5), and no traces of rodenticides were detected in control horses (0/27). Other frequent causes of massive hemorrhages in horses were ruled out in 4 of the cases; one of the horses had a pelvic fracture. Although only traces of anticoagulants were found in the livers of these horses and the role of these substances in the massive bleeding remains uncertain, it is speculated that exercise-related increases in blood pressure may have reduced the threshold for toxicity of these anticoagulants.

  8. Distributed Compressive CSIT Estimation and Feedback for FDD Multi-User Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiongbin; Lau, Vincent K. N.

    2014-06-01

    To fully utilize the spatial multiplexing gains or array gains of massive MIMO, the channel state information must be obtained at the transmitter side (CSIT). However, conventional CSIT estimation approaches are not suitable for FDD massive MIMO systems because of the overwhelming training and feedback overhead. In this paper, we consider multi-user massive MIMO systems and deploy the compressive sensing (CS) technique to reduce the training as well as the feedback overhead in the CSIT estimation. The multi-user massive MIMO systems exhibits a hidden joint sparsity structure in the user channel matrices due to the shared local scatterers in the physical propagation environment. As such, instead of naively applying the conventional CS to the CSIT estimation, we propose a distributed compressive CSIT estimation scheme so that the compressed measurements are observed at the users locally, while the CSIT recovery is performed at the base station jointly. A joint orthogonal matching pursuit recovery algorithm is proposed to perform the CSIT recovery, with the capability of exploiting the hidden joint sparsity in the user channel matrices. We analyze the obtained CSIT quality in terms of the normalized mean absolute error, and through the closed-form expressions, we obtain simple insights into how the joint channel sparsity can be exploited to improve the CSIT recovery performance.

  9. Constraints on the evolutionary mechanisms of massive galaxies since z ∼ 1 from their velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, L.; Balcells, M.; Trujillo, I.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Tapia, T.; Cardiel, N.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Hempel, A.; Martín-Navarro, I.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Sánchez-Bláquez, P.

    2015-10-01

    Several authors have reported that the dynamical masses of massive compact galaxies (M* ≳ 1011 M⊙, re ∼ 1 kpc), computed as Mdyn = 5.0 σe2 re/G, are lower than their stellar masses M*. In a previous study from our group, the discrepancy is interpreted as a breakdown of the assumption of homology that underlie the Mdyn determinations. Here, we present new spectroscopy of six redshift z ≈ 1.0 massive compact ellipticals from the Extended Groth Strip, obtained with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We obtain velocity dispersions in the range 161-340 km s-1. As found by previous studies of massive compact galaxies, our velocity dispersions are lower than the virial expectation, and all of our galaxies show Mdyn < M* (assuming a Salpeter initial mass function). Adding data from the literature, we build a sample covering a range of stellar masses and compactness in a narrow redshift range z ≈ 1.0. This allows us to exclude systematic effects on the data and evolutionary effects on the galaxy population, which could have affected previous studies. We confirm that mass discrepancy scales with galaxy compactness. We use the stellar mass plane (M*, σe, re) populated by our sample to constrain a generic evolution mechanism. We find that the simulations of the growth of massive ellipticals due to mergers agree with our constraints and discard the assumption of homology.

  10. Early experience in endoscopic management of massive intraventricular hemorrhage with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Raj, Jason; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    Massive intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is nearly always associated with hydrocephalus and is often treated with prolonged external ventricular drainage (EVD); however this procedure can lead to bacterial ventriculitis and meningitis, which can worsen the clinical outcomes. Endoscopic burr hole surgery to remove the hematomas in lateral and third ventricles is an alternative treatment option. We describe the surgical techniques and benefits of endoscopic surgery for acute massive IVH in four patients and discuss the current published literature-related to this condition. Four patients were treated endoscopically for massive IVH. Three patients presented with secondary IVH due to vascular malformation, tumoral bleed and chronic hypertension, while one case presented as massive primary IVH. Endoscopic wash out and removal of hematomas was normally performed together with an endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Recombinant factor VIIa was only administered prior to surgery for IVH secondary to vascular malformation and for cases with postoperative rebleeding which required second endoscopic surgery. Weaning from ventilator and EVD commenced on day 4 postoperatively. All treated patients recovered and did not require further shunt surgery. Good outcomes obtained may be related to early removal of hematomas, creation of new cerebrospinal fluid diversion pathway after thorough wash-out, early weaning from ventilator and EVD. Endoscopic surgery is beneficial in treating poor grade IVH with Graeb score of more than 6. PMID:25685202

  11. A massive binary black hole in 1928 + 738?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Nico; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Hummel, Christian A.

    1993-05-01

    We apply the binary black hole model to explain the wiggles in the milliarcsec radio jet of the superluminal quasar 1928 + 738 (4C 73.18) observed with VLBI at 1.3 cm wavelength by Hummel et al. (1992). The period and amplitude of the wiggles can be explained as due to the orbital motion of a binary black hole with mass of order l0 exp 8 solar masses, mass ratio larger than 0.1, and orbital radius about 10 exp 16 cm. The jet's inclination to the line of sight should be small confirming the standard interpretation of superluminal motion and one-sidedness as due to relativistic motion in a direction close to the line of sight. The small orbital radius suggests that the binary has been losing a significant amount of orbital energy during the last 10 exp 7 yr, possibly by interaction with the matter which is flowing through the active galactic nucleus. The arcsec-scale radio structure provides additional support for a link between activity and binary evolution. If our interpretation of the mass wiggle in this quasar is correct, then many other quasars may contain massive binary black holes as well.

  12. [Onychomycoses due to molds].

    PubMed

    Chabasse, D; Pihet, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycoses represent about 30% of superficial mycosis that are encountered in Dermatology consults. Fungi such as dermatophytes, which are mainly found on the feet nails, cause nearly 50% of these onychopathies. Yeasts are predominantly present on hands, whereas non-dermatophytic moulds are very seldom involved in both foot and hand nails infections. According to literature, these moulds are responsible for 2 to 17% of onychomycoses. Nevertheless, we have to differentiate between onychomycoses due to pseudodermatophytes such as Neoscytalidium (ex-Scytalidium) and Onychocola canadensis, which present a high affinity for keratin, and onychomycoses due to filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus, Fusarium, Scopulariopsis, Acremonium... These saprophytic moulds are indeed most of the time considered as colonizers rather than real pathogens agents. Mycology and histopathology laboratories play an important role. They allow to identify the species that is involved in nail infection, but also to confirm parasitism by the fungus in the infected nails. Indeed, before attributing any pathogenic role to non-dermatophytic moulds, it is essential to precisely evaluate their pathogenicity through samples and accurate mycological and/or histological analysis. The treatment of onychomycoses due to non-dermatophytic moulds is difficult, as there is today no consensus. The choice of an antifungal agent will first depend on the species that is involved in the infection, but also on the severity of nail lesions and on the patient himself. In most cases, the onychomycosis will be cured with chemical or mechanical removing of the infected tissues, followed by a local antifungal treatment. In some cases, a systemic therapy will be discussed.

  13. Credit where due.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Steven G

    2016-08-01

    The history of medicine is filled with stories of tireless researchers who failed to get credit for their hard work. Examples of this include Rosalind Franklin, who helped to elucidate the structure of DNA; Frederick Banting, who helped to discover insulin; and Jay McLean, who discovered heparin. The founding of the field of vascular surgery provides one of the most vivid examples of uncredited work. Even though Alexis Carrel was an unpaid, untitled assistant in Charles Guthrie's laboratory, it was Carrel alone who received a Nobel Prize for their work. In an attempt to give credit where due, the reasons for this injustice are described.

  14. Gravito-electromagnetic effects of massive rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2015-05-01

    The Einstein field equations in linear post-Newtonian approximation can be written in analogy with electromagnetism, in the so-called gravito-electromagnetic (GEM) formalism. We use this analogy to study the gravitational field of a massive ring: In particular, we consider a continuous mass distribution on Keplerian orbit around a central body, and we work out the gravitational field generated by this mass distribution in the intermediate zone between the central body and the ring, focusing on the gravitomagnetic (GM) component that originates from the rotation of the ring. In doing so, we generalize and complement some previous results that focused on the purely Newtonian effects of the ring (thus neglecting its rotation) or that were applied to the case, of rotating spherical shells. Eventually, we study in some simple cases, the effect of the rotation of the ring, and suggest that, in principle, this approach could be used to infer information about the angular momentum of the ring.

  15. Matrix gravity and massive colored gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.

    2004-10-01

    We formulate a theory of gravity with a matrix-valued complex vierbein based on the SL(2N,C)⊗SL(2N,C) gauge symmetry. The theory is metric independent, and before symmetry breaking all fields are massless. The symmetry is broken spontaneously and all gravitons corresponding to the broken generators acquire masses. If the symmetry is broken to SL(2,C), then the spectrum would correspond to one massless graviton coupled to 2N2-1 massive gravitons. A novel feature is the way the fields corresponding to noncompact generators acquire kinetic energies with correct signs. Equally surprising is the way Yang-Mills gauge fields acquire their correct kinetic energies through the coupling to the nondynamical antisymmetric components of the vierbeins.

  16. Computational chaos in massively parallel neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep

    1989-01-01

    A fundamental issue which directly impacts the scalability of current theoretical neural network models to massively parallel embodiments, in both software as well as hardware, is the inherent and unavoidable concurrent asynchronicity of emerging fine-grained computational ensembles and the possible emergence of chaotic manifestations. Previous analyses attributed dynamical instability to the topology of the interconnection matrix, to parasitic components or to propagation delays. However, researchers have observed the existence of emergent computational chaos in a concurrently asynchronous framework, independent of the network topology. Researcher present a methodology enabling the effective asynchronous operation of large-scale neural networks. Necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing concurrent asynchronous convergence are established in terms of contracting operators. Lyapunov exponents are computed formally to characterize the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are presented to illustrate network convergence to the correct results, even in the presence of large delays.

  17. Revisiting perturbations in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the theory of extended quasidilaton massive gravity together with the presence of matter fields. After discussing the homogeneous and isotropic fully dynamical background equations, which governs the exact expansion history of the universe, we consider small cosmological perturbations around these general FLRW solutions. The stability of tensor, vector and scalar perturbations on top of these general background solutions give rise to slightly different constraints on the parameters of the theory than those obtained in the approximative assumption of the late-time asymptotic form of the expansion history, which does not correspond to our current epoch. This opens up the possibility of stable FLRW solutions to be compared with current data on cosmic expansion with the restricted parameter space based on theoretical ground.

  18. The Massive Star Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    An increasing number of non-terminal giant eruptions are being observed by modern supernova and transient surveys. Very little is known about the origin of these giant eruptions and their progenitors which are presumably very-massive, evolved stars such as luminous blue variables, hypergiants, and supergiants. Motivated by the small number of progenitors positively associated with these giant eruptions, we have begun a survey of the luminous and evolved massive star populations in several nearby galaxies. We aim to identify the likely progenitors of the giant eruptions, study the spatial variations in the stellar populations, and examine the relationship between massive star populations and their environment. The work presented here is focused on stellar populations in the relatively nearby, giant, spiral galaxy M101 from sixteen archival BVI HST/ACS images. We create a catalog of stars in the direction to M101 with photometric errors < 10% for V < 24.5 and 50% completeness down to V ˜ 26.5 even in regions of high stellar crowding. Using color and magnitude criteria we have identified candidate luminous OB type stars and blue supergiants, yellow supergiants, and red supergiants for future observation. We examine their spatial distributions across the face of M101 and find that the ratio of blue to red supergiants decreases by two orders of magnitude over the radial extent. From our catalog, we derive the star formation history (SFH) for the stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli by fitting the color-magnitude diagrams. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to populations traced by Halpha, far ultraviolet (FUV), and near ultraviolet (NUV) emission, we show that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Halpha is 15% " 35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Halpha emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our

  19. Massive Open Online Courses in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Ira; Klaas, Brian; Yager, James D.; Kanchanaraksa, Sukon

    2013-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) represent a new and potentially transformative model for providing educational opportunities to learners not enrolled in a formal educational program. The authors describe the experience of developing and offering eight MOOCs on a variety of public health topics. Existing institutional infrastructure and experience with both for-credit online education and open educational resources mitigated the institutional risk and resource requirements. Although learners are able to enroll easily and freely and do so in large numbers, there is considerable variety in the level of participation and engagement among enrollees. As a result, comprehensive and accurate assessment of meaningful learning progress remains a major challenge for evaluating the effectiveness of MOOCs for providing public health education. PMID:24350228

  20. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    PubMed

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  1. Mirage simulations of the massiv sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, P.; Perret, V.; Epinat, B.; Bournaud, F.; Contini, T.; Divoy, C.; Garilli, B.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Moultaka, J.; Pairo, L.; Perez-Montero, E.; Queyrel, J.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.

    2015-02-01

    The MIRAGE sample (Merging & isolated high-redshift AMR galaxies; Perret 2014, PhD dissertation; Perret et al. 2014, AA 562, 1) has been built in order to understand the contribution of the merger processes to the mass assembly in the MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS, Contini et al. 2012, AA 539, 91) sample. It consists of a sample of idealized simulations based on the RAMSES code; the initial conditions were designed to reproduce the physical properties of the most gas-rich young galaxies. The sample is composed of 20 simulations of mergers exploring the initial parameters of mass and orientation of the disks with a spatial resolution reaching 7 parsecs.

  2. Hot, Massive Stars in I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, D.; Malumuth, E.

    2011-01-01

    I Zw 18 is one of the most primitive blue, compact dwarf galaxies. The ionized gas in I Zw 18 has a low oxygen abundance (O approx.1/30 Osun) and nitrogen abundance (N-1/100 Nsun) (Pequignot 2008). We have obtained a far-UV spectrum of the northwest massive star cluster of I Zw 18 using Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). The spectrum is compatible with continuous star-formation over the past approx.10 Myr, and a very low metallicity, log Z/Zsun 1.7, although the stellar surface may be enhanced in carbon. Stellar wind lines are very weak, and the edge velocity of wind lines is very low (approx.250 km/s).

  3. Mobil AG scores with massive frac

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    Mobil Oil AG, West Germany, added 20 bcf of natural gas to the field reserves and improved well productivity five-fold through a massive fracture of the Mainsand section of the Upper Rotliegendes formation in Soehlingen field. The frac job was the largest ever in Europe and is felt to be the world's largest in terms of sintered bauxite used. The fracture treatment also showed that it is possible to put 9,000 lb/min of bauxite into a hydraulically formed fracture. This is believed to be a record rate for this high-strength proppant. Mobil engineers feel, however, that Ottawa sand could probably be used, and they may try it if another opportunity presents itself.

  4. Four-dimensional unsubtraction with massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sborlini, Germán F. R.; Driencourt-Mangin, Félix; Rodrigo, Germán

    2016-10-01

    We extend the four-dimensional unsubtraction method, which is based on the loop-tree duality (LTD), to deal with processes involving heavy particles. The method allows to perform the summation over degenerate IR configurations directly at integrand level in such a way that NLO corrections can be implemented directly in four space-time dimensions. We define a general momentum mapping between the real and virtual kinematics that accounts properly for the quasi-collinear configurations, and leads to an smooth massless limit. We illustrate the method first with a scalar toy example, and then analyse the case of the decay of a scalar or vector boson into a pair of massive quarks. The results presented in this paper are suitable for the application of the method to any multipartonic process.

  5. Effect of massive disks on bulge isophotes

    SciTech Connect

    Monet, D.G.; Richstone, D.O.; Schechter, P.L.

    1981-04-15

    Massive disks produce flattened equipotentials. Unless the stars in a galaxy bulge are preferentially hotter in the z direction than in the plane, the isophotes will be at least as flat as the equipotentials. The comparison of two galaxy models having flat rotation curves with the available surface photometry for five external galaxies does not restrict the mass fraction which might reside in the disk. However, star counts in our own Galaxy indicate that unless the disk terminates close to the solar circle, no more than half the mass within that circle lies in the disk. The remaining half must lie either in the bulge or, more probably, in a third dark, round, dynamically distinct component.

  6. Massive neutrinos and invisible axion minimally connected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Stefano; Di Luzio, Luca; Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We survey a few minimal scalar extensions of the standard electroweak model that provide a simple setup for massive neutrinos in connection with an invisible axion. The presence of a chiral U (1 ) à la Peccei-Quinn drives the pattern of Majorana neutrino masses while providing a dynamical solution to the strong C P problem and an axion as a dark matter candidate. We paradigmatically apply such a renormalizable framework to type-II seesaw and to two viable models for neutrino oscillations where the neutrino masses arise at one and two loops, respectively. We comment on the naturalness of the effective setups as well as on their implications for vacuum stability and electroweak baryogenesis.

  7. Energetic Supernovae of Very Massive Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan

    2015-08-01

    Current models of the formation of the first stars in the universe suggest that these stars were very massive, having a typical mass scale of hundreds of solar masses. Some of them would die as pair instability supernovae (PSNe) which might be the biggest explosions of the universe. We present the results from multidimensional numerical studies of PSNe with a new radiation-hydrodynamics code, CASTRO and with realistic nuclear reaction networks. We simulate the fluid instabilities that occur in multiple spatial dimensions and discuss how the resulting mixing affects the explosion, mixing, and nucleosynthesis of these supernovae. Our simulations provide useful predictions for the observational signatures of PSNe, which might soon be examined by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  8. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    SciTech Connect

    He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi

    2011-03-15

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  9. Neutrinos and the Deaths of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. R.; Mezzacappa, A.; Messer, O. E. B.

    2005-06-01

    Observationally categorized as Type II or Ib/c supernovae, core collapse supernovae mark the end of the life of a massive star and the formation of a neutron star or black hole. These explosions are among the most energetic events in the universe, emitting 1046 J of energy, primarily in the form of neutrinos. They play a preeminent role in the cosmic origin of the elements and serve as a principal heating mechanism for the interstellar medium. Numerical simulations of the textbook neutrino-reheating mechanism for core collapse supernovae frequently fail to match the most fundamental observable property: an explosion with roughly 1044 J of kinetic energy. We review recent improvements in the modeling of core collapse supernovae, including improved tracking of the neutrino distribution and better accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the hydrodynamic flows. We also discuss how continued improvements in the treatment of microscopic nuclear and neutrino physics has important macroscopic consequences.

  10. [An unusual case of massive funicular lipoma].

    PubMed

    Masciovecchio, Stefano; Saldutto, Pietro; Del Rosso, Alessandro; Galatioto, Giuseppe Paradiso; Vicentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Intrascrotal lipomas are benign diseases that originate from adipose tissue inside the scrotal sac or constituting the scrotal wall itself. Paratesticular spermatic cord lipomas are a rare type of intrascrotal lipomas. A 78 years old patient in good health comes to our attention for massive tense-elastic swelling of left hemiscrotum appeared about 3 years ago and slowly increasing. Ultrasound evaluation of the intrascrotal mass showed inhomogeneous images mainly hyperechoic, not infiltrating the ipsilateral testis and scrotal wall. The ultrasonography found a lipomatous lesion with benign characteristics and a surgical excision has been performed. The lipomatous mass removed presented a size equal to 25 cm x 14 cm x 11 cm and a weight of about 490 gr. The microscopic examination of the tissue showed only the presence of mature adipocytes in the absence of cellular atypia, of other cellular types and of vascular abnormalities.

  11. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  12. Massive = 2 supergravity in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaç, Gökhan; Basanisi, Luca; Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Ozkan, Mehmet; Sezgin, Ergin

    2015-02-01

    There exists two distinct off-shell = 2 supergravities in three dimensions. They are also referred to as = (1, 1) and = (2, 0) supergravities, and they arise from the coupling of the Weyl multiplet to a compensating scalar or vector multiplet, respectively, followed by fixing of conformal symmetries. The = ( p, q) terminology refers to the underlying anti-de Sitter superalgebras OSp(2, p) ⊕ OSp(2, q) with R-symmetry group SO( p) × SO( q). We construct off-shell invariants of these theories up to fourth order in derivatives. As an application of these results, we determine the special combinations of the = (1, 1) invariants that admit anti-de Sitter vacuum solution about which there is a ghost-free massive spin-2 multiplet of propagating modes. We also show that the =(2,0) invariants do not allow such possibility.

  13. A nanofluidic system for massively parallel PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin; Morrison, Tom; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2008-02-01

    Massively parallel nanofluidic systems are lab-on-a-chip devices where solution phase biochemical and biological analyses are implemented in high density arrays of nanoliter holes micro-machined in a thin platen. Polymer coatings make the interior surfaces of the holes hydrophilic and the exterior surface of the platen hydrophobic for precise and accurate self-metered loading of liquids into each hole without cross-contamination. We have created a "nanoplate" based on this concept, equivalent in performance to standard microtiter plates, having 3072 thirty-three nanoliter holes in a stainless steel platen the dimensions of a microscope slide. We report on the performance of this device for PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping or quantitative measurement of gene expression by real-time PCR in applications ranging from plant and animal diagnostics, agricultural genetics and human disease research.

  14. Plasma simulation using the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Thring, A. L.; Koga, J.; Janetzke, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Two dimensional electrostatic simulation codes using the particle-in-cell model are developed on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). The conventional plasma simulation procedure that computes electric fields at particle positions by means of a gridded system is found inefficient on the MPP. The MPP simulation code is thus based on the gridless system in which particles are assigned to processing elements and electric fields are computed directly via Discrete Fourier Transform. Currently, the gridless model on the MPP in two dimensions is about nine times slower that the gridded system on the CRAY X-MP without considering I/O time. However, the gridless system on the MPP can be improved by incorporating a faster I/O between the staging memory and Array Unit and a more efficient procedure for taking floating point sums over processing elements. The initial results suggest that the parallel processors have the potential for performing large scale plasma simulations.

  15. Compton scattering vertex for massive scalar QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.; Delbourgo, R.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.

    2009-08-15

    We investigate the Compton scattering vertex of charged scalars and photons in scalar quantum electrodynamics (SQED). We carry out its nonperturbative construction consistent with Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identity which relates 3-point vertices to the 4-point ones. There is an undetermined part which is transverse to one or both the external photons, and needs to be evaluated through perturbation theory. We present in detail how the transverse part at the 1-loop order can be evaluated for completely general kinematics of momenta involved in covariant gauges and dimensions. This involves the calculation of genuine 4-point functions with three massive propagators, the most nontrivial integrals reported in this paper. We also discuss possible applications of our results.

  16. Aerodynamic simulation on massively parallel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeuser, Jochem; Simon, Horst D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly addresses the computational requirements for the analysis of complete configurations of aircraft and spacecraft currently under design to be used for advanced transportation in commercial applications as well as in space flight. The discussion clearly shows that massively parallel systems are the only alternative which is both cost effective and on the other hand can provide the necessary TeraFlops, needed to satisfy the narrow design margins of modern vehicles. It is assumed that the solution of the governing physical equations, i.e., the Navier-Stokes equations which may be complemented by chemistry and turbulence models, is done on multiblock grids. This technique is situated between the fully structured approach of classical boundary fitted grids and the fully unstructured tetrahedra grids. A fully structured grid best represents the flow physics, while the unstructured grid gives best geometrical flexibility. The multiblock grid employed is structured within a block, but completely unstructured on the block level. While a completely unstructured grid is not straightforward to parallelize, the above mentioned multiblock grid is inherently parallel, in particular for multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) machines. In this paper guidelines are provided for setting up or modifying an existing sequential code so that a direct parallelization on a massively parallel system is possible. Results are presented for three parallel systems, namely the Intel hypercube, the Ncube hypercube, and the FPS 500 system. Some preliminary results for an 8K CM2 machine will also be mentioned. The code run is the two dimensional grid generation module of Grid, which is a general two dimensional and three dimensional grid generation code for complex geometries. A system of nonlinear Poisson equations is solved. This code is also a good testcase for complex fluid dynamics codes, since the same datastructures are used. All systems provided good speedups, but

  17. Linear stability of magnetized massive protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2014-07-20

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) and gravitational instability (GI) are the two principle routes to turbulent angular momentum transport in accretion disks. Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) may develop both. This paper aims to reinvigorate interest in the study of magnetized massive PPDs, starting from the basic issue of stability. The local linear stability of a self-gravitating, uniformly magnetized, differentially rotating, three-dimensional stratified disk subject to axisymmetric perturbations is calculated numerically. The formulation includes resistivity. It is found that the reduction in the disk thickness by self-gravity (SG) can decrease MRI growth rates; the MRI becomes global in the vertical direction, and MRI modes with small radial length scales are stabilized. The maximum vertical field strength that permits the MRI in a strongly self-gravitating polytropic disk with polytropic index Γ = 1 is estimated to be B{sub z,max}≃c{sub s0}Ω√(μ{sub 0}/16πG), where c{sub s0} is the midplane sound speed and Ω is the local angular velocity. In massive disks with layered resistivity, the MRI is not well localized to regions where the Elsasser number exceeds unity. For MRI modes with radial length scales on the order of the disk thickness, SG can enhance density perturbations, an effect that becomes significant in the presence of a strong toroidal field, and which depends on the symmetry of the underlying MRI mode. In gravitationally unstable disks where GI and MRI growth rates are comparable, the character of unstable modes can transition smoothly between MRI and GI. Implications for nonlinear simulations are discussed briefly.

  18. MASSIVE INFANT STARS ROCK THEIR CRADLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Extremely intense radiation from newly born, ultra-bright stars has blown a glowing spherical bubble in the nebula N83B, also known as NGC 1748. A new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image has helped to decipher the complex interplay of gas and radiation of a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy. The image graphically illustrates just how these massive stars sculpt their environment by generating powerful winds that alter the shape of the parent gaseous nebula. These processes are also seen in our Milky Way in regions like the Orion Nebula. The Hubble telescope is famous for its contribution to our knowledge about star formation in very distant galaxies. Although most of the stars in the Universe were born several billions of years ago, when the Universe was young, star formation still continues today. This new Hubble image shows a very compact star-forming region in a small part of one of our neighboring galaxies - the Large Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy lies only 165,000 light-years from our Milky Way and can easily be seen with the naked eye from the Southern Hemisphere. Young, massive, ultra-bright stars are seen here just as they are born and emerge from the shelter of their pre-natal molecular cloud. Catching these hefty stars at their birthplace is not as easy as it may seem. Their high mass means that the young stars evolve very rapidly and are hard to find at this critical stage. Furthermore, they spend a good fraction of their youth hidden from view, shrouded by large quantities of dust in a molecular cloud. The only chance is to observe them just as they start to emerge from their cocoon - and then only with very high-resolution telescopes. Astronomers from France, the U.S., and Germany have used Hubble to study the fascinating interplay between gas, dust, and radiation from the newly born stars in this nebula. Its peculiar and turbulent structure has been revealed for the first time. This high-resolution study has also uncovered several individual stars

  19. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger.

  20. The influence of feedback from massive stars on the formation and emergence of massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.

    2017-03-01

    Massive star clusters are of fundamental importance both observationally, since they are visible at such great distances, and theoretically, because of their influence on the large-scale ISM. Understanding stellar feedback is a prerequisite for making sense of their formation and early evolution, since feedback influences cluster structure, star formation efficiency, and sets the timescales on which clusters emerge from their parent clouds to become optically visible. I review the progress made in understanding these issues from a numerical perspective.

  1. A MASSIVE PROTOSTAR FORMING BY ORDERED COLLAPSE OF A DENSE, MASSIVE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Telesco, Charles; De Buizer, James M.; Sandell, Goeran; Shuping, Ralph; Beltran, Maria T.; Churchwell, Ed; Whitney, Barbara; McKee, Christopher F.; Staff, Jan E.

    2013-04-10

    We present 30 and 40 {mu}m imaging of the massive protostar G35.20-0.74 with SOFIA-FORCAST. The high surface density of the natal core around the protostar leads to high extinction, even at these relatively long wavelengths, causing the observed flux to be dominated by that emerging from the near-facing outflow cavity. However, emission from the far-facing cavity is still clearly detected. We combine these results with fluxes from the near-infrared to mm to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED). For isotropic emission the bolometric luminosity would be 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }. We perform radiative transfer modeling of a protostar forming by ordered, symmetric collapse from a massive core bounded by a clump with high-mass surface density, {Sigma}{sub cl}. To fit the SED requires protostellar masses {approx}20-34 M{sub Sun} depending on the outflow cavity opening angle (35 Degree-Sign -50 Degree-Sign ), and {Sigma}{sub cl} {approx} 0.4-1 g cm{sup -2}. After accounting for the foreground extinction and the flashlight effect, the true bolometric luminosity is {approx}(0.7-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }. One of these models also has excellent agreement with the observed intensity profiles along the outflow axis at 10, 18, 31, and 37 {mu}m. Overall our results support a model of massive star formation involving the relatively ordered, symmetric collapse of a massive, dense core and the launching bipolar outflows that clear low-density cavities. Thus a unified model may apply for the formation of both low- and high-mass stars.

  2. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - II. Disruption of bound clusters by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O-type stars on star-forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to Ekin/|Epot|= 0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (106 M⊙) clouds prevent the H II regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower density 104 and 105 M⊙ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of per cent of the neutral gas in the 3-Myr time-scale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.

  3. Caecal perforation from TB and the Law of Laplace

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amad N.; Khalid, Salema; Chaudhry, Mohammad Naushad; Ho, Cherrie

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented to the hospital with haemoptysis. When worked up, his history and examination were highly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). He subsequently developed a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed and underwent an emergency laparotomy, which revealed a massively dilated caecum measuring ∼20 cm in diameter. The caecum had perforated due to acute decompensation of intestinal TB. Though common in developing countries, TB is rare in the UK, especially the intestinal kind. The most striking feature of this case is, however, the size of the caecal distension caused by the tubercular inflammation and subsequent perforation—something unheard of in the literature. This massive caecal distention would be explained by the Law of Laplace. In conclusion, massive distension and caecal perforation are possible consequences of intestinal TB, especially in the 48–72 h immediately after starting anti-tubercular therapy. PMID:25972412

  4. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  5. Biological tests of lead absorption following a brief massive exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.K.

    1984-07-01

    A contractor's man suffered a brief, massive exposure to lead fume by contaminating and then smoking hand-rolled cigarettes. His blood lead concentration rose very rapidly to very high levels, but zinc erythrocyte protoporphyrin, urinary lead, and urinary coproporphyrin did not. It is possible that only the blood lead concentration is of value in detecting brief massive exposure.

  6. Inverse relationship between cirrhosis and massive tumours in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Ayo, Diego; Lobach, Iryna; Xu, Ruliang; Newman, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Background A subset of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) present with massive tumours. It is unknown why certain patients develop these massive tumours, and whether this presentation is specific to the underlying viral aetiology or patient demographics such as gender, race and age. Methods All patients with HCC at Bellevue Hospital Center, New York from 1998 to 2012 were identified and relevant demographic and clinical information was collected. Computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) images were reviewed and the maximal tumour diameter on axial sections was recorded. Cirrhosis was defined histologically or by radiographical criteria. The two cohorts of massive and non-massive HCC were compared. Results A total of 361 patients with HCC were identified, of which 58 were categorized as having a massive HCC using a 13 cm size cut-off. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association of massive HCC with age <40 years; hepatitis B or Asian ethnicity; and a lack of cirrhosis or platelet count >100. Discussion Massive HCC represents a tumour subtype that is associated with young, chronic hepatitis B carriers with non-cirrhotic livers. The clinical implications of this finding are that patients with massive HCC are typically excellent resection candidates barring the presence of gross vascular invasion or distant metastases. PMID:23043662

  7. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  8. The nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M. F.; Maeder, A.; Meynet, G.

    We discuss how the nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars can be employed as a quality indicator for model atmosphere analyses and for the derivation of tight observational constraints for developing a better understanding of the evolution of rotating massive stars.

  9. The nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda; Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges

    2015-08-01

    We discuss how the nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars can be employed as a quality indicator for model atmosphere analyses and for the derivation of tight observational constraints for developing a better understanding of the evolution of rotating massive stars.

  10. Analysis of Massively Separated Flows of Aircraft Using Detached Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Scott

    2002-08-01

    An important class of turbulent flows of aerodynamic interest are those characterized by massive separation, e.g., the flow around an aircraft at high angle of attack. Numerical simulation is an important tool for analysis, though traditional models used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations appear unable to accurately account for the time-dependent and three-dimensional motions governing flows with massive separation. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is able to resolve these unsteady three-dimensional motions, yet is cost prohibitive for high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows due to the need to resolve the small scale motions in the boundary layer. Spalart et. al. proposed a hybrid technique, Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES), which takes advantage of the often adequate performance of RANS turbulence models in the "thin," typically attached regions of the flow. In the separated regions of the flow the technique becomes a Large Eddy Simulation, directly resolving the time-dependent and unsteady features that dominate regions of massive separation. The current work applies DES to a 70 degree sweep delta wing at 27 degrees angle of attack, a geometrically simple yet challenging flowfield that exhibits the unsteady three-dimensional massively separated phenomena of vortex breakdown. After detailed examination of this basic flowfield, the method is demonstrated on three full aircraft of interest characterized by massive separation, the F-16 at 45 degrees angle of attack, the F-15 at 65 degree angle of attack (with comparison to flight test), and the C-130 in a parachute drop condition at near stall speed with cargo doors open.

  11. Parrotfish predation on massive Porites on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    Parrotfish grazing scars on coral colonies were quantified across four reef zones at Lizard Island, Northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The abundance of parrotfish grazing scars was highest on reef flat and crest, with massive Porites spp . colonies having more parrotfish grazing scars than all other coral species combined. Massive Porites was the only coral type positively selected for grazing by parrotfishes in all four reef zones. The density of parrotfish grazing scars on massive Porites spp., and the rate of new scar formation, was highest on the reef crest and flat, reflecting the lower massive Porites cover and higher parrotfish abundance in these habitats. Overall, it appears that parrotfish predation pressure on corals could affect the abundance of preferred coral species, especially massive Porites spp , across the reef gradient. Parrotfish predation on corals may have a more important role on the GBR reefs than previously thought.

  12. Evolutionary Connections Between RSGs and Other Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Red supergiants are an important mass-loss phase near the end of a massive star's life, but there are many other evolved mass-losing stars that populate the HR Diagram, and not all massive stars will pass through a red supergiant phase. This talk will provide an overview of other types of massive stars and how they relate to red supergiants. Mass loss by red supergiant winds will be weighed against the mass loss of other massive stars in terms of their contribution to pre-supernova evolution, focussing on trends with initial mass and metallicity. Moreover, some other evolved massive stars have already been RSG or will be in the future, and circumstellar material is an important clue in this regard. Last, the diversity of different supernova explosions, their circumstellar material, and statistics of SN types provide important constraints on the role of RSGs in the latest phases of evolution and mass loss.

  13. Fragmentation of Molecular Clumps and Formation of Massive Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    Massive protostars are born in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the formation of a cluster of stellar objects. The interplay among gravity, turbulence and magnetic fields affects the outcome of fragmentation. The physical condition (temperature and density) in molecular clumps limits the Jeans mass to about 1 Msun. This creates a theoretical puzzle for massive star formation since dense cores much larger than 1 Msun tend to further fragment into lower mass entities. In this talk, I will present recent high resolution observations of massive molecular clumps at very early evolutionary stages. I will discuss fragmentation, physical and chemical evolution of molecular coresand the implication of these findings to current theoretical ideas of massive star and cluster formation. I will also present measurements of dust polarization of a large sample of massive molecular clumps, which suggest that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse of molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores.

  14. VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, José M.; Gómez, José F.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Curiel, Salvador; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert

    2012-07-01

    VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations are a powerful tool to study the gas very close to the central engine responsible for the phenomena associated with the early evolution of massive protostars. In this paper we present a summary of the main observational results obtained toward the massive star-forming regions of Cepheus A and W75N. These observations revealed unexpected phenomena in the earliest stages of evolution of massive objects (e.g., non-collimated ``short-lived'' pulsed ejections in different massive protostars), and provided new insights in the study of the dynamic scenario of the formation of high-mass stars (e.g., simultaneous presence of a jet and wide-angle outflow in the massive object Cep A HW2, similar to what is observed in low-mass protostars). In addition, with these observations it has been possible to identify new, previously unseen centers of high-mass star formation through outflow activity.

  15. Massive gravitons as dark matter and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    We consider the possibility that the massive graviton is a viable candidate for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity. We first derive the energy-momentum tensor of the massive graviton and show that it indeed behaves as that of dark matter fluid. We then discuss a production mechanism and the present abundance of massive gravitons as dark matter. Since the metric to which ordinary matter fields couple is a linear combination of the two mass eigenstates of bigravity, production of massive gravitons, i.e., the dark matter particles, is inevitably accompanied by generation of massless gravitons, i.e., the gravitational waves. Therefore, in this scenario some information about dark matter in our Universe is encoded in gravitational waves. For instance, if LIGO detects gravitational waves generated by the preheating after inflation, then the massive graviton with the mass of ˜0.01 GeV is a candidate for dark matter.

  16. First Circumstellar Disk around a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    Observations with an infrared-sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla have for the first time shown the presence of a disk around a hot and massive star, known as G339.88-1.26 . Until now, disks have only been found around less massive stars. Planets are formed in such disks. The new discovery may thus have important implications for our understanding of the formation of planetary systems around stars. TIMMI observations Observations at mid-infrared wavelengths were carried out in July 1997 by Bringfried Stecklum (Landessternwarte Thüringen, Tautenburg, Germany) and Hans-Ulrich Käufl (ESO), using the TIMMI instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. Additional measurements were carried out in March 1998. TIMMI ( T hermal I nfrared M ulti M ode I nstrument) is a general-purpose camera spectrometer operating at a wavelength of 10 µm. To reach sufficient sensitivity, the camera must be cooled to approx. -260 o C, i.e. a few degrees above the absolute minimum, by use of liquid Helium. Astronomical objects whose temperatures are between -120 o C and 300 o C radiate most of their energy at this wavelength. In addition, dust and haze that are absolutely impenetrable for light visible to the human eye, are often found to be nearly transparent at this wavelength. This is why fire-fighters now use similar equipment to look through smoke. G339.88-1.26: A very special object ESO PR Photo 22a/98 ESO PR Photo 22a/98 [JPEG, 800k] This image is a true-color composite of near-infrared observations of the sky region around the radio source G339.88-1.26 with the ESO/MPI 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. In this image, the visible colors red, green and blue have been used to represent the infrared filters J, H and K (at 1.25, 1.63 and 2.2 µm wavelength, respectively). No object is visible at the position of the radio source, even at these near-infrared wavelengths. A dark band of absorbing dust is clearly visible, exactly at the position of the object (indicated by an

  17. Can gravitational microlensing be used to probe geometry of a massive black-hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Luka Č.; Jovanović, Predrag

    2007-04-01

    Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) Here we discuss the possibility to use gravitational microlensing in order to probe the geometry around a massive black hole. Taking into account that lensed quasars are emitting X-rays which come from the heart of these objects (around a massive black hole), we investigated the influence of microlensing on the shape of the X-ray continuum/Fe K-alpha line variability due to microlensing by stars from a foreground galaxy [1,2]. We considered an X-ray accretion disk in Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics that is microlensed by a straight-fold caustic and a magnification pattern [2]. We found that the changes in the shape of the X-ray continuum as well as Fe K-alpha line due to microlensing depend on assumed metrics. This shows that microlensing can be used to investigate an unresolved X-ray emitting region geometry around massive black holes. [1] Popović, L.Č., Mediavilla, E.G.; Jovanović, P., Muñoz, J.A. 2003 A& A...398..975P [2] Popović, L. Č., Jovanović, P., Mediavilla, E.; Zakharov, A. F.; Abajas, C.; Muñoz, J. A.; Chartas, G. 2005, ApJ (to be published in February 2006; astro-ph /0510271).

  18. Massive glosso-cervical arteriovenous malformation: The rationale for a challenging surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Raúl; Moreno-García, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Massive arterivenous malformations (AVM) in the cervico-facial area are rare but potentially life-threatening. Treatment protocols are not well-established. A 41-year old man presented large painless rubber-like mass within the entire neck, which also extended intraorally through the floor of the mouth, showing a slow growing pattern for 5 years. Angiography diagnosed it as cervicofacial AVM. Treatment approach consisted on the embolization of the right upper thyroid, lingual and facial arteries under intravenous sedation. Three days later, bilateral radical neck dissection and subtotal glossectomy was performed. A musculo-cutaneous pectoralis major pedicled flap was harvested to reconstruct the floor of the mouth. Treatment of massive AVMs in the cervico-facial area is challenging due to the associated disfigurement and frequent recurrence rate due to incomplete resection. Also, massive bleeding may be present despite pre-operative super-selective embolization. A new case is presented with focus on surgical treatment considerations. Key words:Arteriovenous malformation, high-flow vascular malformation, cervical region, tongue, surgical resection PMID:25593675

  19. Effects of simulated natural and massive resuspension on benthic oxygen, nutrient and dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in Loch Creran, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Tengberg, Anders; Andersson, Sara; Apler, Anna; Hall, Per O. J.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of repeated natural resuspension on benthic oxygen consumption and the effect of natural and massive resuspension on oxygen consumption and fluxes of phosphate, silicate, ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were studied at two stations (S1 and S2) in a Scottish sea loch. Station S11 had organically enriched sediment and station S1 had lower organic content in the sediment. The fluxes were measured in situ using the Göteborg benthic lander. Natural resuspension, simulating resuspension events due to strong wind, waves or currents, and massive resuspension, simulating resuspension due to e.g. trawling or dredging, were created inside the incubation chambers by regulating the stirring of the incubated overlying water or by retracting and shaking the incubated sediment. Natural resuspension showed clear effects on the oxygen consumption at station S11, where it increased with an average of 12.8 (standard error (s.e.) 0.17) and 7.7 (s.e. 0.12) mmol m- 2 d- 1 during the first and second incubations, respectively. At station S1 there was no clear effect of natural resuspension on the oxygen consumption. Massive resuspension increased the oxygen consumption on S1 with an average of 608 (standard deviation (sd) 366) mmol m- 2 d- 1 and on S11 with an average of 2396 (sd 2265) mmol m- 2 d- 1. The fluxes of ammonium, phosphate and silicate were affected by the massive resuspension in 50, 14 and 33% of the chambers, respectively, on station S11. However, in the majority of the cases there were no effects on the nutrient and DIC fluxes of massive resuspension. The absolute concentrations of DIC, ammonium and silicate did however instantly increase with an average of 419 (sd 297), 48 (sd 27) and 6.9 (sd 3.7) μM, respectively, at S11 upon massive resuspension. The concentrations of phosphate decreased instantly with an average of 0.2 (sd 0.1) μM. On station S1 there were effects only on the ammonium and silicate concentrations, which increased with 0.8 (sd

  20. Massive deformations of rank-2 symmetric tensor theory (a.k.a. BRS characterization of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Alberto; Maggiore, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider the issue of massive gravity from a pure field theoretical point of view, as the massive deformation of the gauge theory for a symmetric rank-2 tensor field. We look for the most general massive theory with well defined propagators, imposing the absence of unphysical poles. We find several possibilities, depending on the choice of the gauge fixing term. Amongst these, two solutions with good massless limit are found. The request of the absence of tachyons, alone, does not isolate the Fierz-Pauli case: several examples of massive theories, which may or may not include the Fierz-Pauli mass term, are given. On the other hand, the Fierz-Pauli theory can be uniquely identified by means of a symmetry: it turns out the the Fierz-Pauli massive gravity is the only element of the cohomology of a BRS operator.

  1. Star formation at low rates - the impact of lacking massive stars on stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Recchi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Due to their low masses dwarf galaxies experience low star-formation rates resulting in stellar cluster masses insufficient to fill the initial mass function (IMF) to the uppermost mass. Numerical simulations usually do not account for the completeness of the IMF, but treat a filed IMF by numbers, masses, and stellar feedback by fractions. To ensure that only entire stars are formed, we consider an IMF filled from the lower-mass regime and truncated where at least one entire massive star is formed. By 3D simulations we investigate the effects of two possible IMFs on the evolution of dwarf galaxies: filled vs. truncated IMF. For the truncated IMF the star-formation self-regulation is suppressed, while the energy release by typeII supernovae is larger, both compared to the filled IMF. Moreover, the abundance ratios of particular elements yielded from massive and intermediate-mass stars differ significantly between the two IMF distributions.

  2. Pigmentation of massive corals as a simple bioindicator for marine water quality.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Timothy F; Fabricius, Katharina E

    2012-01-01

    Photo-acclimatisation by the algal endosymbionts of scleractinian corals to changes in environmental conditions may influence their density and/or the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, and hence coral brightness, on short time-scales. To examine coral pigmentation as a bioindicator of water quality, the brightness of massive corals was quantified using colour charts, concentrations of the pigment chlorophyll a and reflectance spectrometry in the field and with manipulative experiments. Along a water quality gradient, massive Porites became progressively lighter as nutrients decreased and irradiance increased. A laboratory experiment showed that Porites nubbins darkened within 25 days following exposure to reduced water quality. The results of a transplantation experiment of Porites nubbins in a manipulation incorporating multiple depths and zones of water quality confirmed colony brightness as a simple tool to monitor changes in marine water quality, provided effects due to other influences on pigmentation, e.g. seawater temperatures, are taken into consideration.

  3. Measuring Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of two massive black holes produces gravitational waves (GWs) which can be detected by the space-based detector LISA. By measuring these waves, LISA can determine the various parameters which characterize the source. Measurements of the black hole masses and spins will provide information about the growth of black holes and their host galaxies over time. Measurements of a source's sky position and distance may help astronomers identify an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW event. The counterpart's redshift, combined with the GW-measured luminosity distance, can then be used to measure the Hubble constant and the dark energy parameter $w$. Because the potential science output is so high, it is useful to know in advance how well LISA can measure source parameters for a wide range of binaries. We calculate expected parameter estimation errors using the well-known Fisher matrix method. Our waveform model includes the physics of spin precession, as well as subleading harmonics. When these higher-order effects are not included, strong degeneracies between some parameters cause them to be poorly determined by a GW measurement. When precession and subleading harmonics are properly included, the degeneracies are broken, reducing parameter errors by one to several orders of magnitude.

  4. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    2006-02-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=195). Improvements in detector technology will allow for the detection of companions missed before as well as systems which may have been closer than the resolution limit in 1994. We will also make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=108) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz- Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). Further, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 15 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars masses are presently known for only twelve pairs), and 56 multiple stars for a study of their co- planarity statistics.

  5. Speckle Interferometry of Massive and Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Hartkopf, William I.; Gies, Douglas R.; Henry, Todd J.; Torres, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Conducted on NOAO 4-m telescopes in 1994, the first speckle survey of O stars (Mason et al. 1998) had success far in excess of our expectations. In addition to the frequently cited multiplicity analysis, many of the new systems which were first resolved in this paper are of significant astrophysical importance. To date, this paper has resulted in 86 citations in the refereed literature. Now, some ten years after the original survey, we propose to re-investigate all systems analyzed before (N=98) as well as make a first high-resolution inspection of the additional O stars (N=62) in the recent Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz-Apellaniz & Walborn (2004). In addition, we propose to investigate several additional samples of interesting objects, including 10 accessible Galactic WR stars from the speckle survey of Hartkopf et al. (1999), 16 massive, hot stars with separations which would indicate their applicability for mass determinations (for fully detached O stars, we have only twelve mass determinations), 92 members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters to complement RV studies of these clusters, and 197 Hyades & Pleiades stars, reobserved from the 1991 lists (Mason et al. 1993a,b).

  6. Massive thyroxine intoxication: evaluation of plasma extraction.

    PubMed

    Binimelis, J; Bassas, L; Marruecos, L; Rodriguez, J; Domingo, M L; Madoz, P; Armengol, S; Mangues, M A; de Leiva, A

    1987-01-01

    Six patients were admitted after erroneous massive intake of levothyroxine (70-1200 mg over an interval of 2-12 days). All patients developed classical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis within 3 days of the first dose; five patients presented grade II-III coma and one became stuporous (days 7-10). Two patients developed left ventricular failure and three had arrhythmias (days 8-11). Total thyroid hormone levels in serum on admission ranged 935-7728 nmol/l for T4 (TT4) and 23-399 nmol/l for T3 (TT3). All patients received treatment with hydrocortisone and Propranolol. Propylthiouracil was also given in 3 cases. Extractive techniques (charcoal haemoperfusion and/or plasmapheresis) were initiated 8-14 days after the first dose of L-T4. The plasma disappearance rate (K) of TT4 with plasmapheresis was 30 times higher, on average, than under standard medical treatment (M). Also, K of TT4 under haemoperfusion was about five times higher than K under M. K changes for TT3 were higher under haemoperfusion than under plasmapheresis. Furthermore, extractive procedures shortened the average half life of TT4, (from 106.5 +/- 44.6 to 59.7 +/- 20.2 h, p less than 0.05).

  7. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking—threshold blocking—that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  8. MASSIVE HYBRID PARALLELISM FOR FULLY IMPLICIT MULTIPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Cody J. Permann; David Andrs; John W. Peterson; Derek R. Gaston

    2013-05-01

    As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided.

  9. Mass loss from very young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Th.

    The physics of mass loss from very young massive stars is reviewed, and mass-loss rates are determined for several objects on the basis of published observational data. The observational evidence for mass loss of 0.0001-0.001 solar mass/yr with velocity 10-60 km/s, dynamical timescale 1000-100,000 yr, and kinetic energy (1-100) x 10 to the 38th W from these objects is chracterized; techniques for estimating mass-loss rates from H recombination lines, CO line profiles maser data, and IR-continuum observations are described; rates for molecular outflows and ionized winds are presented in tabels; and theoretical models developed to explain the mechanism driving bipolar mass loss are examined critically. It is found that neither radiation pressure on dust grins nor the ionized winds can drive the molecular outflow. The models considered most probable are those involving production of holes by original spherical stellar winds (Canto, 1980, rotationally driven magnetic pressure (Draine, 1983), and infall from an accretion disk (Torbett, 1984).

  10. Population Models for Massive Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Wook; Joo, Seok-Joo; Han, Sang-Il; Na, Chongsam; Lim, Dongwook; Roh, Dong-Goo

    2015-03-01

    Increasing number of massive globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way are now turned out to host multiple stellar populations having different heavy element abundances enriched by supernovae. Recent observations have further shown that [CNO/Fe] is also enhanced in metal-rich subpopulations in most of these GCs, including ω Cen and M22 (Marino et al. 2011, 2012). In order to reflect this in our population modeling, we have expanded the parameter space of Y 2 isochrones and horizontal-branch (HB) evolutionary tracks to include the cases of normal and enhanced nitrogen abundances ([N/Fe] = 0.0, 0.8, and 1.6). The observed variations in the total CNO content were reproduced by interpolating these nitrogen enhanced stellar models. Our test simulations with varying N and O abundances show that, once the total CNO sum ([CNO/Fe]) is held constant, both N and O have almost identical effects on the HR diagram (see Fig. 1).

  11. Massive hybrid parallelism for fully implicit multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, D. R.; Permann, C. J.; Andrs, D.; Peterson, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided. (authors)

  12. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  13. Collective excitations of massive flavor branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itsios, Georgios; Jokela, Niko; Ramallo, Alfonso V.

    2016-08-01

    We study the intersections of two sets of D-branes of different dimensionalities. This configuration is dual to a supersymmetric gauge theory with flavor hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation of the gauge group which live on the defect of the unflavored theory determined by the directions common to the two types of branes. One set of branes is dual to the color degrees of freedom, while the other set adds flavor to the system. We work in the quenched approximation, i.e., where the flavor branes are considered as probes, and focus specifically on the case in which the quarks are massive. We study the thermodynamics and the speeds of first and zero sound at zero temperature and non-vanishing chemical potential. We show that the system undergoes a quantum phase transition when the chemical potential approaches its minimal value and we obtain the corresponding non-relativistic critical exponents that characterize its critical behavior. In the case of (2 + 1)-dimensional intersections, we further study alternative quantization and the zero sound of the resulting anyonic fluid. We finally extend these results to non-zero temperature and magnetic field and compute the diffusion constant in the hydrodynamic regime. The numerical results we find match the predictions by the Einstein relation.

  14. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

  15. Broadband monitoring simulation with massively parallel processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubetskov, Mikhail; Amotchkina, Tatiana; Tikhonravov, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Modern efficient optimization techniques, namely needle optimization and gradual evolution, enable one to design optical coatings of any type. Even more, these techniques allow obtaining multiple solutions with close spectral characteristics. It is important, therefore, to develop software tools that can allow one to choose a practically optimal solution from a wide variety of possible theoretical designs. A practically optimal solution provides the highest production yield when optical coating is manufactured. Computational manufacturing is a low-cost tool for choosing a practically optimal solution. The theory of probability predicts that reliable production yield estimations require many hundreds or even thousands of computational manufacturing experiments. As a result reliable estimation of the production yield may require too much computational time. The most time-consuming operation is calculation of the discrepancy function used by a broadband monitoring algorithm. This function is formed by a sum of terms over wavelength grid. These terms can be computed simultaneously in different threads of computations which opens great opportunities for parallelization of computations. Multi-core and multi-processor systems can provide accelerations up to several times. Additional potential for further acceleration of computations is connected with using Graphics Processing Units (GPU). A modern GPU consists of hundreds of massively parallel processors and is capable to perform floating-point operations efficiently.

  16. Relativistic entanglement of two massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friis, Nicolai; Bertlmann, Reinhold A.; Huber, Marcus; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2010-04-15

    We describe the spin and momentum degrees of freedom of a system of two massive spin-(1/2) particles as a four-qubit system. Then we explicitly show how the entanglement changes between different partitions of the qubits, when considered by different inertial observers. Although the two particle entanglement corresponding to a partition into Alice's and Bob's subsystems is, as often stated in the literature, invariant under Lorentz boosts, the entanglement with respect to other partitions of the Hilbert space on the other hand, is not. It certainly does depend on the chosen inertial frame and on the initial state considered. The change of entanglement arises, because a Lorentz boost on the momenta of the particles causes a Wigner rotation of the spin, which in certain cases entangles the spin with the momentum states. We systematically investigate the situation for different classes of initial spin states and different partitions of the four-qubit space. Furthermore, we study the behavior of Bell inequalities for different observers and demonstrate how the maximally possible degree of violation, using the Pauli-Lubanski spin observable, can be recovered by any inertial observer.

  17. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  18. Massive Fermi gas in the expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The behavior of a decoupled ideal Fermi gas in a homogeneously expanding three-dimensional volume is investigated, starting from an equilibrium spectrum. In case the gas is massless and/or completely degenerate, the spectrum of the gas can be described by an effective temperature and/or an effective chemical potential, both of which scale down with the volume expansion. In contrast, the spectrum of a decoupled massive and non-degenerate gas can only be described by an effective temperature if there are strong enough self-interactions such as to maintain an equilibrium distribution. Assuming perpetual equilibration, we study a decoupled gas which is relativistic at decoupling and then is red-shifted until it becomes non-relativistic. We find expressions for the effective temperature and effective chemical potential which allow us to calculate the final spectrum for arbitrary initial conditions. This calculation is enabled by a new expansion of the Fermi-Dirac integral, which is for our purpose superior to the well-known Sommerfeld expansion. We also compute the behavior of the phase space density under expansion and compare it to the case of real temperature and real chemical potential. Using our results for the degenerate case, we also obtain the mean relic velocity of the recently proposed non-thermal cosmic neutrino background.

  19. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers

    PubMed Central

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10762.001 PMID:26976813

  20. Massive neutral particles on heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Marco; Villanueva, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The motion of massive particles in the background of a charged black hole in heterotic string theory, which is characterized by a parameter α, is studied in detail in this paper. Since it is possible to write this space-time in the Einstein frame, we perform a quantitative analysis of the time-like geodesics by means of the standard Lagrange procedure. Thus, we obtain and solve a set of differential equations and then we describe the orbits in terms of the elliptic ℘-Weierstraß function. Also, by making an elementary derivation developed by Cornbleet (Am. J. Phys. 61(7):650-651, 1993) we obtain the correction to the angle of advance of perihelion to first order in α, and thus, by comparing with Mercury's data we give an estimation for the value of this parameter, which yields an heterotic solar charge Q ⊙≃0.728 [Km]=0.493 M ⊙. Therefore, in addition to the study on null geodesics performed by Fernando (Phys. Rev. D 85:024033, 2012), this work completes the geodesic structure for this class of space-time.

  1. Dark aspects of massive spinor electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive spinor electrodynamics when torsion is non-vanishing. A non-minimal interaction is introduced between the torsion and the vector field and the coupling constant between them plays an important role in subsequential cosmology. It is shown that the mass of the vector field and torsion conspire to generate dark energy and pressureless dark matter, and for generic values of the coupling constant, the theory effectively provides an interacting model between them with an additional energy density of the form ~ 1/a6. The evolution equations mimic ΛCDM behavior up to 1/a3 term and the additional term represents a deviation from ΛCDM. We show that the deviation is compatible with the observational data, if it is very small. We find that the non-minimal interaction is responsible for generating an effective cosmological constant which is directly proportional to the mass squared of the vector field and the mass of the photon within its current observational limit could be the source of the dark energy.

  2. Massive stars in their death throes.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, John J

    2008-12-13

    The study of the stars that explode as supernovae used to be a forensic study, working backwards from the remnants of the star. This changed in 1987 when the first progenitor star was identified in pre-explosion images. Currently, there are eight detected progenitors with another 21 non-detections, for which only a limit on the pre-explosion luminosity can be placed. This new avenue of supernova research has led to many interesting conclusions, most importantly that the progenitors of the most common supernovae, type IIP, are red supergiants, as theory has long predicted. However, no progenitors have been detected thus far for the hydrogen-free type Ib/c supernovae, which, given the expected progenitors, is an unlikely result. Also, observations have begun to show evidence that luminous blue variables, which are among the most massive stars, may directly explode as supernovae. These results contradict the current stellar evolution theory. This suggests that we may need to update our understanding.

  3. Massive production of nanoparticles via mist reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2009-06-01

    A novel conceptual nanoparticle fabrication method is proposed in this paper. It can be easily implemented for the preparation of micro or nanoparticles through a reaction between mists with different specific chemical compounds produced by ultrasonic atomization technology. Ultrasonic atomization is an established technology that easily atomizes liquid to produce very small droplets-in the orders of tens to hundreds of micrometers. The results reveal that metal oxide nanoparticles, such as iron oxide can be massively produced via reactions between metal chlorides and sodium carbonate in an experimental set-up based on physical and chemical principles. The density of the nanoparticle distribution is also investigated and determined to be dependent on the amount of mist reacted and the collection time. Moreover, since the vibrational frequency of ultrasound can be adjusted, we can control the size of micro-droplets of reactants, hence producing particles of different dimensions. Given that the double mist reaction method is easily controllable, environmentally friendly and extremely low in cost, it can potentially become a significant method for making micro/nano particles in the newly emerging field of nanofabrication and integration.

  4. A close encounter of the massive kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sana, H.; Barbá, R. H.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Gamen, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    We have used (i) Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopy, (ii) ground-based Precision Integrated-Optics Near-infrared Imaging ExpeRiment/Very Large Telescope long-baseline interferometry, and (iii) ground-based spectroscopy from different instruments to study the orbit of the extreme multiple system HD 93 129 Aa,Ab, which is composed of (at least) two very massive stars in a long-period orbit with e > 0.92, which will pass through periastron in 2017/2018. In several ways, the system is an η Car precursor. Around the time of periastron passage, the two very strong winds will collide and generate an outburst of non-thermal hard X-ray emission without precedent in an O+O binary since astronomers have been able to observe above Earth's atmosphere. A coordinated multiwavelength monitoring in the next two years will enable a breakthrough understanding of the wind interactions in such extreme close encounters. Furthermore, we have found evidence that HD 93 129 Aa may be a binary system itself. In that case, we could witness a three-body interaction which may yield a runaway star or a stellar collision close to or shortly after the periastron passage. Either of those outcomes would be unprecedented, as they are predicted to be low-frequency events in the Milky Way.

  5. A search for the most massive galaxies: double trouble?

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, R.K.; Nichol, R.C.; Miller, C.J.; Schlegel, D.; Frieman, J.; Schneider, D.P.; Subbarao, M.; York, D.G.; Brinkmann, J.; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-10-01

    We describe the results of a search for galaxies with large ({approx}> 350 kms{sup -1}) velocity dispersions. The largest systems we have found appear to be the extremes of the early-type galaxy population: compared to other galaxies with similar luminosities, they have the largest velocity dispersions and the smallest sizes. However, they are not distant outliers from the Fundamental Plane and mass-to-light scaling relations defined by the bulk of the early-type galaxy population. They may host the most massive black holes in the Universe, and their abundance and properties can be used to constrain galaxy formation models. Clear outliers from the scaling relations tend to be objects in superposition (angular separations smaller than 1 arcsec), evidence for which comes sometimes from the spectra, sometimes from the images, and sometimes from both. The statistical properties of the superposed pairs, e.g., the distribution of pair separations and velocity dispersions, can be used to provide useful information about the expected distribution of image multiplicities, separations and flux ratios due to gravitational lensing by multiple lenses, and may also constrain models of their interaction rates.

  6. Tracing the wind interface of the massive binary Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Krister

    2007-07-01

    The binarity of Eta Carinae has been debated for a long time, but most recent evidence favors a binary star interpretation. However, very little is known about the nature of the companion star. Over Eta Carinae's spectroscopic period many observable wind lines in the NUV/Optical region, have been shown to exhibit peculiar line profiles with unusual velocity shifts relative to the system velocity. Some of the lines are exclusively blue-shifted over the entire 5.54 yr cycle and their ionization/excitation imply formation in the interface between the two massive stars. Especially, the He I emission lines are mainly formed in the wind interface region. Since the wind momentum is much larger for the primary star than its companion, the wind interface is located fairly close to the companion. Consequently, by tracing the He I emission we can construct a radial velocity curve that will describe the motion of the companion star and will derive the relation between the masses of the binary system stars. Furthermore, we will measure velocity and intensity variations in H I and Fe II to further investigate the ionization/excitation structure throughout Eta Carinae's wind. The analysis of the central source of Eta Carinae, due to the closeness of the two stars in the binary system {30 AU} and the intervening matter in line-of-sight towards Eta Carinae, is extremely dependent on data obtained with high angular resolving power. The HST archival data is crucial for the continuance of this project.

  7. CORE CREATION IN GALAXIES AND HALOS VIA SINKING MASSIVE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Goerdt, Tobias; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Read, J. I.

    2010-12-20

    We perform a detailed investigation into the disruption of central cusps via the transfer of energy from sinking massive objects. Constant density inner regions form at the radius where the enclosed mass approximately matches the mass of the infalling body. We explore parameter space using numerical simulations and give an empirical relation for the size of the resulting core within structures that have different initial cusp slopes. We find that infalling bodies always stall at the edge of these newly formed cores, experiencing no dynamical friction over many dynamical times. As applications, we consider the resulting decrease in the dark matter annihilation flux due to centrally destroyed cusps, and we present a new theory for the formation of close binary nuclei-the 'stalled binary' model. We focus on one particularly interesting binary nucleus system, the dwarf spheroidal galaxy VCC 128 which is dark matter dominated at all radii. We show that its nuclei would rapidly coalesce within a few million years if it has a central dark matter cusp slope steeper than r {sup -1}. However, if its initial dark matter cusp is slightly shallower than a logslope of -0.75 at {approx}0.1% of the virial radius, then the sinking nuclei naturally create a core equal to their observed separation and stall. This is close to the logslope measured in a recent billion particle cold dark matter halo simulation.

  8. Observing Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J.; McWillimas, S.; Baker, J.; Arnaud, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is expected to detect gravitational radiation from the inspiral and merger of massive black hole binaries at high redshifts with large signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). These high-SNR observations will make it possible to extract physical parameters such as hole masses and spins, luminosity distance, and sky position from the observed waveforms. LISA'S effectiveness as a tool for astrophysics will be influenced by the precision with which these parameters can be measured. In addition, the practicality of coordinated observations with other instruments will be affected by the temporal evolution of parameter errors such as sky position. We present estimates of parameter errors for the special case of non-spinning black holes. Our focus is on the contribution of the late inspiral and merger portions of the waveform, a regime which typically dominates the SNR but has not been extensively studied due to the historic lack of a precise description of the waveform. Advances in numerical relativity have recently made such studies possible. Initial results suggest that the portion of the waveform beyond the Schwarzchild inner-most stable circular orbit can reduce parameter uncertainties by up to a factor of two.

  9. SUPERSONIC LINE BROADENING WITHIN YOUNG AND MASSIVE SUPER STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Wuensch, Richard; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Palous, Jan E-mail: richard@wunsch.c E-mail: cmt@ll.iac.e

    2010-01-10

    The origin of supersonic infrared and radio recombination nebular lines often detected in young and massive superstar clusters is discussed. We suggest that these arise from a collection of repressurizing shocks (RSs), acting effectively to re-establish pressure balance within the cluster volume and from the cluster wind which leads to an even broader although much weaker component. The supersonic lines here are shown to occur in clusters that undergo a bimodal hydrodynamic solution, that is within clusters that are above the threshold line in the mechanical luminosity or cluster mass versus the size of the cluster plane. A plethora of RSs is due to frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that take place within the matter reinserted by stellar winds and supernovae. We show that the maximum speed of the RSs and of the cluster wind are both functions of the temperature reached at the stagnation radius. This temperature depends only on the cluster heating efficiency (eta). Based on our two-dimensional simulations we calculate the line profiles that result from several models and confirm our analytical predictions. From a comparison between the predicted and observed values of the half-width zero intensity of the two line components, we conclude that the thermalization efficiency in young super star clusters above the threshold line must be lower than 20%.

  10. Herschel Hi-GAL imaging of massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, F. A.; Hoare, M. G.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Clay, S. J.; de Wit, W.-J.; Rafiq, I.; Pezzuto, S.; Molinari, S.

    2015-05-01

    We used Herschel Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey) data to determine whether massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) are resolved at 70 μm and to study their envelope density distribution. Our analysis of three relatively isolated sources in the l = 30° and 59° Galactic fields show that the objects are partially resolved at 70 μm. The Herschel Hi-GAL survey data have a high scan velocity which makes unresolved and partially resolved sources appear elongated in the 70 μm images. We analysed the two scan directions separately and examine the intensity profile perpendicular to the scan direction. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer models with a power-law density distribution were used to study the circumstellar matter distribution. Single dish submm data were also included to study how different spatial information affects the fitted density distribution. The density distribution which best fits both the 70 μm intensity profile and spectral energy distribution has an average index of ˜0.5. This index is shallower than expected and is probably due to the dust emission from bipolar outflow cavity walls not accounted for in the spherical models. We conclude that 2D axisymmetric models and Herschel images at low scan speeds are needed to better constrain the matter distribution around MYSOs.

  11. A DARK SPOT ON A MASSIVE WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alexandros; Curd, Brandon; Wisniewski, John P.; Bell, Keaton J.; Winget, D. E.; Winget, K. I.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.; Dufour, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    We present the serendipitous discovery of eclipse-like events around the massive white dwarf SDSS J152934.98+292801.9 (hereafter J1529+2928). We selected J1529+2928 for time-series photometry based on its spectroscopic temperature and surface gravity, which place it near the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Instead of pulsations, we detect photometric dips from this white dwarf every 38 minutes. Follow-up optical spectroscopy observations with Gemini reveal no significant radial velocity variations, ruling out stellar and brown dwarf companions. A disintegrating planet around this white dwarf cannot explain the observed light curves in different filters. Given the short period, the source of the photometric dips must be a dark spot that comes into view every 38 minutes due to the rotation of the white dwarf. Our optical spectroscopy does not show any evidence of Zeeman splitting of the Balmer lines, limiting the magnetic field strength to B < 70 kG. Since up to 15% of white dwarfs display kG magnetic fields, such eclipse-like events should be common around white dwarfs. We discuss the potential implications of this discovery on transient surveys targeting white dwarfs, like the K2 mission and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Topologically massive gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika; van Rees, Balt C.

    2009-09-01

    We set up the AdS/CFT correspondence for topologically massive gravity (TMG) in three dimensions. The first step in this procedure is to determine the appropriate fall off conditions at infinity. These cannot be fixed a priori as they depend on the bulk theory under consideration and are derived by solving asymptotically the non-linear field equations. We discuss in detail the asymptotic structure of the field equations for TMG, showing that it contains leading and subleading logarithms, determine the map between bulk fields and CFT operators, obtain the appropriate counterterms needed for holographic renormalization and compute holographically one- and two-point functions at and away from the ``chiral point'' (μ = 1). The 2-point functions at the chiral point are those of a logarithmic CFT (LCFT) with cL = 0,cR = 3l/GN and b = -3l/GN, where b is a parameter characterizing different c = 0 LCFTs. The bulk correlators away from the chiral point (μ ≠ 1) smoothly limit to the LCFT ones as μ → 1. Away from the chiral point, the CFT contains a state of negative norm and the expectation value of the energy momentum tensor in that state is also negative, reflecting a corresponding bulk instability due to negative energy modes.

  13. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  14. Do you know the extinction in your young massive cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Sabbi, Elena; HTTP Team

    2015-08-01

    Up to ages of a few 100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust from their primordial cocoons. This causes considerable and uneven levels of extinction across the cluster that we must understand and measure if we want to extract any physically meaningful parameters, from basic luminosities and effective temperatures to masses and ages. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law and the absolute value of the extinction in a uniform way across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC). Since these stars share very similar physical properties, they allow us to derive the absolute extinction in a straightforward and reliable way. In the Magellanic Clouds, with about 20 RC stars arcmin-2 or ~150 objects in a typical HST pointing, we can easily derive a solid and self-consistent absolute extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry, with no need for spectroscopy.I will show an application of this method to the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project's observations of the Tarantula nebula, containing the massive R136 cluster. We have measured the absolute extinction towards about 3600 objects and the extinction law in the range 0.3 - 1.6 μm. At optical wavelengths, the extinction curve is almost parallel to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), but the value of RV = AV/E(B-V) = 4.5 ± 0.2 that we measure indicates that in the optical there is an extra grey component due to a larger fraction of large grains. Using the RV = 3.1 value typical of the diffuse Galactic ISM would severely underestimate the luminosities and masses and overestimate the ages of the stars in the cluster. At wavelengths longer than ~ 1 μm, the contribution of this additional component tapers off as λ-1.5, like in the Milky Way, suggesting that the nature of the grains is otherwise similar to those in our Galaxy, but with a ~ 2 times higher

  15. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Popolo, A. Del

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003–0.03r{sub 200}, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = −0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = −0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5–10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, R{sub e}, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius r{sub core}, and R{sub e}. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and R{sub e} is due to the fact that in order to have a total

  16. Optimization of massive countermeasure design in complex rockfall settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall protection is a major need in areas impended by subvertical rockwalls with complex 3D morphology and little or no talus to provide natural rockfall attenuation. The design of massive embankments, usually required to ensure such protection, is particularly difficult in complex rockfall settings, due to: widespread occurrence of rockfall sources; difficult characterization of size distribution and location of unstable volumes; variability of failure mechanisms; spatial scattering of rockfall trajectories; high expected kinetic energies. Moreover, rockwalls in complex lithological and structural settings are often prone to mass falls related to rock mass sector collapses. All these issues may hamper a safe application of classic embankment analysis approaches, using empirical rules or 2D-based height/energy statistics, and point to the need of integrated analyses of rock slope instability and rockfall runout in 3D. We explore the potential of combining advanced rock mass characterisation techniques and 3D rockfall modelling to support challenging countermeasure design at a site near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy). Here subvertical cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow (< 150 m) strip of flat land along the Como Lake shore. Rock is thickly bedded limestone (Dolomia Principale Fm) involved in a ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale anticline fold. The spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity is strongly controlled by the geological structure, with individual block sizes varying in the range 0.2-15 m3. This results in spatially variable rockfall susceptibility and mechanisms, from single block falls to mass falls. Several rockfall events occurred between 1981 and 2010 motivated the design of slope benching and a massive embankment. To support reliable design verification and optimization we performed a 3D assessment of both rock slope instability and rockfall runout. We characterised fracture patterns and rock mass quality associated

  17. Spin-up of massive classical bulges during secular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kanak; Gerhard, Ortwin; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2016-04-01

    Context. Classical bulges in spiral galaxies are known to rotate, but the origin of this observed rotational motion is not well understood. It has been shown recently that a low-mass classical bulge (ClB) in a barred galaxy can acquire rotation by absorbing a significant fraction of the angular momentum emitted by the bar. Aims: Our aim here is to investigate whether bars can also spin up more massive ClBs during the secular evolution of the bar, and to study the kinematics and dynamics of these ClBs. Methods: We use a set of self-consistent N-body simulations to study the interaction of ClBs with a bar that forms self-consistently in the disk. We use orbital spectral analysis to investigate the angular momentum gain by the classical bulge stars. Results: We show that the ClBs gain on average 2-6% of the disk's initial angular momentum within the bar region. Most of this angular momentum gain occurs via low-order resonances, particularly 5:2 resonant orbits. A density wake forms in the ClB which corotates and aligns with the bar at the end of the evolution. The spin-up process creates a characteristic linear rotation profile and mild tangential anisotropy in the ClB. The induced rotation is small in the centre, but is significant beyond ~2 bulge half mass radii, where it leads to mass-weighted V/σ ~ 0.2, and reaches a local Vmax/σin ~ 0.5 at around the scale of the bar. The resulting V/σ is tightly correlated with the ratio of the bulge size to the bar size. In all models, a box/peanut bulge forms suggesting that composite bulges may be common. Conclusions: Bar-bulge resonant interaction in barred galaxies can provide some spin-up of massive ClBs, but the process appears to be less efficient than for low-mass ClBs. Further angular momentum transfer due to nuclear bars or gas inflow would be required to explain the observed rotation if it is not primordial.

  18. Proper Motions of Isolated Massive Stars Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most perplexing and unusual regions of the Galaxy. Not only is it home to the central massive black hole but it contains three very massive young star clusters within the central 30 pc; the Arches, Quintuplet and Central clusters. Furthermore, emission-line surveys have revealed the presence of what appears to be a diaspora of 40 very massive isolated Wolf-Rayet-like stars scattered throughout the region, outside of these massive clusters. Their origin is currently unkown but the suspected causes include such diverse and exotic mechanisms as ejection by dynamical interaction within the massive clusters, ejection by supernovae events within those clusters old enough to have SN, ejection by interaction with the central black hole, stellar mergers in the field, and in situ star formation of isolated massive stars. These processes however should all leave clear and distinct dynamical signatures on their products.We propose using WFC3/IR to conduct a survey of 150 square arcminutes the Galactic Center region to measure relative proper motions to an accuracy of 10 km/s for stars with masses as low as a few solar masses {late B-type}. Our objectives include determining which of the known isolated massive stars are runaways, estimating their probable places of origin, discovering less luminous runaways that are invisible to emission line surveys, characterizing the dynamical properties of runaway stars in all luminosty ranges, and searching for signs of tidally disrupted massive clusters. The survey will have lasting legacy value to those trying to unravel the physics of galactic centers and the environments around massive black holes.

  19. Proper Motions of Isolated Massive Stars Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most perplexing and unusual regions of the Galaxy. Not only is it home to the central massive black hole but it contains three very massive young star clusters within the central 30 pc; the Arches, Quintuplet and Central clusters. Furthermore, emission-line surveys have revealed the presence of what appears to be a diaspora of ~40 very massive isolated Wolf-Rayet-like stars scattered throughout the region, outside of these massive clusters. Their origin is currently unkown but the suspected causes include such diverse and exotic mechanisms as ejection by dynamical interaction within the massive clusters, ejection by supernovae events within those clusters old enough to have SN, ejection by interaction with the central black hole, stellar mergers in the field, and in situ star formation of isolated massive stars. These processes however should all leave clear and distinct dynamical signatures on their products.We propose using WFC3/IR to conduct a survey of ~150 square arcminutes the Galactic Center region to measure relative proper motions to an accuracy of 10 km/s for stars with masses as low as a few solar masses (late B-type). Our objectives include determining which of the known isolated massive stars are runaways, estimating their probable places of origin, discovering less luminous runaways that are invisible to emission line surveys, characterizing the dynamical properties of runaway stars in all luminosty ranges, and searching for signs of tidally disrupted massive clusters. The survey will have lasting legacy value to those trying to unravel the physics of galactic centers and the environments around massive black holes.

  20. Recent results on the connection between massive stars and supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    With the dramatic increase in observational data on supernovae (SNe), SN studies are undergoing a renaissance. It is known that Type II SN IIP arise from the explosion of a red supergiant (RSG). In several cases the RSG is seen in pre-explosion images, but it is absent in post-SN images — unambiguous proof that the RSG has exploded. Surprisingly, all RSG progenitors identified have a mass less than approximately 20 M⊙. To date, there has been no direct detection of the progenitor of a Type Ib or Ic SN. Because their ejecta masses are generally low (3 to 5 M⊙), these SNe are believed to arise from a relatively low mass star in a binary system. Such systems dominate the statistics due to the initial mass function. The broad-lined Ic SNe tend to have higher mass, and some of these may be associated with classic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Type IIn SNe are a heterogeneous class of SN — they arise when the SN ejecta interacts with preexisting circumstellar material. Their spectra often exhibit narrow emission lines, and they can be particularly luminous due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy into radiation. The origin of Type IIn SN and their connection to stellar evolution is the subject of fierce debate and controversy. The final class to be discussed are the pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) which arise from a nuclear detonation. PISNe have a distinct chemical signature, and the observational evidence for the existence of this class of SN is ambiguous and controversial. While much progress has been made, it is still difficult to get models of core-collapse SNe to explode from first principles. The problem is inherently 3D and numerous questions remain unanswered. How much material falls back onto the core? What is the nature and extent of mixing in the ejecta? What are the chemical yields? Do all massive stars end their life as a luminous SN?

  1. SGRs and AXPs as Rotation-Powered Massive White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malheiro, Manuel; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-06-01

    SGR 0418+5729 is a ``Rosetta Stone'' for deciphering the energy source of Soft Gamma Ray Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs). We present a model based on canonical physics and astrophysics for SGRs and AXPs powered by massive highly magnetized rotating white dwarfs (WDs), in total analogy with pulsars powered by rotating neutron stars (NSs). We predict for SGR 0418+5729 a lower limit for its spin-down rate, dot{P} ≥ LX P3 /(4π2I) = 1.18 × 10-16, where I is the moment of inertia of the WD. We show for SGRs and AXPs that the occurrence of the glitch and the gain of rotational energy is due to the release of gravitational energy associated to the contraction and decrease of the moment of inertia of the WDs. The steady emission and the outburst following the glitch are explained by the loss of rotational energy of the WDs, in view of the much larger moment of inertia of the WDs, as compared to that of NSs and/or quark stars. There is no need here to invoke the unorthodox concept of magnetic energy release due to the decay of overcritical magnetic fields, as assumed in the magnetar model. A new astrophysical scenario for the SGRs and AXPs associated to Supernova remnants is presented. The observational campaigns of the X-ray Japanese satellite Suzaku on AE Aquarii and the corresponding theoretical works by Japanese groups and recent results of the Hubble Space Telescope, give crucial information for our theoretical model. Follow-on missions of Hubble Telescope and VLT are highly recommended to give further observational evidence of this most fundamental issue of relativistic astrophysics: the identification of the true SGRs/AXPs energy source.

  2. SGRs and AXPs as rotation powered massive white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda Hernandez, Jorge Armando

    2012-07-01

    SGR 0418+5729 is a ``Rosetta Stone'' for deciphering the energy source of Soft Gamma Ray Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs). We show a model based on canonical physics and astrophysics for SGRs and AXPs powered by massive highly magnetized rotating white dwarfs (WDs), in total analogy with pulsars powered by rotating neutron stars (NSs). We predict for SGR 0418+5729 a lower limit for its spin-down rate, \\dot{P} ≥ L_X P^3/(4π^2 I)=1.18× 10^{-16} where I is the moment of inertia of the WD. We show for SGRs and AXPs that, the occurrence of the glitch and the gain of rotational energy, is due to the release of gravitational energy associated to the contraction and decrease of the moment of inertia of the WDs. The steady emission and the outburst following the glitch are explained by the loss of rotational energy of the Wds, in view of the much larger moment of inertia of the WDs, as compared to the one of NSs and/or quark stars. There is no need here to invoke the unorthodox concept of magnetic energy release due to decay of overcritical magnetic fields, as assumed in the magnetar model. A new astrophysical scenario for the SGRs and AXPs associated to Supernova remnants is presented. The observational campaigns of the X-ray Japanese satellite Suzaku on AE Aquarii and the corresponding theoretical works by Japanese groups and recent results of the Hubble Space Telescope, give crucial information for our theoretical model. Follow-on missions of Hubble Telescope and VLT are highly recommended to give further observational evidence of this most fundamental issue of relativistic astrophysics: the identification of the true SGRs/AXPs energy source.

  3. Large N phase transitions in massive N = 2 gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, J. G.

    2014-07-23

    Using exact results obtained from localization on S{sup 4}, we explore the large N limit of N = 2 super Yang-Mills theories with massive matter multiplets. In this talk we discuss two cases: N = 2* theory, describing a massive hypermultiplet in the adjoint representation, and super QCD with massive quarks. When the radius of the four-sphere is sent to infinity these theories are described by solvable matrix models, which exhibit a number of interesting phenomena including quantum phase transitions at finite 't Hooft coupling.

  4. Two-dimensional thermofield bosonization II: Massive fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2008-11-15

    We consider the perturbative computation of the N-point function of chiral densities of massive free fermions at finite temperature within the thermofield dynamics approach. The infinite series in the mass parameter for the N-point functions are computed in the fermionic formulation and compared with the corresponding perturbative series in the interaction parameter in the bosonized thermofield formulation. Thereby we establish in thermofield dynamics the formal equivalence of the massive free fermion theory with the sine-Gordon thermofield model for a particular value of the sine-Gordon parameter. We extend the thermofield bosonization to include the massive Thirring model.

  5. Massive gravity with mass term in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasone, Masashi; Oda, Ichiro

    2009-05-15

    We analyze the effect of the Pauli-Fierz mass term on a recently established, new massive gravity theory in three space-time dimensions. We show that the Pauli-Fierz mass term makes the new massive gravity theory nonunitary. Moreover, although we add the gravitational Chern-Simons term to this model, the situation remains unchanged and the theory stays nonunitary despite that the structure of the graviton propagator is greatly changed. Thus, the Pauli-Fierz mass term is not allowed to coexist with mass-generating higher-derivative terms in the new massive gravity.

  6. Fundamental Parameters of 4 Massive Eclipsing Binaries in Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Koumpia, E.

    2011-05-01

    We present fundamental parameters of 4 massive eclipsing binaries in the young massive cluster Westerlund 1. The goal is to measure accurate masses and radii of their component stars, which provide much needed constraints for evolutionary models of massive stars. Accurate parameters can further be used to determine a dynamical lower limit for the magnetar progenitor and to obtain an independent distance to the cluster. Our results confirm and extend the evidence for a high mass for the progenitor of the magnetar. The authors acknowledge research and travel support from the European Commission Framework Program Seven under the Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG04-GA-2008-239335.

  7. The galactic center: is it a massive black hole?

    PubMed

    Lo, K Y

    1986-09-26

    Studies of active galactic nuclei constitute one of the major efforts in astronomy. Massive black holes are the most likely source for the enormous energy radiated from such nuclei. Observations reviewed here suggest unusual activity and the possible existence of a massive black hole in the nucleus of our galaxy. Because of its proximity to Earth, our galactic nucleus can be observed in unsurpassed detail and may serve as the Rosetta stone both for deciphering active galactic nuclei and for confirming the existence of a massive black hole.

  8. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  9. Anisotropic cosmological solutions in massive vector theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2016-11-01

    In beyond-generalized Proca theories including the extension to theories higher than second order, we study the role of a spatial component v of a massive vector field on the anisotropic cosmological background. We show that, as in the case of the isotropic cosmological background, there is no additional ghostly degrees of freedom associated with the Ostrogradski instability. In second-order generalized Proca theories we find the existence of anisotropic solutions on which the ratio between the anisotropic expansion rate Σ and the isotropic expansion rate H remains nearly constant in the radiation-dominated epoch. In the regime where Σ/H is constant, the spatial vector component v works as a dark radiation with the equation of state close to 1/3. During the matter era, the ratio Σ/H decreases with the decrease of v. As long as the conditions |Σ| ll H and v2 ll phi2 are satisfied around the onset of late-time cosmic acceleration, where phi is the temporal vector component, we find that the solutions approach the isotropic de Sitter fixed point (Σ = 0 = v) in accordance with the cosmic no-hair conjecture. In the presence of v and Σ the early evolution of the dark energy equation of state wDE in the radiation era is different from that in the isotropic case, but the approach to the isotropic value wDE(iso) typically occurs at redshifts z much larger than 1. Thus, apart from the existence of dark radiation, the anisotropic cosmological dynamics at low redshifts is similar to that in isotropic generalized Proca theories. In beyond-generalized Proca theories the only consistent solution to avoid the divergence of a determinant of the dynamical system corresponds to v = 0, so Σ always decreases in time.

  10. Parallel Impurity Spreading During Massive Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Extended-MHD simulations of disruption mitigation in DIII-D demonstrate that both pre-existing islands (locked-modes) and plasma rotation can significantly influence toroidal spreading of impurities following massive gas injection (MGI). Given the importance of successful disruption mitigation in ITER and the large disparity in device parameters, empirical demonstrations of disruption mitigation strategies in present tokamaks are insufficient to inspire unreserved confidence for ITER. Here, MHD simulations elucidate how impurities injected as a localized jet spread toroidally and poloidally. Simulations with large pre-existing islands at the q = 2 surface reveal that the magnetic topology strongly influences the rate of impurity spreading parallel to the field lines. Parallel spreading is largely driven by rapid parallel heat conduction, and is much faster at low order rational surfaces, where a short parallel connection length leads to faster thermal equilibration. Consequently, the presence of large islands, which alter the connection length, can slow impurity transport; but the simulations also show that the appearance of a 4/2 harmonic of the 2/1 mode, which breaks up the large islands, can increase the rate of spreading. This effect is seen both for simulations with spontaneously growing and directly imposed 4/2 modes. Given the prevalence of locked-modes as a cause of disruptions, understanding the effect of large islands is of particular importance. Simulations with and without islands also show that rotation can alter impurity spreading, even reversing the predominant direction of spreading, which is toward the high-field-side in the absence of rotation. Given expected differences in rotation for ITER vs. DIII-D, rotation effects are another important consideration when extrapolating experimental results. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  11. Massive Jets from High-Mass YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, Alessio; Stecklum, Bringfried; Linz, Hendrik; Garcia Lopez, Rebeca; Sanna, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Protostellar jets from high-mass young stellar objects (HMYSOs; M≥8M) provide an excellent opportunity to understand the mechanisms responsible for high-mass star formation. However, the sample of known high-mass protostellar jets is still limited and the jet physical properties are not well known. We present our ongoing near-infrared imaging (H2, 2.12 um) and spectral (1-2.5 um) survey of jets from a sample of HMYSOs. By using H2 narrow-band imaging (Sofi/NTT, NICS/TNG), we aim at verifying the shocked nature of 120 EGOs (Extended Green Objects) detected with Spitzer (Cyganowski et al. 2008), because the EGO origin is not clear (e.g. Takami et al. 2012). Among these 120 EGOs, we indentify jets/outflows with a 44% success rate (Stecklum et al. 2009). In addition, several jets/outflows from previously unknown HMYSOs were detected in this survey (Stecklum et al. in prep.). The morphology of the H2 emission generally differs from that of the 4.5 μm excess, suggesting different excitation conditions. Through IR low-resolution spectroscopy (Sofi/NTT, R~600) we also derive the physical properties of 16 bright massive jets (Caratti o Garatti et al. in prep.), relating them with those of their driving sources (with Lbol~10^2-10^5 Lsun). As for the low-mass jets (Caratti o Garatti et al. 2006, 2008), we derive a clear correlation between the HMYSO bolometric luminosity (Lbol) and the jet H2 luminosity (LH2), extending this relationship over 6 order of magnitudes in the Lbol range (from 0.1 to 10^5 Lsun).

  12. SEGUE 2: THE LEAST MASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.; Geha, Marla

    2013-06-10

    Segue 2, discovered by Belokurov et al., is a galaxy with a luminosity of only 900 L{sub Sun }. We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of 25 members of Segue 2-a threefold increase in spectroscopic sample size. The velocity dispersion is too small to be measured with our data. The upper limit with 90% (95%) confidence is {sigma}{sub v} < 2.2 (2.6) km s{sup -1}, the most stringent limit for any galaxy. The corresponding limit on the mass within the three-dimensional half-light radius (46 pc) is M{sub 1/2} < 1.5 (2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Segue 2 is the least massive galaxy known. We identify Segue 2 as a galaxy rather than a star cluster based on the wide dispersion in [Fe/H] (from -2.85 to -1.33) among the member stars. The stars' [{alpha}/Fe] ratios decline with increasing [Fe/H], indicating that Segue 2 retained Type Ia supernova ejecta despite its presently small mass and that star formation lasted for at least 100 Myr. The mean metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = -2.22 {+-} 0.13 (about the same as the Ursa Minor galaxy, 330 times more luminous than Segue 2), is higher than expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation defined by more luminous dwarf galaxy satellites of the Milky Way. Segue 2 may be the barest remnant of a tidally stripped, Ursa Minor-sized galaxy. If so, it is the best example of an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that came to be ultra-faint through tidal stripping. Alternatively, Segue 2 could have been born in a very low mass dark matter subhalo (v{sub max} < 10 km s{sup -1}), below the atomic hydrogen cooling limit.

  13. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  14. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  15. The massive monsters living deep in the Tarantula nebula: How massive are they really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, Selma

    2013-10-01

    The recent suggestion that stars with masses in excess of about 300 solar masses exist in the dense star cluster R136 at heart of the Tarantula Nebula received wide interest. It reopened the debate about the upper stellar-mass limit of the initial mass function {IMF} and it raised the question whether pair-instability supernovae - originally thought exclusively originate from first generation of pop III stars - can occur in the vicinity of Milky Way.A major challenge hampering mass estimates of the most massive stars is crowding and unresolved companions. High-resolution imaging from the ground and with HST reaching resolutions of about 0.1 arcsec resolved the brightest source in R136 into three separate components. Unfortunately, the extreme crowding and faintness of the targets prohibits ground-based facilities to reach further towards mili-arcsecond resolution.We propose to exploit the new full two-dimensional calibration program of Fine Guidance Sensor {Nelan, Prop ID 13175} to probe the most luminous stars in R136 for previously unseen companions down to a resolution of 12 mili-arsecond, exploring the separation of about 500-5000 AU. Furthermore, we will characterize the claimed source R136-a1B and if needed revise downward the mass estimates of the most massive stars known date.

  16. Cosmological constraints on the properties of weakly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    Considerations of the age and density of, as well as the evolution of structure in, the Universe lead to constraints on the masses and lifetimes of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). 26 references.

  17. 11. STAIRHALL. HANDSOME STAIR HAS A MASSIVE NEWEL, TURNED BALUSTERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. STAIRHALL. HANDSOME STAIR HAS A MASSIVE NEWEL, TURNED BALUSTERS (TWO PER TREAD) AND A BRASS LAMP. ALSO NOTE DOORS AND DOOR TRIM - John L. Wisdom House, 535 East Main Street, Jackson, Madison County, TN

  18. Generalized massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions and its Hamiltonian formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Chao; Zhou, Shuang-Yong E-mail: zkc@itp.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    We extend the four-dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model to a general scalar massive-tensor theory in arbitrary dimensions, coupling a dRGT massive graviton to multiple scalars and allowing for generic kinetic and mass matrix mixing between the massive graviton and the scalars, and derive its Hamiltonian formulation and associated constraint system. When passing to the Hamiltonian formulation, two different sectors arise: a general sector and a special sector. Although obtained via different ways, there are two second class constraints in either of the two sectors, eliminating the BD ghost. However, for the special sector, there are still ghost instabilities except for the case of two dimensions. In particular, for the special sector with one scalar, there is a ''second BD ghost''.

  19. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, K. Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R.; Balaji, V. R.; Manikandan, D.; Ulaganathan, G.; Yoganandha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture. PMID:27829776

  20. Complete decoupling limit of ghost-free massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondo, Nicholas A.; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2013-11-01

    We present the complete form of the decoupling limit of ghost-free massive gravity with a Minkowski reference metric, including the full interactions of the helicity-1 and helicity-0 modes of the massive spin-2 field. While in the metric language the square root structure of the mass terms makes it difficult to find a simple way to write down the interactions, we show that using the vierbein formulation of massive gravity, including Stückelberg fields for both diffeomorphism and local Lorentz symmetries, we can find an explicitly resummed expression for the helicity-1 field interactions. We clarify the equations of motion for the Lorentz Stückelberg fields and how these generate the symmetric vierbein condition which guarantees equivalence between the vierbein and metric formulations of massive gravity.

  1. Complications with massive sacrococcygeal tumor resection on a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Edwin; Parray, Tariq; Ghafoor, Abid

    2010-12-01

    Resection of large sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCT) in neonates can pose many anesthetic challenges. The pathophysiology of the SCT determines the varying management. We present a case report of a 34-week newborn with a massive Altman type 3 SCT. The surgery was delayed 2 days because of hyperkalemia; however, as a result of continued tumor lysis the patient's condition had worsened with little improvement of the potassium level. During the surgery, the patient had issues of bleeding needing massive transfusion. Ventilation was also difficult at times because of the massive tumor resting on the chest, resulting in respiratory acidosis. We also had difficulty in maintaining the temperature. This patient did well after the surgery and was discharged home. We address here the anesthetic issues involved in the perioperative care management of a premature infant with a massive SCT.

  2. Discovery of five new massive pulsating white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, B. G.; Kepler, S. O.; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Fraga, L.

    2013-03-01

    Using the SOuthern Astrophysical Research telescope (SOAR) Optical Imager at the SOAR 4.1 m telescope, we report on the discovery of five new massive pulsating white dwarf stars. Our results represent an increase of about 20 per cent in the number of massive pulsators. We have detected both short and long periods, low and high amplitude pulsation modes, covering the whole range of the ZZ Ceti instability strip. In this paper, we present a first seismological study of the new massive pulsators based on the few frequencies detected. Our analysis indicates that these stars have masses higher than average, in agreement with the spectroscopic determinations. In addition, we study for the first time the ensemble properties of the pulsating white dwarf stars with masses above 0.8 M⊙. We found a bimodal distribution of the main pulsation period with the effective temperature for the massive DAVs, which indicates mode selection mechanisms.

  3. Plasmon modes of a massive Dirac plasma, and their superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Rashi; Thakur, Anmol; Vignale, Giovanni; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-05-01

    We explore the collective density oscillations of a collection of charged massive Dirac particles, in one, two, and three dimensions, and their one-dimensional (1D) superlattice. We calculate the long-wavelength limit of the dynamical polarization function analytically, and use the random phase approximation to obtain the plasmon dispersion. The density dependence of the long-wavelength plasmon frequency in massive Dirac systems is found to be different compared to systems with parabolic and gapless Dirac dispersion. We also calculate the long-wavelength plasmon dispersion of a 1D metamaterial made from 1D and 2D massive Dirac plasma. Our analytical results will be useful for exploring the use of massive Dirac materials as electrostatically tunable plasmonic metamaterials and can be experimentally verified by infrared spectroscopy, as in the case of graphene [L. Ju et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 630 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.146].

  4. REPS: REscaled Power Spectra for initial conditions with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, Matteo; Bel, Julien; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Carbone, Carmelita; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    REPS (REscaled Power Spectra) provides accurate, one-percent level, numerical simulations of the initial conditions for massive neutrino cosmologies, rescaling the late-time linear power spectra to the simulation initial redshift.

  5. TWO MASSIVE, LOW-LUMINOSITY CORES TOWARD INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Jonathan J.

    2009-11-10

    This article presents high-resolution interferometric mosaics in the 850 mum wave band of two massive, quiescent infrared dark clouds. The two clouds were chosen based on their likelihood to represent environments preceding the formation of massive stars. The brightest compact sources detected in each cloud have masses approx110 M{sub sun} and approx60 M{sub sun} with radii <0.1 pc, implying mean densities of (n) approx 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} and (N) approx 1 g cm{sup -2}. Supplementary data show these cores to be cold and inactive. Low upper limits to their bolometric luminosities and temperatures place them at a very early stage of evolution, while current models of massive star formation suggest they have the potential to form massive stars.

  6. The EMCC / DARPA Massively Parallel Electromagnetic Scattering Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Alex C.; Hill, Kueichien C.

    1996-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Code Consortium (EMCC) was sponsored by the Advanced Research Program Agency (ARPA) to demonstrate the effectiveness of massively parallel computing in large scale radar signature predictions. The EMCC/ARPA project consisted of three parts.

  7. 38. Tap room fireplace, showing massive open timber trusses, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Tap room fireplace, showing massive open timber trusses, view looking to southeast. (fixtures and mantle removed 1999). - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  8. Ebstein's anomaly with recurrent massive pericardial effusion: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nirdesh; Saran, Dharam Prakash; Yadav, Sharad Chandra; Dwivedi, Sudhanshu

    2016-07-27

    Ebstein's anomaly is known for its varied presentations and exceptionally long survival in some cases. Here the authors describe a case of previously undiagnosed Ebstein's anomaly in a patient who presented with massive pericardial effusion. Over the next 6 months, the patient was hospitalised twice for pericardiocentesis. To the best of our knowledge, a case of Ebstein's anomaly with recurrent massive pericardial effusion has not been described previously.

  9. Density Perturbations in the Universe from Massive Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, K.

    2007-11-20

    I discuss the possibility of using a massive vector field to generate the density perturbation in the Universe. I find that a scale-invariant superhorizon spectrum of vector field perturbations is possible to generate during inflation. The associated curvature perturbation is imprinted onto the Universe following the curvaton scenario. The mechanism does not generate a long-range anisotropy because an oscillating massive vector field behaves as a pressureless isotropic fluid.

  10. Active feedback cooling of massive electromechanical quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, Junghoon; Lee, Manhee; Stambaugh, Corey; Bak, Wan; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-08-15

    We present a general active feedback cooling scheme for massive electromechanical quartz resonators. We cool down two kinds of macrosized quartz tuning forks and find several characteristic constants for this massive quartz-resonator feedback cooling, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. When combined with conventional cryogenic techniques and low-noise devices, one may reach the quantum sensitivity for macroscopic sensors. This may be useful for high sensitivity measurements and for quantum information studies.

  11. Reconstructing the massive black hole cosmic history through gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sesana, Alberto; Gair, Jonathan; Berti, Emanuele; Volonteri, Marta

    2011-02-15

    The massive black holes we observe in galaxies today are the natural end-product of a complex evolutionary path, in which black holes seeded in proto-galaxies at high redshift grow through cosmic history via a sequence of mergers and accretion episodes. Electromagnetic observations probe a small subset of the population of massive black holes (namely, those that are active or those that are very close to us), but planned space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can measure the parameters of 'electromagnetically invisible' massive black holes out to high redshift. In this paper we introduce a Bayesian framework to analyze the information that can be gathered from a set of such measurements. Our goal is to connect a set of massive black hole binary merger observations to the underlying model of massive black hole formation. In other words, given a set of observed massive black hole coalescences, we assess what information can be extracted about the underlying massive black hole population model. For concreteness we consider ten specific models of massive black hole formation, chosen to probe four important (and largely unconstrained) aspects of the input physics used in structure formation simulations: seed formation, metallicity ''feedback'', accretion efficiency and accretion geometry. For the first time we allow for the possibility of 'model mixing', by drawing the observed population from some combination of the 'pure' models that have been simulated. A Bayesian analysis allows us to recover a posterior probability distribution for the ''mixing parameters'' that characterize the fractions of each model represented in the observed distribution. Our work shows that LISA has enormous potential to probe the underlying physics of structure formation.

  12. Design of Massive-MIMO-NOMA With Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiguo; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a low-feedback non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) scheme using massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission is proposed. In particular, the proposed scheme can decompose a massive-MIMO-NOMA system into multiple separated single-input single-output NOMA channels, and analytical results are developed to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme for two scenarios, with perfect user ordering and with one-bit feedback, respectively.

  13. Hairy Black Holes in Theories with Massive Gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Mikhail S.

    This is a brief survey of the known black hole solutions in the theories of ghost-free bigravity and massive gravity. Various black holes exist in these theories, in particular those supporting a massive graviton hair. However, it seems that solutions which could be astrophysically relevant are the same as in General Relativity, or very close to them. Therefore, the no-hair conjecture essentially applies, and so it would be hard to detect the graviton mass by observing black holes.

  14. Kundt solutions of minimal massive 3D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deger, Nihat Sadik; Sarıoǧlu, Ã.-zgür

    2015-11-01

    We construct Kundt solutions of minimal massive gravity theory and show that, similar to topologically massive gravity (TMG), most of them are constant scalar invariant (CSI) spacetimes that correspond to deformations of round and warped (A)dS. We also find an explicit non-CSI Kundt solution at the merger point. Finally, we give their algebraic classification with respect to the traceless Ricci tensor (Segre classification) and show that their Segre types match with the types of their counterparts in TMG.

  15. Three-dimensional massive gravity and the bigravity black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañados, Máximo; Theisen, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    We study three-dimensional massive gravity formulated as a theory with two dynamical metrics, like the f-g theories of Isham-Salam and Strathdee. The action is parity preserving and has no higher derivative terms. The spectrum contains a single massive graviton. This theory has several features discussed recently in TMG and NMG. We find warped black holes, a critical point, and generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions.

  16. Quark-hadron phase transition in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.

    2016-11-01

    We study the quark-hadron phase transition in the framework of massive gravity. We show that the modification of the FRW cosmological equations leads to the quark-hadron phase transition in the early massive Universe. Using numerical analysis, we consider that a phase transition based on the chiral symmetry breaking after the electroweak transition, occurred at approximately 10 μs after the Big Bang to convert a plasma of free quarks and gluons into hadrons.

  17. Experimental free-space optical network for massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.; Kajita, M.; Kasahara, K.; Kubota, K.; Kurihara, K.; Redmond, I.; Schenfeld, E.; Suzaki, T.

    1996-03-01

    A free-space optical interconnection scheme is described for massively parallel processors based on the interconnection-cached network architecture. The optical network operates in a circuit-switching mode. Combined with a packet-switching operation among the circuit-switched optical channels, a high-bandwidth, low-latency network for massively parallel processing results. The design and assembly of a 64-channel experimental prototype is discussed, and operational results are presented.

  18. Massive basketball diagram for a thermal scalar field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2000-08-01

    The ``basketball diagram'' is a three-loop vacuum diagram for a scalar field theory that cannot be expressed in terms of one-loop diagrams. We calculate this diagram for a massive scalar field at nonzero temperature, reducing it to expressions involving three-dimensional integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. We use this result to calculate the free energy for a massive scalar field with a φ4 interaction to three-loop order.

  19. The Course of Due Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getty, Laura A.; Summy, Sarah E.

    2004-01-01

    Discussion of due process rights for children with disabilities considers common issues leading to due process requests, due process procedures, hearing officers, procedural violations, effects of due process meetings, and areas for improvement (i.e., accountability, paperwork). Tables list categories of procedural violations with examples and…

  20. Petermann Glacier, North Greenland: massive calving in 2010 and the past half century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, O. M.; Babiker, M.; Miles, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    Greenland's marine-terminating glaciers drain large amounts of solid ice through calving of icebergs, as well as melting of floating glacial ice. Petermann Glacier, North Greenland, has the Northern Hemisphere's long floating ice shelf. A massive (~270 km2) calving event was observed from satellite sensors in August 2010. In order to understand this in perspective, here we perform a comprehensive retrospective data analysis of Petermann Glacier calving-front variability spanning half a century. Here we establish that there have been at least four massive (100+ km2) calving events over the past 50 years: (1) 1959-1961 (~153 km2), (2) 1991 (~168 km2), (3) 2001 (~71 km2) and (4) 2010 (~270 km2), as well as ~31 km2 calved in 2008. The terminus position in 2010 has retreated ~15 km beyond the envelope of previous observations. Whether the massive calving in 2010 represents natural episodic variability or a response to global and/or ocean warming in the fjord remains speculative, although this event supports the contention that the ice shelf recently has become vulnerable due to extensive fracturing and channelized basal melting.

  1. Effect of Turbulence Models on Two Massively-Separated Benchmark Flow Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2003-01-01

    Two massively-separated flow cases (the 2-D hill and the 3-D Ahmed body) were computed with several different turbulence models in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D as part of participation in a turbulence modeling workshop held in Poitiers, France in October, 2002. Overall, results were disappointing, but were consistent with results from other RANS codes and other turbulence models at the workshop. For the 2-D hill case, those turbulence models that predicted separation location accurately ended up yielding a too-long separation extent downstream. The one model that predicted a shorter separation extent in better agreement with LES data did so only by coincidence: its prediction of earlier reattachment was due to a too-late prediction of the separation location. For the Ahmed body, two slant angles were computed, and CFD performed fairly well for one of the cases (the larger slant angle). Both turbulence models tested in this case were very similar to each other. For the smaller slant angle, CFD predicted massive separation, whereas the experiment showed reattachment about half-way down the center of the face. These test cases serve as reminders that state- of-the-art CFD is currently not a reliable predictor of massively-separated flow physics, and that further validation studies in this area would be beneficial.

  2. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN THE ESO DISTANT CLUSTER SURVEY (EDisCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'onofrio, M.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fritz, J.; Moretti, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Simard, L.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.

    2010-09-20

    We find a significant number of massive and compact galaxies in clusters from the ESO Distant Clusters Survey (EDisCS) at 0.4 < z < 1. They have similar stellar masses, ages, sizes, and axial ratios to local z {approx} 0.04 compact galaxies in WIde field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (WINGS) clusters, and to z = 1.4-2 massive and passive galaxies found in the general field. If non-brightest cluster galaxies of all densities, morphologies, and spectral types are considered, the median size of EDisCS galaxies is only a factor 1.18 smaller than in WINGS. We show that for morphologically selected samples, the morphological evolution taking place in a significant fraction of galaxies during the last Gyr may introduce an apparent, spurious evolution of size with redshift, which is actually due to intrinsic differences in the selected samples. We conclude that the median mass-size relation of cluster galaxies does not evolve significantly from z {approx} 0.7 to z {approx} 0.04. In contrast, the masses and sizes of BCGs and galaxies with M {sub *}>4 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} have significantly increased by a factor of 2 and 4, respectively, confirming the results of a number of recent works on the subject. Our findings show that progenitor bias effects play an important role in the size-growth paradigm of massive and passive galaxies.

  3. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  4. High Energy Interactions in Massive Binaries: An Application to a Most Mysterious Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Extremely massive stars (50M and above) are exceedingly rare in the local Universe but are believed to have composed the entire first generation of stars, which lived fast, died young and left behind the first generation of black holes and set the stage for the formation of lower mass stars suitable to support life. There are significant uncertainties about how this happened (and how it still happens), mostly due to our poor knowledge of how stars change mass as they evolve. Extremely massive stars give mass back to the ISM via strong radiatively-driven winds and sometimes through sporadic eruptions of the most massive and brightest stars. Such mass loss plays an important role in the chemical and dynamical evolution of the local interstellar medium prior to the supernova explosion. Below we discuss how high energy thermal (and, in some cases, non-thermal) emission, along with modern simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions, can be used to help determine a physically realistic picture of mass loss in a well-studied, mysterious system.

  5. First Eigenmode Transmission by High Efficient CSI Estimation for Multiuser Massive MIMO Using Millimeter Wave Bands

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Kazuki; Iwakuni, Tatsuhiko; Ohta, Atsushi; Arai, Takuto; Shirato, Yushi; Kurosaki, Satoshi; Iizuka, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Drastic improvements in transmission rate and system capacity are required towards 5th generation mobile communications (5G). One promising approach, utilizing the millimeter wave band for its rich spectrum resources, suffers area coverage shortfalls due to its large propagation loss. Fortunately, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) can offset this shortfall as well as offer high order spatial multiplexing gain. Multiuser MIMO is also effective in further enhancing system capacity by multiplexing spatially de-correlated users. However, the transmission performance of multiuser MIMO is strongly degraded by channel time variation, which causes inter-user interference since null steering must be performed at the transmitter. This paper first addresses the effectiveness of multiuser massive MIMO transmission that exploits the first eigenmode for each user. In Line-of-Sight (LoS) dominant channel environments, the first eigenmode is chiefly formed by the LoS component, which is highly correlated with user movement. Therefore, the first eigenmode provided by a large antenna array can improve the robustness against the channel time variation. In addition, we propose a simplified beamforming scheme based on high efficient channel state information (CSI) estimation that extracts the LoS component. We also show that this approximate beamforming can achieve throughput performance comparable to that of the rigorous first eigenmode transmission. Our proposed multiuser massive MIMO scheme can open the door for practical millimeter wave communication with enhanced system capacity. PMID:27399715

  6. First Eigenmode Transmission by High Efficient CSI Estimation for Multiuser Massive MIMO Using Millimeter Wave Bands.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Kazuki; Iwakuni, Tatsuhiko; Ohta, Atsushi; Arai, Takuto; Shirato, Yushi; Kurosaki, Satoshi; Iizuka, Masataka

    2016-07-08

    Drastic improvements in transmission rate and system capacity are required towards 5th generation mobile communications (5G). One promising approach, utilizing the millimeter wave band for its rich spectrum resources, suffers area coverage shortfalls due to its large propagation loss. Fortunately, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) can offset this shortfall as well as offer high order spatial multiplexing gain. Multiuser MIMO is also effective in further enhancing system capacity by multiplexing spatially de-correlated users. However, the transmission performance of multiuser MIMO is strongly degraded by channel time variation, which causes inter-user interference since null steering must be performed at the transmitter. This paper first addresses the effectiveness of multiuser massive MIMO transmission that exploits the first eigenmode for each user. In Line-of-Sight (LoS) dominant channel environments, the first eigenmode is chiefly formed by the LoS component, which is highly correlated with user movement. Therefore, the first eigenmode provided by a large antenna array can improve the robustness against the channel time variation. In addition, we propose a simplified beamforming scheme based on high efficient channel state information (CSI) estimation that extracts the LoS component. We also show that this approximate beamforming can achieve throughput performance comparable to that of the rigorous first eigenmode transmission. Our proposed multiuser massive MIMO scheme can open the door for practical millimeter wave communication with enhanced system capacity.

  7. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; RamIrez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A. E-mail: sellgren@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2009-09-10

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2} (15.0 {mu}m), C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (13.7 {mu}m), and HCN (14.0 {mu}m). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH{sub 3}OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observations demonstrate the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  8. SATELLITES AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2: CONFRONTING THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2012-06-20

    Minor merging has been postulated as the most likely evolutionary path to produce the increase in size and mass observed in the massive galaxies since z {approx} 2. In this Letter, we directly test this hypothesis, comparing the population of satellites around massive galaxies in cosmological simulations versus the observations. We use state-of-the-art, publically available, Millennium I and II simulations, and the associated semi-analytical galaxy catalogs to explore the time evolution of the fraction of massive galaxies that have satellites, the number of satellites per galaxy, the projected distance at which the satellites locate from the host galaxy, and the mass ratio between the host galaxies and their satellites. The three virtual galaxy catalogs considered here overproduce the fraction of galaxies with satellites by a factor ranging between 1.5 and 6 depending on the epoch, whereas the mean projected distance and ratio of the satellite mass over host mass are in closer agreement with data. The larger pull of satellites in the semi-analytical samples could suggest that the size evolution found in previous hydrodynamical simulations is an artifact due to the larger number of infalling satellites compared to the real universe. These results advise us to revise the physical ingredients implemented in the semi-analytical models in order to reconcile the observed and computed fraction of galaxies with satellites, and eventually, it would leave some room for other mechanisms explaining the galaxy size growth not related to the minor merging.

  9. HNCO in massive galactic dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, I.; Henkel, C.; Mao, R. Q.

    2000-09-01

    We surveyed 81 dense molecular cores associated with regions of massive star formation and Sgr A in the JK-1K-1 = 505-404 and 10010-909 lines of HNCO. Line emission was detected towards 57 objects. Selected subsamples were also observed in the 101-000, 404-303, 707-606, 15015-14014, 16016-15015 and 21021-20020 lines, covering a frequency range from 22 to 461 GHz. HNCO lines from the K-1 = 2,3 ladders were detected in several sources. Towards Orion-KL, K-1 = 5 transitions with upper state energies Eu/k ~ 1100 and 1300 K could be observed. Five HNCO cores were mapped. The sources remain spatially unresolved at 220 and 461 GHz (10010-909 and 21010-20020 transitions) with beam sizes of 24'' and 18\\arcsec, respectively. The detection of hyperfine structure in the 101-000 transition is consistent with optically thin emission under conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). This is corroborated by a rotational diagram analysis of Orion-KL that indicates optically thin line emission also for transitions between higher excited states. At the same time a tentative detection of interstellar HN13CO (the 100,10-90,9 line at 220 GHz toward G 310.12-0.20) suggests optically thick emission from some rotational transitions. Typical HNCO abundances relative to H2 as derived from a population diagram analysis are ~ 10-9. The rotational temperatures reach ~ 500 K. The gas densities in regions of HNCO K-1=0 emission should be n>~ 106 cm-3 and in regions of K-1>0 emission about an order of magnitude higher even for radiative excitation. HNCO abundances are found to be enhanced in high-velocity gas. HNCO integrated line intensities correlate well with those of thermal SiO emission. This indicates a spatial coexistence of the two species and may hint at a common production mechanism, presumably based on shock chemistry. Based on the observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and on observations with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope (HHT). The HHT

  10. Massive accretion disks in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, N. Z.

    In the luminous infrared galaxies, very large masses of interstellar matter have been concentrated in the galactic nuclei at radii less than 300 pc as a result of galactic merging, while in lower luminosity systems, this material is probably concentrated by stellar bars and viscous accretion. In both cases, the nuclear region will be highly obscured by dust at visible wavelengths, forcing studies to longer wavelengths where the extinction is reduced. We review recent high resolution near infrared (HST-NICMOS) and mm-interferometric imaging of the dense gas and dust accretion disks in nearby luminous galactic nuclei. Since this nuclear ISM is the active ingredient for both starburst activity and a likely fuel for central AGNs, the nuclear accretion disks are critical to both the activity and the optical appearance of the nucleus. For a sample of 24 luminous galaxies imaged with NICMOS at 1-2μm, approximately 13 show nuclear point sources, indicating the existence of a central AGN or an intense starburst at <= 50 pc radius. Approximately 14 of the sample galaxies have apparent central dust disks. In the best studied ultraluminous IR galaxy, Arp 220, the 2μm imaging shows dust disks in both of the merging galactic nuclei and mm-CO line imaging indicates molecular gas masses ~ 109Msolar for each disk. The two gas disks in Arp 220 are counterrotating and their dynamical masses are ~ 2×109Msolar, that is, only slightly larger than the gas masses. These disks have radii ~ 100 pc and thickness 10-50 pc. The high brightness temperatures of the CO lines indicate that the gas in the disks has area filling factors ~25-50% and mean densities of >= 104 cm-3. Within these nuclear disks, the rate of massive star formation is undoubtedly prodigious and, given the high viscosity of the gas, there will also be high radial accretion rates, perhaps >= 10 Msolar yr-1. If this inflow persists to very small radii, it is enough to feed even the highest

  11. Satellites around massive galaxies since z˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Trujillo, I.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Varela, J.; Barro, G.

    2012-05-01

    The accretion of minor satellites has been postulated as the most likely mechanism to explain the significant size evolution of massive galaxies over cosmic time. Using a sample of 629 massive (Mstar˜ 1011 M⊙) galaxies from the near-infrared Palomar/DEEP-2 survey, we explore what fraction of these objects have satellites with 0.01 < Msat/Mcentral < 1 (1:100) up to z= 1 and what fraction have satellites with 0.1 < Msat/Mcentral < 1 (1:10) up to z= 2 within a projected radial distance of 100 kpc. We find that the fraction of massive galaxies with satellites, after background correction, remains basically constant and close to 30 per cent for satellites with a mass ratio down to 1:100 up to z= 1, and close to 15 per cent for satellites with a 1:10 mass ratio up to z= 2. The family of spheroid-like massive galaxies presents a 2-3 times larger fraction of objects with satellites than the group of disc-like massive galaxies. A crude estimation of the number of 1:3 mergers a massive spheroid-like galaxy has experienced since z˜ 2 is around 2. For a disc-like galaxy this number decreases to ˜1.

  12. Exact solutions of massive gravity in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhad, Mohamed

    In recent years, there has been an upsurge in interest in three-dimensional theories of gravity. In particular, two theories of massive gravity in three dimensions hold strong promise in the search for fully consistent theories of quantum gravity, an understanding of which will shed light on the problems of quantum gravity in four dimensions. One of these theories is the "old" third-order theory of topologically massive gravity (TMG) and the other one is a "new" fourth-order theory of massive gravity (NMG). Despite this increase in research activity, the problem of finding and classifying solutions of TMG and NMG remains a wide open area of research. In this thesis, we provide explicit new solutions of massive gravity in three dimensions and suggest future directions of research. These solutions belong to the Kundt class of spacetimes. A systematic analysis of the Kundt solutions with constant scalar polynomial curvature invariants provides a glimpse of the structure of the spaces of solutions of the two theories of massive gravity. We also find explicit solutions of topologically massive gravity whose scalar polynomial curvature invariants are not all constant, and these are the first such solutions. A number of properties of Kundt solutions of TMG and NMG, such as an identification of solutions which lie at the intersection of the full nonlinear and linearized theories, are also derived.

  13. IRAS 19520+2759: a 105 L⊙ massive young stellar object driving a collimated outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Sahai, R.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Rizzo, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of massive star formation currently suffers from a scarce observational base of massive young stellar objects to compare with. In this paper, we present interferometric 12CO (1-0), 13CO (1-0), C18O (1-0) and 2.6 mm continuum images of the infrared source IRAS 19520+2759 together with complementary single-dish observations of CS (1-0), obtained with the 34 m antenna DSS-54 at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex, as well as archive images at different wavelengths. As a result from our work, IRAS 19520+2759, with a controversial nature in the past, is firmly established as a massive young stellar object associated with a strong and compact millimetre source and driving a collimated outflow. In addition, a second fainter millimetre source is discovered about 4 arcsec to the south, which is also driving an outflow. Furthermore, the two millimetre sources are associated with C18O clumps elongated perpendicularly to the outflows, which may be related to rotating toroids. The masses of gas and dust of the millimetre sources are estimated to be around 100 and 50 M⊙. MM1, the dominant source at all wavelengths, with a total luminosity of (1-2) × 105 L⊙ at 9 kpc, is however not associated with 6 cm emission down to an rms noise level of 0.1 mJy. We propose that IRAS 19520+2759 could be an example of the recent theoretical prediction of `bloated' or `swollen' star, i.e. a massive young stellar object whose radius has increased due to effects of accretion at a high-mass accretion rate.

  14. Clinical Usefulness of Bakri Balloon Tamponade in the Treatment of Massive Postpartum Uterine Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Sayori; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nagata, Tomomi; Hiwatashi, Sayuri; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Yokomine, Daisaku; Orita, Yuji; Oki, Toshimichi; Yoshinaga, Mitsuhiro; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine globe-shaped metreurynter tamponade has been used for some time to treat massive postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). More recently, the Bakri balloon has come into use to treat PPH. It is made of silicon, possesses a drainage lumen, and has a sausage-like spindle shape. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical usefulness of Bakri balloon tamponade for massive PPH. Subjects in the present study comprised 5 patients with uterine atony, 3 with placenta previa, and 2 with low-lying placenta. All patients exhibited massive PPH and resistance to conventional hemostatic managements. Bakri balloon tamponade was appliedto these 10 patients. The mean amounts of uterine bleeding (average ± SD) before and after Bakri insertion were2,732 ± 1,397 mL and 380 ± 376 mL, respectively. The median (third-first quartile ranges) volume of salineinflating the balloon was 200 mL (300-150 mL). The median (third-first quartile ranges) indwelling duration of Bakri balloon was 24 hours (24-11 hrs). The overall success rate of Bakri balloon tamponade was 90% (9/10).There were no cases of slipping out or complications regarding balloon placement. Our findings suggest that Bakri balloon tamponade may be applied to the treatment of massive PPH in uterine atony and placenta previa.The Bakri balloon appears to have the following merits: (1) easy insertion into the uterine cavity and low rate of slipping out, (2) proper conformability to the hemorrhagic area due to its spindle shape, (3) ability to monitor blood loss through the drainage lumen even after insertion.

  15. Central pedicled breast reduction technique in male patients after massive weight loss.

    PubMed

    Stoff, Alexander; Velasco-Laguardia, Fernando J; Richter, Dirk F

    2012-03-01

    Male patients after massive weight loss often suffer from redundant skin and soft tissue in the anterior and lateral chest region, causing various deformities of pseudogynecomastia. Techniques with free or pedicled nipple-areola complex (NAC) transposition are widely accepted. The authors present their approach to male breast reduction with preservation of the NAC on a central dermoglandular pedicle and a wide elliptical tissue excision of breast and lateral thorax tissue in combination with liposuction. Male breast reduction was performed on patients after moderate to massive weight loss due to diet or bariatric procedures. Former procedures included free nipple-areola grafts or inferior pedicled techniques for NAC preservation. As a modification, we performed a central pedicled breast reduction on nine male patients with excessive liposuction of the pedicle and a horizontal elliptical skin removal, allowing for sufficient tissue removal at the lateral thorax. From October 2010 until June 2011, nine male patients had central pedicled breast reconstructions after massive weight loss. Mean age was 29.1 years, mean preoperative body mass index was 29.2, and mean preoperative weight loss was 63.9 kg. The chest wall improvement was rated "very good" by eight patients. No major complications occurred in all nine patients. Male chest deformities after massive weight loss can be dealt by several approaches. The optimal scar positioning and the preservation of NAC may be the most challenging aspects of these procedures. Therefore, the preservation of the NAC on a central dermoglandular pedicle with a horizontal submammary scar course may optimize the esthetic outcome.

  16. Magnetic massive stars as progenitors of `heavy' stellar-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, V.; Keszthelyi, Z.; MacInnis, R.; Cohen, D. H.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Wade, G. A.; Thomas, S. L.; Owocki, S. P.; Puls, J.; ud-Doula, A.

    2017-04-01

    The groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves produced by the inspiralling and coalescence of the black hole (BH) binary GW150914 confirms the existence of 'heavy' stellar-mass BHs with masses >25 M⊙. Initial characterization of the system by Abbott et al. supposes that the formation of BHs with such large masses from the evolution of single massive stars is only feasible if the wind mass-loss rates of the progenitors were greatly reduced relative to the mass-loss rates of massive stars in the Galaxy, concluding that heavy BHs must form in low-metallicity (Z ≲ 0.25-0.5 Z⊙) environments. However, strong surface magnetic fields also provide a powerful mechanism for modifying mass-loss and rotation of massive stars, independent of environmental metallicity. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that some heavy BHs, with masses >25 M⊙ such as those inferred to compose GW150914, could be the natural end-point of evolution of magnetic massive stars in a solar-metallicity environment. Using the MESA code, we developed a new grid of single, non-rotating, solar-metallicity evolutionary models for initial zero-age main sequence masses from 40 to 80 M⊙ that include, for the first time, the quenching of the mass-loss due to a realistic dipolar surface magnetic field. The new models predict terminal-age main-sequence (TAMS) masses that are significantly greater than those from equivalent non-magnetic models, reducing the total mass lost by a strongly magnetized 80 M⊙ star during its main-sequence evolution by 20 M⊙. This corresponds approximately to the mass-loss reduction expected from an environment with metallicity Z = 1/30 Z⊙.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Tissue Swelling due to Injury and due to Exposure to Low Temperature and Massive Water and Electrolyte Loss in Diarrheal Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    shrink and swell in hyper - and hypotonic solutions when the polymer water system is enclosed in a regular dialysis tubing which is fully permeable to...indicate that a polymer water system can shrink and swell in the same manner as the living cells when they are placed in hyper - or hypotonic solutions...cell water would be highly hypotonic . As a result the cell is expected to shrink in a+normal Ringer solution containing Na of a concen- tration equal

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Tissue Swelling Due to Injury and Due to Exposure to Low Temperature and Massive Water and Electrolyte Loss in Diarrheal Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-28

    Continue on revese aide It neceeeary aid Identiiy by block number) ion adsorption, water polarization, ATP , cell injury, NMR 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on...K+ and extrude Nat in the presence of ATP . Only "red ghosts" which have re- tained hemoglobin and other cytoplasmic proteins reaccumulate K+ and... ATP content. Both sets of results confirm prediction of the AI hypo- thesis Accession For NfIIS GRAMI DTIC TAB Unannounced 0 Justificatio Distribut

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Tissue Swelling due to Injury and due to Exposure to Low Temperature and Massive Water and Electrolyte Loss in Diarrheal Disorders,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-06

    MNLOV HUIA Ol 1N I ’ 1 1 A111 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH - BIOPHYSICS PROGRAM - RESEARCH PR.PDSAL 1. TITLE OF RESEARCH PROPOSAL: "Molecular Mecharisms...move- ment and which has some of the characteristics of a metabolic process , such as sen- sitivity to metaolic inhibitors and a Iigh temperature...STREETS MHD.ADMPHA. PENNSYLVANIA 19107 TEiI PONE (21S) 829/ November 10, 1980 Mrs. Farrington Office of Naval Research Code 613 1F 800 N. Quincy St

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Tissue Swelling due to Injury and due to Exposure to Low Temperature and Massive Water and Electrolyte Loss in Diarrheal Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    of the 0- and Y-carboxyl groups of the muscle cells). (i) Edelmann (5, 6, 7): frozen dried- and dry-cut unfixed and unstained frog mus- cle cells with...single fibers (7). (iii) Edelmann (9), using dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis showed concentration of surrogate Cs, Tl? as well as K in normal Kin...isolated air-dried honey been myofibrils (10). (iv) Edelmann (11), using both x-ray microprobe analysis as well as laser microprobe mass spectrometer

  1. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  2. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy. Is the lymph node enlargement always massive?

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Ritesh; Setia, Namrata; Jain, Shyama

    2007-05-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) is a benign proliferating histiocytic disorder, predominantly of lymph nodes with extra-nodal involvement in some cases. It is a self-limiting disease and has a good prognosis; however some patients need steroid therapy. Therein lays a need to differentiate it from other lympho proliferative disorders of poorer prognosis. Clinically, it is suspected only when there is a significant lymph node enlargement in younger age group as the term signifies. Recently, we came across a case where a middle-aged female presented with a subtle swelling in submental region, clinically suspected of reactive or tubercular etiology. However on fine needle aspiration cytology, the smears showed many histiocytes, some of them showing lymphocytes and plasma cells in their cytoplasm, a morphological feature called as "emperipolesis" classically seen in SHML. The present case is reported because of unusual clinical presentation and possibly the need for a revision of existing terminology.

  3. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  4. Massive black hole binary mergers in dynamical galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) have now been detected from stellar-mass black hole binaries, and the first observations of GWs from massive black hole (MBH) binaries are expected within the next decade. Pulsar timing arrays (PTA), which can measure the years long periods of GWs from MBH binaries (MBHBs), have excluded many standard predictions for the amplitude of a stochastic GW background (GWB). We use coevolved populations of MBHs and galaxies from hydrodynamic, cosmological simulations (`Illustris') to calculate a predicted GWB. The most advanced predictions so far have included binary hardening mechanisms from individual environmental processes. We present the first calculation including all of the environmental mechanisms expected to be involved: dynamical friction, stellar `loss-cone' scattering, and viscous drag from a circumbinary disc. We find that MBH binary lifetimes are generally multiple gigayears, and only a fraction coalesce by redshift zero. For a variety of parameters, we find all GWB amplitudes to be below the most stringent PTA upper limit of A_{yr^{-1}} ≈ 10^{-15}. Our fairly conservative fiducial model predicts an amplitude of A_{yr^{-1}} ≈ 0.4× 10^{-15}. At lower frequencies, we find A_{0.1 yr^{-1}} ≈ 1.5× 10^{-15} with spectral indices between -0.4 and -0.6 - significantly flatter than the canonical value of -2/3 due to purely GW-driven evolution. Typical MBHBs driving the GWB signal come from redshifts around 0.3, with total masses of a few times 109 M⊙, and in host galaxies with very large stellar masses. Even without GWB detections, our results can be connected to observations of dual active galactic nuclei to constrain binary evolution.

  5. Muscle architectural changes after massive human rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Michael C; Sato, Eugene J; Bachasson, Damien; Cheng, Timothy; Azimi, Hassan; Schenk, Simon; Engler, Adam J; Singh, Anshuman; Ward, Samuel R

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tendon tears lead to negative structural and functional changes in the associated musculature. The structural features of muscle that predict function are termed "muscle architecture." Although the architectural features of "normal" rotator cuff muscles are known, they are poorly understood in the context of cuff pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tear and repair on RC muscle architecture. To this end thirty cadaveric shoulders were grouped into one of four categories based on tear magnitude: Intact, Full-thickness tear (FTT), Massive tear (MT), or Intervention if sutures or hardware were present, and key parameters of muscle architecture were measured. We found that muscle mass and fiber length decreased proportionally with tear size, with significant differences between all groups. Conversely, sarcomere number was reduced in both FTT and MT with no significant difference between these two groups, in large part because sarcomere length was significantly reduced in MT but not FTT. The loss of muscle mass in FTT is due, in part, to subtraction of serial sarcomeres, which may help preserve sarcomere length. This indicates that function in FTT may be impaired, but there is some remaining mechanical loading to maintain "normal" sarcomere length-tension relationships. However, the changes resulting from MT suggest more severe limitations in force-generating capacity because sarcomere length-tension relationships are no longer normal. The architectural deficits observed in MT muscles may indicate deeper deficiencies in muscle adaptability to length change, which could negatively impact RC function despite successful anatomical repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2089-2095, 2016.

  6. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda Louise

    1999-05-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of ~20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  7. A Dark Spot on a Massive White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alexandros; Bell, Keaton J.; Curd, Brandon; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.; Dufour, Patrick; Wisniewski, John P.; Winget, D. E.; Winget, K. I.

    2015-12-01

    We present the serendipitous discovery of eclipse-like events around the massive white dwarf SDSS J152934.98+292801.9 (hereafter J1529+2928). We selected J1529+2928 for time-series photometry based on its spectroscopic temperature and surface gravity, which place it near the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Instead of pulsations, we detect photometric dips from this white dwarf every 38 minutes. Follow-up optical spectroscopy observations with Gemini reveal no significant radial velocity variations, ruling out stellar and brown dwarf companions. A disintegrating planet around this white dwarf cannot explain the observed light curves in different filters. Given the short period, the source of the photometric dips must be a dark spot that comes into view every 38 minutes due to the rotation of the white dwarf. Our optical spectroscopy does not show any evidence of Zeeman splitting of the Balmer lines, limiting the magnetic field strength to B < 70 kG. Since up to 15% of white dwarfs display kG magnetic fields, such eclipse-like events should be common around white dwarfs. We discuss the potential implications of this discovery on transient surveys targeting white dwarfs, like the K2 mission and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, McDonald Observatory, and the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. The latter is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  8. Massive identification of asteroids in three-body resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Evgeny A.; Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    An essential role in the asteroidal dynamics is played by the mean motion resonances. Two-body planet-asteroid resonances are widely known, due to the Kirkwood gaps. Besides, so-called three-body mean motion resonances exist, in which an asteroid and two planets participate. Identification of asteroids in three-body (namely, Jupiter-Saturn-asteroid) resonances was initially accomplished by Nesvorný and Morbidelli (Nesvorný D., Morbidelli, A. [1998]. Astron. J. 116, 3029-3037), who, by means of visual analysis of the time behaviour of resonant arguments, found 255 asteroids to reside in such resonances. We develop specialized algorithms and software for massive automatic identification of asteroids in the three-body, as well as two-body, resonances of arbitrary order, by means of automatic analysis of the time behaviour of resonant arguments. In the computation of orbits, all essential perturbations are taken into account. We integrate the asteroidal orbits on the time interval of 100,000 yr and identify main-belt asteroids in the three-body Jupiter-Saturn-asteroid resonances up to the 6th order inclusive, and in the two-body Jupiter-asteroid resonances up to the 9th order inclusive, in the set of ˜250,000 objects from the "Asteroids - Dynamic Site" (AstDyS) database. The percentages of resonant objects, including extrapolations for higher-order resonances, are determined. In particular, the observed fraction of pure-resonant asteroids (those exhibiting resonant libration on the whole interval of integration) in the three-body resonances up to the 6th order inclusive is ≈0.9% of the whole set; and, using a higher-order extrapolation, the actual total fraction of pure-resonant asteroids in the three-body resonances of all orders is estimated as ≈1.1% of the whole set.

  9. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  10. ALMA survey of massive cluster progenitors from ATLASGAL. Limited fragmentation at the early evolutionary stage of massive clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Motte, F.; Menten, K. M.; Beuther, H.; Bronfman, L.; Commerçon, B.; Chapillon, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Henning, Th.; Leurini, S.; Longmore, S.; Palau, A.; Peretto, N.; Schuller, F.; Tan, J. C.; Testi, L.; Traficante, A.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    The early evolution of massive cluster progenitors is poorly understood. We investigate the fragmentation properties from 0.3 pc to 0.06 pc scales of a homogenous sample of infrared-quiet massive clumps within 4.5 kpc selected from the ATLASGAL survey. Using the ALMA 7 m array we detect compact dust continuum emission towards all targets and find that fragmentation, at these scales, is limited. The mass distribution of the fragments uncovers a large fraction of cores above 40 M⊙, corresponding to massive dense cores (MDCs) with masses up to 400 M⊙. Seventy-seven percent of the clumps contain at most 3 MDCs per clump, and we also reveal single clumps/MDCs. The most massive cores are formed within the more massive clumps and a high concentration of mass on small scales reveals a high core formation efficiency. The mass of MDCs highly exceeds the local thermal Jeans mass, and we lack the observational evidence of a sufficiently high level of turbulence or strong enough magnetic fields to keep the most massive MDCs in equilibrium. If already collapsing, the observed fragmentation properties with a high core formation efficiency are consistent with the collapse setting in at parsec scales. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/L10

  11. [A case of fetal death resulting from a massive fetomaternal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Denef, M; Capelle, X; Vanlinthout, C; Lepage, S; Emonts, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a late stillbirth which unexpectedly occurred in a patient without any medical history and after a meticulous obstetrical follow up. Stillbirth is unfortunately not unusual and implies a complete etiological work up. In the present observation, the Kleihauer test and anatomoclinical examination concluded that the death was due to an acute cerebral anoxy resulting from a massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (HFM). HFM is rarely considered as the cause of a late stillbirth, but its occurrence is certainly underestimated. Yet, if HFM is identified before fetal death, an .adequate management could considerably improve the fetal prognosis and, sometines, save the child's life.

  12. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  13. Zoning Issues and Area of Interest Management in Massively Multiplayer Online Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Dewan Tanvir; Shirmohammadi, Shervin

    Game is a way of entertainment, a means for excitement, fun and socialization. Online games have achieved popularity due to increasing broadband adoption among consumers. Relatively cheap bandwidth Internet connections allow large number of players to play together. Since the introduction of Network Virtual Environment (NVE) in 1980s for military simulation, many interesting applications have been evolved over the past few decades. Massively multiplayer online (role-playing) game, MMOG or MMORPG, is a new genre of online games that has emerged with the introduction of Ultima since 1997. It is a kind of online computer game with the participation of hundreds of thousands of players in a virtual world.

  14. Trace element content of gossans at four mines in the West Shasta massive sulfide district.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Domenico, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Paired analyses of the spongy whole-rock gossan and its botryoidal crust ("chipped rock rind') show little differences, whereas duplicate samples of each at individual sites show such extreme differences as to preclude the use of the data in areal mapping. Gossans from disseminated sulphides have lower and less variable trace-element contents than gossans from massive sulphides, due in part to dilution by rock silicates. Computer reduction of the data by a regionalizing algorithm enables determination of pattern differences among the four mines.-G.J.N.

  15. Two cases of massive mitral annular calcification mimicking left atrial neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon William; Pearse, Simon; Dahdal, Maher; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Dalby, Miles; Mittal, Tarun

    2011-08-31

    The authors describe two cases of massive mitral annular calcification, initially picked up on echocardiography and suspected of being neoplastic. Subsequent evaluation by CT scanning confirmed the location, aetiology, structure and diagnosis. Both cases demonstrated large masses, with calcification of varying density. This is likely explained by the presence of the previously reported amorphous caseous material demonstrated to be present within such mass structures. Such a feature is described as caseous degeneration. Both patients described have been managed conservatively with medical therapy, predominantly due to their age and general frailty.

  16. Two cases of massive mitral annular calcification mimicking left atrial neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Dubrey, Simon William; Pearse, Simon; Dahdal, Maher; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Dalby, Miles; Mittal, Tarun

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of massive mitral annular calcification, initially picked up on echocardiography and suspected of being neoplastic. Subsequent evaluation by CT scanning confirmed the location, aetiology, structure and diagnosis. Both cases demonstrated large masses, with calcification of varying density. This is likely explained by the presence of the previously reported amorphous caseous material demonstrated to be present within such mass structures. Such a feature is described as caseous degeneration. Both patients described have been managed conservatively with medical therapy, predominantly due to their age and general frailty. PMID:22679051

  17. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Surgical Pulmonary Embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Aaron; Tapson, Victor F; Ramzy, Danny

    2017-02-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) refers to large emboli that cause hemodynamic instability, right ventricular failure, and circulatory collapse. According to the 2016 ACCP Antithrombotic Guidelines, therapy for massive PE should include systemic thrombolytic therapy in conjunction with anticoagulation and supportive care. However, in patients with a contraindication to systemic thrombolytics or in those who fail the above interventions, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and/or surgical embolectomy may be used to improve oxygenation, achieve hemodynamic stability, and successfully treat massive PE. Randomized controlled human trials evaluating ECMO in this context have not been done, and its role has not been well-defined. The European Society of Cardiology 2014 acute PE guidelines briefly mention that ECMO can be used for massive PE as a method for hemodynamic support and as an adjunct to surgical embolectomy. The 2016 CHEST Antithrombotic Therapy for venous thromboembolism Disease guidelines do not mention ECMO in the management of massive PE. However, multiple case reports and small series cited benefit with ECMO for massive PE. Further, ECMO may facilitate stabilization for surgical embolectomy. Unfortunately, ECMO requires full anticoagulation to maintain the functionality of the system; hence, significant bleeding complicates its use in 35% of patients. Contraindications to ECMO include high bleeding risk, recent surgery or hemorrhagic stroke, poor baseline functional status, advanced age, neurologic dysfunction, morbid obesity, unrecoverable condition, renal failure, and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation without adequate perfusion of end organs. In this review, we discuss management of massive PE, with an emphasis on the potential role for ECMO and/or surgical embolectomy.

  18. MiMes and Magnetic Fields in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Veronique

    2013-06-01

    Massive star magnetism is often considered an astronomical ``wildcard'', as it is hard to predict in which stars it may occur. This reflects our fundamental ignorance of the origin of massive star magnetism, and compels us to better understand the scope of its influence on massive stars individually, and also as a population. In the last decade, our understanding of this phenomenon has made a giant leap forward thanks to a new generation of powerful spectropolarimeters capable of measuring the Zeeman effect in the spectra of these stars. Over the past 5 years, ambitious projects such as the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Collaboration have been seeking out magnetic massive stars in the Galaxy, to better understand their origins, physical properties, and how they influence observable stellar characteristics. In this talk, we review the general properties of OB star magnetism in the Galaxy, using recent MiMeS discoveries as examples. It is now clear that the magnetic properties of massive stars are established early in their evolution. This raises interesting and fundamental questions about the physics of stellar formation and connections with stellar magnetism, as MiMeS observations have established that about 1 in 15 Galactic OB stars hosts a magnetic field that is sufficiently strong to significantly influence its atmospheric and wind structure. Could your own mysterious and perplexing OB target be a magnetic massive star? To aid in answering this question, we review many of the outstanding or exotic properties exhibited by known magnetic OB stars that relate directly to their magnetic nature.

  19. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  20. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens of modern trauma care are targeted to the early correction of acute traumatic coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of trauma massive transfusion based on clinical outcomes. We also examined whether the concept was useful in that early prediction of massive transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. Methods Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability of death. A logistic regression model for the prediction of massive transfusion, defined as 10 or more units of red cell transfusions, was developed. Results In total, 5,693 patient records were available for analysis. Mortality increased as transfusion requirements increased, but the model indicated no threshold effect. Mortality was 9% in patients who received none to five PRBC units, 22% in patients receiving six to nine PRBC units, and 42% in patients receiving 10 or more units. A logistic model for prediction of massive transfusion was developed and validated at multiple sites but achieved only moderate performance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.81, with specificity of only 50% at a sensitivity of 90% for the prediction of 10 or more PRBC units. Performance varied widely at different trauma centers, with specificity varying from 48% to 91%. Conclusions No threshold for definition exists at which a massive transfusion specifically results in worse outcomes. Even with a large sample size across multiple trauma datasets, it was not possible to develop a

  1. Massively parallel sequencing: the next big thing in genetic medicine.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Marra, Marco; Friedman, Jan M

    2009-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has reduced the cost and increased the throughput of genomic sequencing by more than three orders of magnitude, and it seems likely that costs will fall and throughput improve even more in the next few years. Clinical use of massively parallel sequencing will provide a way to identify the cause of many diseases of unknown etiology through simultaneous screening of thousands of loci for pathogenic mutations and by sequencing biological specimens for the genomic signatures of novel infectious agents. In addition to providing these entirely new diagnostic capabilities, massively parallel sequencing may also replace arrays and Sanger sequencing in clinical applications where they are currently being used. Routine clinical use of massively parallel sequencing will require higher accuracy, better ways to select genomic subsets of interest, and improvements in the functionality, speed, and ease of use of data analysis software. In addition, substantial enhancements in laboratory computer infrastructure, data storage, and data transfer capacity will be needed to handle the extremely large data sets produced. Clinicians and laboratory personnel will require training to use the sequence data effectively, and appropriate methods will need to be developed to deal with the incidental discovery of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance. Massively parallel sequencing has the potential to transform the practice of medical genetics and related fields, but the vast amount of personal genomic data produced will increase the responsibility of geneticists to ensure that the information obtained is used in a medically and socially responsible manner.

  2. Space-time philosophy reconstructed via massive Nordström scalar gravities? Laws vs. geometry, conventionality, and underdetermination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, J. Brian

    2016-02-01

    What if gravity satisfied the Klein-Gordon equation? Both particle physics from the 1920-30s and the 1890s Neumann-Seeliger modification of Newtonian gravity with exponential decay suggest considering a "graviton mass term" for gravity, which is algebraic in the potential. Unlike Nordström's "massless" theory, massive scalar gravity is strictly special relativistic in the sense of being invariant under the Poincaré group but not the 15-parameter Bateman-Cunningham conformal group. It therefore exhibits the whole of Minkowski space-time structure, albeit only indirectly concerning volumes. Massive scalar gravity is plausible in terms of relativistic field theory, while violating most interesting versions of Einstein's principles of general covariance, general relativity, equivalence, and Mach. Geometry is a poor guide to understanding massive scalar gravity(s): matter sees a conformally flat metric due to universal coupling, but gravity also sees the rest of the flat metric (barely or on long distances) in the mass term. What is the 'true' geometry, one might wonder, in line with Poincaré's modal conventionality argument? Infinitely many theories exhibit this bimetric 'geometry,' all with the total stress-energy's trace as source; thus geometry does not explain the field equations. The irrelevance of the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild construction to a critique of conventionalism becomes evident when multi-geometry theories are contemplated. Much as Seeliger envisaged, the smooth massless limit indicates underdetermination of theories by data between massless and massive scalar gravities-indeed an unconceived alternative. At least one version easily could have been developed before General Relativity; it then would have motivated thinking of Einstein's equations along the lines of Einstein's newly re-appreciated "physical strategy" and particle physics and would have suggested a rivalry from massive spin 2 variants of General Relativity (massless spin 2, Pauli and Fierz

  3. Initiation of Massive Landsliding through Progressive Strength Reduction in Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. E.; Keith, T. C.; Kayen, R. E.; Iverson, N. R.; Iverson, R. M.; Brien, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Landslides that sculpt deeply into volcano edifices can be extremely large. For example, the 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano generated a 2.8 km3 debris-avalanche deposit from a series of massive retrogressive failures. Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in such landsliding, yet pertinent data from modern volcano collapse surfaces are rare. The collapse crater at MSH affords access to rocks directly from the failure surface of the1980 massive landslide. We used a combination of field observations, laboratory strength tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice, and quasi-3D slope-stability analyses to investigate the effects of progressive strength reduction, caused by pre-collapse deformation, on the instability of the volcano's edifice. Within the MSH crater, we observed that the basal shear zone from the outermost initial landslide block (Block I) of the 1980 failure formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dacitic dome rocks; shearing was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. We collected relatively undisturbed tube samples and disturbed bulk samples of the shattered dacite from near the slip surface of Block I. Using a triaxial testing device, equipped with high-pressure components to mimic overburden stresses in the pre-collapse edifice, we determined the quasi-static drained shear strength of the undisturbed samples. These tests indicated a peak angle of internal friction, φ, of 35° and a residual φ (after undergoing axial strain up to 20%) of 29°. We also determined residual shear strength using a specially constructed large-volume ring-shear apparatus that imposed large quasi-static shear strains exceeding 100%. These tests yielded a similar residual strength, with φ of 27°. Prior to its catastrophic collapse in 1980, the MSH edifice was deformed northward tens of meters by an intruding cryptodome, which likely caused shearing along a summit fault and

  4. Waveforms in massive gravity and neutralization of giant black hole ringings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine; Ould El Hadj, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    A distorted black hole radiates gravitational waves in order to settle down in a smoother geometry. During that relaxation phase, a characteristic damped ringing is generated. It can be theoretically constructed from both the black hole quasinormal frequencies (which govern its oscillating behavior and its decay) and the associated excitation factors (which determine intrinsically its amplitude) by carefully taking into account the source of the distortion. In the framework of massive gravity, the excitation factors of the Schwarzschild black hole have an unexpected strong resonant behavior which, theoretically, could lead to giant and slowly decaying ringings. If massive gravity is relevant to physics, one can hope to observe these extraordinary ringings by using the next generations of gravitational wave detectors. Indeed, they could be generated by supermassive black holes if the graviton mass is not too small. In fact, by focusing on the odd-parity ℓ=1 mode of the Fierz-Pauli field, we shall show here that such ringings are neutralized in waveforms due to (i) the excitation of the quasibound states of the black hole and (ii) the evanescent nature of the particular partial modes which could excite the concerned quasinormal modes. Despite this, with observational consequences in mind, it is interesting to note that the waveform amplitude is nevertheless rather pronounced and slowly decaying (this effect is now due to the long-lived quasibound states). It is worth noting also that, for very low values of the graviton mass (corresponding to the weak instability regime for the black hole), the waveform is now very clean and dominated by an ordinary ringing which could be used as a signature of massive gravity.

  5. Southern Massive Stars at High Angular Resolution: Observational Campaign and Companion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, H.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Duvert, G.; Gauchet, L.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Pickel, D.; Zins, G.; Absil, O.; de Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0° H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f m = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f c = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved, including the newly

  6. SOUTHERN MASSIVE STARS AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: OBSERVATIONAL CAMPAIGN AND COMPANION DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sana, H.; Lacour, S.; Gauchet, L.; Pickel, D.; Berger, J.-P.; Norris, B.; Olofsson, J.; Absil, O.; De Koter, A.; Kratter, K.; Schnurr, O.; Zinnecker, H.

    2014-11-01

    Multiplicity is one of the most fundamental observable properties of massive O-type stars and offers a promising way to discriminate between massive star formation theories. Nevertheless, companions at separations between 1 and 100 milliarcsec (mas) remain mostly unknown due to intrinsic observational limitations. At a typical distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to projected physical separations of 2-200 AU. The Southern MAssive Stars at High angular resolution survey (SMaSH+) was designed to fill this gap by providing the first systematic interferometric survey of Galactic massive stars. We observed 117 O-type stars with VLTI/PIONIER and 162 O-type stars with NACO/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM), probing the separation ranges 1-45 and 30-250 mas and brightness contrasts of ΔH < 4 and ΔH < 5, respectively. Taking advantage of NACO's field of view, we further uniformly searched for visual companions in an 8'' radius down to ΔH = 8. This paper describes observations and data analysis, reports the discovery of almost 200 new companions in the separation range from 1 mas to 8'' and presents a catalog of detections, including the first resolved measurements of over a dozen known long-period spectroscopic binaries. Excluding known runaway stars for which no companions are detected, 96 objects in our main sample (δ < 0°; H < 7.5) were observed both with PIONIER and NACO/SAM. The fraction of these stars with at least one resolved companion within 200 mas is 0.53. Accounting for known but unresolved spectroscopic or eclipsing companions, the multiplicity fraction at separation ρ < 8'' increases to f {sub m} = 0.91 ± 0.03. The fraction of luminosity class V stars that have a bound companion reaches 100% at 30 mas while their average number of physically connected companions within 8'' is f {sub c} = 2.2 ± 0.3. This demonstrates that massive stars form nearly exclusively in multiple systems. The nine non-thermal radio emitters observed by SMaSH+ are all resolved

  7. HCN Hyperfine Ratio Analysis of Massive Molecular Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, William; Barnes, Peter; Ginsburg, Adam; Ordonez, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The CHaMP project has identified a uniform sample of 303 massive (20-8000 M⊙), dense (200-30,000 cm-3) molecular clumps in a large sector of the southern Milky Way that includes much of the Carina Arm. These are the kinds of clumps that are likely to be the precursors to IRDCs, large stellar clusters, and massive stars. We report new results of the physical conditions in these clouds based on the J=1 -> 0 emission at 3mm from the HCN molecule. Analysis of the HCN emission from these clumps reveals that the physical conditions in the gas (i.e., the excitation temperature, optical depth, and column density) do not follow the molecular line emissivity in a straightforward way. This means that large fractions of the molecular material involved in massive cluster formation, while not completely``dark'', are under-luminous and easily missed in certain studies.

  8. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  9. Role of Massive Stars in the Evolution of Primitive Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara

    2012-01-01

    An important factor controlling galaxy evolution is feedback from massive stars. It is believed that the nature and intensity of stellar feedback changes as a function of galaxy mass and metallicity. At low mass and metallicity, feedback from massive stars is mainly in the form of photoionizing radiation. At higher mass and metallicity, it is in stellar winds. IZw 18 is a local blue, compact dwarf galaxy that meets the requirements for a primitive galaxy: low halo mass greater than 10(exp 9)Msun, strong photoionizing radiation, no galactic outflow, and very low metallicity,log(O/H)+12=7.2. We will describe the properties of massive stars and their role in the evolution of IZw 18, based on analysis of ultraviolet images and spectra obtained with HST.

  10. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  11. Unilateral massive hemothorax in Dengue hemorrhagic fever: a unique presentation.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Anurag; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana

    2012-09-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a more serious form of disease characterised by plasma leakage syndrome, thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We present a 51 year old male who presented with fever, petechiae and acute onset of breathlessness. Emergency chest rhoentogram showed a massive right sided pleural effusion. On insertion of intercostal drain, there was a sudden gush of blood tinged fluid suggestive of hemothorax. There was no history of trauma or bleeding tendencies. Laboratory investigations revealed a raised hematocrit and severe thrombocytopenia. Dengue IgM was surprisingly positive. After aggressive supportive management the patient gradually improved and was discharged. While bilateral pleural effusion is a known occurrence in dengue hemorrhagic fever, massive hemothorax is unheard of. We report the first case in literature of dengue hemorrhagic fever presenting as unilateral massive hemothorax. A suspicion of dengue must also be borne in mind in cases of non-traumatic hemothorax especially in endemic areas.

  12. Simulating nonlinear cosmological structure formation with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arka; Dalal, Neal

    2016-11-01

    We present a new method for simulating cosmologies that contain massive particles with thermal free streaming motion, such as massive neutrinos or warm/hot dark matter. This method combines particle and fluid descriptions of the thermal species to eliminate the shot noise known to plague conventional N-body simulations. We describe this method in detail, along with results for a number of test cases to validate our method, and check its range of applicability. Using this method, we demonstrate that massive neutrinos can produce a significant scale-dependence in the large-scale biasing of deep voids in the matter field. We show that this scale-dependence may be quantitatively understood using an extremely simple spherical expansion model which reproduces the behavior of the void bias for different neutrino parameters.

  13. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  14. Instability of flat space for massive gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, J.; Kang, I.

    1986-08-15

    Flat space is not stable in massive gravity, in the sense that for any nonzero graviton mass m-italic, no matter how small it may be, any nontrivial solution for the massive field equations is not asymptotically flat as one goes far away from the source, i.e., r-italic..-->..infinity. This is because, although one may be able to construct a locally stable solution with respect to flat space, it does not approach flat space in the limit r-italic..-->..infinity. This is still true even if one takes a successive set of both limits r-italic..-->..infinity and m-italic..-->..0. Flat space in massive gravity as well as in its massless limit is only an isolated trivial solution. This leads to the conclusion that Einstein's general relativity is an isolated theory.

  15. Secrecy and Energy Efficiency in Massive MIMO Aided Heterogeneous C-RAN: A New Look at Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Wong, Kai-Kit; Elkashlan, Maged; Nallanathan, Arumugam; Lambotharan, Sangarapillai

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the potential benefits of the massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) enabled heterogeneous cloud radio access network (C-RAN) in terms of the secrecy and energy efficiency (EE). In this network, both remote radio heads (RRHs) and massive MIMO macrocell base stations (BSs) are deployed and soft fractional frequency reuse (S-FFR) is adopted to mitigate the inter-tier interference. We first examine the physical layer security by deriving the area ergodic secrecy rate and secrecy outage probability. Our results reveal that the use of massive MIMO and C-RAN can greatly improve the secrecy performance. For C-RAN, a large number of RRHs achieves high area ergodic secrecy rate and low secrecy outage probability, due to its powerful interference management. We find that for massive MIMO aided macrocells, having more antennas and serving more users improves secrecy performance. Then we derive the EE of the heterogeneous C-RAN, illustrating that increasing the number of RRHs significantly enhances the network EE. Furthermore, it is indicated that allocating more radio resources to the RRHs can linearly increase the EE of RRH tier and improve the network EE without affecting the EE of the macrocells.

  16. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (<1:1) subgroups. Coagulation was detected before and after 24 h of massive blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P < 0.05) in the low plasma subgroup of coagulation normal group after massive blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the ratio of plasma to erythrocyte should be adjusted according to the patient's coagulation function during massive blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  17. THE MERGER-DRIVEN EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Robaina, Aday R.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Wolf, Christian

    2010-08-10

    We explore the rate and impact of galaxy mergers on the massive galaxy population using the amplitude of the two-point correlation function on small scales for M {sub *} > 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} galaxies from the COSMOS and COMBO-17 surveys. Using a pair fraction derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a low-redshift benchmark, the large survey area at intermediate redshifts allows us to determine the evolution of the close-pair fraction with unprecedented accuracy for a mass-selected sample: we find that the fraction of galaxies more massive than 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in pairs separated by less than 30 kpc in three-dimensional space evolves as F(z) = (0.0130 {+-} 0.0019) x (1 + z){sup 1.21{+-}0.25} between z = 0 and z = 1.2. Assuming a merger timescale of 0.5 Gyr, the inferred merger rate is such that galaxies with mass in excess of 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} have undergone, on average, 0.5 (0.7) mergers involving progenitor galaxies both more massive than 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} since z = 0.6 (1.2). We also study the number density evolution of massive red sequence galaxies using published luminosity functions and constraints on the M/L {sub B} evolution from the fundamental plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the measured merger rate of massive galaxies is sufficient to explain this observed number density evolution in massive red sequence galaxies since z = 1.

  18. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 M ⊙) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N2D+ (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N2D+ cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ~ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ~60 M ⊙, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that mA ~= 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  19. Gravitational Collapse and Neutrino Emission of Population III Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2006-07-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars are the first stars in the universe. They do not contain metals, and their formation and evolution may be different from that of stars of later generations. In fact, according to the theory of star formation, Pop III stars might have very massive components (~100-10000 Msolar). In this paper, we compute the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of these Pop III massive stars. We solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics and neutrino transfer equations simultaneously, treating neutrino reactions in detail. Unlike supermassive stars (>~105 Msolar), the stars of concern in this paper become opaque to neutrinos. The collapse is simulated until after an apparent horizon is formed. We confirm that the neutrino transfer plays a crucial role in the dynamics of gravitational collapse and find also that the β-equilibration leads to a somewhat unfamiliar evolution of electron fraction. Contrary to the naive expectation, the neutrino spectrum does not become harder for more massive stars. This is mainly because the neutrino cooling is more efficient and the outer core is more massive as the stellar mass increases. Here the outer core is the outer part of the iron core falling supersonically. We also evaluate the flux of relic neutrinos from Pop III massive stars. As expected, the detection of these neutrinos is difficult for the currently operating detectors. However, if ever observed, the spectrum will enable us to obtain information on the formation history of Pop III stars. We investigate 18 models covering the mass range of 300-104 Msolar, making this study the most detailed numerical exploration of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of Pop III massive stars. This will also serve as an important foundation for multidimensional investigations.

  20. Electromagnetic field properties in the vicinity of a massive wormhole

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, I. D.; Shatskiy, A. A.

    2011-12-15

    It is proved that not only massless but also traversable massive wormholes can have electromagnetic 'hair.' An analysis is also presented of the passage from a traversable wormhole to the limit of a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole, with the corresponding disappearance of 'hair.' A general method is developed for solving stationary axisymmetric Maxwell's equations in the field of a massive, spherically symmetric wormhole. As a particular example of application of the method, a solution is found to the axisymmetric magnetostatic problem for a current loop in the field of the Bronnikov-Ellis-Morris-Thorne wormhole.

  1. Do you know the extinction in your young massive cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Sabbi, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Up to ages of ~ 100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, with considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars, from basic luminosities and effective temperatures to masses and ages, we must understand and measure the local extinction law. This problem affects all the massive young clusters discussed in his volume.

  2. Massive subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardium in children.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Stefano; Franklin, Ashanti; Pierce, James; Ford, Henri; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2010-03-01

    Massive subcutaneous emphysema (SE), pneumomediastinum (PM), and pneumopericardium (PP) are rare conditions in the pediatric population. Air leak syndrome is a constellation of disorders that include SE, PM, PP, and pulmonary interstitial emphysema. In children, SE, PM, and PP are associated with obstructive airway disease most often in the case of asthma. Management may be conservative or involve invasive procedures that require surgical intervention. Here, we describe a case of massive SE, PM, and PP in a 10-year-old child after placement of a peripherally inserted central line and review the literature.

  3. Combined stellar evolution and spectroscopic modeling of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose H.

    The morphological appearance of massive stars during their evolution and at the pre-SN stage is very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. We recently developed coupled stellar evolution and atmospheric modeling of stars done with the Geneva and CMFGEN codes, for initial masses between 9 and 120 M ⊙. We are able to predict the observables such as the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry. Here I discuss how the spectrum of a massive star changes across its evolution and before death. Our models allow, for the first time, direct comparison between predictions from stellar evolution models and observations of SN progenitors.

  4. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) in a Boy with Massive Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Khalesi, Maryam; Farid, Reza; Badiee, Zahra; Rastin, Maryam; Ahanchian, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon nonmalignant lymphoproliferative disease which is characterized by chronic, persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, immune cytopenia , hypergammaglobinemia and increased risk of lymphoma. We report a 2-year old boy with hepatosplenomegaly as first presentation. Petechial and purpuric rashes with massive cervical lymphadenopathies developed 10 months later.In laboratory tests anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypergammaglobinemia were observed. According to flocytometry increased double negative T cells and by apoptosis assay decrease apoptosis of lymphocytes accompanied clinical manifestations, thus diagnosis of ALPS was established. In conclusion; in all patients with massive lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegay; especially with cytopenia; ALPS should be considered.

  5. Fulminant massive gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shoji; Okada, Yumi; Mita, Masaki; Okamoto, Yasuo; Kato, Hirotaka; Ueyama, Shigemitsu; Fujii, Ikuzo; Morita, Sumiharu; Yoshida, Yasuaki

    2005-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C.P) gas gangrene is one of the most fulminant infectious diseases. We encountered fulminant massive gas gangrene in a 56- year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The patient died 14 hours after diagnosis of gas gangrene (54 hours after admission). Dramatic changes in abdominal CT imaging revealed development of a massive volume of gas in the intra-portal vein, retroperitoneum and abdominal subcutaneous tissue within 24 hours. We also proved C.P infection by immunohistological staining, leading to a diagnosis of C.P gas gangrene.

  6. Experimental and clinical observations on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Lakhanpal, V

    1993-01-01

    We have been able to create a reproducible experimental model of nonexpulsive massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage in a rabbit eye. Massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage was demonstrated on echography and confirmed on histopathologic examination in all eyes. The natural course of the disease suggests that there is very little change in the size of the choroidal detachment in the first 7 days. Maximum liquefaction of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage clot was seen to occur between 7 and 14 days. However, increased retinal and ciliary body atrophy was also noted at 14 days. Therefore, the optimum time to drain massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage appears to be between 7 and 14 days. Immediate sclerotomy during the acute formation of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage resulted in further increase in the suprachoroidal hemorrhage, with marked extension of the hemorrhage into the retina and vitreous. Therefore, in our opinion, immediate sclerotomy during massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is detrimental to the eye. Our clinical data have shown that eyes with massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage can be treated successfully by secondary surgery, and the majority of the eyes can be salvaged with good visual results. No serious complications of this surgery were encountered in our cases. We advocate early surgical intervention between 7 and 14 days. Aggressive anterior and posterior segment reconstruction by anterior and posterior vitrectomy after sclerotomy drainage of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage is essential for better anatomic and visual results. Our animal data and clinical experience suggest that the optimum time of drainage of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is between 7 and 14 days. The results of our animal experiments in relation to human clinical application should be taken with caution. Furthermore, we had a small number of animals to study the various groups. In addition, longer follow-up may be needed for comparing controls with the treatment groups. Our animal model may help

  7. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  8. A massive young cluster in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; Monguió, M.; Marco, A.; González-Fernández, C.; Dorda, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the reddened open cluster Berkeley 51. We find an important population of yellow and red supergiant stars. Multi-object spectroscopy with GTC/OSIRIS reveals a population of B-type stars, with a main-sequence extending up to B3 V. With a combination of spectroscopy and photometry, we determine an age around 35 Ma and a distance probably compatible with the Perseus Arm in this direction. The large population of supergiants suggests a rather massive cluster, confirming that this kind of young massive clusters are much more frequent in the Milky Way than envisaged only a few years ago.

  9. One-loop divergences in massive gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Pereira, D. D.; Shapiro, I. L.

    2012-05-01

    The one-loop divergences are calculated for the recently proposed ghost-free massive gravity model, where the action depends on both metric and external tensor field f. The non-polynomial structure of the massive term is reduced to a more standard form by means of auxiliary tensor field, which is settled on-shell after quantum calculations are performed. As one should expect, the counter-terms do not reproduce the form of the classical action. Moreover, the result has the form of the power series in f.

  10. Construction of a massive ABJM theory without Higgs superfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2017-01-01

    A massive Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) model in N =1 superspace is analysed by considering a Proca-type mass term into the most general Faddeev-Popov action in a covariant gauge. The presence of a mass term breaks the original BRST and anti-BRST invariance of the model. Further, the symmetry of the massive ABJM model is restored by extending the BRST and anti-BRST transformations. We show that the supergauge dependence of the generating functional for connected diagrams occurs in the presence of mass and ghost–anti-ghost condensates in the theory.

  11. Bosonization of fermions coupled to topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Moreno, Enrique F.; Schaposnik, Fidel A.

    2014-03-01

    We establish a duality between massive fermions coupled to topologically massive gravity (TMG) in d=3 space-time dimensions and a purely gravity theory which also will turn out to be a TMG theory but with different parameters: the original graviton mass in the TMG theory coupled to fermions picks up a contribution from fermion bosonization. We obtain explicit bosonization rules for the fermionic currents and for the energy-momentum tensor showing that the identifications do not depend explicitly on the parameters of the theory. These results are the gravitational analog of the results for 2+1 Abelian and non-Abelian bosonization in flat space-time.

  12. Management of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Chan, Keith W; Kwon, Young W

    2009-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears pose a distinct clinical challenge for the orthopaedist. In this review, we will discuss the classification, diagnosis, and evaluation of massive rotator cuff tears before discussing various treatment options for this problem. Nonoperative treatment has had inconsistent results and proven unsuccessful for chronic symptoms while operative treatment including debridement and partial and complete repairs have had varying degrees of success. For rotator cuff tears that are deemed irreparable, treatment options are limited. The use of tendon transfers in younger patients to reconstruct rotator cuff function and restore shoulder kinematics can be useful in salvaging this difficult problem.

  13. Massive basketball diagram for a thermal scalar field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2000-08-15

    The ''basketball diagram'' is a three-loop vacuum diagram for a scalar field theory that cannot be expressed in terms of one-loop diagrams. We calculate this diagram for a massive scalar field at nonzero temperature, reducing it to expressions involving three-dimensional integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. We use this result to calculate the free energy for a massive scalar field with a {phi}{sup 4} interaction to three-loop order. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  15. Comparing ALMA, VLT, and HST data for Massive, Young Clusters in Grand-Design Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosboel, Preben; Dottori, Horacio

    2015-08-01

    A population of young, massive stellar cluster complexes with near-infrared (NIR) colors indicating high extinction (i.e. Av ~ 7mag) was identified on HAWK-I/VLT images of several nearby, grand-design spiral galaxies (Grosboel & Dottori 2012, A&A 542, A39). Models suggest that they are very young cluster complexes still embedded in a dust/gas envelope which will be expelled after the first supernovae explosions (Grosboel & Dottori 2013, A&A 551, L13). Optical studies of nearby disk galaxies using HST data (see e.g. Larsen & Richtler 1999 A&A 345, 49, and Bastian et al. 2012, MNRAS 419, 2606) do not find a similar population of clusters. This may be due to several reasons such as a) lower spatial resolution of the NIR data (Bastian et al. 2014, MNRAS 444, 3829), b) high attenuation by dust limiting detection at optical wavelengths, or c) such populations only exist in grand-design spirals due to the strong perturbations in their arm regions. The current paper presents a detailed comparison of HST and HAWK-I images to better understand the discrepancy between the optical and NIR detection of stellar clusters in nearby galaxies. Further, the ALMA CO-map of NGC 4321 is compared with the VLT NIR images to analyze the possible correlation between giant molecular clouds and formation of massive clusters.

  16. Dynamics of massive black holes as a possible candidate of Galactic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Guohong; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    If the dark halo of the Galaxy is comprised of massive black holes (MBHs), then those within approximately 1 kpc will spiral to the center, where they will interact with one another, forming binaries which contract, owing to further dynamical friction, and then possibly merge to become more massive objects by emission of gravitational radiation. If successive mergers would invariably lead, as has been proposed by various authors, to the formation of a very massive nucleus of 10(exp 8) solar mass, then the idea of MBHs as a dark matter candidate could be excluded on observational grounds, since the observed limit (or value) for a Galactic central black hole is approximately 10(exp 6.5) solar mass. But, if successive mergers are delayed or prevented by other processes, such as the gravitational slingshot or rocket effect of gravitational radiation, then a large mass accumulation will not occur. In order to resolve this issue, we perform detailed N-body simulations using a modfied Aarseth code to explore the dynamical behavior of the MBHs, and we find that for a 'best estimate' model of the Galaxy a runaway does not occur. The code treates the MBHs as subject to the primary gravitational forces of one another and to the smooth stellar distribution, as well as the secondary perturbations in their orbits due to another and to the smooth stellar distribution, as well as the secondary perturbations in their orbits due to dynamical friction and gravitational radiation. Instead of a runaway, three-body interactions between hard binaries and single MBHs eject massive objects before accumulation of more than a few units, so that typically the center will contain zero, one, or two MBHs. We study how the situation depends in detail on the mass per MBH, the rotation of the halo, the mass distribution within the Galaxy, and other parameters. A runaway will most sensitively depend on the ratio of initial (spheroid/halo) central mass densities and secondarily on the typical values

  17. Dynamical mass estimates of young massive clusters in NGC1140 and M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Sarah L.; de Grijs, Richard; Mengel, Sabine; Smith, Linda J.; Crowther, Paul A.

    2009-12-01

    We present virial mass estimates of young massive clusters (YMCs) in the starburst galaxies NGC1140 and M83, determined from high spectral resolution VLT echelle spectroscopy and high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging. The survivability of such clusters is important in testing the scenario that YMCs are potentially proto-globular clusters. As young clusters, they lie in the domain in which dynamical masses appear to overestimate true cluster masses, most likely due to the clusters not being virialised. We find that the dynamical mass of NGC1140-1 is approximately ten times greater than its photometric mass. We propose that the most likely explanation for this disparity is the crowded environment of NGC1140-1, rather than this being solely due to a lack of virial equilibrium.

  18. F(R) nonlinear massive theories of gravity and their cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Duplessis, Francis; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a nonlinear massive gravitational theory which includes F(R) modifications. This construction inherits the benefits of the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley model and is free of the Boulware-Deser ghost due to the existence of a Hamiltonian constraint accompanied by a nontrivial secondary one. The scalar perturbations in a cosmological background can be stabilized at the linear level for a wide class of the F(R) models. The linear scalar mode arisen from the F(R) sector can absorb the nonlinear longitudinal graviton, and hence, our scenario demonstrates the possibility of a gravitational Goldstone theorem. Finally, due to the combined contribution of the F(R) and graviton-mass sectors, the proposed theory allows for a large class of cosmological evolutions, such as the simultaneous and unified description of inflation and late-time acceleration.

  19. Resolving the properties of massive, high-redshift starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, James Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) are a population of dusty, obscured sources that represent some of the most extreme sites of star-formation in the Universe. These galaxies have total far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of 10E12-10E13Lsol and colossal star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼100-1000 Msol/yr, with the FIR-emission arising due to the reprocessing of ultraviolet radiation from massive, young stars by dust. Despite their discovery nearly 20 years ago, our understanding of the SMG population has been hampered by the coarse resolution (FWHM = 15-30") of single-dish sub-millimeter surveys. In this thesis I present observations of FIR-bright (S870≳1mJy) galaxies that have precise identifications from high-resolution imaging taken with sub-mm/mm interferometers. I present a multi-wavelength study of 96 SMGs that have unambiguous identifications from observations with Atacama Large Millimeter sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) and determine that the photometric redshift distribution for the SMG population has a median of zphot=2.5±0.2. I show that if the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100Myr then their descendants at z∼0 would have a space density and absolute H -band magnitude distribution that are in good agreement with a volume limited sample of local ellipticals. The low resolution of single-dish surveys has led to concerns about the blending of multiple individual galaxies into a single sub-millimeter source. I present ALMA observations of a sample of 30 bright, single-dish-identified sub-mm sources and show that 61(+19 -15)% are comprised of a blend of multiple SMGs brighter than ≳1mJy. Furthermore, I show that source blending boosts the apparent single-dish number counts by 20% at S870>7.5 mJy. A morphological analysis of the far-infrared emission from a subset of 23 of the brightest sources detected in the ALMA maps shows that the intense starburst in SMGs occurs in a compact region with a median physical half-light diameter of 2.4±0.2kpc

  20. Spectroscopic evolution of massive stars on the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Palacios, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars depends on several parameters, and the relation between different morphological types is not fully constrained. Aims: We aim to provide an observational view of evolutionary models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, on the main sequence. This view should help compare observations and model predictions. Methods: We first computed evolutionary models with the code STAREVOL for initial masses between 15 and 100 M⊙. We subsequently calculated atmosphere models at specific points along the evolutionary tracks, using the code CMFGEN. Synthetic spectra obtained in this way were classified as if they were observational data: we assigned them a spectral type and a luminosity class. We tested our spectral classification by comparison to observed spectra of various stars with different spectral types. We also compared our results with empirical data of a large number of OB stars. Results: We obtain spectroscopic sequences along evolutionary tracks. In our computations, the earliest O stars (O2-3.5) appear only above 50 M⊙. For later spectral types, a similar mass limit exists, but is lower. A luminosity class V does not correspond to the entire main sequence. This only holds for the 15 M⊙ track. As mass increases, a larger portion of the main sequence is spent in luminosity class III. Above 50 M⊙, supergiants appear before the end of core-hydrogen burning. Dwarf stars (luminosity class V) do not occur on the zero-age main sequence above 80 M⊙. Consequently, the distribution of luminosity class V in the HR diagram is not a diagnostic of the length of the main sequence (above 15 M⊙) and cannot be used to constrain the size of the convective core. The distribution of dwarfs and giants in the HR diagram that results from our calculations agrees well with the location of stars analyzed by means of quantitative spectroscopy. For supergiants, there is a slight discrepancy in the sense that luminosity class I is observed slightly

  1. Management of hematometrocolpos due to dysfunctional uterine bleeding following progestin use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bakacak, Murat; Avci, Fazil; Bostanci, Mehmet Suhha; Bakacak, Zeyneb; Serin, Salih; Ercan, Onder; Kostu, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Hematometrocolpos is accumulation of blood in the vagina and uterine cavity due to intra-uterine hemorrhage. A 20-year-old female presented to our clinic with massive menorrhagia at menarche after progestin usage. Hematometrocolpos was detected by transabdominal ultrasonography. She was pale because of heavy bleeding for 5 days and hemoglobin level was measured as 5.1 g/dl. Initial treatment was blood transfusion and medical drug therapy. After resolution of the hematometrocolpos was shown by transabdominal ultrasound 2 days later, the patient, who was stable, was discharged without complication. Obstruction of the female genital outflow tract is rarely seen. Hematocolpos has been reported in elderly women following vaginal occlusion due to radiotherapy, vaginal fibroma and labial synechiae causing infection or inflammatory conditions. The case is presented here because of the successful management of hematometrocolpos due to massive dysfunctional uterine bleeding in a young virgin patient. PMID:28058301

  2. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  3. Perturbation Theory of Massive Yang-Mills Fields

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Veltman, M.

    1968-08-01

    Perturbation theory of massive Yang-Mills fields is investigated with the help of the Bell-Treiman transformation. Diagrams containing one closed loop are shown to be convergent if there are more than four external vector boson lines. The investigation presented does not exclude the possibility that the theory is renormalizable.

  4. The High Angular Resolution Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    were probably ejected from clusters. The ejection process may have involved close gravitational encounters of binaries and/or supernovae explosions in...1990) while the latter are the result of a supernova explosion in a binary, so both processes must contribute to the ejection of massive stars from

  5. MOOCs: Massive Open Online Courses. EUA Occasional Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Over the past year, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have received a great deal of attention from the academic community and the media. The EUA Secretariat has followed the development of the MOOCs since the beginning of 2012, surveying discussion forums and publications, but also assessing the websites of MOOC providers and participating in…

  6. Experience with a Massive Open Online Course in Rural Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warugaba, Christine; Naughton, Brienna; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany; Muhirwa, Ernest; Amoroso, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    The growing utilization of massive open online courses (MOOCs) is opening opportunities for students worldwide, but the completion rate for MOOCs is low (Liyanagunawardena, Adams, & Williams, 2013). Partners In Health (PIH) implemented a "flipped" MOOC in Rwanda that incorporated in-class sessions to facilitate participant…

  7. Self- and Peer Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huisman, Bart; van de Ven, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lecture content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in…

  8. Changing "Course": Reconceptualizing Educational Variables for Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBoer, Jennifer; Ho, Andrew D.; Stump, Glenda S.; Breslow, Lori

    2014-01-01

    In massive open online courses (MOOCs), low barriers to registration attract large numbers of students with diverse interests and backgrounds, and student use of course content is asynchronous and unconstrained. The authors argue that MOOC data are not only plentiful and different in kind but require reconceptualization--new educational variables…

  9. MOOCs as a Massive Research Laboratory: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diver, Paul; Martinez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) offer many opportunities for research into several topics related to pedagogical methods and student incentives. In the context of over 20 years of online learning research, we discuss lessons to be learned from observational comparisons and experiments on randomly chosen groups of students. We target two MOOCs…

  10. Improving the Learning Design of Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubens, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be regarded as a promising next step in the evolution of distance education. However, they have been criticised for their poor learning design. This article describes the development of an adequate learning design in a series of nineteen MOOCs (called online master classes). A formative evaluation focuses on…

  11. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Early Treatment of Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A. Baarslag, Henk Jan; Koolen, Maria G.J.; Delden, Otto van; Beek, Edwin J.R. van

    2003-06-15

    We report our technique and results of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy in a consecutive series of eight patients with massive PE. We also discuss the possible role of mechanical PE thrombectomy. Eight consecutive patients with acute massive PE, with or without hemodynamic impairment, were treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We used a modified 7-fr hydrolyzer catheter. The treatment was combined with systemic fibrinolysis. From the logistic and technical point we encountered no problems. All patients showed significant improvement while still in the angiography suite. There were no bleeding complications and no other events related to the procedure. Despite the clinical improvement, one patient died shortly after the procedure from cardiac failure. In all patients there was an acute increase in PO2 to normal values. Only a mean of about 50% of all local thrombus could be removed (range 30-80%). The mean PAP pre-intervention decreased only minimally from 42.5 mmHg to 36.3 mm Hg post-intervention (not significant). In three patients, the PAP continues to remain high at follow-up. The most important feature of mechanical thrombectomy for massive PE is the immediate improvement of the cardiac output, PO2, and clinical situation, overcoming the first critical hours after massive PE. The amount of thrombus reduction seems not to be an important parameter.

  12. Searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    The status of searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay is reviewed. The claim by an ITEP group that the electron antineutrino mass > 17eV has been disputed by all the subsequent experiments. Current measurements of the tritium beta spectrum limit m[sub [bar [nu

  13. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  14. Supporting Professional Learning in a Massive Open Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Colin; Littlejohn, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Professional learning, combining formal and on the job learning, is important for the development and maintenance of expertise in the modern workplace. To integrate formal and informal learning, professionals have to have good self-regulatory ability. Formal learning opportunities are opening up through massive open online courses (MOOCs),…

  15. Exploring Engaging Gamification Mechanics in Massive Online Open Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jen-Wei; Wei, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have developed rapidly and become tremendously popular because of their plentiful gamification designs, such as reputation points, rewards, and goal setting. Although previous studies have mentioned a broad range of gamification designs that might influence MOOC learner engagement, most gamified MOOCs fail to…

  16. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyo, Benedict; Kalema, Billy Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs), open access to higher education (HE) was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery,…

  17. Project Based Case Learning and Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Bo; Yang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a new approach to massive open online course: project based case learning. Although there are many online teaching websites, such as Coursera and Edx, most of the courses are video based. That is, students learn knowledge through watching lecture videos. This method may apply to theoretical subjects, but for…

  18. Classical and quantum cosmology of minimal massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.; Mousavi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time background we study the classical cosmological models in the context of recently proposed theory of nonlinear minimal massive bigravity. We show that in the presence of perfect fluid the classical field equations acquire contribution from the massive graviton as a cosmological term which is positive or negative depending on the dynamical competition between two scale factors of bigravity metrics. We obtain the classical field equations for flat and open universes in the ordinary and Schutz representation of perfect fluid. Focusing on the Schutz representation for flat universe, we find classical solutions exhibiting singularities at early universe with vacuum equation of state. Then, in the Schutz representation, we study the quantum cosmology for flat universe and derive the Schrodinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We find its exact and wave packet solutions and discuss on their properties to show that the initial singularity in the classical solutions can be avoided by quantum cosmology. Similar to the study of Hartle-Hawking no-boundary proposal in the quantum cosmology of de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, it turns out that the mass of graviton predicted by quantum cosmology of the minimal massive bigravity is large at early universe. This is in agreement with the fact that at early universe the cosmological constant should be large.

  19. Peer Assessment for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suen, Hoi K.

    2014-01-01

    The teach-learn-assess cycle in education is broken in a typical massive open online course (MOOC). Without formative assessment and feedback, MOOCs amount to information dump or broadcasting shows, not educational experiences. A number of remedies have been attempted to bring formative assessment back into MOOCs, each with its own limits and…

  20. Astronomy for Astronomical Numbers: A Worldwide Massive Open Online Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impey, Chris D.; Wenger, Matthew C.; Austin, Carmen L.

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy: State of the Art is a massive, open, online class (MOOC) offered through Udemy by an instructional team at the University of Arizona. With nearly 24,000 enrolled as of early 2015, it is the largest astronomy MOOC available. The astronomical numbers enrolled do not translate into a similar level of engagement. The content consists of 14…