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Sample records for massive protostar cepheus

  1. SEDs of massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Chakrabarti, Sukanya

    Massive protostars are generally enshrouded in dust, so that most of their radiation emerges in the far infrared. For protostars embedded in opaque, spherical cores, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is determined by two distance-independent parameters, the luminosity-to-mass ratio, L/M_c, and the surface density of the core, Σ=M_c/(π R_c^2), where R_c is the radius of the core. Chakrabarti & McKee (2005a) have derived an approximate analytic expression for the SED that agrees well with numerical results. It is generally not possible to infer the power-law of the density from the SED of a massive protostar. Masses and accretion rates are inferred for several well-studied sources.

  2. VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, José M.; Gómez, José F.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Curiel, Salvador; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert

    2012-07-01

    VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations are a powerful tool to study the gas very close to the central engine responsible for the phenomena associated with the early evolution of massive protostars. In this paper we present a summary of the main observational results obtained toward the massive star-forming regions of Cepheus A and W75N. These observations revealed unexpected phenomena in the earliest stages of evolution of massive objects (e.g., non-collimated ``short-lived'' pulsed ejections in different massive protostars), and provided new insights in the study of the dynamic scenario of the formation of high-mass stars (e.g., simultaneous presence of a jet and wide-angle outflow in the massive object Cep A HW2, similar to what is observed in low-mass protostars). In addition, with these observations it has been possible to identify new, previously unseen centers of high-mass star formation through outflow activity.

  3. Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (abbrev. Cep, gen. Cephei; area 588 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Draco and Cassiopeia, and culminates at midnight in late August. It is named after King Cepheus, husband of Queen Cassiopeia and father of Andromeda in Greek mythology. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  4. The feeding and feedback of massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. The framework requires the accretion rate from the clump to be specified. We investigate constant, decelerating and accelerating accretion rate scenarios and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disk accretion, respectively. We find that accelerated accretion is not favoured on the basis of the often-used diagnostic diagram which correlates the bolometric luminosity and clump mass. Instead, source counts as a function of the bolometric temperature can distinguish the accretion mode. Specifically, accelerated accretion yields a relatively high number of lowtemperatureob jects. On this basis, we demonstrate that evolutionary tracks to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations. Neither spherical nor disk accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hot spots covering less than 20% of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. This suggest that massive stars form via gas accretion through disks which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  5. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Bieging, J.; Araya, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  6. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  7. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  8. VLA and CARMA observations of protostars in the Cepheus clouds: Sub-arcsecond proto-binaries formed via disk fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Chandler, Claire J.; Wilner, David J.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Kwon, Woojin

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of λ = 7.3 mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of ∼0.''06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at λ = 1.3 mm with a best resolution of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at λ = 3.4 mm with a best resolution of ∼3'' (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We suggest that these companions may have formed from disk fragmentation; turbulent fragmentation would not preferentially arrange the binary companions to be orthogonal to the outflow direction. For L1165-SMM1, both the 7.3 mm and 1.3 mm emission show evidence of a large (R > 100 AU) disk. For the L1165-SMM1 primary protostar and the CB230 IRS1 secondary protostar, the 7.3 mm emission is resolved into structures consistent with ∼20 AU radius disks. For the other protostars, including L1157-mm, the emission is unresolved, suggesting disks with radii <20 AU.

  9. VLA and CARMA Observations of Protostars in the Cepheus Clouds: Sub-arcsecond Proto-binaries Formed via Disk Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Wilner, David J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Loinard, Laurent; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; Bourke, Tyler L.; Kwon, Woojin

    2013-12-01

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of λ = 7.3 mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of ~0.''06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at λ = 1.3 mm with a best resolution of ~0.''3 (100 AU) and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at λ = 3.4 mm with a best resolution of ~3'' (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of ~0.''3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We suggest that these companions may have formed from disk fragmentation; turbulent fragmentation would not preferentially arrange the binary companions to be orthogonal to the outflow direction. For L1165-SMM1, both the 7.3 mm and 1.3 mm emission show evidence of a large (R > 100 AU) disk. For the L1165-SMM1 primary protostar and the CB230 IRS1 secondary protostar, the 7.3 mm emission is resolved into structures consistent with ~20 AU radius disks. For the other protostars, including L1157-mm, the emission is unresolved, suggesting disks with radii <20 AU.

  10. IRAS 23385+6053: AN Example of Candidate Massive Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, Francesco; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Testi, Leonardo; Walmsley, Malcolm

    We present the results of a multi-line study towards the source IRAS 23385+6053 performed with the IRAM-30m telescope the Plateau de Bure Interferometer and the Very Large Array. We have obtained single-dish and interferometric maps in various transitions of the C18O C17O CH3CCH and NH3 molecular species. Our results confirm the findings of Molinari et al. (1998b) namely that IRAS 23385 a luminous (and therefore massive) source (L ~ 1.6 x 104 solar luminosities) is a good candidate high-mass class 0 object precursor of an ultracompact HII region. The source is approximately made out of two components: a compact molecular ~2 arcsec core with temperature of ~40 K and an H2 volume density of the order of 107 cm-3 and a more extended clump (~15 arcsec) with an average kinetic temperature of ~15 K and H2 volume density of the order of 105 cm-3. The core temperature is much smaller than typical temperatures found in hot molecular cores around massive ZAMS stars. This result supports the idea that IRAS 23385 is a massive protostar in a pre-ZAMS evolutionary stage still accreting material from its parental molecular cloud and deriving most of its luminosity from the release of gravitational energy.

  11. A HIGHLY COLLIMATED WATER MASER BIPOLAR OUTFLOW IN THE CEPHEUS A HW3d MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chibueze, James O.; Imai, Hiroshi; Tafoya, Daniel; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Chong, Sze-Ning; Kameya, Osamu; Hirota, Tomoya; Torrelles, Jose M.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of multi-epoch very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) water (H{sub 2}O) maser observations carried out with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry toward the Cepheus A HW3d object. We measured for the first time relative proper motions of the H{sub 2}O maser features, whose spatio-kinematics traces a compact bipolar outflow. This outflow looks highly collimated and expanding through {approx}280 AU (400 mas) at a mean velocity of {approx}21 km s{sup -1} ({approx}6 mas yr{sup -1}) without taking into account the turbulent central maser cluster. The opening angle of the outflow is estimated to be {approx}30 Degree-Sign . The dynamical timescale of the outflow is estimated to be {approx}100 years. Our results provide strong support that HW3d harbors an internal massive young star, and the observed outflow could be tracing a very early phase of star formation. We also have analyzed Very Large Array archive data of 1.3 cm continuum emission obtained in 1995 and 2006 toward Cepheus A. The comparative result of the HW3d continuum emission suggests the possibility of the existence of distinct young stellar objects in HW3d and/or strong variability in one of their radio continuum emission components.

  12. Reflected infrared spectrum of a massive protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Morino, J I; Yamashita, T; Hasegawa, T; Nakano, T

    1998-05-28

    The infrared source IRc2 in the star-forming region Orion-KL is generally believed to contain a massive and very young star. Its nature and evolutionary status, however, are difficult to determine because it is hidden from direct view by a dense disklike envelope of gas and dust. Here we report observations of infrared radiation (at a wavelength of about 2 microm) that has escaped the surrounding dust in the polar direction, perpendicular to the plane of the disk, and then been reflected towards us by dust farther away from the star. The reflected spectrum contains absorption lines of neutral metallic atoms and carbon monoxide, which we interpret as indicating a source temperature of about 4,500 K. But, given the luminosity of the source, its radius must be at least 300 solar radii-too large to be attained with the modest gas-accretion rates in existing theories of massive-star formation. Whether the infrared radiation is coming from the protostar itself or the self-luminous accretion disk around it, the accretion rate must be around (5-15) x 10(-3) solar masses per year, at least two orders of magnitude greater than is commonly assumed in models of star formation.

  13. A MASSIVE PROTOSTAR FORMING BY ORDERED COLLAPSE OF A DENSE, MASSIVE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Telesco, Charles; De Buizer, James M.; Sandell, Goeran; Shuping, Ralph; Beltran, Maria T.; Churchwell, Ed; Whitney, Barbara; McKee, Christopher F.; Staff, Jan E.

    2013-04-10

    We present 30 and 40 {mu}m imaging of the massive protostar G35.20-0.74 with SOFIA-FORCAST. The high surface density of the natal core around the protostar leads to high extinction, even at these relatively long wavelengths, causing the observed flux to be dominated by that emerging from the near-facing outflow cavity. However, emission from the far-facing cavity is still clearly detected. We combine these results with fluxes from the near-infrared to mm to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED). For isotropic emission the bolometric luminosity would be 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }. We perform radiative transfer modeling of a protostar forming by ordered, symmetric collapse from a massive core bounded by a clump with high-mass surface density, {Sigma}{sub cl}. To fit the SED requires protostellar masses {approx}20-34 M{sub Sun} depending on the outflow cavity opening angle (35 Degree-Sign -50 Degree-Sign ), and {Sigma}{sub cl} {approx} 0.4-1 g cm{sup -2}. After accounting for the foreground extinction and the flashlight effect, the true bolometric luminosity is {approx}(0.7-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }. One of these models also has excellent agreement with the observed intensity profiles along the outflow axis at 10, 18, 31, and 37 {mu}m. Overall our results support a model of massive star formation involving the relatively ordered, symmetric collapse of a massive, dense core and the launching bipolar outflows that clear low-density cavities. Thus a unified model may apply for the formation of both low- and high-mass stars.

  14. ON THE SIMULTANEOUS EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE PROTOSTARS AND THEIR HOST CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, R.; Yorke, H. W. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2013-07-20

    Studies of the evolution of massive protostars and the evolution of their host molecular cloud cores are commonly treated as separate problems. However, interdependencies between the two can be significant. Here, we study the simultaneous evolution of massive protostars and their host molecular cores using a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code that incorporates the effects of the thermal pressure and radiative acceleration feedback of the centrally forming protostar. The evolution of the massive protostar is computed simultaneously using the stellar evolution code STELLAR, modified to include the effects of variable accretion. The interdependencies are studied in three different collapse scenarios. For comparison, stellar evolutionary tracks at constant accretion rates and the evolution of the host cores using pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks are computed. The resulting interdependencies of the protostellar evolution and the evolution of the environment are extremely diverse and depend on the order of events, in particular the time of circumstellar accretion disk formation with respect to the onset of the bloating phase of the star. Feedback mechanisms affect the instantaneous accretion rate and the protostar's radius, temperature, and luminosity on timescales t {<=} 5 kyr, corresponding to the accretion timescale and Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction timescale, respectively. Nevertheless, it is possible to approximate the overall protostellar evolution in many cases by pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks assuming appropriate constant average accretion rates.

  15. The formation of a massive protostar through the disk accretion of gas.

    PubMed

    Chini, Rolf; Hoffmeister, Vera; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Nielbock, Markus; Nürnberger, Dieter; Schmidtobreick, Linda; Sterzik, Michael

    2004-05-13

    The formation of low-mass stars like our Sun can be explained by the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud fragment into a protostellar core and the subsequent accretion of gas and dust from the surrounding interstellar medium. Theoretical considerations suggest that the radiation pressure from the protostar on the in-falling material may prevent the formation of stars above ten solar masses through this mechanism, although some calculations have claimed that stars up to 40 solar masses can in principle be formed via accretion through a disk. Given this uncertainty and the fact that most massive stars are born in dense clusters, it was suggested that high-mass stars are the result of the runaway merging of intermediate-mass stars. Here we report observations that clearly show a massive star being born from a large rotating accretion disk. The protostar has already assembled about 20 solar masses, and the accretion process is still going on. The gas reservoir of the circumstellar disk contains at least 100 solar masses of additional gas, providing sufficient fuel for substantial further growth of the forming star.

  16. Stellar physics. Observing the onset of outflow collimation in a massive protostar.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-González, C; Torrelles, J M; Cantó, J; Curiel, S; Surcis, G; Vlemmings, W H T; van Langevelde, H J; Goddi, C; Anglada, G; Kim, S-W; Kim, J-S; Gómez, J F

    2015-04-03

    The current paradigm of star formation through accretion disks, and magnetohydrodynamically driven gas ejections, predicts the development of collimated outflows, rather than expansion without any preferential direction. We present radio continuum observations of the massive protostar W75N(B)-VLA 2, showing that it is a thermal, collimated ionized wind and that it has evolved in 18 years from a compact source into an elongated one. This is consistent with the evolution of the associated expanding water-vapor maser shell, which changed from a nearly circular morphology, tracing an almost isotropic outflow, to an elliptical one outlining collimated motions. We model this behavior in terms of an episodic, short-lived, originally isotropic ionized wind whose morphology evolves as it moves within a toroidal density stratification. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. A Hot and Massive Accretion Disk around the High-mass Protostar IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou; Sridharan, T. K.; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2016-06-01

    We present new spectral line observations of the CH3CN molecule in the accretion disk around the massive protostar IRAS 20126+4104 with the Submillimeter Array, which, for the first time, measure the disk density, temperature, and rotational velocity with sufficient resolution (0.″37, equivalent to ˜600 au) to assess the gravitational stability of the disk through the Toomre-Q parameter. Our observations resolve the central 2000 au region that shows steeper velocity gradients with increasing upper state energy, indicating an increase in the rotational velocity of the hotter gas nearer the star. Such spin-up motions are characteristics of an accretion flow in a rotationally supported disk. We compare the observed data with synthetic image cubes produced by three-dimensional radiative transfer models describing a thin flared disk in Keplerian motion enveloped within the centrifugal radius of an angular-momentum-conserving accretion flow. Given a luminosity of 1.3 × 104 L ⊙, the optimized model gives a disk mass of 1.5 M ⊙ and a radius of 858 au rotating about a 12.0 M ⊙ protostar with a disk mass accretion rate of 3.9 × 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1. Our study finds that, in contrast to some theoretical expectations, the disk is hot and stable to fragmentation with Q > 2.8 at all radii which permits a smooth accretion flow. These results put forward the first constraints on gravitational instabilities in massive protostellar disks, which are closely connected to the formation of companion stars and planetary systems by fragmentation.

  18. High-resolution Observations of the Massive Protostar in IRAS 18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofner, P.; Cesaroni, R.; Kurtz, S.; Rosero, V.; Anderson, C.; Furuya, R. S.; Araya, E. D.; Molinari, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report 3 mm continuum, CH3CN(5-4) and 13CS(2-1) line observations with CARMA (Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy), in conjunction with 6 and 1.3 cm continuum VLA data, and 12 and 25 μm broadband data from the Subaru Telescope toward the massive proto-star IRAS 18566+0408. The VLA data resolve the ionized jet into four components aligned in the E-W direction. Radio components A, C, and D have flat centimeter SEDs indicative of optically thin emission from ionized gas, and component B has a spectral index α = 1.0, and a decreasing size with frequency \\propto {ν }-0.5. Emission from the CARMA 3 mm continuum and from the 13CS(2-1) and CH3CN(5-4) spectral lines is compact (i.e., < 6700 {au}) and peaks near the position of the VLA centimeter source, component B. Analysis of these lines indicates hot and dense molecular gas, which is typical for HMCs. Our Subaru telescope observations detect a single compact source, coincident with radio component B, demonstrating that most of the energy in IRAS 18566+0408 originates from a region of size < 2400 {au}. We also present UKIRT near-infrared archival data for IRAS 18566+0408, which show extended K-band emission along the jet direction. We detect an E-W velocity shift of about 10 km s-1 over the HMC in the CH3CN lines possibly tracing the interface of the ionized jet with the surrounding core gas. Our data demonstrate the presence of an ionized jet at the base of the molecular outflow and support the hypothesis that massive protostars with O-type luminosity form with a mechanism similar to lower mass stars.

  19. SOFIA/EXES detection of absorption by water vapor in a massive protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick; DeWitt, Curtis N.; Richter, Matthew; Boogert, Adwin; Harper, Graham; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Kulas, Kristin; McKelvey, Mark; Ryde, Nils; Vacca, William

    2015-08-01

    Using the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), we have detected ten absorption features of water vapor toward the massive protostar AFGL 2591. These features, detected in the 6.086 - 6.135 μm spectral region, have been observed with a resolving power λ/dλ ~ 85,000, allowing individual rovibrational transitions to be cleanly separated from each other and from telluric lines. The observations provide an unequivocal detection of the 6.116 μm ν2 111 - 000 line, Doppler-shifted out of its telluric counterpart, which probes the ground rotational state of para-H2O and demonstrates the potential of SOFIA/EXES to observe absorption by cold interstellar water toward bright 6 μm continuum sources. EXES on SOFIA provides our first opportunity to observe the 6 μm vibrational band of astrophysical water vapor since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the late-1990s, and provides a spectral resolution that is almost two orders of magnitude better than what had previously been possible with ISO. A simultaneous fit to the EXES-observed transitions toward AFGL 2591 yields an inferred H2O column density of (1.3 ± 0.3) x 1019 cm-2, a source covering factor of 0.25, and a rotational temperature of 640 ± 80 K.

  20. Evidence for a solar system-size accretion disk around the massive protostar G192.16-3.82.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, D S; Claussen, M J; Kurtz, S E

    2001-05-25

    Seven-millimeter continuum observations of a massive bipolar outflow source, G192.16-3.82, were made at a milli-arc-second resolution with a capability that links the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array radio interferometer with the Very Long Baseline Array antenna, located in Pie Town, New Mexico. The observations provide evidence for a true accretion disk that is about the size of our solar system and located around a massive star. A model of the radio emission suggests the presence of a binary protostellar system. The primary protostar, G192 S1, at the center of the outflow, with a protostar mass of about 8 to 10 times the solar mass, is surrounded by an accretion disk with a diameter of 130 astronomical units (AU). The mass of the disk is on the order of the protostar mass. The outflow is poorly collimated with a full opening angle of about 40 degrees; there is no indication of a more highly collimated jetlike component. The companion source, G192 S2, is located 80 AU north of the primary source.

  1. A HOT MOLECULAR CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AROUND THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR ORION SOURCE I

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2014-02-20

    We report new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a circumstellar disk around Source I in Orion KL, an archetype of massive protostar candidates. We detected two ortho-H{sub 2}O lines at 321 GHz (10{sub 2,} {sub 9}-9{sub 3,} {sub 6}) and 336 GHz (ν{sub 2} = 1, 5{sub 2,} {sub 3}-6{sub 1,} {sub 6}) for the first time in Source I. The latter one is in a vibrationally excited state at the lower state energy of 2939 K, suggesting evidence of hot molecular gas close to Source I. The integrated intensity map of the 321 GHz line is elongated along the bipolar outflow while the 336 GHz line map is unresolved with a beam size of 0.''4. Both of these maps show velocity gradients perpendicular to the bipolar outflow. The velocity centroid map of the 321 GHz line implies a spatial and velocity structure similar to that of vibrationally excited SiO masers tracing the root of the outflow emanating from the disk surface. In contrast, the 336 GHz line is most likely emitting from the disk midplane with a diameter of 0.''2 (84 AU) as traced by radio continuum emission and a dark lane devoid of the vibrationally excited SiO maser emission. The observed velocity gradient and the spectral profile of the 336 GHz H{sub 2}O line can be reconciled with a model of an edge-on ring-like structure with an enclosed mass of >7 M{sub ☉} and an excitation temperature of >3000 K. The present results provide further evidence of a hot and neutral circumstellar disk rotating around Source I with a diameter of ∼100 AU scale.

  2. Abundant gas-phase H2O in absorption toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2003-06-01

    We present infrared spectra of gas-phase H2O around 6 mu m toward 12 deeply embedded massive protostars obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The nu2 ro-vibrational band has been detected toward 7 of the sources and the excitation temperatures indicate an origin in the warm gas at Tex>~ 250 K. Typical derived gas-phase H2O abundances are ~ 5*E-6-6*E-5, with the abundances increasing with the temperature of the warm gas. The inferred gas/solid ratios show a similar trend with temperature and suggest that grain-mantle evaporation is important. The increasing gas/solid ratio correlates with other indicators of increased temperatures. If the higher temperatures are due to a larger ratio of source luminosity to envelope mass, this makes gas-phase H2O a good evolutionary tracer. Comparison with chemical models shows that three different chemical processes, ice evaporation, high-T chemistry, and shocks, can reproduce the high inferred gas-phase H2O abundances. In a forthcoming paper each of these processes are investigated in more detail in comparison with data from the Long Wavelength Spectrometer on board ISO and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). Comparison with existing SWAS data indicates that a jump in the H2O abundance is present and that the observed nu2 ro-vibrational band traces primarily the warm inner envelope. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  3. A Hot Molecular Circumstellar Disk around the Massive Protostar Orion Source I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kurono, Yasutaka; Honma, Mareki

    2014-02-01

    We report new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a circumstellar disk around Source I in Orion KL, an archetype of massive protostar candidates. We detected two ortho-H2O lines at 321 GHz (102, 9-93, 6) and 336 GHz (ν2 = 1, 52, 3-61, 6) for the first time in Source I. The latter one is in a vibrationally excited state at the lower state energy of 2939 K, suggesting evidence of hot molecular gas close to Source I. The integrated intensity map of the 321 GHz line is elongated along the bipolar outflow while the 336 GHz line map is unresolved with a beam size of 0.''4. Both of these maps show velocity gradients perpendicular to the bipolar outflow. The velocity centroid map of the 321 GHz line implies a spatial and velocity structure similar to that of vibrationally excited SiO masers tracing the root of the outflow emanating from the disk surface. In contrast, the 336 GHz line is most likely emitting from the disk midplane with a diameter of 0.''2 (84 AU) as traced by radio continuum emission and a dark lane devoid of the vibrationally excited SiO maser emission. The observed velocity gradient and the spectral profile of the 336 GHz H2O line can be reconciled with a model of an edge-on ring-like structure with an enclosed mass of >7 M ⊙ and an excitation temperature of >3000 K. The present results provide further evidence of a hot and neutral circumstellar disk rotating around Source I with a diameter of ~100 AU scale.

  4. Simulating the Formation of Massive Protostars. I. Radiative Feedback and Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi

    2016-05-01

    We present radiation hydrodynamic simulations of collapsing protostellar cores with initial masses of 30, 100, and 200 M ⊙. We follow their gravitational collapse and the formation of a massive protostar and protostellar accretion disk. We employ a new hybrid radiative feedback method blending raytracing techniques with flux-limited diffusion for a more accurate treatment of the temperature and radiative force. In each case, the disk that forms becomes Toomre-unstable and develops spiral arms. This occurs between 0.35 and 0.55 freefall times and is accompanied by an increase in the accretion rate by a factor of 2-10. Although the disk becomes unstable, no other stars are formed. In the case of our 100 and 200 M ⊙ simulations, the star becomes highly super-Eddington and begins to drive bipolar outflow cavities that expand outwards. These radiatively driven bubbles appear stable, and appear to be channeling gas back onto the protostellar accretion disk. Accretion proceeds strongly through the disk. After 81.4 kyr of evolution, our 30 M ⊙ simulation shows a star with a mass of 5.48 M ⊙ and a disk of mass 3.3 M ⊙, while our 100 M ⊙ simulation forms a 28.8 M ⊙ mass star with a 15.8 M ⊙ disk over the course of 41.6 kyr, and our 200 M ⊙ simulation forms a 43.7 M ⊙ star with an 18 M ⊙ disk in 21.9 kyr. In the absence of magnetic fields or other forms of feedback, the masses of the stars in our simulation do not appear to be limited by their own luminosities.

  5. [Fe II] Emission Tracing Massive, Irradiated Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    We present new spectroscopy and HST and ground-based AO imaging of five protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude higher than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostars. For two of the sources, mid-IR luminosities of the driving sources are clearly consistent with intermediate-mass protostars, while the other two driving sources are more deeply embedded and require imaging at longer wavelengths with high spatial resolution to confirm their luminosity. Tangential velocities from new proper motion measurements exceed velocities typical for lower-luminosity sources (100-200 km/s). In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exists in a feedback dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  6. Multiple monopolar outflows driven by massive protostars in IRAS 18162-2048

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-López, M.; Girart, J. M.; Curiel, S.; Fonfría, J. P.; Zapata, L. A.; Qiu, K. E-mail: girart@ieec.cat

    2013-11-20

    In this article, we present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 3.5 mm observations and SubMillimeter Array (SMA) 870 μm observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 18162-2048, which is the core of the HH 80/81/80N system. Molecular emission from HCN, HCO{sup +}, and SiO traces two molecular outflows (the so-called northeast and northwest outflows). These outflows have their origin in a region close to the position of MM2, a millimeter source known to harbor two protostars. For the first time we estimate the physical characteristics of these molecular outflows, which are similar to those of 10{sup 3}-5 × 10{sup 3} L {sub ☉} protostars, and suggest that MM2 harbors high-mass protostars. High-angular resolution CO observations show an additional outflow due southeast. Also for the first time, we identify its driving source, MM2(E), and see evidence of precession. All three outflows have a monopolar appearance, but we link the NW and SE lobes, and explain their asymmetric shape as being a consequence of possible deflection.

  7. Tracing Massive Protostellar Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present new spectroscopy and imaging of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in the Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude larger than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (around 2 - 8 solar masses) protostars. Velocities from new proper motion and spectroscopic measurements fall among the velocities typically measured in lower-luminosity sources (100 - 200 km/s). We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a feedback-dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to 8 solar masses form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  8. Multiple Monopolar Outflows Driven by Massive Protostars in IRAS 18162-2048

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, M.; Girart, J. M.; Curiel, S.; Zapata, L. A.; Fonfría, J. P.; Qiu, K.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 3.5 mm observations and SubMillimeter Array (SMA) 870 μm observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 18162-2048, which is the core of the HH 80/81/80N system. Molecular emission from HCN, HCO+, and SiO traces two molecular outflows (the so-called northeast and northwest outflows). These outflows have their origin in a region close to the position of MM2, a millimeter source known to harbor two protostars. For the first time we estimate the physical characteristics of these molecular outflows, which are similar to those of 103-5 × 103 L ⊙ protostars, and suggest that MM2 harbors high-mass protostars. High-angular resolution CO observations show an additional outflow due southeast. Also for the first time, we identify its driving source, MM2(E), and see evidence of precession. All three outflows have a monopolar appearance, but we link the NW and SE lobes, and explain their asymmetric shape as being a consequence of possible deflection.

  9. The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP): From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    2015-08-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars, and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state, which is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas using a full LTE solution for the column density from the hyperfine line ratios (Schap et al), which identifies low-luminosity but high-column areas that significantly increase the clumps' mass estimates, and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT and CTIO data and MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al), which gives basic cluster parameters such as mass and luminosity as well as the associated star formation efficiency (SFE).

  10. Modeling gas-phase H2O between 5 μ m and 540 μ m toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; Doty, S. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Melnick, G. J.; Wright, C. M.; Stark, R.

    2003-08-01

    We present models and observations of gas-phase H2O lines between 5 and 540 mu m toward deeply embedded massive protostars, involving both pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions. The data have been obtained for 6 sources with both the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrometers (SWS and LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). For comparison, CO J=7-6 spectra have been observed with the MPIfR/SRON 800 GHz heterodyne spectrometer at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). A radiative transfer model in combination with different physical/chemical scenarios has been used to model these H2O lines for 4 sources to probe the chemical structure of these massive protostars. The results indicate that pure gas-phase production of H2O cannot explain the observed spectra. Ice evaporation in the warm inner envelope and freeze-out in the cold outer part are important for most of our sources and occur at T ~ 90-110 K. The ISO-SWS data are particularly sensitive to ice evaporation in the inner part whereas the ISO-LWS data are good diagnostics of freeze-out in the outer region. The modeling suggests that the 557 GHz SWAS line includes contributions from both the cold and the warm H2O gas. The SWAS line profiles indicate that for some of the sources a fraction of up to 50% of the total flux may originate in the outflow. Shocks do not seem to contribute significantly to the observed emission in other H2O lines, however, in contrast with the case for Orion. The results show that three of the observed and modeled H2O lines, the 303-212, 212-101, and 110-101 lines, are good candidates to observe with the Herschel Space Observatory in order to further investigate the physical and chemical conditions in massive star-forming regions. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, The Netherlands and UK) and with the

  11. Disk and Envelope Structure in Class 0 Protostars. I. The Resolved Massive Disk in Serpens Firs 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Corder, Stuartt; Dunham, Michael M.; Duchêne, Gaspard

    2009-12-01

    We present the first results of a program to characterize the disk and envelope structure of typical Class 0 protostars in nearby low-mass star-forming regions. We use Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared spectra, high-resolution Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 230 GHz continuum imaging, and two-dimensional radiative transfer models to constrain the envelope structure, as well as the size and mass of the circumprotostellar disk in Serpens FIRS 1. The primary envelope parameters (centrifugal radius, outer radius, outflow opening angle, and inclination) are well constrained by the spectral energy distribution (SED), including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, IRS spectra, and 1.1 mm Bolocam photometry. These together with the excellent uv-coverage (4.5-500 kλ) of multiple antenna configurations with CARMA allow for a robust separation of the envelope and a resolved disk. The SED of Serpens FIRS 1 is best fit by an envelope with the density profile of a rotating, collapsing spheroid with an inner (centrifugal) radius of approximately 600 AU, and the millimeter data by a large resolved disk with Mdisk ~ 1.0 M sun and Rdisk ~ 300 AU. These results suggest that large, massive disks can be present early in the main accretion phase. Results for the larger, unbiased sample of Class 0 sources in the Perseus, Serpens, and Ophiuchus molecular clouds are needed to determine if relatively massive disks are typical in the Class 0 stage.

  12. Challenging shock models with SOFIA OH observations in the high-mass star-forming region Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Codella, C.; Csengeri, T.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Heyminck, S.; Jacobs, K.; Kristensen, L. E.; Leurini, S.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. OH is a key molecule in H2O chemistry, a valuable tool for probing physical conditions, and an important contributor to the cooling of shock regions around high-mass protostars. OH participates in the re-distribution of energy from the protostar towards the surrounding Interstellar Medium. Aims: Our aim is to assess the origin of the OH emission from the Cepheus A massive star-forming region and to constrain the physical conditions prevailing in the emitting gas. We thus want to probe the processes at work during the formation of massive stars. Methods: We present spectrally resolved observations of OH towards the protostellar outflows region of Cepheus A with the GREAT spectrometer onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope. Three triplets were observed at 1834.7 GHz, 1837.8 GHz, and 2514.3 GHz (163.4 μm, 163.1 μm between the 2Π1/2 J = 1/2 states, and 119.2 μm, a ground transition between the 2Π3/2 J = 3/2 states), at angular resolutions of 16.̋3, 16.̋3, and 11.̋9, respectively. We also present the CO (16-15) spectrum at the same position. We compared the integrated intensities in the redshifted wings to the results of shock models. Results: The two OH triplets near 163 μm are detected in emission, but with blending hyperfine structure unresolved. Their profiles and that of CO (16-15) can be fitted by a combination of two or three Gaussians. The observed 119.2 μm triplet is seen in absorption, since its blending hyperfine structure is unresolved, but with three line-of-sight components and a blueshifted emission wing consistent with that of the other lines. The OH line wings are similar to those of CO, suggesting that they emanate from the same shocked structure. Conclusions: Under this common origin assumption, the observations fall within the model predictions and within the range of use of our model only if we consider that four shock structures are caught in our beam. Overall, our comparisons suggest that

  13. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION AND JET-LIKE OUTFLOWS IN IRDC G28.34+0.06: A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOSTAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-07-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) {lambda} = 0.88 mm observations of an infrared dark cloud G28.34+0.06. Located in the quiescent southern part of the G28.34 cloud, the region of interest is a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}) molecular clump P1 with a luminosity of {approx}10{sup 3} L{sub sun}, where our previous SMA observations at 1.3 mm have revealed a string of five dust cores of 22-64 M{sub sun} along the 1 pc IR-dark filament. The cores are well aligned at a position angle (P.A.) of 48 deg. and regularly spaced at an average projected separation of 0.16 pc. The new high-resolution, high-sensitivity 0.88 mm image further resolves the five cores into 10 compact condensations of 1.4-10.6 M{sub sun}, with sizes of a few thousand AU. The spatial structure at clump ({approx}1 pc) and core ({approx}0.1 pc) scales indicates a hierarchical fragmentation. While the clump fragmentation is consistent with a cylindrical collapse, the observed fragment masses are much larger than the expected thermal Jeans masses. All the cores are driving CO (3-2) outflows up to 38 km s{sup -1}, the majority of which are bipolar, jet-like outflows. The moderate luminosity of the P1 clump sets a limit on the mass of protostars of 3-7 M{sub sun}. Because of the large reservoir of dense molecular gas in the immediate medium and ongoing accretion as evident by the jet-like outflows, we speculate that P1 will grow and eventually form a massive star cluster. This study provides a first glimpse of massive, clustered star formation that currently undergoes through an intermediate-mass stage.

  14. The Mystery of Sulfur in Dense Environments: EXES Spectroscopy of Sulfur Dioxide toward Massive Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, Adwin

    2015-10-01

    The sulfur element in dense clouds and the envelopes and disks of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is surrounded by mystery. Only 4% of the cosmic sulfur budget is accounted for in known molecules, i.e., 96% is missing! Also, the chemical origin of the detected molecules (their progenitors) is unclear. The warm SO2 gas seen toward massive YSOs by ro-vibrational spectroscopy at 7.35 micron with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is two orders of magnitude more abundant than the widespread SO2 emission seen by pure rotational transitions at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. It likely originates close to the star, and is picked up along the pencil absorption beam at 7.35 micron. We propose to observe the nu_3 S-O stretching mode of SO2 toward three massive YSOs at high (R=50,000, 6 km/s) resolving power with EXES/SOFIA. Many ro-vibrational transitions are expected to be resolved, as opposed to the R~2,000 observations by ISO/SWS. The proposed observations are unique. The 7.35 micron band of SO2 is an order of magnitude stronger than other vibrational modes, and (sub-)millimeter facilities lack sensitivity at the small spatial scales. We will compare the SO2 line profiles over a range of energy levels with those of available VLT and Keck CO isotopologue spectra and with proposed EXES observations of H2O. The stable CO molecule is present everywhere along the sight-line, while H2O sublimates from the grains and is formed in the gas phase at higher temperatures. The observed SO2 may originate from gas phase oxidation of atomic sulfur, but only at temperature below ~230 K as at higher temperatures the oxygen is rapidly driven into H2O. The observations will shed light on S-containing progenitor species: a yet unidentifed ice or grain species?

  15. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  16. Star Forming Regions in Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, M.; Kiss, Z. T.; Balog, Z.

    2008-12-01

    The northern Milky Way in the constellation of Cepheus (100° ≤ l ≤ 120°; 0° ≤ b ≤ 20°) contains several star forming regions. The molecular clouds of the Cepheus Flare region at b > 10°, are sites of low and intermediate mass star formation located between 200 and 450 pc from the Sun. Three nearby OB associations, Cep OB2, Cep OB3, Cep OB4, located at 600--800 pc, are eac= h involved in forming stars, like the well known high mass star forming regio= n S 140 at 900 pc. The reflection nebula NGC 7129 around 1 kpc harbors young, compact clusters of low and intermediate mass stars. The giant star forming complex NGC 7538 and the young open cluster NGC 7380, associated with the Perseus arm, are located at d > 2 kpc.

  17. DISCOVERY OF INTERSTELLAR ANIONS IN CEPHEUS AND AURIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.; Millar, T. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C{sub 6}H{sup -} and its parent neutral C{sub 6}H in the star-forming region L1251A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core L1512 (in Auriga). The carbon-chain-bearing species C{sub 4}H, HC{sub 3}N, HC{sub 5}N, HC{sub 7}N, and C{sub 3}S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC{sub 3}N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for L1512. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  18. Discovery of Interstellar Anions in Cepheus and Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H in the star-forming region LI251 A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core LI512 (in Auriga). The carbon chain-bearing species C4H, HC3N, HC5N, HC7N, and C3S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC3N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for LI5l2. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  19. Discovery of Interstellar Anions in Cepheus and Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H in the star-forming region LI251 A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core LI512 (in Auriga). The carbon chain-bearing species C4H, HC3N, HC5N, HC7N, and C3S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC3N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for LI5l2. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  20. Astrometric Observation of Delta Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Naomi; Wilson, Betsie; Estrada, Chris; Crisafi, Kim; King, Jackie; Jones, Stephany; Salam, Akash; Warren, Glenn; Collins, S. Jananne; Genet, Russell

    2012-04-01

    Members of a Cuesta College astronomy research seminar used a manually-controlled 10-inch Newtonian Reflector telescope to determine the separation and position angle of the binary star Delta Cepheus. It was observed on the night of Saturday, October 29, 2011, at Star Hill in Santa Margarita, California. Their values of 40.2 arc seconds and 192.4 degrees were similar to those reported in the WDS (1910).

  1. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  2. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  3. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  4. X-rays from Cepheus A East and West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-rays from both components of Cepheus A, East and West, with the XMM-Newton observatory. HH 168 joins the ranks of other energetic Herbig-Haro objects that are sources of T &GE; 10(6) K X-ray emission. The effective temperature of HH 168 is T = 5.8(-2.3)(+3.5) x 10(6) K, and its unabsorbed luminosity is 1: 1; 10(29) ergs s(-1), making it hotter and less luminous than other representatives of its class. We also detect prominent X-ray emission from the complex of compact radio sources believed to be the power sources for Cep A. We call this source HWX, and it is distinguished by its hard X-ray spectrum, T = 1.2(-0.5)(+1.2) 10(8) K, and its complex spatial distribution. It may arise from one or more protostars associated with the radio complex, the outflows, or a combination of the two. We detect 102 X-ray sources, many presumed to be pre-main-sequence stars on the basis of the reddening of their optical and IR counterparts.

  5. X-rays from Cepheus A East and West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-rays from both components of Cepheus A, East and West, with the XMM-Newton observatory. HH 168 joins the ranks of other energetic Herbig-Haro objects that are sources of T &GE; 10(6) K X-ray emission. The effective temperature of HH 168 is T = 5.8(-2.3)(+3.5) x 10(6) K, and its unabsorbed luminosity is 1: 1; 10(29) ergs s(-1), making it hotter and less luminous than other representatives of its class. We also detect prominent X-ray emission from the complex of compact radio sources believed to be the power sources for Cep A. We call this source HWX, and it is distinguished by its hard X-ray spectrum, T = 1.2(-0.5)(+1.2) 10(8) K, and its complex spatial distribution. It may arise from one or more protostars associated with the radio complex, the outflows, or a combination of the two. We detect 102 X-ray sources, many presumed to be pre-main-sequence stars on the basis of the reddening of their optical and IR counterparts.

  6. A disk of dust and molecular gas around a high-mass protostar.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh A; Curiel, Salvador; Sridharan, T K; Zhang, Qizhou; Hunter, Todd R; Ho, Paul T P; Torrelles, José M; Moran, James M; Gómez, José F; Anglada, Guillem

    2005-09-01

    The processes leading to the birth of low-mass stars such as our Sun have been well studied, but the formation of high-mass (over eight times the Sun's mass, M(o)) stars remains poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that high-mass stars may form through accretion of material from a circumstellar disk, in essentially the same way as low-mass stars form, rather than through the merging of several low-mass stars. There is as yet, however, no conclusive evidence. Here we report the presence of a flattened disk-like structure around a massive 15M(o) protostar in the Cepheus A region, based on observations of continuum emission from the dust and line emission from the molecular gas. The disk has a radius of about 330 astronomical units (Au) and a mass of 1 to 8 M(o). It is oriented perpendicular to, and spatially coincident with, the central embedded powerful bipolar radio jet, just as is the case with low-mass stars, from which we conclude that high-mass stars can form through accretion.

  7. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  8. ORPHANED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Reipurth, Bo; Connelley, Michael; Mikkola, Seppo; Valtonen, Mauri

    2010-12-10

    We explore the origin of a population of distant companions ({approx}1000-5000 AU) to Class I protostellar sources recently found by Connelley and coworkers, who noted that the companion fraction diminished as the sources evolved. Here, we present N-body simulations of unstable triple systems embedded in dense cloud cores. Many companions are ejected into unbound orbits and quickly escape, but others are ejected with insufficient momentum to climb out of the potential well of the cloud core and associated binary. These loosely bound companions reach distances of many thousands of AU before falling back and eventually being ejected into escapes as the cloud cores gradually disappear. We use the term orphans to denote protostellar objects that are dynamically ejected from their placental cloud cores, either escaping or for a time being tenuously bound at large separations. Half of all triple systems are found to disintegrate during the protostellar stage, so if multiple systems are a frequent outcome of the collapse of a cloud core, then orphans should be common. Bound orphans are associated with embedded close protostellar binaries, but escaping orphans can travel as far as {approx}0.2 pc during the protostellar phase. The steep climb out of a potential well ensures that orphans are not kinematically distinct from young stars born with a less violent pre-history. The identification of orphans outside their heavily extincted cloud cores will allow the detailed study of protostars high up on their Hayashi tracks at near-infrared and in some cases even at optical wavelengths.

  9. OH maser proper motions in Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migenes, V.; Cohen, R. J.; Brebner, G. C.

    1992-02-01

    MERLIN measurements made between 1982 and 1989 reveal proper motions of OH masers in the source Cepheus A. The proper motions are typically a few milliarcsec per year, and are mainly directed away from the central H II regions. Statistical analysis of the data suggests an expansion time-scale of some 300 yr. The distance of the source implied by the proper motions is 320+140/-80 pc, assuming that the expansion is isotropic. The proper motions can be reconciled with the larger distance of 730 pc which is generally accepted, provided that the masers are moving at large angles to the line of sight. The expansion time-scale agrees with that of the magnetic field decay recently reported by Cohen, et al. (1990).

  10. Monitoring the Far Infrared Variability of Deeply Embedded Protostars with SOFIA/HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug

    2015-10-01

    Low-mass stars form via gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores. The evolution of the mass accretion onto a forming protostar depends on the rate at which the interior of the core collapses, the significance of a circumstellar disk as a temporary mass reservoir, and the physics of how the gas is transported through the disk and accretes onto the central star. Despite a clear requirement for time dependency in the accretion rate onto deeply embedded protostars and a large number of theoretical mechanisms for powering variability, our understanding of both the timescale and amplitude of variability is almost entirely unconstrained. The bolometric luminosity of deeply embedded protostars is a direct proxy for the accretion luminosity, modified only by the addition of the stellar luminosity itself. For deeply embedded protostars, the spectral energy distribution peaks in the far infrared, near 100 microns, making this an ideal wavelength for long-term monitoring of accretion variability. We propose to use SOFIA/HAWC at 89 and 154 microns to monitor three star-forming fields (Cepheus, Perseus, and Serpens) as part of a long-term campaign dedicated to uncovering the observational signature of episodic accretion. These observations will aid in our understanding of how stars accumulate their final mass and are neceassry for discriminating between the various theoretical models of episodic accretion onto deeply embedded protostars.

  11. SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD THE YOUNG MASSIVE PROTOSTAR NGC 2264 CMM3 IN THE 4 mm, 3 mm, AND 0.8 mm BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Furuya, Ryuta; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2015-08-20

    Spectral line survey observations are conducted toward the high-mass protostar candidate NGC 2264 CMM3 in the 4, 3, and 0.8 mm bands with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope. In total, 265 emission lines are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands, and 74 emission lines in the 0.8 mm band. As a result, 36 molecular species and 30 isotopologues are identified. In addition to the fundamental molecular species, many emission lines of carbon-chain molecules such as HC{sub 5}N, C{sub 4}H, CCS, and C{sub 3}S are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands. Deuterated molecular species are also detected with relatively strong intensities. On the other hand, emission lines of complex organic molecules such as HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} are found to be weak. For the molecules for which multiple transitions are detected, rotation temperatures are derived to be 7–33 K except for CH{sub 3}OH. Emission lines with high upper-state energies (E{sub u} > 150 K) are detected for CH{sub 3}OH, indicating the existence of a hot core. In comparison with the chemical composition of the Orion KL, carbon-chain molecules and deuterated molecules are found to be abundant in NGC 2264 CMM3, while sulfur-bearing species and complex organic molecules are deficient. These characteristics indicate the chemical youth of NGC 2264 CMM3 in spite of its location at the center of the cluster forming core, NGC 2264 C.

  12. Spectral Line Survey toward the Young Massive Protostar NGC 2264 CMM3 in the 4 mm, 3 mm, and 0.8 mm Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Furuya, Ryuta; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Spectral line survey observations are conducted toward the high-mass protostar candidate NGC 2264 CMM3 in the 4, 3, and 0.8 mm bands with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope. In total, 265 emission lines are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands, and 74 emission lines in the 0.8 mm band. As a result, 36 molecular species and 30 isotopologues are identified. In addition to the fundamental molecular species, many emission lines of carbon-chain molecules such as HC5N, C4H, CCS, and C3S are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands. Deuterated molecular species are also detected with relatively strong intensities. On the other hand, emission lines of complex organic molecules such as HCOOCH3 and CH3OCH3 are found to be weak. For the molecules for which multiple transitions are detected, rotation temperatures are derived to be 7-33 K except for CH3OH. Emission lines with high upper-state energies (Eu > 150 K) are detected for CH3OH, indicating the existence of a hot core. In comparison with the chemical composition of the Orion KL, carbon-chain molecules and deuterated molecules are found to be abundant in NGC 2264 CMM3, while sulfur-bearing species and complex organic molecules are deficient. These characteristics indicate the chemical youth of NGC 2264 CMM3 in spite of its location at the center of the cluster forming core, NGC 2264 C.

  13. Protostar formation in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-08-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass 1% that of the Sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  14. A survey of the chemical properties of the M17 and Cepheus A cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Ungerechts, H.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Snell, R. L.; Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic survey of the chemical properties of two giant molecular cloud (GMC) cores in M17 and Cepheus A. In all, we have mapped the emission from 32 molecular transitions of 13 molecules and seven isotopic variants over a 4' x 5' region in each core. Each map includes known sites of massive star formation, as well as the more extended quiescent material. In M17 most molecules have emission peaks away from the H II region/molecular cloud interface, while two species, HC3N and CH3C2H, deviate from this structure with sharp maxima closer to this interface. In Cepheus A the core is influenced by a compact high-velocity molecular outflow and a more extended low-velocity flow. The molecular emission distributions in this source are generally quite similar, with most molecules peaking near the center of the core to the east of the compact H II region HW 2. A few molecules, SO, CH3OH, H13CN, and C18O, have more extended emission. Only two molecules, CO and HCO+, appear to trace the high- and low-velocity outflows; all other species are tracing the quiescent core. We have used the results of previous studies of the density and temperature of the dense gas in the same cloud cores to derive accurate abundances relative to CO for several positions in each core. The principal result is that the chemical composition of all the cores we have surveyed (which include OMC-1 as well as M17 and Cepheus A) show remarkable similarity, both within a given core and among the cores. This suggests that the chemical processes are similar in quiescent GMC core material. In M17 the lack of variation of molecular abundances is remarkable because the radiation field and the gas temperature are known to vary appreciably throughout the surveyed region, suggesting that the bulk of the emission arises from gas that is well shielded from radiation.

  15. A survey of the chemical properties of the M17 and Cepheus A cloud cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Ungerechts, H.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Snell, R. L.; Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic survey of the chemical properties of two giant molecular cloud (GMC) cores in M17 and Cepheus A. In all, we have mapped the emission from 32 molecular transitions of 13 molecules and seven isotopic variants over a 4' x 5' region in each core. Each map includes known sites of massive star formation, as well as the more extended quiescent material. In M17 most molecules have emission peaks away from the H II region/molecular cloud interface, while two species, HC3N and CH3C2H, deviate from this structure with sharp maxima closer to this interface. In Cepheus A the core is influenced by a compact high-velocity molecular outflow and a more extended low-velocity flow. The molecular emission distributions in this source are generally quite similar, with most molecules peaking near the center of the core to the east of the compact H II region HW 2. A few molecules, SO, CH3OH, H13CN, and C18O, have more extended emission. Only two molecules, CO and HCO+, appear to trace the high- and low-velocity outflows; all other species are tracing the quiescent core. We have used the results of previous studies of the density and temperature of the dense gas in the same cloud cores to derive accurate abundances relative to CO for several positions in each core. The principal result is that the chemical composition of all the cores we have surveyed (which include OMC-1 as well as M17 and Cepheus A) show remarkable similarity, both within a given core and among the cores. This suggests that the chemical processes are similar in quiescent GMC core material. In M17 the lack of variation of molecular abundances is remarkable because the radiation field and the gas temperature are known to vary appreciably throughout the surveyed region, suggesting that the bulk of the emission arises from gas that is well shielded from radiation.

  16. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    The Protostars and Planets book and conference series has been a long-standing tradition that commenced with the first meeting led by Tom Gehrels and held in Tucson, Arizona, in 1978. The goal then, as it still is today, was to bridge the gap between the fields of star and planet formation as well as the investigation of planetary systems and planets. As Tom Gehrels stated in the preface to the first Protostars and Planets book, "Cross-fertilization of information and understanding is bound to occur when investigators who are familiar with the stellar and interstellar phases meet with those who study the early phases of solar system formation." The central goal remained the same for the subsequent editions of the books and conferences Protostars and Planets II in 1984, Protostars and Planets III in 1990, Protostars and Planets IV in 1998, and Protostars and Planets V in 2005, but has now been greatly expanded by the flood of new discoveries in the field of exoplanet science. The original concept of the Protostars and Planets series also formed the basis for the sixth conference in the series, which took place on July 15-20, 2013. It was held for the first time outside of the United States in the bustling university town of Heidelberg, Germany. The meeting attracted 852 participants from 32 countries, and was centered around 38 review talks and more than 600 posters. The review talks were expanded to form the 38 chapters of this book, written by a total of 250 contributing authors. This Protostars and Planets volume reflects the current state-of-the-art in star and planet formation, and tightly connects the fields with each other. It is structured into four sections covering key aspects of molecular cloud and star formation, disk formation and evolution, planetary systems, and astrophysical conditions for life. All poster presentations from the conference can be found at www.ppvi.org. In the eight years that have passed since the fifth conference and book in the

  17. Untangling the protostars and jets in HH 900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-02-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution (comparable to HST), narrowband [Fe II] images with GSAOI to disentangle the protostars and jets in HH 900. Recent H-alpha imaging of HH 900 reveals an unusually broad outflow emerging from a small ( 1"), dark globule in Trumpler 16. A bright H-alpha microjet along the western edge of HH 900 may be a second jet-protostar system that was ejected from the dark globule. Strong UV radiation from the many O stars in Trumpler 16 illuminates unshocked material in these jets, making it possible to estimate the jet mass-loss rates and infer the mass accretion history of the driving protostars. Two Spitzer-detected YSOs appear to lie within the globule, although with relatively coarse resolution (2"), Spitzer cannot resolve which protostar drives the jet. However, for HH jets with an associated Spitzer source, we have shown that IR [Fe II] emission traces the jet into the dark globule, connecting the H-alpha jet with the driving protostar. In addition, [Fe II] in these externally irradiated jets is excited in the dense, neutral jet core and may trace most of the mass in the outflow. We also propose to obtain narrowband H_2 images of HH 900 to see if extended H2 emission seen in ground-based images without AO correction corresponds to molecules entrained in the outflow. The associated Spitzer YSOs suggest that HH 900 samples the lower mass end of the jet-driving protostars detectable in Carina. Previous studies of [Fe II] in HH jets in Carina have focused on bright, highly collimated outflows likely driven by more massive, and more evolved protostars. Thus, HH 900 provides an important test of the behavior of lower mass jet driving protostars. These observation will be a chapter in P.I. M. Reiter's PhD thesis.

  18. Far-infrared spectroscopy across the asymmetric bipolar outflows from Cepheus A and L 1448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froebrich, D.; Smith, M. D.; Eislöffel, J.

    2002-04-01

    Bipolar outflows are driven from protostars within molecular cores. They drive into molecular clouds, generating shock waves whose molecular emission lines have been observed in the infrared with ISO. We present spectroscopic data for seven locations within two asymmetric outflows, Cepheus A and L 1448, in order to test the shock physics and shock dynamics. Here, we simultaneously interpret the CO and H2 data sets which are generated by shocked gas, radiating at temperatures from 300 to 2000 K. We find that large-scale spatial variations in the excitation are absent across both outflows and that the excitation is low everywhere. Planar shock models are inconsistent with the data sets. Models with configurations or ensembles of shocks, in the form of bow shocks or supersonic turbulence, are consistent. This solves the previously reported problem that the CO abundances were anomalously high. Cool gas is dominant, from which we infer bow shocks with flanks more extended than for paraboloids. As a consequence, the atomic oxygen abundances must be quite low. J-type bow models require implausibly long wings. C-type physics is thus favoured. The density and the ratio of molecules to atoms are constrained by the CO/H2 flux levels as well as the H2 vibrational level distributions. Other C-shock parameters, such as the magnetic field strength, ion fraction and speed, are not tightly constrained. The total shock powers are derived and are comparable to the mechanical outflow luminosities for both outflows, consistent with the outflows being momentum-driven. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  19. Protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Andre, P.; O'Linger, J.

    1997-12-01

    We present new millimeter, submillimeter, and far-infrared images of three Class 0 protostar systems in Perseus: L1448C, the triple system L1448N, and IRAS 03282+3035. The data were acquired with a 7-element bolometer array on the IRAM 30-m, the common user bolometer, UKT14, on the 15-m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and via extensive HIRES processing and modelling of the IRAS data (Aumann, Fowler, & Melnyk 1990). All three sources power bipolar molecular outflows. The spectacular outflow from L1448C is seen in dust emission for the first time at 60, 100, and 1300 microns. The instantaneous outflow mechanical luminosity derived from this emission is found to be a high fraction ( 50%) of the source luminosity, a property recently found to be another distinguishing characteristic of Class 0 protostars, the earliest observable protostellar stage (Bontemps et al. 1996). Extensive HIRES point-source modelling of the 100-micron IRAS emission around IRAS 03282 shows that the emitting dust is co-extensive with the flattened dense gas core, as traced by previous ammonia observations, from which the protostar is forming (Bachiller, Martin-Pintado, & Planesas 1991; Tafalla et al. 1993). References Aumann, H.H., Fowler, J.W., & Melnyk, M. 1990, AJ 99 1674 Bontemps, S., Andre, P., Terebey, S., & Cabrit, S. 1996, A&A 311 858 Bachiller, R., Martin-Pintado, J., & Planesas, P. 1991, A&A 251 639 Tafalla, M, Bachiller, R., Martin-Pintado, J. & M.C.H. Wright 1993, ApJL 415 L139

  20. Waterfalls Around Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schmalzl, M.; Kristensen, L. E.; Visser, R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-07-01

    Water is uniquely sensitive to motion of any kind within the protostellar environment due to its large Einstein A coefficient. As part of the 'Water in star-forming regions with Herschel' (WISH) survey, infall signatures were detected in the HIFI water spectra observed towards 5 Class 0/I protostars observed. The combination of observations of multiple water transitions and full 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer models of protostellar envelopes provides a self-consistent way to probe the physics and chemistry of infalling envelope material.

  1. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. II. THE CEPHEUS FLARE OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Jason M.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Di Francesco, James E-mail: derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; {approx}2 deg{sup 2}) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; {approx}8 deg{sup 2}) observations of the Cepheus Flare, which is associated with the Gould Belt, at an approximate distance of {approx}300 pc. Around 6500 sources are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which {approx}900 have MIPS 24 {mu}m detections. We identify 133 young stellar object (YSO) candidates using color-magnitude diagram techniques, and a large number of the YSO candidates are associated with the NGC 7023 reflection nebula. Cross-identifications were made with the Guide Star Catalog II and the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were constructed. SED modeling was conducted to estimate the degree of infrared excess. It was found that a large majority of disks were optically thick accreting disks, suggesting that there has been little disk evolution in these sources. Nearest-neighbor clustering analysis identified four small protostellar groups (L1228, L1228N, L1251A, and L1251B) with 5-15 members each and the larger NGC 7023 association with 32 YSO members. The star-formation efficiency for cores with clusters of protostars and for those without clusters was found to be {approx}8% and {approx}1%, respectively. The cores L1155, L1241, and L1247 are confirmed to be starless down to our luminosity limit of L {sub bol} = 0.06 L {sub sun}.

  2. Evidence for Multiple Outbursts from the Cepheus A Molecular Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Gopal; Walker, Christopher K.

    1996-08-01

    We report evidence for multiple episodes of outflow activity in the Cepheus A star-forming region. We present new, high signal-to-noise CSO observations of 12CO J = 3 2, 13CO J = 3 → 2, and CS J = 7 → 6 emission. We also present new, interferometric and single-dish observations of 12CO J = 1 → 0 emission toward the Cepheus A molecular outflow. Using line core velocity centroid maps, we argue that the multiple self-absorption features in the CO J = 3 → 2 line profiles are tracing cool shells of material swept-up by an episodic outflow. We present the results of a flexible three-dimensional LTE outflow model and radiative transfer code that best explain the observations as tracing multiple generations of outflow. The difference in the dynamical timescales between the "old" and "new" swept-up shells gives an estimate of ˜1.6 x 105 yr between the two generations of outbursts. The high-resolution 12CO J = 1 → 0 maps obtained by combining single-dish observations with interferometric data clearly show a shell-like morphology at low velocities. This cool shell appears to encompass the hot, extremely high velocity (EHV) winds seen in the J = 3 → 2 transition. The interferometric observations show that the current generation of outflow is being powered by the object Cepheus A-HW 2. There is also evidence for redirection of the blueshifted lobe of the current generation of outflow, possibly by the extended NH3 structure Cep A-3. We present a model of the outflow geometry that can explain most of the observed structures in Cepheus A. The rotating, dense core traced by the CS observations is ˜0.32 pc in diameter and has an estimated dynamical mass of 330 Msun. The velocity structure of the core suggests that it is being disrupted by the high-velocity winds driving the molecular outflow. This new technique of extracting information from self-absorbed line profiles could be used to study other deeply embedded protostellar systems. Since outflows are believed to be

  3. Characterizing Dust and Ice Toward Protostars in the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteet, Charles Allen

    Protostars are young stars in the process of accreting infalling envelopes of gas and dust which are transported from the diffuse interstellar medium through gravitational collapse. Although the envelopes are commonly thought to be comprised of cold, pristine material from the interstellar medium, recent space-based studies suggest that protostellar envelopes of low- and high-mass protostars contain thermally processed dust and ice. Unlike the envelope material from luminous, massive protostars, where dust and ice are subject to processing by direct stellar irradiation, thermally processed materials in low-mass protostars may be the consequence of accretion-driven outbursts, shocks in protostellar outflows, or transport of materials from the inner disk to the envelope by outflows and winds. We present an analysis of mid-infrared spectra of a large sample of protostars from the Orion Molecular Cloud complex, the most active region of star formation within the nearest 500 pc. The spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope , reveal strong silicate and solid molecular absorption bands. Using spectral decomposition analyses to determine the dust and ice composition toward the protostars, we find that the amorphous silicate composition is more dominated by amorphous pyroxene than dust in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium, and that the mass fraction of amorphous pyroxene varies between protostars. Toward the perplexing protostar HOPS-68, we report the first unambiguous detection of (1) crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling protostellar envelope and (2) highly processed carbon dioxide ice mantles. Moreover, we find evidence for crystalline silicate absorption towards two additional protostars. These results provide strong evidence that dust and ice delivered to planet-forming disks around low-mass stars in the protostellar phase may be processed by feedback from the central protostar.

  4. Fermi observations of Cassiopeia and Cepheus: Diffuse gamma-ray emission in the outer galaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    Here, we present the analysis of the interstellar γ-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope toward a region in the second Galactic quadrant at 100° ≤ l ≤ 145° and –15° ≤ b ≤ +30°. This region encompasses the prominent Gould Belt clouds of Cassiopeia, Cepheus, and the Polaris flare, as well as atomic and molecular complexes at larger distances, like that associated with NGC 7538 in the Perseus arm. The good kinematic separation in velocity between the local, Perseus, and outer arms, and the presence of massive complexes in each of them, make this region well suitedmore » to probe cosmic rays (CRs) and the interstellar medium beyond the solar circle. Furthermore, the γ-ray emissivity spectrum of the gas in the Gould Belt is consistent with expectations based on the locally measured CR spectra. The γ-ray emissivity decreases from the Gould Belt to the Perseus arm, but the measured gradient is flatter than expectations for CR sources peaking in the inner Galaxy as suggested by pulsars. The X CO = N(H2)/W CO conversion factor is found to increase from (0.87 ± 0.05) × 1020 cm–2 (K km s–1)–1 in the Gould Belt to (1.9 ± 0.2) × 1020 cm–2 (K km s–1)–1 in the Perseus arm. We also derive masses for the molecular clouds under study. Dark gas, not properly traced by radio and microwave surveys, is detected in the Gould Belt through a correlated excess of dust and γ-ray emission: its mass amounts to ~50% of the CO-traced mass.« less

  5. Fermi observations of Cassiopeia and Cepheus: Diffuse gamma-ray emission in the outer galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    Here, we present the analysis of the interstellar γ-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope toward a region in the second Galactic quadrant at 100° ≤ l ≤ 145° and –15° ≤ b ≤ +30°. This region encompasses the prominent Gould Belt clouds of Cassiopeia, Cepheus, and the Polaris flare, as well as atomic and molecular complexes at larger distances, like that associated with NGC 7538 in the Perseus arm. The good kinematic separation in velocity between the local, Perseus, and outer arms, and the presence of massive complexes in each of them, make this region well suited to probe cosmic rays (CRs) and the interstellar medium beyond the solar circle. Furthermore, the γ-ray emissivity spectrum of the gas in the Gould Belt is consistent with expectations based on the locally measured CR spectra. The γ-ray emissivity decreases from the Gould Belt to the Perseus arm, but the measured gradient is flatter than expectations for CR sources peaking in the inner Galaxy as suggested by pulsars. The X CO = N(H2)/W CO conversion factor is found to increase from (0.87 ± 0.05) × 1020 cm–2 (K km s–1)–1 in the Gould Belt to (1.9 ± 0.2) × 1020 cm–2 (K km s–1)–1 in the Perseus arm. We also derive masses for the molecular clouds under study. Dark gas, not properly traced by radio and microwave surveys, is detected in the Gould Belt through a correlated excess of dust and γ-ray emission: its mass amounts to ~50% of the CO-traced mass.

  6. Circumstellar dust: From protostars to planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Ray

    2000-11-01

    A combination of theoretical work and observational discoveries over the past three decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the star and planet formation process. However, many important questions remain to be addressed, especially regarding the earliest phases of protostellar collapse and the transformation of circumstellar disks into planetary systems. In this thesis, I have undertaken a theoretical study of ``Class 0'' protostars and an observational investigation of the evolution of protoplanetary disks, diversity of planetary debris systems, and the kinship between dusty remnants and planets, using a new generation of infrared and sub- millimeter instruments. I present radiative transfer calculations of infalling envelopes surrounding Class 0 sources, compare them to the observed spectral energy distributions and radial intensity profiles, and derive mass infall rates. The rapid infall, probably inevitable given their dense environments, and the relatively flat inferred density distribution, perhaps due to contributions from external cloud material, lead us to suggest that many Class 0 sources could be the protostars of dense regions. It has been suggested that circumstellar disks evolve from massive, optically thick, actively accreting structures to low-mass, optically thin, passive remnants in about 10 Myr. That transition may mark the assembly of grains into planetesimals, or clearing of the disk by planets. I present mid infrared observation of the TW Hydrate Association, a recently identified nearby group of 10-Myr-old stars. The results suggest rapid evolution of inner disks as does our discovery of a spatially- resolved disk with a central cavity around the young A star HR 4796A. I also present the results of mid-infrared imaging of 11 other Vega-like stars, derive global properties of the dust disks, place constraints on their sizes, and discuss several interesting cases in detail. Finally, I report the detection of dust

  7. Constraining the disk masses of the class I binary protostar GV Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.

    2014-08-10

    We present new spatially resolved 1.3 mm imaging with CARMA of the GV Tau system. GV Tau is a Class I binary protostar system in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, the components of which are separated by 1.''2. Each protostar is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, and the pair may be surrounded by a circumbinary envelope. We analyze the data using detailed radiative transfer modeling of the system. We create synthetic protostar model spectra, images, and visibilities and compare them with CARMA 1.3 mm visibilities, a Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared scattered light image, and broadband spectral energy distributions from the literature to study the disk masses and geometries of the GV Tau disks. We show that the protoplanetary disks around GV Tau fall near the lower end of estimates of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, and may have just enough mass to form giant planets. When added to the sample of Class I protostars from Eisner, we confirm that Class I protostars are on average more massive than their Class II counterparts. This suggests that substantial dust grain processing occurs between the Class I and Class II stages, and may help to explain why the Class II protostars do not appear to have, on average, enough mass in their disks to form giant planets.

  8. 6.7 GHz methanol maser variability in Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Wolak, P.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2014-03-01

    6.7 GHz methanol maser emission from the well-studied star-forming region Cepheus A was monitored with the Torun 32 m radio telescope. We found synchronized and anticorrelated changes of the flux density of the two blueshifted and one redshifted maser features for ˜30 per cent of 1340 d of our observations. Two of those features exhibited high-amplitude flux density variations with periods of 84-87 d over the last 290 d interval of the monitoring. We also report on two flares of emission at two different redshifted velocities completely covered during the whole outburst. These flare events lasted 510-670 d and showed a very rapid linear rise and slow exponential decline, which may be caused by variability of the seed flux density. The flux density of the two strongest features dropped by a factor of 2-5 on a time-scale ˜22 yr, while other features have not changed significantly during this period, but showed strong variability on time-scales ≲ 5 yr.

  9. Probing the core of Cepheus A - Millimeter and submillimeter observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.; Snell, R. L.; Hughes, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    Moderate and high angular resolution (40-7 arcsec) maps are presented of the core of the Cepheus A star-forming region using CS J = 3-2 and J = 7-6 emission, which traces the dense gas component of the cloud core, and using far-infrared (450 and 800 microns) continuum emission tracing the warm dust component. Three regimes in the core are traced by these observations: (1) a small (about 0.14 pc), nearly circular central core of high density (1-10 x 10 to the 6th/cu cm) and temperature (30-100 K) containing at least 25 percent of the mass and which contains the active early-type star formation; (2) an extended (0.5 x 0.25 pc), NE-SW oriented core of mass 200-300 solar masses, temperature 30-40 K, and average density nH2 of about 10 to the 5th/cu cm and which, together with the central core, contains 60-80 percent of the total core mass; and (3) an extended core envelope of dimensions 0.5 x 0.85 pc oriented primarily north-south, and a lower density. The velocity structure of the core suggests that it is being disrupted by the high-velocity winds driving the molecular outflow and is not due to a rotating circumstellar disk.

  10. Gamma-Ray Observations of the Interstellar Clouds in Cepheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, S.; Thaddeus, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    During the last six months of the period of performance, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Monoceros region was reanalyzed and one of the important conclusions was revised as a result. The reanalysis incorporated newly-available data from recent EGRET viewing periods and revealed a previously-uncataloged gamma-ray point source near the plane in Monoceros. The effect of incorporating this source in the diffuse emission model was significant, as its flux was comparable to that from a large interstellar cloud complex in the Perseus arm. In the updated model, a greatly reduced gamma-ray emissivity was found in the Perseus arm. This finding alters the previous conclusion that we had found evidence for an enhanced emissivity in the arm, which had supported the hypothesis that cosmic rays are coupled to the interstellar medium on the scale of spiral arms. Our updated findings are consistent with our previous results for the emissivity toward the Cepheus region (Digel et al. 1996), where a monotonic gradient of emissivity in the outer Galaxy was found. The updated analysis of Monoceros was presented at the June, 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, and a journal publication should be ready for submission soon.

  11. A sparse population of young stars in Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klutsch, A.

    2010-12-01

    Once mixed in the ambient galactic plane stellar population, young stars are virtually indiscernible because neither their global photometric properties nor the presence of nearby gas can help to disentangle them from older ones. Nevertheless, the study of the RasTyc sample revealed 4 lithium-rich field stars displaying the same space motion, which are located within a few degrees from each other on the celestial sphere near the Cepheus-Cassiopeia complex and at a similar distance from the Sun. Both physical and kinematical indicators show that all these stars are young, with ages in the range 10-30 Ma. Multivariate analysis methods were used to select optical counterparts of XMM-Newton / ROSAT All-Sky Survey X-ray sources cross-identified with late-type stars around these 4 young stars. Recent intermediate- and high-resolution spectroscopic observations of this sample allowed to discover additional lithium-rich sources. The preliminary results show that some of them share the same space motion as the 4 original stars. They have properties rather similar to the members of the TW~Hydrae association, although they are slightly older and located in the northern hemisphere. Nearby young stars in the field are of great importance to understand the recent local history of star formation, as well as to give new insight into the process of star formation outside standard star-forming regions and to study the evolution of circumstellar discs.

  12. Cepheus A HW2: A powerful thermal radio jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Luis F.; Garay, Guido; Curiel, Salvador; Ramirez, Solange; Torrelles, Jose M.; Gomez, Yolanda; Velazquez, Arturo

    1994-07-01

    At angular resolution of approximately 1 arc second(s) the Cepheus A East Radio source is known to consist of 16 compact components clustered within a 25 arc second(s) radius region, most of which are aligned in stringlike structures. We present multifrequency very large array (VLA) radio continuum observations of Cep A HW2, the elongated radio object believed to be associated with te most luminous (approximately 104 solar luminosity)source in the region. In the frequency range from 1.5 to 43 GHz, we find that its flux density increases with frequency as nu 0.69, while the angular size of its major axis decreases with frequency as nu-0.57. The above frequency dependences are very close to the theoretical values of nu0.6 and nu-0.7 expected for a biconical thermal jet and make Cep A HW2 the best example known of this type of object. We suggest that Cep A HW2 is responsible for at least part of the complex outflow and excitation phenomena observed in the region. The estimated ionized mass-loss rate in this source, approximately 8 x 10 -7 solar mass per year, is about 100 times larger than the value expected for a star of the same luminosity in the main sequence.

  13. Radiative Feedback from Primordial Protostars and Final Mass of the First Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Yorke, Harold W.

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our efforts toward understanding the typical mass-scale of primordial stars. Our direct numerical simulations show that, in both of Population III.1 and III.2 cases, strong UV stellar radiative feedback terminatesmass accretion onto a protostar.AnHII region formed around the protostar very dynamically expands throughout the gas accreting envelope, which cuts off the gas supply to a circumstellar disk. The disk is exposed to the stellar UV radiation and loses its mass by photoevaporation. The derived final masses are 43 Stellar Mass and 17 Stellar Mass in our fiducial Population III.1 and III.2 cases. Much more massive stars should form in other exceptional conditions. In atomic-cooling halos where H2 molecules are dissociated, for instance, a protostar grows via very rapid mass accretion with the rates M* approx. 0.1 - 1 Stellar Mass/yr. Our newstellar evolution calculations show that the protostar significantly inflates and never contracts to reach the ZAMS stage in this case. Such the "supergiant protostars" have very low UV luminosity, which results in weak radiative feedback against the accretion flow. In the early universe, supermassive stars formed through this process might provide massive seeds of supermassive black holes.

  14. Radiative Feedback from Primordial Protostars and Final Mass of the First Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Yorke, Harold W.

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our efforts toward understanding the typical mass-scale of primordial stars. Our direct numerical simulations show that, in both of Population III.1 and III.2 cases, strong UV stellar radiative feedback terminatesmass accretion onto a protostar.AnHII region formed around the protostar very dynamically expands throughout the gas accreting envelope, which cuts off the gas supply to a circumstellar disk. The disk is exposed to the stellar UV radiation and loses its mass by photoevaporation. The derived final masses are 43 Stellar Mass and 17 Stellar Mass in our fiducial Population III.1 and III.2 cases. Much more massive stars should form in other exceptional conditions. In atomic-cooling halos where H2 molecules are dissociated, for instance, a protostar grows via very rapid mass accretion with the rates M* approx. 0.1 - 1 Stellar Mass/yr. Our newstellar evolution calculations show that the protostar significantly inflates and never contracts to reach the ZAMS stage in this case. Such the "supergiant protostars" have very low UV luminosity, which results in weak radiative feedback against the accretion flow. In the early universe, supermassive stars formed through this process might provide massive seeds of supermassive black holes.

  15. A Triple Protostar System in L1448 IRS3B Formed via Fragmentation of a Gravitationally Unstable Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Persson, Magnus; Looney, Leslie; Dunham, Michael; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Sadavoy, Sarah; Harris, Robert J.; Melis, Carl; Perez, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process; most stars form as part of a binary/multiple protostar system. A possible pathway to the formation of close (< 500 AU) binary/multiple star systems is fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. We observed the triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B with ALMA at 1.3 mm in dust continuum and molecular lines to determine if this triple protostar system, where all companions are separated by < 200 AU, is likely to have formed via disk fragmentation. From the dust continuum emission, we find a massive, 0.39 solar mass disk surrounding the three protostars with spiral structure. The disk is centered on two protostars that are separated by 61 AU and the third protostar is located in the outer disk at 183 AU. The tertiary companion is coincident with a spiral arm, and it is the brightest source of emission in the disk, surrounded by ~0.09 solar masses of disk material. Molecular line observations from 13CO and C18O confirm that the kinematic center of mass is coincident with the two central protostars and that the disk is consistent with being in Keplerian rotation; the combined mass of the two close protostars is ~1 solar mass. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B remains marginally unstable at radii between 150~AU and 320~AU, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability, spawning the companion stars.

  16. Winds from Low Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana; Adams, Fred C.; Ruden, Steven P.

    In its last stages, star formation in molecular clouds includes the onset of a stellar wind that helps to clear away the surrounding placenta of gas and dust, thereby making the young stellar object optically visible. The authors discuss new observational evidence that the emerging wind is largely neutral and atomic in low-mass protostars. They then suggest a simple theoretical mechanism for the generation of such powerful neutral winds.

  17. Disk Masses of Class I Protostars in Taurus and Ophiuchus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Patrick; Eisner, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that many protoplanetary disks around pre-main sequence stars with inferred ages of 1-5 Myr (known as Class II protostars) contain insufficient mass to form giant planets. This may be because by this stage much of the material in the disk has already grown into larger bodies, hiding the material from sight. To test this hypothesis, we have observed every protostar in the Taurus and Ophiuchus star forming regions identified as Class I in multiple independent surveys, whose young (< 1 Myr old) disks are more likely to represent the initial mass budget of protoplanetary disks. For my dissertation I have used detailed radiative transfer modeling of CARMA and ALMA millimeter images, broadband SEDs, and near-infrared scattered light images to determine the geometry of the circumstellar material and measure the mass of the disks around these protostars. By comparing the inferred disk mass distribution with results for the existing 1-5 Myr old disk sample, we constrain the initial mass budget for forming planets in protoplanetary disks. We find that the younger Class I disks are, on average, more massive than the older disk sample, but still may be shy of the necessary mass for forming planets. It may be that even by this early stage, planet formation is well underway.

  18. [Fe II] jets from intermediate-mass protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John

    2016-12-01

    We present new HST/WFC3-IR narrow-band [Fe II] images of protostellar jets in the Carina Nebula. Combined with five previously published sources, we have a sample of 18 jets and two Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. All of the jets we targeted with Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) show bright infrared [Fe II] emission, and a few Hα candidate jets are confirmed as collimated outflows based on the morphology of their [Fe II] emission. Continuum-subtracted images clearly separate jet emission from the adjacent ionization front, providing a better tracer of the collimated jet than Hα and allowing us to connect these jets with their embedded driving sources. The [Fe II] 1.64 μm/Hα flux ratio measured in the jets is ≳5 times larger than in the adjacent ionization fronts. The low-ionization jet core requires high densities to shield Fe+ against further ionization by the FUV radiation from O-type stars in the H II region. High jet densities imply high mass-loss rates, consistent with the intermediate-mass driving sources we identify for 13 jets. The remaining jets emerge from opaque globules that obscure emission from the protostar. In many respects, the HH jets in Carina look like a scaled-up version of the jets driven by low-mass protostars. Altogether, these observations suggest that [Fe II] emission is a reliable tracer of dense, irradiated jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars. We argue that highly collimated outflows are common to more massive protostars, and that they suggest the outflow physics inferred for low-mass stars formation scales up to at least ˜8 M⊙.

  19. Multiwavelength Spectroscopy of the Bipolar Outflow from Cepheus E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Froebrich, Dirk; Eislöffel, Jochen

    2003-07-01

    Cepheus E is the site of an exceptional example of a protostellar outflow with a very young dynamical age and extremely high near-infrared luminosity. We combine molecular spectroscopic data from the submillimeter to the near-infrared in order to interpret the rotational excitation of CO and the rovibrational excitation of H2. We conclude that C-type shocks with a paraboloidal bow shock geometry can simultaneously explain all the molecular excitations. Extinction accounts for the deviation of the column densities from local thermodynamic equilibrium. A difference in the extinction between the red- and blueshifted outflow lobes may account for the measured flux difference. The outflow is deeply embedded in a clump of density 105 cm-3, yet a good fraction of atomic hydrogen, about 40%, is required to explain the excitation and statistical equilibrium. We propose that this atomic component arises, self-consistently, from the dissociated gas at the apex of the leading bow shocks and the relatively long molecule reformation time. At least 20 bow shocks are required in each lobe, although these may be subdivided into smaller bows and turbulent shocked regions. The total outflow mechanical power and cooling amounts to over 30 Lsolar, almost half the source's bolometric luminosity. Nevertheless, only about 6% of the clump mass has been set in outward motion by the outflow, allowing a collapse to continue. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  20. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-18

    This archival image from 2003 captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope captured the Elephant Trunk Nebula, an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus.

  1. Primordial stellar evolution - The protostar phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, S. W.; Palla, F.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and evolution of a protostar forming from a cloud composed of pure hydrogen and helium gas are calculated. Using an accretion rate of 0.0044 solar mass/yr, the collapse of the cloud is followed numerically as a sequence of steady state accretion flows onto the hydrostatic core, which grows from an initial mass of 0.01 solar mass to 10.5 solar masses. The core is surrounded by an optically thick radiative precursor for most of its evolution. The core radius reaches 47 solar radii when the mass is 1 solar mass. For sufficiently massive cores, the deep interior contracts strongly, driving out a 'luminosity wave' which reaches the surface when the mass is 8 solar masses. This results in a large increase in core radius, the establishment of surface convection, and the disappearance of the radiative precursor. The dependence of core radius on the mass and accretion rate is analytically derived, and a new table or Rosseland mean opacities for metal-free gas is presented.

  2. No high-mass protostars in the silhouette young stellar object M17-SO1.

    PubMed

    Sako, Shigeyuki; Yamashita, Takuya; Kataza, Hirokazu; Miyata, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Terada, Hiroshi; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Jiang, Zhibo; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Onaka, Takashi

    2005-04-21

    The birth of very massive stars is not well understood, in contrast to the formation process of low-mass stars like our Sun. It is not even clear that massive stars can form as single entities; rather, they might form through the mergers of smaller ones born in tight groups. The recent claim of the discovery of a massive protostar in M17 (a nearby giant ionized region) forming through the same mechanism as low-mass stars has therefore generated considerable interest. Here we show that this protostar has an intermediate mass of only 2.5 to 8 solar masses (M(o), contrary to the earlier claim of 20M(o) (ref. 8). The surrounding circumstellar envelope contains only 0.09M(o) and a much more extended local molecular cloud has 4-9M(o).

  3. SIMULATIONS ON A MOVING MESH: THE CLUSTERED FORMATION OF POPULATION III PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Greif, Thomas H.; White, Simon D. M.; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker

    2011-08-20

    The cosmic dark ages ended a few hundred million years after the big bang, when the first stars began to fill the universe with new light. It has generally been argued that these stars formed in isolation and were extremely massive-perhaps 100 times as massive as the Sun. In a recent study, Clark and collaborators showed that this picture requires revision. They demonstrated that the accretion disks that build up around Population III stars are strongly susceptible to fragmentation and that the first stars should therefore form in clusters rather than in isolation. We here use a series of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations performed with the moving mesh code AREPO to follow up on this proposal and to study the influence of environmental parameters on the level of fragmentation. We model the collapse of five independent minihalos from cosmological initial conditions, through the runaway condensation of their central gas clouds, to the formation of the first protostar, and beyond for a further 1000 years. During this latter accretion phase, we represent the optically thick regions of protostars by sink particles. Gas accumulates rapidly in the circumstellar disk around the first protostar, fragmenting vigorously to produce a small group of protostars. After an initial burst, gravitational instability recurs periodically, forming additional protostars with masses ranging from {approx}0.1 to 10 M{sub sun}. Although the shape, multiplicity, and normalization of the protostellar mass function depend on the details of the sink-particle algorithm, fragmentation into protostars with diverse masses occurs in all cases, confirming earlier reports of Population III stars forming in clusters. Depending on the efficiency of later accretion and merging, Population III stars may enter the main sequence in clusters and with much more diverse masses than are commonly assumed.

  4. Identification of a Collapsing Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II; Zhou, Shudong; Kompe, Carsten; Walmsley, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    The globular molecular cloud B335 contains a single, deeply embedded far-infrared source. Our recent observations of H2CO and CS lines toward this source provide direct kinematic evidence for collapse. Both the intensity and detailed shape of the line profiles match those expected from inside-out collapse inside a radius of 0.036 pc. The collapse began about 1.5 x 10(exp 5) years ago, similar to the onset of the outflow. The mass accretion rate is about 10 times the outflow rate, and about 0.4 solar mass should have now accumulated in the star and disk. Because B335 rotates only, any disk would still be small (about 3 AU). The accretion luminosity should be adequate to power the observed luminosity. Consequently, we believe that B335 is indeed a collapsing protostar.

  5. The Birth of Disks Around Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The dusty disks around young stars make the news regularly due to their appeal as the birthplace of early exoplanets. But how do disks like these first form and evolve around their newly born protostars? New observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are helping us to better understand this process.Formation from CollapseStars are born from the gravitational collapse of a dense cloud of molecular gas. Long before they start fusing hydrogen at their centers when they are still just hot overdensities in the process of contracting we call them protostars. These low-mass cores are hidden at the hearts of the clouds of molecular gas from which they are born.Aerial image of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. [EFE/Ariel Marinkovic]During this contraction phase, before a protostar transitions to a pre-main-sequence star (which it does by blowing away its outer gas envelope, halting the stars growth), much of the collapsing material will spin into a centrifugally supported Keplerian disk that surrounds the young protostar. Later, these circumstellar disks will become the birthplace for young planets something for which weve seen observational evidence in recent years.But how do these Keplerian disks which eventually have scales of hundreds of AU first form and grow around protostars? We need observations of these disks in their early stages of formation to understand their birth and evolution a challenging prospect, given the obscuring molecular gas that hides them at these stages. ALMA, however, is up to the task: it can peer through to the center of the gas clouds to see the emission from protostellar cores and their surroundings.ALMA observations of the protostar Lupus 3 MMS. The molecular outflows from the protostar are shown in panel a. Panel b shows the continuum emission, which has a compact component that likely traces a disk surrounding the protostar. [Adapted from Yen et al. 2017]New Disks Revealed?In a recent

  6. High spatial resolution mapping of the Cepheus A region at 20, 50, and 100 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H. B., Jr.; Lester, D. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.; Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Cepheus A region at 20 microns has been mapped, and a bright, unresolved central source with a peak flux of 41 Jy into a 4.0 arcsec x 4.3 arcsec beam has been detected. One-dimensional slit scans have been obtained in two perpendicular directions across Cepheus A at 50 and 100 microns using a high spatial-resolution sampling technique. The temperature and optical depth profile of the far-IR emission are determined, and a peak temperature of 46 K and peak 100 micron optical depth of 0.4 are derived. Maximum entropy deconvolution of the far-IR scans indicate that there is a bright central core with clumpy extended emission. Within errors the position of the 50/100 micron peak is the same as the 20-micron source; this is interpreted as indicating that the 20 micron radiation represents the short-wavelength emission from the core of the dust cloud seen in the far-IR. It is concluded that an embedded source provides the major source of luminosity in the Cepheus A region.

  7. Clusters of high-mass protostars: From extreme clouds to mini-bursts of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Frédérique; Louvet, Fabien; Nguyen Lu'O'Ng, Quang

    2017-03-01

    Herschel revealed high-density cloud filaments of several pc3, which are forming clusters of OB-type stars. Counting Herschel protostars gives a direct measure of the mass of stars forming in a period of ~105 yrs, the ``instantaneous'' star formation activity. Given their activity, these so-called mini-starburst cloud ridges could be seen as ``miniature and instant models'' of starburst galaxies. Their characteristics could shed light on the origin of massive clusters.

  8. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  9. A triple protostar system formed via fragmentation of a gravitationally unstable disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Persson, Magnus V.; Looney, Leslie W.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Harris, Robert J.; Melis, Carl; Pérez, Laura M.

    2016-10-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process and as a result almost half of all stars with masses similar to that of the Sun have at least one companion star. Theoretical studies indicate that there are two main pathways that can operate concurrently to form binary/multiple star systems: large-scale fragmentation of turbulent gas cores and filaments or smaller-scale fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. Observational evidence for turbulent fragmentation on scales of more than 1,000 astronomical units has recently emerged. Previous evidence for disk fragmentation was limited to inferences based on the separations of more-evolved pre-main sequence and protostellar multiple systems. The triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B is an ideal system with which to search for evidence of disk fragmentation as it is in an early phase of the star formation process, it is likely to be less than 150,000 years old and all of the protostars in the system are separated by less than 200 astronomical units. Here we report observations of dust and molecular gas emission that reveal a disk with a spiral structure surrounding the three protostars. Two protostars near the centre of the disk are separated by 61 astronomical units and a tertiary protostar is coincident with a spiral arm in the outer disk at a separation of 183 astronomical units. The inferred mass of the central pair of protostellar objects is approximately one solar mass, while the disk surrounding the three protostars has a total mass of around 0.30 solar masses. The tertiary protostar itself has a minimum mass of about 0.085 solar masses. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B appears susceptible to disk fragmentation at radii between 150 and 320 astronomical units, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability

  10. A triple protostar system formed via fragmentation of a gravitationally unstable disk.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John J; Kratter, Kaitlin M; Persson, Magnus V; Looney, Leslie W; Dunham, Michael M; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J; Sadavoy, Sarah I; Harris, Robert J; Melis, Carl; Pérez, Laura M

    2016-10-27

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process and as a result almost half of all stars with masses similar to that of the Sun have at least one companion star. Theoretical studies indicate that there are two main pathways that can operate concurrently to form binary/multiple star systems: large-scale fragmentation of turbulent gas cores and filaments or smaller-scale fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. Observational evidence for turbulent fragmentation on scales of more than 1,000 astronomical units has recently emerged. Previous evidence for disk fragmentation was limited to inferences based on the separations of more-evolved pre-main sequence and protostellar multiple systems. The triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B is an ideal system with which to search for evidence of disk fragmentation as it is in an early phase of the star formation process, it is likely to be less than 150,000 years old and all of the protostars in the system are separated by less than 200 astronomical units. Here we report observations of dust and molecular gas emission that reveal a disk with a spiral structure surrounding the three protostars. Two protostars near the centre of the disk are separated by 61 astronomical units and a tertiary protostar is coincident with a spiral arm in the outer disk at a separation of 183 astronomical units. The inferred mass of the central pair of protostellar objects is approximately one solar mass, while the disk surrounding the three protostars has a total mass of around 0.30 solar masses. The tertiary protostar itself has a minimum mass of about 0.085 solar masses. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B appears susceptible to disk fragmentation at radii between 150 and 320 astronomical units, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability

  11. Protostar mass functions in young clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C.

    2014-01-20

    In an improved model of protostar mass functions (PMFs), protostars gain mass from isothermal cores in turbulent clumps. Their mass accretion rate is similar to Shu accretion at low mass and to reduced Bondi accretion at high mass. Accretion durations follow a simple expression in which higher-mass protostars accrete for longer times. These times are set by ejections, stellar feedback, and gravitational competition, which terminate accretion and reduce its efficiency. The mass scale is the mass of a critically stable isothermal core. In steady state, the PMF approaches a power law at high mass because of competition between clump accretion and accretion stopping. The power law exponent is the ratio of the timescales of accretion and accretion stopping. The protostar luminosity function (PLF) peaks near 1 L {sub ☉} because of inefficient accretion of core gas. Models fit observed PLFs in four large embedded clusters. These indicate that their underlying PMFs may be top-heavy compared with the initial mass function, depending on the protostar radius model.

  12. FORCAST Spectroscopy of Orion Protostars: Probing Intermediate Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We propose FORECAST low resolution spectroscopy of seven protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. These protostars have luminosities between those of low mass protostars which were the primary focus of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) and those of the high mass protostars in the Orion Nebula. Although we have constructed 1-870 micron SEDs from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX photometry of these intermediate (40-600 Lsun) luminosity protostars, we do not have Spitzer IRS spectra showing the shape and depth of the 10 micron silicate features and the slope of the mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED). Given the importance of such spectra for constraining the properties of the protostars through radiative transfer modeling, we request time to obtain FORCAST FOR-G111 (8.4-13.7 micron) and FOR-G227 (17.6-27.7 micron) grism spectra. With these data, we can extend our study of protostars in Orion to include a sample of more luminous protostar which are expected to include both intermediate mass protostars and low mass protostars undergoing outbursts. To investigate potential variability between Spitzer and WISE epochs, we also request photomety of a protostar potentially undergoing an episodic outburst.

  13. Protostars: Forges of cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Marcowith, A.; Hennebelle, P.; Ferrière, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic rays are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy and their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and at the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, which leads to an apparent contradiction. Aims: We want to explain the origin of these cosmic rays accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Methods: Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient cosmic-ray acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites (shocks in accretion flows, along the jets, and on protostellar surfaces), then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. Results: We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of cosmic-ray protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Other promising acceleration sites are protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. In contrast, accretion flow shocks are too weak to efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. Though cosmic-ray electrons are weakly accelerated, they can gain a strong boost to relativistic energies through re-acceleration in successive shocks. Conclusions: We suggest a mechanism able to accelerate both cosmic-ray protons and electrons through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which can be used to explain the high ionisation rate and the synchrotron emission observed towards protostellar sources. The existence of an internal source of energetic particles can have a strong and unforeseen impact on the ionisation of the protostellar disc, on the star and planet formation

  14. Planar infall of CH3OH gas around Cepheus A HW2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Moscadelli, L.; Surcis, G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Torstensson, K. J. E.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: In order to test the nature of an (accretion) disk in the vicinity of Cepheus A HW2, we measured the three-dimensional velocity field of the CH3OH maser spots, which are projected within 1000 au of the HW2 object, with an accuracy on the order of 0.1 km s-1. Methods: We made use of the European VLBI Network (EVN) to image the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser emission toward Cepheus A HW2 with 4.5 milliarcsec resolution (3 au). We observed at three epochs spaced by one year between 2013 and 2015. During the last epoch, in mid-March 2015, we benefited from the newly deployed Sardinia Radio Telescope. Results: We show that the CH3OH velocity vectors lie on a preferential plane for the gas motion with only small deviations of 12° ± 9° away from the plane. This plane is oriented at a position angle of 134° east of north, and inclined by 26° with the line of sight, closely matching the orientation of the previously reported disk-like structure. Knowing the orientation of the equatorial plane, we can reconstruct a face-on view of the CH3OH gas kinematics onto the plane. CH3OH maser emission is detected within a radius of 900 au from HW2, and down to a radius of about 300 au, the latter coincident with the extent of the dust emission at 0.9 mm. The velocity field is dominated by an infall component of about 2 km s-1 down to a radius of 300 au, where a rotational component of 4 km s-1 becomes dominant. We discuss the nature of this velocity field and the implications for the enclosed mass. Conclusions: These findings directly support the interpretation that the high-density gas and dust emission that surrounds Cepheus A HW2 traces an accretion disk.

  15. The distribution of warm dust in the star forming region Cepheus A: Infrared constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colome, Cecilia; Harvey, Paul M.

    We have obtained new, high angular resolution far-infrared (FIR) maps (at 50 and 100 microns) of the star forming region Cepheus A and polarimetric images (1.65 and 2.2 microns) of the reflection nebulosity, IRS6, associated with this young stellar object. Our results are consistent with current star formation theories: a young stellar object surrounded by an infalling envelope with a characteristic density distribution of nd(r) proportional to r-1.5, a circumstellar disk, and a cavity (Ri approx. 0.07 pc) in which nd is constant, created by the dispersal of the initial dust cloud by a strong stellar wind.

  16. CHARACTERIZING THE YOUNGEST HERSCHEL-DETECTED PROTOSTARS. I. ENVELOPE STRUCTURE REVEALED BY CARMA DUST CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ragan, Sarah E.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    2015-01-10

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 2.9 mm dust continuum emission observations of a sample of 14 Herschel-detected Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, drawn from the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS) sample. These objects are characterized by very red 24-70 μm colors and prominent submillimeter emission, suggesting that they are very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We detect all of the PBRS in 2.9 mm continuum emission and emission from four protostars and one starless core in the fields toward the PBRS; we also report one new PBRS source. The ratio of 2.9 mm luminosity to bolometric luminosity is higher by a factor of ∼5 on average, compared to other well-studied protostars in the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds. The 2.9 mm visibility amplitudes for 6 of the 14 PBRS are very flat as a function of uv distance, with more than 50% of the source emission arising from radii <1500 AU. These flat visibility amplitudes are most consistent with spherically symmetric envelope density profiles with ρ ∝ R {sup –2.5}. Alternatively, there could be a massive unresolved structure like a disk or a high-density inner envelope departing from a smooth power law. The large amount of mass on scales <1500 AU (implying high average central densities) leads us to suggest that that the PBRS with flat visibility amplitude profiles are the youngest PBRS and may be undergoing a brief phase of high mass infall/accretion and are possibly among the youngest Class 0 protostars. The PBRS with more rapidly declining visibility amplitudes still have large envelope masses, but could be slightly more evolved.

  17. Characterizing the Youngest Herschel-detected Protostars. I. Envelope Structure Revealed by CARMA Dust Continuum Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Henning, Thomas; Ragan, Sarah E.; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 2.9 mm dust continuum emission observations of a sample of 14 Herschel-detected Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, drawn from the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS) sample. These objects are characterized by very red 24-70 μm colors and prominent submillimeter emission, suggesting that they are very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We detect all of the PBRS in 2.9 mm continuum emission and emission from four protostars and one starless core in the fields toward the PBRS; we also report one new PBRS source. The ratio of 2.9 mm luminosity to bolometric luminosity is higher by a factor of ~5 on average, compared to other well-studied protostars in the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds. The 2.9 mm visibility amplitudes for 6 of the 14 PBRS are very flat as a function of uv distance, with more than 50% of the source emission arising from radii <1500 AU. These flat visibility amplitudes are most consistent with spherically symmetric envelope density profiles with ρ vprop R -2.5. Alternatively, there could be a massive unresolved structure like a disk or a high-density inner envelope departing from a smooth power law. The large amount of mass on scales <1500 AU (implying high average central densities) leads us to suggest that that the PBRS with flat visibility amplitude profiles are the youngest PBRS and may be undergoing a brief phase of high mass infall/accretion and are possibly among the youngest Class 0 protostars. The PBRS with more rapidly declining visibility amplitudes still have large envelope masses, but could be slightly more evolved.

  18. Unraveling the Evolution of Protostars in Diverse Environments: The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. Thomas; the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey Team

    2014-01-01

    The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a 200 hour PACS imaging and spectroscopy OTKP, is the cornerstone of a large multi-observatory campaign combining Herschel data with observations from Spitzer,Hubble, APEX, and other facilities. HOPS has produced well sampled 1-870 micron SEDs of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, the most extensive such survey of a single cloud complex to date, and has obtained PACS spectra of 36 protostars to observe line emission from CO, OH, and H2O. We will present the major HOPS discoveries that demonstrate Herschel's contributions to an emerging picture of protostellar evolution within the diverse environments of the Orion A & B molecular clouds. Among these, the HOPS team has discovered protostars undetected by Spitzer that appear to be the youngest protostars in Orion (Stutz et al. 2013). We have found that the luminosities of high-J CO lines are correlated with protostellar luminosities, but the excitation temperatures are not, indicating that these lines form in high-temperature gas within outflows (Manoj et al. 2013). We have also constructed and modeled the first 1-70 um SED of a protostellar FU Ori object before and after its outburst, finding an atypically low post-outburst luminosity (Fischer et al. 2012). Finally, we have identified systematic variations in the spacing and luminosity of protostars between the different environments found in Orion (Megeath, Stanke, in prep.). More generally, the HOPS team is now determining the fundamental protostellar properties (envelope mass and density, system luminosity, and outflow cavity geometry) of the 300 Orion protostars by a comparison of the SEDs to radiative transfer models. We will summarize the prospects of using these fundamental properties to construct a detailed sequence for the physical evolution of protostars as they dissipate their envelopes, accounting for the influence of the diverse environments found within Orion.

  19. Protostars at Low Extinction in Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John Arban; Lada, Charles J.

    2016-07-01

    In the list of young stellar objects (YSOs) compiled by Megeath et al. for the Orion A molecular cloud, only 44 out of 1208 sources found projected onto low extinction ({A}{{K}}\\lt 0.8 mag) gas are identified as protostars. These objects are puzzling because protostars are not typically expected to be associated with extended low extinction material. Here, we use high resolution extinction maps generated from Herschel data, optical/infrared and Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of the low extinction protostellar candidate sources to determine if they are likely true protostellar sources or contaminants. Out of 44 candidate objects, we determine that 10 sources are likely protostars, with the rest being more evolved YSOs (18), galaxies (4), false detections of nebulosity and cloud edges (9), or real sources for which more data are required to ascertain their nature (3). We find none of the confirmed protostars to be associated with recognizable dense cores and we briefly discuss possible origins for these orphaned objects.

  20. Complex Organic Molecules toward Embedded Low-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Jennifer B.; Öberg, Karin I.; Garrod, Robin T.; Graninger, Dawn M.

    2017-06-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been observed toward several low-mass young stellar objects (LYSOs). Small and heterogeneous samples have so far precluded conclusions on typical COM abundances, as well as the origin(s) of abundance variations between sources. We present observations toward 16 deeply embedded (Class 0/I) low-mass protostars using the IRAM 30 m telescope. We detect CH2CO, CH3CHO, CH3OCH3, CH3OCHO, CH3CN, HNCO, and HC3N toward 67%, 37%, 13%, 13%, 44%, 81%, and 75% of sources, respectively. Median column densities derived using survival analysis range between 6.0 × 1010 cm-2 (CH3CN) and 2.4 × 1012 cm-2 (CH3OCH3), and median abundances range between 0.48% (CH3CN) and 16% (HNCO) with respect to CH3OH. Column densities for each molecule vary by about one order of magnitude across the sample. Abundances with respect to CH3OH are more narrowly distributed, especially for oxygen-bearing species. We compare observed median abundances with a chemical model for low-mass protostars and find fair agreement, although some modeling work remains to bring abundances higher with respect to CH3OH. Median abundances with respect to CH3OH in LYSOs are also found to be generally comparable to observed abundances in hot cores, hot corinos, and massive YSOs. Compared with comets, our sample is comparable for all molecules except HC3N and CH2CO, which likely become depleted at later evolutionary stages. Based on observations carried out under project nos. 003-14 and 006-13 with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  1. The Cluster Environment of Two High-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Virginie; Hofner, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Characterizing the environment and stellar population in which high-mass stars form is an important step to decide between the main massive star formation theories. In the monolithic collapse model, the mass of the core will determine the final stellar mass (e.g., McKee & Tan 2003). In contrast, in the competitive accretion model (e.g., Bonnell & Bate 2006), the mass of the high-mass star is related to the properties of the cluster. As dynamical processes substantially affect the appearance of a cluster, we study early stages of high-mass star formation. These regions often show extended emission from hot dust at infrared wavelengths, which can cause difficulties to define the cluster. We use a multi-wavelength technique to study nearby high-mass star clusters, based on X-ray observations with the Chandra X-Ray Telescope, in conjunction with infrared data and VLA data. The technique relies on the fact that YSOs are particularly bright in X-ray and that contamination is relatively small. X-ray observations allow us to determine the cluster size. The cluster membership and YSOs classification is established using infrared identification of the X-ray sources, and color-color and color-magnitude diagrams.In this talk, I will present our findings on the cluster study of two high-mass star forming regions: IRAS 20126+4104 and IRAS 16562-3959. While most massive stars appear to be formed in rich a cluster environment, those two sources are candidates for the formation of massive stars in a relatively poor cluster. In contrast to what was found in previous studies (Qiu et al. 2008), the dominant B0-type protostar in IRAS 20126+4104 is associated with a small cluster of low-mass stars. I will also show our current work on IRAS 16562-3959, which contains one of the most luminous O-type protostars in the Galaxy. In the vicinity of this particularly interesting region there is a multitude of small clusters, for which I will present how their stellar population differ from the

  2. DIRECT DIAGNOSTICS OF FORMING MASSIVE STARS: STELLAR PULSATION AND PERIODIC VARIABILITY OF MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Hosokawa, Takashi; Motogi, Kazuhito E-mail: koichiro@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2013-06-01

    The 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission, a tracer of forming massive stars, sometimes shows enigmatic periodic flux variations over several 10-100 days. In this Letter, we propose that these periodic variations could be explained by the pulsation of massive protostars growing under rapid mass accretion with rates of M-dot{sub *}{approx}>10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Our stellar evolution calculations predict that the massive protostars have very large radii exceeding 100 R{sub Sun} at maximum, and here we study the pulsational stability of such bloated protostars by way of the linear stability analysis. We show that the protostar becomes pulsationally unstable with various periods of several 10-100 days depending on different accretion rates. With the fact that the stellar luminosity when the star is pulsationally unstable also depends on the accretion rate, we derive the period-luminosity relation log (L/ L{sub Sun }) = 4.62 + 0.98log (P/100 days), which is testable with future observations. Our models further show that the radius and mass of the pulsating massive protostar should also depend on the period. It would be possible to infer such protostellar properties and the accretion rate with the observed period. Measuring the maser periods enables a direct diagnosis of the structure of accreting massive protostars, which are deeply embedded in dense gas and are inaccessible with other observations.

  3. Methanol ice in the protostar GL 2136

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barlow, M. J.; Justtanont, K.

    1992-01-01

    We present ground-based spectra in the 10 and 20 micron atmospheric windows of the deeply embedded protostar GL 2136. These reveal narrow absorption features at 9.7 and 8.9 microns, which we ascribe to the CO-stretch and CH3 rock (respectively) of solid methanol in grain mantles. The peak position of the 9.7 micron band implies that methanol is an important ice mantle component. However, the CH3OH/H2O abundance ratio derived from the observed column densities is only 0.1. This discrepancy suggests that the solid methanol and water ice are located in independent grain components. These independent components may reflect chemical differentiation during grain mantle formation and/or partial outgassing close to the protostar.

  4. X-ray flares in protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M. R.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    1995-12-01

    Origin of X-ray flares in protostars and the formation of magnetohydrodynamical jets are studied by numerically simulating the interaction between the disk material and the dipole magnetic field of the central protostar.At the initial state, we assume that a thin Keplerian disk is threaded by the dipole magnetic fields of the central star. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. As the twist accumulates, magnetic loops expand and finally approach to the open field configuration. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet developed along the expanding magnetic loops. Outgoing magnetic island and 'post flare loops' are formed as a result of the reconnection.This process can be regarded as a bifurcation to the lower energy state triggered by continuous helicity injection (e.g., Kusano 1995). The time scale of this flare is the order of the rotation period of the disk. The released magnetic energy (typically 10(35) erg in protostars) goes into the thermal energy of the plasma in the flaring loop and the thermal and kinetic energies of the ejected plasmoids. The maximum speed of the streamer is the order of the Keplerian rotation speed around the inner edge of the disk. High energy particles created by the reconnection by bremsstrahlung emission at the footpoints of the flaring loop. The length of the flaring loop is several times larger than the radius of the central star. The magnetic reconnection accompanying this mechanism can explain hard X-ray flares in protostars observed by ASCA (Koyama et al. 1995).

  5. Episodic Accretion among the Orion Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Safron, Emily; Megeath, S. Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Episodic accretion, where a young stellar object undergoes stochastic spikes in its disk-to-star accretion rate one or more times over its formation period, may be a crucial process in the formation of low-mass stars. These spikes result in a factor of 10 to 100 increase in the source luminosity over the course of several months that may persist for years. Six years after the Spitzer survey of the Orion molecular clouds, the WISE telescope mapped Orion with similar wavelength coverage. Thus, the two surveys can be used to explore the mid-infrared variability of young stars on this timescale, which is suitable for discovering episodic accretion events. Out of 319 Orion protostars that were targets of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, we identified two examples of episodic accretion with this method. One of them, HOPS 223, was previously known. The other, HOPS 383, is the first known example of episodic accretion in a Class 0 protostar (age < 0.2 Myr). With these and one other outburst that began early in the Spitzer mission, we estimate that the most likely interval between protostellar outbursts is 740 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 470 to 6200 years. These outbursts are weaker than the optically revealed FU Ori events. We will update the mid-infrared light curves of HOPS 223 and HOPS 383 with recent data from FORCAST aboard SOFIA; HOPS 223 shows signs of fading.

  6. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF WATER MASERS IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CEPHEUS A AND W75 N

    SciTech Connect

    Uscanga, L.; Gomez, J. F.; Anglada, G.; Canto, J.; Curiel, S.; Torrelles, J. M.; Patel, N. A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: jfg@iaa.e E-mail: scuriel@astroscu.unam.m E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-05-20

    We have done a statistical analysis of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data of water masers in the star-forming regions (SFRs) Cepheus A and W75 N, using correlation functions to study the spatial clustering and Doppler-velocity distribution of these masers. Two-point spatial correlation functions show a characteristic scale size for clusters of water maser spots {approx_lt}1 AU, similar to the values found in other SFRs. This suggests that the scale for water maser excitation tends to be {approx_lt}1 AU. Velocity correlation functions show power-law dependences with indices that can be explained by regular velocity fields, such as expansion and/or rotation. These velocity fields are similar to those indicated by the water maser proper-motion measurements; therefore, the velocity correlation functions appear to reveal the organized motion of water maser spots on scales larger than 1 AU.

  7. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  8. The distribution of warm dust in the star forming region Cepheus A: Infrared constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colome, Cecilia; Harvey, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained new, high angular resolution far-infrared (FIR) maps (at 50 and 100 microns) of the star forming region Cepheus A and polarimetric images (1.65 and 2.2 microns) of the reflection nebulosity, IRS6, associated with this young stellar object. Our results are consistent with current star formation theories: a young stellar object surrounded by an infalling envelope with a characteristic density distribution of n(sub d)(r) proportional to r(exp -1.5), a circumstellar disk, and a cavity (R(sub i) approx. 0.07 pc) in which n(sub d) is constant, created by the dispersal of the initial dust cloud by a strong stellar wind.

  9. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  10. Kinematics of powerful jets from intermediate-mass protostars in the Carina nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    We present measurements of proper motions and radial velocities of four powerful Herbig-Haro (HH) jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902, and HH 1066. Two epochs of Hubble Space Telescope imaging separated by a time baseline of ˜4.4 yr provide proper motions that allow us to measure the transverse velocities of the jets, while ground-based spectra sample their Doppler velocities. Together these yield full three-dimensional space velocities. Aside from HH 666, their identification as outflows was previously inferred only from morphology in images. Proper motions now show decisively that these objects are indeed jets, and confirm that the intermediate-mass protostars identified as the candidate driving sources for HH 666 and HH 1066 are indeed the origin of these outflows. The appearance of two new knots in the HH 1066 jet suggests recent (˜35 yr) changes in the accretion rate, underscoring the variable nature of accretion and outflow in the formation of intermediate-mass stars. In fact, kinematics and mass-ejection histories for all the jets suggest highly episodic mass loss, and point towards pronounced accretion fluctuations. Overall, we measure velocities similar to those found for low-mass protostars. However, the HH jets in Carina have higher densities and are more massive than their low-mass counterparts. Coarse estimates suggest that the heavy jets of intermediate-mass protostars can compete with or even exceed inject ˜10 or more times the cumulative momentum injection of lower mass protostars.

  11. Evolutionary tracks of massive stars during formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. We investigate specified accretion histories of constant, decelerating and accelerating forms and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disc accretion, respectively. Diagnostic tools for the interpretation of the phases of massive star formation and testing the evolutionary models are then developed. Evolutionary tracks able to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations, thus being consistent with clump star formation efficiencies of 10-15 per cent. However, for these cold Herschel clumps, the bolometric temperature is not a good diagnostic to differentiate between accretion models. We also find that neither spherical nor disc accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hotspots covering less than 10 per cent of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. We show that these conclusions are independent of the imposed accretion history. This suggests that massive stars form via gas accretion through discs which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  12. Modeling Protostar Envelopes and Disks Seen With ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Willacy, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Thermal continuum emission from protostars comes from both the envelope and circumstellar disk. The dust emits on a variety of spatial scales, ranging from sub-arcseconds for disks to roughly 10 arcseconds for envelopes for nearby protostars. We present models of what ALMA should detect that incorporate a self-consistent collapse solution, radiative transfer, and realistic dust properties.

  13. Determining Protostar Masses: L1527 IRS in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Isella, Andrea; De Vries, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Protostar masses have been difficult to determine, in part due to the complex nature of protostar environments. We report on a pilot study to determine the mass of the L1527 protostar using CARMA interferometer data. The velocity channel maps are compared with a model that incorporates 1) LVG radiative transfer, 2) TSC collapse envelope and outflow cavity, and 3) a CARMA interferometer simulation. The models are able to reproduce observed C18O(2-1) channel maps quite well, and are sensitive to the gravity field of the infalling gas. The best-fit mass is 0.24 +/- 0.04 Mo for the L1527 protostar plus disk. The models indicate that line-width is a sensitive and robust indicator of mass. We conclude that this method of comparing millimeter interferometer data with infall models incorporating radiative transfer shows promise for determining a fundamental but poorly known quantity, the protostar mass.

  14. The Cluster Environment of High Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John C.; Smith, H. A.; Campbell, M. F.; Hora, J. L.; Marengo, M.; Sridharan, T. K.; Pillai, T.; Robitaille, T. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Molinari, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present images and some initial results from Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of 49 candidate high mass protostellar objects (HMPOs) and their surrounding environments. These candidate HMPOs are objects in the lists assembled by Sridharan et al (2002) and Molinari et al (1996) that were not covered by the GLIMPSE, GLIMPSEII and MIPSGAL surveys, with a few additions. Our sample has the advantage of longer exposure times than the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys. The images were reduced and photometry was performed using IRACproc (Schuster et al 2006). Color-color and color-magnitude criteria adopted from Gutermuth et al (2009), were used to identify candidate class0/I and classII protostars around each of the HMPO candidates. We present IRAS09131-4723 as an example of this analysis. It revealed 22 class0/I and 59 classII protostars distributed around IRAS 09131-4723. We plan to search the library of models presented by Robitaille et al (2007) for each class0/I/II candidate found, and use the parameters taken from the best fitting models to test the classifications obtained from the color-color analysis. We also plan to study the clustering of low mass protostars around the HMPOs. Gutermuth, R. A., et al, 2009 ApJS, 184, 18; Molinari, S. et al 1996 A&A 308, 573; Robitaille, T. P., et al, ApJS, 169, 328; Schuster M. T., Marengo, M., Patten, B. M. 2006, SPIE, 6270, 627020; Sridharan, T. K., et al, ApJ, 566, 931

  15. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors.

  16. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors.

  17. Young Stellar Populations in MYStIX Star-forming Regions: Candidate Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, Gregory; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Povich, Matthew S.

    2016-12-01

    The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) project provides a new census on stellar members of massive star-forming regions within 4 kpc. Here the MYStIX Infrared Excess catalog and Chandra-based X-ray photometric catalogs are mined to obtain high-quality samples of Class I protostars using criteria designed to reduce extragalactic and Galactic field star contamination. A total of 1109 MYStIX Candidate Protostars (MCPs) are found in 14 star-forming regions. Most are selected from protoplanetary disk infrared excess emission, but 20% are found from their ultrahard X-ray spectra from heavily absorbed magnetospheric flare emission. Two-thirds of the MCP sample is newly reported here. The resulting samples are strongly spatially associated with molecular cores and filaments on Herschel far-infrared maps. This spatial agreement and other evidence indicate that the MCP sample has high reliability with relatively few “false positives” from contaminating populations. But the limited sensitivity and sparse overlap among the infrared and X-ray subsamples indicate that the sample is very incomplete with many “false negatives.” Maps, tables, and source descriptions are provided to guide further study of star formation in these regions. In particular, the nature of ultrahard X-ray protostellar candidates without known infrared counterparts needs to be elucidated.

  18. Migration and Survival of Planets near Magnetized Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina

    A significant fraction of observed exoplanets are located very close to the star with a clear peak at 0.05AU. This peak may be an imprint of the past history of the protostar and its disk, when it had a strong magnetic field and cleared a magnetic cavity of very low density. Planets which migrate to this region can survive for millions of years, until the disk is dispersed. This proposal plans to systematically investigate the migration of close- in planets inside the magnetospheric cavity caused by the star's magnetic field. We plan to investigate the cases of dipole and more complex multipole magnetic fields, as well as regimes of unstable accretion when cavities can have a very low density or can be partially filled with matter. In the second part of the proposal, we plan to investigate the migration of planets in the inner disks around rotating stars with misaligned dipole field. A rotating star with a tilted magnetic field excites a strong bending wave (a warp) that propagates outward to large distances in the disk. The wave has super-Keplerian angular velocity. We plan to analyze whether this bending wave may halt or reverse the inward migration of a planet. Also, we plan to investigate cases where the rotational axis of the star is tilted relative to the disk's axis. In this case, a new type of bending wave forms. In both cases, the close-in planet gets multiple kicks in the vertical direction, and this may change the inclination of the planet's orbit. We also plan to study the case where the massive planet clears the gap while interacting with the lower-mass inner parts of the disk. Solutions of these problems require global multidimensional simulations. Our group has developed state-of-the-art global axisymmetric and three-dimensional Godunov type codes, which are oriented to the investigation of plasma flow around rotating magnetized stars. Recently, we developed a module that calculates planetary orbits in our MHD simulations. These powerful tools and

  19. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Luminosity and Envelope Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Furlan, Elise; Ali, Babar; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tobin, John J.; Osorio, Mayra; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Poteet, Charles A.; Booker, Joseph J.; Hartmann, Lee; Wilson, Thomas L.; Myers, Philip C.; Watson, Dan M.

    2017-05-01

    The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey obtained well-sampled 1.2-870 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, home to most of the young stellar objects (YSOs) in the nearest 500 pc. We plot the bolometric luminosities and temperatures for 330 Orion YSOs, 315 of which have bolometric temperatures characteristic of protostars. The histogram of the bolometric temperature is roughly flat; 29% of the protostars are in Class 0. The median luminosity decreases by a factor of four with increasing bolometric temperature; consequently, the Class 0 protostars are systematically brighter than the Class I protostars, with a median luminosity of 2.3 L⊙ as opposed to 0.87 L⊙. At a given bolometric temperature, the scatter in luminosities is three orders of magnitude. Using fits to the SEDs, we analyze how the luminosities corrected for inclination and foreground reddening relate to the mass in the inner 2500 au of the best-fit model envelopes. The histogram of the envelope mass is roughly flat, while the median-corrected luminosity peaks at 15 L⊙ for young envelopes and falls to 1.7 L⊙ for late-stage protostars with remnant envelopes. The spread in luminosity at each envelope mass is three orders of magnitude. Envelope masses that decline exponentially with time explain the flat mass histogram and the decrease in luminosity, while the formation of a range of stellar masses explains the dispersion in luminosity.

  20. Connecting diverse molecular cloud environments with nascent protostars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Megeath, S.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Furlan, E.; Tobin, J. J.; Stanke, T.; Henning, T.; Krause, O.; Manoj, P.; Osorio, M.; Robitaille, T.; HOPS Team

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the gas environment within molecular clouds influences the properties of protostars is a key step towards understanding the physical factors that control star formation. We report on an analysis of the connection between molecular cloud environment and protostellar properties using the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a large multi-observatory survey of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. HOPS has produced well sampled 1 um to 870 um SEDs of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using images and spectra from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX. Furthermore, the combination of APEX 870 um continuum observations with the HOPS/PACS 160 um data over the same area allows for a determination of the temperatures and column densities in the often filamentary dense gas surrounding the Orion protostars. Based on these data, we link the protostellar properties with their environmental properties. Utilizing the diverse environments present within the Orion molecular clouds, we show how the luminosity and spacing of protostars in Orion depends on the local gas column density. Furthermore, we report an unusual concentration of the youngest known protostars (the Herschel identified PBRS, PACS Bright Red Sources) in the Orion B cloud, and we discuss possible reasons for this concentration.

  1. CEPHEUS SA: a South African survey on the undertreatment of hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Raal, F; Schamroth, C; Blom, D; Marx, J; Rajput, M; Haus, M; Hussain, R; Cassim, F; Nortjé, M; Vandehoven, G; Temmerman, A-M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the CEntralised Pan-South African survey on tHE Under-treatment of hypercholeSterolaemia (CEPHEUS SA) was to evaluate the current use and efficacy of lipidlowering drugs (LLDs), and to identify possible patient and physician characteristics associated with failure, if any, to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets. The survey was conducted in 69 study centres in South Africa and recruited consecutive consenting patients who had been prescribed LLDs for at least three months. One visit was scheduled for data collection, including fasting plasma lipid and glucose levels. Physicians and patients completed questionnaires regarding their knowledge, awareness and perceptions of hypercholesterolaemia and the treatment thereof. Of the 3 001 patients recruited, 2 996 were included in the final analyses. The mean age was 59.4 years, and 47.5% were female. Only 60.5 and 52.3% of patients on LLDs for at least three months achieved the LDL-C target recommended by the NCEP ATP III/2004 updated NCEP ATP III and the Fourth JETF/South African guidelines, respectively. Being male, older than 40 years, falling into the lower-risk categories, compliance with the medication regimen, and patient knowledge that the LDL-C goal had been reached, were associated with the highest probability of attaining LDL-C goals. The results of this survey highlight the sub-optimal lipid control achieved in many South African patients taking lipid-lowering therapy.

  2. Carbon monoxide and far-infrared observations of the S 155-Cepheus B region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, Nigel R.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; White, Glenn J.

    1992-11-01

    We present maps of the CO J = 3-2 and (C-13)O J = 2-1 molecular line and mid- to far-infrared continuum emission of the interface between the Cepheus B molecular cloud and the S155 H II region. Far-infrared dust color temperature and optical depth maps show the molecular cloud to be externally heated and that the edge of the cloud is compressed by the expansion of S155. The data are compared with current models, and various dust grain parameters are derived. A hotspot is observed in the CO J = 3-2 emission line, at a position coincident with the radio continuum and infrared emission peaks. The infrared, radio continuum, and molecular line emission from the hotspot are all consistent with it being a compact H II region, ionized by an embedded B1-B0.5 star. The position of the compact H II region, adjacent to the northwestern edge of Cep B, suggests it is the product of a phase of sequential OB star formation.

  3. Evolution of Mass Outflow in Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Dan M.; Calvet, Nuria P.; Fischer, William J.; Forrest, W. J.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Melnick, Gary J.; Najita, Joan; Neufeld, David A.; Sheehan, Patrick D.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tobin, John J.

    2016-09-01

    We have surveyed 84 Class 0, Class I, and flat-spectrum protostars in mid-infrared [Si ii], [Fe ii], and [S i] line emission, and 11 of these in far-infrared [O i] emission. We use the results to derive their mass outflow rates, {\\dot{M}}w. Thereby we observe a strong correlation of {\\dot{M}}w with bolometric luminosity, and with the inferred mass accretion rates of the central objects, {\\dot{M}}a, which continues through the Class 0 range the trend observed in Class II young stellar objects. Along this trend from large to small mass flow rates, the different classes of young stellar objects lie in the sequence Class 0-Class I/flat-spectrum-Class II, indicating that the trend is an evolutionary sequence in which {\\dot{M}}a and {\\dot{M}}w decrease together with increasing age, while maintaining rough proportionality. The survey results include two that are key tests of magnetocentrifugal outflow-acceleration mechanisms: the distribution of the outflow/accretion branching ratio b={\\dot{M}}w/{\\dot{M}}a, and limits on the distribution of outflow speeds. Neither rules out any of the three leading outflow-acceleration, angular-momentum-ejection mechanisms, but they provide some evidence that disk winds and accretion-powered stellar winds (APSWs) operate in many protostars. An upper edge observed in the branching-ratio distribution is consistent with the upper bound of b = 0.6 found in models of APSWs, and a large fraction (31%) of the sample have a branching ratio sufficiently small that only disk winds, launched on scales as large as several au, have been demonstrated to account for them.

  4. A new population of protostars discovered by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, A. M.; Tobin, J.; Fischer, W.; S. T. Megeath; Stanke, T.; Ali, B.; Henning, T.

    2012-03-01

    We present a newly discovered Herschel--detected class of very red protostars found in the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). In contrast to the known Orion protostars targeted with HOPS, the new sources are undetected or very faint in the Spitzer 24 μm imaging. A subset of these sources is redder than any of the known Orion Class 0 protostars, and appear similar in their 70 μm to 24 μm colors to the most extreme Class 0 objects known. These new Orion protostars are likely to be in a very early and short lived stage of protostellar evolution. As a sample of extremely red sources at a common distance, they represent an important new population of protostars. The majority of these reddest sources exhibit associated IRAC 4.5, and 5.8 μm extended emission that suggests the presence of an outflow, confirming their protostellar nature. In addition, many of these sources are located within classical filaments as traced by Spitzer absorption features and APEX 870 μm dust emission maps. Fits of the broad--band SEDs to radiative transfer models of protostars suggest that the extremely red 70 μm to 24 μm colors result from a combination of nearly edge--on viewing angles and high envelope infall rates. We analyze the properties of the filaments from which these sources form using sub--mm and IRAM 30 m N_2H^+ measurements. Finally, we present the initial results of a search for outflows using IRAM 30 m CO maps. As a population of cold protostars detected by Herschel but not Spitzer, the PBRS extend the Spitzer--identified sample to earlier stages of envelope evolution, allowing the most complete census yet of the Orion protostellar population.

  5. Mapping dust in Orion protostars: from Herschel to APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; Megeath, Thomas; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    HOPS (Herschel Orion Protostar Survey) is a 70 and 160mum Herschel PACS survey towards a sample of Spitzer identified protostar candidates in the Orion A and B giant molecular clouds. In this poster we give an overview of our efforts to obtain longer wavelength dust continuum maps, using the Laboca and Saboca cameras (870 and 350mum, respectively) at the APEX telescope, which provide maps at spatial resolutions well matched to the Herschel PACS data. The Laboca maps cover the entire field surveyed also by Herschel, providing a dust continuum measurement for all protostars observed by Herschel. The Saboca maps are restricted to smaller maps, mainly targeting PACS-bright protostar candidates, new protostar candidates not seen previously by Spitzer and identified from the Herschel maps, and also all bright cores found in the Laboca maps which do not have a protostellar association (i.e., starless cores). The data are used to provide long-wavelength submm photometry constraining the protostellar envelope masses. The 350mum Saboca data spatially resolve the emission from the outer envelope and are used to constrain their radial density distribution. Furthermore, combined with the Herschel data, we derive column density and temperature maps of the dense gas surrounding the protostars.

  6. JETS AND WIDE-ANGLE OUTFLOWS IN CEPHEUS E: NEW EVIDENCE FROM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Grave, J. M. C. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: jgrave@astro.up.pt

    2011-11-01

    Outflows and jets are believed to play a crucial role in determining the mass of the central protostar and its planet-forming disk by virtue of their ability to transport energy, mass, and momentum of the surrounding material, and thus terminate the infall stage in star and disk formation. In some protostellar objects both wide-angle outflows and collimated jets are seen, while in others only one is observed. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features. Here, we use HiRes deconvolution to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands) and removing the contaminating sidelobes from bright sources. We apply this approach to study the jet and outflow features in Cep E, a young, energetic Class 0 protostar. In the reprocessed images we detect (1) wide-angle outflow seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details on at least 29 jet-driven bow shocks and jet heads or knots, (3) three compact features in 24 {mu}m continuum image as atomic/ionic line emission coincident with the jet heads, and (4) a flattened {approx}35'' size protostellar envelope seen against the interstellar background polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission as an absorption band across the protostar at 8 {mu}m. By separating the protostellar photospheric scattered emission in the wide-angle cavity from the jet emission we show that we can study directly the scattered light spectrum. We present the H{sub 2} emission line spectra, as observed in all IRAC bands, for 29 knots in the jets and bow shocks and use them in the IRAC color-color space as a diagnostic of the thermal gas in the shocks driven by the jets. The data presented here will enable detailed modeling of the individual shocks retracing the history of the episodic jet activity and the associated accretion on to the protostar. The Spitzer data analysis presented here shows the richness of its

  7. On the Role of the ΩΓ Limit in the Formation of Population III Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunchul; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    We explore the role of the modified Eddington limit due to rapid rotation (the so-called ΩΓ limit) in the formation of Population III stars. We performed one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations of zero-metallicity protostars accreting mass at a very high rate (\\dot{M}˜ {10}-3\\quad {M}⊙ \\quad {{yr}}-1) and dealt with stellar rotation as a separate post-process. The protostar would reach the Keplerian rotation very soon after the onset of mass accretion, but mass accretion would continue as stellar angular momentum is transferred outward to the accretion disk by viscous stress. The envelope of the protostar expands rapidly when the stellar mass reaches ~5-7 M⊙ and the Eddington factor increases sharply. This makes the protostar rotate critically at a rate that is significantly below the Keplerian value (i.e., the ΩΓ limit). The resultant positive gradient of the angular velocity in the boundary layer between the protostar and the Keplerian disk prohibits angular momentum transport from the star to the disk, and consequently further rapid mass accretion. This would prevent the protostar from growing significantly beyond 20-40 M⊙. Another important consequence of the ΩΓ limit is that the protostar can remain fairly compact (R ≲ 50 R⊙) and avoid a fluffy structure (R ≳ 500 R⊙) that is usually found with a very high rate of mass accretion. This effect would make the protostar less prone to binary interactions during the protostar phase. Although our analysis is based on Population III protostar models, this role of the ΩΓ limit would be universal in the formation process of massive stars, regardless of metallicity.

  8. CARBON CHAINS AND METHANOL TOWARD EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn M.; Wilkins, Olivia H.; Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-03-10

    Large interstellar organic molecules are potential precursors of prebiotic molecules. Their formation pathways and chemical relationships with one another and simpler molecules are therefore of great interest. In this paper we address the relationships between two classes of large organic molecules, carbon chains and saturated complex organic molecules at the early stages of star formation through observations of C{sub 4}H and CH{sub 3}OH. We surveyed these molecules with the IRAM 30 m telescope toward 16 deeply embedded low-mass protostars selected from the Spitzer c2d ice survey. We find that CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 4}H are positively correlated, indicating that these two classes of molecules can coexist during the embedded protostellar stage. The C{sub 4}H/CH{sub 3}OH gas abundance ratio tentatively correlates with the CH{sub 4}/CH{sub 3}OH ice abundance ratio in the same lines of sight. This relationship supports a scenario where carbon chain formation in protostellar envelopes begins with CH{sub 4} ice desorption.

  9. Star Formation near Berkeley 59: Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvick, J. M.; Majaess, D.

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (~2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, 12CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v LSR = -15 to -17 km s-1, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (-15.7 km s-1), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction AV and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  10. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 105 years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.

  11. Flares and MHD Jets in Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    We present a magnetic reconnection model for hard X-ray emission and flare-like hard X-ray variabilities associated with protostars detected by ASCA. The energy released by protostellar flares is 102 - 105 times larger than solar flares. Moreover, the spectrum is harder. A new ingredient in protostellar flare is the existence of a protostellar disk which can twist the magnetic fields threading the protostellar disk. We carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. Hot, outgoing plasmoid and post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011-1012cm), the total energy of X-ray flares (~1035-36erg). Furthermore, along the opening magnetic loops, hot jet is ejected in bipolar directions with speed 200-400 km/s. The speed and mass flow rate of the jet is consistent with those of optical jets. Our model can explain both the X-ray flare-like variability and mass outflow in star forming region.

  12. Carbon Chains and Methanol toward Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graninger, Dawn M.; Wilkins, Olivia H.; Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-03-01

    Large interstellar organic molecules are potential precursors of prebiotic molecules. Their formation pathways and chemical relationships with one another and simpler molecules are therefore of great interest. In this paper we address the relationships between two classes of large organic molecules, carbon chains and saturated complex organic molecules at the early stages of star formation through observations of C4H and CH3OH. We surveyed these molecules with the IRAM 30 m telescope toward 16 deeply embedded low-mass protostars selected from the Spitzer c2d ice survey. We find that CH3OH and C4H are positively correlated, indicating that these two classes of molecules can coexist during the embedded protostellar stage. The C4H/CH3OH gas abundance ratio tentatively correlates with the CH4/CH3OH ice abundance ratio in the same lines of sight. This relationship supports a scenario where carbon chain formation in protostellar envelopes begins with CH4 ice desorption. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  13. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar.

    PubMed

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-17

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 10(5) years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MYStIX candidate protostars (Romine+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, G.; Feigelson, E. D.; Getman, K. V.; Kuhn, M. A.; Povich, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    The present study seeks protostars from the Massive Young Star-forming complex in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) survey catalogs. We combine objects with protostellar infrared SEDs and 4.5um excesses with X-ray sources exhibiting ultrahard spectra denoting very heavy obscuration. These criteria filter away nearly all of the older Class II-III stars and contaminant populations, but give very incomplete samples. The result is a list of 1109 protostellar candidates in 14 star-forming regions. See sections 1 and 2 for further explanations. The reliability of the catalog is strengthened because a large majority (86%) are found to be associated with dense cores seen in Herschel 500um maps that trace cold dust emission. However, the candidate list requires more detailed study for confirmation and cannot be viewed as an unbiased view of star formation in the clouds. (3 data files).

  15. Massive Gravity.

    PubMed

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alternative and related models of massive gravity such as new massive gravity, Lorentz-violating massive gravity and non-local massive gravity.

  16. Rotating Bullets from A Variable Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuepeng; Arce, Héctor G.; Zhang, Qizhou; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) CO (2-1) observations toward the protostellar jet driven by SVS 13 A, a variable protostar in the NGC 1333 star-forming region. The SMA CO (2-1) images show an extremely high-velocity jet composed of a series of molecular “bullets.” Based on the SMA CO observations, we discover clear and large systematic velocity gradients, perpendicular to the jet axis, in the blueshifted and redshifted bullets. After discussing several alternative interpretations, such as twin-jets, jet precession, warped disk, and internal helical shock, we suggest that the systematic velocity gradients observed in the bullets result from the rotation of the SVS 13 A jet. From the SMA CO images, the measured rotation velocities are 11.7-13.7 km s-1 for the blueshifted bullet and 4.7 ± 0.5 km s-1 for the redshifted bullet. The estimated specific angular momenta of the two bullets are comparable to those of dense cores, about 10 times larger than those of protostellar envelopes, and about 20 times larger than those of circumstellar disks. If the velocity gradients are due to the rotation of the SVS 13 A jet, the significant amount of specific angular momenta of the bullets indicates that the rotation of jets/outflows is a key mechanism to resolve the so-called “angular momentum problem” in the field of star formation. The kinematics of the bullets suggests that the jet launching footprint on the disk has a radius of ˜7.2-7.7 au, which appears to support the extended disk-wind model. We note that further observations are needed to comprehensively understand the kinematics of the SVS 13 A jet, in order to confirm the rotation nature of the bullets.

  17. STAR FORMATION NEAR BERKELEY 59: EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosvick, J. M.; Majaess, D.

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (∼2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v {sub LSR} = –15 to –17 km s{sup –1}, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (–15.7 km s{sup –1}), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction A{sub V} and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  18. CO in Protostars (COPS): Herschel-SPIRE Spectroscopy of Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao-Lun; Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J.; COPS Team

    2017-06-01

    Molecular emission from early stage protostars reveals the properties of the surrounding gas and the underlying physical processes that govern the early stage of star formation. The CO in Protostars (COPS) Herschel program observes 27 embedded protostars with SPIRE, including several molecular species, such as CO, 13CO, H2O, and HCO+, allowing us to investigate the processes that regulate the early stage of star formation across a large sample of sources. We detect CO rotational lines from Jup = 4 to 36, 13CO lines from Jup = 5 to 10, and six H2O lines, along with atomic lines, such as [N II] and [C I]. We have created an uniformly calibrated dataset with the data from Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time (DIGIT) Herschel Key Program and archival photometry, in which we characterize each source by its spectral energy distribution and evolutionary class. We detect 323 lines from 25 sources from which we successfully extracted 1D spectra, and 3068 lines from 27 sources observed in all spatial pixels of SPIRE. We analyze the correlations of the line strengths of every line pair from all lines detected in our sample with two methods from ASURV package, Spearman's ρ, which test whether the line strengths relation can be described by a monotonic function, and the Kendall z-value, which quantifies the similarity of the ordering of the line strengths of two lines. We notice that the distribution of correlations shows a systematic tendency coinciding with the wavelength coverages of the instruments, suggesting an instrumental bias. Within each module, the correlations of two CO line pairs show high correlations, which decrease as the difference of the upper J-level of the two CO lines increases. The smooth gradients of the distribution of correlations hint that the temperature and density of CO gas are continuously varying throughout the embedding envelope. If all CO gas in the envelope shares a same temperature or density, the correlations would be strong for two CO lines

  19. Co in Protostars (cops): Herschel-Spire Spectroscopy of Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao-Lun; Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J., II

    2017-06-01

    Protostars form from cold dense cores dominated by molecular gas and dust, showing excess continuum and rich spectra beyond 100 μm that are best observed by Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular emission reveals the properties of the surrounding gas and the underlying physical processes that govern the early stage of star formation. The CO in Protostars (COPS) Herschel program observes 27 embedded protostars with SPIRE, including several dominant molecular species, such as CO, ^{13}CO, H_{2}O, and HCO^{+}. The COPS dataset covers a unique wavelength range, allowing us to investigate the early stage of star formation across a large sample of sources. We detect CO rotational lines from J_{up} = 4 to 36, ^{13}CO lines from J_{up} = 5 to 10, and six H_{2}O lines, along with [N II] and [C I]. We have created an uniformly calibrated dataset with the data from Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time (DIGIT) Herschel Key Program and archival photometry, in which we characterize each source by its spectral energy distribution and evolutionary class. With an automatic line fitting pipeline, we detect 323 lines from 25 sources from which we successfully extracted 1D spectra, and 3068 lines from 27 sources observed in all spatial pixels of SPIRE. We analyze the correlations of the line strengths of every line pair from all lines detected with two methods from ASURV package, Spearman's ρ, which test whether the line strengths relation can be described by a monotonic function, and the Kendall z-value, which quantifies the similarity of the ordering of the line strengths of two lines. The distribution of correlations shows a systematic tendency coinciding with the wavelength coverages of the instruments, suggesting that the correlations should only be compared within the lines observed by each module. Within each module, the correlations of two CO line pairs show high correlations, which decrease as the difference of the upper J-level of the two CO lines increases. The smooth gradients of

  20. Ionisation and the Formation of Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Bate, M. R.; Price, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular clouds are known to have strong magnetic fields and low ionisation rates. Numerical simulations performed with these more realistic conditions yield results closer to those observed, and furthermore, suggest additional observational signatures not yet explored. I will discuss my simulations of the formation of a single protostar starting from one solar mass of gas; the models include a self-consistent treatment of all three non-ideal MHD processes. My focus will be on how the ionisation parameters and non-ideal MHD processes affect the formation of the protostar and its environment.

  1. Molecule formation in fast neutral winds from protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Huggins, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    A time-dependent chemical model is used to analyze the processes generating and destroying molecules in very high velocity winds from low-mass protostars. CO and SiO are found to be generated in significant quantities despite the persistence of H in atomic form, consistently with recent protostellar wind detections of CO and H I at velocities in excess of 100 km/sec. A moderate mass-loss rate, in conjunction with a temperature distribution that decreases rather rapidly with distance from the protostar, are the conditions for substantial molecule formation.

  2. Therapeutic lipid target achievements among high and highest risk patients: results from the CEPHEUS study in the Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al Mahmeed, Wael; Arafah, Mohamed; Al-Hinai, Ali T; Shehab, Abdullah; Al Tamimi, Omer; Alawadhi, Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    To determine lipid target achievements of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) in the Centralized Pan-Middle East Survey on the undertreatment of hypercholesterolemia (CEPHEUS) in Arabian Gulf States patients with high and highest risk according to the joint Consensus Statement of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACC). CEPHEUS was conducted in patients (≥ 18 years of age) in six Middle Eastern countries between November 2009 and July 2010 on lipid lowering drugs (LLDs). Serum samples collected included total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides (TGs), apo B, and apolipoprotein A1 (apo A1). The overall mean age of the cohort (n = 5275) was 56 ± 13 years, 58% (n = 3060) were male and 69% (n = 3635) were highest risk. LDL-C target was achieved in 25%, non-HDL-C in 36% and apo B in 38% of patients in the highest risk cohort compared with LDL-C 46%, non-HDL-C 58% and apo B 51% in the high risk group. In patients with TGs ≥ 2.2 mmol/L, LDL-C target was achieved in 16% and apo B in 15% of patients in the highest risk group compared with LDL-C 32% and apo B 22% in the high risk cohort. Despite being on LLDs, a large proportion of high and highest risk patients in the Arabian Gulf are not at recommended lipid targets and remain at a substantial residual risk for cardiovascular diseases. Apo B may be used as an additional target in patients with triglycerides ≥ 2.2 mmol/L. The findings should be interpreted in light of the study's limitations.

  3. Nature of shocks revealed by SOFIA OI observations in the Cepheus E protostellar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.; Anderl, S.; Lefloch, B.; Leurini, S.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Benedettini, M.; Codella, C.; Godard, B.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Jacobs, K.; Kristensen, L. E.; Lesaffre, P.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lis, D. C.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Protostellar jets and outflows are key features of the star-formation process, and primary processes of the feedback of young stars on the interstellar medium. Understanding the underlying shocks is necessary to explain how jet and outflow systems are launched, and to quantify their chemical and energetic impacts on the surrounding medium. Aims: We performed a high-spectral resolution study of the [OI]63μm emission in the outflow of the intermediate-mass Class 0 protostar Cep E-mm. The goal is to determine the structure of the outflow, to constrain the chemical conditions in the various components, and to understand the nature of the underlying shocks, thus probing the origin of the mass-loss phenomenon. Methods: We present observations of the O i 3P1 → 3P2, OH between 2Π1/2J = 3/2 and J = 1/2 at 1837.8 GHz, and CO (16-15) lines with the GREAT receiver onboard SOFIA towards three positions in the Cep E protostellar outflow: Cep E-mm (the driving protostar), Cep E-BI (in the southern lobe), and Cep E-BII (the terminal position in the southern lobe). Results: The CO (16-15) line is detected at all three positions. The [OI]63μm line is detected in Cep E-BI and BII, whereas the OH line is not detected. In Cep E-BII, we identify three kinematical components in O i and CO. These were already detected in CO transitions and relate to spatial components: the jet, the HH377 terminal bow-shock, and the outflow cavity. We measure line temperature and line integrated intensity ratios for all components. The O i column density is higher in the outflow cavity than in the jet, which itself is higher than in the terminal shock. The terminal shock is the region where the abundance ratio of O i to CO is the lowest (about 0.2), whereas the jet component is atomic (N(O i)/N(CO) 2.7). In the jet, we compare the [OI]63μm observations with shock models that successfully fit the integrated intensity of 10 CO lines. We find that these models most likely do not fit the [OI]63

  4. Stellar Properties of Embedded Protostars: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Until now, high extinctions have prevented direct observation of the central objects of self-embedded, accreting protostars. However, sensitive high dispersion spectrographs on large aperture telescopes have allowed us to begin studying the stellar astrophysical properties of dozens of embedded low mass protostars in the nearest regions of star formation. These high dispersion spectra allow, for the first time, direct measurements of their stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, rotation velocities, radial velocities (and spectroscopic binarity), mass accretion properties, and mass outflow indicators. Comparisons of the stellar properties with evolutionary models also allow us to estimate masses and constrain ages. We find that these objects have masses similar to those of older, more evolved T Tauri stars, but protostars have higher mean rotation velocities and angular momenta. Most protostars indicate high mass accretion or outflow, but some in Taurus-Auriga appear to be relatively quiescent. These new results are testing, expanding, and refining the standard star formation paradigm, and we explore how to expand this work further.

  5. The origin of massive clusters: from hyper-massive clouds to mini-bursts of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Frederique; Louvet, Fabien; Nguyen Luong, Quang

    2015-08-01

    Herschel revealed high-density cloud filaments of several pc^3, which are forming clusters of OB-type stars. Counting Herschel protostars gives a direct measure of the mass of stars forming in a period of ~10^5 yrs, the ``instantaneous'' star formation activity. Given their activity, these so-called mini-starburst cloud ridges could be seen as "miniature and instant models" of starburst galaxies. Their characteristics could shed light on the origin of massive clusters.

  6. Massive outflows driven by magnetic effects in star-forming clouds with high mass accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Yuko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Sakurai, Yuya; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The relation between the mass accretion rate on to the circumstellar disc and the rate of mass ejection by magnetically driven winds is investigated using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Using a spherical cloud core with a varying ratio of thermal to gravitational energy, which determines the mass accretion rate on to the disc, to define the initial conditions, the outflow propagation for approximately 104 yr after protostar formation is then calculated for several cloud cores. The mass ejection rate and accretion rate are comparable only when the magnetic energy of the initial cloud core is comparable to the gravitational energy. Consequently, in strongly magnetized clouds a higher mass accretion rate naturally produces both massive protostars and massive outflows. The simulated outflow mass, momentum, kinetic energy and momentum flux agree well with observations, indicating that massive stars form through the same mechanism as low-mass stars but require a significantly strong magnetic field to launch massive outflows.

  7. CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD: A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS AND THE DENSE GAS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Di Francesco, J.; André, Ph.; Maury, A.; Men'shchikov, A.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Könyves, V.; Louvet, F.; Roy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Nguyên-Lu'o'ng, Q.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Peretto, N.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We use PACS and SPIRE continuum data at 160 μm, 250 μm, 350 μm, and 500 μm from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey to sample seven clumps in Perseus: B1, B1-E, B5, IC 348, L1448, L1455, and NGC 1333. Additionally, we identify and characterize the embedded Class 0 protostars using detections of compact Herschel sources at 70 μm as well as archival Spitzer catalogs and SCUBA 850 μm photometric data. We identify 28 candidate Class 0 protostars, four of which are newly discovered sources not identified with Spitzer. We find that the star formation efficiency of clumps, as traced by Class 0 protostars, correlates strongly with the flatness of their respective column density distributions at high values. This correlation suggests that the fraction of high column density material in a clump reflects only its youngest protostellar population rather than its entire source population. We propose that feedback from either the formation or evolution of protostars changes the local density structure of clumps.

  8. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  9. Fragmentation of Molecular Clumps and Formation of Massive Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    Massive protostars are born in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the formation of a cluster of stellar objects. The interplay among gravity, turbulence and magnetic fields affects the outcome of fragmentation. The physical condition (temperature and density) in molecular clumps limits the Jeans mass to about 1 Msun. This creates a theoretical puzzle for massive star formation since dense cores much larger than 1 Msun tend to further fragment into lower mass entities. In this talk, I will present recent high resolution observations of massive molecular clumps at very early evolutionary stages. I will discuss fragmentation, physical and chemical evolution of molecular coresand the implication of these findings to current theoretical ideas of massive star and cluster formation. I will also present measurements of dust polarization of a large sample of massive molecular clumps, which suggest that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse of molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores.

  10. Witnessing the birth of a supermassive protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Hartwig, T.

    2016-05-01

    The detection of z > 6 quasars reveals the existence of supermassive black holes of a few 109 M⊙. One of the potential pathways to explain their formation in the infant universe is the so-called direct collapse model which provides massive seeds of 105-106 M⊙. An isothermal direct collapse mandates that haloes should be of a primordial composition and the formation of molecular hydrogen remains suppressed in the presence of a strong Lyman Werner flux. In this study, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two massive primordial haloes employing a detailed chemical model which includes H- cooling as well as realistic opacities for both the bound-free H- emission and the Rayleigh scattering of hydrogen atoms. We are able to resolve the collapse up to unprecedentedly high densities of ˜10-3 g cm-3 and to scales of about 10-4 au. Our results show that the gas cools down to ˜5000 K in the presence of H- cooling, and induces fragmentation at scales of about 8000 au in one of the two simulated haloes, which may lead to the formation of a binary. In addition, fragmentation also occurs on the au scale in one of the haloes but the clumps are expected to merge on short time-scales. Our results confirm that H- cooling does not prevent the formation of a supermassive star and the trapping of cooling radiation stabilizes the collapse on small scales.

  11. THE SMALL-SCALE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND FRAGMENTATION DIFFERENCE OF TWO EMBEDDED INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTARS IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kempen, T. A.; Longmore, S. N.; Johnstone, D.; Pillai, T.; Fuente, A.

    2012-06-01

    Intermediate-mass (IM) protostars, the bridge between the very common solar-like protostars and the more massive, but rarer, O and B stars, can only be studied at high physical spatial resolutions in a handful of clouds. In this paper, we present and analyze the continuum results from an observing campaign at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) targeting two well-studied IM protostars in Orion, NGC 2071 and L1641 S3 MMS 1. The extended SMA (eSMA) probes structure at angular resolutions up to 0.''2, revealing protostellar disks on scales of {approx}200 AU. Continuum flux measurements on these scales indicate that a significant amount of mass, a few tens of M{sub Sun }, is present. Envelope, stellar, and disk masses are derived using compact, extended, and eSMA configurations and compared against spectral energy distribution fitting models. We hypothesize that fragmentation into three components occurred within NGC 2071 at an early time, when the envelopes were less than 10% of their current masses, e.g., <0.5 M{sub Sun }. No fragmentation occurred for L1641 S3 MMS 1. For NGC 2071, evidence is given that the bulk of the envelope material currently around each source was accreted after the initial fragmentation. In addition, about 30% of the total core mass is not yet associated to one of the three sources. A global accretion model is favored and a potential accretion history of NGC 2071 is presented. It is shown that the relatively low level of fragmentation in NGC 2071 was stifled compared to the expected fragmentation from a Jeans argument. Similarly, the lack of fragmentation in L1641 S3 MMS 1 is likely due to similar arguments.

  12. High-J CO emission in the Cepheus E protostellar outflow observed with SOFIA/GREAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Gusdorf, A.; Leurini, S.; Codella, C.; Güsten, R.; Wyrowski, F.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Risacher, C.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Owing to the high energy required for their excitation, high-J CO transitions are a valuable tool for the study of protostellar jets and outflows. However, high spectral resolution observations of high-J CO lines, which are essential to distinguish the different components in the line profiles, were impossible until the start of operations of the Herschel Space Observatory and the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Aims: We present and analyze two spectrally resolved high-J CO lines toward a protostellar outflow. We study the physical conditions, as a function of velocity, traced by such high-energy transitions in bipolar outflows. Methods: We selected the molecular outflow Cep E, driven by an intermediate-mass class 0 protostar. Using the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) onboard SOFIA, we observed the CO (12-11) and (13-12) transitions (Eu ~ 430 and 500 K, respectively) toward one position in the blue lobe of this outflow, that had been known to display high-velocity molecular emission. Results: We detect the outflow emission in both transitions, up to extremely high velocities (~100 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity). We divide the line profiles into three velocity ranges that each have interesting spectral features: standard, intermediate, and extremely high-velocity. One distinct bullet is detected in each of the last two. A large velocity gradient analysis for these three velocity ranges provides constraints on the kinetic temperature and volume density of the emitting gas, ≳ 100 K and ≳ 104 cm-3, respectively. These results are in agreement with previous ISO observations and are comparable with results obtained by Herschel for similar objects. Conclusions: High-J CO lines are a good tracer of molecular bullets in protostellar outflows. Our analysis suggests that different physical conditions are at work in the intermediate velocity range compared with the standard and extremely high

  13. Strong irradiation of low-mass protostars in Corona Australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes; Digit Team; Alma Cycle 0 Protostars Team

    2013-07-01

    Very young low-mass protostars are deeply embedded in cold gas and dust. These early stages of star formation often show an interesting and varied chemistry, e.g. with complex organic molecules or long carbon-chain molecules in the inner regions. The effect on the physics and chemistry from nearby luminous stars remains poorly understood. We find unexpectedly high temperatures in the R CrA region, but also in other protostars in CrA. Models suggest that the Herbig Be star R CrA is the dominant heat source in this star-forming region. Thus, also intermediate-mass stars have large effects on the physical properties in such regions. ALMA observations of H2CO can be used to trace such heating also in more distant regions.

  14. Discovery of a protostar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatley, I.; Becklin, E. E.; Hyland, A. R.; Jones, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A near infrared search of the H II region/molecular cloud complex N159 in the Large Magellanic Cloud has revealed a very red (H-K = 2.1, K-L-prime = 2.7) compact object. The location, brightness, color and 2.1-2.4 micron spectrum of this source suggest that it is very young, and similar to the galactic infrared protostars. This is the first identification of an infrared protostar in an external galaxy. Its discovery provides direct evidence of current star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and suggests that regions of star formation in external galaxies will appear similar to those in the Milky Way.

  15. Herschel Shines Light on the Episodic Evolutionary Sequence of Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.; DIGIT; FOOSH; COPS Teams

    2014-01-01

    New far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic capabilities, along with moderate spatial and spectral resolution, provide the opportunity to study the diversity of shocks, accretion processes, and compositions of the envelopes of developing protostellar objects in nearby molecular clouds. We present the "COPS" (CO in Protostars) sample; a statistical analysis of the full sample of 30 Class 0/I protostars from the "DIGIT" Key project using Herschel-PACS/SPIRE 50-700 micron spectroscopy. We consider the sample as a whole in characteristic spectral lines, using a standardized data reduction procedure for all targets, and analyze the differences in the continuum and gas over the full sample, presenting an overview of trends. We compare the sources in evolutionary state, envelope mass, and gas properties to more evolved sources from the"FOOSH'' (FUor) samples.

  16. COMPLEX MOLECULES TOWARD LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS: THE SERPENS CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Van der Marel, Nienke; Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2011-10-10

    Gas-phase complex organic molecules are commonly detected toward high-mass protostellar hot cores. Detections toward low-mass protostars and outflows are comparatively rare, and a larger sample is the key to investigate how the chemistry responds to its environment. Guided by the prediction that complex organic molecules form in CH{sub 3}OH-rich ices and thermally or non-thermally evaporate with CH{sub 3}OH, we have identified three sight lines in the Serpens core-SMM1, SMM4, and SMM4-W-which are likely to be rich in complex organics. Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, narrow lines (FWHM of 1-2 km s{sup -1}) of CH{sub 3}CHO and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} are detected toward all sources, HCOOCH{sub 3} toward SMM1 and SMM4-W, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH not at all. Beam-averaged abundances of individual complex organics range between 0.6% and 10% with respect to CH{sub 3}OH when the CH{sub 3}OH rotational temperature is applied. The summed complex organic abundances also vary by an order of magnitude, with the richest chemistry toward the most luminous protostar SMM1. The range of abundances compare well with other beam-averaged observations of low-mass sources. Complex organic abundances are of the same order of magnitude toward low-mass protostars and high-mass hot cores, but HCOOCH{sub 3} is relatively more important toward low-mass protostars. This is consistent with a sequential ice photochemistry, dominated by CHO-containing products at low temperatures and early times.

  17. Star formation in the Cepheus Flare region: implications from morphology and infrared properties of optically selected clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Z. T.; Tóth, L. V.; Krause, O.; Kun, M.; Stickel, M.

    2006-07-01

    Aims.A complex study of visual and infrared properties of ISM and an examination of cloud morphology was carried out using USNO, 2MASS, DIRBE, IRAS, and ISO data of an extended region in Cepheus to explore the conditions of cloud and star formation. Methods: .We mapped the distribution of visual extinction in a 256 square degree area of Cepheus. We identified clouds and described their morphology quantitatively to find features such as globular and head-tail shape. We also characterized the region using infrared data and combined the results with those obtained from visual data. Results: .Eight cloud complexes and four voids were identified and 208 dark clouds were localised, 86 of which had not been previously catalogued. The observed distribution of cloud axis ratios corresponds to near-prolate ellipsoidal clouds with random alignment. The cloud mass spectrum derived is dN_cloud/dM_cloud=6.1×10^2(M_cloud/M_⊙)-1.70~M_⊙-1 . We pointed out a linear relationship between FIR colour temperature and galactic latitude at intermediate galactic latitudes (3° < b < 18°) and a similar relationship for minimum cloud temperatures. The observed FIR colours of dark clouds were found to agree well with model calculations. We showed the signs of connection between the far-IR loop GIRL G109+11 and the active triggered star formation of adjacent cloud complexes. Relationships between the star-forming efficiency, peak extinction, and cloud mass were recognized and described with empirical formulae. YSOs were found in 7 of the 11 clouds with extinction above 4 mag. These 11 clouds represent 21% of the total cloud mass and contain 52% of all the YSO candidates. High star-forming efficiencies, 0.52% and 0.56%, were found in globular and head-tail clouds, respectively, relative to the mean efficiency for the clouds in the region (0.16%). Conclusions: .Cloud mass and peak extinction were found to be the most important factors of star-forming efficiency besides cloud morphology. The

  18. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  19. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  20. EXTREMELY LARGE AND HOT MULTILAYER KEPLERIAN DISK AROUND THE O-TYPE PROTOSTAR W51N: THE PRECURSORS OF THE HCH II REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Leurini, Silvia

    2010-12-10

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (0.''57-0.''78) SO, SO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, HC{sub 3}N, and HCOCH{sub 2}OH line observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths of the young O-type protostar W51 North made with the Submillimeter Array. We report the presence of a large (about 8000 AU) and hot molecular circumstellar disk around this object, which connects the inner dusty disk with the molecular ring or toroid reported recently and confirms the existence of a single bipolar outflow emanating from this object. The molecular emission from the large disk is observed in layers with the transitions characterized by high excitation temperatures in their lower energy states (up to 1512 K) being concentrated closer to the central massive protostar. The molecular emission from those transitions with low or moderate excitation temperatures is found in the outermost parts of the disk and exhibits an inner cavity with an angular size of around 0.''7. We modeled all lines with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectrum. A detailed study of the kinematics of the molecular gas together with an LTE model of a circumstellar disk shows that the innermost parts of the disk are also Keplerian plus a contracting velocity. The emission of the HCOCH{sub 2}OH reveals the possible presence of a warm 'companion' located to the northeast of the disk, however its nature is unclear. The emission of the SO and SO{sub 2} is observed in the circumstellar disk as well as in the outflow. We suggest that the massive protostar W51 North appears to be in a phase before the presence of a hypercompact or an ultracompact H II (HC/UCH II) region and propose a possible sequence on the formation of the massive stars.

  1. EXTREMELY BROAD RADIO RECOMBINATION MASER LINES TOWARD THE HIGH-VELOCITY IONIZED JET IN CEPHEUS A HW2

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Patel, N.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Baez-Rubio, A.; Thum, C. E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: baezra@cab.inta-csic.es

    2011-05-10

    We present the first detection of the H40{alpha}, H34{alpha}, and H31{alpha} radio recombination lines (RRLs) at millimeter wavelengths toward the high-velocity ionized jet in the Cepheus A HW2 star-forming region. From our single-dish and interferometric observations, we find that the measured RRLs show extremely broad asymmetric line profiles with zero-intensity line widths of {approx}1100 km s{sup -1}. From the line widths, we estimate a terminal velocity for the ionized gas in the jet of {>=}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with that obtained from the proper motions of the HW2 radio jet. The total integrated line-to-continuum flux ratios of the H40{alpha}, H34{alpha}, and H31{alpha} lines are 43, 229, and 280 km s{sup -1}, clearly deviating from LTE predictions. These ratios are very similar to those observed for the RRL masers toward MWC349A, suggesting that the intensities of the RRLs toward HW2 are affected by maser emission. Our radiative transfer modeling of the RRLs shows that their asymmetric profiles could be explained by maser emission arising from a bi-conical radio jet with a semi-opening angle of 18 deg., electron density distribution varying as r {sup -2.11}, and turbulent and expanding wind velocities of 60 and 500 km s{sup -1}.

  2. Tentative Discovery of a New Supernova Remnant in Cepheus: Unveiling an Elusive Shell in the Spitzer Galactic First Look Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Stolovy, Susan; Wachter, Stefanie; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Hoard, D. W.

    2006-04-01

    We have discovered an axially symmetric, well-defined shell of material in the constellation of Cepheus, based on imaging acquired as part of the Galactic First Look Survey with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 86''×75'' object exhibits brightened limbs on the minor axis and is clearly visible at 24 μm, but it is not detected in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 70, or 160 μm images. Follow-up 7.5-40 μm spectroscopy reveals that the shell is composed entirely of ionized gas and that the 24 μm imaging traces [O IV] 25.89 μm emission solely. The spectrum also exhibits weaker [Ne III] and [S III] emission, and very weak [Ne V] emission. No emission from warm dust is detected. Spectral cuts through the center of the shell and at the northern limb are highly consistent with each other. The progenitor is not readily identified, but with scaling arguments and comparison to well-known examples of evolved stellar objects, we find the observations to be most straightforward to interpret in terms of a young supernova remnant located at a distance of at least 10 kpc, some 400 pc above the Galactic disk. If confirmed, this would be the first supernova remnant discovered initially at infrared wavelengths.

  3. Massive Hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Tariq, Cheema

    2016-01-01

    Hemoptysis, or coughing of blood, oftentimes triggers anxiety and fear for patients. The etiology of hemoptysis will determine the clinical course, which includes watchful waiting or intensive care admission. Any amount of hemoptysis that compromises the patient's respiratory status is considered massive hemoptysis and should be considered a medical emergency. In this article, we review introduction, definition, bronchial circulation anatomy, etiology, and management of massive hemoptysis.

  4. Photometry and Classification of Stars in the Direction of Clusters NGC 7129 and NGC 7142 in Cepheus. I. Magnitudes, Color Indices and Spectral Types of 2140 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskoliūnas, M.; Zdanavičius, J.; Zdanavičius, K.; Straižys, V.

    In a 1.5 square degree area, centered at RA = 21:44:30, DEC = +65:58, we have determined magnitudes and color indices for 2140 stars in the Vilnius seven-color system down to V = 17 mag. This area includes a star-forming region with the open cluster NGC 7129 embedded in a dense dust cloud TGU 645 (LDN 1181), close to the Cepheus Flare, and a distant old open cluster NGC 7142 seen through a semi-transparent window. For most of the stars spectral and luminosity classes in the MK system, determined from the photometric data, are given.

  5. The structure of the Cepheus E protostellar outflow: The jet, the bowshock, and the cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Gusdorf, A.; Codella, C.; Eislöffel, J.; Neri, R.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Güsten, R.; Leurini, S.; Risacher, C.; Benedettini, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Protostellar outflows are a crucial ingredient of the star-formation process. However, the physical conditions in the warm outflowing gas are still poorly known. Aims: We present a multi-transition, high spectral resolution CO study of the outflow of the intermediate-mass Class 0 protostar Cep E-mm. The goal is to determine the structure of the outflow and to constrain the physical conditions of the various components in order to understand the origin of the mass-loss phenomenon. Methods: We have observed the J = 12-11, J = 13-12, and J = 16-15 CO lines at high spectral resolution with SOFIA/GREAT and the J = 5-4, J = 9-8, and J = 14-13 CO lines with HIFI/Herschel towards the position of the terminal bowshock HH377 in the southern outflow lobe. These observations were complemented with maps of CO transitions obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope (J = 1-0, 2-1), the Plateau de Bure interferometer (J = 2-1), and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (J = 3-2, 4-3). Results: We identify three main components in the protostellar outflow: the jet, the cavity, and the bowshock, with a typical size of 1.7″ × 21″, 4.5″, and 22″ × 10″, respectively. In the jet, the emission from the low-J CO lines is dominated by a gas layer at Tkin = 80-100 K, column density N(CO) = 9 × 1016 cm-2, and density n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J CO lines arises from a warmer (Tkin = 400-750 K), denser (n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 106 cm-3), lower column density (N(CO) = 1.5 × 1016 cm-2) gas component. Similarly, in the outflow cavity, two components are detected: the emission of the low-J lines is dominated by a gas layer of column density N(CO) = 7 × 1017 cm-2 at Tkin = 55-85 K and density in the range (1-8) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J lines is dominated by a hot, denser gas layer with Tkin = 500-1500K, n(H2) = (1-5) × 106 cm-3, and N(CO) = 6 × 1016 cm-2. A temperature gradient as a function of the velocity is found in the high-excitation gas

  6. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  7. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}⊙ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}⊙ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}⊙ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}⊙ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  8. Bipolar Outflows Properties from Class 0/I protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Oscar A.; Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES) Program

    2017-01-01

    The Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES) program is a key project by the Submillimeter Array (SMA) telescope that is observing the 70 youngest protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud. From SMA CO(2-1) and continuum observations, we investigate correlations among the YSOs properties, including outflow opening angles, ages, luminosities, envelope masses, and temperatures. No discernable pattern between measured angle versus bolometric temperature was found, independent of the mass or luminosity. These results indicate that the evolutionary sequence is more chaotic than originally predicted in Arce & Sargent (2006).

  9. Molecular outflows from protostars. Questions, options and facts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.

    In this discussion of molecular outflows the author isolates the basic theoretical questions, and discusses some of the model options in the light of a few decisive observational facts. In addition several new lines of theoretical argument are introduced regarding the behaviour of the protostar environment. These concern the global energy and momentum balance and the nature of the steady state that is compatible with a non-zero Poynting flux. Finally brief reference is made to a thorough study by Fiege and Henriksen, 1995 of the global model suggested in Henriksen and Valls-Gabaud, 1994.

  10. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  11. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  12. THE VLA NASCENT DISK AND MULTIPLICITY SURVEY OF PERSEUS PROTOSTARS (VANDAM). II. MULTIPLICITY OF PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Perez, Laura; Dunham, Michael M.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Kratter, Kaitlin

    2016-02-10

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L{sub ⊙} and ∼33 L{sub ⊙}, with a median of 0.7 L{sub ⊙}. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ∼0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ∼43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ∼75 au and another peak at ∼3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50–400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  13. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey of Perseus Protostars (VANDAM). II. Multiplicity of Protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Melis, Carl; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin; Perez, Laura

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L⊙ and ˜33 L⊙, with a median of 0.7 L⊙. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of ˜0.″065 (15 au) and separations out to ˜43″ (10,000 au) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be 0.40 ± 0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71 ± 0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23 ± 0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at ˜75 au and another peak at ˜3000 au. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on >1000 au scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on <200 au scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by <30 au. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50-400 au) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.

  14. Draco cloud as a matrix of potential protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    The Draco molecular cloud is inbound at a z distance of a few hundred parsecs, according to previous observations. IRAS Point Source Catalog data for a 36 sq deg area that includes most of the cloud and a comparison area around it are tabulated, illustrated, and discussed. The sources are classified as 56 unidentified, 38 identified extragalactic objects, and 44 identified stars. The unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources appear to be globule-like clumps that are candidates for producing protostars, although the data cannot demonstrate currently accreting protostars in the globules. An undetermined percent of 100 micron sources may be artifactual, but only a small percent of them may be galaxies because of the adherence to the Draco cloud. Sources detected also at 60 micron or only at 60 micron do not adhere to the cloud and are probably galaxies. Unless artifactual the unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources may provide considerable new information about the cloud components and therefore about potential star formation in a new class of sites and origins. Six unidentified sources have 12-25 micron stellar spectral distributions, but neither they nor the identified stars have 12-25 micron spectra characteristic of T Tauri stars. 18 references.

  15. The Draco cloud as a matrix of potential protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hugh M.

    1986-01-01

    The Draco molecular cloud is inbound at a z distance of a few hundred parsecs, according to previous observations. IRAS Point Source Catalog data for a 36 sq deg area that includes most of the cloud and a comparison area around it are tabulated, illustrated, and discussed. The sources are classified as 56 unidentified, 38 identified extragalactic objects, and 44 identified stars. The unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources appear to be globule-like clumps that are candidates for producing protostars, although the data cannot demonstrate currently accreting protostars in the globules. An undetermined percent of 100 micron sources may be artifactual, but only a small percent of them may be galaxies because of the adherence to the Draco cloud. Sources detected also at 60 micron or only at 60 micron do not adhere to the cloud and are probably galaxies. Unless artifactual the unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources may provide considerable new information about the cloud components and therefore about potential star formation in a new class of sites and origins. Six unidentified sources have 12-25 micron stellar spectral distributions, but neither they nor the identified stars have 12-25 micron spectra characteristic of T Tauri stars.

  16. HOPS 383: AN OUTBURSTING CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, Emily J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Booker, Joseph; Fischer, William J.; Furlan, Elise; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Stanke, Thomas; Billot, Nicolas; Tobin, John J.; Ali, Babar; Allen, Lori E.; Watson, Dan M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2015-02-10

    We report the dramatic mid-infrared brightening between 2004 and 2006 of Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) 383, a deeply embedded protostar adjacent to NGC 1977 in Orion. By 2008, the source became a factor of 35 brighter at 24 μm with a brightness increase also apparent at 4.5 μm. The outburst is also detected in the submillimeter by comparing APEX/SABOCA to SCUBA data, and a scattered-light nebula appeared in NEWFIRM K{sub s} imaging. The post-outburst spectral energy distribution indicates a Class 0 source with a dense envelope and a luminosity between 6 and 14 L{sub ⊙}. Post-outburst time-series mid- and far-infrared photometry show no long-term fading and variability at the 18% level between 2009 and 2012. HOPS 383 is the first outbursting Class 0 object discovered, pointing to the importance of episodic accretion at early stages in the star formation process. Its dramatic rise and lack of fading over a 6 year period hint that it may be similar to FU Ori outbursts, although the luminosity appears to be significantly smaller than the canonical luminosities of such objects.

  17. Radio variability survey of very low luminosity protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2014-07-01

    Ten very low luminosity objects were observed multiple times in the 8.5 GHz continuum in search of protostellar magnetic activities. A radio outburst of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS was detected, and the variability timescale was about 20 days or shorter. The results of this survey and archival observations suggest that IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is in active states about half the time. Archival data show that L1014 IRS and L1148 IRS were detectable previously and suggest that at least 20%-30% of very low luminosity protostars are radio variables. Considering the variability timescale and flux level of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS and the previous detection of the circular polarization of L1014 IRS, the radio outbursts of these protostars are probably caused by magnetic flares. However, IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is too young and small to develop an internal convective dynamo. If the detected radio emission is indeed coming from magnetic flares, the discovery implies that the flares may be caused by the fossil magnetic fields of interstellar origin.

  18. Bipolar Molecular Outflows from Young Stars and Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachiller, Rafael

    A violent outflow of high-velocity gas is one of the first manifestations of the formation of a new star. Such outflows emerge bipolarly from the young object and involve amounts of energy similar to those involved in accretion processes. The youngest (proto-)stellar low-mass objects known to date (the Class 0 protostars) present a particularly efficient outflow activity, indicating that outflow and infall motions happen simultaneously and are closely linked since the very first stages of the star formation processes. This article reviews the wealth of information being provided by large millimeter-wave telescopes and interferometers on the small-scale structure of molecular outflows, as well as the most recent theories about their origin. The observations of highly collimated CO outflows, extremely high velocity (EHV) flows, and molecular "bullets" are examined in detail, since they provide key information on the origin and propagation of outflows. The peculiar chemistry operating in the associated shocked molecular regions is discussed, highlighting the recent high sensitivity observations of low-luminosity sources. The classification schemes and the properties of the driving sources of bipolar outflows are summarized with special attention devoted to the recently identified Class 0 protostars. All these issues are crucial for building a unified theory on the mass-loss phenomena in young stars.

  19. Molecular Anions in Protostars, Prestellar Cores and Dark Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, Steven; Buckle, Jane; Wash, Catherine; Millar, Tom

    2011-01-01

    From our recent survey work using the Green Bank Telescope, microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H have been detected in six new sources. Using HC3N = 10(exp -9) emission maps, we targeted the most carbon-chain-rich sources for our anion survey, which included the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1251A-IRS3, the prestellar cores L1389-SMM1 and L1512, and the interstellar clouds Ll172A, TMC-1C and L1495B. Derived [C6H(-)]/[C6H] anion-to-neutral ratios are approximately 1-10. The greatest C6H(-) column densities are found in the quiescent clouds TMC-1C and L1495B, but the anion-to-neutral ratios are greatest in the prestellar cores and protostars. These results are interpreted in terms of the physical and chemical properties of the sources, and the implications for molecular cloud chemistry are discussed.

  20. Giant Molecular Outflows Powered by Protostars in L1448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony, Mary; Wolf-Chase, Grace A.; O'Linger, Joann

    1999-10-01

    We present sensitive (T*R somewhat equal to 0.1K), large-scale (47' x 7'--corresponding to 4 pc x 6 pc at the source) maps of the CO J = 1 to 0 emission of the L1448 dark cloud at 55" resolution. The maps were acquired using the On-The-Fly (OTF) capability of the NRAO's 12-meter telescope. Careful comparison of the spatial and velocity distribution of the high-velocity CO with previously published optical and near-infrared images and spectra has led to the identification of four distinct, parsec-scale molecular outflows from our maps. These CO flows are powered by four Class 0 protostars: L1448C, L1448N(A), L1448N(B), and L1448 IRS2 and end at the cloud's boundaries. The famous, well-collimated, high-velocity molecular outflow powered by L1448C can now be traced to distances an order of magnitude greater than previously. We present strong evidence for interactions between all four outflows on scales over a parsec from the driving sources. The magnitude of the combined flow momenta, as well as the combined kinetic energy of the flows, are sufficient to disperse the 50 MSun ammonia core in which the protostars are currently forming. It remains to be shown whether the combined directions of the outflow momenta, and the efficiency of momentum transfer from outflow to ambient material, are sufficient for dispersal of the L1448 molecular cloud.

  1. Near and far infrared observations of protostars and dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suters, Mark Gerard

    1992-11-01

    Far infrared point source and extended emission data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) survey are used to investigate the properties of star formation in the regions of high galactic latitude dark cloud complexes. The properties of individual sources are examined using near infrared spectroscopy and broad band spectral energy distributions. The IRAS signature of star formation is derived by comparing the far infrared colors of a sample of protostars with those of other common far infrared objects. The quality of the IRAS data is ignored for the purposes of this investigation. The criteria developed for identifying protostars from the IRAS Point Source Catalog discriminates against most non-protostellar objects, with the exception of galaxies and HII regions. Objects identified as protostellar according to other criteria are also likely to be identified by the criteria developed. Extended emission data in the far infrared is used to estimate the column density and temperature of several dark cloud complexes, and the optical extinction in the same regions is estimated with the Guide Star Catalog. Temperature and column density share an inverse relationship cloud cores are characterized by column densities above 1024 hydrogen atoms m-2 and temperatures around 20 K, while the inter cloud medium has column densities below 1023 atoms m-2 and temperatures above 50 K. The column density, as measured by IRAS, and the optical extinction appear to be related up to values of around 1025 atoms m-2 and 5 magnitudes respectively but the IRAS detectors appear insensitive to material at higher densities than these. Near infrared spectra of a variety of objects chosen for their youth, including IRAS sources which satisfy the protostar criteria, are investigated. These spectra are categorized into three distinct groups of increasing youth: (1) T Tauri-like spectra, with flat H and K band continua, lacking both Br-gamma emission and CO absorption; (2) FU Orilike spectra

  2. The Discovery of Extremely Young Protostars in Orion with Herschel and APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia; Tobin, John; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, Tom; Fischer, Will; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Di Francesco, James; Furlan, Elise; Osorio, Mayra; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using 24 um - 870 um imaging obtained with the Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX telescopes as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). We find a sample of 15 new extremely red protostar candidates that can reliably identified as protostars (Stutz et al., 2013). Taking the previously known sample of 300 Spitzer protostars and the new sample of 15 Herschel identified protostars together, we find 18 extremely red protostars (i.e., log λFλ70 / λFλ24 > 1.65). These are the reddest protostars known in Orion and we name them "PACS Bright Red sources", or PBRS. Our analysis reveals that the PBRs sample is composed of Class 0 like sources with very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; Tbol < 45 K) and large sub-millimeter fluxes (Lsmm/Lbol > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2 Msun - 2 Msun and luminosities of 0.7 Lsun - 10 Lsun. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and possibly high mass infall rates. We estimate the ages of the PBRs to be between 5000 and 25000 years. We find that the fraction of PBRS is more than 5 times higher in the Orion B cloud than in Orion A; this may be due to differences in the star formation histories or in the star forming environment.

  3. A VLA Survey of Orion Class 0 Protostars at 30 AU Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Tobin, John J.; Booker, Joseph J.; Guilfoil Cox, Erin; Diaz-Rodriguez, Ana; Kama, MIHKEL; Li, Zhi-Yun; Looney, Leslie; Melis, Carl; Murillo, Nadia; Persson, Magnus; Reynolds, Nick; Sadavoy, Sarah; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Stephenson, Brian; Megeath, Samuel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We present initial results from the VANDAM:Orion survey, a VLA survey of Class 0 protostars in Orion. Disks and multiple systems are thought to originate early in the star formation process, when the protostars are deeply embedded in dense envelopes. The VANDAM survey of the Perseus molecular cloud demonstrated that VLA Ka-band (33 GHz) observations can resolve disks and companions around Class 0 protostars, providing the means to study the incidence and separations of companions, and the properties of disks during the first 100,000 years of protostellar evolution. The VANDAM:Orion survey targets 92 Class 0 protostars in the Orion Molecular clouds, the largest population of Class 0 objects within 500 pc of the Sun. These were selected from protostars characterized by the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, or HOPS, which assembled 1.6-870 micron SEDs of 319 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds. VANDAM:Orion not only triples the number of Class 0 protostars observed with the VLA , as compared to the original VANDAM survey, but also samples the diverse environments found in the Orion clouds. VANDAM:Orion also includes 38 Class I protostars found near the targeted Class 0 objects.VANDAM:Orion initially carried out VLA observations in the C-array to determine their fluxes in the Ka-band (33 GHZ). The subsequent A-array observations then imaged the protostars with a resolution of 0.08”/34 AU. The entire sample has now been observed and reduced. We will overview the detection statistics and show examples of multiple systems and disks around Orion Class 0 protostars. The VLA images will also be compared to images from a recent ALMA 850 micron snapshot survey of all Orion protostars characterized by HOPS. Many sources appear opaque to ALMA at 870 μm, but the dust is optically thin for the VLA, enabling it to detect structure that ALMA cannot. Finally, we will discuss the prospects of VANDAM:Orion for characterizing the role of environment in the formation of

  4. Chasing discs around O-type (proto)stars: Evidence from ALMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Beltrán, M. T.; Johnston, K. G.; Maud, L. T.; Moscadelli, L.; Mottram, J. C.; Ahmadi, A.; Allen, V.; Beuther, H.; Csengeri, T.; Etoka, S.; Fuller, G. A.; Galli, D.; Galván-Madrid, R.; Goddi, C.; Henning, T.; Hoare, M. G.; Klaassen, P. D.; Kuiper, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lumsden, S.; Peters, T.; Rivilla, V. M.; Schilke, P.; Testi, L.; van der Tak, F.; Vig, S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Zinnecker, H.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Circumstellar discs around massive stars could mediate the accretion onto the star from the infalling envelope, and could minimize the effects of radiation pressure. Despite such a crucial role, only a few convincing candidates have been provided for discs around deeply embedded O-type (proto)stars. Aims: In order to establish whether disc-mediated accretion is the formation mechanism for the most massive stars, we have searched for circumstellar, rotating discs around a limited sample of six luminous (>105L⊙) young stellar objects. These objects were selected on the basis of their IR and radio properties in order to maximize the likelihood of association with disc+jet systems. Methods: We used ALMA with 0.̋2 resolution to observe a large number of molecular lines typical of hot molecular cores. In this paper we limit our analysis to two disc tracers (methyl cyanide, CH3CN, and its isotopologue, 13CH3CN), and an outflow tracer (silicon monoxide, SiO). Results: We reveal many cores, although their number depends dramatically on the target. We focus on the cores that present prominent molecular line emission. In six of these a velocity gradient is seen across the core,three of which show evidence of Keplerian-like rotation. The SiO data reveal clear but poorly collimated bipolar outflow signatures towards two objects only. This can be explained if real jets are rare (perhaps short-lived) in very massive objects and/or if stellar multiplicity significantly affects the outflow structure.For all cores with velocity gradients, the velocity field is analysed through position-velocity plots to establish whether the gas is undergoing rotation with νrot ∝ R- α, as expected for Keplerian-like discs. Conclusions: Our results suggest that in three objects we are observing rotation in circumstellar discs, with three more tentative cases, and one core where no evidence for rotation is found. In all cases but one, we find that the gas mass is less than the mass of

  5. A Cluster of Class 0 Protostars in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony, M.

    1997-01-01

    We present new 12, 25, 60, and 100 micron HIRES-processed IRAS images of the nearby Serpens star-forming cloud core at FWHM resolutions of ~ 30"-10'. We use HIRES-processed point-source models of the IRAS emission to derive new flux values and flux upper limits for all the protostellar candidates in the Serpens core. Our fluxes (and flux upper limits) determine the spectral energy distributions (SED's) necessary to derive the dust temperature, circumstellar mass, bolometric luminosity, and evolutionary status of each protostellar candidate. Remarkably, we find that all five sources: FIRS1, SMM4, S68N, SMM2, and SMM3 studied by Hurt, Barsony & Wootten (1996) share the defining characteristics of Class 0 protostars, the short-lived (a few X 10^4 yr) earliest observable protostellar stage (Andre, Ward-Thompson & Barsony 1993, Barsony 1994).

  6. DETECTION OF A MAGNETIZED DISK AROUND A VERY YOUNG PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramprasad; Girart, Josep M.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Marrone, Daniel P. E-mail: girart@ice.cat

    2014-01-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution polarimetric observations of the 878 μm thermal dust continuum emission obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward the IRAS 16293–2422 protostellar binary system. We report the detection of linearly polarized dust emission arising from the circumstellar disk associated with the IRAS 16293–2422 B protostar. The fractional polarization of ≅ 1.4% is only slightly lower than that expected from theoretical calculations in such disks. The magnetic field structure on the plane of the sky derived from the dust polarization suggests a complex magnetic field geometry in the disk, possibly associated with a rotating disk that is wrapping the field lines as expected from the simulations. The polarization around IRAS 16293–2422 A at subarcsecond angular resolution is only marginally detected.

  7. Water and complex organic molecules in the warm inner regions of solar-type protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Persson, M. V.; Lykke, J. M.; Taquet, V.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Vastel, C.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    Water and complex organic molecules play an important role in the emergence of Life. They have been detected in different types of astrophysical environments (protostars, prestellar cores, outflows, protoplanetary disks, comets, etc). In particular, they show high abundances towards the warm inner regions of protostars, where the icy grain mantles thermally desorb. Can a part of the molecular content observed in these regions be preserved during the star formation process and incorporated into asteroids and comets, that can deliver it to planetary embryos through impacts? By comparison with cometary studies, interferometric observations of solar-type protostars can help to address this important question. We present recent results obtained with the Plateau de Bure interferometer about water deuteration, glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol towards the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A.

  8. On the existence of accretion-driven bursts in massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Kuiper, R.; Kley, W.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion-driven luminosity outbursts are a vivid manifestation of variable mass accretion on to protostars. They are known as the so-called FU Orionis phenomenon in the context of low-mass protostars. More recently, this process has been found in models of primordial star formation. Using numerical radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we stress that present-day forming massive stars also experience variable accretion and show that this process is accompanied by luminous outbursts induced by the episodic accretion of gaseous clumps falling from the circumstellar disc on to the protostar. Consequently, the process of accretion-induced luminous flares is also conceivable in the high-mass regime of star formation and we propose to regard this phenomenon as a general mechanism that can affect protostars regardless of their mass and/or the chemical properties of the parent environment in which they form. In addition to the commonness of accretion-driven outbursts in the star formation machinery, we conjecture that luminous flares from regions hosting forming high-mass stars may be an observational implication of the fragmentation of their accretion discs.

  9. Searching for Correlations with the HCO+ 4-3 Molecular Spectra of Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acikgoz, Ogulcan; Basturk, Seda

    The assignment is based on HCO+ J=4-3 spectral line molecular observations of protostars from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, which has the 15 m diameter dish and located in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA. Data of 20 protostars are taken from the public LOMASS database and analyzed. We looked for correlations between a few observational quantities. We thank Dr Umut Yildiz (NASA/JPL-Caltech) for providing data and his comments and support to our research project.

  10. A HERSCHEL AND APEX CENSUS OF THE REDDEST SOURCES IN ORION: SEARCHING FOR THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Krause, Oliver; Tobin, John J.; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, Thomas L.; Allen, Lori; Manoj, P.

    2013-04-10

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 {mu}m and 160 {mu}m that are either too faint (m{sub 24} > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 {mu}m fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65; we name these sources 'PACS Bright Red sources', or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBR sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; T{sub bol} < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L{sub smm}/L{sub bol} > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2-2 M{sub Sun} and luminosities of 0.7-10 L{sub Sun }. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.

  11. HST 1.6μm Imaging Survey of Orion Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Joseph J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Kounkel, Marina; Poteet, Charles A.; Furlan, Elise; Stutz, Amelia Marie; Puravankara, Manoj; Tobin, John J.; Nagy, Zsofia; Watson, Dan M.; Herschel Orion Protostar Survey

    2017-01-01

    We present near-infrared 1.6μm HST NICMOS and/or WFC3 images of 244 protostars in the Orion A & B molecular clouds, the largest sample of protostars imaged in a single cloud complex to date. These protostars are part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a multi-observatory program which obtained 1-870μm photometry, spectroscopy, imaging of 319 protostars in the Orion clouds. The HST images resolve structures illuminated in scattered light from the central protostar, including disks, cavities, and shadows cast in envelopes by disks, with better than 100 AU spatial resolution. We classify all the protostars into five morphological classes: non-detections, point sources, bipolar cavities, unipolar cavities and irregular sources. Sixteen of the bipolar sources show disks in absorption, revealing a minimum spatial extent of the disks. The resolved cavities allow us to directly measure the clearing of the envelopes by bipolar outflows. We map cavities for 30 of these sources by applying a custom edge detection technique to both the scattered light images and radiative transfer models with known cavity geometries. We constrain the shape of the cavities and estimate the fractional volumes of the collapsing cores dispersed by the outflows. Contrary to previous results, we do not find evidence that outflow cavities grow in volume as protostars evolve from Class 0 to flat spectrum sources. These results indicate that feedback by outflow clearing is not the primary agent for dissipating envelopes and halting accretion, and cannot explain the 30-40% star formation efficiency estimated for molecular cores.

  12. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 μm and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ˜100 μm. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  13. The Circumestellar Disk of the B0 Protostar Powering the HH 80-81 Radio Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girart, J. M.; Estalella, R.; Fernández-López, M.; Curiel, S.; Frau, P.; Galvan-Madrid, R.; Rao, R.; Busquet, G.; Juárez, C.

    2017-09-01

    We present subarcsecond angular resolution observations carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 880 μm centered at the B0-type protostar GGD27 MM1, the driving source of the parsec scale HH 80-81 jet. We constrain its polarized continuum emission to ≲0.8% at this wavelength. Its submillimeter spectrum is dominated by sulfur-bearing species tracing a rotating-disk-like structure (SO and SO2 isotopologues mainly), but also shows HCN-bearing and CH3OH lines, which trace the disk and the outflow cavity walls excavated by the HH 80-81 jet. The presence of many sulfurated lines could indicate the presence of shocked gas at the disk’s centrifugal barrier or that MM1 is a hot core at an evolved stage. The resolved SO2 emission traces the disk kinematics very well and we fit the SMA observations using a thin-disk Keplerian model, which gives the inclination (47°), the inner (≲170 au) and outer (∼950–1300 au) radii, and the disk’s rotation velocity (3.4 km s‑1 at a putative radius of 1700 au). We roughly estimate a protostellar dynamical mass of 4–18 {M}ȯ . MM2 and WMC cores show, comparatively, an almost empty spectra, suggesting that they are associated with extended emission detected in previous low-angular resolution observations, and therefore indicating youth (MM2) or the presence of a less massive object (WMC).

  14. ACCRETION DISKS AROUND MASSIVE STARS: HYDRODYNAMIC STRUCTURE, STABILITY, AND DUST SUBLIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks around massive protostar applying steady state models of thin disks. The thin disk equations are solved with proper opacities for dust and gas taking into account the huge temperature variation along the disk. We explore a wide parameter range concerning stellar mass, accretion rate, and viscosity parameter {alpha}. The most essential finding is a very high temperature of the inner disk. For e.g., a 10 M{sub sun} protostar with an accretion rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the disk midplane temperature may reach almost 10{sup 5} K. The disk luminosity in this case is about 10{sup 4} L{sub sun} and, thus, potentially higher than that of a massive protostar. We motivate our disk model with similar hot disks around compact stars. We calculate a dust sublimation radius by turbulent disk self-heating of more than 10 AU, a radius, which is 3 times larger than that caused by stellar irradiation. We discuss implications of this result on the flashlight effect and the consequences for the radiation pressure of the central star. In deference to disks around low-mass protostars, our models suggest rather high values for the disk turbulence parameter {alpha} {<=} 1. However, disk stability to fragmentation due to thermal effects and gravitational instability would require a lower {alpha} value. For {alpha} = 0.1, we find stable disks out to 80 AU. Essentially, our model allows us to compare the outer disk to some of the observed massive protostellar disk sources, and from that, extrapolate the disk structure close to the star which is yet impossible to observe.

  15. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HEATING IN A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou; Li Huabai

    2012-02-15

    The dense molecular clump P1 in the infrared dark cloud complex G28.34+0.06 harbors a massive protostellar cluster at its extreme youth. Our previous Submillimeter Array observations revealed several jet-like CO outflows emanating from the protostars, indicative of intense accretion and potential interaction with ambient natal materials. Here, we present the Expanded Very Large Array spectral line observations toward P1 in the NH{sub 3} (J,K) = (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines, as well as H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH masers. Multiple NH{sub 3} transitions reveal the heated gas widely spread in the 1 pc clump. The temperature distribution is highly structured; the heated gas is offset from the protostars, and morphologically matches the outflows very well. Hot spots of spatially compact, spectrally broad NH{sub 3} (3,3) emission features are also found coincident with the outflows. A weak NH{sub 3} (3,3) maser is discovered at the interface between an outflow jet and the ambient gas. These findings suggest that protostellar heating may not be effective in suppressing fragmentation during the formation of massive cores.

  16. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF CLASS I PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2010-11-15

    We present the results of a near-IR spectroscopic survey of 110 Class I protostars observed from 0.80 {mu}m to 2.43 {mu}m at a spectroscopic resolution of R = 1200. This survey is unique in its selection of targets from the whole sky, its sample size, wavelength coverage, depth, and sample selection. We find that Class I objects exhibit a wide range of lines and the continuum spectroscopic features. Eighty-five percent of Class I protostars exhibit features indicative of mass accretion, and we found that the veiling excess, CO emission, and Br {gamma} emission are closely related. We modeled the spectra to estimate the veiling excess (r{sub k} ) and extinction to each target. We also used near-IR colors and emission line ratios, when available, to also estimate extinction. In the course of this survey, we observed the spectra of 10 FU Orionis-like objects, including 2 new ones, as well as 3 Herbig Ae-type stars among our Class I young stellar objects. We used photospheric absorption lines, when available, to estimate the spectral type of each target. Although most targets are late-type stars, there are several A- and F-type stars in our sample. Notably, we found no A or F class stars in the Taurus-Auriga or Perseus star-forming regions. There are several cases where the observed CO and/or water absorption bands are deeper than expected from the photospheric spectral type. We find a correlation between the appearance of the reflection nebula, which traces the distribution of material on very large scales, and the near-IR spectrum, which probes smaller scales. All of the FU Orionis-like objects are associated with reflection nebulae. The spectra of the components of spatially resolved protostellar binaries tend to be very similar. In particular both components tend to have similar veiling and H{sub 2} emission, inconsistent with random selection from the sample as a whole. There is a strong correlation between [Fe II] and H{sub 2} emission, supporting previous

  17. RAPIDLY ACCRETING SUPERGIANT PROTOSTARS: EMBRYOS OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES?

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki E-mail: hosokwtk@gmail.com

    2012-09-01

    Direct collapse of supermassive stars (SMSs) is a possible pathway for generating supermassive black holes in the early universe. It is expected that an SMS could form via very rapid mass accretion with M-dot{sub *} {approx} 0.1-1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} during the gravitational collapse of an atomic-cooling primordial gas cloud. In this paper, we study how stars would evolve under such extreme rapid mass accretion, focusing on the early evolution until the stellar mass reaches 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. To this end, we numerically calculate the detailed interior structure of accreting stars with primordial element abundances. Our results show that for accretion rates higher than 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, stellar evolution is qualitatively different from that expected at lower rates. While accreting at these high rates, the star always has a radius exceeding 100 R{sub Sun }, which increases monotonically with the stellar mass. The mass-radius relation for stellar masses exceeding {approx}100 M{sub Sun} follows the same track with R{sub *}{proportional_to}M {sup 1/2}{sub *} in all cases with accretion rates {approx}> 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}; at a stellar mass of 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }, the radius is {approx_equal} 7000 R{sub Sun} ({approx_equal} 30 AU). With higher accretion rates, the onset of hydrogen burning is shifted toward higher stellar masses. In particular, for accretion rates exceeding M-dot{sub *}{approx}>0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, there is no significant hydrogen burning even after 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} have accreted onto the protostar. Such 'supergiant' protostars have effective temperatures as low as T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 5000 K throughout their evolution and because they hardly emit ionizing photons, they do not create an H II region or significantly heat their immediate surroundings. Thus, radiative feedback is unable to hinder the growth of rapidly accreting stars to masses in excess of 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} as long as material is

  18. Astronomers puzzle over a peculiar age-defying massive star

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    An age-defying star designated as IRAS 19312+1950 exhibits features characteristic of a very young star and a very old star. The object stands out as extremely bright inside a large, chemically rich cloud of material, as shown in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. A NASA-led team of scientists thinks the star – which is about 10 times as massive as our sun and emits about 20,000 times as much energy – is a newly forming protostar. That was a big surprise because the region had not been known as a stellar nursery before. But the presence of a nearby interstellar bubble, which indicates the presence of a recently formed massive star, also supports this idea. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bMza9d Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

  19. Physics and Chemistry of Strongly Irradiated Protostars in Corona Australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Bisschop, S.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Digit Team, Alma Cycle 0 Protostars Team

    2013-10-01

    We have conducted interferometric spectral-line observations with the SMA and APEX of the R CrA region, a star-forming region with a handful of low-mass young stellar objects. We have also conducted single-dish observations of the same spectral lines in 17 young stellar objects in the CrA star-forming region, conducted APEX and ASTE unbiased line surveys of IRS7B, a Class 0/I source in the region, and performed far-infrared continuum mapping with the Herschel Space Observatory. We find unexpectedly high H2CO excitation temperatures in the R CrA region, but also in other protostars in the CrA (Corona Australis) star-forming region. Our models show that the Herbig Be star R CrA is the dominant heat source in this region. Thus, also intermediate-mass stars have large effects on the physical properties in such regions. ALMA observations of H2CO can be used to trace such heating also in more distant regions.

  20. ALIGNMENT OF PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DURING THE EMBEDDED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu

    2014-12-20

    Star formation proceeds via the collapse of a molecular cloud core over multiple dynamical timescales. Turbulence within cores results in a spatially non-uniform angular momentum of the cloud, causing a stochastic variation in the orientation of the disk forming from the collapsing material. In the absence of star-disk angular momentum coupling, such disk-tilting would provide a natural mechanism for the production of primordial spin-orbit misalignments in the resulting planetary systems. However, owing to high accretion rates in the embedded phase of star formation, the inner edge of the circumstellar disk extends down to the stellar surface, resulting in efficient gravitational and accretional angular momentum transfer between the star and the disk. Here, we demonstrate that the resulting gravitational coupling is sufficient to suppress any significant star-disk misalignment, with accretion playing a secondary role. The joint tilting of the star-disk system leads to a stochastic wandering of star-aligned bipolar outflows. Such wandering widens the effective opening angle of stellar outflows, allowing for more efficient clearing of the remainder of the protostar's gaseous envelope. Accordingly, the processes described in this work provide an additional mechanism responsible for sculpting the stellar initial mass function.

  1. The Earliest Stages of Star Formation: Protostars and Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, P.

    2001-07-01

    Despite recent progress, both the earliest stages of individual protostellar collapse and the origin of the global stellar initial mass function (IMF) are poorly understood. Since pre-stellar condensations and young protostars have Tbol ~< 30 K and emit the bulk of their luminosity in the 80-350 microns band, a large far-infrared and submillimeter space telescope such as FIRST/Herschel is needed to make further advances in this area. In particular, FIRST will provide a unique probe of the energy budget and temperature structure of pre/proto-stellar condensations. With an angular resolution at 85-300 microns comparable to, or better than, the largest ground-based millimeter radiotelescopes, the two imaging instruments of FIRST (i.e., PACS and SPIRE) will make possible deep, unbiased surveys for such condensations in the nearby (d ~< 0.5-1 kpc) molecular cloud complexes of the Galaxy. These surveys will provide, for the first time, the mass and luminosity functions of complete samples of cold pre-stellar condensations, comprising thousands of objects down to substellar masses. This should greatly help improve our understanding of the fragmentation origin of the IMF.

  2. An X-ray and radio study of the massive star-forming cluster IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Virginie; Hofner, Peter; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

    2015-08-01

    Two main competitive theories intent to explain massive star formation: the turbulent core model, which is an extension of the low-mass star formation model (McKee & Tan 2003), and models involving competitive accretion or stellar collisions (Bonnell & Bate 2006). The characterization of the cluster in which massive stars remain can help discriminate between the two main scenarios of their formation.Until recently it was believed that massive stars were only formed in dense molecular clouds leading to a substantial cluster. However, a previous study of the massive star forming region IRAS 20126+4104 using Spitzer observations by Qiu et al. (2008), suggested that the massive protostar was isolated, and the region was showing no obvious cluster.Here we adopt a multiwavelength technique to characterize the stellar environment of the IRAS 20126+4104 region combining Chandra X-ray ACIS-I and VLA 6cm continuum observations, and near-infrared (2MASS) data of the region. We detected 150 X-ray sources in the ACIS-I field and 13 radio sources within the 9’.2 VLA primary beam. Associating X-ray sources with their near-infrared counterparts from the 2MASS catalog and a color study of those counterparts, allow us to determine the galactic foreground/background contamination, and we conclude that 90 X-ray sources are associated with the region.This study shows an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and a number of at least 42 YSOs within 1.2 pc distance from the massive protostar. This number is consistent with typical B-type stars clusters (Lada & Lada 2003).

  3. Infrared Observations of Hot Gas and Cold Ice Toward the Low Mass Protostar Elias 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ceccarelli, C.; Boonman, A. M. S.; vanDishoeck, E. F.; Keane, J. V.; Whittet, D. C. B.; deGraauw, T.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained the full 1-200 micrometer spectrum of the low luminosity (36 solar luminosity Class I protostar Elias 29 in the rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud. It provides a unique opportunity to study the origin and evolution of interstellar ice and the interrelationship of interstellar ice and hot core gases around low mass protostars. We see abundant hot CO and H2O gas, as well as the absorption bands of CO, CO2, H2O and "6.85 micrometer" ices. We compare the abundances and physical conditions of the gas and ices toward Elias 29 with the conditions around several well studied luminous, high mass protostars. The high gas temperature and gas/solid ratios resemble those of relatively evolved high mass objects (e.g. GL 2591). However, none of the ice band profiles shows evidence for significant thermal processing, and in this respect Elias 29 resembles the least evolved luminous protostars, such as NGC 7538 : IRS9. Thus we conclude that the heating of the envelope of the low mass object Elias 29 is qualitatively different from that of high mass protostars. This is possibly related to a different density gradient of the envelope or shielding of the ices in a circumstellar disk. This result is important for our understanding of the evolution of interstellar ices, and their relation to cometary ices.

  4. Nonaxisymmetric Dynamic Instabilities of Rotating Polytropes. II. Torques, Bars, and Mode Saturation with Applications to Protostars and Fizzlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Brian K.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic nonaxisymmetric instabilities in rapidly rotating stars and protostars have a range of potential applications in astrophysics, including implications for binary formation during protostellar cloud collapse and for the possibility of aborted collapse to neutron star densities at late stages of stellar evolution (``fizzlers''). We have recently presented detailed linear analyses for polytropes of the most dynamically unstable global modes, the barlike modes. These produce bar distortions in the regions near the rotation axis but have trailing spiral arms toward the equator. In this paper, we use our linear eigenfunctions to predict the early nonlinear behavior of the dynamic instability and compare these ``quasi-linear'' predictions with several fully nonlinear hydrodynamics simulations. The comparisons demonstrate that the nonlinear saturation of the barlike instability is due to the self-interaction gravitational torques between the growing central bar and the spiral arms, where angular momentum is transferred outward from bar to arms. We also find a previously unsuspected resonance condition that accurately predicts the mass of the bar regions in our own simulations and in those published by other researchers. The quasi-linear theory makes other accurate predictions about consequences of instability, including properties of possible end-state bars and increases in central density, which can be large under some conditions. We discuss in some detail the application of our results to binary formation during protostellar collapse and to the formation of massive rotating black holes.

  5. High Resolution Near-IR Spectroscopy of Protostars With Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Tom; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It is now possible to measure absorption spectra of Class I protostars using D greater than or = 8m telescopes equipped with sensitive cryogenic IR spectrographs. Our latest high-resolution (R approx. 20,000) Keck data reveal that Class I protostars are indeed low-mass stars with dwarf-like features. However, they differ from T Tauri stars in that Class I protostars have much higher IR veilings (tau(sub k) greater than or = 1 - 3+) and they are rotating quickly, v sin i greater than 20 km/s. Interestingly, the vast majority of protostellar absorption spectra show stellar - not disk - absorption features. A preliminary H-R diagram suggests that protostellar photospheres may have different physical structures than T Tauri stars, perhaps due to their higher accretion rates.

  6. Mapping Collapsing Cores in Scattered Light: HST NICMOS+WFC3 Imaging of Orion Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Joseph J.; Megeath, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    A long standing question in the study of protostellar collapse is what halts the infall of a core onto a central protostar. Is the core eventually exhausted by infall, or does feedback from accretion-driven outflows disperse the core? Perhaps the best tracer of the impact of the outflow on the cores are the observed cavities carved by the outflows. We present a systematic study of near-infrared HST NICMOS+WFC3 1.6 micron images, mapping light scattered by dust grains in collapsing cores around low mass protostars with 80 AU resolution. These images are a component of HOPS, the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, a multi-observatory survey designed to obtain 1-870 micron photometry, spectroscopy and imaging of a large sample of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. Orion is home to half of the known protostars within 500 parsecs and is a largely unexplored ground for scattered-light studies of protostellar cores and disks. With 304 targets from the HOPS program imaged by the HST, we obtained a large sample of sources with resolved scattered light nebulae. The high spatial resolution allows us to determine properties of the protostars and collapsing cores that are not well constrained by the 1-870 micron spectral energy distributions. In particular, we map the profile of the outflow cavities for 25 sources by applying a variation of traditional edge detection techniques to the scattered light images and to radiative transfer models with known cavity geometries. From this, we estimate the fractional volumes of the collapsing cores dispersed by the outflows.

  7. On the nature of the deeply embedded protostar OMC-2 FIR 4

    SciTech Connect

    Furlan, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Fischer, W. J.; Osorio, M.; Stutz, A. M.; Ali, B.; Manoj, P.; Adams, J. D.; Tobin, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    We use mid-infrared to submillimeter data from the Spitzer, Herschel, and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescopes to study the bright submillimeter source OMC-2 FIR 4. We find a point source at 8, 24, and 70 μm, and a compact, but extended source at 160, 350, and 870 μm. The peak of the emission from 8 to 70 μm, attributed to the protostar associated with FIR 4, is displaced relative to the peak of the extended emission; the latter represents the large molecular core the protostar is embedded within. We determine that the protostar has a bolometric luminosity of 37 L {sub ☉}, although including more extended emission surrounding the point source raises this value to 86 L {sub ☉}. Radiative transfer models of the protostellar system fit the observed spectral energy distribution well and yield a total luminosity of most likely less than 100 L {sub ☉}. Our models suggest that the bolometric luminosity of the protostar could be as low as 12-14 L {sub ☉}, while the luminosity of the colder (∼20 K) extended core could be around 100 L {sub ☉}, with a mass of about 27 M {sub ☉}. Our derived luminosities for the protostar OMC-2 FIR 4 are in direct contradiction with previous claims of a total luminosity of 1000 L {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find evidence from far-infrared molecular spectra and 3.6 cm emission that FIR 4 drives an outflow. The final stellar mass the protostar will ultimately achieve is uncertain due to its association with the large reservoir of mass found in the cold core.

  8. Feedback from deeply embedded low- and high-mass protostars. Surveying hot molecular gas with Herschel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, Agata

    2014-09-01

    Protostars interact violently with their natal cocoons within dense molecular clouds. Characterizing this feedback is key to understanding the efficiency of the star formation process and the chemical processing of material that will be available for planet formation. In this thesis, the imprints of physical processes on molecular gas are analyzed using state-of-the-art far-infrared spectroscopy from Herschel / PACS. Interpretation of the origin of far-infrared line emission allows us to quantify the physical conditions and the role of shocks and ultraviolet radiation during the 'kindergarten years' of low- and high-mass protostars.

  9. Observations of Carbon Chain Chemistry in the Envelopes of Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M.; Charnley, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.; Millar, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Observational results are reported from our surveys in the Northern Hemisphere (using the Onsala 20 m telescope) and the Southern Hemisphere (using the Mopra 22 m telescope) to search for 3 mm emission lines from carbon-chain-bearing species and other complex molecules in the envelopes of low-mass protostars. Based on a sample of approximately 60 sources, we find that carbon-chain-bearing species including HC3N (and C4H) are highly abundant in the vicinity of more than half of the observed protostars. The origin and evolution of these species, including their likely incorporation into ices in protoplanetary disks will be discussed

  10. Molecular Outflows from Newly Formed Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2015-12-01

    We map 6 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the CO J=2-1 line and survey 18 massive YSOs, including the six, in the hcopj, sioj, water 6_{16}-5_{23} maser, and methanol 7_{0}-6_{1} A^{+} maser lines. We detect CO bipolar outflows in all the six mapped sources. Four of them are newly discovered (ifive, ieight, inine, iten), while itwo is mapped in the CO J=2-1 line for the first time. The detected outflows are much more massive and energetic than outflows from low-mass YSOs with masses >20 M_⊙ and momenta >300 M_⊙ km/s. They have mass outflow rates (3-6)×10^{-4} M_⊙ yr^{-1}, which are at least one order of magnitude greater than those observed in low-mass YSOs. We detect hcop and SiO line emission in 18 (100%) and 4 (22%) sources, respectively. The hcop spectra show high-velocity wings in 11 (61%) sources. We detect water maser emission in 13 (72%) sources and 44 GHz methanol maser emission in 8 (44%) sources. Of the detected sources, 5 water and 6 methanol maser sources are new discoveries. iseven shows high-velocity (>30 kms) water maser lines. We find good correlations of the bolometric luminosity of the central (proto)star with the mechanical force, mechanical luminosity, and mass outflow rate of molecular outflow %L_{bol} with F_{m}, L_{m}, and dot{M}_{out} in the bolometric luminosity range of 10^{-1}-10^6 lsol, and identified 3 intermediate- or high-mass counterparts of Class O objects.

  11. A Complex Organic Slushy Bathing Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Complex organic molecules are ubiquitous companions of young forming stars. They were first observed in hot cores surrounding high-mass protostars [e.g., 1], but have since also been detected in the environs of several low-mass counterparts [e.g., 2]. Recent studies have shown that colder envelopes and positions with impinging outflows may also glow with emission from complex organic species [e.g., 3, 4]. For this meeting, I would like to present physicochemical modeling results on the synthesis of complex organics in an envelope-cavity system that is subject to non-thermal processing. This includes wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations with RADMC [5] and a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network [6]. The results show that the morphology of such a system delineates three distinct regions: the cavity wall layer with time-dependent and species-variant enhancements; a torus rich in complex organic ices, but not reflected in gas-phase abundances; and the remaining outer envelope abundant in simpler solid and gaseous molecules. Within the adopted paradigm, complex organic molecules are demonstrated to have unique lifetimes and be grouped into early and late species [7]. Key chemical processes for forming and destroying complex organic molecules will be discussed. In addition, the results of adding newly experimentally verified routes [8] into the existing chemical networks will be shown.[1] Blake G. A., Sutton E. C., Masson C. R., Phillips T. G., 1987, ApJ, 315, 621[2] Jørgensen J. K., Favre C., Bisschop S. E., Bourke T. L., van Dishoeck E. F., Schmalzl M., 2012, ApJ, 757, L4[3] Arce H. G., Santiago-García J., Jørgensen J. K., Tafalla M., Bachiller R., 2008, ApJ, 681, L21[4] Öberg K. I., Bottinelli S., Jørgensen J. K., van Dishoeck E. F., 2010, ApJ, 716, 825[5] Dullemond C. P., Dominik C., 2004, A&A, 417, 159[6] Walsh C., Millar T. J., Nomura H., Herbst E., Widicus Weaver S., Aikawa Y., Laas J. C., Vasyunin A. I., 2014, A&A, 563, A33[7] Drozdovskaya

  12. Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, S F; Jørgensen, J K; Bizzarro, M; Bisschop, S E

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in (15)N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused (15)N-enrichment in the solids. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations, including chemical fractionation. However, observational results that constrain the fractionation models are scarce. While there is evidence of (15)N-enrichment in prestellar cores, it is unclear how the signature evolves into the protostellar phases. The aim of this study is to measure the (14)N/(15)N ratio around three nearby, embedded low- to intermediate-mass protostars. Isotopologues of HCN and HNC were used to probe the (14)N/(15)N ratio. A selection of J = 3-2 and 4-3 transitions of H(13)CN, HC(15)N, HN(13)C, and H(15)NC was observed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment telescope (APEX). The (14)N/(15)N ratios were derived from the integrated intensities assuming a standard (12)C/(13)C ratio. The assumption of optically thin emission was verified using radiative transfer modeling and hyperfine structure fitting. Two sources, IRAS 16293A and R CrA IRS7B, show (15)N-enrichment by a factor of ~1.5-2.5 in both HCN and HNC with respect to the solar composition. IRAS 16293A falls in the range of typical prestellar core values. Solar composition cannot be excluded for the third source, OMC-3 MMS6. Furthermore, there are indications of a trend toward increasing (14)N/(15)N ratios with increasing outer envelope temperature. The enhanced (15)N abundances in HCN and HNC found in two Class 0 sources ((14)N/(15)N ~ 160-290) and the tentative trend toward a temperature-dependent (14)N/(15)N ratio are consistent with the chemical fractionation scenario, but (14)N/(15)N ratios from additional tracers are indispensable for testing the models. Spatially resolved observations are needed to distinguish between

  13. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  14. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2016-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  15. EVLA Observation of Centimeter Continuum Emission from Protostars in Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Nicholas S.; Tobin, John J.; Keown, Jared A.; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Serpens South is a protocluster with an unusually high abundance of Class 0 and I protostars, suggesting it is in a very early phase of star formation and may eventually form a star cluster. Following its discovery in 2008 with the Spitzer space telescope, infrared and millimeter observations and analysis quickly followed, however, Serpens South has yet to be fully explored in the radio. Radio observations at centimeter wavelengths have long been used as a tool to probe the dynamical processes of young protostars that are still heavily shrouded in their protostellar envelopes and thus cannot be seen at longer wavelengths. Radio observations then become an important tool in understanding Serpens South due to its young age. To this end, we have conducted EVLA C band continuum observations of the central region of the Serpens South protostellar cluster in order to map the centimeter continuum emission in a region of high Class 0 / I protostellar surface density. We report the detection of centimeter emission corresponding to protostars identified by Spitzer, and to protostars identified but blended by Herschel. We characterize their centimeter emission, and put them in context with previous Spitzer and Herschel infrared and far-infrared observations, as well as IRAM millimeter observations. Additionally, we make an assessment of the protostars' bolometric luminosity, and compare them to the known protostellar 3.6 cm to 6.0 cm luminosity vs. bolometric luminosity relation. With the EVLA, we present a mid-resolution map of centimeter emission from the central region of Serpens South with the highest sensitivity to date, with a beam size of ~5 arcseconds and rms on the order of 15 microJansky.

  16. In Search of the Youngest Protostars: IRAS HIRES Results in the Serpens Cloud Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, R. L.; Barsony, M.

    1995-12-01

    Protostars which have yet to accrete the bulk of their initial main sequence mass from their infall envelopes, dubbed ``Class 0'' (Andre, Ward-Thompson, & Barsony 1993), represent the youngest (a few x 10(4) yr) protostellar sources. The defining observational characteristics for Class 0 protostars include a high ratio of mm/submm to bolometric luminosity, the presence of molecular outflows, invisibility shortward of 10 mu m, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) resembling modified blackbodies with T <= 30 K. Since Class 0 SEDs peak at ~ 100--200 mu m, far-infrared (FIR) data are required to produce SEDs for these sources. The nearby Serpens star-forming cloud core is a region of great interest for Class 0 protostar searches. Millimeter continuum maps of the central 6(') x 5(') reveal at least five cold dust continuum peaks which lack NIR counterparts (Casali, Eiroa, & Duncan 1993). A recent multi-transition H_2CO study of these millimeter continuum sources (FIRS1, SMM2, SMM3, SMM4, & S68N) confirms the presence of central heating sources and substantial masses of circumstellar gas in these objects, suggesting that they could all be Class 0 protostars (Hurt, Barsony & Wooten 1996). We present new 12, 25, 60, & 100 mu m HIRES processed IRAS images of the Serpens cloud core at FWHM resolutions of ~ 30('') --1(') . Such resolutions are necessary to help identify the individual contributions from the closely spaced sources. We use HIRES-processed point source models of the IRAS emission to determine new flux values and flux upper limits for all the protostellar candidates in the Serpens core. From the resulting SEDs we derive the dust temperature, circumstellar mass, bolometric luminosity, and evolutionary status of each protostellar candidate. Remarkably, we find all five millimeter continuum sources to share the defining characteristics of Class 0 protostars, potentially making the Serpens core the densest known collection of such objects.

  17. Infrared observations of hot gas and cold ice toward the low mass protostar Elias 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ceccarelli, C.; Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Keane, J. V.; Whittet, D. C. B.; de Graauw, Th.

    2000-08-01

    We have obtained the full 1-200 μm spectrum of the low luminosity (36 Lsolar) Class I protostar Elias 29 in the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud. It provides a unique opportunity to study the origin and evolution of interstellar ice and the interrelationship of interstellar ice and hot core gases around low mass protostars. We see abundant hot CO and H2O gas, as well as the absorption bands of CO, CO2, H2O and "6.85 μm" ices. We compare the abundances and physical conditions of the gas and ices toward Elias 29 with the conditions around several well studied luminous, high mass protostars. The high gas temperature and gas/solid ratios resemble those of relatively evolved high mass objects (e.g. GL 2591). However, none of the ice band profiles shows evidence for significant thermal processing, and in this respect Elias 29 resembles the least evolved luminous protostars, such as NGC 7538 : IRS9. Thus we conclude that the heating of the envelope of the low mass object Elias 29 is qualitatively different from that of high mass protostars. This is possibly related to a different density gradient of the envelope or shielding of the ices in a circumstellar disk. This result is important for our understanding of the evolution of interstellar ices, and their relation to cometary ices. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  18. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  19. The SOFIA Massive (SOMA) Star Formation Survey. I. Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James M.; Liu, Mengyao; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen; Beltrán, Maria T.; Shuping, Ralph; Staff, Jan E.; Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Whitney, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    We present an overview and first results of the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy Massive (SOMA) Star Formation Survey, which is using the FORCAST instrument to image massive protostars from ˜10 to 40 μm. These wavelengths trace thermal emission from warm dust, which in Core Accretion models mainly emerges from the inner regions of protostellar outflow cavities. Dust in dense core envelopes also imprints characteristic extinction patterns at these wavelengths, causing intensity peaks to shift along the outflow axis and profiles to become more symmetric at longer wavelengths. We present observational results for the first eight protostars in the survey, i.e., multiwavelength images, including some ancillary ground-based mid-infrared (MIR) observations and archival Spitzer and Herschel data. These images generally show extended MIR/FIR emission along directions consistent with those of known outflows and with shorter wavelength peak flux positions displaced from the protostar along the blueshifted, near-facing sides, thus confirming qualitative predictions of Core Accretion models. We then compile spectral energy distributions and use these to derive protostellar properties by fitting theoretical radiative transfer models. Zhang and Tan models, based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan, imply the sources have protostellar masses m * ˜ 10-50 M ⊙ accreting at ˜10-4-10-3 M ⊙ yr-1 inside cores of initial masses M c ˜ 30-500 M ⊙ embedded in clumps with mass surface densities Σcl ˜ 0.1-3 g cm-2. Fitting the Robitaille et al. models typically leads to slightly higher protostellar masses, but with disk accretion rates ˜100× smaller. We discuss reasons for these differences and overall implications of these first survey results for massive star formation theories.

  20. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-01

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole—a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole.

  1. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-29

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole-a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Sonnhalter, Cordula

    2002-01-01

    We calculate numerically the collapse of slowly rotating, nonmagnetic, massive molecular clumps of masses 30,60, and 120 Stellar Mass, which conceivably could lead to the formation of massive stars. Because radiative acceleration on dust grains plays a critical role in the clump's dynamical evolution, we have improved the module for continuum radiation transfer in an existing two-dimensional (axial symmetry assumed) radiation hydrodynamic code. In particular, rather than using "gray" dust opacities and "gray" radiation transfer, we calculate the dust's wavelength-dependent absorption and emission simultaneously with the radiation density at each wavelength and the equilibrium temperatures of three grain components: amorphous carbon particles. silicates, and " dirty ice " -coated silicates. Because our simulations cannot spatially resolve the innermost regions of the molecular clump, however, we cannot distinguish between the formation of a dense central cluster or a single massive object. Furthermore, we cannot exclude significant mass loss from the central object(s) that may interact with the inflow into the central grid cell. Thus, with our basic assumption that all material in the innermost grid cell accretes onto a single object. we are able to provide only an upper limit to the mass of stars that could possibly be formed. We introduce a semianalytical scheme for augmenting existing evolutionary tracks of pre-main-sequence protostars by including the effects of accretion. By considering an open outermost boundary, an arbitrary amount of material could, in principal, be accreted onto this central star. However, for the three cases considered (30, 60, and 120 Stellar Mass originally within the computation grid), radiation acceleration limited the final masses to 3 1.6, 33.6, and 42.9 Stellar Mass, respectively, for wavelength-dependent radiation transfer and to 19.1, 20.1, and 22.9 Stellar Mass. for the corresponding simulations with gray radiation transfer. Our

  3. Feedback of atomic jets from embedded protostars in NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionatos, Odysseas; Güdel, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Context. The feedback of star formation to the parent cloud is conventionally examined through the study of molecular outflows. Little is known, however, about the effect that atomic ejecta tracing fast shocks can have on small scales or on global cloud properties. Aims: Our immediate objective is to study the morphology of protostellar ejecta through far-infrared atomic lines, compare them to other outflow tracers, and associate them with their driving sources. The main goal is to study the feedback from atomic jet emission that is excited by fast shocks on the parent cloud material, and examine the relative importance of atomic jets as regulators of the star formation process. Methods: We employed [O i] and [C ii] line maps of the NGC 1333 star-forming region observed with Herschel/PACS. We studied the detailed morphology and velocity distribution of the [O i] line using channel and line-centroid maps. We derived the momentum, energy, and mass flux for all the bipolar outflows traced by [O i] line emission. We compared the [O i] morphology to CO and H2 emission, and its dynamical and kinematic properties to the emission corresponding to CO outflows. Results: We find that the line-centroid maps can trace velocity structures down to 5 km s-1 which is a factor of 20 beyond the nominal velocity resolution reached by Herschel/PACS. These maps reveal an unprecedented degree of details that significantly assist in the association and characterization of outflows. We associate most of the [O i] emission with ejecta from embedded protostars. The spatial distribution of the [O i] emission closely follows the CO emission pattern and strongly correlates to the spatial distribution of the H2 emission, with the latter indicating excitation in shocks. The [O i] momentum accounts for only 1% of the momentum carried by the large-scale CO outflows. The energy released in shocks, however, corresponds to 50-100% of the energy carried away by outflows. Mass-flux estimates of the

  4. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. III. The Evolutionary Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of evolutionary sequences of massive protostars forming from massive dense cores in environments of high mass surface densities, based on the Turbulent Core Model. The protostellar evolution is calculated with a multi-zone numerical model, with the accretion rate regulated by feedback from an evolving disk wind outflow cavity. The disk evolution is calculated assuming a fixed ratio of disk to protostellar mass, while the core envelope evolution assumes an inside-out collapse of the core with a fixed outer radius. In this framework, an evolutionary track is determined by three environmental initial conditions: the core mass Mc , the mass surface density of the ambient clump Σcl, and the ratio of the core's initial rotational to gravitational energy β c . Evolutionary sequences with various Mc , Σcl, and β c are constructed. We find that in a fiducial model with Mc = 60 M ⊙, Σcl = 1 g cm-2, and β c = 0.02, the final mass of the protostar reaches at least ~26 M ⊙, making the final star formation efficiency >~ 0.43. For each of the evolutionary tracks, radiation transfer simulations are performed at selected stages, with temperature profiles, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and multiwavelength images produced. At a given stage, the envelope temperature depends strongly on Σcl, with higher temperatures in a higher Σcl core, but only weakly on Mc . The SED and MIR images depend sensitively on the evolving outflow cavity, which gradually widens as the protostar grows. The fluxes at <~ 100 μm increase dramatically, and the far-IR peaks move to shorter wavelengths. The influence of Σcl and β c (which determines disk size) are discussed. We find that, despite scatter caused by different Mc , Σcl, β c , and inclinations, sources at a given evolutionary stage appear in similar regions of color-color diagrams, especially when using colors with fluxes at >~ 70 μm, where scatter due to inclination is minimized

  5. IRDC G030.88+00.13: A TALE OF TWO MASSIVE CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Ke

    2011-05-20

    Massive stars (M {approx}>10 M{sub sun}) form from collapse of parsec-scale molecular clumps. How molecular clumps fragment to give rise to massive stars in a cluster with a distribution of masses is unclear. We search for cold cores that may lead to future formation of massive stars in a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}), low luminosity (4.6 x 10{sup 2} L{sub sun}) infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G030.88+00.13. The NH{sub 3} data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Green Bank Telescope reveal that the extinction feature seen in the infrared consists of two distinctive clumps along the same line of sight. The C1 clump at 97 km s{sup -1} coincides with the extinction in the Spitzer 8 and 24 {mu}m. Therefore, it is responsible for the majority of the IRDC. The C2 clump at 107 km s{sup -1} is more compact and has a peak temperature of 45 K. Compact dust cores and H{sub 2}O masers revealed in the Submillimeter Array and VLA observations are mostly associated with C2, and none are within the IRDC in C1. The luminosity indicates that neither the C1 nor C2 clump has yet to form massive protostars. But C1 might be at a precluster forming stage. The simulated observations rule out 0.1 pc cold cores with masses above 8 M{sub sun} within the IRDC. The core masses in C1 and C2 and those in high-mass protostellar objects suggest an evolutionary trend that the mass of cold cores increases over time. Based on our findings, we propose an empirical picture of massive star formation that protostellar cores and the embedded protostars undergo simultaneous mass growth during the protostellar evolution.

  6. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  7. Spectroscopic Detection of a Stellar-like Photosphere in an Accreting Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas P.; Lada, Charles J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present high-resolution (R is approximately equal to 18,000), high signal-to-noise 2 micron spectra of two luminous, X-ray flaring Class I protostars in the rho Ophiuchi cloud acquired with the NIRSPEC (near infrared spectrograph) of the Keck II telescope. We present the first spectrum of a highly veiled, strongly accreting protostar which shows photospheric absorption features and demonstrates the stellar nature of its central core. We find the spectrum of the luminous (L (sub bol) = 10 solar luminosity) protostellar source, YLW 15, to be stellar-like with numerous atomic and molecular absorption features, indicative of a K5 IV/V spectral type and a continuum veiling r(sub k) = 3.0. Its derived stellar luminosity (3 stellar luminosity) and stellar radius (3.1 solar radius) are consistent with those of a 0.5 solar mass pre-main-sequence star. However, 70% of its bolometric luminosity is due to mass accretion, whose rate we estimate to be 1.7 x 10(exp -6) solar masses yr(exp -1). We determine that excess infrared emission produced by the circumstellar accretion disk, the inner infalling envelope, and accretion shocks at the surface of the stellar core of YLW 15 all contribute significantly to its near-IR (infrared) continuum veiling. Its rotational velocity v sin i = 50 km s(exp -1) is comparable to those of flat-spectrum protostars but considerably higher than those of classical T Tauri stars in the rho Oph cloud. The protostar may be magnetically coupled to its circumstellar disk at a radius of 2 - 3 R(sub *). It is also plausible that this protostar can shed over half its angular momentum and evolve into a more slowly rotating classical T Tauri star by remaining coupled to its circumstellar disk (at increasing radius) as its accretion rate drops by an order of magnitude during the rapid transition between the Class I and Class II phases of evolution. The spectrum of WL 6 does not show any photospheric absorption features, and we estimate that its continuum

  8. Probing the effects of external irradiation on low-mass protostars through unbiased line surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Watanabe, Y.; Bisschop, S. E.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The envelopes of molecular gas around embedded low-mass protostars show different chemistries, which can be used to trace their formation history and physical conditions. The excitation conditions of some molecular species can also be used to trace these physical conditions, making it possible to constrain for instance sources of heating and excitation. Aims: We study the range of influence of an intermediate-mass Herbig Be protostar. We also study the effect of feedback from the environment on the chemical and physical properties of embedded protostars. Methods: We followed up on an earlier line survey of the Class 0/I source R CrA IRS7B in the 0.8 mm window with an unbiased line survey of the same source in the 1.3 mm window using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope. We also studied the excitation of the key species H2CO, CH3OH, and c-C3H2 in a complete sample of the 18 embedded protostars in the Corona Australis star-forming region. Radiative transfer models were employed to establish abundances of the molecular species. Results: We detect line emission from 20 molecular species (32 including isotopologues) in the two surveys. The most complex species detected are CH3OH, CH3CCH, CH3CHO, and CH3CN (the latter two are only tentatively detected). CH3CN and several other complex organic molecules are significantly under-abundant in comparison with what is found towards hot corino protostars. The H2CO rotational temperatures of the sources in the region decrease with the distance to the Herbig Be star R CrA, whereas the c-C3H2 temperatures remain constant across the star-forming region. Conclusions: The high H2CO temperatures observed towards objects close to R CrA suggest that this star has a sphere of influence of several 10 000 AU in which it increases the temperature of the molecular gas to 30-50 K through irradiation. The chemistry in the IRS7B envelope differs significantly from many other embedded protostars, which could be an effect of

  9. Identifying the Low-Luminosity Population of Embedded Protostars in the c2d Observations of Clouds and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Crapsi, Antonio; Evans, Neal J., II; Bourke, Tyler L.; Huard, Tracy L.; Myers, Philip C.; Kauffmann, Jens

    2008-11-01

    We present the results of a search for all embedded protostars with internal luminosities <=1.0 L⊙ in the full sample of nearby, low-mass star-forming regions surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Project "From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks" (c2d). The internal luminosity of a source, Lint, is the luminosity of the central source and excludes luminosity arising from external heating. On average, the Spitzer c2d data are sensitive to embedded protostars with Lint >= 4 × 10-3(d/140 pc)2 L⊙, a factor of 25 better than the sensitivity of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) to such objects. We present a set of selection criteria used to identify candidates from the Spitzer data and examine complementary data to decide whether each candidate is truly an embedded protostar. We find a tight correlation between the 70 μm flux and internal luminosity of a protostar, an empirical result based on both observations and detailed two-dimensional radiative transfer models of protostars. We identify 50 embedded protostars with Lint <= 1.0 L⊙ 15 have Lint <= 0.1 L⊙. The intrinsic distribution of source luminosities increases to lower luminosities. While we find sources down to the above sensitivity limit, indicating that the distribution may extend to luminosities lower than probed by these observations, we are able to rule out a continued rise in the distribution below Lint = 0.1 L⊙. Between 75% and 85% of cores classified as starless prior to being observed by Spitzer remain starless to our luminosity sensitivity; the remaining 15%-25% harbor low-luminosity, embedded protostars. We compile complete spectral energy distributions for all 50 objects and calculate standard evolutionary signatures (Lbol, Tbol, and Lbol/Lsmm) and argue that these objects are inconsistent with the simplest picture of star formation, wherein mass accretes from the core onto the protostar at a constant rate.

  10. The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity Survey (VANDAM): Resolved Candidate Disks around Class 0 and I Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Cox, Dominique; Harris, Robert J.; Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Dunham, Michael; Sadavoy, Sarah; Perez, Laura M.; Melis, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The properties of young protostellar disks, particularly Class 0 disks, are not well studied observationally, and their expected properties are controversial. In particular, there is debate about whether or not the earliest disks are large and massive and about when and how disks form. To characterize the properties of the youngest disks and binaries we are conducting the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity survey (VANDAM) toward all known protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud (d ~ 230 pc). The survey is the largest and most complete high-resolution millimeter/centimeter wavelength survey of protostellar disks and binaries. We present the dust emission results toward a sample of ~15 protostellar disk candidates around Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the VANDAM survey with ~0.05'' or 12 AU resolution. We have begun to confirm the disk candidacy of these sources by fitting the Ka-band 8 mm dust-continuum data in the uv-plane to a simple, parametrized model based on the Shakura-Sunyaev disk model. The seven candidate disks this analysis has been performed on are well-fit by the disk shaped model, and have estimated masses from the measured flux in agreement with masses of previously known disks. The inner-disk surface densities of the VANDAM candidate disks have shallower density profiles compared to disks around more evolved Class II systems. The best-fit model radii of the seven early-result candidate disks are R > 10 AU; at 8 mm, the radii reflect lower limits on the disk size since dust continuum emission is tied to grain size and large grains radially drift inwards. These disks, if confirmed kinematically, are inconsistent with theoretical models where the disk size is limited by strong magnetic braking to < 10 AU at early times.

  11. Molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars. I. Correcting for underestimates when measuring outflow masses and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Héctor G.; Mardones, Diego; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Matthews, Brenda C.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a survey of 28 molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars, all of which are sufficiently isolated spatially and/or kinematically to fully separate into individual outflows. Using a combination of new and archival data from several single-dish telescopes, 17 outflows are mapped in {sup 12}CO (2-1) and 17 are mapped in {sup 12}CO (3-2), with 6 mapped in both transitions. For each outflow, we calculate and tabulate the mass (M {sub flow}), momentum (P {sub flow}), kinetic energy (E {sub flow}), mechanical luminosity (L {sub flow}), and force (F {sub flow}) assuming optically thin emission in LTE at an excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, of 50 K. We show that all of the calculated properties are underestimated when calculated under these assumptions. Taken together, the effects of opacity, outflow emission at low velocities confused with ambient cloud emission, and emission below the sensitivities of the observations increase outflow masses and dynamical properties by an order of magnitude, on average, and factors of 50-90 in the most extreme cases. Different (and non-uniform) excitation temperatures, inclination effects, and dissociation of molecular gas will all work to further increase outflow properties. Molecular outflows are thus almost certainly more massive and energetic than commonly reported. Additionally, outflow properties are lower, on average, by almost an order of magnitude when calculated from the {sup 12}CO (3-2) maps compared to the {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps, even after accounting for different opacities, map sensitivities, and possible excitation temperature variations. It has recently been argued in the literature that the {sup 12}CO (3-2) line is subthermally excited in outflows, and our results support this finding.

  12. Protostellar accretion traced with chemistry. High-resolution C18O and continuum observations towards deeply embedded protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, Søren; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Dunham, Michael M.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Stephens, Ian W.; Tobin, John J.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Understanding how accretion proceeds is a key question of star formation, with important implications for both the physical and chemical evolution of young stellar objects. In particular, very little is known about the accretion variability in the earliest stages of star formation. Aims: Our aim is to characterise protostellar accretion histories towards individual sources by utilising sublimation and freeze-out chemistry of CO. Methods: A sample of 24 embedded protostars are observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in context of the large program "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). The size of the C18O-emitting region, where CO has sublimated into the gas-phase, is measured towards each source and compared to the expected size of the region given the current luminosity. The SMA observations also include 1.3 mm continuum data, which are used to investigate whether or not a link can be established between accretion bursts and massive circumstellar disks. Results: Depending on the adopted sublimation temperature of the CO ice, between 20% and 50% of the sources in the sample show extended C18O emission indicating that the gas was warm enough in the past that CO sublimated and is currently in the process of refreezing; something which we attribute to a recent accretion burst. Given the fraction of sources with extended C18O emission, we estimate an average interval between bursts of 20 000-50 000 yr, which is consistent with previous estimates. No clear link can be established between the presence of circumstellar disks and accretion bursts, however the three closest known binaries in the sample (projected separations <20 AU) all show evidence of a past accretion burst, indicating that close binary interactions may also play a role in inducing accretion variability.

  13. Suboptimal Control of Lipid Levels: Results from 29 Countries Participating in the Centralized Pan-Regional Surveys on the Undertreatment of Hypercholesterolaemia (CEPHEUS).

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Ferrières, Jean; Gotcheva, Nina N; Raal, Frederick J; Shehab, Abdulla; Sung, Jidong; Henriksson, Karin M; Hermans, Michel P

    2016-05-02

    Five multicentre, cross-sectional Centralized Pan-Regional Surveys on the Undertreatment of Hypercholesterolaemia (CEPHEUS) were conducted in 29 countries across Asia, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The surveys assessed the current use and efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (LLDs) worldwide and identified possible patient and physician characteristics associated with failure to attain low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. The aim of this analysis was to consolidate the global results from these surveys. The surveys involved patients aged ≥18 years who had been prescribed LLDs for at least 3 months without dose changes for at least 6 weeks. A single visit was scheduled for data collection, including fasting plasma lipid and glucose levels. Cardiovascular risk profile and LDL-C goal attainment were assessed according to the 2004 updated US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. In total, 35 121 patients (mean age: 60.4 years) were included, and 90.3% had been prescribed statin monotherapy. Overall, only 49.4% of patients reached their recommended LDL-C level. LDL-C goals were attained in 54.8% (5084/9273) and 22.8% (3287/14 429) of patients were at high and very high cardiovascular risk, respectively. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of LDL-C goal attainment were lower baseline cardiovascular risk; presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or history of cardiovascular disease; and treatment with simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin (vs. all other LLDs). LDL-C goal attainment in patients taking LLDs is suboptimal worldwide, particularly in patients at high and very high cardiovascular risk.

  14. The formation and fragmentation of disks around primordial protostars.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul C; Glover, Simon C O; Smith, Rowan J; Greif, Thomas H; Klessen, Ralf S; Bromm, Volker

    2011-02-25

    The very first stars to form in the universe heralded an end to the cosmic dark ages and introduced new physical processes that shaped early cosmic evolution. Until now, it was thought that these stars lived short, solitary lives, with only one extremely massive star, or possibly a very wide binary system, forming in each dark-matter minihalo. Here we describe numerical simulations that show that these stars were, to the contrary, often members of tight multiple systems. Our results show that the disks that formed around the first young stars were unstable to gravitational fragmentation, possibly producing small binary and higher-order systems that had separations as small as the distance between Earth and the Sun.

  15. X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, V. A.; Hofner, P.; Anderson, C.; Rosero, V.

    2015-08-15

    We present results from Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star-forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17′ × 17′ ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9.′2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these observtions are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al., namely, I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio source is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive, we identified 88 near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only four of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color–color analysis and on the Besançon simulation of Galactic stellar populations, we estimate that approximately 80 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star-forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 43 young stellar objects within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive protostar.

  16. Millimetre spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanghuo; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Fang, Min; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fan, Junhui; Zhu, Qingfeng; Li, Fei

    2017-04-01

    We present spectral line mapping observations towards four massive star-forming regions - Cepheus A, DR21S, S76E and G34.26+0.15 - with the IRAM 30-m telescope at the 2 and 3 mm bands. In total, 396 spectral lines from 51 molecules, one helium recombination line, 10 hydrogen recombination lines and 16 unidentified lines were detected in these four sources. An emission line of nitrosyl cyanide (ONCN, 140, 14-130, 13) was detected in G34.26+0.15, as the first detection in massive star-forming regions. We found that c-C3H2 and NH2D show enhancement in shocked regions, as suggested by the evidence of SiO and/or SO emission. The column density and rotational temperature of CH3CN were estimated with the rotational diagram method for all four sources. Isotope abundance ratios of 12C/13C were derived using HC3N and its 13C isotopologue, which were around 40 in all four massive star-forming regions and slightly lower than the local interstellar value (∼65). The 14N/15N and 16O/18O abundance ratios in these sources were also derived using the double isotopic method, which were slightly lower than in the local interstellar medium. Except for Cep A, the 33S/34S ratios in the other three targets were derived, which were similar to that in the local interstellar medium. The column density ratios of N(DCN)/N(HCN) and N(DCO+)/N(HCO+) in these sources were more than two orders of magnitude higher than the elemental [D]/[H] ratio, which is 1.5 × 10-5. Our results show that the later stage sources, G34.26+0.15 in particular, present more molecular species than earlier stage sources. Evidence of shock activity is seen in all stages studied.

  17. CHaMP: From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al. (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state. This is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two other posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas (Schap et al. 2015), and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT & CTIO data, and on MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al. 2015).

  18. Two protostar candidates in the bright-rimmed dark cloud LDN 1206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Shure, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of several near IR objects associated with two IRAS point sources in the LDN 1206 region is reported. IRAS 22272 + 6358A is probably a 'protostar' which is seen only in scattered light at near-IR wavelengths because of heavy obscuration by an almost edge-on circumstellar disk. In contrast, IRAS 22272 + 6358B is directly visible at these wavelengths and is perhaps an object which lies between protostars and T-Tauri stars in its evolution. Both direct and polarimetric K-band images of the region are presented, as well as spectral energy distributions constructed from J, H, K, L, L-prime, and M data and published far-IR and mm data.

  19. Two protostar candidates in the bright-rimmed dark cloud LDN 1206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Shure, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of several near IR objects associated with two IRAS point sources in the LDN 1206 region is reported. IRAS 22272 + 6358A is probably a 'protostar' which is seen only in scattered light at near-IR wavelengths because of heavy obscuration by an almost edge-on circumstellar disk. In contrast, IRAS 22272 + 6358B is directly visible at these wavelengths and is perhaps an object which lies between protostars and T-Tauri stars in its evolution. Both direct and polarimetric K-band images of the region are presented, as well as spectral energy distributions constructed from J, H, K, L, L-prime, and M data and published far-IR and mm data.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): SEDs (Furlan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-06-01

    To summarize, starting from a sample of 410 Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) targets (see section 2), but excluding likely contaminants and objects not observed or detected by PACS, there are 330 remaining objects that have Spitzer and Herschel data and are considered protostars (based on their Spitzer classification from Megeath et al. 2012, J/AJ/144/192). They form the sample studied in this work. In order to construct SEDs for our sample of 330 YSOs, we combined our own Herschel/PACS observations (see Proposal KPOTtmegeath2) with data from the literature and existing catalogs (see section 3.1). To extend the SEDs into the submillimeter, most of the YSOs were also observed in the continuum at 350 and 870um with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope (Stutz et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/36). (5 data files).

  1. Modeling the evolution of ice deuteration during the formation of low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed around low-mass proto- stars for a decade. New observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory or with ground- based interferometers have allowed astronomers to derive the D/H ratio of water, giving contrasting results (between less than 1e-3 to a few percents; Coutens et al. 2012, Persson et al. 2013, Visser et al. 2013, Taquet et al. 2013a). In previous studies, we have successfully reproduced the high deuteration of water derived by Coutens et al. (2012) with typical molecular cloud conditions and a low value for the H2 ortho/para ratio (opr < 1e-3; Taquet et al. 2013b). However, this result contrasts with the long timescale needed to decrease the H2 opr from its statistical value of 3 and, therefore, the non-detection of DCO+ towards interstellar clouds outside dense cores (see Pagani et al. 2011). In this poster, we study the time-dependent and spatial evolutions of the H2 opr and the ice deuteration in the early-stages of low-mass star formation. For this purpose, we coupled our gas-grain astrochemical model (Taquet et al. 2012) with a simple dynamical model of core collapse leading to the formation of a central protostar (Whitworth & Ward-Thompson 2001). We present the first results of this work and show that we can reproduce the deuteration of various molecules both in prestellar cores and Class 0 protostars. In pre stellar cores, the deuteration of interstellar ices is limited to the few outermost layers. In Class 0 protostars, the deuteration of various molecules decreases with the age of the protostar and could explain the difference in the observations presented above.

  2. CONSTRAINING THE ABUNDANCES OF COMPLEX ORGANICS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Neri, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  3. Constraining the Abundances of Complex Organics in the Inner Regions of Solar-type Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Charnley, Steven B.

    2015-05-01

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  4. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived; in particular, mid-IR spectroscopy reveals the detailed emission around the silicate absorption feature and thus provides additional constraints for the models. Here we present results from modeling a sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming region that were observed as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). These protostars represent a subsample of HOPS; they have Spitzer/IRS spectra, which cover the mid-IR SED from 5 to 35 micron, and photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS), and far-IR (Herschel/PACS). We show the importance of adding Spitzer/IRS spectra with appropriate weights in determining the best fit to the SED from a large grid of protostellar models. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present preliminary results from our fits.

  5. OBSERVING SIMULATED PROTOSTARS WITH OUTFLOWS: HOW ACCURATE ARE PROTOSTELLAR PROPERTIES INFERRED FROM SEDs?

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Hansen, Charles E.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-10

    The properties of unresolved protostars and their local environment are frequently inferred from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using radiative transfer modeling. In this paper, we use synthetic observations of realistic star formation simulations to evaluate the accuracy of properties inferred from fitting model SEDs to observations. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) three-dimensional gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate low-mass star formation in a turbulent molecular cloud including the effects of protostellar outflows. To obtain the dust temperature distribution and SEDs of the forming protostars, we post-process the simulations using HYPERION, a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We find that the ORION and HYPERION dust temperatures typically agree within a factor of two. We compare synthetic SEDs of embedded protostars for a range of evolutionary times, simulation resolutions, aperture sizes, and viewing angles. We demonstrate that complex, asymmetric gas morphology leads to a variety of classifications for individual objects as a function of viewing angle. We derive best-fit source parameters for each SED through comparison with a pre-computed grid of radiative transfer models. While the SED models correctly identify the evolutionary stage of the synthetic sources as embedded protostars, we show that the disk and stellar parameters can be very discrepant from the simulated values, which is expected since the disk and central source are obscured by the protostellar envelope. Parameters such as the stellar accretion rate, stellar mass, and disk mass show better agreement, but can still deviate significantly, and the agreement may in some cases be artificially good due to the limited range of parameters in the set of model SEDs. Lack of correlation between the model and simulation properties in many individual instances cautions against overinterpreting properties inferred from SEDs for unresolved protostellar

  6. Uncovering the Protostars in Serpens South with ALMA: Continuum Sources and Their Outflow Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele; Arce, H.; Corder, S.; Dunham, M.

    2017-06-01

    Serpens South is an appealing protostellar cluster to study due the combination of several factors: (1) a high protostar fraction that shows evidence for very recent and ongoing star formation; (2) iconic clustered star formation along a filamentary structure; (3) its relative proximity within a few hundred parsecs. An effective study requires the sensitivity, angular and spectral resolution, and mapping capabilities recently provided with ALMA. Here we present a multi-faceted data set acquired from Cycles 1 through 3 with ALMA, including maps of continuum sources and molecular outflows throughout the region, as well as a more focused kinematical study of the protostar that is the strongest continuum source at the cluster center. Together these data span spatial scales over several orders of magnitude, allowing us to investigate the outflow-driving sources and the impact of the outflows on the cluster environment. Currently, we focus on the census of protostars in the cluster center, numbering about 20, including low-flux, low-mass sources never before detected in mm-wavelengths and evidence for multiplicity that was previously unresolved.

  7. Water in embedded low-mass protostars: cold envelopes and warm outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Mottram, Joseph; Schmalzl, Markus; Visser, Ruud

    2015-08-01

    As stars form, gas from the parental cloud is transported through the molecular envelope to the protostellar disk from which planets eventually form. Water plays a crucial role in such systems: it forms the backbone of the oxygen chemistry, it is a unique probe of warm and hot gas, and it provides a unique link between the grain surface and gas-phase chemistries. The distribution of water, both as ice and gas, is a fundamental question to our understanding of how planetary systems, such as the Solar System, form.The Herschel Space Observatory observed many tens of embedded low-mass protostars in a suite of gas-phase water transitions in several programs (e.g. Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel, WISH, and the William Herschel Line Legacy Survey, WILL), and related species (e.g. CO in Protostars with HIFI, COPS-HIFI). I will summarize what Herschel has revealed about the water distribution in the cold outer molecular envelope of low-mass protostars, and the warm gas in outflows, the two components predominantly traced by Herschel observations. I will present our current understanding of where the water vapor is in protostellar systems and the underlying physical and chemical processes leading to this distribution. Through these dedicated observational surveys and complementary modeling efforts, we are now at a stage where we can quantify where the water is during the early stages of star formation.

  8. [Fe II] Emission Tracing Dense Jets from Intermediate-mass Protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present narrowband WFC3-UVIS and -IR images of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula, HH 666, HH 901, HH 902, and HH 1066. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of the Hα emission from these jets. New estimates of the mass-loss rates exceed those derived from the Hα emission measure by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates onto their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜ 2 - 8 M⊙) stars. All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows are traced by shock-excited molecules in the walls of the outflow cavity. In the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula, molecules entrained in the outflow are rapidly destroyed, and the atomic jet core is irradiated and photoevaporated. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a harsh, feedback dominated environment, and offer strong evidence that stars up to at least ˜ 8 M⊙ form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  9. Hydroxyl (OH) Emission from the Intermediate-mass Protostar LDN 1641N MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Andrew; Bergin, E. A.; Visser, R.; Manoj, P.; Fischer, W. J.; Tobin, J. J.; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is an important molecule for the formation and destruction of water during protostellar evolution. The ultimate aim of this work is to determine the OH column density and compare it to that of water to explore the chemistry of oxygen in shocked gas near protostars. We present an analysis of hydroxyl emission from 60 to 200 micron within a intermediate-mass embedded protostar (LDN 1641N MM1/HOPS-182) located in the Orion Molecular Cloud. These data were obtained as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) (Manoj et al 2012) using the PACS instrument (Poglitsch, 2010) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al, 2010). We detect 16 rotational transitions of OH, covering energies up to 600 K above the ground state. The emission probably originates on scales of a few 100 AU in shocked gas associated with the bipolar outflow. The OH lines are a sensitive probe of the physical properties of the emitting gas (density, temperature), as well as for the far-infrared radiation field close to the central star (Wampfler et al, 2012). We will present the results of our excitation analysis using the large-velocity gradient code RADEX (Van der Tak et al, 2007).

  10. Searching for coronal radio emission from protostars using very-long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Massi, M.; Ros, E.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:In order to directly study the role of magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity of protostars, we use Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), aiming at the detection of non-thermal centimetric radio emission. This is technically the only possibility to study coronal emission at sub-AU resolution. Methods: We performed VLBI observations of the four nearby protostars HL Tau, LDN 1551 IRS5, EC 95, and YLW 15 in order to look for compact non-thermal centimetric radio emission. For maximum sensitivity, we used the High Sensitivity Array (HSA) where possible, involving the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), the phased Very Large Array (VLA), as well as the Arecibo, Green Bank, and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Results: While all four protostars were detected in VLA-only data, only one source (YLW 15 VLA 2) was detected in the VLBI data. The possibility of non-detections due to free-free absorption, possibly depending on source geometry, is considered.

  11. Is Episodic Accretion Necessary to Resolve the Luminosity Problem in Low-Mass Protostars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevrinsky, Raymond Andrew; Dunham, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, we compare the results of protostellar accretion simulations for scenarios both containing and lacking episodic accretion activity. We determine synthetic observational signatures for collapsing protostars by taking hydrodynamical simulations predicting highly variable episodic accretion events, filtering out the stochastic behavior by applying power law fits to the mass accretion rates onto the disk and central star, and using the filtered rates as inputs to two-dimensional radiative transfer calculations. The spectral energy distributions generated by these calculations are used to calculate standard observational signatures of Lbol and Tbol, and compared directly to a sample of 230 embedded protostars. We explore the degree to which these continually declining accretion models successfully reproduce the observed spread of protostellar luminosities, and examine their consistency with the prior variable models to investigate the degree to which episodic accretion bursts are necessary in protostellar formation theories to match observations of field protostars. The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. The JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey: physical structure of the molecular envelope of the high-mass protostar AFGL2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Spaans, M.; Fuller, G. A.; Plume, R.; Roberts, H.; Williams, J. L.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The understanding of the formation process of massive stars ( ≳ 8 M⊙) is limited by a combination of theoretical complications and observational challenges. The high UV luminosities of massive stars give rise to chemical complexity in their natal molecular clouds and affect the dynamical properties of their circumstellar envelopes. Aims: We investigate the physical structure of the large-scale (~104-105 AU) molecular envelope of the high-mass protostar AFGL2591. Methods: Observational constraints are provided by spectral imaging in the 330-373 GHz regime from the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey and its high-frequency extension. While the majority of the ~160 spectral features from the survey cube are spatially unresolved, this paper uses the 35 that are significantly extended in the spatial directions. For these features we present integrated intensity maps and velocity maps. The observed spatial distributions of a selection of six species are compared with radiative transfer models based on (i) a static spherically symmetric structure; (ii) a dynamic spherical structure; and (iii) a static flattened structure. Results: The maps of CO and its isotopic variations exhibit elongated geometries on scales of ~100″, and smaller scale substructure is found in maps of N2H+, o-H2CO, CS, SO2, C2H, and various CH3OH lines. In addition, a line-of-sight velocity gradient is apparent in maps of all molecular lines presented here, except SO, SO2, and H2CO. We find two emission peaks in warm (Eup ~ 200 K) CH3OH separated by 12″ (12 000 AU), indicative of a secondary heating source in the envelope. The spherical models are able to explain the distribution of emission for the optically thin H13CO+ and C34S, but not for the optically thick HCN, HCO+, and CS or for the optically thin C17O. The introduction of velocity structure mitigates the optical depth effects, but does not fully explain the observations, especially in the spectral dimension. A static flattened

  13. Constraining massive star evolution from massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Herve, Anthony; Martins, Fabrice; Bouret, Jean-Claude; Borissova, Jordanka; Ramirez, Sebastian; Kurtev, Radostin; Kumar, Nanda; Amigo, Pia; Fierro, Celia

    2013-06-01

    The exact evolution of massive stars is not accurately known at present. The general trend is that stars with masses above 40 - 60 Mo go from O-type stars to H-rich WN stars, and Luminous Blue Variables (?), before turning into H-poor WN stars and finally WC stars. At lower masses, the H-rich WN and LBV phases are replaced by a blue and a red supergiant phases, respectively. However, what are the details of such evolutionary sequences? The study of massive clusters is a golden opportunity to establish this. Indeed, the turn-off mass of massive clusters can be directly translated into the mass, and hence the nature, of the progenitors of their evolved objects contents. So far, only the Arches, Quintuplet, NGC3603, NGC2244 and central clusters have been studied this way. But 6 newly discovered heavily-obscured clusters in the large survey â"VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) have been found to have Wolf-Rayet stars as well as blue and/or red supergiants, together with many main sequence OB stars. This poster presents our efforts to model the massive star components of these clusters using CMFGEN, bringing new blocks to the pavement of massive stellar evolution and more than doubling the number of clusters in which such evolutionary sequence are established.

  14. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  15. The Formation Process of Massive Close Spectroscopic Binaries: The Fission Hypothesis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.; Ostriker, J.

    2013-06-01

    The vast majority of massive Main-Sequence stars (M>20 Mo) seem to be born in close interactive binary systems (Chini et al. 2012, Sana et al. 2012). The very process by which these systems form is still a mystery and has received little attention so far. Because the binary separation is so tight (less than 1AU), break-up of a critically rotating protostar ("fission") remains an interesting possibility. However, standard current star formation theory treats fission as unlikely (cf. Tohline 2002, ARAA). We question this view and investigate minimum energy states of compressible polytropic analogs to the well-known incompressible MacLaurin spheroids. Dynamical non-axisymmetric instability at a critical ratio of rotational to gravitational energy (cf. Ostriker and Bodenheimer 1973) during the shrinkage of an accreting, rapidly rotating, bloated, massive protostar AFTER ACCRETION DECLINES may provide the conditions for break-up into a close binary system. Time dependent hydro-dynamical simulations are required to either confirm or reject this hypothesis.

  16. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  17. [Massive traumatic hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Bourdereau, J M; Mathé, D; Voultoury, J C

    1985-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who suffered a rupture of one lung as result of thoracic trauma. This gave rise to respiratory distress with massive haemoptysis which was initially treated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube, with separate lung ventilation, a chest drain and massive transfusion. A haemostatic pneumonectomy had to be performed because of the persisting and profuse bleeding.

  18. Magnetic fields during the early stages of massive star formation - I. Accretion and disc evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Duffin, D.; Pudritz, R. E.

    2011-10-01

    We present simulations of collapsing 100 M⊙ mass cores in the context of massive star formation. The effect of variable initial rotational and magnetic energies on the formation of massive stars is studied in detail. We focus on accretion rates and on the question under which conditions massive Keplerian discs can form in the very early evolutionary stage of massive protostars. For this purpose, we perform 12 simulations with different initial conditions extending over a wide range in parameter space. The equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are solved under the assumption of ideal MHD. We find that the formation of Keplerian discs in the very early stages is suppressed for a mass-to-flux ratio normalized to the critical value μ below 10, in agreement with a series of low-mass star formation simulations. This is caused by very efficient magnetic braking resulting in a nearly instantaneous removal of angular momentum from the disc. For weak magnetic fields, corresponding to μ≳ 10, large-scale, centrifugally supported discs build up with radii exceeding 100 au. A stability analysis reveals that the discs are supported against gravitationally induced perturbations by the magnetic field and tend to form single stars rather than multiple objects. We find protostellar accretion rates of the order of a few 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 which, considering the large range covered by the initial conditions, vary only by a factor of ˜ 3 between the different simulations. We attribute this fact to two competing effects of magnetic fields. On the one hand, magnetic braking enhances accretion by removing angular momentum from the disc thus lowering the centrifugal support against gravity. On the other hand, the combined effect of magnetic pressure and magnetic tension counteracts gravity by exerting an outward directed force on the gas in the disc thus reducing the accretion on to the protostars.

  19. GRAVITATIONAL SLINGSHOT OF YOUNG MASSIVE STARS IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2012-08-01

    The Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is the nearest region of massive star formation and thus a crucial testing ground for theoretical models. Of particular interest among the ONC's {approx}1000 members are: {theta}{sup 1} Ori C, the most massive binary in the cluster with stars of masses 38 and 9 M{sub Sun }; the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) object, a 30 km s{sup -1} runaway star of {approx}8 M{sub Sun }; and the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula protostar, a highly obscured, {approx}15 M{sub Sun} object still accreting gas while also driving a powerful, apparently 'explosive' outflow. The unusual behavior of BN and KL is much debated: How did BN acquire its high velocity? How is this related to massive star formation in the KL nebula? Here, we report the results of a systematic survey using {approx}10{sup 7} numerical experiments of gravitational interactions of the {theta}{sup 1}C and BN stars. We show that dynamical ejection of BN from this triple system at its observed velocity leaves behind a binary with total energy and eccentricity matching those observed for {theta}{sup 1}C. Five other observed properties of {theta}{sup 1}C are also consistent with it having ejected BN and altogether we estimate that there is only a {approx}< 10{sup -5} probability that {theta}{sup 1}C has these properties by chance. We conclude that BN was dynamically ejected from the {theta}{sup 1}C system about 4500 years ago. BN then plowed through the KL massive star-forming core within the last 1000 years causing its recently enhanced accretion and outflow activity.

  20. Gravitational Slingshot of Young Massive Stars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is the nearest region of massive star formation and thus a crucial testing ground for theoretical models. Of particular interest amongst the ONC's 1000 members are: theta1C, the most massive binary in the cluster with stars of masses 38 and 9 Msun; the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) object, a 30 km/s runaway star of 8 Msun; and the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula protostar, a highly-obscured, 15 Msun object still accreting gas while also driving a powerful, apparently "explosive" outflow. The unusual behavior of BN and KL is much debated: How did BN acquire its high velocity? How is this related to massive star formation in the KL nebula? Here we report the results of a systematic survey using 10^7 numerical experiments of gravitational interactions of the theta1C and BN stars. We show that dynamical ejection of BN from this triple system at its observed velocity leaves behind a binary with total energy and eccentricity matching those observed for theta1C. Several other observed properties of theta1C are also consistent with it having ejected BN and altogether we estimate there is only a 10^-5 probability that theta1C has these properties by chance. Our results suggest that after being launched from theta1C 4,500 years ago, BN has plowed through the KL massive-star-forming core within the last 1,000 years causing its recently-enhanced accretion and outflow activity.

  1. Gravitational Slingshot of Young Massive Stars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-08-01

    The Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is the nearest region of massive star formation and thus a crucial testing ground for theoretical models. Of particular interest among the ONC's ~1000 members are: θ1 Ori C, the most massive binary in the cluster with stars of masses 38 and 9 M ⊙ the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) object, a 30 km s-1 runaway star of ~8 M ⊙ and the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula protostar, a highly obscured, ~15 M ⊙ object still accreting gas while also driving a powerful, apparently "explosive" outflow. The unusual behavior of BN and KL is much debated: How did BN acquire its high velocity? How is this related to massive star formation in the KL nebula? Here, we report the results of a systematic survey using ~107 numerical experiments of gravitational interactions of the θ1C and BN stars. We show that dynamical ejection of BN from this triple system at its observed velocity leaves behind a binary with total energy and eccentricity matching those observed for θ1C. Five other observed properties of θ1C are also consistent with it having ejected BN and altogether we estimate that there is only a <~ 10-5 probability that θ1C has these properties by chance. We conclude that BN was dynamically ejected from the θ1C system about 4500 years ago. BN then plowed through the KL massive star-forming core within the last 1000 years causing its recently enhanced accretion and outflow activity.

  2. Waterfalls around protostars. Infall motions towards Class 0/I envelopes as probed by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schmalzl, M.; Kristensen, L. E.; Visser, R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. For stars to form, material must fall inwards from core scales through the envelope towards the central protostar. While theories of how this takes place have been around for some time, the velocity profile around protostars is poorly constrained. The combination of observations in multiple transitions of a tracer which is sensitive to kinematics and radiative transfer modelling of those lines has the potential to break this deadlock. Aims: Seven protostars observed with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the "Water in star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) survey show infall signatures in water line observations. We aim to constrain the infall velocity and the radii over which infall is taking place within the protostellar envelopes of these sources. We will also use these data to constrain the chemistry of cold water. Methods: We use 1-D non-LTE ratran radiative transfer models of the observed water lines to constrain the infall velocity and chemistry in the protostellar envelopes of six Class 0 protostars and one Class I source. We assume a free-fall velocity profile and, having found the best fit, vary the radii over which infall takes place. Results: In the well-studied Class 0 protostar NGC 1333-IRAS4A we find that our observations probe infall over the whole envelope to which our observations are sensitive (r ≳ 1000 AU). For L1527, L1157, BHR71 and IRAS 15398 infall takes place on core to envelope scales (i.e. ~10 000-3000 AU). In Serpens-SMM4 and GSS30 the inverse P-Cygni profiles seen in the ground-state lines are more likely due to larger-scale motions or foreground clouds. Models including a simple consideration of the chemistry are consistent with the observations, while using step abundance profiles are not. The non-detection of excited water in the inner envelope in six out of seven protostars is further evidence that water must be heavily depleted from the gas

  3. Submillimeter-Wave Observations toward the Low-Mass Protostar IRAS 15398-3359 at Subarcsecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Sakai, T.; Hirota, T.; Lindberg, J. E.; Bisschop, S. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subarcsecond 0."5 images of H2CO and CCH line emission have been obtained in the 0.8 mm band toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398-3359 in the Lupus 1 cloud with ALMA. We have detected a compact component concentrated in the vicinity of the protostar and a well-collimated outflow cavity extending along the northeast-southwest axis. The inclination angle of the outflow is found to be almost edge-on (20°) based on the kinematic structure of the outflow cavity. The centrally concentrated component is interpreted by use of a model of the infalling rotating envelope with the estimated inclination angle, and the mass of the protostar is estimated to be less than 0.09 ⊙.

  4. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. VI. THE PROTOSTARS OF LYNDS DARK NEBULA 1221

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Chadwick H.; Young, Kaisa E.; Popa, Victor; Bourke, Tyler L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Evans, Neal J.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Shirley, Yancy L.; De Vries, Christopher; Claussen, Mark J.

    2009-09-01

    Observations of Lynds Dark Nebula 1221 from the Spitzer Space Telescope are presented. These data show three candidate protostars toward L1221, only two of which were previously known. The infrared observations also show signatures of outflowing material, an interpretation which is also supported by radio observations with the Very Large Array. In addition, molecular line maps from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory are shown. One-dimensional dust continuum modeling of two of these protostars, IRS1 and IRS3, is described. These models show two distinctly different protostars forming in very similar environments. IRS1 shows a higher luminosity and a larger inner radius of the envelope than IRS3. The disparity could be caused by a difference in age or mass, orientation of outflow cavities, or the impact of a binary in the IRS1 core.

  5. Microwave Spectroscopy of Complex Molecules Around the Young Protostar Chamaeleon MMS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirstrom, Eva S.; Smith, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 30-100 GHz in the vicinity of the extremely young, chemically rich, very low-luminosity protostar and candidate first hydrostatic core Chamaeleon MMS1. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon-chains and methanol. Emission from the carbon-chain-bearing species peaks very near to the protostar; methanol peaks about 0.1 pc further away. The mean molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10(exp 6) per cc. and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 4-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains (including C6H and HC7N) are very large -- similar to those found in the most carbon-chain-rich regions of the Galaxy, and indicative of a non-equilibrium carbon chemistry. The observed methanol and acetaldehyde abundances indicate active grain-surface chemistry and desorption processes. The carbon-chain anions C4H- and C6H- were not detected and the upper limit on the anion-to-neutral ratio for C4H- is less than 0.02% and for C6H-, less than 10%. These values are consistent with previous observations in interstellar clouds and low-mass protostars. Deuterated HC3N and c-C3H2 were detected, with fractionation ratios of about 4%, and 22%, respectively. A low c-C3H2 ortho-to-para ratio was measured, which is consistent with a molecular hydrogen ortho-to-para ratio of close to zero and implies a relatively young chemical age (less than about 10(exp 5) yr) for the matter surrounding Cha-MMS1. These observations show that a high level of chemical complexity can be present in star-forming gas.

  6. Comprehensive Study of Thermal Desorption of Grain-surface Species by Accretion Shocks around Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Nomura, Hideko; Nakamoto, Taishi; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Nagasawa, Makiko

    2017-04-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of the dust heating in accretion shocks induced by the interaction between the infalling envelope and the Keplerian disk surrounding a protostar, in order to investigate the thermal desorption of molecules from the dust-grain surfaces. It is thought that the surfaces of the amorphous dust grains are inhomogeneous; various adsorption sites with different binding energies should therefore exist. We assumed that the desorption energy has a Gaussian distribution and investigated the effect of the desorption energy distribution on the desorption-efficiency evaluation. We calculated the desorption fractions of the grain-surface species for wide ranges of input parameters and summarized our results in a shock diagram. The resulting shock diagram suggests that the enhanced line emissions around protostars observed using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array cannot be explained by the thermal desorption in an accretion shock if typical interstellar dust-grain sizes (˜ 0.1 μ {{m}}) and a single desorption energy are considered. On the other hand, if significantly smaller dust grains are the main grain-surface species carriers and the desorption energy has a Gaussian distribution, the origin of the enhanced line emission can be explained by the accretion shock heating scenario for all of the three protostars examined in this study: IRAS 04368+2557, IRAS 04365+2535, and IRAS 16293-2422. The small-grain-carrier supposition is quite reasonable when the dust grains have a power-law size distribution because the smaller grains primarily contribute to the dust-grain surface area.

  7. Detection of glycolaldehyde toward the solar-type protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Persson, M. V.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Wampfler, S. F.; Lykke, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a key molecule in the formation of biologically relevant molecules such as ribose. We report its detection with the Plateau de Bure interferometer toward the Class 0 young stellar object NGC 1333 IRAS2A, which is only the second solar-type protostar for which this prebiotic molecule is detected. Local thermodynamic equilibrium analyses of glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde), and methyl formate (the most abundant isomer of glycolaldehyde) were carried out. The relative abundance of ethylene glycol to glycolaldehyde is found to be ~5 - higher than in the Class 0 source IRAS 16293-2422 (~1), but similar to the lower limits derived in comets (≥3-6). The different ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde ratios in the two protostars might be related to different CH3OH:CO compositions of the icy grain mantles. In particular, a more efficient hydrogenation on the grains in NGC 1333 IRAS2A would favor the formation of both methanol and ethylene glycol. In conclusion, it is possible that like NGC 1333 IRAS2A, other low-mass protostars show high ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde abundance ratios. The cometary ratios might consequently be inherited from earlier stages of star formation if the young Sun experienced conditions similar to NGC 1333 IRAS2A. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Figures 3-4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Proper motions of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Kiminki, Megan M.; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John

    2017-10-01

    We present proper motion measurements of 37 jets and HH objects in the Carina Nebula measured in two epochs of H α images obtained ˜10 yr apart with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Transverse velocities in all but one jet are faster than ≳ 25 km s-1, confirming that the jet-like H α features identified in the first epoch images trace outflowing gas. Proper motions constrain the location of the jet-driving source and provide kinematic confirmation of the intermediate-mass protostars that we identify for 20/37 jets. Jet velocities do not correlate with the estimated protostar mass and embedded driving sources do not have slower jets. Instead, transverse velocities (median ˜75 km s-1) are similar to those in jets from low-mass stars. Assuming a constant velocity since launch, we compute jet dynamical ages (median ˜104 yr). If continuous emission from inner jets traces the duration of the most recent accretion bursts, then these episodes are sustained longer (median ˜700 yr) than the typical decay time of an FU Orionis outburst. These jets can carry appreciable momentum that may be injected into the surrounding environment. The resulting outflow force, dP/dt, lies between that measured in low- and high-mass sources, despite the very different observational tracers used. Smooth scaling of the outflow force argues for a common physical process underlying outflows from protostars of all masses. This latest kinematic result adds to a growing body of evidence that intermediate-mass star formation proceeds like a scaled-up version of the formation of low-mass stars.

  9. THE LUMINOSITIES OF PROTOSTARS IN THE SPITZER c2d AND GOULD BELT LEGACY CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Hector G.; Allen, Lori E.; Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Hatchell, Jennifer; Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Kirk, Jason M.; Merin, Bruno; Peterson, Dawn E.; Spezzi, Loredana

    2013-04-15

    Motivated by the long-standing 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation whereby protostars are underluminous compared to theoretical expectations, we identify 230 protostars in 18 molecular clouds observed by two Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy surveys of nearby star-forming regions. We compile complete spectral energy distributions, calculate L{sub bol} for each source, and study the protostellar luminosity distribution. This distribution extends over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 L{sub Sun} to 69 L{sub Sun }, and has a mean and median of 4.3 L{sub Sun} and 1.3 L{sub Sun }, respectively. The distributions are very similar for Class 0 and Class I sources except for an excess of low luminosity (L{sub bol} {approx}< 0.5 L{sub Sun }) Class I sources compared to Class 0. 100 out of the 230 protostars (43%) lack any available data in the far-infrared and submillimeter (70 {mu}m <{lambda} < 850 {mu}m) and have L{sub bol} underestimated by factors of 2.5 on average, and up to factors of 8-10 in extreme cases. Correcting these underestimates for each source individually once additional data becomes available will likely increase both the mean and median of the sample by 35%-40%. We discuss and compare our results to several recent theoretical studies of protostellar luminosities and show that our new results do not invalidate the conclusions of any of these studies. As these studies demonstrate that there is more than one plausible accretion scenario that can match observations, future attention is clearly needed. The better statistics provided by our increased data set should aid such future work.

  10. Powerful jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Carina nebula hosts the largest known population of powerful HH jets driven by intermediate-mass stars in a single region. These jets are externally irradiated by dozens of O-type stars in Carina that illuminate unshocked material in the jet, allowing for a more complete census of the mass-loss. Despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of these jets remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, FUV radiation, or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. New proper motion measurements using Halpha images with a ~4.25 year baseline reveal tangential velocities of >200 km/s, in some cases exceeding velocities typical for jets from low-mass stars. In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of jets from intermediate-mass protostars that demonstrate that they are as collimated as their low-mass counterparts, but support higher densities and velocities, leading to higher mass-loss rates. This scaling of phenomena seen in low-mass star formation offers strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanism as low-mass stars.

  11. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Constraining Protostellar Models with Near- to Far-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Elise; Ali, Babar; Fischer, Will; Tobin, John; Stutz, Amy; Megeath, Tom; Allen, Lori; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    During the protostellar stage of star formation, a young star is surrounded by a large infalling envelope of dust and gas; the material falls onto a circumstellar disk and is eventually accreted by the central star. The dust in the disk and envelope emits prominently at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths; at 10 micron, absorption by small silicate grains typically causes a broad absorption feature. By modeling the near- to far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostars, properties of their disks and envelopes can be derived. As part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS; PI: S. T. Megeath), we have observed a large sample of protostars in the Orion star-forming complex at 70 and 160 micron with the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. For most objects, we also have photometry in the near-IR (2MASS), mid-IR (Spitzer/ IRAC and MIPS), at 100 micron (PACS data from the Gould Belt Survey), sub-mm (APEX/SABOCA and LABOCA), and mid-infrared spectra (Spitzer/IRS). For the interpretation of the SEDs, we have constructed a large grid of protostellar models using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Here we present our SED fitting techniques to determine the best-fit model for each object. We show the importance of including IRS spectra with appropriate weights, in addition to the constraints provided by the PACS measurements, which probe the peak of the SED. The 10 micron silicate absorption feature and the mid- to far-IR SED slope provide key constraints for the inclination angle of the object and its envelope density, with a deep absorption feature and steep SED slope for the most embedded and highly inclined objects. We show a few examples that illustrate our SED fitting method and present some preliminary results from our fits.

  12. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  14. The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars. III. 12CO Maps and Physical Properties of Dense Clump Envelopes and Their Embedding GMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Hernandez, Audra K.; O'Dougherty, Stefan N.; Schap, William J., III; Muller, Erik

    2016-11-01

    We report the second complete molecular line data release from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), a large-scale, unbiased, uniform mapping survey at sub-parsec resolution, of millimeter-wave line emission from 303 massive, dense molecular clumps in the Milky Way. This release is for all 12CO J = 1 \\to 0 emission associated with the dense gas, the first from Phase II of the survey, which includes 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. The observed clump emission traced by both 12CO and HCO+ (from Phase I) shows very similar morphology, indicating that, for dense molecular clouds and complexes of all sizes, parsec-scale clumps contain Ξ ˜ 75% of the mass, while only 25% of the mass lies in extended (≳10 pc) or “low density” components in these same areas. The mass fraction of all gas above a density of 109 m-3 is {ξ }9 ≳ 50%. This suggests that parsec-scale clumps may be the basic building blocks of the molecular interstellar medium, rather than the standard GMC concept. Using 12CO emission, we derive physical properties of these clumps in their entirety, and compare them to properties from HCO+, tracing their denser interiors. We compare the standard X-factor converting {I}{12{CO}} to {N}{{{H}}2} with alternative conversions, and show that only the latter give whole-clump properties that are physically consistent with those of their interiors. We infer that the clump population is systematically closer to virial equilibrium than when considering only their interiors, with perhaps half being long-lived (10s of Myr), pressure-confined entities that only terminally engage in vigorous massive star formation, supporting other evidence along these lines that was previously published.

  15. Massive Oral Decoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicke, Eugene M.

    1981-01-01

    An intensive reading clinic used the Massive Oral Decoding (MOD) technique to help 10 reading disabled students (grades 7 and 8) increase independent reading skills. MOD stresses large amounts of reading practice at the student's independent level. (CL)

  16. An ALMA Search for Substructure, Fragmentation, and Hidden Protostars in Starless Cores in Chamaeleon I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Arce, Héctor G.; Chen, Xuepeng; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Lee, Katherine I.; Myers, Philip C.; Price, Daniel; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Schnee, Scott

    2016-06-01

    We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 106 GHz (Band 3) continuum survey of the complete population of dense cores in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud. We detect a total of 24 continuum sources in 19 different target fields. All previously known Class 0 and Class I protostars in Chamaeleon I are detected, whereas all of the 56 starless cores in our sample are undetected. We show that the Spitzer+Herschel census of protostars in Chamaeleon I is complete, with the rate at which protostellar cores have been misclassified as starless cores calculated as <1/56, or <2%. We use synthetic observations to show that starless cores collapsing following the turbulent fragmentation scenario are detectable by our ALMA observations when their central densities exceed ˜108 cm-3, with the exact density dependent on the viewing geometry. Bonnor-Ebert spheres, on the other hand, remain undetected to central densities at least as high as 1010 cm-3. Our starless core non-detections are used to infer that either the star-formation rate is declining in Chamaeleon I and most of the starless cores are not collapsing, matching the findings of previous studies, or that the evolution of starless cores are more accurately described by models that develop less substructure than predicted by the turbulent fragmentation scenario, such as Bonnor-Ebert spheres. We outline future work necessary to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  17. THE DYNAMICS OF THE ENVELOPE SURROUNDING THE PROTOSTAR HH 211 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Joel D.; Arce, Hector G. E-mail: hector.arce@yale.edu

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the structure and dynamics of the dense gas surrounding the HH 211 mm source, using Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the ammonia (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions. We find that the envelope around this Class 0 source has an elongated geometry, extending about 10{sup 4} AU in the direction perpendicular to the well-known HH 211 jet, and exhibits a velocity distribution consistent with rotation along the major axis. Our VLA observations indicate that the envelope is mostly in virial equilibrium. However, comparing our data with results from previous studies, it appears that the gas within approximately 0.005 pc of the central protostar is undergoing dynamical collapse. The size of this collapsing radius may constrain the amount of mass that can eventually infall into the forming star. We also find that the envelope is mostly internally heated, most probably by radiation from the central protostar. In addition, we detect evidence of outflow-envelope interaction in the ammonia data. These include a velocity gradient in the dense gas along the outflow axis and significant line broadening that is spatially correlated with the jet and could be the result of outflow-induced turbulence in the envelope.

  18. THE EXTRAORDINARY FAR-INFRARED VARIATION OF A PROTOSTAR: HERSCHEL/PACS OBSERVATIONS OF LRLL54361

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, Zoltan; Detre, Örs H.; Bouwmann, Jeroen; Nielbock, Markus; Klaas, Ulrich; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Muzerolle, James; Flaherty, Kevin; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Rob; Juhasz, Attila; Bally, John; Marton, Gabor

    2014-07-10

    We report Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) photometric observations at 70 μm and 160 μm of LRLL54361—a suspected binary protostar that exhibits periodic (P = 25.34 days) flux variations at shorter wavelengths (3.6 μm and 4.5 μm) thought to be due to pulsed accretion caused by binary motion. The PACS observations show unprecedented flux variation at these far-infrared wavelengths that are well correlated with the variations at shorter wavelengths. At 70 μm the object increases its flux by a factor of six while at 160 μm the change is about a factor of two, consistent with the wavelength dependence seen in the far-infrared spectra. The source is marginally resolved at 70 μm with varying FWHM. Deconvolved images of the sources show elongations exactly matching the outflow cavities traced by the scattered light observations. The spatial variations are anti-correlated with the flux variation, indicating that a light echo is responsible for the changes in FWHM. The observed far-infrared flux variability indicates that the disk and envelope of this source is periodically heated by the accretion pulses of the central source, and suggests that such long wavelength variability in general may provide a reasonable proxy for accretion variations in protostars.

  19. Detection of Formamide, the Simplest but Crucial Amide, in a Solar-type Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahane, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Faure, A.; Caux, E.

    2013-02-01

    Formamide (NH2CHO), the simplest possible amide, has recently been suggested to be a central species in the synthesis of metabolic and genetic molecules, the chemical basis of life. In this Letter, we report the first detection of formamide in a protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, which may be similar to the Sun and solar system progenitor. The data combine spectra from the millimeter and submillimeter TIMASSS survey with recent, more sensitive observations at the IRAM 30 m telescope. With an abundance relative to H2 of ~10-10, formamide appears as abundant in this solar-type protostar as in the two high-mass star-forming regions, Orion-KL and SgrB2, where this species has previously been detected. Given the largely different UV-illuminated environments of the three sources, the relevance of UV photolysis of interstellar ices in the synthesis of formamide is therefore questionable. Assuming that this species is formed in the gas phase via the neutral-neutral reaction between the radical NH2 and H2CO, we predict an abundance in good agreement with the value derived from our observations. The comparison of the relative abundance [NH2CHO]/[H2O] in IRAS 16293-2422 and in the coma of the comet Hale-Bopp supports the similarity between interstellar and cometary chemistry. Our results thus suggest that the abundance of some cometary organic volatiles could reflect gas phase rather than grain-surface interstellar chemistry.

  20. Detection of methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO) in a solar-type protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Quénard, D.; Testi, L.; Martín-Pintado, J.

    2017-08-01

    We report the detection of the pre-biotic molecule CH3NCO in a solar-type protostar, IRAS16293-2422 B. A significant abundance of this species on the surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has been proposed, and it has recently been detected in hot cores around high-mass protostars. We observed IRAS16293-2422 B with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array in the 90 to 265 GHz range, and detected eight unblended transitions of CH3NCO. From our Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium analysis, we derived an excitation temperature of 110 ± 19 K and a column density of (4.0 ± 0.3) × 1015 cm-2, which results in an abundance of ≤(1.4 ± 0.1) × 10-10 with respect to molecular hydrogen. This implies a CH3NCO/HNCO and CH3NCO/NH2CHO column density ratios of ∼0.08. Our modelling of the chemistry of CH3NCO suggests that both ice surface and gas phase formation reactions of this molecule are needed to explain the observations.

  1. Discovery of calcite in the solar type protostar NGC 1333-IRAS 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccarelli, C.; Caux, E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Kemper, F.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Phillips, T.

    2002-11-01

    We present observations, obtained with ISO-LWS, of the continuum between 50-200 mu m of the solar type protostar IRAS 4, in the NGC 1333 complex. The continuum presents an excess, around 95 mu m, that we demonstrate must be a dust feature. We compared the 95 mu m excess with the calcite feature at 92 mu m and find that it fits the observations reasonably well. There may be a further contribution from hydrous silicates at ~ 100 mu m, but this seems a less robust result. The detected calcite mass is ~ 8 x 10-5 Msun and represents about 1% of the warm ( ~ 23 K) dust mass surrounding IRAS 4. This is only the second observation indicating the presence of carbonates outside the solar system, and the first revealing calcite in a young protostar. It is remarkable and intriguing that in all the objects where calcite has been detected so far, namely meteorites, planetary nebulae and IRAS 4, it represents from 0.3 to 1% of the dust mass. This new detection of calcite strengthens the claim by Kemper et al. (2002a) that calcite formation does not necessarely requires liquid water. We suggest that calcite forms at the surface of the grains, where water ice layers may locally have an enhanced mobility caused by heating due to hard X-rays emitted by the central object.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF HDCO/H{sub 2}CO RATIOS IN THE ENVELOPES OF EXTREMELY COLD PROTOSTARS IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Choi, Minho; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi

    2015-11-20

    We present observations of HDCO and H{sub 2}CO emission toward a sample of 15 Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B clouds. Of these, 11 protostars are Herschel-identified PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRSs) and 4 are previously identified protostars. Our observations revealed the chemical properties of the PBRS envelope for the first time. The column densities of HDCO and H{sub 2}CO are derived from single-dish observations at an angular resolution of ∼20″ (∼8400 AU). The degree of deuteration in H{sub 2}CO ([HDCO]/[H{sub 2}CO]) was estimated to range from 0.03 to 0.31. The deuterium fractionation of most PBRSs (70%) is similar to that of the non-PBRS sources. Three PBRSs (30%) exhibit high deuterium fractionation, larger than 0.15. The large variation of the deuterium fractionation of H{sub 2}CO in the whole PBRS sample may reflect the diversity in the initial conditions of star-forming cores. There is no clear correlation between the [HDCO]/[H{sub 2}CO] ratio and the evolutionary sequence of protostars.

  3. OT1_sbontemp_1: Water emission from outflows and hot cores in the Cygnus X proto-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontemps, S.

    2010-07-01

    The impressive first results from the WISH GT key program by van Dishoeck et al. indicate that water emission is bright towards the embedded proto-stars of all masses. These emissions are tracing outflows and warm inner regions of the collapsing envelopes (radiatively heated hot cores) which are unique probes of the cooling of these regions and of the kinematics of the dense warm gas. But WISH is limited by the reduced number of targets, and by the unavoidable biases introduced by the stringent selection of sources. The intermediate to high mass range is critical to challenge protostellar evolution models, and we argue that water emission from a complete sample of proto-stars in this mass range will be an important piece of knowledge for outflows to trace indirectly accretion and for hot cores to follow their time of appearance. Only Cygnus X is nearby and rich enough to provide a large sample of such proto-stars. We propose here to dramatically change the level of significance of WISH results by observing as many as 92 proto-stars covering the (final stellar) mass range of 3 to 20 Msun in the single complex of Cygnus X.

  4. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: PROPERTIES OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS IN OMC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George E.; Henderson, Charles P.; Schoenwald, Justin; Stacey, Gordon; Osorio, Mayra; Macias, Enrique; Thomas Megeath, S.; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; D'Alessio, Paola; De Buizer, James M.; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Keller, Luke D.; Morris, Mark R.; Remming, Ian S.; Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; and others

    2012-04-20

    We examine eight young stellar objects in the OMC-2 star-forming region based on observations from the SOFIA/FORCAST early science phase, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, and other results in the literature. We show the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these objects from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, and compare the SEDs with those of sheet collapse models of protostars and circumstellar disks. Four of the objects can be modeled as protostars with infalling envelopes, two as young stars surrounded by disks, and the remaining two objects have double-peaked SEDs. We model the double-peaked sources as binaries containing a young star with a disk and a protostar. The six most luminous sources are found in a dense group within a 0.15 Multiplication-Sign 0.25 pc region; these sources have luminosities ranging from 300 L{sub Sun} to 20 L{sub Sun }. The most embedded source (OMC-2 FIR 4) can be fit by a class 0 protostar model having a luminosity of {approx}50 L{sub Sun} and mass infall rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  5. SUBARCSECOND ANALYSIS OF THE INFALLING–ROTATING ENVELOPE AROUND THE CLASS I PROTOSTAR IRAS 04365+2535

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Aikawa, Yuri; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Kahane, Claudine; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subarcsecond images of the rotational line emission of CS and SO have been obtained toward the Class I protostar IRAS 04365+2535 in TMC-1A with ALMA. A compact component around the protostar is clearly detected in the CS and SO emission. The velocity structure of the compact component of CS reveals infalling–rotating motion conserving the angular momentum. It is well explained by a ballistic model of an infalling–rotating envelope with the radius of the centrifugal barrier (one-half of the centrifugal radius) of 50 au, although the distribution of the infalling gas is asymmetric around the protostar. The distribution of SO is mostly concentrated around the radius of the centrifugal barrier of the simple model. Thus, a drastic change in chemical composition of the gas infalling onto the protostar is found to occur at a 50 au scale probably due to accretion shocks, demonstrating that the infalling material is significantly processed before being delivered into the disk.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: H2O + CH3OH maser survey of Orion protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Lee, J.-E.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Kim, K.-T.; di Francesco, J.; Park, Y.-S.

    2015-04-01

    Out of the protostars listed in the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) catalogue (Fischer et al. 2010A&A...518L.122F; Stutz et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/36), we selected protostars showing line wings in the CO(J=2->1) line spectra obtained with the Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory 6m telescope. In the Orion molecular cloud complex 99 protostars were observed using the KVN 21m radio antennas in the single-dish telescope mode during the 2010 Mar-2010 Jun and 2011-2012 observing seasons. The observations were carried out with the KVN Yonsei telescope at Seoul, the KVN Ulsan telescope at Ulsan, and the KVN Tamna telescope at Seogwipo, Korea. The target lines were the H2O(616->523) (22.23508GHz) line and the CH3OH (70->61 A+), (80->71A+), and (6-1->50E) lines at 44.06943, 95.169516, and 132.890800GHz, respectively. (6 data files).

  7. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Correcting for Inclination in BLT Diagrams and Reassessing the Class 0 Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S.; Stutz, A. M.; Tobin, J. J.; Ali, B.; Stanke, T.; Osorio, M.; Furlan, E.; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    We describe recent results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a multiwavelength study of Spitzer-identified protostars in the Orion Molecular Cloud complex. Over 300 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, the largest star-forming region in the nearest 500 pc, have been observed with 70 μm and 160 μm Herschel/PACS imaging and spectroscopy and with near-IR, mid-IR, and submillimeter imaging and spectroscopy. Using a custom grid of radiative transfer models, we have fit the resulting spectral energy distributions of the sources to estimate their fundamental properties, including infall rate, luminosity, and outflow cavity angle. We also use the model fits to correct the bolometric luminosities and temperatures (BLT properties) of the sources for the effects of foreground extinction and inclination. After the inclination correction, we find that many of the putative young Class 0 sources seem to be highly inclined, more evolved Class I sources. Furthermore, we have discovered a class of protostars previously unidentified by Spitzer that may be young or highly inclined Class 0 sources. We re-evaluate the Class 0 lifetime in light of these new results.

  8. Massive Supergravity and Deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, Thomas; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shadmi, Yael

    2004-03-23

    We present a simple superfield Lagrangian for massive supergravity. It comprises the minimal supergravity Lagrangian with interactions as well as mass terms for the metric superfield and the chiral compensator. This is the natural generalization of the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for massive gravity which comprises mass terms for the metric and its trace. We show that the on-shell bosonic and fermionic fields are degenerate and have the appropriate spins: 2, 3/2, 3/2 and 1. We then study this interacting Lagrangian using goldstone superfields. We find that achiral multiplet of goldstones gets a kinetic term through mixing, just as the scalar goldstone does in the non-supersymmetric case. This produces Planck scale (Mpl) interactions with matter and all the discontinuities and unitarity bounds associated with massive gravity. In particular, the scale of strong coupling is (Mpl m^4)^1/5, where m is the multiplet's mass. Next, we consider applications of massive supergravity to deconstruction. We estimate various quantum effects which generate non-local operators in theory space. As an example, we show that the single massive supergravity multiplet in a 2-site model can serve the function of an extra dimension in anomaly mediation.

  9. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  10. HCN hyperfine ratio analysis of massive molecular clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, W. J.; Barnes, P. J.; Ordoñez, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Yonekura, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new analysis protocol for HCN hyperfine data, based on the PYSPECKIT package, and results of using this new protocol to analyse a sample area of seven massive molecular clumps from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) survey, in order to derive maps of column density for this species. There is a strong correlation between the HCN integrated intensity, IHCN, and previously reported I_HCO+ in the clumps, but I_N_{2H+} is not well correlated with either of these other two 'dense gas tracers'. The four fitted parameters from PYSPECKIT in this region fall in the range of VLSR = 8-10 km s-1, σV = 1.2-2.2 km s-1, Tex = 4-15 K, and τ = 0.2-2.5. These parameters allow us to derive a column density map of these clouds, without limiting assumptions about the excitation or opacity. A more traditional (linear) method of converting IHCN to total mass column gives much lower clump masses than our results based on the hyperfine analysis. This is primarily due to areas in the sample region of low I, low Tex, and high τ. We conclude that there may be more dense gas in these massive clumps not engaged in massive star formation than previously recognized. If this result holds for other clouds in the CHaMP sample, it would have dramatic consequences for the calibration of the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws, including a large increase in the gas depletion time-scale in such regions.

  11. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  12. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. II. EFFECTS OF THE OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-04-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 M{sub Sun }) protostar forming from a massive (M{sub c} = 60 M{sub Sun }) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang and Tan. The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities, based in part on the disk-wind model of Blandford and Payne; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. We also include a non-Keplerian potential appropriate for a growing, massive disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the synthetic images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, i.e., looking down the outflow cavity (although not too close to the axis), the SED from the near-IR to about 60 {mu}m is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 {mu}m, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at {approx}20 {mu}m. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow

  13. Characterizing the Youngest Herschel-detected Protostars. II. Molecular Outflows from the Millimeter and the Far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Karska, Agata; Nagy, Zsofia; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Fischer, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Stanke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) CO (J=1\\to 0) observations and Herschel PACS spectroscopy, characterizing the outflow properties toward extremely young and deeply embedded protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. The sample comprises a subset of the Orion protostars known as the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS; Stutz et al.). We observed 14 PBRS with CARMA and 8 of these 14 with Herschel, acquiring full spectral scans from 55 to 200 μm. Outflows are detected in CO (J=1\\to 0) from 8 of 14 PBRS, with two additional tentative detections; outflows are also detected from the outbursting protostar HOPS 223 (V2775 Ori) and the Class I protostar HOPS 68. The outflows have a range of morphologies; some are spatially compact, <10,000 au in extent, while others extend beyond the primary beam. The outflow velocities and morphologies are consistent with being dominated by intermediate inclination angles (80° ≥ i ≥ 20°). This confirms the interpretation of the very red 24-70 μm colors of the PBRS as a signpost of high envelope densities, with only one (possibly two) cases of the red colors resulting from edge-on inclinations. We detect high-J (J up > 13) CO lines and/or H2O lines from 5 of 8 PBRS and only for those with detected CO outflows. The far-infrared CO rotation temperatures of the detected PBRS are marginally colder (˜230 K) than those observed for most protostars (˜300 K), and only one of these five PBRS has detected [O i] 63 μm emission. The high envelope densities could be obscuring some [O i] emission and cause a ˜20 K reduction to the CO rotation temperatures. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  14. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  15. Observations of irradiated protostars show a lack of complex organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    In their youngest stages, protostars are deeply enshrouded in envelopes of gas and dust, material that later accretes onto the central object and the protoplanetary disc. The icy grain mantles are the formation sites for complex organic molecules. The formation of such molecules is strongly affected by external effects such as heating and irradiation, both due to changes in reaction rates and the evaporation of key species from the ice mantles. To understand these effects, we have studied the molecular composition of irradiated protostars.We demonstrate the strengths of unbiased single-dish line surveys, which we use to study the chemical and physical properties of protostellar envelopes. We have performed line surveys of more than 50 sources in the nearby Corona Australis and Ophiuchus star-forming regions using the APEX telescope. Many of the Corona Australis sources are located near the intermediate-mass Herbig Be star R CrA, and we find that despite its moderate luminosity, the irradiation from this star enhances the H2CO temperatures of the nearby protostellar envelopes from 10 K to at least 30-40 K. This drastically elevated temperature should be of crucial importance to the chemistry of these envelopes, due to thermal evaporation of many key species from the dust grain surfaces.Towards R CrA-IRS7B, the most thoroughly investigated object in our study, we find that the chemistry differs greatly from other thoroughly investigated deeply embedded protostars (hot corinos and warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, WCCC). We find low abundances of complex organic molecules such as CH3OCH3 and CH3CN, but instead elevated abundances of CN and some carbon-chain species like HC3N and C2H, although not to the same level as towards typical WCCC sources. We interpret the observed chemical properties as a result of thermal evaporation of CO from the grain mantles and photo-dissociation reactions in the IRS7B envelope, both initiated by the irradiation from R CrA.

  16. Evidence for disks at an early stage in class 0 protostars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, M.; Pety, J.; Commerçon, B.; Fuente, A.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.; Ciardi, A.; Lis, D. C.; Roueff, E.; Wootten, H. A.; Chapillon, E.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: The formation epoch of protostellar disks is debated because of the competing roles of rotation, turbulence, and magnetic fields in the early stages of low-mass star formation. Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cores predict that rotationally supported disks may form in strongly magnetized cores through ambipolar diffusion or misalignment between the rotation axis and the magnetic field orientation. Detailed studies of individual sources are needed to cross check the theoretical predictions. Methods: We present 0.06-0.1'' resolution images at 350 GHz toward B1b-N and B1b-S, which are young class 0 protostars, possibly first hydrostatic cores. The images have been obtained with ALMA, and we compare these data with magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a collapsing turbulent and magnetized core. Results: The submillimeter continuum emission is spatially resolved by ALMA. Compact structures with optically thick 350 GHz emission are detected toward both B1b-N and B1b-S, with 0.2 and 0.35'' radii (46 and 80 au at the Perseus distance of 230 pc), within a more extended envelope. The flux ratio between the compact structure and the envelope is lower in B1b-N than in B1b-S, in agreement with its earlier evolutionary status. The size and orientation of the compact structure are consistent with 0.2'' resolution 32 GHz observations obtained with the Very Large Array as a part of the VANDAM survey, suggesting that grains have grown through coagulation. The morphology, temperature, and densities of the compact structures are consistent with those of disks formed in numerical simulations of collapsing cores. Moreover, the properties of B1b-N are consistent with those of a very young protostar, possibly a first hydrostatic core. These observations provide support for the early formation of disks around low-mass protostars. The reduced images and datacubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via

  17. Supertwistors and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mezincescu, Luca; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    In the (super)twistor formulation of massless (super)particle mechanics, the mass-shell constraint is replaced by a “spin-shell” constraint from which the spin content can be read off. We extend this formalism to massive (super)particles (with N-extended space–time supersymmetry) in three and four space–time dimensions, explaining how the spin-shell constraints are related to spin, and we use it to prove equivalence of the massive N=1 and BPS-saturated N=2 superparticle actions. We also find the supertwistor form of the action for “spinning particles” with N-extended worldline supersymmetry, massless in four dimensions and massive in three dimensions, and we show how this simplifies special features of the N=2 case. -- Highlights: •Spin-shell constraints are related to Poincaré Casimirs. •Twistor form of 4D spinning particle for spin N/2. •Twistor proof of scalar/antisymmetric tensor equivalence for 4D spin 0. •Twistor form of 3D particle with arbitrary spin. •Proof of equivalence of N=1 and N=2 BPS massive 4D superparticles.

  18. Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    date of determination). DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). "Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators" August... electromechanical systems) processes are used to manufacture reliable and reproducible stators and sliders for the actuators. These processes include

  19. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  20. Spectroscopy of Spitzer-discovered Protostars in the Elephant Trunk Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reach, William; Boogert, Adwin; Carey, Sean; Ciardi, David; Morris, Patrick; Rho, Jeonghee

    2004-09-01

    We propose to obtain spectra of protostellar candidates discovered in the early Spitzer observation of IC 1396N. No protostars were known or suspected in the globule before the Spitzer observations, and the properties of such objects are not known. The IRS observations were designed with sufficient signal-to-noise to detect absorption features due to silicates and ices. The shape of the spectral energy distribution and the depth of the silicate feature will be used to determine the ratio of stellar core to envelope mass and determine the evolutionary state of these new objects. This is a unique sample having a range of suspected evolutionary states all located in the same globule.

  1. Detection of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, B.; Du, F.; Liu, F.-C.; Belloche, A.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Hübers, H.-W.; Klein, B.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Although water is an essential and widespread molecule in star-forming regions, its chemical formation pathways are still not very well constrained. Observing the level of deuterium fractionation of OH, a radical involved in the water chemical network, is a promising way to infer its chemical origin. Aims: We aim at understanding the formation mechanisms of water by investigating the origin of its deuterium fractionation. This can be achieved by observing the abundance of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422, where the HDO distribution is already known. Methods: Using the GREAT receiver on board SOFIA, we observed the ground-state OD transition at 1391.5 GHz towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422. We also present the detection of the HDO 111-000 line using the APEX telescope. We compare the OD/HDO abundance ratio inferred from these observations with the predictions of chemical models. Results: The OD line is detected in absorption towards the source continuum. This is the first detection of OD outside the solar system. The SOFIA observation, coupled to the observation of the HDO 111-000 line, provides an estimate of the abundance ratio OD/HDO ~ 17-90 in the gas where the absorption takes place. This value is fairly high compared with model predictions. This may be reconciled if reprocessing in the gas by means of the dissociative recombination of H2DO+ further fractionates OH with respect to water. Conclusions: The present observation demonstrates the capability of the SOFIA/GREAT instrument to detect the ground transition of OD towards star-forming regions in a frequency range that was not accessible before. Dissociative recombination of H2DO+ may play an important role in setting a high OD abundance. Measuring the branching ratios of this reaction in the laboratory will be of great value for chemical models. Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. WFC3-IR Imaging of Dense, Embedded Outflows from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Based on H-alpha imaging of the Carina Nebula with ACS, we discovered 40 new Herbig-Haro {HH} jets marking outflows from young stars. This is valuable because {1} it is a large sample of jets at one distance, {2} the driving sources are intermediate-mass {IM} stars {1-8 Msun}, allowing us to investigate the bridge between low- and high-mass star formation, and {3} the jets are exposed to the same feedback source and trace various stages of being uncovered by the advancing ionization front. This sample is all the more valuable because it can be placed in the context of a well-understood environment that has been studied extensively with HST, Spitzer, Chandra, and from the ground. We propose to image 13 of these jets in the [Fe II] 1.26-micron and 1.64-micron lines. These lines suffer less extincton than optical lines, trace embedded jets, and are essential to measure the total mass in these dense outflows. Four jets have already been imaged in the F126N and F164N filters to make public release images; these images demonstrate that [FeII] emission traces a large mass of neutral gas not seen in H-alpha emission and traces the jet back into the cloud to the Spitzer-identified driving source. This study will permit a detailed comparison of the jet properties {e.g. mass-loss rate, momentum injection, mass-loss history} to IM protostar properties {e.g. accretion rate, luminosity, envelope mass and structure} during the most active accretion. These relationships are poorly determined for IM protostars. Additionally, the flux ratio of [Fe II] lines will trace the spatially dependent extinction through the cloud, providing a map of the density structure in the extended envelope.

  3. Line survey observations of irradiated protostars - photo-destruction and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    In their youngest stages, protostars are deeply enshrouded in envelopes of gas and dust, material that later accretes onto the central object and the protoplanetary disc. The chemical composition of the molecular gas and the icy grain mantles is strongly affected by external irradiation, and studying the excitation and composition of the molecular gas can provide valuable information on the irradiation history of the envelope.We demonstrate the strengths of unbiased single-dish line surveys, which we use to study the chemical and physical properties of protostellar envelopes. We have performed line surveys of more than 50 sources in the nearby Corona Australis and Ophiuchus star-forming regions using the APEX telescope. Many of the Corona Australis sources are located near the intermediate-mass Herbig Be star R CrA, and we find that despite its moderate luminosity, the irradiation from this star enhances the H2CO temperatures of the nearby protostellar envelopes from 10 K to at least 30-40 K. This drastically elevated temperature should be of crucial importance to the chemistry of these envelopes, due to thermal evaporation of many key species from the dust grain surfaces.Towards R CrA-IRS7B, the most thoroughly investigated object in our study, we find that the chemistry differs greatly from other thoroughly investigated deeply embedded protostars (hot corinos and warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, WCCC). We find low abundances of complex organic molecules such as CH3OCH3 and CH3CN, but instead elevated abundances of CN and some carbon-chain species like HC3N and C2H, although not to the same level as towards typical WCCC sources. We interpret the observed chemical properties as a result of thermal evaporation of CO from the grain mantles and photo-dissociation reactions in the IRS7B envelope, both initiated by the irradiation from R CrA.

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR IN NGC 7538 S

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Melvyn; Zhao Junui; Sandell, Goeran; Corder, Stuartt; Goss, W. M.; Zhu Lei

    2012-02-20

    We present high angular resolution continuum observations of the high-mass protostar NGC 7538 S with BIMA and CARMA at 3 and 1.4 mm, Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 1.3, 2, 3.5, and 6 cm, and archive Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations from the Spitzer Space Observatory, which detect the star at 4.5, 5.8, and 8 {mu}m. The star looks rather unremarkable in the mid-IR. The excellent positional agreement of the IRAC source with the VLA free-free emission, the OH, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}O masers, and the dust continuum confirms that this is the most luminous object in the NGC 7538 S core. The continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths is dominated by dust emission from the dense cold cloud core surrounding the protostar. Including all array configurations, the emission is dominated by an elliptical source with a size of {approx}8'' Multiplication-Sign 3''. If we filter out the extended emission we find three compact millimeter sources inside the elliptical core. The strongest one, S{sub A}, coincides with the VLA/IRAC source and resolves into a double source at 1.4 mm, where we have subarcsecond resolution. The measured spectral index, {alpha}, between 3 and 1.4 mm is {approx}2.3, and steeper at longer wavelengths, suggesting a low dust emissivity or that the dust is optically thick. We argue that the dust in these accretion disks is optically thick and estimate a mass of an accretion disk or infalling envelope surrounding S{sub A} to be {approx}60 M{sub Sun }.

  5. DETECTION OF FORMAMIDE, THE SIMPLEST BUT CRUCIAL AMIDE, IN A SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kahane, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Faure, A.

    2013-02-01

    Formamide (NH{sub 2}CHO), the simplest possible amide, has recently been suggested to be a central species in the synthesis of metabolic and genetic molecules, the chemical basis of life. In this Letter, we report the first detection of formamide in a protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, which may be similar to the Sun and solar system progenitor. The data combine spectra from the millimeter and submillimeter TIMASSS survey with recent, more sensitive observations at the IRAM 30 m telescope. With an abundance relative to H{sub 2} of {approx}10{sup -10}, formamide appears as abundant in this solar-type protostar as in the two high-mass star-forming regions, Orion-KL and SgrB2, where this species has previously been detected. Given the largely different UV-illuminated environments of the three sources, the relevance of UV photolysis of interstellar ices in the synthesis of formamide is therefore questionable. Assuming that this species is formed in the gas phase via the neutral-neutral reaction between the radical NH{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO, we predict an abundance in good agreement with the value derived from our observations. The comparison of the relative abundance [NH{sub 2}CHO]/[H{sub 2}O] in IRAS 16293-2422 and in the coma of the comet Hale-Bopp supports the similarity between interstellar and cometary chemistry. Our results thus suggest that the abundance of some cometary organic volatiles could reflect gas phase rather than grain-surface interstellar chemistry.

  6. HOPS 136: An edge-on orion protostar near the end of envelope infall

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Kounkel, Marina; Stutz, Amelia M.; Poteet, Charles A.; Ali, Babar; Manoj, P.; Remming, Ian; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.

    2014-02-01

    Edge-on protostars are valuable for understanding the disk and envelope properties of embedded young stellar objects, since the disk, envelope, and envelope cavities are all distinctly visible in resolved images and well constrained in modeling. Comparing Two Micron All Sky Survey, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX photometry and an IRAM limit from 1.2 to 1200 μm, Spitzer spectroscopy from 5 to 40 μm, and high-resolution Hubble imaging at 1.60 and 2.05 μm to radiative transfer modeling, we determine envelope and disk properties for the Class I protostar HOPS 136, an edge-on source in Orion's Lynds 1641 region. The source has a bolometric luminosity of 0.8 L {sub ☉}, a bolometric temperature of 170 K, and a ratio of submillimeter to bolometric luminosity of 0.8%. Via modeling, we find a total luminosity of 4.7 L {sub ☉} (larger than the observed luminosity due to extinction by the disk), an envelope mass of 0.06 M {sub ☉}, and a disk radius and mass of 450 AU and 0.002 M {sub ☉}. The stellar mass is highly uncertain but is estimated to fall between 0.4 and 0.5 M {sub ☉}. To reproduce the flux and wavelength of the near-infrared scattered-light peak in the spectral energy distribution, we require 5.4 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust in each cavity. The disk has a large radius and a mass typical of more evolved T Tauri disks in spite of the significant remaining envelope. HOPS 136 appears to be a key link between the protostellar and optically revealed stages of star formation.

  7. Rotation-Infall Motion around the Protostar IRAS 16293-2422 Traced by Water Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Hiroshi; Iwata, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Makoto

    1999-08-01

    We made VLBI observations of the water maser emission associated with a protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, using the Kashima-Nobeyama Interferometer (KNIFE) and the Japanese domestic VLBI network (J-Net).\\footnote[2]. These distributions of water maser features showed the blue-shifted and red-shifted components separated in the north-south direction among three epochs spanning three years. The direction of the separation was perpendicular to the molecular outflow and parallel to the elongation of the molecular disk. These steady distributions were successfully modeled by a rotating-infalling disk with an outer radius of 100 AU around a central object with a mass of 0.3 MO . The local specific angular momentum of the disk was calculated to be 0.2-1.0times 10-3 km s-1 pc at a radius of 20-100 AU. This value is roughly equal to that of the disk of IRAS 00338+6312 in L1287 and those of the molecular disks around the protostars in the Taurus molecular cloud. The relatively large disk radius of about 100 AU traced by water maser emission suggests that impinging clumps onto the disk should be hotter than 200 K to excite the water maser emission. Mizusawa, Nobeyama, and Kagoshima stations are operated by staff members of National Astronomical Observatory of the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture. Kashima station is operated by staff members of Communications Research Laboratory of the Ministry of Posts and Telecomunications. The recent status of J-Net is seen in the WWW home page: http://www.nro.nao.ac.jp/\\ \\ miyaji/Jnet.

  8. MODELING THE RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Wilner, David J.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at {lambda} = 870 {mu}m and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M{sub Sun }, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: {alpha} {approx} 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index {beta} {approx} 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (H{proportional_to}R {sup 1.3}), has a radial density profile {rho}{proportional_to}R {sup -2.5}, and has a mass of 0.0075 M{sub Sun }. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of {approx}1 {mu}m-sized dust grains.

  9. Modeling the Resolved Disk around the Class 0 Protostar L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Wilner, David J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Loinard, Laurent; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at λ = 870 μm and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M ⊙, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: α ~ 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index β ~ 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (HvpropR 1.3), has a radial density profile ρvpropR -2.5, and has a mass of 0.0075 M ⊙. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of ~1 μm-sized dust grains.

  10. Massive 70 μm quiet clumps I: evidence of embedded low/intermediate-mass star formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Billot, N.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Merello, M.; Molinari, S.; Peretto, N.; Schisano, E.

    2017-10-01

    Massive clumps, prior to the formation of any visible protostars, are the best candidates to search for the elusive massive starless cores. In this work, we investigate the dust and gas properties of massive clumps selected to be 70 μm quiet, therefore good starless candidates. Our sample of 18 clumps has masses 300 ≲ M ≲ 3000 M⊙, radius 0.54 ≤ R ≤ 1.00 pc, surface densities Σ ≥ 0.05 g cm-2 and luminosity/mass ratio L/M ≤ 0.3. We show that half of these 70 μm quiet clumps embed faint 24 μm sources. Comparison with GLIMPSE counterparts shows that five clumps embed young stars of intermediate stellar mass up to ≃5.5 M⊙. We study the clump dynamics with observations of N2H+ (1-0), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) made with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Seven clumps have blue-shifted spectra compatible with infall signatures, for which we estimate a mass accretion rate 0.04≲ \\dot{M}≲ 2.0× 10^{-3} M⊙ yr-1, comparable with values found in high-mass protostellar regions, and free-fall time of the order of tff ≃ 3 × 105 yr. The only appreciable difference we find between objects with and without embedded 24 μm sources is that the infall rate appears to increase from 24 μm dark to 24 μm bright objects. We conclude that all 70 μm quiet objects have similar properties on clump scales, independently of the presence of an embedded protostar. Based on our data, we speculate that the majority, if not all of these clumps, may already embed faint, low-mass protostellar cores. If these clumps are to form massive stars, this must occur after the formation of these lower mass stars.

  11. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  12. Phases of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei L.

    2004-10-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity is described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff ~ (mMPl)1/2. This theory is free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of arbitrary higher dimension operators without assuming any fine-tunings among the coefficients of these operators, besides those enforced by the symmetries. These theories can be thought of as generalizations of the ghost condensate model with a smaller residual symmetry group. We briefly discuss what kind of cosmology can one expect in massive gravity and argue that the allowed values of the graviton mass may be quite large, affecting growth of primordial perturbations, structure formation and, perhaps, enhancing the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe.

  13. The formation of massive primordial stars in the presence of moderate UV backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Spaans, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiative feedback produced by stellar populations played a vital role in early structure formation. In particular, photons below the Lyman limit can escape the star-forming regions and produce a background ultraviolet (UV) flux, which consequently may influence the pristine halos far away from the radiation sources. These photons can quench the formation of molecular hydrogen by photodetachment of H{sup –}. In this study, we explore the impact of such UV radiation on fragmentation in massive primordial halos of a few times 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. To accomplish this goal, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two distinct halos and vary the strength of the impinging background UV field in units of J {sub 21} assuming a blackbody radiation spectrum with a characteristic temperature of T {sub rad} = 10{sup 4} K. We further make use of sink particles to follow the evolution for 10,000 yr after reaching the maximum refinement level. No vigorous fragmentation is observed in UV-illuminated halos while the accretion rate changes according to the thermal properties. Our findings show that a few 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} solar mass protostars are formed when halos are irradiated by J {sub 21} = 10-500 at z > 10 and suggest a strong relation between the strength of the UV flux and mass of a protostar. This mode of star formation is quite different from minihalos, as higher accretion rates of about 0.01-0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} are observed by the end of our simulations. The resulting massive stars are potential cradles for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes at earlier cosmic times and contribute to the formation of a global X-ray background.

  14. The Formation of Massive Primordial Stars in the Presence of Moderate UV Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Spaans, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiative feedback produced by stellar populations played a vital role in early structure formation. In particular, photons below the Lyman limit can escape the star-forming regions and produce a background ultraviolet (UV) flux, which consequently may influence the pristine halos far away from the radiation sources. These photons can quench the formation of molecular hydrogen by photodetachment of H-. In this study, we explore the impact of such UV radiation on fragmentation in massive primordial halos of a few times 107 M ⊙. To accomplish this goal, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two distinct halos and vary the strength of the impinging background UV field in units of J 21 assuming a blackbody radiation spectrum with a characteristic temperature of T rad = 104 K. We further make use of sink particles to follow the evolution for 10,000 yr after reaching the maximum refinement level. No vigorous fragmentation is observed in UV-illuminated halos while the accretion rate changes according to the thermal properties. Our findings show that a few 102-104 solar mass protostars are formed when halos are irradiated by J 21 = 10-500 at z > 10 and suggest a strong relation between the strength of the UV flux and mass of a protostar. This mode of star formation is quite different from minihalos, as higher accretion rates of about 0.01-0.1 M ⊙ yr-1 are observed by the end of our simulations. The resulting massive stars are potential cradles for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes at earlier cosmic times and contribute to the formation of a global X-ray background.

  15. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  16. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. M.; Johnston, K. G.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low- and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionized stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12°), which may be either an ionized jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionized cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ˜5-arcsec resolution in 12CO (P.A. ˜ 30°), which in the case of a jet suggests precession. The emission from the mm core associated with VLA 2 is also detected; we estimate its mass to be 12-23 M⊙, depending on the contribution from ionized gas. Furthermore, the large-scale outflow has properties intermediate between outflows from low- and high-mass young stars. Therefore, we conclude that the IM protostar within IRAS 05373+2349 is phenomenologically as well as quantitatively intermediate between the low- and high-mass domains.

  17. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Yusuke; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the emissions of 12CO and C18O (J = 2–1) and 1.3 mm dust continuum. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.″50 × 0.″37, perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O, although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.″3 × 2.″2, indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power law ∝r‑a with an index of ∼0.5 at higher velocities. This indicates that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keplerian rotation orbiting a protostar with a dynamical mass of 0.68 {M}ȯ (inclination corrected). The additional velocity gradient of C18O along the outflow is considered to be mainly infall motions in the envelope. Position–velocity diagrams made from models consisting of an infalling envelope and a Keplerian disk are compared with the observations, revealing that the observed infall velocity is ∼0.3 times smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by the dynamical mass of the protostar. Magnetic fields could be responsible for the slow infall velocity. A possible scenario of Keplerian disk formation is discussed.

  18. A RECENT ACCRETION BURST IN THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR IRAS 15398-3359: ALMA IMAGING OF ITS RELATED CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Jørgensen, Jes K.; Brinch, Christian; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A.; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Harsono, Daniel; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Persson, Magnus V.

    2013-12-20

    Low-mass protostars have been suggested to show highly variable accretion rates throughout their evolution. Such changes in accretion, and related heating of their ambient envelopes, may trigger significant chemical variations on different spatial scales and from source-to-source. We present images of emission from C{sup 17}O, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sup 34}S and C{sub 2}H toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398-3359 on 0.''5 (75 AU diameter) scales with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at 340 GHz. The resolved images show that the emission from H{sup 13}CO{sup +} is only present in a ring-like structure with a radius of about 1-1.''5 (150-200 AU) whereas the CO and other high dipole moment molecules are centrally condensed toward the location of the central protostar. We propose that HCO{sup +} is destroyed by water vapor present on small scales. The origin of this water vapor is likely an accretion burst during the last 100-1000 yr increasing the luminosity of IRAS 15398-3359 by a factor of 100 above its current luminosity. Such a burst in luminosity can also explain the centrally condensed CH{sub 3}OH and extended warm carbon-chain chemistry observed in this source and furthermore be reflected in the relative faintness of its compact continuum emission compared to other protostars.

  19. Early Science Planning of Protoplanetary Disks and Protostars in the Orion Nebula Cluster Using SOFIA/FORCAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri; Adams, J. D.; Herter, T. L.; Gull, G.; Henderson, C.; Schoenwald, J.; Keller, L.; Megeath, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    The Faint Object Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) is a mid-infrared facility instrument for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). In late May of this year, FORCAST achieved first light on SOFIA during a Telescope Assembly characterization flight, successfully taking photometry of Jupiter, its moons, and M82 from an altitude of 35,000 ft. Analysis of images of Jupiter and one of its moons, Ganymede, show the in-flight sensitivity to be comparable to that expected from preflight (lab) measurements and models. In preparation for SOFIA Short Science, we constructed Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) for known proplyds and protostars (Smith et al. 2005) in the core of the Orion molecular cloud using 2MASS (Skrutskie et al. 2006), IRAC on Spitzer, TReCS on Gemini South (Smith et al. 2005), and 880mm SCUBA data (Mann and Williams 2009). FORCAST will provide important wavelength coverage (20 - 40 microns) which when used in conjunction with previous data will constrain the physical properties of the proplyds and protostars. We fit the observed SEDs with those from radiative transfer models for circumstellar disks and protostars from Robitaille et al (2006, 2007). With these models, we can extrapolate into the 20 - 40 micron region of FORCAST and determine the range of models that FORCAST is capable of detecting. Using the FORCAST sensitivity model and the SEDs of known proplyds, we expect to detect 67% of the proplyds found by other investigations. However, detectability will be greatly influenced by the presence of structures in the diffuse dust emission associated with the HII region complex. Comparing FORCAST observations with the radiative transfer models will help to understand the physical properties of proplyds and protostars, and perhaps illuminate the impact of their environments, such as photoevaporation of disks and effects from crowding.

  20. Chemical evolution during the process of proto-star formation by considering a two dimensional hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-10-01

    Chemical composition of a molecular cloud is highly sensitive to the physical properties of the cloud. In order to obtain the chemical composition around a star forming region, we carry out a two dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of the collapsing phase of a proto-star. A total variation diminishing scheme (TVD) is used to solve the set of equations governing hydrodynamics. This hydrodynamic code is capable of mimicking evolution of the physical properties during the formation of a proto-star. We couple our reasonably large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. To have a realistic estimate of the abundances of bio-molecules in the interstellar medium, we include the recently calculated rate coefficients for the formation of several interstellar bio-molecules into our gas phase network. Chemical evolution is studied in detail by keeping grain at the constant temperature throughout the simulation as well as by using the temperature variation obtained from the hydrodynamical model. By considering a large gas-grain network with the sophisticated hydrodynamic model more realistic abundances are predicted. We find that the chemical composition are highly sensitive to the dynamic behavior of the collapsing cloud, specifically on the density and temperature distribution.

  1. Massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Bik, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.

    2017-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Massive young stellar objects (mYSOs) are deeply embedded in their parental clouds; these objects are rare, and thus typically distant, and their reddened spectra usually preclude the determination of their photospheric parameters. M17 is one of the best-studied H ii regions in the sky, is relatively nearby, and hosts a young stellar population. We have obtained optical to near-infrared spectra of previously identified candidate mYSOs and a few OB stars in this region with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage enables a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the photospheres and circumstellar disks of these candidate mYSOs. We confirm the pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature of six of the stars and characterise the O stars. The PMS stars have radii that are consistent with being contracting towards the main sequence and are surrounded by a remnant accretion disk. The observed infrared excess and the double-peaked emission lines provide an opportunity to measure structured velocity profiles in the disks. We compare the observed properties of this unique sample of young massive stars with evolutionary tracks of massive protostars and propose that these mYSOs near the western edge of the H ii region are on their way to become main-sequence stars ( 6-20 M⊙) after having undergone high mass accretion rates (Ṁacc 10-4-10-3M⊙yr-1). Their spin distribution upon arrival at the zero age main-sequence is consistent with that observed for young B stars, assuming conservation of angular momentum and homologous contraction. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 60.A-9404(A), 085.D-0741, 089.C-0874(A), and 091.C-0934(B)).The full normalised X-shooter spectra are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A78

  2. Water deuterium fractionation in the low-mass protostar NGC1333-IRAS2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.-C.; Parise, B.; Kristensen, L.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Güsten, R.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Although deuterium enrichment of water may provide an essential piece of information in the understanding of the formation of comets and protoplanetary systems, only a few studies up to now have aimed at deriving the HDO/H2O ratio in low-mass star forming regions. Previous studies of the molecular deuteration toward the solar-type class 0 protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, have shown that the D/H ratio of water is significantly lower than other grain-surface-formed molecules. It is not clear if this property is general or particular to this source. Aims: In order to see if the results toward IRAS 16293-2422 are particular, we aimed at studying water deuterium fractionation in a second low-mass solar-type protostar, NGC1333-IRAS2A. Methods: Using the 1-D radiative transfer code RATRAN, we analyzed five HDO transitions observed with the IRAM 30 m, JCMT, and APEX telescopes. We assumed that the abundance profile of HDO in the envelope is a step function, with two different values in the inner warm (T > 100 K) and outer cold (T < 100 K) regions of the protostellar envelope. Results: The inner and outer abundance of HDO is found to be well constrained at the 3σ level. The obtained HDO inner and outer fractional abundances are xHDO_in = 6.6 × 10-8-1.0 × 10-7(3σ) and x^{HDO}out=9×10-11= 9 × 10-11-1.0-1.8 × 10-9(3σ). These values are close to those in IRAS 16293-2422, which suggests that HDO may be formed by the same mechanisms in these two solar-type protostars. Taking into account the (rather poorly onstrained) H2O abundance profile deduced from Herschel observations, the derived HDO/H2O in the inner envelope is ≥1% and in the outer envelope it is 0.9%-18%. These values are more than one order of magnitude higher than what is measured in comets. If the same ratios apply to the protosolar nebula, this would imply that there is some efficient reprocessing of the material between the protostellar and cometary phases. Conclusions: The H2O inner fractional

  3. History of the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422 as told by the cyanopolyynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber Al-Edhari, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Viti, S.; Balucani, N.; Caux, E.; Faure, A.; Lefloch, B.; Lique, F.; Mendoza, E.; Quenard, D.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Cyanopolyynes are chains of carbon atoms with an atom of hydrogen and a CN group on either side. They are detected almost everywhere in the interstellar medium (ISM), as well as in comets. In the past, they have been used to constrain the age of some molecular clouds, since their abundance is predicted to be a strong function of time. Finally, cyanopolyynes can potentially contain a large portion of molecular carbon. Aims: We present an extensive study of the cyanopolyynes distribution in the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. The goals are (i) to obtain a census of the cyanopolyynes in this source and of their isotopologues; (ii) to derive how their abundance varies across the protostar envelope; and (iii) to obtain constraints on the history of IRAS 16293-2422 by comparing the observations with the predictions of a chemical model. Methods: We analysed the data from the IRAM-30 m unbiased millimeter and submillimeter spectral survey towards IRAS 16293-2422 named TIMASSS. The derived spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of each detected cyanopolyyne was compared with the predictions from the radiative transfer code GRenoble Analysis of Protostellar Envelope Spectra (GRAPES) to derive the cyanopolyyne abundances across the envelope of IRAS 16293-2422. Finally, the derived abundances were compared with the predictions of the chemical model UCL_CHEM. Results: We detect several lines from cyanoacetylene (HC3N) and cyanodiacetylene (HC5N), and report the first detection of deuterated cyanoacetylene, DC3N, in a solar-type protostar. We found that the HC3N abundance is roughly constant ( 1.3 × 10-11) in the outer cold envelope of IRAS 16293-2422, and it increases by about a factor 100 in the inner region where the dust temperature exceeds 80 K, namely when the volcano ice desorption is predicted to occur. The HC5N has an abundance similar to HC3N in the outer envelope and about a factor of ten lower in the inner region. The comparison with the chemical

  4. Observations of water with Herschel/HIFI toward the high-mass protostar AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Herpin, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Water is an important chemical species in the process of star formation, and a sensitive tracer of physical conditions in star-forming regions because of its rich line spectrum and large abundance variations between hot and cold regions. Aims: We use spectrally resolved observations of rotational lines of H2O and its isotopologs to constrain the physical conditions of the water emitting region toward the high-mass protostar AFGL 2591. Methods: Herschel/HIFI spectra from 552 up to 1669 GHz show emission and absorption in 14 lines of H 2 O, H218O, and H217O. We decompose the line profiles into contributions from the protostellar envelope, the bipolar outflow, and a foreground cloud. We use analytical estimates and rotation diagrams to estimate excitation temperatures and column densities of H2O in these components. Furthermore, we use the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) radiative transfer code RADEX to estimate the temperature and volume density of the H2O emitting gas. Results: Assuming LTE, we estimate an excitation temperature of ~42 K and a column density of ~2 × 1014 cm-2 for the envelope and ~45 K and 4 × 1013 cm-2 for the outflow, in beams of 4″ and 30″, respectively. Non-LTE models indicate a kinetic temperature of ~60-230 K and a volume density of 7 × 106-108 cm-3 for the envelope, and a kinetic temperature of ~70-90 K and a gas density of ~107-108 cm-3 for the outflow. The ortho/para ratio of the narrow cold foreground absorption is lower than three (~1.9 ± 0.4), suggesting a low temperature. In contrast, the ortho/para ratio seen in absorption by the outflow is about 3.5 ± 1.0, as expected for warm gas. Conclusions: The water abundance in the outer envelope of AFGL 2591 is ~10-9 for a source size of 4″, similar to the low values found for other high-mass and low-mass protostars, suggesting that this abundance is constant during the embedded phase of high-mass star formation. The water abundance in the outflow is ~10-10 for a

  5. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Cyganowski, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  6. Class II 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Association with Young Massive Cores Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Csengeri, Timea; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Satoru; Alhassan, Jibrin A.; Higuchi, Aya E.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-02-01

    We explored the implication of the association (or lack of it) of 6.7 GHz class II methanol (CH3OH) masers with massive dense cores (MDCs) detected (within a sample of ATLASGAL selected infrared quiet massive clumps) at 0.9 mm with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array. We found 42 out of the 112 cores (37.5%) detected with the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) to be associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. The lowest mass core with CH3OH maser association is ∼ 12 {M}ȯ . The angular offsets of the ACA cores from the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser peak positions range from 0.″17 to 4.″79, with a median value of 2.″19. We found a weak correlation between the 0.9 mm continuum (MDCs) peak fluxes and the peak fluxes of their associated methanol multibeam (MMB) 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. About 90% of the cores associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers have masses of >40 M ⊙. The CH3OH maser containing cores are candidates for embedded high-mass protostellar objects in their earliest evolutionary stages. With our ACA 0.9 continuum data compared with the MMB 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser survey, we have constrained the cores already housing massive protostars based on their association with the radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  7. Early-stage Massive Star Formation near the Galactic Center: Sgr C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Ginsburg, A.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Bally, J.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Battersby, C.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ~10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H2 and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ~103 M ⊙, with column densities of 1-2 × 1024 cm-2. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ~105 M ⊙ of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  8. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star-formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Rolf; Turner, Neal J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2016-11-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, and to determine the ratio of ejection to accretion rates and the strength of the wide-angle disk wind component. The star-formation efficiency, i.e., the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects. First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow become larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star-formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very weak outflows to as low as 20% for very strong outflows. At latitudes between the low-density bipolar cavity and the high-density accretion disk, wide-angle disk winds remove some of the gas, which otherwise would be part of the accretion flow onto the disk; varying the strength of these wide-angle disk winds, however, alters the final star-formation efficiency by only ±6%. For all cases, the opening angle of the bipolar outflow cavity remains below 20° during early protostellar accretion phases, increasing rapidly up to 65° at the onset of radiation pressure feedback.

  9. Massively Parallel Genetics.

    PubMed

    Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Human genetics has historically depended on the identification of individuals whose natural genetic variation underlies an observable trait or disease risk. Here we argue that new technologies now augment this historical approach by allowing the use of massively parallel assays in model systems to measure the functional effects of genetic variation in many human genes. These studies will help establish the disease risk of both observed and potential genetic variants and to overcome the problem of "variants of uncertain significance." Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Massive star forming environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    We present a study of the earliest stages of massive star formation, in which we focus on Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) and young massive clusters. We present Very Large Array spectral line observations of ammonia (NH 3) and CCS toward four IRDCs. The NH3 lines provide diagnostics of the temperature and density structure within IRDCs. Based upon the NH 3 column density, IRDCs have masses of ˜ 103 to 10 4 M⊙ . We detect twenty NH3 clumps within four IRDCs, with radii < 0.3 pc and masses ˜ 102 to 103 M⊙ . A majority of the clumps are associated with signatures of star formation: 24 mum emission, H2O masers, 8 GHz continuum emission, and/or outflows. The physical properties of the clumps are consistent with massive cluster progenitors. From the NH3 emission we also find distinct velocity components, or "subclouds", within each IRDC. Although they appear ubiquitous in IRDCs, subclouds have not previously been reported. Subclouds may represent an intermediate stage of molecular cloud fragmentation, between filamentary structure and clump formation. The spatial distribution of the CCS and NH3 emission is generally anti-correlated, with the NH 3 predominantly in the high-density clumps, and CCS in lower-density gas. This spatial distribution may be explained by chemical evolution models for star forming gas, where in chemically young clouds with recently disrupted gas CCS forms quickly. In early clump formation CCS is abundant and in the centers of more evolved star forming clumps CCS is depleted. Near infrared observations of three embedded massive star forming regions are presented from the Near Infrared Imager (NIRIM) camera on the 3.5 m WIYN telescope. We report J, H, and K' band photometry in the clusters AFGL437, AFGL5180, and AFGL5142 and use these results to probe the stellar populations, extinction, and ages of the clusters. We find that all three clusters suffer significant extinction (AK ˜1), have ages ≤ 5 Myr, and are actively forming stars. We

  11. Observational evidence for dissociative shocks in the inner 100 AU of low-mass protostars using Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Benz, A. O.; Bruderer, S.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: Herschel-HIFI spectra of H2O towards low-mass protostars show a distinct velocity component not seen in observations from the ground of CO or other species. The aim is to characterise this component in terms of excitation conditions and physical origin. Methods: A velocity component with an offset of ~10 km s-1 detected in spectra of the H2O 110-101 557 GHz transition towards six low-mass protostars in the "Water in star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) programme is also seen in higher-excited H2O lines. The emission from this component is quantified and local excitation conditions are inferred using 1D slab models. Data are compared to observations of hydrides (high-J CO, OH+, CH+, C+, OH) where the same component is uniquely detected. Results: The velocity component is detected in all six targeted H2O transitions (Eup ~ 50-250 K), as well as in CO 16-15 towards one source, Ser SMM1. Inferred excitation conditions imply that the emission arises in dense (n ~ 5 × 106-108 cm-3) and hot (T ~ 750 K) gas. The H2O and CO column densities are ≳1016 and 1018 cm-2, respectively, implying a low H2O abundance of ~10-2 with respect to CO. The high column densities of ions such as OH+ and CH+ (both ≳1013 cm-2) indicate an origin close to the protostar where the UV field is strong enough that these species are abundant. The estimated radius of the emitting region is 100 AU. This component likely arises in dissociative shocks close to the protostar, an interpretation corroborated by a comparison with models of such shocks. Furthermore, one of the sources, IRAS 4A, shows temporal variability in the offset component over a period of two years which is expected from shocks in dense media. High-J CO gas detected with Herschel-PACS with Trot ~ 700 K is identified as arising in the same component and traces the part of the shock where H2 reforms. Thus, H2O reveals new dynamical components, even on small spatial scales in low-mass protostars. Herschel is an ESA space

  12. Herschel/PACS Spectroscopic Survey of Protostars in Orion: The Origin of Far-infrared CO Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Megeath, S. T.; Vavrek, R.; Yu, Vincent; Visser, R.; Bergin, E. A.; Fischer, W. J.; Tobin, J. J.; Stutz, A. M.; Ali, B.; Wilson, T. L.; Di Francesco, J.; Osorio, M.; Maret, S.; Poteet, C. A.

    2013-02-01

    We present far-infrared (57-196 μm) spectra of 21 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. These were obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel Space observatory as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey program. We analyzed the emission lines from rotational transitions of CO, involving rotational quantum numbers in the range J up = 14-46, using PACS spectra extracted within a projected distance of lsim2000 AU centered on the protostar. The total luminosity of the CO lines observed with PACS (L CO) is found to increase with increasing protostellar luminosity (L bol). However, no significant correlation is found between L CO and evolutionary indicators or envelope properties of the protostars such as bolometric temperature, T bol, or envelope density. The CO rotational (excitation) temperature implied by the line ratios increases with increasing rotational quantum number J, and at least 3-4 rotational temperature components are required to fit the observed rotational diagram in the PACS wavelength range. The rotational temperature components are remarkably invariant between protostars and show no dependence on L bol, T bol, or envelope density, implying that if the emitting gas is in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the CO emission must arise in multiple temperature components that remain independent of L bol over two orders of magnitudes. The observed CO emission can also be modeled as arising from a single-temperature gas component or from a medium with a power-law temperature distribution; both of these require sub-thermally excited molecular gas at low densities (n(H2) <~ 106 cm-3) and high temperatures (T gsim 2000 K). Our results suggest that the contribution from photodissociation regions, produced along the envelope cavity walls from UV-heating, is unlikely to be the dominant component of the CO emission observed with PACS. Instead, the "universality" of the rotational temperatures and the observed

  13. Massively Parallel QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  14. Neutral stellar winds that drive bipolar outflows in low-mass protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizano, Susana; Heiles, Carl; Koo, Bon-Ghul; Shu, Frank H.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    1988-01-01

    The Arecibo radio telescope at the 21-cm line of atomic hydrogen has been used to detect a neutral atomic wind in the bipolar flow source HH 7-11. An atomic mass of about 0.015 solar associated with the rapidly flowing gas is deduced. The stellar mass-loss rate is roughly 3 x 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr if the crossing time of the decelerating wind is 5000 yr. The excess emission in the H I line core gives a total duration of the outflow of about 70,000 yr. A detailed analysis of the H I line shape yields a reasonable deceleration rate for the atomic wind if the stellar wind continuously entrains ambient molecular gas as it propagates from the protostar. A stellar wind with the described characteristics and a terminal velocity of 170 km/s would be more than sufficient to drive the known extended CO bipolar outflow in HH 7-11.

  15. TESTING MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS FOR THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J. A.; Li, Z.-Y.; Hull, C. L. H.; Plambeck, R. L.; Kwon, W.; Crutcher, R. M.; Looney, L. W.; Novak, G.; Chapman, N. L.; Matthews, B. C.; Stephens, I. W.; Tobin, J. J.; Jones, T. J.

    2014-12-20

    For the Class 0 protostar L1527 we compare 131 polarization vectors from SCUPOL/JCMT, SHARP/CSO, and TADPOL/CARMA observations with the corresponding model polarization vectors of four ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, cloud core collapse models. These four models differ by their initial magnetic fields before collapse; two initially have aligned fields (strong and weak) and two initially have orthogonal fields (strong and weak) with respect to the rotation axis of the L1527 core. Only the initial weak orthogonal field model produces the observed circumstellar disk within L1527. This is a characteristic of nearly all ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, core collapse models. In this paper we test whether this weak orthogonal model also has the best agreement between its magnetic field structure and that inferred from the polarimetry observations of L1527. We found that this is not the case; based on the polarimetry observations, the most favored model of the four is the weak aligned model. However, this model does not produce a circumstellar disk, so our result implies that a nonturbulent, ideal-MHD global collapse model probably does not represent the core collapse that has occurred in L1527. Our study also illustrates the importance of using polarization vectors covering a large area of a cloud core to determine the initial magnetic field orientation before collapse; the inner core magnetic field structure can be highly altered by a collapse, and so measurements from this region alone can give unreliable estimates of the initial field configuration before collapse.

  16. Neutral stellar winds that drive bipolar outflows in low-mass protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizano, Susana; Heiles, Carl; Koo, Bon-Ghul; Shu, Frank H.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    1988-01-01

    The Arecibo radio telescope at the 21-cm line of atomic hydrogen has been used to detect a neutral atomic wind in the bipolar flow source HH 7-11. An atomic mass of about 0.015 solar associated with the rapidly flowing gas is deduced. The stellar mass-loss rate is roughly 3 x 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr if the crossing time of the decelerating wind is 5000 yr. The excess emission in the H I line core gives a total duration of the outflow of about 70,000 yr. A detailed analysis of the H I line shape yields a reasonable deceleration rate for the atomic wind if the stellar wind continuously entrains ambient molecular gas as it propagates from the protostar. A stellar wind with the described characteristics and a terminal velocity of 170 km/s would be more than sufficient to drive the known extended CO bipolar outflow in HH 7-11.

  17. A symmetrically pulsed jet of gas from an invisible protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Zinnecker, H; McCaughrean, M J; Rayner, J T

    1998-08-27

    Young stars are thought to accumulate most of their mass through an accretion disk, which channels the gas and dust of a collapsing cloud onto the central protostellar object. The rotational and magnetic forces in the star-disk system often produce high-velocity jets of outflowing gas. These jets can in principle be used to study the accretion and ejection history of the system, which is hidden from direct view by the dust and dense gas of the parent cloud. But the structures of these jets are often too complex to determine which features arise at the source and which are the result of subsequent interactions with the surrounding gas. Here we present infrared observations of a very young jet driven by an invisible protostar in the vicinity of the Horsehead nebula in Orion. These observations reveal a sequence of geyser-like eruptions occurring at quasi-regular intervals and with near-perfect mirror symmetry either side of the source. This symmetry is strong evidence that such features must be associated with the formation of the jet, probably related to recurrent or even chaotic instabilities in the accretion disk.

  18. COMBINED ANALYSIS OF IMAGES AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF TAURUS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gomez, Mercedes; Whitney, Barbara A.; Robitaille, Thomas P. E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.ed E-mail: trobitaille@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-15

    We present an analysis of spectral energy distributions (SEDs), near- and mid-infrared images, and Spitzer spectra of eight embedded Class I/II objects in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. The initial model for each source was chosen using the grid of young stellar objects (YSOs) and SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al. Then the models were refined using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. to fit both the spectra and the infrared images of these objects. In general, our models agree with previous published analyses. However, our combined models should provide more reliable determinations of the physical and geometrical parameters since they are derived from SEDs, including the Spitzer spectra, covering the complete spectral range; and high-resolution near-infrared and Spitzer IRAC images. The combination of SED and image modeling better constrains the different components (central source, disk, envelope) of the YSOs. Our derived luminosities are higher, on average, than previous estimates because we account for the viewing angles (usually nearly edge-on) of most of the sources. Our analysis suggests that the standard rotating collapsing protostar model with disks and bipolar cavities works well for the analyzed sample of objects in the Taurus molecular cloud.

  19. Unraveling the 10 micron "silicate" feature of protostars: the detection of frozen interstellar ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Faraji, H.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present infrared spectra of four embedded protostars in the 750-1230 cm-1 (13.3-8.1 microns) range. For NGC 7538 IRS 9, a new band is reported at 1110 cm-1 (9.01 microns, and several others may be present near 785, 820, 900, 1030, and 1075 cm-1 (12.7, 12.2, 11.1, 9.71, and 9.30 microns). The band 1110 cm-1 is attributed to frozen NH3. Its position and width imply that the NH3 is frozen in a polar, H2O-rich interstellar ice component. The NH3/H2O ice ratio inferred for NGC 7538 IRS 9 is 0.1, making NH3 as important a component as CH3OH and CO2 in the polar ices along this line of sight. At these concentrations, hydrogen bonding between the NH3 and H2O can account for much of the enigmatic low-frequency wing on the 3240 cm-1 (3.09 microns) H2O interstellar ice band. The strength of the implied NH3 deformation fundamental at 1624 cm-1 (6.158 microns) can also account for the absorption at this position reported by ISO.

  20. PROTOSTARS AND STARS IN THE CORONET CLUSTER: AGE, EVOLUTION, AND CLUSTER STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Kainulainen, Jouni; Roccatagliata, Veronica

    2011-08-01

    We present new optical spectroscopy with the FLAMES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), near-IR imaging with VLT/HAWK-I, and 870 {mu}m mapping with APEX/LABOCA of the Coronet cluster. The optical data allow us to estimate spectral types, extinction, and the presence of accretion in 6 more M-type members, in addition to the 12 that we had previously studied. The submillimeter maps and near-IR data reveal the presence of nebular structures and high extinction regions, which are in some cases associated to known IR, optical, and X-ray sources. Most star formation is associated to two elongated structures crossing in the central part of the cluster. Placing all the 18 objects with known spectral types and extinction in an H-R diagram suggests that the cluster is younger than previously thought (<2 Myr, and probably {approx}0.5-1 Myr). The new age estimate is in agreement with the evolutionary status of the various protostars in the region and with its compactness (<1.3 pc across), but results in a conflict with the low disk and accretion fraction (only 50%-65% of low-mass stars appear to have protoplanetary disks, and most transitional and homologously depleted disks are consistent with no accretion) and with the evolutionary features observed in the mid-IR spectra and spectral energy distributions of the disks.

  1. Star formation in a turbulent framework: from giant molecular clouds to protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    Turbulence is thought to be a primary driving force behind the early stages of star formation. In this framework large, self-gravitating, turbulent clouds fragment into smaller clouds which in turn fragment into even smaller ones. At the end of this cascade we find the clouds which collapse into protostars. Following this process is extremely challenging numerically due to the large dynamical range, so in this paper we propose a semi-analytic framework which is able to model star formation from the largest, giant molecular cloud scale, to the final protostellar size scale. Because of the simplicity of the framework it is ideal for theoretical experimentation to explore the principal processes behind different aspects of star formation, at the cost of introducing strong assumptions about the collapse process. The basic version of the model discussed in this paper only contains turbulence, gravity and crude assumptions about feedback; nevertheless it can reproduce the observed core mass function and provide the protostellar system mass function (PSMF), which shows a striking resemblance to the observed initial mass function (IMF), if a non-negligible fraction of gravitational energy goes into turbulence. Furthermore we find that to produce a universal IMF protostellar feedback must be taken into account otherwise the PSMF peak shows a strong dependence on the background temperature.

  2. A symmetrically pulsed jet of gas from an invisible protostar in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, Hans; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Rayner, John T.

    1998-08-01

    Young stars are thought to accumulate most of their mass through an accretion disk, which channels the gas and dust of a collapsing cloud onto the central protostellar object. The rotational and magnetic forces in the star-disk system often produce high-velocity jets of outflowing gas. These jets can in principle be used to study the accretion and ejection history of the system, which is hidden from direct view by the dust and dense gas of the parent cloud. But the structures of these jets are often too complex to determine which features arise at the source and which are the result of subsequent interactions with the surrounding gas. Here we present infrared observations of a very young jet driven by an invisible protostar in the vicinity of the Horsehead nebula in Orion. These observations reveal a sequence of geyser-like eruptions occurring at quasi-regular intervals and with near-perfect mirror symmetry either side of the source. This symmetry is strong evidence that such features must be associated with the formation of the jet, probably related to recurrent or even chaotic instabilities in the accretion disk.

  3. A Cluster of Class 0 Protostars in Serpens: an IRAS HIRES Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, Robert L.; Barsony, Mary

    1996-03-01

    We present new 12, 25, 60, and 100 mu m high-resolution--processed (HIRES-processed) IRAS images of the nearby Serpens star-forming cloud core at FWHM resolutions of ~30"--1'. We use HIRES-processed point-source models of the IRAS emission to derive new flux values and flux upper limits for all the protostellar candidates in the Serpens core. Our fluxes (and flux upper limits) determine the spectral energy distributions necessary to derive the dust temperature, circumstellar mass, bolometric luminosity, and evolutionary status of each protostellar candidate. Remarkably, we find all five sources studied by Hurt, Barsony, & Wootten, FIRS 1, SMM 4, S68N, SMM 3, and SMM 2, to share the defining characteristics of class 0 protostars, the short-lived (a few times 104 yr), earliest observable protostellar stage. We can also set an upper limit of 8 L⊙ on the preoutburst bolometric luminosity of the recently discovered "FU Ori" source in this region.

  4. Unraveling the 10 micron "silicate" feature of protostars: the detection of frozen interstellar ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Faraji, H.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present infrared spectra of four embedded protostars in the 750-1230 cm-1 (13.3-8.1 microns) range. For NGC 7538 IRS 9, a new band is reported at 1110 cm-1 (9.01 microns, and several others may be present near 785, 820, 900, 1030, and 1075 cm-1 (12.7, 12.2, 11.1, 9.71, and 9.30 microns). The band 1110 cm-1 is attributed to frozen NH3. Its position and width imply that the NH3 is frozen in a polar, H2O-rich interstellar ice component. The NH3/H2O ice ratio inferred for NGC 7538 IRS 9 is 0.1, making NH3 as important a component as CH3OH and CO2 in the polar ices along this line of sight. At these concentrations, hydrogen bonding between the NH3 and H2O can account for much of the enigmatic low-frequency wing on the 3240 cm-1 (3.09 microns) H2O interstellar ice band. The strength of the implied NH3 deformation fundamental at 1624 cm-1 (6.158 microns) can also account for the absorption at this position reported by ISO.

  5. Observing the Circumstellar Environment of the Eruptive FUor/EXor Protostar V1647 Ori with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Cieza, Lucas A.; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fu Ori (FUor) and EXor objects represent a short-lived stage of protostellar evolution characterized by intense mass accretion events which cause extreme variability in the form of outbursts. While it is well demonstrated that these objects exhibit sudden outbursts (ΔV~2-6), the mechanism causing such variability is not well understood. High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the circumstellar environment of these objects are essential to distinguish between different outbursting mechanisms. We present ALMA observations of the FUor/EXor object V1647 Ori as part of an ALMA campaign, which has observed a combined eight FUor and EXor type objects. Deeply embedded in the dark cloud LDN 1630 (L1630), V1647 Ori is one of a few FUor/EXor objects to have been extensively studied at multiple wavelengths before, during and after an outburst. We present preliminary results derived from ALMA 12CO, 13CO, C18O and continuum observations of the circumstellar environment of V1647 Ori. By measuring gas/dust masses and gas kinematics of the circumstellar disk, we investigate the potential mechanisms producing variability in these eruptive protostars during an essential, yet rarely observed, stage of pre-main sequence stellar evolution.

  6. The dependence of protostar formation on the geometry and strength of the initial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin T.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2017-05-01

    We report results from 12 simulations of the collapse of a molecular cloud core to form one or more protostars, comprising three field strengths (mass-to-flux ratios, μ, of 5, 10 and 20) and four field geometries (with values of the angle between the field and rotation axes, ϑ, of 0°, 20°, 45° and 90°), using a smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics method. We find that the values of both parameters have a strong effect on the resultant protostellar system and outflows. This ranges from the formation of binary systems when μ = 20 to strikingly differing outflow structures for differing values of ϑ, in particular highly suppressed outflows when ϑ = 90°. Misaligned magnetic fields can also produce warped pseudo-discs where the outer regions align perpendicular to the magnetic field but the innermost region re-orientates to be perpendicular to the rotation axis. We follow the collapse to sizes comparable to those of first cores and find that none of the outflow speeds exceed 8 km s-1. These results may place constraints on both observed protostellar outflows and also on which molecular cloud cores may eventually form either single stars or binaries: a sufficiently weak magnetic field may allow for disc fragmentation, whilst conversely the greater angular momentum transport of a strong field may inhibit disc fragmentation.

  7. Submillimeter continuum observations of Rho Ophiuchi A - The candidate protostar VLA 1623 and prestellar clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Philippe; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Barsony, Mary

    1993-03-01

    Submillimeter continuum mapping of the Rho Ophiuchi A cloud core reveals four compact clumps with masses less than about 1 solar mass embedded in an arcshaped ridge of total mass about 15 solar, lying at the edge of the compact H II region around the B3 star S1. Three of the clumps appear amorphous in shape and are probably prestellar in nature. The fourth clump is the best defined and coldest and coincides with the young stellar object (YSO) VLA 1623. It is suggested that this object is a protostar whose circumstellar material is distributed in a 'cored-apple' envelope. The density gradient appears to be that of a centrally heated envelope or of an isothermal envelope with no central heating object. The mass ejection of VLA 1623 appears to be extremely efficient and implies that a global MHD approach to infall and outflow may be required to explain the youngest embedded sources. It is suggested that VLA 1623 and a few other low-luminosity YSOs make up an entirely new class of YSOs.

  8. Quantifying Nitrogen Isotope Enrichment Around the Young Protostar Chamaeleon MMS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Smith, Robert G.; Charnley, Steven; Milam, Stefanie; gilles, adande; Wirstrom, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many Solar System objects, including meteorites and comets. It has been hypothesised that `anomalous' 14N/15N ratios in Solar System bodies could be the result of incorporation of relatively pristine (unprocessed) interstellar material that predates the formation of the Solar System, but to-date there have been very few accurate measurements of the 14N/15N ratios in interstellar matter to test this idea. Current astrochemical models for dense interstellar clouds predict time-variable 14N/15N ratios for ammonia in the range 100-800, which can provide an explanation for the 15N enrichments observed in meteoritic samples, as well as providing a chemical clock to help trace the evolutionary state of star-forming gas. In this proposal we aim to make an accurate measurement of the 14NH3/15NH3 ratio in the envelope of the very young protostar Chamaeleon MMS1 in order to provide a test for our understanding of nitrogen fractionation chemistry during the earliest stages of star formation, and thus help inform theories concerning the possible incorporation of interstellar material into Solar System bodies.

  9. Inconsistency of topologically massive hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.; Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    The coupled topologically massive spin-5/2 gravity system in D = 3 dimensions whose kinematics represents dynamical propagating gauge invariant massive spin-5/2 and spin-2 excitations, is shown to be inconsistent, or equivalently, not locally hypersymmetric. In contrast to D = 4, the local constraints on the system arising from failure of the fermionic Bianchi identities do not involve the 'highest spin' components of the field, but rather the auxiliary spinor required to construct a consistent massive model.

  10. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same ‘minimal’ bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new ‘minimal massive gravity’ has both a positive energy graviton and positive central charges for the asymptotic AdS-boundary conformal algebra.

  11. A catalog of extended green objects in the Glimpse survey: A new sample of massive young stellar object outflow candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Holden, E.; Braden, E.; Churchwell, E.; Babler, B. L.; Meade, M. R.; Povich, M. S.; Whitney, B. A.; Brogan, C. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Watson, D. F.; Benjamin, R.; Gomez, M.; Robitaille, T. P.; Watson, C. E-mail: bwhitney@spacescience.org

    2008-12-01

    Using images from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE), we have identified more than 300 extended 4.5 μm sources (Extended Green Objects (EGOs), for the common coding of the [4.5] band as green in three-color composite InfraRed Array Camera images). We present a catalog of these EGOs, including integrated flux density measurements at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 μm from GLIMPSE and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey. The average angular separation between a source in our sample and the nearest IRAS point source is greater than 1'. The majority of EGOs are associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), and where high-resolution 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys overlap the GLIMPSE coverage, EGOs and 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers are strongly correlated. Extended 4.5 μm emission is thought to trace shocked molecular gas in protostellar outflows; the association of EGOs with IRDCs and 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers suggests that the extended 4.5 μm emission may pinpoint outflows specifically from massive protostars. The mid-IR colors of EGOs lie in regions of color-color space occupied by young protostars still embedded in infalling envelopes.

  12. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  13. A ∼0.2-solar-mass protostar with a Keplerian disk in the very young L1527 IRS system.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John J; Hartmann, Lee; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Wilner, David J; Looney, Leslie W; Loinard, Laurent; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola

    2012-12-06

    In their earliest stages, protostars accrete mass from their surrounding envelopes through circumstellar disks. Until now, the smallest observed protostar-to-envelope mass ratio was about 2.1 (ref. 1). The protostar L1527 IRS is thought to be in the earliest stages of star formation. Its envelope contains about one solar mass of material within a radius of about 0.05 parsecs (refs 3, 4), and earlier observations suggested the presence of an edge-on disk. Here we report observations of dust continuum emission and (13)CO (rotational quantum number J = 2 → 1) line emission from the disk around L1527 IRS, from which we determine a protostellar mass of 0.19 ± 0.04 solar masses and a protostar-to-envelope mass ratio of about 0.2. We conclude that most of the luminosity is generated through the accretion process, with an accretion rate of about 6.6 × 10(-7) solar masses per year. If it has been accreting at that rate through much of its life, its age is approximately 300,000 years, although theory suggests larger accretion rates earlier, so it may be younger. The presence of a rotationally supported disk is confirmed, and significantly more mass may be added to its planet-forming region as well as to the protostar itself in the future.

  14. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  15. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings.

  16. Magnetospheres of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küker, M.

    We study the interaction of line-driven winds from massive stars with the magnetic field rooted in these stars by carrying out numerical simulations using the Nirvana MHD code in 2D in spherical polar coordinates. The code's adaptive mesh refinement feature allows high spatial resolution across the whole simulation box. We study both O and Wolf-Rayet stars for a range of magnetic field strengths from weak to strong as measured by the confinement parameter. For weak fields our simulations show that the initially dipolar field opens up far away from the star and a thin disk-like structure forms in the equatorial plane of the magnetic field. For stronger fields the disk is disrupted close to the stellar surface and closed field lines persist at low latitudes. For very strong fields a pronounced magnetosphere forms where the gas is forced to move along the field lines and eventually falls back to the stellar surface.

  17. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  18. Complex Organic Molecules tracing shocks along the outflow cavity in the high-mass protostar IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Walsh, Catherine; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Girart, Josep M.; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Fuente, Asunción; Zapata, Luis A.; Neri, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We report on subarcsecond observations of complex organic molecules (COMs) in the high-mass protostar IRAS 20126+4104 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in its most extended configurations. In addition to the simple molecules SO, HNCO and H_2^{13}CO, we detect emission from CH3CN, CH3OH, HCOOH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CH2CN, CH3COCH3, NH2CN, and (CH2OH)2. SO and HNCO present a X-shaped morphology consistent with tracing the outflow cavity walls. Most of the COMs have their peak emission at the putative position of the protostar, but also show an extension towards the south(east), coinciding with an H2 knot from the jet at about 800-1000 au from the protostar. This is especially clear in the case of H_2^{13}CO and CH3OCH3. We fitted the spectra at representative positions for the disc and the outflow, and found that the abundances of most COMs are comparable at both positions, suggesting that COMs are enhanced in shocks as a result of the passage of the outflow. By coupling a parametric shock model to a large gas-grain chemical network including COMs, we find that the observed COMs should survive in the gas phase for ˜2000 yr, comparable to the shock lifetime estimated from the water masers at the outflow position. Overall, our data indicate that COMs in IRAS 20126+4104 may arise not only from the disc, but also from dense and hot regions associated with the outflow.

  19. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS TOWARD CANDIDATE LOW-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Dunham, Michael M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of nine candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L{sub int} {<=} 0.1 L{sub Sun }). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope cataloged by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star-forming regions. Each object was observed in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J = 2 {yields} 1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30'' resolution. Using five-point grid maps, we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A-IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A-IRS3 outflow is detected but not re-mapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with the kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.

  20. Complex organic molecules tracing shocks along the outflow cavity in the high-mass protostar IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Walsh, Catherine; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Girart, Josep M.; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Fuente, Asunción; Zapata, Luis A.; Neri, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We report on subarcsecond observations of complex organic molecules (COMs) in the high-mass protostar IRAS 20126+4104 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in its most extended configurations. In addition to the simple molecules SO, HNCO and H213CO, we detect emission from CH3CN, CH3OH, HCOOH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CH2CN, CH3COCH3, NH2CN and (CH2OH)2. SO and HNCO present a X-shaped morphology consistent with tracing the outflow cavity walls. Most of the COMs have their peak emission at the putative position of the protostar, but also show an extension towards the south(east), coinciding with an H2 knot from the jet at about 800-1000 au from the protostar. This is especially clear in the case of H213CO and CH3OCH3. We fitted the spectra at representative positions for the disc and the outflow, and found that the abundances of most COMs are comparable at both positions, suggesting that COMs are enhanced in shocks as a result of the passage of the outflow. By coupling a parametric shock model to a large gas-grain chemical network including COMs, we find that the observed COMs should survive in the gas phase for ˜2000 yr, comparable to the shock lifetime estimated from the water masers at the outflow position. Overall, our data indicate that COMs in IRAS 20126+4104 may arise not only from the disc, but also from dense and hot regions associated with the outflow.

  1. X-Ray Flares and Mass Outflows Driven by Magnetic Interaction between a Protostar and Its Surrounding Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M. R.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    1996-09-01

    We propose a model of hard X-ray flares in protostars observed by the ASCA satellite. We assumed that the dipole magnetic field of the protostar threads the protostellar disk and carried out 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. As the twist accumulates, magnetic loops expand and finally approach the open field configuration. A current sheet is formed inside the expanding loops. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet. Outgoing magnetic island and postflare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. The timescale of this "flare" is the order of the rotation period of the disk. The released magnetic energy partly goes into the thermal energy and heats up the flaring plasma up to 108 K. The length of the flaring loop is several times the radius of the central star, consistent with observations. The speed of the hot plasmoid ejected by the reconnection is 200--400 km s-1 when the footpoint of the loop is at 0.03 AU from 1 Msolar protostar. The hot plasma outflow can explain the speed and mass flow rate of optical jets. Dense, cold, magnetically accelerated wind (v ~ 150--250 km s-1) emanates from the surface of the disk along the partially open magnetic field lines threading the disk. This dense, cold wind may correspond to high-velocity neutral winds.

  2. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  3. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10{sup –10}. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  4. The Class 0 Protostar BHR71: Herschel Observations and Dust Continuum Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao-Lun; Evans, Neal J., II; Green, Joel D.; Dunham, Michael M.; Jørgensen, Jes K.

    2017-02-01

    We use Herschel spectrophotometry of BHR71, an embedded Class 0 protostar, to provide new constraints on its physical properties. We detect 645 (non-unique) spectral lines among all spatial pixels. At least 61 different spectral lines originate from the central region. A CO rotational diagram analysis shows four excitation temperature components, 43, 197, 397, and 1057 K. Low-J CO lines trace the outflow while the high-J CO lines are centered on the infrared source. The low-excitation emission lines of {{{H}}}2{{O}} trace the large-scale outflow, while the high-excitation emission lines trace a small-scale distribution around the equatorial plane. We model the envelope structure using the dust radiative transfer code, hyperion, incorporating rotational collapse, an outer static envelope, outflow cavity, and disk. The evolution of a rotating collapsing envelope can be constrained by the far-infrared/millimeter spectral energy distribution along with the azimuthally averaged radial intensity profile, and the structure of the outflow cavity plays a critical role at shorter wavelengths. Emission at 20-40 μm requires a cavity with a constant-density inner region and a power-law density outer region. The best-fit model has an envelope mass of 19 {M}⊙ inside a radius of 0.315 pc and a central luminosity of 18.8 {L}⊙ . The time since collapse began is 24,630-44,000 years, most likely around 36,000 years. The corresponding mass infall rate in the envelope (1.2 × 10-5 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1) is comparable to the stellar mass accretion rate, while the mass-loss rate estimated from the CO outflow is 20% of the stellar mass accretion rate. We find no evidence for episodic accretion.

  5. Dynamical structure of the inner 100 AU of the deeply embedded protostar IRAS 16293–2422

    SciTech Connect

    Favre, Cécile; Field, David; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Brinch, Christian; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Frieswijk, Wilfred W. F.

    2014-07-20

    A fundamental question about the early evolution of low-mass protostars is when circumstellar disks may form. High angular resolution observations of molecular transitions in the (sub)millimeter wavelength windows make it possible to investigate the kinematics of the gas around newly formed stars, for example, to identify the presence of rotation and infall. IRAS 16293–2422 was observed with the extended Submillimeter Array (eSMA) resulting in subarcsecond resolution (0.''46 × 0.''29, i.e., ∼55 × 35 AU) images of compact emission from the C{sup 17}O (3-2) and C{sup 34}S (7-6) transitions at 337 GHz (0.89 mm). To recover the more extended emission we have combined the eSMA data with SMA observations of the same molecules. The emission of C{sup 17}O (3-2) and C{sup 34}S (7-6) both show a velocity gradient oriented along a northeast-southwest direction with respect to the continuum marking the location of one of the components of the binary, IRAS 16293A. Our combined eSMA and SMA observations show that the velocity field on the 50-400 AU scales is consistent with a rotating structure. It cannot be explained by simple Keplerian rotation around a single point mass but rather needs to take into account the enclosed envelope mass at the radii where the observed lines are excited. We suggest that IRAS 16293–2422 could be among the best candidates to observe a pseudo-disk with future high angular resolution observations.

  6. PTF10nvg: An Outbursting Class I Protostar in the Pelican/North American Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Miller, Adam A.; Poznanski, Dovi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Fischer, William; Rayner, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Law, Nicholas M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Agüeros, Marcel; Dekany, Richard G.; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Quimby, Robert M.; Nugent, Peter; Jacobsen, Janet; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Khanh; McKenna, Dan; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Klein, Christopher

    2011-02-01

    During a synoptic survey of the North American Nebula region, the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) detected an optical outburst (dubbed PTF10nvg) associated with the previously unstudied flat or rising spectrum infrared source IRAS 20496+4354. The PTF R-band light curve reveals that PTF10nvg brightened by more than 5 mag during the current outburst, rising to a peak magnitude of R PTF ≈ 13.5 in 2010 September. Follow-up observations indicate that PTF10nvg has undergone a similar ~5 mag brightening in the K band and possesses a rich emission-line spectrum, including numerous lines commonly assumed to trace mass accretion and outflows. Many of these lines are blueshifted by ~175 km s-1 from the North American Nebula's rest velocity, suggesting that PTF10nvg is driving an outflow. Optical spectra of PTF10nvg show several TiO/VO band heads fully in emission, indicating the presence of an unusual amount of dense (>1010 cm-3), warm (1500-4000 K) circumstellar material. Near-infrared spectra of PTF10nvg appear quite similar to a spectrum of McNeil's Nebula/V1647 Ori, a young star which has undergone several brightenings in recent decades, and 06297+1021W, a Class I protostar with a similarly reached near-infrared emission line spectrum. While further monitoring is required to fully understand this event, we conclude that the brightening of PTF10nvg is indicative of enhanced accretion and outflow in this Class-I-type protostellar object, similar to the behavior of V1647 Ori in 2004-2005.

  7. Formation of the Unequal-mass Binary Protostars in L1551NE by Rotationally driven Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Yeung, Paul K. H.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saigo, Kazuya

    2016-11-01

    We present observations at 7 mm that fully resolve the two circumstellar disks and a reanalysis of archival observations at 3.5 cm that resolve along their major axes the two ionized jets of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551NE. We show that the two circumstellar disks are better fit by a shallow inner and steep outer power law than a truncated power law. The two disks have very different transition radii between their inner and outer regions of ∼18.6 au and ∼8.9 au, respectively. Assuming that they are intrinsically circular and geometrically thin, we find that the two circumstellar disks are parallel with each other and orthogonal in projection to their respective ionized jets. Furthermore, the two disks are closely aligned if not parallel with their circumbinary disk. Over an interval of ∼10 yr, source B (possessing the circumsecondary disk) has moved northward with respect to and likely away from source A, indicating an orbital motion in the same direction as the rotational motion of their circumbinary disk. All the aforementioned elements therefore share the same axis for their angular momentum, indicating that L1551NE is a product of rotationally driven fragmentation of its parental core. Assuming a circular orbit, the relative disk sizes are compatible with theoretical predictions for tidal truncation by a binary system having a mass ratio of ∼0.2, in agreement with the reported relative separations of the two protostars from the center of their circumbinary disk. The transition radii of both disks, however, are a factor of ≳1.5 smaller than their predicted tidally truncated radii.

  8. CONTINUUM VARIABILITY OF DEEPLY EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS AS A PROBE OF ENVELOPE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, Doug; Hendricks, Benjamin; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Bruderer, Simon E-mail: gherczeg1@gmail.com

    2013-03-10

    Stars may be assembled in large growth spurts; however the evidence for this hypothesis is circumstantial. Directly studying the accretion at the earliest phases of stellar growth is challenging because young stars are deeply embedded in optically thick envelopes, which have spectral energy distributions that peak in the far-IR, where observations are difficult. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of detecting accretion outbursts from these younger stars by investigating the timescales for how the protostellar envelope responds to changes in the emission properties of the central source. The envelope heats up in response to an outburst, brightening at all wavelengths and with the emission peak moving to shorter wavelengths. The timescale for this change depends on the time for dust grains to heat and re-emit photons and the time required for the energy to escape the inner, optically thick portion of the envelope. We find that the dust response time is much shorter than the photon propagation time and thus the timescale over which the emission varies is set by time delays imposed by geometry. These times are hours to days near the peak of the spectral energy distribution and weeks to months in the sub-mm. The ideal location to quickly detect continuum variability is therefore in the mid- to far-IR, near the peak of the spectral energy distribution, where the change in emission amplitude is largest. Searching for variability in sub-mm continuum emission is also feasible, though with a longer time separation and a weaker relationship between the amount of detected emission amplitude and change in central source luminosity. Such observations would constrain accretion histories of protostars and would help to trace the disk/envelope instabilities that lead to stellar growth.

  9. GAS GAPS IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND THE YOUNG PROTOSTAR HL TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Gu, Pin-Gao; Hirano, Naomi; Lee, Chin-Fei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Puspitaningrum, Evaria

    2016-04-01

    We have analyzed the HCO{sup +} (1–0) data of the Class I–II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO{sup +} image cube at an angular resolution of ∼0.″07 (∼10 au) and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO{sup +} integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ∼28 and ∼69 au and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO{sup +} gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 au. The outer HCO{sup +} gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 au and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 and 74 au. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO{sup +} gas. We derived the HCO{sup +} column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the FWHM widths of the inner and outer HCO{sup +} gaps are both estimated to be ∼14 au, and their depths are estimated to be ∼2.4 and ∼5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.

  10. Protostars and Stars in the Coronet Cluster: Age, Evolution, and Cluster Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Kainulainen, Jouni; Roccatagliata, Veronica

    2011-08-01

    We present new optical spectroscopy with the FLAMES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), near-IR imaging with VLT/HAWK-I, and 870 μm mapping with APEX/LABOCA of the Coronet cluster. The optical data allow us to estimate spectral types, extinction, and the presence of accretion in 6 more M-type members, in addition to the 12 that we had previously studied. The submillimeter maps and near-IR data reveal the presence of nebular structures and high extinction regions, which are in some cases associated to known IR, optical, and X-ray sources. Most star formation is associated to two elongated structures crossing in the central part of the cluster. Placing all the 18 objects with known spectral types and extinction in an H-R diagram suggests that the cluster is younger than previously thought (<2 Myr, and probably ~0.5-1 Myr). The new age estimate is in agreement with the evolutionary status of the various protostars in the region and with its compactness (<1.3 pc across), but results in a conflict with the low disk and accretion fraction (only 50%-65% of low-mass stars appear to have protoplanetary disks, and most transitional and homologously depleted disks are consistent with no accretion) and with the evolutionary features observed in the mid-IR spectra and spectral energy distributions of the disks. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal IDs: 081.C-0204(A), 083.C-0079(A), and 083.C-0079(B)).

  11. The complex chemistry of outflow cavity walls exposed: the case of low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2015-08-01

    Complex organic molecules are ubiquitous companions of young low-mass protostars. Recent observations suggest that their emission stems, not only from the traditional hot corino, but also from offset positions. In this work, 2D physicochemical modelling of an envelope-cavity system is carried out. Wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations are performed and a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is used to simulate the physical and chemical structure. The morphology of the system delineates three distinct regions: the cavity wall layer with time-dependent and species-variant enhancements; a torus rich in complex organic ices, but not reflected in gas-phase abundances and the remaining outer envelope abundant in simpler solid and gaseous molecules. Strongly irradiated regions, such as the cavity wall layer, are subject to frequent photodissociation in the solid phase. Subsequent recombination of the photoproducts leads to frequent reactive desorption, causing gas-phase enhancements of several orders of magnitude. This mechanism remains to be quantified with laboratory experiments. Direct photodesorption is found to be relatively inefficient. If radicals are not produced directly in the icy mantle, the formation of complex organics is impeded. For efficiency, a sufficient number of FUV photons needs to penetrate the envelope, and elevated cool dust temperatures need to enable grain-surface radical mobility. As a result, a high stellar luminosity and a sufficiently wide cavity favour chemical complexity. Furthermore within this paradigm, complex organics are demonstrated to have unique lifetimes and be grouped into early (formaldehyde, ketene, methanol, formic acid, methyl formate, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) and late (acetaldehyde, dimethyl ether and ethanol) species.

  12. Gas Gaps in the Protoplanetary Disk around the Young Protostar HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Gu, Pin-Gao; Hirano, Naomi; Lee, Chin-Fei; Puspitaningrum, Evaria; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2016-04-01

    We have analyzed the HCO+ (1-0) data of the Class I-II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO+ image cube at an angular resolution of ˜0.″07 (˜10 au) and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO+ integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ˜28 and ˜69 au and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO+ gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 au. The outer HCO+ gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 au and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 and 74 au. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO+ gas. We derived the HCO+ column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the FWHM widths of the inner and outer HCO+ gaps are both estimated to be ˜14 au, and their depths are estimated to be ˜2.4 and ˜5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.

  13. Change in the chemical composition of infalling gas forming a disk around a protostar.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Vastel, Charlotte; Coutens, Audrey; Taquet, Vianney; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-03-06

    IRAS 04368+2557 is a solar-type (low-mass) protostar embedded in a protostellar core (L1527) in the Taurus molecular cloud, which is only 140 parsecs away from Earth, making it the closest large star-forming region. The protostellar envelope has a flattened shape with a diameter of a thousand astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), and is infalling and rotating. It also has a protostellar disk with a radius of 90 AU (ref. 6), from which a planetary system is expected to form. The interstellar gas, mainly consisting of hydrogen molecules, undergoes a change in density of about three orders of magnitude as it collapses from the envelope into the disk, while being heated from 10 kelvin to over 100 kelvin in the mid-plane, but it has hitherto not been possible to explore changes in chemical composition associated with this collapse. Here we report that the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule cyclic-C3H2 resides in the infalling rotating envelope, whereas sulphur monoxide (SO) is enhanced in the transition zone at the radius of the centrifugal barrier (100 ± 20 AU), which is the radius at which the kinetic energy of the infalling gas is converted to rotational energy. Such a drastic change in chemistry at the centrifugal barrier was not anticipated, but is probably caused by the discontinuous infalling motion at the centrifugal barrier and local heating processes there.

  14. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  15. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  16. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  17. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  18. Benchmarking massively parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeck, O.; Moore, J.; Simmons, M.; Wasserman, H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize some initial experiences related to measuring the performance of massively parallel processors (MPPs) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Actually, the range of MPP architectures the authors have used is rather limited, being confined mostly to the Thinking Machines Corporation (TMC) Connection Machine CM-2 and CM-5. Some very preliminary work has been carried out on the Kendall Square KSR-1, and efforts related to other machines, such as the Intel Paragon and the soon-to-be-released CRAY T3D are planned. This paper will concentrate more on methodology rather than discuss specific architectural strengths and weaknesses; the latter is expected to be the subject of future reports. MPP benchmarking is a field in critical need of structure and definition. As the authors have stated previously, such machines have enormous potential, and there is certainly a dire need for orders of magnitude computational power over current supercomputers. However, performance reports for MPPs must emphasize actual sustainable performance from real applications in a careful, responsible manner. Such has not always been the case. A recent paper has described in some detail, the problem of potentially misleading performance reporting in the parallel scientific computing field. Thus, in this paper, the authors briefly offer a few general ideas on MPP performance analysis.

  19. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  20. Chemical differentiation in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, S. D.; Charnley, S. B.

    2001-01-01

    We have reexamined the origin of the apparent differentiation between nitrogen-bearing molecules and complex oxygen-bearing molecules that is observed in hot molecular cores associated with massive protostars. Observations show that methanol is an ubiquitous and abundant component of protostellar ices. Recent observations suggest that ammonia may constitute an appreciable fraction of the ices toward some sources. In contrast to previous theories that suggested that N/O differentiation was caused by an anticorrelation between methanol and ammonia in the precursor grain mantles, we show that the presence of ammonia in mantles and the core temperature are key quantities in determining N/O differentiation. Calculations are presented which show that when large amounts of ammonia are evaporated alkyl cation transfer reactions are suppressed and the abundances of complex O-bearing organic molecules greatly reduced. Cooler cores (100 K) eventually evolve to an oxygen-rich chemical state similar to that attained when no ammonia was injected, but on a timescale that is an order of magnitude longer (10(5) yr). Hotter cores (300 K) never evolve an O-rich chemistry unless ammonia is almost absent from the mantles. In this latter case, a complex O-rich chemistry develops on a timescale of 10(4) yr, as in previous models, but disappears in about 2 x 10(5) yr, after which time the core is rich in NH3, HCN, and other N-bearing molecules. There are thus two ways in which N-rich cores can occur. We briefly discuss the implications for the determination of hot-core ages and for explaining N/O differentiation in several well-studied sources.

  1. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  2. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION W49

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Hora, J. L.; Willis, S. E.; Koenig, X. P.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Saygac, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective of locating a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color–color and color–magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49, we analyzed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with ≥7 members is found to be 52% for a cutoff distance of 96″, and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star-forming regions and concluded that W49 has the richest population, with seven subclusters of YSOs.

  3. The Spectral Energy Distribution of the Earliest Phases of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Randolf; Cooper, Jennifer; Looney, Leslie; Henning, Thomas; Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Shenoy, Sachin

    2017-03-01

    We have selected cold and massive (M > 100M ⊙) cores as candidates for early phases of star formation from millimeter continuum surveys without associations at short wavelengths. We compared the millimeter continuum peak positions with IR and radio catalogs and excluded cores that had sources associated with the cores' peaks. We compiled a list of 173 cores in over 117 regions that are candidates for very early phases of Massive Star Formation (MSF). Now with the Spitzer and Herschel archives, these cores can be characterized further. We are compiling this data set to construct the complete spectral energy distribution (SED) in the mid- and far-infrared with good spatial resolution and broad spectral coverage. This allow us to disentangle the complex regions and model the SED of the deeply embedded protostars/clusters. We present a status report of our efforts: a preview of the IR properties of all cores and their embedded source inferred from a grey body fit to the compiled SEDs.

  4. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  5. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  6. Massive gravity in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K

    2009-05-22

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a special case, propagates the two spin-2 helicity states with different masses. We discuss the extension to massive N-extended supergravity, and we present a "cosmological" extension that admits an anti-de Sitter vacuum.

  7. An Extraordinary Outburst in the Massive Protostellar System NGC6334I-MM1: Quadrupling of the Millimeter Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; MacLeod, G.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Chibueze, J. O.; Friesen, R.; Indebetouw, R.; Thesner, C.; Young, K. H.

    2017-03-01

    Based on sub-arcsecond Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm continuum images of the massive protocluster NGC 6334I obtained in 2015 and 2008, we find that the dust emission from MM1 has increased by a factor of 4.0 ± 0.3 during the intervening years, and undergone a significant change in morphology. The continuum emission from the other cluster members (MM2, MM4, and the UCH ii region MM3 = NGC 6334F) has remained constant. Long-term single-dish maser monitoring at HartRAO finds that multiple maser species toward NGC 6334I flared beginning in early 2015, a few months before our ALMA observation, and some persist in that state. New ALMA images obtained in 2016 July–August at 1.1 and 0.87 mm confirm the changes with respect to SMA 0.87 mm images from 2008, and indicate that the (sub)millimeter flaring has continued for at least a year. The excess continuum emission, centered on the hypercompact H ii region MM1B, is extended and elongated (1.″6 × 1.″0 ≈ 2100 × 1300 au) with multiple peaks, suggestive of general heating of the surrounding subcomponents of MM1, some of which may trace clumps in a fragmented disk rather than separate protostars. In either case, these remarkable increases in maser and dust emission provide direct observational evidence of a sudden accretion event in the growth of a massive protostar yielding a sustained luminosity surge by a factor of 70 ± 20, analogous to the largest events in simulations by Meyer et al. This target provides an excellent opportunity to assess the impact of such a rare event on a protocluster over many years.

  8. 183 GHz H{sub 2}O MASER EMISSION AROUND THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR SERPENS SMM1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kempen, T. A.; Wilner, D.; Gurwell, M.

    2009-11-20

    We report the first interferometric detection of 183 GHz water emission in the low-mass protostar Serpens SMM1 using the Submillimeter Array with a resolution of 3'' and rms of approx7 Jy in a 3 km s{sup -1} bin. Due to the small size and high brightness of more than 240 Jy beam{sup -1}, it appears to be maser emission. In total, three maser spots were detected out to approx700 AU from the central protostar, lying along the redshifted outflow axis, outside the circumstellar disk but within the envelope region as evidenced by the continuum measurements. Two of the maser spots appear to be blueshifted by about 1-2 km s{sup -1}. No extended or compact thermal emission from a passively heated protostellar envelope was detected with a limit of 7 Jy (16 K), in agreement with recent modeling efforts. We propose that the maser spots originate within the cavity walls due to the interaction of the outflow jet with the surrounding protostellar envelope. Hydrodynamical models predict that such regions can be dense and warm enough to invert the 183 GHz water transition.

  9. The methanol lines and hot core of OMC2-FIR4, an intermediate-mass protostar, with Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Dominik, C.; Maret, S.; van der Tak, F.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Fuente, A.; Crimier, N.; Lord, S.; Bacmann, A.; Baudry, A.; Bell, T.; Benedettini, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A.; Bottinelli, S.; Cabrit, S.; Caselli, P.; Castets, A.; Cernicharo, J.; Codella, C.; Comito, C.; Coutens, A.; Demyk, K.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Gerin, M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Helmich, F.; Hennebelle, P.; Henning, T.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Jacq, T.; Kahane, C.; Klotz, A.; Langer, W.; Lefloch, B.; Lis, D.; Lorenzani, A.; Melnick, G.; Nisini, B.; Pacheco, S.; Pagani, L.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J.; Phillips, T.; Salez, M.; Saraceno, P.; Schilke, P.; Schuster, K.; Tielens, X.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Vastel, C.; Viti, S.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Yorke, H.; Cais, P.; Güsten, R.; Philipp, S.; Klein, T.; Helmich, F.

    2010-10-01

    In contrast with numerous studies on the physical and chemical structure of low- and high-mass protostars, much less is known about their intermediate-mass counterparts, a class of objects that could help to elucidate the mechanisms of star formation on both ends of the mass range. We present the first results from a rich HIFI spectral dataset on an intermediate-mass protostar, OMC2-FIR4, obtained in the CHESS (Chemical HErschel Survey of Star forming regions) key programme. The more than 100 methanol lines detected between 554 and 961 GHz cover a range in upper level energy of 40 to 540 K. Our physical interpretation focusses on the hot core, but likely the cold envelope and shocked regions also play a role in reality, because an analysis of the line profiles suggests the presence of multiple emission components. An upper limit of 10-6 is placed on the methanol abundance in the hot core, using a population diagram, large-scale source model and other considerations. This value is consistent with abundances previously seen in low-mass hot cores. Furthermore, the highest energy lines at the highest frequencies display asymmetric profiles, which may arise from infall around the hot core. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. FORMALDEHYDE AND METHANOL DEUTERATION IN PROTOSTARS: FOSSILS FROM A PAST FAST HIGH-DENSITY PRE-COLLAPSE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, V.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.

    2012-03-20

    Extremely high deuteration of several molecules has been observed around low-mass protostars for a decade. Among them, formaldehyde and methanol present particularly high deuteration, with observations of abundant doubly and triply deuterated forms. Both species are thought to be mainly formed on interstellar grains during the low-temperature and dense pre-collapse phase by H and D atom additions on the iced CO. We present here a theoretical study of the formaldehyde and methanol deuteration obtained with our gas-grain model, GRAINOBLE. This model takes into account the multilayer nature of the mantle and explores the robustness of the results against the uncertainties of poorly constrained chemical and surface model parameters. The comparison of the model predictions with the observations leads to two major results: (1) the observed high deuteration is obtained during the last phase of the pre-collapse stage, when the density reaches {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, and this phase is fast, lasting only several thousands years; and (2) D and H abstraction and substitution reactions are crucial in making up the observed deuteration ratios. This work shows the power of chemical composition as a tool to reconstruct the past history of protostars.

  11. Simulating A Massive, Mobile Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.; Kahn, Jon B.; Sprague, Benny B.

    1990-01-01

    Simulator replicates, kinematically and dynamically, mating of large, massive mobile structure with similarly large and massive fixed structure. Developed for testing berthing-and-latching mechanism. Fixed section holds active berthing-and-latching mechanism and its motor control system with optical encoder to maintain synchronization among four latches in mechanism. Tripodal load-cell network gathers data on load history of berthing operation, and infrared tracking system including light-emitting diodes produces data for position history.

  12. Dense and warm molecular gas in the envelopes and outflows of southern low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kempen, T. A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Güsten, R.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Observations of dense molecular gas lie at the basis of our understanding of the density and temperature structure of protostellar envelopes and molecular outflows. The Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) opens up the study of southern (Dec < -35circ) protostars. Aims: We aim to characterize the properties of the protostellar envelope, molecular outflow and surrounding cloud, through observations of high excitation molecular lines within a sample of 16 southern sources presumed to be embedded YSOs, including the most luminous Class I objects in Corona Australis and Chamaeleon. Methods: Observations of submillimeter lines of CO, HCO+ and their isotopologues, both single spectra and small maps (up to 80''× 80''), were taken with the FLASH and APEX-2a instruments mounted on APEX to trace the gas around the sources. The HARP-B instrument on the JCMT was used to map IRAS 15398-3359 in these lines. HCO+ mapping probes the presence of dense centrally condensed gas, a characteristic of protostellar envelopes. The rare isotopologues C18O and H13CO+ are also included to determine the optical depth, column density, and source velocity. The combination of multiple CO transitions, such as 3-2, 4-3 and 7-6, allows to constrain outflow properties, in particular the temperature. Archival submillimeter continuum data are used to determine envelope masses. Results: Eleven of the sixteen sources have associated warm and/or dense (≥ 106 cm-3) quiescent gas characteristic of protostellar envelopes, or an associated outflow. Using the strength and degree of concentration of the HCO+ 4-3 and CO 4-3 lines as a diagnostic, five sources classified as Class I based on their spectral energy distributions are found not to be embedded YSOs. The C18O 3-2 lines show that for none of the sources, foreground cloud layers are present. Strong molecular outflows are found around six sources, with outflow forces an order of magnitude higher than for previously studied Class I sources of

  13. The Evolution of the Multiplicity of Embedded Protostars. II. Binary Separation Distribution and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelley, Michael S.; Reipurth, Bo; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2008-06-01

    We present the Class I protostellar binary separation distribution based on the data tabulated in a companion paper. We verify the excess of Class I binary stars over solar-type main-sequence stars in the separation range from 500 AU to 4500 AU. Although our sources are in nearby star-forming regions distributed across the entire sky (including Orion), none of our objects are in a high stellar density environment. A log-normal function, used by previous authors to fit the main-sequence and T Tauri binary separation distributions, poorly fits our data, and we determine that a log-uniform function is a better fit. Our observations show that the binary separation distribution changes significantly during the Class I phase, and that the binary frequency at separations greater than 1000 AU declines steadily with respect to spectral index. Despite these changes, the binary frequency remains constant until the end of the Class I phase, when it drops sharply. We propose a scenario to account for the changes in the Class I binary separation distribution. This scenario postulates that a large number of companions with a separation greater than ~1000 AU were ejected during the Class 0 phase, but remain gravitationally bound due to the significant mass of the Class I envelope. As the envelope dissipates, these companions become unbound and the binary frequency at wide separations declines. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks are expected to play an important role in the orbital evolution at closer separations. This scenario predicts that a large number of Class 0 objects should be non-hierarchical multiple systems, and that many Class I young stellar objects (YSOs) with a widely separated companion should also have a very close companion. We also find that Class I protostars are not dynamically pristine, but have experienced dynamical evolution before they are visible as Class I objects. Our analysis shows that the Class I binary frequency and the binary separation

  14. The Evolution of the Multiplicity of Embedded Protostars. I. Sample Properties and Binary Detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelley, Michael S.; Reipurth, Bo; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2008-06-01

    We present the observational results of a near-infrared survey of a large sample of Class I protostars designed to determine the Class I binary separation distribution from ~100 AU to ~5000 AU. We have selected targets from a new sample of 267 nearby candidate Class I objects. This sample is well understood, consists of mostly Class I young stellar objects (YSOs) within 1 kpc, has targets selected from the whole sky, and is not biased by previous studies of star formation. We have observed 189 Class I YSOs north of δ = -40° at the H, K, and L' bands, with a median angular resolution of 0farcs33 at L'. We determine our detection limit for close binary companions by observing artificial binaries. We choose a contrast limit and an outer detection limit to minimize contamination and to ensure that a candidate companion is gravitationally bound. Our survey uses observations at the L' rather than the K band for the detection of binary companions since there is less scattered light and better seeing at L'. This paper presents the positions of our targets, the near-IR photometry of sources detected in our fields at L', as well as the observed properties of the 89 detected companions (73 of which are newly discovered). Although we have chosen contrast and separation limits to minimize contamination, we expect that there are about six stars identified as binary companions that are due to contamination. Finder charts at L' for each field are shown to facilitate future studies of these objects. The Infrared Telescope Facility is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the U.K. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical

  15. A substellar-mass protostar and its outflow of IRAS 15398–3359 revealed by subarcsecond-resolution observations of H{sub 2}CO and CCH

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Yoko; Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-11-10

    Subarcsecond (0.''5) images of H{sub 2}CO and CCH line emission have been obtained in the 0.8 mm band toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398–3359 in the Lupus 1 cloud as one of the Cycle 0 projects of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. We have detected a compact component concentrated in the vicinity of the protostar and a well-collimated outflow cavity extending along the northeast-southwest axis. The inclination angle of the outflow is found to be about 20°, or almost edge-on, based on the kinematic structure of the outflow cavity. This is in contrast to previous suggestions of a more pole-on geometry. The centrally concentrated component is interpreted by use of a model of the infalling rotating envelope with the estimated inclination angle and the mass of the protostar is estimated to be less than 0.09 M {sub ☉}. Higher spatial resolution data are needed to infer the presence of a rotationally supported disk for this source, hinted at by a weak high-velocity H{sub 2}CO emission associated with the protostar.

  16. Impact of initial models and variable accretion rates on the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive and intermediate-mass stars and the early evolution of H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, Lionel; Peters, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Massive star formation requires the accretion of gas at high rate while the star is already bright. Its actual luminosity depends sensitively on the stellar structure. We compute pre-main-sequence tracks for massive and intermediate-mass stars with variable accretion rates and study the evolution of stellar radius, effective temperature and ionizing luminosity, starting at 2 M⊙ with convective or radiative structures. The radiative case shows a much stronger swelling of the protostar for high accretion rates than the convective case. For radiative structures, the star is very sensitive to the accretion rate and reacts quickly to accretion bursts, leading to considerable changes in photospheric properties on time-scales as short as 100-1000 yr. The evolution for convective structures is much less influenced by the instantaneous accretion rate, and produces a monotonically increasing ionizing flux that can be many orders of magnitude smaller than in the radiative case. For massive stars, it results in a delay of the H II region expansion by up to 10 000 yr. In the radiative case, the H II region can potentially be engulfed by the star during the swelling, which never happens in the convective case. We conclude that the early stellar structure has a large impact on the radiative feedback during the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive protostars and introduces an important uncertainty that should be taken into account. Because of their lower effective temperatures, our convective models may hint at a solution to an observed discrepancy between the luminosity distribution functions of massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions.

  17. Gender and ethnic differences in the control of hyperlipidaemia and other vascular risk factors: insights from the CEntralised Pan-South African survey on tHE Under-treatment of hypercholeSterolaemia (CEPHEUS SA) study.

    PubMed

    Rapeport, Naomi; Schamroth, Colin Leslie; Blom, Dirk Jacobus

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the CEntralised Pan-South African survey on tHE Under-treatment of hypercholeSterolaemia (CEPHEUS SA) was to evaluate the current use and efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (LLDs) in urban patients of different ethnicity with hyperlipidaemia, and to identify possible patient characteristics associated with failure to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets. There is little published data on LDL-C attainment from developing countries. The survey was conducted in 69 study centres in South Africa and recruited consecutive patients who had been prescribed LLDs for at least three months with no dose adjustment for six weeks. All patients provided written consent. One visit was scheduled for data collection, including fasting lipid and glucose, and HbA1c levels. Of the 3 001 patients recruited, 2 996 were included in the final analyses; 1 385 subjects were of Caucasian origin (818 male), 510 of African ancestry (168 male), 481 of mixed ancestry (222 male) and 620 of Asian origin (364 male). Only 60.5% of patients on LLDs for at least three months achieved the LDL-C targets recommended by the NCEP ATP III/2004 updated NCEP ATP III guidelines and 52.3% the fourth JETF/South African guidelines. African females were on average younger than females of other ethnic origins, and had the lowest smoking rates but the highest prevalence of obesity, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus (DM), with the worst glycaemic control. Although women were less likely than men to reach goal [OR 0.65 (CI 0.54-0.77), p < 0.001 for NCEP ATP III guidelines and OR 0.76 (CI 0.64-0.91), p < 0.003 for fourth JETF guidelines], women of African ancestry were just as likely not to reach goal as their Caucasian counterparts. The results of this survey highlight the sub-optimal lipid control achieved in many South African patients, and profile important gender and ethnic differences. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors across gender and ethnic

  18. Holographically viable extensions of topologically massive and minimal massive gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altas, Emel; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Recently [E. Bergshoeff et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 145008 (2014)], an extension of the topologically massive gravity (TMG) in 2 +1 dimensions, dubbed as minimal massive gravity (MMG), which is free of the bulk-boundary unitarity clash that inflicts the former theory and all the other known three-dimensional theories, was found. Field equations of MMG differ from those of TMG at quadratic terms in the curvature that do not come from the variation of an action depending on the metric alone. Here we show that MMG is a unique theory and there does not exist a deformation of TMG or MMG at the cubic and quartic order (and beyond) in the curvature that is consistent at the level of the field equations. The only extension of TMG with the desired bulk and boundary properties having a single massive degree of freedom is MMG.

  19. Massive transfusion: blood component ratios.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devika S; Shaz, Beth H

    2013-11-01

    This review will address recent developments in the transfusion management of massively transfused trauma patients, focusing on the use of fixed blood component ratios in massive transfusion protocols. The majority of trauma centers have migrated from laboratory-based transfusion protocols to massive transfusion protocols with fixed blood component ratios. These protocols with red blood cell : plasma : platelet ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 are associated with improved survival in severely injured patients. However, alternate ratios have also demonstrated improved survival. Thus, the optimal ratio has not been determined. In addition, the use of medications, such as antifibrinolytics, and point of care testing, such as thromboelastography, are increasingly being used as part of massive transfusion protocols to adjust transfusion therapy and decrease bleeding. However, their optimal integration has yet to be determined. Massive transfusion protocols with fixed ratios of red blood cells to plasma and platelets have improved survival in both civilian and military trauma patients. Continued studies of ratios as well as integration of other therapies and testing are ongoing in order to continue to improve patient outcome.

  20. OH far-infrared emission from low- and intermediate-mass protostars surveyed with Herschel-PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampfler, S. F.; Bruderer, S.; Karska, A.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Benz, A. O.; Doty, S. D.; McCoey, C.; Baudry, A.; Giannini, T.; Larsson, B.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The OH radical is a key species in the water chemistry network of star-forming regions, because its presence is tightly related to the formation and destruction of water. Previous studies of the OH far-infrared emission from low- and intermediate-mass protostars suggest that the OH emission mainly originates from shocked gas and not from the quiescent protostellar envelopes. Aims: We aim to study the excitation of OH in embedded low- and intermediate-mass protostars, determine the influence of source parameters on the strength of the emission, investigate the spatial extent of the OH emission, and further constrain its origin. Methods: This paper presents OH observations from 23 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects obtained with the PACS integral field spectrometer on-board Herschel in the context of the "Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) key program. Radiative transfer codes are used to model the OH excitation. Results: Most low-mass sources have compact OH emission (≲5000 AU scale), whereas the OH lines in most intermediate-mass sources are extended over the whole 47.″0 × 47.″0 PACS detector field-of-view (≳20 000 AU). The strength of the OH emission is correlated with various source properties such as the bolometric luminosity and the envelope mass, but also with the [OI] and H2O emission. Rotational diagrams for sources with many OH lines show that the level populations of OH can be approximated by a Boltzmann distribution with an excitation temperature at around 70 K. Radiative transfer models of spherically symmetric envelopes cannot reproduce the OH emission fluxes nor their broad line widths, strongly suggesting an outflow origin. Slab excitation models indicate that the observed excitation temperature can either be reached if the OH molecules are exposed to a strong far-infrared continuum radiation field or if the gas temperature and density are sufficiently high. Using realistic source parameters and

  1. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. I. DEPENDENCE ON BASIC CORE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2011-05-20

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  2. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. I. Dependence on Basic Core Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2011-05-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  3. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  4. Positive signs in massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  5. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  6. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  7. On the origin of H2CO abundance enhancements in low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, F. L.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2004-04-01

    High angular resolution H2CO 218 GHz line observations have been carried out toward the low-mass protostars IRAS 16293-2422 and L1448-C using the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at ˜2 arcsec resolution. Simultaneous 1.37 mm continuum data reveal extended emission which is compared with that predicted by model envelopes constrained from single-dish data. For L1448-C the model density structure works well down to the 400 AU scale to which the interferometer is sensitive. For IRAS 16293-2422, a known proto-binary object, the interferometer observations indicate that the binary has cleared much of the material in the inner part of the envelope, out to the binary separation of ˜800 AU. For both sources there is excess unresolved compact emission centered on the sources, most likely due to accretion disks ⪉200 AU in size with masses of ⪆0.02 M⊙ (L1448-C) and ⪆0.1 M⊙ (IRAS 16293-2422). The H2CO data for both sources are dominated by emission from gas close to the positions of the continuum peaks. The morphology and velocity structure of the H2CO array data have been used to investigate whether the abundance enhancements inferred from single-dish modelling are due to thermal evaporation of ices or due to liberation of the ice mantles by shocks in the inner envelope. For IRAS 16293-2422 the H2CO interferometer observations indicate the presence of rotation roughly perpendicular to the large scale CO outflow. The H2CO distribution differs from that of C18O, with C18O emission peaking near MM1 and H2CO stronger near MM2. For L1448-C, the region of enhanced H2CO emission extends over a much larger scale >1'' than the radius of 50-100 K (0.6 arcsrec - 0.15 arcsec) where thermal evaporation can occur. The red-blue asymmetry of the emission is consistent with the outflow; however the velocities are significantly lower. The H2CO 322-221/303-202 flux ratio derived from the interferometer data is significantly higher than that found from single-dish observations for both

  8. High-J CO survey of low-mass protostars observed with Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; San José-García, I.; Karska, A.; Harsono, D.; Tafalla, M.; Fuente, A.; Visser, R.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2013-08-01

    Context. In the deeply embedded stage of star formation, protostars start to heat and disperse their surrounding cloud cores. The evolution of these sources has traditionally been traced through dust continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but the use of CO excitation as an evolutionary probe has not yet been explored due to the lack of high-J CO observations. Aims: The aim is to constrain the physical characteristics (excitation, kinematics, column density) of the warm gas in low-mass protostellar envelopes using spectrally resolved Herschel data of CO and compare those with the colder gas traced by lower excitation lines. Methods: Herschel-HIFI observations of high-J lines of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (up to Ju = 10, Eu up to 300 K) are presented toward 26 deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 and Class I young stellar objects, obtained as part of the Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) key program. This is the first large spectrally resolved high-J CO survey conducted for these types of sources. Complementary lower J CO maps were observed using ground-based telescopes, such as the JCMT and APEX and convolved to matching beam sizes. Results: The 12CO 10-9 line is detected for all objects and can generally be decomposed into a narrow and a broad component owing to the quiescent envelope and entrained outflow material, respectively. The 12CO excitation temperature increases with velocity from ~60 K up to ~130 K. The median excitation temperatures for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O derived from single-temperature fits to the Ju = 2-10 integrated intensities are ~70 K, 48 K and 37 K, respectively, with no significant difference between Class 0 and Class I sources and no trend with Menv or Lbol. Thus, in contrast to the continuum SEDs, the spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) do not show any evolution during the embedded stage. In contrast, the integrated line intensities of all CO isotopologs show a clear decrease with evolutionary stage as the envelope is

  9. Broadbeam for Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Deli; Qian, Haifeng; Li, Geoffrey Ye

    2016-05-01

    Massive MIMO has been identified as one of the promising disruptive air interface techniques to address the huge capacity requirement demanded by 5G wireless communications. For practical deployment of such systems, the control message need to be broadcast to all users reliably in the cell using broadbeam. A broadbeam is expected to have the same radiated power in all directions to cover users in any place in a cell. In this paper, we will show that there is no perfect broadbeam. Therefore, we develop a method for generating broadbeam that can allow tiny fluctuations in radiated power. Overall, this can serve as an ingredient for practical deployment of the massive MIMO systems.

  10. Processing massive datasets in genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiguenave, F.

    2011-02-01

    Life science researches have been profoundly impacted by technological advances allowing faster and cheaper DNA sequencing. Opening a wide range of applications in medical and biology, the last generation sequencing platforms raised new challenges, in particular in processing, analysing and interpreting massive data. In this talk, the growing role of bioinformatics will be illustrated by providing some figures about genome sequencing and others applications aimed at unravelling biological mechanisms. Methods to gather insights from massive amount of data will be illustrated by the genome annotation process, by which genes are identified in the genome sequence.

  11. Massive photons and Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiaso, Mauro; Lehnert, Ralf; Potting, Robertus

    2012-04-01

    All quadratic translation- and gauge-invariant photon operators for Lorentz breakdown are included into the Stueckelberg Lagrangian for massive photons in a generalized Rξ gauge. The corresponding dispersion relation and tree-level propagator are determined exactly, and some leading-order results are derived. The question of how to include such Lorentz-violating effects into a perturbative quantum-field expansion is addressed. Applications of these results within Lorentz-breaking quantum-field theories include the regularization of infrared divergences as well as the free propagation of massive vector bosons.

  12. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF V2775 Ori, AN OUTBURSTING PROTOSTAR IN L 1641: EXPLORING THE EDGE OF THE FU ORIONIS REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Kounkel, Marina; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, T. L.

    2012-09-01

    Individual outbursting young stars are important laboratories for studying the physics of episodic accretion and the extent to which this phenomenon can explain the luminosity distribution of protostars. We present new and archival data for V2775 Ori (HOPS 223), a protostar in the L 1641 region of the Orion molecular clouds that was discovered by Caratti o Garatti et al. to have recently undergone an order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity. Our near-infrared spectra of the source have strong blueshifted He I {lambda}10830 absorption, strong H{sub 2}O and CO absorption, and no H I emission, all typical of FU Orionis sources. With data from the Infrared Telescope Facility, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment that span from 1 to 70 {mu}m pre-outburst and from 1 to 870 {mu}m post-outburst, we estimate that the outburst began between 2005 April and 2007 March. We also model the pre- and post-outburst spectral energy distributions of the source, finding it to be in the late stages of accreting its envelope with a disk-to-star accretion rate that increased from {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} during the outburst. The post-outburst luminosity at the epoch of the FU Orionis-like near-IR spectra is 28 L{sub Sun }, making V2775 Ori the least luminous documented FU Orionis outburster with a protostellar envelope. The existence of low-luminosity outbursts supports the notion that a range of episiodic accretion phenomena can partially explain the observed spread in protostellar luminosities.

  13. The magnetic field structure around protostars. Submillimetre polarimetry of VLA 1623 and S 106-IR/FIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, W. S.; Greaves, J. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Andre, P.

    1996-05-01

    We present 800μm polarization observations of the young low-mass candidate protostar VLA 1623, and of the high-mass young stellar object S 106-IR and its companion candidate protostar S 106-FIR. The polarized emission due to aligned dust grains has been used to derive the magnetic field direction around both sources. In the case of VLA 1623 we find that the field direction is almost exactly perpendicular to the extremely well-collimated CO outflow. This suggests that the large-scale magnetic field in the cloud cannot be responsible for the collimation of the outflow. However, the data may be consistent with a recent magneto-hydrodynamic model where the field follows stream lines through the central plane of a `cored apple' accretion structure. In S 106 our observations indicate a magnetic field along the dust lane connecting the IR/FIR sources, and perpendicular to the bipolar HII region. A model consistent both with these data, and previous Zeeman measurements, is presented, in which the large-scale magnetic field is poloidal, but is either twisted into a toroidal morphology, or highly `pinched-in', in the flattened dust lane. We also present a synopsis of recent submillimetre polarimetry observations of young disk/outflow sources. For high-mass objects, the data are consistent with super-critical collapse models, and there is evidence for varying degrees of field compression. There is also a correlation of net field orientation with source distance, which is explained by the inclusion of varying amounts of ambient cloud material within the telescope beam. For the few low-mass objects for which data is available, the polarization is less affected by ambient material, and there is some evidence that different outflow models may apply in different sources.

  14. HOT WATER IN THE INNER 100 AU OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A.; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2013-05-20

    Evaporation of water ice above 100 K in the inner few 100 AU of low-mass embedded protostars (the so-called hot core) should produce quiescent water vapor abundances of {approx}10{sup -4} relative to H{sub 2}. Observational evidence so far points at abundances of only a few 10{sup -6}. However, these values are based on spherical models, which are known from interferometric studies to be inaccurate on the relevant spatial scales. Are hot cores really that much drier than expected, or are the low abundances an artifact of the inaccurate physical models? We present deep velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the 3{sub 12}-3{sub 03} lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (1097 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 249 K) in the low-mass Class 0 protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A. A spherical radiative transfer model with a power-law density profile is unable to reproduce both the HIFI data and existing interferometric data on the H{sub 2}{sup 18}O 3{sub 13}-2{sub 20} line (203 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 204 K). Instead, the HIFI spectra likely show optically thick emission from a hot core with a radius of about 100 AU. The mass of the hot core is estimated from the C{sup 18}O J = 9-8 and 10-9 lines. We derive a lower limit to the hot water abundance of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, consistent with the theoretical predictions of {approx}10{sup -4}. The revised HDO/H{sub 2}O abundance ratio is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, an order of magnitude lower than previously estimated.

  15. Curtain-Lifting Winds Allow Rare Glimpse into Massive Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Formation of Exceedingly Luminous and Hot Stars in Young Stellar Cluster Observed Directly Summary Based on a vast observational effort with different telescopes and instruments, ESO-astronomer Dieter Nürnberger has obtained a first glimpse of the very first stages in the formation of heavy stars. These critical phases of stellar evolution are normally hidden from the view, because massive protostars are deeply embedded in their native clouds of dust and gas, impenetrable barriers to observations at all but the longest wavelengths. In particular, no visual or infrared observations have yet "caught" nascent heavy stars in the act and little is therefore known so far about the related processes. Profiting from the cloud-ripping effect of strong stellar winds from adjacent, hot stars in a young stellar cluster at the center of the NGC 3603 complex, several objects located near a giant molecular cloud were found to be bona-fide massive protostars, only about 100,000 years old and still growing. Three of these objects, designated IRS 9A-C, could be studied in more detail. They are very luminous (IRS 9A is about 100,000 times intrinsically brighter than the Sun), massive (more than 10 times the mass of the Sun) and hot (about 20,000 degrees). They are surrounded by relative cold dust (about 0°C), probably partly arranged in disks around these very young objects. Two possible scenarios for the formation of massive stars are currently proposed, by accretion of large amounts of circumstellar material or by collision (coalescence) of protostars of intermediate masses. The new observations favour accretion, i.e. the same process that is active during the formation of stars of smaller masses. PR Photo 16a/03: Stellar cluster and star-forming region NGC 3603. PR Photo 16b/03: Region near very young, massive stars IRS 9A-C in NGC 3603 (8 bands from J to Q). How do massive stars form? This question is easy to pose, but so far very difficult to answer. In fact, the processes

  16. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  17. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  18. EMBEDDED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AROUND (SUB-)SOLAR PROTOSTARS. I. DISK STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2010-11-10

    We perform a comparative numerical hydrodynamics study of embedded protostellar disks formed as a result of the gravitational collapse of cloud cores of distinct mass (M{sub cl} = 0.2-1.7 M{sub sun}) and ratio of rotational to gravitational energy {beta} = 0.0028-0.023. An increase in M{sub cl} and/or {beta} leads to the formation of protostellar disks that are more susceptible to gravitational instability. Disk fragmentation occurs in most models but its effect is often limited to the very early stage, with the fragments being either dispersed or driven onto the forming star during tens of orbital periods. Only cloud cores with high enough M{sub cl} or {beta} may eventually form wide-separation binary/multiple systems with low-mass ratios and brown dwarf or sub-solar mass companions. It is feasible that such systems may eventually break up, giving birth to rogue brown dwarfs. Protostellar disks of equal age formed from cloud cores of greater mass (but equal {beta}) are generally denser, hotter, larger, and more massive. On the other hand, protostellar disks formed from cloud cores of higher {beta} (but equal M{sub cl}) are generally thinner and colder but larger and more massive. In all models, the difference between the irradiation temperature and midplane temperature utriT is small, except for the innermost regions of young disks, dense fragments, and disk's outer edge where utriT is negative and may reach a factor of 2 or even more. Gravitationally unstable, embedded disks show radial pulsations, the amplitude of which increases along the line of increasing M{sub cl} and {beta} but tends to diminish as the envelope clears. We find that single stars with a disk-to-star mass ratio of order unity can be formed only from high-{beta} cloud cores, but such massive disks are unstable and quickly fragment into binary/multiple systems. A substantial fraction of an embedded disk, especially its inner regions, spiral arms, and dense clumps, may be optically thick

  19. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of jets and outflows from high-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen; Liu, Mengyao

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a series of nested, large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds with a Blandford-Payne like magnetic field configuration, resolving scales from the stellar surface to beyond the core. The goal is to understand the structure of massive protostellar cores at various stages of their formation as the protostellar mass grows from a massive core. At each stage of a given protostellar mass, first, we study how jets and winds develop from the inner accretion disk to ~100 AU scales. We use the results from these simulations to dictate the inner boundary condition of a set of simulation extending to the core boundary at ~10,000 AU of an initially 60 solar mass core. We run separate simulations where the protostellar mass is 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 Msun, and we are working on making a small grid of models in the context of the Turbulent Core Model with three different core masses and three different core surface densities. The wind is blown into the simulation box with properties derived from the previous jet simulations. We examine the opening angle of the outflow cavity and thus the star formation efficiency from the core due to outflow feedback. We find that the opening angle increases as the protostellar mass grows, but it is always less than 10 degrees, which is surprisingly small compared with previous analytic models. This is caused by the core which confines the outflow. Finally, we use our simulation results as input to a radiative transfer calculation, to compare with observations made by the SOMA survey.

  20. Radiation hydrodynamics using characteristics on adaptive decomposed domains for massively parallel star formation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntemeyer, Lars; Banerjee, Robi; Peters, Thomas; Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2016-02-01

    We present an algorithm for solving the radiative transfer problem on massively parallel computers using adaptive mesh refinement and domain decomposition. The solver is based on the method of characteristics which requires an adaptive raytracer that integrates the equation of radiative transfer. The radiation field is split into local and global components which are handled separately to overcome the non-locality problem. The solver is implemented in the framework of the magneto-hydrodynamics code FLASH and is coupled by an operator splitting step. The goal is the study of radiation in the context of star formation simulations with a focus on early disc formation and evolution. This requires a proper treatment of radiation physics that covers both the optically thin as well as the optically thick regimes and the transition region in particular. We successfully show the accuracy and feasibility of our method in a series of standard radiative transfer problems and two 3D collapse simulations resembling the early stages of protostar and disc formation.

  1. Massive Star Formation in the LMC. I. N159 and N160 Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Jones, Terry J.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Helton, L. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in three star-forming H ii regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud: N159A, N159 Papillon, and N160. We use photometry from SOFIA/FORCAST at 25.3-37.1 μm to constrain model fits to the SEDs and determine luminosities, ages, and dust content of the embedded YSOs and their local environments. By placing these sources on mid-infrared color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we analyze their dust properties and consider their evolutionary status. Since each object in the FORCAST images has an obvious bright near-infrared counterpart in Spitzer Space Telescope images, we do not find any evidence for new, very cool, previously undiscovered Class 0 YSOs. Additionally, based on its mid-infrared colors and model parameters, N159A is younger than N160 and the Papillon. The nature of the first extragalactic protostars in N159, P1, and P2, is also discussed.

  2. Linear Polarization of Class I Methanol Masers in Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ji-hyun; Byun, Do-Young; Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Jongsoo; Lyo, A.-Ran; Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2016-12-01

    Class I methanol masers are found to be good tracers of the interaction between outflows from massive young stellar objects with their surrounding media. Although polarization observations of Class II methanol masers have been able to provide information about magnetic fields close to the central (proto)stars, polarization observations of Class I methanol masers are rare, especially at 44 and 95 GHz. We present the results of linear polarization observations of 39 Class I methanol maser sources at 44 and 95 GHz. These two lines are observed simultaneously with one of the 21 m Korean VLBI Network telescopes in single-dish mode. Approximately 60% of the observed sources have fractional polarizations of a few percent in at least one transition. This is the first reported detection of linear polarization of the 44 GHz methanol maser. The two maser transitions show similar polarization properties, indicating that they trace similar magnetic environments, although the fraction of the linear polarization is slightly higher at 95 GHz. We discuss the association between the directions of polarization angles and outflows. We also discuss some targets having different polarization properties at both lines, including DR21(OH) and G82.58+0.20, which show the 90° polarization angle flip at 44 GHz.

  3. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  4. Deuterium chemistry of dense gas in the vicinity of low-mass and massive star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Zainab; Viti, Serena; Bayet, Estelle; Caselli, Paola

    2014-09-01

    The standard interstellar ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) atoms is ˜1.5 × 10-5. However, the deuterium fractionation is in fact found to be enhanced, to different degrees, in cold, dark cores, hot cores around massive star-forming regions, lukewarm cores, and warm cores (hereafter hot corinos) around low-mass star-forming regions. In this paper, we investigate the overall differences in the deuterium chemistry between hot cores and hot corinos. We have modelled the chemistry of dense gas around low-mass and massive star-forming regions using a gas-grain chemical model. We investigate the influence of varying the core density, the depletion efficiency of gaseous species on to dust grains, the collapse mode and the final mass of the protostar on the chemical evolution of star-forming regions. We find that the deuterium chemistry is, in general, most sensitive to variations of the depletion efficiency on to grain surfaces, in agreement with observations. In addition, the results showed that the chemistry is more sensitive to changes in the final density of the collapsing core in hot cores than in hot corinos. Finally, we find that ratios of deuterated sulphur bearing species in dense gas around hot cores and corinos may be good evolutionary indicators in a similar way as their non-deuterated counterparts.

  5. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Megeath, S. Thomas; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Furlan, Elise; Fischer, William J.; Manoj, P.; Gómez, José F.; González-García, Beatriz; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.; Loinard, Laurent; Vavrek, Roland; Carrasco-González, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7-5 cm), multi-epoch (1994-2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free-free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ˜7500-12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ˜100 km s-1. The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ˜30 km s-1, similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  6. Topologically massive higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Lal, Shailesh; Saha, Arunabha; Sahoo, Bindusar

    2011-10-01

    We look at the generalisation of topologically massive gravity (TMG) to higher spins, specifically spin-3. We find a special "chiral" point for the spin-three, analogous to the spin-two example, which actually coincides with the usual spin-two chiral point. But in contrast to usual TMG, there is the presence of a non-trivial trace and its logarithmic partner at the chiral point. The trace modes carry energy opposite in sign to the traceless modes. The logarithmic partner of the traceless mode carries negative energy indicating an instability at the chiral point. We make several comments on the asymptotic symmetry and its possible deformations at this chiral point and speculate on the higher spin generalisation of LCFT2 dual to the spin-3 massive gravity at the chiral point.

  7. Spin-3 topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wu, Jun-bao

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the spin-3 topologically massive gravity (TMG), paying special attention to its properties at the chiral point. We propose an action describing the higher spin fields coupled to TMG. We discuss the traceless spin-3 fluctuations around the AdS3 vacuum and find that there is an extra local massive mode, besides the left-moving and right-moving boundary massless modes. At the chiral point, such extra mode becomes massless and degenerates with the left-moving mode. We show that at the chiral point the only degrees of freedom in the theory are the boundary right-moving graviton and spin-3 field. We conjecture that spin-3 chiral gravity with generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary condition is holographically dual to 2D chiral CFT with classical W3 algebra and central charge cR = 3 l / G.

  8. New branches of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Crisostomi, M.; Koyama, K.; Pilo, L.; Tasinato, G.

    2015-06-01

    The basic building block for Lorentz-invariant and ghost-free massive gravity is the square root of the combination g-1η , where g-1 is the inverse of the physical metric and η is a reference metric. Since the square root of a matrix is not uniquely defined, it is possible to have physically inequivalent potentials corresponding to different branches. We show that around the Minkowski background, the only perturbatively well-defined branch is the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley. On the other hand, if Lorentz symmetry is broken spontaneously, other potentials exist with a standard perturbative expansion. We show this explicitly building new Lorentz-invariant, ghost-free massive gravity potentials for theories that in the background preserve rotational invariance but break Lorentz boosts.

  9. Black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Brito, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We review the black hole (BH) solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension, and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact BH solutions, analogous to those of general relativity (GR). In addition to these solutions, hairy BHs—solutions with no correspondent in GR—have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of Birkhoff’s theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these BHs richer and more complex than those of GR. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild BH exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical BHs are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability of the Kerr solution imposes stringent bounds on the graviton mass.

  10. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  11. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  12. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  13. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  14. Massive gravity on a brane

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Graesser, M.L.; Grojean, C.; Pilo, L.

    2003-12-11

    At present no theory of a massive graviton is known that is consistent with experiments at both long and short distances. The problem is that consistency with long distance experiments requires the graviton mass to be very small. Such a small graviton mass however implies an ultraviolet cutoff for the theory at length scales far larger than the millimeter scale at which gravity has already been measured. In this paper we attempt to construct a model which avoids this problem. We consider a brane world setup in warped AdS spacetime and we investigate the consequences of writing a mass term for the graviton on a the infrared brane where the local cutoff is of order a large (galactic) distance scale. The advantage of this setup is that the low cutoff for physics on the infrared brane does not significantly affect the predictivity of the theory for observers localized on the ultraviolet brane. For such observers the predictions of this theory agree with general relativity at distances smaller than the infrared scale but go over to those of a theory of massive gravity at longer distances. A careful analysis of the graviton two-point function, however, reveals the presence of a ghost in the low energy spectrum. A mode decomposition of the higher dimensional theory reveals that the ghost corresponds to the radion field. We also investigate the theory with a brane localized mass for the graviton on the ultraviolet brane, and show that the physics of this case is similar to that of a conventional four dimensional theory with a massive graviton, but with one important difference: when the infrared brane decouples and the would-be massive graviton gets heavier than the regular Kaluza-Klein modes, it becomes unstable and it has a finite width to decay off the brane into the continuum of Kaluza-Klein states.

  15. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  16. Massive pulmonary embolus without hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Baird, J Scott; Greene, Anne; Schleien, Charles L

    2005-09-01

    To describe a patient who had been taking ibuprofen for 3 days before the diagnosis of a massive pulmonary embolus without hypoxemia. Institutional review board-approved case report. Pediatric intensive care unit. A 16-yr-old male with a history of supraventricular tachycardia. The patient underwent an electrophysiology study and developed mild shortness of breath and then chest pain 2 and 4 days later, respectively. He took ibuprofen for 3 days. Evaluation 1 wk following the procedure revealed dyspnea and tachycardia. Arterial blood gas in room air was significant for hypocarbia without hypoxemia (Pao2, 108 mm Hg; Paco2, 28 mm Hg). Ventilation perfusion scan and computed axial tomography with intravenous contrast were consistent with a massive pulmonary embolus and left external iliac vein thrombus. He received anticoagulation, thrombolysis, a stent in the left iliac vein, and a filter in the inferior vena cava. Perfusion gradually improved and he was discharged home on oral anticoagulation. The absence of hypoxemia (including a normal alveolar-arterial oxygen difference) in our patient with a massive pulmonary embolus may have been related to cyclooxygenase inhibition due to ibuprofen, with improvement in ventilation-perfusion mismatch.

  17. Voids in massive neutrino cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Sutter, P.M. E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: sutter@oats.inaf.it

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic voids are a promising environment to characterize neutrino-induced effects on the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. We perform a comprehensive numerical study of the statistical properties of voids, identified both in the matter and galaxy distributions, in massive and massless neutrino cosmologies. The matter density field is obtained by running several independent N-body simulations with cold dark matter and neutrino particles, while the galaxy catalogs are modeled by populating the dark matter halos in simulations via a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to reproduce the clustering properties observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7. We focus on the impact of massive neutrinos on the following void statistical properties: number density, ellipticities, two-point statistics, density and velocity profiles. Considering the matter density field, we find that voids in massive neutrino cosmologies are less evolved than those in the corresponding massless neutrinos case: there is a larger number of small voids and a smaller number of large ones, their profiles are less evacuated, and they present a lower wall at the edge. Moreover, the degeneracy between σ{sub 8} and Ω{sub ν} is broken when looking at void properties. In terms of the galaxy density field, we find that differences among cosmologies are difficult to detect because of the small number of galaxy voids in the simulations. Differences are instead present when looking at the matter density and velocity profiles around these voids.

  18. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  19. Simultaneous low- and high-mass star formation in a massive protocluster: ALMA observations of G11.92-0.61★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Smith, R.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Bonnell, I. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-07-01

    We present 1.05 mm Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the deeply embedded high-mass protocluster G11.92-0.61, designed to search for low-mass cores within the accretion reservoir of the massive protostars. Our ALMA mosaic, which covers an extent of ˜0.7 pc at sub-arcsecond (˜1400 au) resolution, reveals a rich population of 16 new millimetre continuum sources surrounding the three previously known millimetre cores. Most of the new sources are located in the outer reaches of the accretion reservoir: the median projected separation from the central, massive (proto)star MM1 is ˜0.17 pc. The derived physical properties of the new millimetre continuum sources are consistent with those of low-mass prestellar and protostellar cores in nearby star-forming regions: the median mass, radius and density of the new sources are 1.3 M⊙, 1600 au and n_H_2˜ 107 cm-3. At least three of the low-mass cores in G11.92-0.61 drive molecular outflows, traced by high-velocity 12CO(3-2) (observed with the Submillimeter Array) and/or by H2CO and CH3OH emission (observed with ALMA). This finding, combined with the known outflow/accretion activity of MM1, indicates that high- and low-mass stars are forming (accreting) simultaneously within this protocluster. Our ALMA results are consistent with the predictions of competitive-accretion-type models in which high-mass stars form along with their surrounding clusters.

  20. Dynamics of disk galaxies under eccentric perturbations and the effect of radiative thermal exchange on the rotation of lower mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linchu

    2000-09-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, the dynamics of disk galaxies are treated using a representation in a number of circular rings*. The rings are assumed to be rigid and oscillate in a plane. Motion of matter within each ring is taken into account. Eccentric perturbations are studied. First the axisymmetric equilibrium configuration of the galaxy is discussed. After that eccentric perturbations are described. The ring representation is then applied and relevant equations of motion derived. Various formulas involving coefficients of terms in the equations of motion are derived. Angular momentum transport is then discussed with the results of numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Besides the disk, two other components: the galactic bulge, and the dark matter halo are also included, but only as passive sources of gravity. The central region of the disk is handled separately; it may contain a black hole. The second part of this dissertation treats protostars. It is shown that radiative thermal exchange can significantly reduce the angular momentum of a rapidly spinning protostar. The mechanism is especially important for high temperature and large surface area. Also, it is expected that the mechanism is most relevant to lower mass protostars, since they may be embedded inside H II regions which have high temperatures. *This first part of the dissertation is related to [15] (Lovelace, R. V. E., Zhang, L., Kornreich, D. A., & Haynes, M. P. 1999, THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 524, 634, published by the University of Chicago Press,© 1999.The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved).

  1. Outflows, infall and evolution of a sample of embedded low-mass protostars. The William Herschel Line Legacy (WILL) survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Karska, A.; San José-García, I.; Khanna, S.; Herczeg, G. J.; André, Ph.; Bontemps, S.; Cabrit, S.; Carney, M. T.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Dunham, M. M.; Evans, N. J.; Fedele, D.; Green, J. D.; Harsono, D.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Könyves, V.; Nisini, B.; Persson, M. V.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Herschel observations of water and highly excited CO (J > 9) have allowed the physical and chemical conditions in the more active parts of protostellar outflows to be quantified in detail for the first time. However, to date, the studied samples of Class 0/I protostars in nearby star-forming regions have been selected from bright, well-known sources and have not been large enough for statistically significant trends to be firmly established. Aims: We aim to explore the relationships between the outflow, envelope and physical properties of a flux-limited sample of embedded low-mass Class 0/I protostars. Methods: We present spectroscopic observations in H2O, CO and related species with Herschel HIFI and PACS, as well as ground-based follow-up with the JCMT and APEX in CO, HCO+ and isotopologues, of a sample of 49 nearby (d < 500 pc) candidate protostars selected from Spitzer and Herschel photometric surveys of the Gould Belt. This more than doubles the sample of sources observed by the WISH and DIGIT surveys. These data are used to study the outflow and envelope properties of these sources. We also compile their continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the near-IR to mm wavelengths in order to constrain their physical properties (e.g. Lbol, Tbol and Menv). Results: Water emission is dominated by shocks associated with the outflow, rather than the cooler, slower entrained outflowing gas probed by ground-based CO observations. These shocks become less energetic as sources evolve from Class 0 to Class I. Outflow force, measured from low-J CO, also decreases with source evolutionary stage, while the fraction of mass in the outflow relative to the total envelope (i.e. Mout/Menv) remains broadly constant between Class 0 and I. The median value of 1% is consistent with a core to star formation efficiency on the order of 50% and an outflow duty cycle on the order of 5%. Entrainment efficiency, as probed by FCO/Ṁacc, is also invariant with source

  2. Constraining the physical structure of the inner few 100 AU scales of deeply embedded low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, M. V.; Harsono, D.; Tobin, J. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Murillo, N.; Lai, S.-P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The physical structure of deeply embedded low-mass protostars (Class 0) on scales of less than 300 AU is still poorly constrained. While molecular line observations demonstrate the presence of disks with Keplerian rotation toward a handful of sources, others show no hint of rotation. Determining the structure on small scales (a few 100 AU) is crucial for understanding the physical and chemical evolution from cores to disks. Aims: We determine the presence and characteristics of compact, disk-like structures in deeply embedded low-mass protostars. A related goal is investigating how the derived structure affects the determination of gas-phase molecular abundances on hot-core scales. Methods: Two models of the emission, a Gaussian disk intensity distribution and a parametrized power-law disk model, are fitted to subarcsecond resolution interferometric continuum observations of five Class 0 sources, including one source with a confirmed Keplerian disk. Prior to fitting the models to the de-projected real visibilities, the estimated envelope from an independent model and any companion sources are subtracted. For reference, a spherically symmetric single power-law envelope is fitted to the larger scale emission (~1000 AU) and investigated further for one of the sources on smaller scales. Results: The radii of the fitted disk-like structures range from ~90-170 AU, and the derived masses depend on the method. Using the Gaussian disk model results in masses of 54-556 × 10-3 M⊙, and using the power-law disk model gives 9-140 × 10-3 M⊙. While the disk radii agree with previous estimates the masses are different for some of the sources studied. Assuming a typical temperature distribution (r-0.5), the fractional amount of mass in the disk above 100 K varies from 7% to 30%. Conclusions: A thin disk model can approximate the emission and physical structure in the inner few 100 AU scales of the studied deeply embedded low-mass protostars and paves the way for

  3. Probing the CO and methanol snow lines in young protostars. Results from the CALYPSO IRAM-PdBI survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, S.; Maret, S.; Cabrit, S.; Belloche, A.; Maury, A. J.; André, Ph.; Codella, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bontemps, S.; Podio, L.; Gueth, F.; Bergin, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. So-called snow lines, indicating regions where abundant volatiles freeze out onto the surface of dust grains, play an important role for planet growth and bulk composition in protoplanetary disks. They can already be observed in the envelopes of the much younger, low-mass Class 0 protostars, which are still in their early phase of heavy accretion. Aims: We aim to use the information on the sublimation regions of different kinds of ices to understand the chemistry of the envelope, its temperature and density structure, and the history of the accretion process. This information is crucial to get the full picture of the early protostellar collapse and the subsequent evolution of young protostars. Methods: As part of the CALYPSO IRAM Large Program, we have obtained observations of C18O, N2H+, and CH3OH towards nearby Class 0 protostars with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at sub-arcsecond resolution. For four of these sources, we have modeled the emission using a chemical code coupled with a radiative transfer module. Results: We observe an anti-correlation of C18O and N2H+ in NGC 1333-IRAS4A, NGC 1333-IRAS4B, L1157, and L1448C, with N2H+ forming a ring (perturbed by the outflow) around the centrally peaked C18O emission. This emission morphology, which is due to N2H+ being chemically destroyed by CO, reveals the CO and N2 ice sublimation regions in these protostellar envelopes with unprecedented resolution. We also observe compact methanol emission towards three of the sources. Based on our chemical model and assuming temperature and density profiles from the literature, we find that for all four sources the CO snow line appears further inwards than expected from the binding energy of pure CO ices (~855 K). The emission regions of models and observations match for a higher value of the CO binding energy of 1200 K, corresponding to a dust temperature of ~24 K at the CO snow line. The binding energy for N2 ices is modeled at 1000 K, also higher than for

  4. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  5. Boundary-Layer Origin for Jets, and Non-Existence of the Boundary Layer in Young Jet-Producing Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Pringle suggested a boundary-layer origin for jets from YSOs. The jets were driven by a toroidal magnetic field generated by strong shear in the accretion boundary layer. Such a mechanism is clearly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature.Nearly fifteen years ago, we suggested a cartoon of the jet-launching mechanism in protostars in which shear, acting upon MHD turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), generated a tangled, toroidal magnetic field capable of driving a jet. This picture, which is also manifestly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature, relied upon a novel model for MRI-driven MHD turbulence based on a viscoelastic, rather than a viscous, prescription for the turbulent stress. Our hypothesis has some clear similarities to Pringle's mechanism, but it relied upon a large envelope surrounding the central star.An accretion boundary layer has long been recognized as a promising source for protostellar jets in good part because in a standard thin disk, matter loses circa half of all its accretion energy in this layer, but it is problematic to drive a well-collimated outflow from a boundary layer in a thin disk. In this presentation, we argue paradoxically that the "boundary layer" can drive jets when a true boundary layer, like the thin disk, does not exist. This changes the inner boundary condition for viscous angular momentum flux in the disk.The standard argument for a thin boundary layer is, we argue, circular. In high accretion-rate systems, or when the gas cannot cool efficiently, there is no reason to suspect the turbulent viscosity in this boundary layer to be small, and therefore neither is the boundary layer. When the boundary layer becomes larger than the central accretor itself, it is arguably no longer a boundary layer, but rather an envelope. It is still, however, a substantial source of power and toroidal MRI-driven magnetic fields.It is, again, only in relatively hot or high-accretion rate systems in which

  6. A COLD COMPLEX CHEMISTRY TOWARD THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR B1-b: EVIDENCE FOR COMPLEX MOLECULE PRODUCTION IN ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Joergensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2010-06-10

    Gas-phase complex organic molecules have been detected toward a range of high- and low-mass star-forming regions at abundances which cannot be explained by any known gas-phase chemistry. Recent laboratory experiments show that UV irradiation of CH{sub 3}OH-rich ices may be an important mechanism for producing complex molecules and releasing them into the gas phase. To test this ice formation scenario, we mapped the B1-b dust core and nearby protostar in CH{sub 3}OH gas using the IRAM 30 m telescope to identify locations of efficient non-thermal ice desorption. We find three CH{sub 3}OH abundance peaks tracing two outflows and a quiescent region on the side of the core facing the protostar. The CH{sub 3}OH gas has a rotational temperature of {approx}10 K at all locations. The quiescent CH{sub 3}OH abundance peak and one outflow position were searched for complex molecules. Narrow, 0.6-0.8 km s{sup -1} wide, HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO lines originating in cold gas are clearly detected, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} is tentatively detected, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and HOCH{sub 2}CHO are undetected toward the quiescent core, while no complex molecular lines were found toward the outflow. The core abundances with respect to CH{sub 3}OH are {approx}2.3% and 1.1% for HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO, respectively, and the upper limits are 0.7%-1.1%, which is similar to most other low-mass sources. The observed complex molecule characteristics toward B1-b and the pre-dominance of HCO-bearing species suggests a cold ice (below 25 K, the sublimation temperature of CO) formation pathway followed by non-thermal desorption through, e.g., UV photons traveling through outflow cavities. The observed complex gas composition together with the lack of any evidence of warm gas-phase chemistry provides clear evidence of efficient complex molecule formation in cold interstellar ices.

  7. OUTFLOW, INFALL, AND PROTOSTARS IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE W3-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Zhao Junhui; Wright, M. C. H. E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-10-20

    We report new results on outflow and infall in the star-forming cores W3-SE SMA-1 and SMA-2 based on analysis of {approx}2.''5 resolution observations of the molecular lines HCN(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), and CH{sub 3}OH(5{sub 2,3}-4{sub 1,3}) with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A high-velocity bipolar outflow originating from the protostellar core SMA-1 was observed in the HCN(3-2) line, with a projected outflow axis at a position angle of 48{sup 0}. The detection of the outflow is confirmed from other molecular lines. An inverse P-Cygni profile in the HCN(3-2) line toward SMA-1 suggests that at least one of the double cores accretes matter from the molecular core. A filamentary structure in the molecular gas surrounds SMA-1 and SMA-2. Based on the SMA observations, our analysis suggests that the double pre-stellar cores SMA-1 and SMA-2 result from fragmentation in the collapsing massive molecular core W3-SE, and it is likely that they are forming intermediate- to high-mass stars which will be new members of a star cluster in the W3-SE region.

  8. Large-scale numerical simulations of star formation put to the test. Comparing synthetic images and actual observations for statistical samples of protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, S.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Haugbølle, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Both observations and simulations of embedded protostars have progressed rapidly in recent years. Bringing them together is an important step in advancing our knowledge about the earliest phases of star formation. Aims: To compare synthetic continuum images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), calculated from large-scale numerical simulations, to observational studies, thereby aiding in both the interpretation of the observations and in testing the fidelity of the simulations. Methods: The adaptive mesh refinement code, RAMSES, is used to simulate the evolution of a 5 pc × 5 pc × 5 pc molecular cloud. The simulation has a maximum resolution of 8 AU, resolving simultaneously the molecular cloud on parsec scales and individual protostellar systems on AU scales. The simulation is post-processed with the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D, which is used to create synthetic continuum images and SEDs of the protostellar systems. In this way, more than 13 000 unique radiative transfer models, of a variety of different protostellar systems, are produced. Results: Over the course of 0.76 Myr the simulation forms more than 500 protostars, primarily within two sub-clusters. The synthetic SEDs are used to calculate evolutionary tracers Tbol and Lsmm/Lbol. It is shown that, while the observed distributions of the tracers are well matched by the simulation, they generally do a poor job of tracking the protostellar ages. Disks form early in the simulation, with 40% of the Class 0 protostars being encircled by one. The flux emission from the simulated disks is found to be, on average, a factor ~6 too low relative to real observations; an issue that can be traced back to numerical effects on the smallest scales in the simulation. The simulated distribution of protostellar luminosities spans more than three order of magnitudes, similar to the observed distribution. Cores and protostars are found to be closely associated with one another, with the distance distribution

  9. The ALMA-PILS survey: First detections of ethylene oxide, acetone and propanal toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykke, J. M.; Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Garrod, R. T.; Müller, H. S. P.; Bjerkeli, P.; Bourke, T. L.; Calcutt, H.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Favre, C.; Fayolle, E. C.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Öberg, K. I.; Persson, M. V.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2017-01-01

    Context. One of the open questions in astrochemistry is how complex organic and prebiotic molecules are formed. The unsurpassed sensitivity of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) takes the quest for discovering molecules in the warm and dense gas surrounding young stars to the next level. Aims: Our aim is to start the process of compiling an inventory of oxygen-bearing complex organic molecules toward the solar-type Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 from an unbiased spectral survey with ALMA, Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS). Here we focus on the new detections of ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O), acetone (CH3COCH3), and propanal (C2H5CHO). Methods: With ALMA, we surveyed the spectral range from 329 to 363 GHz at 0.5″ (60 AU diameter) resolution. Using a simple model for the molecular emission in local thermodynamical equilibrium, the excitation temperatures and column densities of each species were constrained. Results: We successfully detect propanal (44 lines), ethylene oxide (20 lines) and acetone (186 lines) toward one component of the protostellar binary, IRAS 16293B. The high resolution maps demonstrate that the emission for all investigated species originates from the compact central region close to the protostar. This, along with a derived common excitation temperature of Tex ≈ 125 K, is consistent with a coexistence of these molecules in the same gas. Conclusions: The observations mark the first detections of acetone, propanal and ethylene oxide toward a low-mass protostar. The relative abundance ratios of the two sets of isomers, a CH3COCH3/C2H5CHO ratio of 8 and a CH3CHO/c-C2H4O ratio of 12, are comparable to previous observations toward high-mass protostars. The majority of observed abundance ratios from these results as well as those measured toward high-mass protostars are up to an order of magnitude above the predictions from chemical models. This may reflect either missing reactions or uncertain rates in the

  10. Herschel/PACS far-IR spectral imaging of a jet from an intermediate mass protostar in the OMC-2 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, B.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Vavrek, R.; Megeath, S. T.; Stutz, A. M.; Osorio, M.; Wyrowski, F.; Fischer, W.; Tobin, J. J.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Diaz Rodriguez, A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first detection of a jet in the far-IR [O I] lines from an intermediate mass protostar. This jet was detected in a Herschel/PACS spectral mapping study in the [O I] lines of OMC-2 FIR 3 and FIR 4, two of the most luminous protostars in Orion outside of the Orion Nebula. The spatial morphology of the fine structure line emission reveals the presence of an extended photodissociation region (PDR) and a narrow, but intense jet connecting the two protostars. The jet seen in [O I] emission is spatially aligned with the Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm jet and the CO (6-5) molecular outflow centered on FIR 3. The mass-loss rate derived from the total [O I] 63 μm line luminosity of the jet is 7.7 × 10-6M⊙ yr-1, more than an order of magnitude higher than that measured for typical low-mass class 0 protostars. The implied accretion luminosity is significantly higher than the observed bolometric luminosity of FIR 4, indicating that the [O I] jet is unlikely to be associated with FIR 4. We argue that the peak line emission seen toward FIR 4 originates in the terminal shock produced by the jet driven by FIR 3. The higher mass-loss rate that we find for FIR 3 is consistent with the idea that intermediate-mass protostars drive more powerful jets than their low-mass counterparts. Our results also call into question the nature of FIR 4. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.The final reduced Herschel data used in this paper (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A26

  11. Chemistry of massive young stellar objects with a disk-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokoski, K.; Bottinelli, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: Our goal is to take an inventory of complex molecules in three well-known high-mass protostars for which disks or toroids have been claimed and to study the similarities and differences with a sample of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) without evidence of such flattened disk-like structures. With a disk-like geometry, UV radiation can escape more readily and potentially affect the ice and gas chemistry on hot-core scales. Methods: A partial submillimeter line survey, targeting CH3OH, H2CO, C2H5OH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CN, HNCO, NH2CHO, C2H5CN, CH2CO, HCOOH, CH3CHO, and CH3CCH, was made toward three massive YSOs with disk-like structures, IRAS 20126+4104, IRAS 18089-1732, and G31.41+0.31. Rotation temperatures and column densities were determined by the rotation diagram method, as well as by independent spectral modeling. The molecular abundances were compared with previous observations of massive YSOs without evidence of any disk structure, targeting the same molecules with the same settings and using the same analysis method. Results: Consistent with previous studies, different complex organic species have different characteristic rotation temperatures and can be classified either as warm (>100 K) or cold (<100 K). The excitation temperatures and abundance ratios are similar from source to source and no significant difference can be established between the two source types. Acetone, CH3COCH3, is detected for the first time in G31.41+0.31 and IRAS 18089-1732. Temperatures and abundances derived from the two analysis methods generally agree within factors of a few. Conclusions: The lack of chemical differentiation between massive YSOs with and without observed disks suggest either that the chemical complexity is already fully established in the ices in the cold prestellar phase or that the material experiences similar physical conditions and UV exposure through outflow cavities during the short embedded lifetime. Appendices are available in electronic form

  12. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early Massive Star Formation Regions: An Ionized Jet toward G11.11-0.12P1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; McCoy, M.; Kurtz, S.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Araya, E. D.; Loinard, L.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Cesaroni, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We report 1.3 cm and 6 cm continuum observations toward the massive proto-stellar candidate G11.11-0.12P1 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We detect a string of four unresolved radio continuum sources coincident with the mid-infrared source in G11P1. The continuum sources have positive spectral indices consistent with a thermal (free-free) ionized jet. The most likely origins of the ionized gas are shocks due to the interaction of a stellar wind with the surrounding high-density material. We also present NIR United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) archival data that show an extended structure detected only at K band (2.2 μm), which is oriented perpendicular to the jet, and that may be scattered light from a circumstellar disk around the massive protostar. Our observations plus the UKIRT archival data thus provide new evidence that a disk/jet system is present in the massive proto-stellar candidate located in the G11.11-0.12P1 core.

  13. Weak and compact radio emission in early massive star formation regions: an ionized jet toward G11.11–0.12P1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; McCoy, M.; Kurtz, S.; Loinard, L.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Araya, E. D.; Cesaroni, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We report 1.3 cm and 6 cm continuum observations toward the massive proto-stellar candidate G11.11–0.12P1 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We detect a string of four unresolved radio continuum sources coincident with the mid-infrared source in G11P1. The continuum sources have positive spectral indices consistent with a thermal (free-free) ionized jet. The most likely origins of the ionized gas are shocks due to the interaction of a stellar wind with the surrounding high-density material. We also present NIR United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) archival data that show an extended structure detected only at K band (2.2 μm), which is oriented perpendicular to the jet, and that may be scattered light from a circumstellar disk around the massive protostar. Our observations plus the UKIRT archival data thus provide new evidence that a disk/jet system is present in the massive proto-stellar candidate located in the G11.11–0.12P1 core.

  14. Periodicity of Eclipsing Binary Star GK Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    Eclipsing Binary stars are stars in which there is some mass exchange taking place between two main bodies. This mass exchange produces a change in the magnitude or “brightness” of the star. The star known as GK Cephius has been listed as an eclipsing binary in number of publications, journal articles, and data tables. If the light curve is examined carefully, it exhibits some behavior that is not typical of simple eclipsing binary stars. A study of this light curve is underway to examine the possibility of another gravitational influence being at work in the region of this star. In this paper we will report on the predictions concerning an additional candidate that may be influencing the light curves of the GK Cephius system.

  15. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  16. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  17. Massive Acquision of Asteroid Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodrian, R. J.

    A massive data acquisition programme based on minirobotic techniques is described. A mother spaceship would transport a load of "minilanders" close to the asteroid belt and direct them to asteroids having a given minimal size. Close to 100 such minilanders with miniprobes and minirobots could be transported by one spaceship. Each would have its own propulsion and guidance system, as well as radio contact with the mother ship. They would anchor on the asteroids and measure physical and composition data. Asteroids often consist of a single valuable element and could be transported, using solar sails, towards the earth's orbit or to a lunar location for utilization.

  18. WATER VAPOR IN THE INNER 25 AU OF A YOUNG DISK AROUND A LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. E-mail: ewine@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2010-02-10

    Water is one of the key molecules in the physical and chemical evolution of star- and planet-forming regions. We here report the first spatially resolved observation of thermal emission of (an isotopologue of) water with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer toward the deeply embedded Class 0 protostar NGC 1333-IRAS4B. The observations of the H{sup 18} {sub 2}O 3{sub 1,3}-2{sub 2,0} transition at 203.4 GHz resolve the emission of water toward this source with an extent of about 0.''2 corresponding to the inner 25 AU (radius). The H{sup 18} {sub 2}O emission reveals a tentative velocity gradient perpendicular to the extent of the protostellar outflow/jet probed by observations of CO rotational transitions and water masers. The line is narrow, {approx}1 km s{sup -1} (FWHM), significantly less than what would be expected for emission from an infalling envelope or accretion shock, but consistent with emission from a disk seen at a low inclination angle. The water column density inferred from these data suggests that the water emitting gas is a thin warm layer containing about 25 M {sub Earth} of material, 0.03% of the total disk mass traced by continuum observations.

  19. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    DOE PAGES

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the propertiesmore » of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.« less

  20. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the properties of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.

  1. Deuterated water in the solar-type protostars NGC 1333 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Cabrit, S.; Codella, C.; Kristensen, L. E.; Ceccarelli, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Bottinelli, S.; Castets, A.; Caux, E.; Comito, C.; Demyk, K.; Herpin, F.; Lefloch, B.; McCoey, C.; Mottram, J. C.; Parise, B.; Taquet, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Visser, R.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The measure of the water deuterium fractionation is a relevant tool for understanding mechanisms of water formation and evolution from the prestellar phase to the formation of planets and comets. Aims: The aim of this paper is to study deuterated water in the solar-type protostars NGC 1333 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B, to compare their HDO abundance distributions with other star-forming regions, and to constrain their HDO/H2O abundance ratios. Methods: Using the Herschel/HIFI instrument as well as ground-based telescopes, we observed several HDO lines covering a large excitation range (Eup/k = 22-168 K) towards these protostars and an outflow position. Non-local thermal equilibrium radiative transfer codes were then used to determine the HDO abundance profiles in these sources. Results: The HDO fundamental line profiles show a very broad component, tracing the molecular outflows, in addition to a narrower emission component and a narrow absorbing component. In the protostellar envelope of NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, the HDO inner (T ≥ 100 K) and outer (T < 100 K) abundances with respect to H2 are estimated with a 3σ uncertainty at 7.5-3.0+3.5 × 10-9 and 1.2-0.4+0.4 × 10-11, respectively, whereas in NGC 1333 IRAS 4B they are 1-0.9+1.8 × 10-8 and 1.2-0.4+0.6 × 10-10, respectively. Similarly to the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422, an absorbing outer layer with an enhanced abundance of deuterated water is required to reproduce the absorbing components seen in the fundamental lines at 465 and 894 GHz in both sources. This water-rich layer is probably extended enough to encompass the two sources, as well as parts of the outflows. In the outflows emanating from NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, the HDO column density is estimated at about (2-4) × 1013 cm-2, leading to an abundance of about (0.7-1.9) × 10-9. An HDO/H2O ratio between 7 × 10-4 and 9 × 10-2 is also derived in the outflows. In the warm inner regions of these two sources, we estimate the HDO/H2O ratios at about 1 × 10

  2. THE MAGNETIZED ENVIRONMENT OF THE W3(H{sub 2}O) PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Rao, Ramprasad; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Wilner, David J.

    2012-05-20

    We present the first interferometric polarization map of the W3(OH) massive star-forming region observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 878 {mu}m with an angular resolution of 1.''5 (about 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} AU). Polarization is detected in the W3(H{sub 2}O) hot core, an extended emission structure in the northwest of W3(H{sub 2}O), and part of the W3(OH) ultracompact H II region. The W3(H{sub 2}O) hot core is known to be associated with a synchrotron jet along the east-west direction. In this core, the inferred magnetic field orientation is well aligned with the synchrotron jet and close to the plane of sky. Using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method with the observed dispersion in polarization angle, we estimate a plane-of-sky magnetic field strength of 17.0 mG. Combined with water maser Zeeman measurements, the total magnetic field strength is estimated to be 17.1 mG, comparable to the field strength estimated from the synchrotron model. The magnetic field energy dominates over turbulence in this core. In addition, the depolarization effect is discerned in both SMA and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope measurements. Despite the great difference in angular resolutions and map extents, the polarization percentage shows a similar power-law dependence with the beam averaged column density. We suggest that the column density may be an important factor to consider when interpreting the depolarization effect.

  3. Solid holography and massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  4. G11.92-0.61 MM1: a Keplerian disc around a massive young proto-O star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilee, J. D.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Nazari, P.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Forgan, D. H.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-11-01

    The formation process of massive stars is not well understood, and advancement in our understanding benefits from high-resolution observations and modelling of the gas and dust surrounding individual high-mass (proto)stars. Here, we report subarcsecond (≲1550 au) resolution observations of the young massive star G11.92-0.61 MM1 with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Very Large Array (VLA). Our 1.3 mm SMA observations reveal consistent velocity gradients in compact molecular line emission from species such as CH3CN, CH3OH, OCS, HNCO, H2CO, DCN and CH3CH2CN, oriented perpendicular to the previously reported bipolar molecular outflow from MM1. Modelling of the compact gas kinematics suggests a structure undergoing rotation around the peak of the dust continuum emission. The rotational profile can be well fitted by a model of a Keplerian disc, including infall, surrounding an enclosed mass of ˜30-60 M⊙, of which 2-3 M⊙ is attributed to the disc. From modelling the CH3CN emission, we determine that two temperature components, of ˜150 K and 230 K, are required to adequately reproduce the spectra. Our 0.9 and 3.0 cm VLA continuum data exhibit an excess above the level expected from dust emission; the full centimetre-submillimetre wavelength spectral energy distribution of MM1 is well reproduced by a model including dust emission, an unresolved hypercompact H II region, and a compact ionized jet. In combination, our results suggest that MM1 is an example of a massive proto-O star forming via disc accretion, in a similar way to that of lower mass stars.

  5. Increased Understanding of Accretion in Massive YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Willem-Jan; Caratti, A.; Kraus, S.

    2017-06-01

    That massive stars up to 20Msol form by disk accretion is by now reasonably well established. We will present the latest observational results for the formation of single and multiple massive YSOs. By means of optical interferometry using the newly commissioned instrument Gravity at the VLT-I, we show the discovery of a young, embedded, 170AU-wide binary and is the most massive and most compact accreting young binary to date. We will also present the results of a multi-site multi-epoch follow-up campaign of the first well studied accretion outburst in a massive YSO.

  6. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA.

  7. The physics of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Gibrat-Debu, F.; Perrier, F.; Kayser, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the physics and phenomenology of massive neutrinos. The authors argue that neutrino mass is not unlikely and consider briefly the search for evidence of this mass in decay processes before they examine the physics and phenomenology of neutrino oscillation. The physics of Majorana neutrinos (neutrinos which are their own antiparticles) is then discussed. Firstly, a number of basic properties of such neutrinos are established without using any field theory. Then the field-theory description of a Majorana particle is introduced and used to treat such processes as neutrinos double beta decay. Finally, there is a treatment of neutrino masses in gauge theories and a derivation of the seesaw relation, which explains why neutrino masses are so small by relating them to the inverse of a large mass scale.

  8. Massively parallel MRI detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-04-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas via reception, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called "ultimate" SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  10. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  11. Stable massive particles at colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbairn, M.; Kraan, A.C.; Milstead, D.A.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  12. Light weakly interacting massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2017-08-01

    Light weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are dark matter particle candidates with weak scale interaction with the known particles, and mass in the GeV to tens of GeV range. Hints of light WIMPs have appeared in several dark matter searches in the last decade. The unprecedented possible coincidence into tantalizingly close regions of mass and cross section of four separate direct detection experimental hints and a potential indirect detection signal in gamma rays from the galactic center, aroused considerable interest in our field. Even if these hints did not so far result in a discovery, they have had a significant impact in our field. Here we review the evidence for and against light WIMPs as dark matter candidates and discuss future relevant experiments and observations.