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Sample records for massive protostar cepheus

  1. The Circumstellar Structure and Excitation Effects around the Massive Protostar Cepheus A HW 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, J. M.; Patel, N. A.; Curiel, S.; Ho, P. T. P.; Garay, G.; Rodríguez, L. F.

    2007-09-01

    We report SMA 335 GHz continuum observations with angular resolution of ~0.3", together with VLA ammonia observations with ~1" resolution toward Cep A HW 2. We find that the flattened disk structure of the dust emission observed by Patel et al. is preserved at the 0.3" scale, showing an elongated structure of ~0.6" size (450 AU) peaking on HW 2. In addition, two ammonia cores are observed, one associated with a hot core previously reported and an elongated core with a double peak separated by ~1.3", with signs of heating at the inner edges of the gas facing HW 2. The double-peaked ammonia structure, as well as the double-peaked CH3CN structure reported previously (and proposed to be two independent hot cores), surround both the dust emission as well as the double-peaked SO2 disk structure found by Jiménez-Serra et al. All these results argue against the interpretation of the elongated dust-gas structure as due to a chance superposition of different cores; instead, they imply that it is physically related to the central massive object within a ``disk-protostar-jet '' system.

  2. Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (abbrev. Cep, gen. Cephei; area 588 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Draco and Cassiopeia, and culminates at midnight in late August. It is named after King Cepheus, husband of Queen Cassiopeia and father of Andromeda in Greek mythology. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  3. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Bieging, J.; Araya, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  4. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  5. Peering to the Heart of Massive Star Birth - V. Highest Priority Massive Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    As part of an on-going, multi-year program to build up a sample of massive and intermediate-mass protostars that are observed across MIR and FIR bands to test theoretical models of massive star formation, we propose to observe about 15 highest priority massive protostar targets with SOFIA-FORCAST with this Regular Program proposal. Especially the unique 37 micron imaging can help reveal thermal emission from outflow cavities and the relative fluxes from the near and far-facing sides probes the amount of dense gas in the immediate vicinity of the protostar. Core Accretion models generally involve larger quantities of such gas than Competitive Accretion models. We will compare observational results against specific predictions of a grid of radiative transfer simulations developed for the Turbulent Core Model of massive star formation.

  6. VLA and CARMA observations of protostars in the Cepheus clouds: Sub-arcsecond proto-binaries formed via disk fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Chandler, Claire J.; Wilner, David J.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Kwon, Woojin

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of λ = 7.3 mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of ∼0.''06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at λ = 1.3 mm with a best resolution of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at λ = 3.4 mm with a best resolution of ∼3'' (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We suggest that these companions may have formed from disk fragmentation; turbulent fragmentation would not preferentially arrange the binary companions to be orthogonal to the outflow direction. For L1165-SMM1, both the 7.3 mm and 1.3 mm emission show evidence of a large (R > 100 AU) disk. For the L1165-SMM1 primary protostar and the CB230 IRS1 secondary protostar, the 7.3 mm emission is resolved into structures consistent with ∼20 AU radius disks. For the other protostars, including L1157-mm, the emission is unresolved, suggesting disks with radii <20 AU.

  7. Reflected infrared spectrum of a massive protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Morino, J I; Yamashita, T; Hasegawa, T; Nakano, T

    1998-05-28

    The infrared source IRc2 in the star-forming region Orion-KL is generally believed to contain a massive and very young star. Its nature and evolutionary status, however, are difficult to determine because it is hidden from direct view by a dense disklike envelope of gas and dust. Here we report observations of infrared radiation (at a wavelength of about 2 microm) that has escaped the surrounding dust in the polar direction, perpendicular to the plane of the disk, and then been reflected towards us by dust farther away from the star. The reflected spectrum contains absorption lines of neutral metallic atoms and carbon monoxide, which we interpret as indicating a source temperature of about 4,500 K. But, given the luminosity of the source, its radius must be at least 300 solar radii-too large to be attained with the modest gas-accretion rates in existing theories of massive-star formation. Whether the infrared radiation is coming from the protostar itself or the self-luminous accretion disk around it, the accretion rate must be around (5-15) x 10(-3) solar masses per year, at least two orders of magnitude greater than is commonly assumed in models of star formation.

  8. Spectacular Spitzer Images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a Young, Massive-Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, William T.; Lefloch, Bertrand; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, highlighting the nebula's special evolutionary stage. The images feature recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stellar objects, and a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed, and unveil large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. Multiple protostars are detected in the infrared, within the cold dust cores of TC3 and TC4, which were previously defined as Class 0. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~160 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify them into different evolutionary stages. The diagram also revealed a unique group of YSOs that are bright at 24 μm but have the spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8 μm. Despite expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars. The mid-infrared emission of the protostars can be fit by two temperatures of 150 and 400 K; the hot core region is probably optically thin in the mid-infrared regime, and the size of hot core is much smaller than that of the cold envelope. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive star in the TC3 cluster is located at the center of the cluster and at the bottom of the gravitational potential well.

  9. ON THE SIMULTANEOUS EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE PROTOSTARS AND THEIR HOST CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, R.; Yorke, H. W. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2013-07-20

    Studies of the evolution of massive protostars and the evolution of their host molecular cloud cores are commonly treated as separate problems. However, interdependencies between the two can be significant. Here, we study the simultaneous evolution of massive protostars and their host molecular cores using a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code that incorporates the effects of the thermal pressure and radiative acceleration feedback of the centrally forming protostar. The evolution of the massive protostar is computed simultaneously using the stellar evolution code STELLAR, modified to include the effects of variable accretion. The interdependencies are studied in three different collapse scenarios. For comparison, stellar evolutionary tracks at constant accretion rates and the evolution of the host cores using pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks are computed. The resulting interdependencies of the protostellar evolution and the evolution of the environment are extremely diverse and depend on the order of events, in particular the time of circumstellar accretion disk formation with respect to the onset of the bloating phase of the star. Feedback mechanisms affect the instantaneous accretion rate and the protostar's radius, temperature, and luminosity on timescales t {<=} 5 kyr, corresponding to the accretion timescale and Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction timescale, respectively. Nevertheless, it is possible to approximate the overall protostellar evolution in many cases by pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks assuming appropriate constant average accretion rates.

  10. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2005-07-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources ``Hot excess'' YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early protostars are

  11. Arcsecond-Scale Kinematic and Chemical Complexity in Cepheus A East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogan, C. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Hunter, T. R.; Shirley, Y. L.; Sarma, A. P.

    2007-05-01

    We present results from Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the star-forming region Cepheus A East at ~340 GHz (875 μm) with 0.7"-2" resolution. At least four compact submillimeter continuum sources have been detected as well as a rich forest of hot core line emission. Two kinematically, chemically, and thermally distinct regions of molecular emission are present in the vicinity of the HW2 thermal jet, both spatially distinct from the submillimeter counterpart to HW2. We propose that this emission is indicative of multiple protostars rather than a massive disk as reported by Patel et al.

  12. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20; see Figure 1) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources "Hot excess" YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be "starless" cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early

  13. Stellar physics. Observing the onset of outflow collimation in a massive protostar.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-González, C; Torrelles, J M; Cantó, J; Curiel, S; Surcis, G; Vlemmings, W H T; van Langevelde, H J; Goddi, C; Anglada, G; Kim, S-W; Kim, J-S; Gómez, J F

    2015-04-01

    The current paradigm of star formation through accretion disks, and magnetohydrodynamically driven gas ejections, predicts the development of collimated outflows, rather than expansion without any preferential direction. We present radio continuum observations of the massive protostar W75N(B)-VLA 2, showing that it is a thermal, collimated ionized wind and that it has evolved in 18 years from a compact source into an elongated one. This is consistent with the evolution of the associated expanding water-vapor maser shell, which changed from a nearly circular morphology, tracing an almost isotropic outflow, to an elliptical one outlining collimated motions. We model this behavior in terms of an episodic, short-lived, originally isotropic ionized wind whose morphology evolves as it moves within a toroidal density stratification. PMID:25838383

  14. Stellar physics. Observing the onset of outflow collimation in a massive protostar.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-González, C; Torrelles, J M; Cantó, J; Curiel, S; Surcis, G; Vlemmings, W H T; van Langevelde, H J; Goddi, C; Anglada, G; Kim, S-W; Kim, J-S; Gómez, J F

    2015-04-01

    The current paradigm of star formation through accretion disks, and magnetohydrodynamically driven gas ejections, predicts the development of collimated outflows, rather than expansion without any preferential direction. We present radio continuum observations of the massive protostar W75N(B)-VLA 2, showing that it is a thermal, collimated ionized wind and that it has evolved in 18 years from a compact source into an elongated one. This is consistent with the evolution of the associated expanding water-vapor maser shell, which changed from a nearly circular morphology, tracing an almost isotropic outflow, to an elliptical one outlining collimated motions. We model this behavior in terms of an episodic, short-lived, originally isotropic ionized wind whose morphology evolves as it moves within a toroidal density stratification.

  15. RESOLVING THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AROUND THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR DRIVING THE HH 80-81 JET

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Anglada, Guillem; Osorio, Mayra; D'Alessio, Paola; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Hofner, Peter; Linz, Hendrik; Araya, Esteban D.

    2012-06-20

    We present new high angular resolution observations toward the driving source of the HH 80-81 jet (IRAS 18162-2048). Continuum emission was observed with the Very Large Array at 7 mm and 1.3 cm, and with the Submillimeter Array at 860 {mu}m, with angular resolutions of {approx}0.''1 and {approx}0.''8, respectively. Submillimeter observations of the sulfur oxide (SO) molecule are reported as well. At 1.3 cm the emission traces the well-known radio jet, while at 7 mm the continuum morphology is quadrupolar and seems to be produced by a combination of free-free and dust emission. An elongated structure perpendicular to the jet remains in the 7 mm image after subtraction of the free-free contribution. This structure is interpreted as a compact accretion disk of {approx}200 AU radius. Our interpretation is favored by the presence of rotation in our SO observations observed at larger scales. The observations presented here add to the small list of cases where the hundred-AU scale emission from a circumstellar disk around a massive protostar has been resolved.

  16. Evidence for a solar system-size accretion disk around the massive protostar G192.16-3.82.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, D S; Claussen, M J; Kurtz, S E

    2001-05-25

    Seven-millimeter continuum observations of a massive bipolar outflow source, G192.16-3.82, were made at a milli-arc-second resolution with a capability that links the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array radio interferometer with the Very Long Baseline Array antenna, located in Pie Town, New Mexico. The observations provide evidence for a true accretion disk that is about the size of our solar system and located around a massive star. A model of the radio emission suggests the presence of a binary protostellar system. The primary protostar, G192 S1, at the center of the outflow, with a protostar mass of about 8 to 10 times the solar mass, is surrounded by an accretion disk with a diameter of 130 astronomical units (AU). The mass of the disk is on the order of the protostar mass. The outflow is poorly collimated with a full opening angle of about 40 degrees; there is no indication of a more highly collimated jetlike component. The companion source, G192 S2, is located 80 AU north of the primary source.

  17. A HOT MOLECULAR CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AROUND THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR ORION SOURCE I

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2014-02-20

    We report new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a circumstellar disk around Source I in Orion KL, an archetype of massive protostar candidates. We detected two ortho-H{sub 2}O lines at 321 GHz (10{sub 2,} {sub 9}-9{sub 3,} {sub 6}) and 336 GHz (ν{sub 2} = 1, 5{sub 2,} {sub 3}-6{sub 1,} {sub 6}) for the first time in Source I. The latter one is in a vibrationally excited state at the lower state energy of 2939 K, suggesting evidence of hot molecular gas close to Source I. The integrated intensity map of the 321 GHz line is elongated along the bipolar outflow while the 336 GHz line map is unresolved with a beam size of 0.''4. Both of these maps show velocity gradients perpendicular to the bipolar outflow. The velocity centroid map of the 321 GHz line implies a spatial and velocity structure similar to that of vibrationally excited SiO masers tracing the root of the outflow emanating from the disk surface. In contrast, the 336 GHz line is most likely emitting from the disk midplane with a diameter of 0.''2 (84 AU) as traced by radio continuum emission and a dark lane devoid of the vibrationally excited SiO maser emission. The observed velocity gradient and the spectral profile of the 336 GHz H{sub 2}O line can be reconciled with a model of an edge-on ring-like structure with an enclosed mass of >7 M{sub ☉} and an excitation temperature of >3000 K. The present results provide further evidence of a hot and neutral circumstellar disk rotating around Source I with a diameter of ∼100 AU scale.

  18. Simulating the Formation of Massive Protostars. I. Radiative Feedback and Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi

    2016-05-01

    We present radiation hydrodynamic simulations of collapsing protostellar cores with initial masses of 30, 100, and 200 M ⊙. We follow their gravitational collapse and the formation of a massive protostar and protostellar accretion disk. We employ a new hybrid radiative feedback method blending raytracing techniques with flux-limited diffusion for a more accurate treatment of the temperature and radiative force. In each case, the disk that forms becomes Toomre-unstable and develops spiral arms. This occurs between 0.35 and 0.55 freefall times and is accompanied by an increase in the accretion rate by a factor of 2–10. Although the disk becomes unstable, no other stars are formed. In the case of our 100 and 200 M ⊙ simulations, the star becomes highly super-Eddington and begins to drive bipolar outflow cavities that expand outwards. These radiatively driven bubbles appear stable, and appear to be channeling gas back onto the protostellar accretion disk. Accretion proceeds strongly through the disk. After 81.4 kyr of evolution, our 30 M ⊙ simulation shows a star with a mass of 5.48 M ⊙ and a disk of mass 3.3 M ⊙, while our 100 M ⊙ simulation forms a 28.8 M ⊙ mass star with a 15.8 M ⊙ disk over the course of 41.6 kyr, and our 200 M ⊙ simulation forms a 43.7 M ⊙ star with an 18 M ⊙ disk in 21.9 kyr. In the absence of magnetic fields or other forms of feedback, the masses of the stars in our simulation do not appear to be limited by their own luminosities.

  19. Gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Lahuis, F.; Wright, C. M.; Doty, S. D.

    2000-11-01

    We present a study of gas-phase H2O and CO2 towards a sample of 14 massive protostars with the ISO-SWS. Modeling of the H2O spectra using a homogeneous model with a constant excitation temperature Tex shows that the H2O abundances increase with temperature, up to a few times 10-5 with respect to H2 for the hottest sources (Tex~ 500 K). This is still a factor of 10 lower than the H2O ice abundances observed towards cold sources in which evaporation is not significant (Keane et al. 2000). Gas-phase CO2 is not abundant in our sources. The abundances are nearly constant for Tex >~ 100 K at a value of a few times 10-7, much lower than the solid-state abundances of ~1-3× 10-6 (Gerakines et al. 1999). Gas/solid ratios have been determined, using the solid-state features of H2O (Keane et al. 2000) and CO2 (Gerakines et al. 1999) as observed with ISO-SWS towards the same objects. For both H2O and CO2 the gas/solid ratio increases with temperature, but the increase is much stronger for H2O than for CO2, suggesting a different type of chemistry. In addition to the homogeneous models, a power law model has been developed for one of our sources, based on the physical structure of this region as determined from submillimeter data by van der Tak et al. (1999). The resulting H2O model spectrum gives a good fit to the data.

  20. [Fe II] Emission Tracing Massive, Irradiated Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    We present new spectroscopy and HST and ground-based AO imaging of five protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars, but is excited by non-ionizing FUV photons that penetrate the ionization front within the jet. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude higher than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (~2-8 Msun) protostars. For two of the sources, mid-IR luminosities of the driving sources are clearly consistent with intermediate-mass protostars, while the other two driving sources are more deeply embedded and require imaging at longer wavelengths with high spatial resolution to confirm their luminosity. Tangential velocities from new proper motion measurements exceed velocities typical for lower-luminosity sources (100-200 km/s). In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exists in a feedback dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  1. Tracing Massive Protostellar Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present new spectroscopy and imaging of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in the Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude larger than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (around 2 - 8 solar masses) protostars. Velocities from new proper motion and spectroscopic measurements fall among the velocities typically measured in lower-luminosity sources (100 - 200 km/s). We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a feedback-dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to 8 solar masses form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  2. Multiple monopolar outflows driven by massive protostars in IRAS 18162-2048

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-López, M.; Girart, J. M.; Curiel, S.; Fonfría, J. P.; Zapata, L. A.; Qiu, K. E-mail: girart@ieec.cat

    2013-11-20

    In this article, we present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 3.5 mm observations and SubMillimeter Array (SMA) 870 μm observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 18162-2048, which is the core of the HH 80/81/80N system. Molecular emission from HCN, HCO{sup +}, and SiO traces two molecular outflows (the so-called northeast and northwest outflows). These outflows have their origin in a region close to the position of MM2, a millimeter source known to harbor two protostars. For the first time we estimate the physical characteristics of these molecular outflows, which are similar to those of 10{sup 3}-5 × 10{sup 3} L {sub ☉} protostars, and suggest that MM2 harbors high-mass protostars. High-angular resolution CO observations show an additional outflow due southeast. Also for the first time, we identify its driving source, MM2(E), and see evidence of precession. All three outflows have a monopolar appearance, but we link the NW and SE lobes, and explain their asymmetric shape as being a consequence of possible deflection.

  3. Challenging shock models with SOFIA OH observations in the high-mass star-forming region Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Codella, C.; Csengeri, T.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Heyminck, S.; Jacobs, K.; Kristensen, L. E.; Leurini, S.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. OH is a key molecule in H2O chemistry, a valuable tool for probing physical conditions, and an important contributor to the cooling of shock regions around high-mass protostars. OH participates in the re-distribution of energy from the protostar towards the surrounding Interstellar Medium. Aims: Our aim is to assess the origin of the OH emission from the Cepheus A massive star-forming region and to constrain the physical conditions prevailing in the emitting gas. We thus want to probe the processes at work during the formation of massive stars. Methods: We present spectrally resolved observations of OH towards the protostellar outflows region of Cepheus A with the GREAT spectrometer onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope. Three triplets were observed at 1834.7 GHz, 1837.8 GHz, and 2514.3 GHz (163.4 μm, 163.1 μm between the 2Π1/2 J = 1/2 states, and 119.2 μm, a ground transition between the 2Π3/2 J = 3/2 states), at angular resolutions of 16.̋3, 16.̋3, and 11.̋9, respectively. We also present the CO (16-15) spectrum at the same position. We compared the integrated intensities in the redshifted wings to the results of shock models. Results: The two OH triplets near 163 μm are detected in emission, but with blending hyperfine structure unresolved. Their profiles and that of CO (16-15) can be fitted by a combination of two or three Gaussians. The observed 119.2 μm triplet is seen in absorption, since its blending hyperfine structure is unresolved, but with three line-of-sight components and a blueshifted emission wing consistent with that of the other lines. The OH line wings are similar to those of CO, suggesting that they emanate from the same shocked structure. Conclusions: Under this common origin assumption, the observations fall within the model predictions and within the range of use of our model only if we consider that four shock structures are caught in our beam. Overall, our comparisons suggest that

  4. DISK AND ENVELOPE STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS. I. THE RESOLVED MASSIVE DISK IN SERPENS FIRS 1

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Duchene, Gaspard; Corder, Stuartt

    2009-12-10

    We present the first results of a program to characterize the disk and envelope structure of typical Class 0 protostars in nearby low-mass star-forming regions. We use Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared spectra, high-resolution Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 230 GHz continuum imaging, and two-dimensional radiative transfer models to constrain the envelope structure, as well as the size and mass of the circumprotostellar disk in Serpens FIRS 1. The primary envelope parameters (centrifugal radius, outer radius, outflow opening angle, and inclination) are well constrained by the spectral energy distribution (SED), including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, IRS spectra, and 1.1 mm Bolocam photometry. These together with the excellent uv-coverage (4.5-500 klambda) of multiple antenna configurations with CARMA allow for a robust separation of the envelope and a resolved disk. The SED of Serpens FIRS 1 is best fit by an envelope with the density profile of a rotating, collapsing spheroid with an inner (centrifugal) radius of approximately 600 AU, and the millimeter data by a large resolved disk with M{sub disk} approx 1.0 M {sub sun} and R{sub disk} approx 300 AU. These results suggest that large, massive disks can be present early in the main accretion phase. Results for the larger, unbiased sample of Class 0 sources in the Perseus, Serpens, and Ophiuchus molecular clouds are needed to determine if relatively massive disks are typical in the Class 0 stage.

  5. The Mystery of Sulfur in Dense Environments: EXES Spectroscopy of Sulfur Dioxide toward Massive Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, Adwin

    2015-10-01

    The sulfur element in dense clouds and the envelopes and disks of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is surrounded by mystery. Only 4% of the cosmic sulfur budget is accounted for in known molecules, i.e., 96% is missing! Also, the chemical origin of the detected molecules (their progenitors) is unclear. The warm SO2 gas seen toward massive YSOs by ro-vibrational spectroscopy at 7.35 micron with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is two orders of magnitude more abundant than the widespread SO2 emission seen by pure rotational transitions at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. It likely originates close to the star, and is picked up along the pencil absorption beam at 7.35 micron. We propose to observe the nu_3 S-O stretching mode of SO2 toward three massive YSOs at high (R=50,000, 6 km/s) resolving power with EXES/SOFIA. Many ro-vibrational transitions are expected to be resolved, as opposed to the R~2,000 observations by ISO/SWS. The proposed observations are unique. The 7.35 micron band of SO2 is an order of magnitude stronger than other vibrational modes, and (sub-)millimeter facilities lack sensitivity at the small spatial scales. We will compare the SO2 line profiles over a range of energy levels with those of available VLT and Keck CO isotopologue spectra and with proposed EXES observations of H2O. The stable CO molecule is present everywhere along the sight-line, while H2O sublimates from the grains and is formed in the gas phase at higher temperatures. The observed SO2 may originate from gas phase oxidation of atomic sulfur, but only at temperature below ~230 K as at higher temperatures the oxygen is rapidly driven into H2O. The observations will shed light on S-containing progenitor species: a yet unidentifed ice or grain species?

  6. DISCOVERY OF INTERSTELLAR ANIONS IN CEPHEUS AND AURIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.; Millar, T. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C{sub 6}H{sup -} and its parent neutral C{sub 6}H in the star-forming region L1251A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core L1512 (in Auriga). The carbon-chain-bearing species C{sub 4}H, HC{sub 3}N, HC{sub 5}N, HC{sub 7}N, and C{sub 3}S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC{sub 3}N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for L1512. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  7. Discovery of Interstellar Anions in Cepheus and Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H in the star-forming region LI251 A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core LI512 (in Auriga). The carbon chain-bearing species C4H, HC3N, HC5N, HC7N, and C3S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC3N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for LI5l2. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  8. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  9. Multi-Wavelength Views of Protostars in IC 1396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a glowing stellar nursery within a dark globule that is opaque at visible light. These new images pierce through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and young stars never before seen.

    The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas.

    The large composite image above is a product of combining data from the observatory's multiband imaging photometer and the infrared array camera. The thermal emission at 24 microns measured by the photometer (red) is combined with near-infrared emission from the camera at 3.6/4.5 microns (blue) and from 5.8/8.0 microns (green). The colors of the diffuse emission and filaments vary, and are a combination of molecular hydrogen (which tends to be green) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (brown) emissions.

    Within the globule, a half dozen newly discovered protostars, or embryonic stars, are easily discernible as the bright red-tinted objects, mostly along the southern rim of the globule. These were previously undetected at visible wavelengths due to obscuration by the thick cloud ('globule body') and by dust surrounding the newly forming stars. The newborn stars form in the dense gas because of compression by the wind and radiation from a nearby massive star (located outside the field of view to the left). The winds from this unseen star are also responsible for producing the

  10. X-rays from Cepheus A East and West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-rays from both components of Cepheus A, East and West, with the XMM-Newton observatory. HH 168 joins the ranks of other energetic Herbig-Haro objects that are sources of T &GE; 10(6) K X-ray emission. The effective temperature of HH 168 is T = 5.8(-2.3)(+3.5) x 10(6) K, and its unabsorbed luminosity is 1: 1; 10(29) ergs s(-1), making it hotter and less luminous than other representatives of its class. We also detect prominent X-ray emission from the complex of compact radio sources believed to be the power sources for Cep A. We call this source HWX, and it is distinguished by its hard X-ray spectrum, T = 1.2(-0.5)(+1.2) 10(8) K, and its complex spatial distribution. It may arise from one or more protostars associated with the radio complex, the outflows, or a combination of the two. We detect 102 X-ray sources, many presumed to be pre-main-sequence stars on the basis of the reddening of their optical and IR counterparts.

  11. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  12. Proceedings of Protostars and Planets V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Oral presentation sessions in this conference include: Clouds and cores; Star formation and protostars; Binaries and multiples; Newborn massive stars; jets and outflows; Clusters and associations; T Tauri stars and disks; Brown dwarfs; Planet formation and evolution; Extrasolar planets; Dust and protoplanetary disks; Early solar system and Astrobiology. Poster presentations included: Clouds and Cores. Collapse and Protostars, Binaries and Multiples, Clusters, Associations, and the IMF, Jets and Outflows, T Tauri Stars and Other Young Stars, Disks and Disk Accretion, Brown Dwarfs, Herbig Ae/Be Stars and Massive Stars, Solar System Objects, Planet Formation, Extrasolar Planets and Planet Detection, Properties of Protoplanetary Disks, Migration and Planetary Orbits and Meteoritics and Astrobiology

  13. X-rays From The Exciting Region Of Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdo, Steven; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2009-09-01

    We report an observation of X-ray emission from the exciting region of Cepheus A with the Chandra/ACIS instrument. What had been an unresolved X-ray source comprising the putative power sources is now resolved into at least 3 point-like sources, each with similar X-ray properties and differing radio and submillimeter properties. They each have inferred X-ray luminosities ≥ 10^{31} erg s^{-1} with hard spectra, T ≥ 10^7 K, and high low-energy absorption equivalent to tens to as much as a hundred magnitudes of visual absorption. The star usually assumed to be the most massive and energetic, HW2, is not detected with an upper limit about 7 times lower than the detections. The X-rays may arise via thermal bremsstrahlung in diffuse emission regions associated with a gyrosynchrotron source for the radio emission, or they could arise from powerful stellar winds. We also analyzed the Spitzer/IRAC mid-IR observation from this star-formation region and present the X-ray results and mid-IR classifications of the nearby stars. The X-ray emission from HH 168 is confirmed and it is not as underluminous in X-rays as previously believed. Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  14. Monitoring the Far Infrared Variability of Deeply Embedded Protostars with SOFIA/HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug

    2015-10-01

    Low-mass stars form via gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores. The evolution of the mass accretion onto a forming protostar depends on the rate at which the interior of the core collapses, the significance of a circumstellar disk as a temporary mass reservoir, and the physics of how the gas is transported through the disk and accretes onto the central star. Despite a clear requirement for time dependency in the accretion rate onto deeply embedded protostars and a large number of theoretical mechanisms for powering variability, our understanding of both the timescale and amplitude of variability is almost entirely unconstrained. The bolometric luminosity of deeply embedded protostars is a direct proxy for the accretion luminosity, modified only by the addition of the stellar luminosity itself. For deeply embedded protostars, the spectral energy distribution peaks in the far infrared, near 100 microns, making this an ideal wavelength for long-term monitoring of accretion variability. We propose to use SOFIA/HAWC at 89 and 154 microns to monitor three star-forming fields (Cepheus, Perseus, and Serpens) as part of a long-term campaign dedicated to uncovering the observational signature of episodic accretion. These observations will aid in our understanding of how stars accumulate their final mass and are neceassry for discriminating between the various theoretical models of episodic accretion onto deeply embedded protostars.

  15. Protostar formation in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-08-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass 1% that of the Sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star.

  16. Protostar formation in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-08-01

    The nature of the first generation of stars in the universe remains largely unknown. Observations imply the existence of massive primordial stars early in the history of the universe, and the standard theory for the growth of cosmic structure predicts that structures grow hierarchically through gravitational instability. We have developed an ab initio computer simulation of the formation of primordial stars that follows the relevant atomic and molecular processes in a primordial gas in an expanding universe. The results show that primeval density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang can drive the formation of a tiny protostar with a mass 1% that of the Sun. The protostar is a seed for the subsequent formation of a massive primordial star. PMID:18669856

  17. High-resolution mm interferometry and the search for massive protostellar disks: the case of Cep-A HW2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comito, Claudia; Schilke, Peter; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Martín-Pintado, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    The direct detection of accretion onto massive protostars through rotating disks constitutes an important tile in the massive-star-formation-theory mosaic. This task is however observationally very challenging. A very interesting example is Cepheus A HW2. The properties of the molecular emission around this YSO seems to suggest the presence of a massive rotating disk (cf. Patel et al. in Nature 437:109, 2005). We have carried out sub-arcsec-resolution PdBI observations of high-density and shock tracers such as SO2, SiO, CH3CN, and CH3OH towards the center of the outflow. A detailed analysis of the spatial distribution and of the velocity field traced by all observed species leads us to conclude that, on a ˜700 AU scale, the Cep-A “disk” is actually the result of the superposition of multiple hot-core-type objects, at least one of them ejecting an outflow at a small angle with respect to the line of sight. Together with the well-known large-scale outflow ejected by HW2, this setup makes for a very complex spatial and kinematic picture.

  18. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    The Protostars and Planets book and conference series has been a long-standing tradition that commenced with the first meeting led by Tom Gehrels and held in Tucson, Arizona, in 1978. The goal then, as it still is today, was to bridge the gap between the fields of star and planet formation as well as the investigation of planetary systems and planets. As Tom Gehrels stated in the preface to the first Protostars and Planets book, "Cross-fertilization of information and understanding is bound to occur when investigators who are familiar with the stellar and interstellar phases meet with those who study the early phases of solar system formation." The central goal remained the same for the subsequent editions of the books and conferences Protostars and Planets II in 1984, Protostars and Planets III in 1990, Protostars and Planets IV in 1998, and Protostars and Planets V in 2005, but has now been greatly expanded by the flood of new discoveries in the field of exoplanet science. The original concept of the Protostars and Planets series also formed the basis for the sixth conference in the series, which took place on July 15-20, 2013. It was held for the first time outside of the United States in the bustling university town of Heidelberg, Germany. The meeting attracted 852 participants from 32 countries, and was centered around 38 review talks and more than 600 posters. The review talks were expanded to form the 38 chapters of this book, written by a total of 250 contributing authors. This Protostars and Planets volume reflects the current state-of-the-art in star and planet formation, and tightly connects the fields with each other. It is structured into four sections covering key aspects of molecular cloud and star formation, disk formation and evolution, planetary systems, and astrophysical conditions for life. All poster presentations from the conference can be found at www.ppvi.org. In the eight years that have passed since the fifth conference and book in the

  19. Waterfalls Around Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schmalzl, M.; Kristensen, L. E.; Visser, R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-07-01

    Water is uniquely sensitive to motion of any kind within the protostellar environment due to its large Einstein A coefficient. As part of the 'Water in star-forming regions with Herschel' (WISH) survey, infall signatures were detected in the HIFI water spectra observed towards 5 Class 0/I protostars observed. The combination of observations of multiple water transitions and full 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer models of protostellar envelopes provides a self-consistent way to probe the physics and chemistry of infalling envelope material.

  20. Characterizing Dust and Ice Toward Protostars in the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteet, Charles Allen

    Protostars are young stars in the process of accreting infalling envelopes of gas and dust which are transported from the diffuse interstellar medium through gravitational collapse. Although the envelopes are commonly thought to be comprised of cold, pristine material from the interstellar medium, recent space-based studies suggest that protostellar envelopes of low- and high-mass protostars contain thermally processed dust and ice. Unlike the envelope material from luminous, massive protostars, where dust and ice are subject to processing by direct stellar irradiation, thermally processed materials in low-mass protostars may be the consequence of accretion-driven outbursts, shocks in protostellar outflows, or transport of materials from the inner disk to the envelope by outflows and winds. We present an analysis of mid-infrared spectra of a large sample of protostars from the Orion Molecular Cloud complex, the most active region of star formation within the nearest 500 pc. The spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope , reveal strong silicate and solid molecular absorption bands. Using spectral decomposition analyses to determine the dust and ice composition toward the protostars, we find that the amorphous silicate composition is more dominated by amorphous pyroxene than dust in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium, and that the mass fraction of amorphous pyroxene varies between protostars. Toward the perplexing protostar HOPS-68, we report the first unambiguous detection of (1) crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling protostellar envelope and (2) highly processed carbon dioxide ice mantles. Moreover, we find evidence for crystalline silicate absorption towards two additional protostars. These results provide strong evidence that dust and ice delivered to planet-forming disks around low-mass stars in the protostellar phase may be processed by feedback from the central protostar.

  1. First detection of CF+ towards a high-mass protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechtenbaum, S.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Herpin, F.; Lefloch, B.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We report the first detection of the J = 1-0 (102.6 GHz) rotational lines of CF+ (fluoromethylidynium ion) towards CygX-N63, a young and massive protostar of the Cygnus X region. Methods: This detection occurred as part of an unbiased spectral survey of this object in the 0.8-3 mm range, performed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. The data were analyzed using a local thermodynamical equilibrium model (LTE model) and a population diagram in order to derive the column density. Results: The line velocity (-4 km s-1) and line width (1.6 km s-1) indicate an origin from the collapsing envelope of the protostar. We obtain a CF+ column density of 4 × 1011 cm-2. The CF+ ion is thought to be a good tracer for C+ and assuming a ratio of 10-6 for CF+/C+, we derive a total number of C+ of 1.2 × 1053 within the beam. There is no evidence of carbon ionization caused by an exterior source of UV photons suggesting that the protostar itself is the source of ionization. Ionization from the protostellar photosphere is not efficient enough. In contrast, X-ray ionization from the accretion shock(s) and UV ionization from outflow shocks could provide a large enough ionizing power to explain our CF+ detection. Conclusions: Surprisingly, CF+ has been detected towards a cold, massive protostar with no sign of an external photon dissociation region (PDR), which means that the only possibility is the existence of a significant inner source of C+. This is an important result that opens interesting perspectives to study the early development of ionized regions and to approach the issue of the evolution of the inner regions of collapsing envelopes of massive protostars. The existence of high energy radiations early in the evolution of massive protostars also has important implications for chemical evolution of dense collapsing gas and could trigger peculiar chemistry and early formation of a hot core. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Dissecting disks around B-type protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Beltran, Maite; Kumar, M. S. Nanda; Stanke, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans; Etoka, Sandra; Galli, Daniele; Hummel, Christian A.; Moscadelli, Luca; Preibisch, Thomas; Ratzka, Thorsten; van der Tak, Floris F. S.; Vig, Sarita; Walmsley, C. Malcolm; Wang, Kuo-Song

    2013-07-01

    Recent theoretical models indicate that OB-type stars could form through disk-mediated accretion, like their low mass counterparts. However, on the observational side, circumstellar disks appear still elusive, especially around the most massive (proto)stars. As for early B-type (proto)stars, an ever growing number of disk candidates has been proposed, but only very few of these present evidence for Keplerian rotation. The advent of ALMA provides us with the necessary sensitivity and angular resolution to assess the existence of such disks and possibly establish their rotation curves. With this in mind, we have performed ALMA observations with the highest possible resolution (~0.4") at 350 GHz to search for circumstellar disks in a couple of presumably massive young stellar objects with luminosities of ~10000 Lsun and associated with bipolar nebulosities suggestive of the presence of disk/outflow systems. By observing simultaneously core and jet tracers, we could reveal molecular cores with velocity gradients perpendicular to the corresponding jets. In at least one case (G35.20-0.74 N), the core structure appears resolved and the velocity field can be fitted with an almost edge-on Keplerian disk rotating about a central mass of 18 Msun. This finding is consistent with the results of a recent study of the CO first overtone bandhead emission at 2.3mum towards G35.20-0.74 N. The disk radius and mass are >2500 au and 3 Msun. To reconcile the observed bolometric luminosity (3x10^4 Lsun) with the estimated stellar mass of 18 Msun, we propose that the latter is the total mass of a binary system.

  3. Constraining the disk masses of the class I binary protostar GV Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.

    2014-08-10

    We present new spatially resolved 1.3 mm imaging with CARMA of the GV Tau system. GV Tau is a Class I binary protostar system in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, the components of which are separated by 1.''2. Each protostar is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, and the pair may be surrounded by a circumbinary envelope. We analyze the data using detailed radiative transfer modeling of the system. We create synthetic protostar model spectra, images, and visibilities and compare them with CARMA 1.3 mm visibilities, a Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared scattered light image, and broadband spectral energy distributions from the literature to study the disk masses and geometries of the GV Tau disks. We show that the protoplanetary disks around GV Tau fall near the lower end of estimates of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, and may have just enough mass to form giant planets. When added to the sample of Class I protostars from Eisner, we confirm that Class I protostars are on average more massive than their Class II counterparts. This suggests that substantial dust grain processing occurs between the Class I and Class II stages, and may help to explain why the Class II protostars do not appear to have, on average, enough mass in their disks to form giant planets.

  4. Multiwavelength Spectroscopy of the Bipolar Outflow from Cepheus E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Froebrich, Dirk; Eislöffel, Jochen

    2003-07-01

    Cepheus E is the site of an exceptional example of a protostellar outflow with a very young dynamical age and extremely high near-infrared luminosity. We combine molecular spectroscopic data from the submillimeter to the near-infrared in order to interpret the rotational excitation of CO and the rovibrational excitation of H2. We conclude that C-type shocks with a paraboloidal bow shock geometry can simultaneously explain all the molecular excitations. Extinction accounts for the deviation of the column densities from local thermodynamic equilibrium. A difference in the extinction between the red- and blueshifted outflow lobes may account for the measured flux difference. The outflow is deeply embedded in a clump of density 105 cm-3, yet a good fraction of atomic hydrogen, about 40%, is required to explain the excitation and statistical equilibrium. We propose that this atomic component arises, self-consistently, from the dissociated gas at the apex of the leading bow shocks and the relatively long molecule reformation time. At least 20 bow shocks are required in each lobe, although these may be subdivided into smaller bows and turbulent shocked regions. The total outflow mechanical power and cooling amounts to over 30 Lsolar, almost half the source's bolometric luminosity. Nevertheless, only about 6% of the clump mass has been set in outward motion by the outflow, allowing a collapse to continue. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  5. Radiative Feedback from Primordial Protostars and Final Mass of the First Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Yorke, Harold W.

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our efforts toward understanding the typical mass-scale of primordial stars. Our direct numerical simulations show that, in both of Population III.1 and III.2 cases, strong UV stellar radiative feedback terminatesmass accretion onto a protostar.AnHII region formed around the protostar very dynamically expands throughout the gas accreting envelope, which cuts off the gas supply to a circumstellar disk. The disk is exposed to the stellar UV radiation and loses its mass by photoevaporation. The derived final masses are 43 Stellar Mass and 17 Stellar Mass in our fiducial Population III.1 and III.2 cases. Much more massive stars should form in other exceptional conditions. In atomic-cooling halos where H2 molecules are dissociated, for instance, a protostar grows via very rapid mass accretion with the rates M* approx. 0.1 - 1 Stellar Mass/yr. Our newstellar evolution calculations show that the protostar significantly inflates and never contracts to reach the ZAMS stage in this case. Such the "supergiant protostars" have very low UV luminosity, which results in weak radiative feedback against the accretion flow. In the early universe, supermassive stars formed through this process might provide massive seeds of supermassive black holes.

  6. Winds from Low Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana; Adams, Fred C.; Ruden, Steven P.

    In its last stages, star formation in molecular clouds includes the onset of a stellar wind that helps to clear away the surrounding placenta of gas and dust, thereby making the young stellar object optically visible. The authors discuss new observational evidence that the emerging wind is largely neutral and atomic in low-mass protostars. They then suggest a simple theoretical mechanism for the generation of such powerful neutral winds.

  7. Observations of feedback between protostars and their natal clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis we explore the relationship between the formation of protostars, and the influence of protostellar outflows on their environment using Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. First we introduce the modern understanding of protostellar development advanced by the IRS_Disks guaranteed time program. Next we explore the FU Orionis phenomenon, an IRS_Disks dataset of flaring stars undergoing a burst accretion event. Finally we present a suite of data on Herbig Haro flows in Cepheus A to determine whether protostellar outflows can dissociate a wide angle cavity in their natal cloud. We present 5-35 mm spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 mm and 20 mm, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 mm and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 mm. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres--signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 mm is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer-wavelength emission may be fit by a model which includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes. This indicates that FU Orionis events can briefly raise outflow rates sufficiently high to dispel their surrounding envelopes and open swaths of the ambient medium via compression waves. Herbig Haro objects are small emission nebulae that signify the interaction between both broad and collimated outflows from young stellar objects and the ambient molecular cloud material. GGD37 is suspected to be an amalgamation of at least two superposed flows (including HH 168) traveling in

  8. Cataloging the Youngest Protostars in NGC2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jonathan; Brown, Arianna; Terebey, Susan; CSI2264

    2016-06-01

    Protostars are young stars in their earliest stages of development. We can determine the current stage of development of a young star depending on its relative brightness at varying wavelengths. Protostars are brightest at far-infrared wavelengths, typically peaking at 70-100um. A previous catalog of young stars in NGC 2264 is based on Spitzer data with 24um being the longest available wavelength data. Herschel data at 70um was used to improve the census of protostars. We found 11 new class 0 and 1 protostar candidates that were previously not found in the Spitzer catalog and are bright at 70um. We describe the properties of these candidates.

  9. [Fe II] jets from intermediate-mass protostars in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan; Bally, John

    2016-09-01

    We present new HST/WFC3-IR narrowband [Fe II] images of protostellar jets in the Carina Nebula. Combined with 5 previously published sources, we have a sample of 18 jets and 2 HH objects. All of the jets we targeted with WFC3 show bright infrared [Fe II] emission, and a few Hα candidate jets are confirmed as collimated outflows based on the morphology of their [Fe II] emission. Continuum-subtracted images clearly separate jet emission from the adjacent ionization front, providing a better tracer of the collimated jet than Hα and allowing us to connect these jets with their embedded driving sources. The [Fe II] 1.64 μm/Hα flux ratio measured in the jets is ≳ 5 times larger than in the adjacent ionization fronts. The low-ionization jet core requires high densities to shield Fe+ against further ionization by the FUV radiation from O-type stars in the H II region. High jet densities imply high mass-loss rates, consistent with the intermediate-mass driving sources we identify for 13 jets. The remaining jets emerge from opaque globules that obscure emission from the protostar. In many respects, the HH jets in Carina look like a scaled-up version of the jets driven by low-mass protostars. Altogether, these observations suggest that [Fe II] emission is a reliable tracer of dense, irradiated jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars. We argue that highly collimated outflows are common to more massive protostars, and that they suggest the outflow physics inferred for low-mass stars formation scales up to at least ˜8 M⊙.

  10. A Photoevaporating Rotating Disk in the Cepheus A HW2 Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Rodríguez-Franco, A.; Chandler, C.; Comito, C.; Schilke, P.

    2007-06-01

    We present VLA and PdBI subarcsecond images (~0.15"-0.6") of the radio continuum emission at 7 mm and of the SO2 J=192,18-->183,15 and J=278,20-->287,21 lines toward the Cep A HW2 region. The SO2 images reveal the presence of a hot core internally heated by an intermediate-mass protostar, and a circumstellar rotating disk around the HW2 radio jet of size 600×100 AU and mass ~1 Msolar. Keplerian rotation for the disk velocity gradient of ~5 km s-1 requires a 9 Msolar central star, which cannot explain the total luminosity observed in the region. This may indicate that the disk does not rotate with a Keplerian law due to the extreme youth of this object. Our high-sensitivity radio continuum image at 7 mm shows, in addition to the ionized jet, an extended emission to the west (and marginally to the south) of the HW2 jet, filling the southwest cavity of the HW2 disk. From the morphology and location of this free-free continuum emission at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths (spectral index ~0.4-1.5), we propose that the disk is photoevaporating due to the UV radiation from the central star. All this indicates that the Cep A HW2 region harbors a cluster of massive stars. Disk accretion seems to be the most plausible way to form massive stars in moderate density/luminosity clusters.

  11. SMA 850 micron Observations of CepA East -- Many Protostars, no Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogan, C. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Shirley, Y. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Sarma, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    We present high angular resolution (1'' to 2'') observations toward CepheusA-East taken with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in its compact configuration. The observations were centered near 333, 343, 336.5, and 346.5 GHz; each with 2 GHz of bandwidth. With the high angular resolution afforded by the SMA, the previously identified single dish submm source has been resolved into a number of individual components. The strongest submm emission is detected in the vicinity of HW2 and a distinct submm source is also coincident with HW3c. Surprisingly few of the other cm-λ sources are coincident with distinct submm emission, while several submm cores are detected that are not coincident with cm-λ emission. Numerous molecular lines are detected toward the HW2 region and HW3c, including a wide range of organic molecules as is typical of hot cores. Compared to other hot cores observed with similar resolution, CepA-HW2 has unusually strong SO2, and weaker lines of organic species like methyl formate. The different molecular species show a wide range of kinematic behavior toward CepA, suggesting the presence of several distinct protostars and outflows in the vicinity of HW2. No evidence is seen for the rotating disk recently reported by Patel et al. (2005).

  12. Primordial stellar evolution - The protostar phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, S. W.; Palla, F.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and evolution of a protostar forming from a cloud composed of pure hydrogen and helium gas are calculated. Using an accretion rate of 0.0044 solar mass/yr, the collapse of the cloud is followed numerically as a sequence of steady state accretion flows onto the hydrostatic core, which grows from an initial mass of 0.01 solar mass to 10.5 solar masses. The core is surrounded by an optically thick radiative precursor for most of its evolution. The core radius reaches 47 solar radii when the mass is 1 solar mass. For sufficiently massive cores, the deep interior contracts strongly, driving out a 'luminosity wave' which reaches the surface when the mass is 8 solar masses. This results in a large increase in core radius, the establishment of surface convection, and the disappearance of the radiative precursor. The dependence of core radius on the mass and accretion rate is analytically derived, and a new table or Rosseland mean opacities for metal-free gas is presented.

  13. Identification of a Collapsing Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II; Zhou, Shudong; Kompe, Carsten; Walmsley, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    The globular molecular cloud B335 contains a single, deeply embedded far-infrared source. Our recent observations of H2CO and CS lines toward this source provide direct kinematic evidence for collapse. Both the intensity and detailed shape of the line profiles match those expected from inside-out collapse inside a radius of 0.036 pc. The collapse began about 1.5 x 10(exp 5) years ago, similar to the onset of the outflow. The mass accretion rate is about 10 times the outflow rate, and about 0.4 solar mass should have now accumulated in the star and disk. Because B335 rotates only, any disk would still be small (about 3 AU). The accretion luminosity should be adequate to power the observed luminosity. Consequently, we believe that B335 is indeed a collapsing protostar.

  14. Temperature gradients in the Cepheus B molecular cloud - a multi-line analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiss, B. M.; Beuther, H.; Kramer, C.

    The Cepheus B molecular cloud is a prime candidate to study the effect of sequential star formation on molecular clouds: it is located at the edge of an H ii region (S155) and an OB association (Cepheus OB3), and it comprises a hot-core region with an embedded compact H ii region and NIR cluster suggesting on-going star formation. The bulk of the cloud, however, appears to be in a 'calm' state where star formation has not (yet) started. We conducted on-the-fly maps of the (2-1) and (3-2) low-J transitions of the CO isotopomers 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (Beuther et al. 1999, to appear in A&A); the observations were carried out with the 3 m KOSMA submillimeter telescope at Gornergrat, Switzerland (Kramer et al. 1998, SPIE, Conf.Proc., Kona, Vol 3350). We present line ratio maps as well as spectra at selected positions, where the latter sample regions of Cepheus B each having different physical conditions. The line ratio distribution is a measure for the variation of the excitation conditions. Adopting an escape probability integration scheme the data can be fitted reasonably treating each of the CO isotopomers seperately. From that we derive differing kinetic temperatures at each of the projected positions. This strongly indicates a temperature gradient along the line-of-sight since different isotopomers trace different layers of the cloud due to their differing optical depths. The temperature difference between the cooler inner parts of the cloud and the cloud's 'surface' amounts up to 40 K. We also found a lateral west-to-east 'surface' temperature decrease from 70 K at the hot-core region down to 40 K.

  15. Molecular hydrogen emission from the Cepheus A star-formation region

    SciTech Connect

    Doyon, R.; Nadeau, D.

    1988-11-01

    Fabry-Perot spectrometry of H2 emission lines in the Cepheus A star-formation region is presented. It is found that the H2 emission in Cep A(E) is associated with dense condensations of NH3 and CS, while the emission in Cep A(W) is associated with Herbig-Haro objects and reflection nebulae. The data support the hypothesis that the two lobes of emission are produced by a single outflow originating from the region of maser and compact H II regions at the western edge of Cep A(E). 49 references.

  16. Clarifying Massive Protostellar Evolution and Circumstellar Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indebetouw, Remy; Brogan, Crystal; Hoare, Melvin; Lumsden, Stuart; Robitaille, Thomas; Sewilo, Marta; Urquhart, James; Viti, Serena; Whitney, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    Massive stars dominate the evolution of galaxies and even as protostars, their feedback can affect their own formation and that of their host clusters. We propose a systematic study of massive protostars through the stages of their early evolution, to derive a clearer evolutionary sequence and a better link between the state of the central source and physical conditions in circumstellar material. This experiment will improve over existing work by careful source selection to systematically span evolutionary parameter space, resulting in a more uniform and comprehensive sample. Sophisticated radiative transfer, ionization, and chemical modeling will be used to extract the full riches of each IRS spectrum and find trends in how massive stars form and process their natal material: We will be able to determine the temperature, density, and chemical state (heating history) of circumstellar dust and ice in the accretion disk and envelope, and at later evolutionary stages the ionizing and soft (PAH-exciting) ultraviolet radiation emitted by the protostars and how that radiation is quenched and shadowed by circumstellar material. This investigation is the key to realizing the full potential of previous infrared imaging surveys like MSX and Spitzer's GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL to study massive star formation. These surveys have provided a basis for us to select a large relatively unbiased sample spanning evolutionary state. In return, revealing the spectroscopic signature of massive YSOs will greatly clarify the modeling and interpretation of the thousands of other protostars in these imaging survey data.

  17. A triple protostar system formed via fragmentation of a gravitationally unstable disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Persson, Magnus V.; Looney, Leslie W.; Dunham, Michael M.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Harris, Robert J.; Melis, Carl; Pérez, Laura M.

    2016-10-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are a frequent outcome of the star formation process and as a result almost half of all stars with masses similar to that of the Sun have at least one companion star. Theoretical studies indicate that there are two main pathways that can operate concurrently to form binary/multiple star systems: large-scale fragmentation of turbulent gas cores and filaments or smaller-scale fragmentation of a massive protostellar disk due to gravitational instability. Observational evidence for turbulent fragmentation on scales of more than 1,000 astronomical units has recently emerged. Previous evidence for disk fragmentation was limited to inferences based on the separations of more-evolved pre-main sequence and protostellar multiple systems. The triple protostar system L1448 IRS3B is an ideal system with which to search for evidence of disk fragmentation as it is in an early phase of the star formation process, it is likely to be less than 150,000 years old and all of the protostars in the system are separated by less than 200 astronomical units. Here we report observations of dust and molecular gas emission that reveal a disk with a spiral structure surrounding the three protostars. Two protostars near the centre of the disk are separated by 61 astronomical units and a tertiary protostar is coincident with a spiral arm in the outer disk at a separation of 183 astronomical units. The inferred mass of the central pair of protostellar objects is approximately one solar mass, while the disk surrounding the three protostars has a total mass of around 0.30 solar masses. The tertiary protostar itself has a minimum mass of about 0.085 solar masses. We demonstrate that the disk around L1448 IRS3B appears susceptible to disk fragmentation at radii between 150 and 320 astronomical units, overlapping with the location of the tertiary protostar. This is consistent with models for a protostellar disk that has recently undergone gravitational instability

  18. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  19. Interferometric Studies of Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jes K.

    2011-12-01

    With the advances in high angular resolution (sub)millimeter observations of low-mass protostars, windows of opportunities are opening up for very detailed studies of the molecular structure of star forming regions on wide range of spatial scales. Deeply embedded protostars provide an important laboratory to study the chemistry of star formation - providing the link between dense regions in molecular clouds from which stars are formed, i.e., the initial conditions and the end product in terms of, e.g., disk and planet formation. High angular resolution observations at (sub)millimeter wavelengths provide an important tool for studying the chemical composition of such low-mass protostars. They for example constrain the spatial molecular abundance variations - and can thereby identify which species are useful tracers of different components of the protostars at different evolutionary stages. In this review I discuss the possibilities and limitations of using high angular resolution (sub)millimeter interferometric observations for studying the chemical evolution of low-mass protostars - with a particular keen eye toward near-future ALMA observations.

  20. Protostar mass functions in young clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C.

    2014-01-20

    In an improved model of protostar mass functions (PMFs), protostars gain mass from isothermal cores in turbulent clumps. Their mass accretion rate is similar to Shu accretion at low mass and to reduced Bondi accretion at high mass. Accretion durations follow a simple expression in which higher-mass protostars accrete for longer times. These times are set by ejections, stellar feedback, and gravitational competition, which terminate accretion and reduce its efficiency. The mass scale is the mass of a critically stable isothermal core. In steady state, the PMF approaches a power law at high mass because of competition between clump accretion and accretion stopping. The power law exponent is the ratio of the timescales of accretion and accretion stopping. The protostar luminosity function (PLF) peaks near 1 L {sub ☉} because of inefficient accretion of core gas. Models fit observed PLFs in four large embedded clusters. These indicate that their underlying PMFs may be top-heavy compared with the initial mass function, depending on the protostar radius model.

  1. FORCAST Spectroscopy of Orion Protostars: Probing Intermediate Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, Tom

    2015-10-01

    We propose FORECAST low resolution spectroscopy of seven protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. These protostars have luminosities between those of low mass protostars which were the primary focus of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) and those of the high mass protostars in the Orion Nebula. Although we have constructed 1-870 micron SEDs from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX photometry of these intermediate (40-600 Lsun) luminosity protostars, we do not have Spitzer IRS spectra showing the shape and depth of the 10 micron silicate features and the slope of the mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED). Given the importance of such spectra for constraining the properties of the protostars through radiative transfer modeling, we request time to obtain FORCAST FOR-G111 (8.4-13.7 micron) and FOR-G227 (17.6-27.7 micron) grism spectra. With these data, we can extend our study of protostars in Orion to include a sample of more luminous protostar which are expected to include both intermediate mass protostars and low mass protostars undergoing outbursts. To investigate potential variability between Spitzer and WISE epochs, we also request photomety of a protostar potentially undergoing an episodic outburst.

  2. Into the Darkness: Interstellar Extinction Near the Cepheus OB3 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Edward L.; Jacklin, S.; Massa, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a followup investigation to a study performed by Massa and Savage (1984, ApJ, 279, 310) of the properties of UV interstellar extinction in the region of the Cepheus OB3 molecular cloud. That study was performed using UV photometry and spectro-photometry from the ANS and IUE satellites. We have extended this study into the IR, utilizing the uniform database of IR photometry available from the 2MASS project. This is a part of a larger program whose goal is to study the properties of extinction in localized regions, where we hope to find clues to dust grain growth and destruction processes through spatial correlations of extinction with distinct environmental properties. Similarly to Massa and Savage’s UV results, we find that the IR extinction properties on the Cepheus OB3 region vary systematically with the apparent proximity of the target stars to the molecular cloud. We also find that the UV extinction and the IR extinction are crudely correlated. The methodology leading to these results and their implications are discussed.

  3. Protostars: Forges of cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Marcowith, A.; Hennebelle, P.; Ferrière, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic rays are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy and their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and at the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, which leads to an apparent contradiction. Aims: We want to explain the origin of these cosmic rays accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Methods: Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient cosmic-ray acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites (shocks in accretion flows, along the jets, and on protostellar surfaces), then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. Results: We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of cosmic-ray protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Other promising acceleration sites are protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. In contrast, accretion flow shocks are too weak to efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. Though cosmic-ray electrons are weakly accelerated, they can gain a strong boost to relativistic energies through re-acceleration in successive shocks. Conclusions: We suggest a mechanism able to accelerate both cosmic-ray protons and electrons through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which can be used to explain the high ionisation rate and the synchrotron emission observed towards protostellar sources. The existence of an internal source of energetic particles can have a strong and unforeseen impact on the ionisation of the protostellar disc, on the star and planet formation

  4. CHARACTERIZING THE YOUNGEST HERSCHEL-DETECTED PROTOSTARS. I. ENVELOPE STRUCTURE REVEALED BY CARMA DUST CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ragan, Sarah E.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    2015-01-10

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 2.9 mm dust continuum emission observations of a sample of 14 Herschel-detected Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, drawn from the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS) sample. These objects are characterized by very red 24-70 μm colors and prominent submillimeter emission, suggesting that they are very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We detect all of the PBRS in 2.9 mm continuum emission and emission from four protostars and one starless core in the fields toward the PBRS; we also report one new PBRS source. The ratio of 2.9 mm luminosity to bolometric luminosity is higher by a factor of ∼5 on average, compared to other well-studied protostars in the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds. The 2.9 mm visibility amplitudes for 6 of the 14 PBRS are very flat as a function of uv distance, with more than 50% of the source emission arising from radii <1500 AU. These flat visibility amplitudes are most consistent with spherically symmetric envelope density profiles with ρ ∝ R {sup –2.5}. Alternatively, there could be a massive unresolved structure like a disk or a high-density inner envelope departing from a smooth power law. The large amount of mass on scales <1500 AU (implying high average central densities) leads us to suggest that that the PBRS with flat visibility amplitude profiles are the youngest PBRS and may be undergoing a brief phase of high mass infall/accretion and are possibly among the youngest Class 0 protostars. The PBRS with more rapidly declining visibility amplitudes still have large envelope masses, but could be slightly more evolved.

  5. Protostars at Low Extinction in Orion A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John Arban; Lada, Charles J.

    2016-07-01

    In the list of young stellar objects (YSOs) compiled by Megeath et al. for the Orion A molecular cloud, only 44 out of 1208 sources found projected onto low extinction ({A}{{K}}\\lt 0.8 mag) gas are identified as protostars. These objects are puzzling because protostars are not typically expected to be associated with extended low extinction material. Here, we use high resolution extinction maps generated from Herschel data, optical/infrared and Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of the low extinction protostellar candidate sources to determine if they are likely true protostellar sources or contaminants. Out of 44 candidate objects, we determine that 10 sources are likely protostars, with the rest being more evolved YSOs (18), galaxies (4), false detections of nebulosity and cloud edges (9), or real sources for which more data are required to ascertain their nature (3). We find none of the confirmed protostars to be associated with recognizable dense cores and we briefly discuss possible origins for these orphaned objects.

  6. Jet-driving protostars identified from infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, H.; Preibisch, T.; Gaczkowski, B.; Ratzka, T.; Grellmann, R.; McLeod, A. F.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: Jets are excellent signposts for very young embedded protostars, so we want to identify jet-driving protostars as a tracer of the currently forming generation of stars in the Carina Nebula, which is one of the most massive galactic star-forming regions and which is characterised by particularly high levels of massive-star feedback on the surrounding clouds. Methods: We used archive data to construct large ( ≳ 2° × 2°) Spitzer IRAC mosaics of the Carina Nebula and performed a spatially complete search for objects with excesses in the 4.5 μm band, typical of shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. We also identified the mid-infrared point sources that are the likely drivers of previously discovered Herbig-Haro jets and molecular hydrogen emission line objects. We combined the Spitzer photometry with our recent Herschel far-infrared data to construct the spectral energy distributions, and used the Robitaille radiative-transfer modelling tool to infer the properties of the objects. Results: The radiative-transfer modelling suggests that the jet sources are protostars with masses between ~1 M⊙ and ~10 M⊙ that are surrounded by circumstellar disks and embedded in circumstellar envelopes. Conclusions: The estimated protostar masses ≤10 M⊙ suggest that the current star-formation activity in the Carina Nebula is restricted to low- and intermediate-mass stars. More optical than infrared jets can be observed, indicating that star formation predominantly takes place close to the surfaces of clouds. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA, and on data collected by Herschel, an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  7. X-Rays and Protostars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Corcoran, Michael F.; Chu, You-Hua; Reach, William T.

    2001-11-01

    The Trifid Nebula is a young H II region, recently rediscovered as a ``pre-Orion'' star-forming region, containing protostars undergoing violent mass ejections visible in optical jets as seen in images from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. We report the first X-ray observations of the Trifid Nebula using ROSAT and ASCA. The ROSAT image shows a dozen X-ray sources, with the brightest X-ray source being the O7 star, HD 164492, which provides most of the ionization in the nebula. We also identify 85 T Tauri star and young, massive star candidates from near-infrared colors using the JHKs color-color diagram from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). Ten X-ray sources have counterpart near-infrared sources. The 2MASS stars and X-ray sources suggest there are potentially numerous protostars in the young H II region of the Trifid. ASCA moderate-resolution spectroscopy of the brightest source shows hard emission up to 10 keV with a clearly detected Fe K line. The best model fit is a two-temperature (T=1.2×106 K and 39×106 K) thermal model with additional warm absorbing media. The hotter component has an unusually high temperature for either an O star or an H II region; a typical Galactic H II region could not be the primary source for such hot temperature plasma and the Fe XXV line emission. We suggest that the hotter component originates in either the interaction of the wind with another object (a companion star or a dense region of the nebula) or from flares from deeply embedded young stars.

  8. X-rays and Protostars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Corcoran, M. F.; Chu, Y.-H.; Reach, W. T.

    2001-05-01

    The Trifid Nebula is a young HII region recently rediscovered as a ``pre-Orion" star forming region, containing protostars undergoing violent mass ejections visible in optical jets as seen in images from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. We report the first X-ray observations of the Trifid nebula using ROSAT and ASCA. The ROSAT image shows a dozen X-ray sources, with the brightest X-ray source being the O7 star, HD 164492, which provides most of the ionization in the nebula. We also identify 85 T Tauri star and young, massive star candidates from near-infrared colors using the JHKs color-color diagram from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Ten X-ray sources have counterpart near-infrared sources. The 2MASS stars and X-ray sources suggest there are potentially numerous protostars in the young HII region of the Trifid. ASCA moderate resolution spectroscopy of the brightest source shows hard emission up to 10 keV with a clearly detected Fe K line. The best model fit is a two-temperature (T = 2.0x 106 K and 36 x 106 K) thermal model with additional warm absorbing media. The hotter component has an unusually high temperature for either an O star or an HII region; a typical Galactic HII region could not be the primary source for such hot temperature plasma and the Fe XXV line emission. We suggest that the hot component originates in either the interaction of the wind with another object (a companion star or a dense region of the nebula) or from flares from deeply embedded young stars.

  9. From bipolar to quadrupolar - The collimation processes of the Cepheus A outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    Results of new K-band observations of the (1, 1) and (2, 2) ammonia lines toward Cepheus A are reported. The lines are mapped with approximately 2 arcsec of angular resolution and 0.3 km/s of velocity resolution. A sensitivity of 10 mJy has been achieved. The observations reveal details of the spatial and kinematics structure of the ambient high-density gas. It is suggested that the interstellar high-density gas is diverting and redirecting the outflow in the sense that the quadrupolar structure of the molecular outflow is produced by the interaction with the ammonia condensationss, with Cep A-1 and Cep A-3 splitting in two halves, respectively the blue- and redshifted lobes of an east-west bipolar molecular outflow.

  10. Episodic Accretion among the Orion Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Safron, Emily; Megeath, S. Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Episodic accretion, where a young stellar object undergoes stochastic spikes in its disk-to-star accretion rate one or more times over its formation period, may be a crucial process in the formation of low-mass stars. These spikes result in a factor of 10 to 100 increase in the source luminosity over the course of several months that may persist for years. Six years after the Spitzer survey of the Orion molecular clouds, the WISE telescope mapped Orion with similar wavelength coverage. Thus, the two surveys can be used to explore the mid-infrared variability of young stars on this timescale, which is suitable for discovering episodic accretion events. Out of 319 Orion protostars that were targets of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, we identified two examples of episodic accretion with this method. One of them, HOPS 223, was previously known. The other, HOPS 383, is the first known example of episodic accretion in a Class 0 protostar (age < 0.2 Myr). With these and one other outburst that began early in the Spitzer mission, we estimate that the most likely interval between protostellar outbursts is 740 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 470 to 6200 years. These outbursts are weaker than the optically revealed FU Ori events. We will update the mid-infrared light curves of HOPS 223 and HOPS 383 with recent data from FORCAST aboard SOFIA; HOPS 223 shows signs of fading.

  11. Present-day star formation: From molecular cloud cores to protostars and protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2012-10-01

    due to the hoop stress of piled-up toroidal field lines. The angular momentum in a collapsing cloud is removed by magnetohydrodynamical effects such as magnetic braking and driving of outflows and jets. The rotation velocity of the protostar tends to be on the order of break-up speed at its formation epoch, and thus, a further removal mechanism for the angular momentum, such as through the interactions between the protostar, disk, jets, and winds, should be important in its long-term evolution. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone," a region that is decoupled from the magnetic field. The outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during accretion from the envelope of the molecular cloud core. A rapid increase in the disk size occurs after depletion of the envelope. The circumstellar disks remain massive in their formation phase, and are subject to gravitational instability, even at 10 AU from the central stars. The further long-term evolution of massive disks is also described. This may provide an improved description for the realistic initial condition and environments for planet formation in gaseous protoplanetary disks.

  12. Migration and Survival of Planets near Magnetized Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina

    A significant fraction of observed exoplanets are located very close to the star with a clear peak at 0.05AU. This peak may be an imprint of the past history of the protostar and its disk, when it had a strong magnetic field and cleared a magnetic cavity of very low density. Planets which migrate to this region can survive for millions of years, until the disk is dispersed. This proposal plans to systematically investigate the migration of close- in planets inside the magnetospheric cavity caused by the star's magnetic field. We plan to investigate the cases of dipole and more complex multipole magnetic fields, as well as regimes of unstable accretion when cavities can have a very low density or can be partially filled with matter. In the second part of the proposal, we plan to investigate the migration of planets in the inner disks around rotating stars with misaligned dipole field. A rotating star with a tilted magnetic field excites a strong bending wave (a warp) that propagates outward to large distances in the disk. The wave has super-Keplerian angular velocity. We plan to analyze whether this bending wave may halt or reverse the inward migration of a planet. Also, we plan to investigate cases where the rotational axis of the star is tilted relative to the disk's axis. In this case, a new type of bending wave forms. In both cases, the close-in planet gets multiple kicks in the vertical direction, and this may change the inclination of the planet's orbit. We also plan to study the case where the massive planet clears the gap while interacting with the lower-mass inner parts of the disk. Solutions of these problems require global multidimensional simulations. Our group has developed state-of-the-art global axisymmetric and three-dimensional Godunov type codes, which are oriented to the investigation of plasma flow around rotating magnetized stars. Recently, we developed a module that calculates planetary orbits in our MHD simulations. These powerful tools and

  13. JETS AND WIDE-ANGLE OUTFLOWS IN CEPHEUS E: NEW EVIDENCE FROM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Grave, J. M. C. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: jgrave@astro.up.pt

    2011-11-01

    Outflows and jets are believed to play a crucial role in determining the mass of the central protostar and its planet-forming disk by virtue of their ability to transport energy, mass, and momentum of the surrounding material, and thus terminate the infall stage in star and disk formation. In some protostellar objects both wide-angle outflows and collimated jets are seen, while in others only one is observed. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features. Here, we use HiRes deconvolution to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands) and removing the contaminating sidelobes from bright sources. We apply this approach to study the jet and outflow features in Cep E, a young, energetic Class 0 protostar. In the reprocessed images we detect (1) wide-angle outflow seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details on at least 29 jet-driven bow shocks and jet heads or knots, (3) three compact features in 24 {mu}m continuum image as atomic/ionic line emission coincident with the jet heads, and (4) a flattened {approx}35'' size protostellar envelope seen against the interstellar background polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission as an absorption band across the protostar at 8 {mu}m. By separating the protostellar photospheric scattered emission in the wide-angle cavity from the jet emission we show that we can study directly the scattered light spectrum. We present the H{sub 2} emission line spectra, as observed in all IRAC bands, for 29 knots in the jets and bow shocks and use them in the IRAC color-color space as a diagnostic of the thermal gas in the shocks driven by the jets. The data presented here will enable detailed modeling of the individual shocks retracing the history of the episodic jet activity and the associated accretion on to the protostar. The Spitzer data analysis presented here shows the richness of its

  14. Evolution of Mass Outflow in Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Dan M.; Calvet, Nuria P.; Fischer, William J.; Forrest, W. J.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Melnick, Gary J.; Najita, Joan; Neufeld, David A.; Sheehan, Patrick D.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tobin, John J.

    2016-09-01

    We have surveyed 84 Class 0, Class I, and flat-spectrum protostars in mid-infrared [Si ii], [Fe ii], and [S i] line emission, and 11 of these in far-infrared [O i] emission. We use the results to derive their mass outflow rates, {\\dot{M}}w. Thereby we observe a strong correlation of {\\dot{M}}w with bolometric luminosity, and with the inferred mass accretion rates of the central objects, {\\dot{M}}a, which continues through the Class 0 range the trend observed in Class II young stellar objects. Along this trend from large to small mass flow rates, the different classes of young stellar objects lie in the sequence Class 0-Class I/flat-spectrum-Class II, indicating that the trend is an evolutionary sequence in which {\\dot{M}}a and {\\dot{M}}w decrease together with increasing age, while maintaining rough proportionality. The survey results include two that are key tests of magnetocentrifugal outflow-acceleration mechanisms: the distribution of the outflow/accretion branching ratio b={\\dot{M}}w/{\\dot{M}}a, and limits on the distribution of outflow speeds. Neither rules out any of the three leading outflow-acceleration, angular-momentum-ejection mechanisms, but they provide some evidence that disk winds and accretion-powered stellar winds (APSWs) operate in many protostars. An upper edge observed in the branching-ratio distribution is consistent with the upper bound of b = 0.6 found in models of APSWs, and a large fraction (31%) of the sample have a branching ratio sufficiently small that only disk winds, launched on scales as large as several au, have been demonstrated to account for them.

  15. Evolution of Mass Outflow in Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Dan M.; Calvet, Nuria P.; Fischer, William J.; Forrest, W. J.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Melnick, Gary J.; Najita, Joan; Neufeld, David A.; Sheehan, Patrick D.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tobin, John J.

    2016-09-01

    We have surveyed 84 Class 0, Class I, and flat-spectrum protostars in mid-infrared [Si ii], [Fe ii], and [S i] line emission, and 11 of these in far-infrared [O i] emission. We use the results to derive their mass outflow rates, {\\dot{M}}w. Thereby we observe a strong correlation of {\\dot{M}}w with bolometric luminosity, and with the inferred mass accretion rates of the central objects, {\\dot{M}}a, which continues through the Class 0 range the trend observed in Class II young stellar objects. Along this trend from large to small mass flow rates, the different classes of young stellar objects lie in the sequence Class 0–Class I/flat-spectrum–Class II, indicating that the trend is an evolutionary sequence in which {\\dot{M}}a and {\\dot{M}}w decrease together with increasing age, while maintaining rough proportionality. The survey results include two that are key tests of magnetocentrifugal outflow-acceleration mechanisms: the distribution of the outflow/accretion branching ratio b={\\dot{M}}w/{\\dot{M}}a, and limits on the distribution of outflow speeds. Neither rules out any of the three leading outflow-acceleration, angular-momentum-ejection mechanisms, but they provide some evidence that disk winds and accretion-powered stellar winds (APSWs) operate in many protostars. An upper edge observed in the branching-ratio distribution is consistent with the upper bound of b = 0.6 found in models of APSWs, and a large fraction (31%) of the sample have a branching ratio sufficiently small that only disk winds, launched on scales as large as several au, have been demonstrated to account for them.

  16. Deuterated water in low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, Audrey; Vastel, Charlotte; Chess Collaboration; Wish Collaboration; Hexos Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    In addition to its dominant role in the cooling of warm gas and in the oxygen chemistry, water is a primordial species in the emergence of life, and comets may have brought a large fraction to Earth to form the oceans. Observations of deuterated water are an important complement for studies of H2O to understand how water forms and how it has evolved from cold prestellar cores to protoplanetary disks and consequently oceans for the Earth's specific, but probably not isolated, case. Several deuterated water transitions were observed with the Herschel/HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared) instrument towards three low-mass protostars: IRAS 16293-2422, NGC1333 IRAS4A and NGC1333 IRAS4B. In the first source, both HDO and D2O lines are detected, thanks to the unbiased spectral survey carried out by the CHESS key program (Vastel et al. 2010, Coutens et al. 2013a). In the framework of a collaboration between the CHESS, WISH and HEXOS programs, two HDO key lines were observed towards the two other protostars. In addition, complementary observations were carried out with several ground-based single-dish telescopes (IRAM-30m, JCMT, APEX). We used the non-LTE RATRAN spherical model (Hogerheijde & van der Tak 2000) to determine the HDO abundance distribution throughout the protostellar envelope. An abundance jump at 100 K is required to reproduce the line profiles. Indeed, water molecules trapped in the icy grain mantles thermally desorb in the hot corinos, the inner warm regions of the protostellar envelopes. We also obtain that it is necessary to add a water-rich external absorbing layer to reproduce the absorbing components of the HDO and D2O fundamental transitions in all sources (Coutens et al. 2012, 2013a,b). The results derived for the different sources will be then presented and discussed.

  17. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar.

    PubMed

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-17

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 10(5) years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied. PMID:23283175

  18. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar.

    PubMed

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-17

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 10(5) years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.

  19. On the Role of the ΩΓ Limit in the Formation of Population III Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunchul; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    We explore the role of the modified Eddington limit due to rapid rotation (the so-called ΩΓ limit) in the formation of Population III stars. We performed one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations of zero-metallicity protostars accreting mass at a very high rate (\\dot{M}˜ {10}-3\\quad {M}⊙ \\quad {{yr}}-1) and dealt with stellar rotation as a separate post-process. The protostar would reach the Keplerian rotation very soon after the onset of mass accretion, but mass accretion would continue as stellar angular momentum is transferred outward to the accretion disk by viscous stress. The envelope of the protostar expands rapidly when the stellar mass reaches ~5-7 M⊙ and the Eddington factor increases sharply. This makes the protostar rotate critically at a rate that is significantly below the Keplerian value (i.e., the ΩΓ limit). The resultant positive gradient of the angular velocity in the boundary layer between the protostar and the Keplerian disk prohibits angular momentum transport from the star to the disk, and consequently further rapid mass accretion. This would prevent the protostar from growing significantly beyond 20-40 M⊙. Another important consequence of the ΩΓ limit is that the protostar can remain fairly compact (R ≲ 50 R⊙) and avoid a fluffy structure (R ≳ 500 R⊙) that is usually found with a very high rate of mass accretion. This effect would make the protostar less prone to binary interactions during the protostar phase. Although our analysis is based on Population III protostar models, this role of the ΩΓ limit would be universal in the formation process of massive stars, regardless of metallicity.

  20. The discovery based on GLIMPSE data of a protostar driving a bipolar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Huang, Ya Fang; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Miao, Jingqi

    2012-04-01

    We report the discovery based on GLIMPSE data of a proto-stellar system driving a bipolar outflow. The bipolar outflow closely resembles the shape of an hourglass in the infrared. The total luminosity of Ltotal = 5507 L⊙, derived from IRAS fluxes, indicates the ongoing formation of a massive star in this region. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the driving source is fitted with an online SED fitting tool, which results in a spectral index of about 1.2. This, along with the presence of a bipolar outflow, suggests the detection of a Class I protostar. The driving source indicates prominent infrared excesses in color-color diagrams based on archived 2 MASS and GLIMPSE data, which is in line with an early evolutionary stage of the system.

  1. The Warm And Dense Gas In Embedded Low-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Kempen, Tim; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Joergensen, J. K.; Guesten, R.; Schilke, P.

    2008-03-01

    The central regions of embedded low-mass protostars is characterized by warm (T K) and dense (10^6 cm-3) gas. Although short (10^5 years), these stages are critical for the subsequent evolution of the system. The total mass of the system and the initial conditions for (massive) planet formation are determined. Outflows, disks and envelopes all exist on scales of a few hundred to thousand AU, but except for a few cases, the physical structure has mainly been constrained on scales of a few thousand AU through observations of the cold, quiescent gas and dust. We present recent observations of observations using newly commisioned array receivers HARP-B on the JCMT and CHAMP+ on APEX of rotational emission lines of CO, HCO+ and their isotopologues ranging in frequency from 230 to 900 GHz for to probe the warm and dense gas, both close to the star and within the immedeate surroundings of the protostellar system. Observations were supplemented with continuum data ranging from the near-IR to radio. Special emphasis was put on the results obtained by the c2d program carried out on Spitzer. A large number of sources was observed, ranging from luminous, deeply embedded sources to weak sources where most of the envelope has accreted onto the central star/disk system. Initial results show that the amount of warm and dense gas is not necessarily related. Warm gas seems to be more present at more evolved sources, even at low luminosities, while dense gas is more present in the massive envelopes surrounding the deeply embedded Class 0 protostars. It is also shown that the warm (T 100 K) gas is mostly quiescent and not related to outflow activity. It is likely that the gas is thermally heated.

  2. Studying the photosphere of a Class 0 protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Tom

    2014-02-01

    We propose to obtain a moderate signal to noise spectrum of a Class 0 protostar in Serpens. We will determine the surface gravity (stellar or circumstellar disk origin), effective temperature, and continuum veiling of this object by analyzing the Na, Ca, and CO features in its spectrum. These parameters and models will constrain the mass of this object, and we will compare these quantities to those of less embedded Class I protostars we have studied. This will extend our knowledge of the stellar properties of the very youngest protostars, inform theories of how their accretion rates evolve over time, how quickly they assemble their masses, and how they generate their luminosities. This study will also serve as a pilot project for a more sensitive survey with the James Webb Space Telescope, and it is a resubmission of a proposal that was awarded 1 night in 2013A.

  3. Studying the photosphere of a Class 0 protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Tom

    2013-02-01

    We propose to obtain a moderate signal to noise spectrum of a Class 0 protostar in Serpens. We will determine the surface gravity (stellar or circumstellar disk origin), effective temperature, and continuum veiling of this object by analyzing the Na, Ca, and CO features in its spectrum. These parameters and models will constrain the mass and accretion rates of this object, and we will compare these quantities to those of less embedded Class I protostars we have studied. This will extend our knowledge of the stellar properties of the very youngest protostars, inform theories of how their accretion rates evolve over time, how quickly they assemble their masses, and how they generate their luminosities. This study will also serve as a pilot project for a more sensitive survey with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  4. Rotating Bullets from A Variable Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuepeng; Arce, Héctor G.; Zhang, Qizhou; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) CO (2-1) observations toward the protostellar jet driven by SVS 13 A, a variable protostar in the NGC 1333 star-forming region. The SMA CO (2-1) images show an extremely high-velocity jet composed of a series of molecular “bullets.” Based on the SMA CO observations, we discover clear and large systematic velocity gradients, perpendicular to the jet axis, in the blueshifted and redshifted bullets. After discussing several alternative interpretations, such as twin-jets, jet precession, warped disk, and internal helical shock, we suggest that the systematic velocity gradients observed in the bullets result from the rotation of the SVS 13 A jet. From the SMA CO images, the measured rotation velocities are 11.7-13.7 km s-1 for the blueshifted bullet and 4.7 ± 0.5 km s-1 for the redshifted bullet. The estimated specific angular momenta of the two bullets are comparable to those of dense cores, about 10 times larger than those of protostellar envelopes, and about 20 times larger than those of circumstellar disks. If the velocity gradients are due to the rotation of the SVS 13 A jet, the significant amount of specific angular momenta of the bullets indicates that the rotation of jets/outflows is a key mechanism to resolve the so-called “angular momentum problem” in the field of star formation. The kinematics of the bullets suggests that the jet launching footprint on the disk has a radius of ˜7.2-7.7 au, which appears to support the extended disk-wind model. We note that further observations are needed to comprehensively understand the kinematics of the SVS 13 A jet, in order to confirm the rotation nature of the bullets.

  5. CO outflows from high-mass Class 0 protostars in Cygnus-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Schneider, N.; André, Ph.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The earliest phases of the formation of high-mass stars are not well known. It is unclear whether high-mass cores in monolithic collapse exist or not, and what the accretion process and origin of the material feeding the precursors of high-mass stars are. As outflows are natural consequences of the accretion process, they represent one of the few (indirect) tracers of accretion. Aims: We aim to search for individual outflows from high-mass cores in Cygnus X and to study the characteristics of the detected ejections. We compare these to what has been found for the low-mass protostars, to understand how ejection and accretion change and behave with final stellar mass. Methods: We used CO (2-1) PdBI observations towards six massive dense clumps, containing a total of 9 high-mass cores. We estimated the bolometric luminosities and masses of the 9 high-mass cores and measured the energetics of outflows. We compared our sample to low-mass objects studied in the literature and developed simple evolutionary models to reproduce the observables. Results: We find that 8 out of 9 high-mass cores are driving clear individual outflows. They are therefore true equivalents of Class 0 protostars in the high-mass regime. The remaining core, CygX-N53 MM2, has only a tentative outflow detection. It could be one of the first examples of a true individual high-mass prestellar core. We also find that the momentum flux of high-mass objects has a linear relation to the reservoir of mass in the envelope, as a scale up of the relations previously found for low-mass protostars. This suggests a fundamental proportionality between accretion rates and envelope masses. The linear dependency implies that the timescale for accretion is similar for high- and low-mass stars. Conclusions: The existence of strong outflows driven by high-mass cores in Cygnus X clearly indicates that high-mass Class 0 protostars exist. The collapsing envelopes of these Class 0 objects have similar sizes and a

  6. Peering to the Heart of Massive Star Birth - IV. Surveying Across Evolution, Environment and the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to continue our Cycle 2 survey of MIR/FIR (10-40 micron) emission from massive protostars, utilizing the unique capabilities of SOFIA-FORCAST. We have demonstrated theoretically and observationally that 10-40 micron observations are crucial for defining the spectral energy distribution of massive protostars and thus the bolometric flux directed towards us. The 40 micron peak brightness is typically very close to the actual protostar's position, while at shorter wavelengths this is often not the case due to re-radiation via outflow cavities. SOFIA's relatively high angular resolution at 30-40 microns, i.e. ~3" compared to ~6" of Herschel at 70 microns, is thus important for disentangling massive star formation activity, especially that occurring in crowded regions. With source G35.2 we have also demonstrated SOFIA's ability to deliver high contrast imaging revealing fainter extended emission from the protostellar envelope that is impractical to observe from the ground at 10-20 microns. Combined with sophisticated radiative transfer modeling, analysis of this emission constrains the geometry of the outflow cavities, allowing more reliable measurement of the true bolometric luminosity and thus protostellar mass. Our goal is to continue to apply these techniques to a much larger sample of protostars, spanning a range of evolutionary and environmental states, from relatively isolated sources in Infrared Dark Clouds, to less extincted sources with compact (often jet-like) radio emission, to ultra-compact HII regions (where radio emission extends beyond MIR emission), to sources in crowded regions. We also include 10 intermediate-mass protostars to allow comparison with their more massive cousins. A typical observation will take ~60 minutes and the ~50 targeted fields of view will yield ~60 protostars: enough to begin to provide statistically significant samples in these different evolutionary and environmental states.

  7. Stellar Properties of Embedded Protostars: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Until now, high extinctions have prevented direct observation of the central objects of self-embedded, accreting protostars. However, sensitive high dispersion spectrographs on large aperture telescopes have allowed us to begin studying the stellar astrophysical properties of dozens of embedded low mass protostars in the nearest regions of star formation. These high dispersion spectra allow, for the first time, direct measurements of their stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, rotation velocities, radial velocities (and spectroscopic binarity), mass accretion properties, and mass outflow indicators. Comparisons of the stellar properties with evolutionary models also allow us to estimate masses and constrain ages. We find that these objects have masses similar to those of older, more evolved T Tauri stars, but protostars have higher mean rotation velocities and angular momenta. Most protostars indicate high mass accretion or outflow, but some in Taurus-Auriga appear to be relatively quiescent. These new results are testing, expanding, and refining the standard star formation paradigm, and we explore how to expand this work further.

  8. The Evolution of Far-infrared CO Emission from Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, P.; Green, J. D.; Megeath, S. T.; Evans, N. J., II; Stutz, A. M.; Tobin, J. J.; Watson, D. M.; Fischer, W. J.; Furlan, E.; Henning, T.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of far-IR CO emission from protostars observed with Herschel/PACS for 50 sources from the combined sample of HOPS and DIGIT Herschel key programs. From the uniformly sampled spectral energy distributions, whose peaks are well sampled, we computed the {L}{bol}, {T}{bol}, and {L}{bol}/{L}{smm} for these sources to search for correlations between far-IR CO emission and protostellar properties. We find a strong and tight correlation between far-IR CO luminosity ({L}{CO}{fir}) and the bolometric luminosity ({L}{bol}) of the protostars with {L}{CO}{fir} \\propto {L}{bol} 0.7. We, however, do not find a strong correlation between {L}{CO}{fir} and protostellar evolutionary indicators, {T}{bol} and {L}{bol}/{L}{smm}. FIR CO emission from protostars traces the currently shocked gas by jets/outflows, and far-IR CO luminosity, {L}{CO}{fir}, is proportional to the instantaneous mass-loss rate, {\\dot{M}}{out}. The correlation between {L}{CO}{fir} and {L}{bol}, then, is indicative of instantaneous {\\dot{M}}{out} tracking instantaneous {\\dot{M}}{acc}. The lack of a correlation between {L}{CO}{fir} and evolutionary indicators {T}{bol} and {L}{bol}/{L}{smm} suggests that {\\dot{M}}{out} and, therefore, {\\dot{M}}{acc} do not show any clear evolutionary trend. These results are consistent with mass accretion/ejection in protostars being episodic. Taken together with the previous finding that the time-averaged mass-ejection/accretion rate declines during the protostellar phase, our results suggest that the instantaneous accretion/ejection rate of protostars is highly time variable and episodic, but the amplitude and/or frequency of this variability decreases with time such that the time-averaged accretion/ejection rate declines with system age.

  9. CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD: A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS AND THE DENSE GAS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Di Francesco, J.; André, Ph.; Maury, A.; Men'shchikov, A.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Könyves, V.; Louvet, F.; Roy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Nguyên-Lu'o'ng, Q.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Peretto, N.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We use PACS and SPIRE continuum data at 160 μm, 250 μm, 350 μm, and 500 μm from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey to sample seven clumps in Perseus: B1, B1-E, B5, IC 348, L1448, L1455, and NGC 1333. Additionally, we identify and characterize the embedded Class 0 protostars using detections of compact Herschel sources at 70 μm as well as archival Spitzer catalogs and SCUBA 850 μm photometric data. We identify 28 candidate Class 0 protostars, four of which are newly discovered sources not identified with Spitzer. We find that the star formation efficiency of clumps, as traced by Class 0 protostars, correlates strongly with the flatness of their respective column density distributions at high values. This correlation suggests that the fraction of high column density material in a clump reflects only its youngest protostellar population rather than its entire source population. We propose that feedback from either the formation or evolution of protostars changes the local density structure of clumps.

  10. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  11. Witnessing the birth of a supermassive protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Hartwig, T.

    2016-05-01

    The detection of z > 6 quasars reveals the existence of supermassive black holes of a few 109 M⊙. One of the potential pathways to explain their formation in the infant universe is the so-called direct collapse model which provides massive seeds of 105-106 M⊙. An isothermal direct collapse mandates that haloes should be of a primordial composition and the formation of molecular hydrogen remains suppressed in the presence of a strong Lyman Werner flux. In this study, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two massive primordial haloes employing a detailed chemical model which includes H- cooling as well as realistic opacities for both the bound-free H- emission and the Rayleigh scattering of hydrogen atoms. We are able to resolve the collapse up to unprecedentedly high densities of ˜10-3 g cm-3 and to scales of about 10-4 au. Our results show that the gas cools down to ˜5000 K in the presence of H- cooling, and induces fragmentation at scales of about 8000 au in one of the two simulated haloes, which may lead to the formation of a binary. In addition, fragmentation also occurs on the au scale in one of the haloes but the clumps are expected to merge on short time-scales. Our results confirm that H- cooling does not prevent the formation of a supermassive star and the trapping of cooling radiation stabilizes the collapse on small scales.

  12. Water in the warm inner regions of Class 0 protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, Audrey; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Persson, Magnus V.; van Dishoeck, Ewine; vastel, charlotte; Taquet, Vianney; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Harsono, Daniel; Lykke, Julie M.

    2015-08-01

    Water plays a key role in many astrophysical environments (star-forming regions, outflows, prestellar cores, comets, asteroids, …) as well as for the emergence of life as we know it. Its detection in the inner regions of low-mass protostars raises the question whether this is similar to the water that is incorporated into comets and asteroids that may deliver it to Earth-like planets. The water deuterium fractionation is very helpful to understand how it forms and evolves. For example, Cleeves et al. (2014) showed that a contribution of water formed in the primordial cloud is necessary to explain the HDO/H2O ratio of the terrestrial oceans. Observations of the deuterated and non-deuterated forms of water at an early stage of star formation may therefore potentially be an important tool to describe the origin of water on Earth.We here present recent interferometric measurements of the distribution and deuteration of water on Solar System scales. During the last few years, a few HDO and H218O lines were observed in the inner regions of Class 0 protostars with interferometers (Jørgensen & van Dishoeck 2010, Codella+2010, Persson+ 2012, 2013, 2014, Taquet+ 2013), which enables estimates of the HDO/H2O ratios. Our recent detection of D2O with the Plateau de Bure interferometer towards the low-mass protostar NGC1333 IRAS2A leads to a surprisingly high D2O/HDO ratio compared with the HDO/H2O ratio (Coutens+ 2014). These results contradict the predictions of current grain surface chemical models and indicate that either an ingredient is missing in our understanding of the surface deuteration process or that both sublimation of grain mantles and water formation at high temperature (T > 230K) take place in the inner regions of protostars. We also present the first results of an ALMA Cycle 2 program (PI: A. Coutens) to target several HDO, H218O and D2O lines at a spatial resolution of ~0.3" (40 AU) toward the nearby protostellar binary IRAS16293-2422. These observations

  13. THE SMALL-SCALE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND FRAGMENTATION DIFFERENCE OF TWO EMBEDDED INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTARS IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kempen, T. A.; Longmore, S. N.; Johnstone, D.; Pillai, T.; Fuente, A.

    2012-06-01

    Intermediate-mass (IM) protostars, the bridge between the very common solar-like protostars and the more massive, but rarer, O and B stars, can only be studied at high physical spatial resolutions in a handful of clouds. In this paper, we present and analyze the continuum results from an observing campaign at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) targeting two well-studied IM protostars in Orion, NGC 2071 and L1641 S3 MMS 1. The extended SMA (eSMA) probes structure at angular resolutions up to 0.''2, revealing protostellar disks on scales of {approx}200 AU. Continuum flux measurements on these scales indicate that a significant amount of mass, a few tens of M{sub Sun }, is present. Envelope, stellar, and disk masses are derived using compact, extended, and eSMA configurations and compared against spectral energy distribution fitting models. We hypothesize that fragmentation into three components occurred within NGC 2071 at an early time, when the envelopes were less than 10% of their current masses, e.g., <0.5 M{sub Sun }. No fragmentation occurred for L1641 S3 MMS 1. For NGC 2071, evidence is given that the bulk of the envelope material currently around each source was accreted after the initial fragmentation. In addition, about 30% of the total core mass is not yet associated to one of the three sources. A global accretion model is favored and a potential accretion history of NGC 2071 is presented. It is shown that the relatively low level of fragmentation in NGC 2071 was stifled compared to the expected fragmentation from a Jeans argument. Similarly, the lack of fragmentation in L1641 S3 MMS 1 is likely due to similar arguments.

  14. Bipolar Molecular Outflows from High-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Nung; Zhang, Qizhou; Lim, Jeremy

    2004-03-01

    We report observations of the bipolar molecular outflows associated with the luminous (~2×104 Lsolar) far-IR sources IRAS 21519+5613 and IRAS 22506+5944, as well the dust and molecular gas condensations on which these outflows appear to be centered. The observations were made in 12CO, 13CO, C18O, and continuum at 3 mm with the BIMA array and in 12CO and 13CO with the NRAO 12 m telescope to recover extended emission filtered out by the interferometric array. We find that the outflow associated with each IRAS source shows a clear bipolar morphology in 12CO, with properties (i.e., total mass of order 10-100 Msolar, mass-outflow rate >~10-3 Msolar, dynamical timescale 104-105 yr, and energetics) comparable with those of other massive outflows associated with luminous young stellar objects. Each outflow appears to be centered on a dust and gas condensation with a mass of 200-300 Msolar, likely marking the location of the driving source. The outflow lobes of both sources are fully resolved along their major but not minor axes, and they have collimation factors that may be comparable with young low-mass stars. The mass-velocity diagrams of both outflows change in slope at a velocity of ~10 km s-1, suggesting that the high-velocity component (HVC) may drive the low-velocity component (LVC). Although the HVC of IRAS 21519+5613 shows evidence for deceleration, no such signature is seen in the HVC of IRAS 22506+5944. Neither HVC has a momentum supply rate sufficient to drive their corresponding LVCs, although it is possible that the HVC is more highly excited and hence its thrust underestimated. Like for other molecular outflows the primary driving agent cannot be ionized gas, leaving atomic gas as the other remaining candidate. Neither IRAS 21519+5613 nor IRAS 22506+5944 exhibits detectable free-free emission, which together with the observed properties of their molecular outflows and surrounding condensations make them credible candidates for high-mass protostars. The mass

  15. Variability of young stars: Determination of rotational periods of weak-line T Tauri stars in the Cepheus-Cassiopeia star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeltzsch, A.; Mugrauer, M.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Vaňko, M.; Ginski, Ch.; Marka, C.; Moualla, M.; Schreyer, K.; Broeg, Ch.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on observation and determination of rotational periods of ten weak-line T Tauri stars in the Cepheus-Cassiopeia star-forming region. Observations were carried out with the Cassegrain-Teleskop-Kamera (CTK) at University Observatory Jena between 2007 June and 2008 May. The periods obtained range between 0.49 d and 5.7 d, typical for weak-line and post T Tauri stars. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University.

  16. Photometry and Classification of Stars in the Direction of Clusters NGC 7129 and NGC 7142 in Cepheus. I. Magnitudes, Color Indices and Spectral Types of 2140 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskoliūnas, M.; Zdanavičius, J.; Zdanavičius, K.; Straižys, V.

    In a 1.5 square degree area, centered at RA = 21:44:30, DEC = +65:58, we have determined magnitudes and color indices for 2140 stars in the Vilnius seven-color system down to V = 17 mag. This area includes a star-forming region with the open cluster NGC 7129 embedded in a dense dust cloud TGU 645 (LDN 1181), close to the Cepheus Flare, and a distant old open cluster NGC 7142 seen through a semi-transparent window. For most of the stars spectral and luminosity classes in the MK system, determined from the photometric data, are given.

  17. Rotation and internal structure of Population III protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Greif, Thomas H.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    We analyse the cosmological simulations performed in the recent work of Greif et al., which followed the early growth and merger history of Population III (Pop III) stars while resolving scales as small as 0.05 R⊙. This is the first set of cosmological simulations to self-consistently resolve the rotation and internal structure of Pop III protostars. We find that Pop III stars form under significant rotational support which is maintained for the duration of the simulations. The protostellar surfaces spin from ˜50 per cent to nearly 100 per cent of Keplerian rotational velocity. These rotation rates persist after experiencing multiple stellar merger events. In the brief time period simulated (˜10 yr), the protostars show little indication of convective instability, and their properties furthermore show little correlation with the properties of their host minihaloes. If Pop III protostars within this range of environments generally form with high degrees of rotational support, and if this rotational support is maintained for a sufficient amount of time, this has a number of crucial implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the possibility for Pop III pair-instability supernovae, and the question of whether the first stars produced gamma-ray bursts.

  18. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  19. EXTREMELY LARGE AND HOT MULTILAYER KEPLERIAN DISK AROUND THE O-TYPE PROTOSTAR W51N: THE PRECURSORS OF THE HCH II REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Leurini, Silvia

    2010-12-10

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (0.''57-0.''78) SO, SO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, HC{sub 3}N, and HCOCH{sub 2}OH line observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths of the young O-type protostar W51 North made with the Submillimeter Array. We report the presence of a large (about 8000 AU) and hot molecular circumstellar disk around this object, which connects the inner dusty disk with the molecular ring or toroid reported recently and confirms the existence of a single bipolar outflow emanating from this object. The molecular emission from the large disk is observed in layers with the transitions characterized by high excitation temperatures in their lower energy states (up to 1512 K) being concentrated closer to the central massive protostar. The molecular emission from those transitions with low or moderate excitation temperatures is found in the outermost parts of the disk and exhibits an inner cavity with an angular size of around 0.''7. We modeled all lines with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectrum. A detailed study of the kinematics of the molecular gas together with an LTE model of a circumstellar disk shows that the innermost parts of the disk are also Keplerian plus a contracting velocity. The emission of the HCOCH{sub 2}OH reveals the possible presence of a warm 'companion' located to the northeast of the disk, however its nature is unclear. The emission of the SO and SO{sub 2} is observed in the circumstellar disk as well as in the outflow. We suggest that the massive protostar W51 North appears to be in a phase before the presence of a hypercompact or an ultracompact H II (HC/UCH II) region and propose a possible sequence on the formation of the massive stars.

  20. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  1. The structure of the Cepheus E protostellar outflow: The jet, the bowshock, and the cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Gusdorf, A.; Codella, C.; Eislöffel, J.; Neri, R.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Güsten, R.; Leurini, S.; Risacher, C.; Benedettini, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Protostellar outflows are a crucial ingredient of the star-formation process. However, the physical conditions in the warm outflowing gas are still poorly known. Aims: We present a multi-transition, high spectral resolution CO study of the outflow of the intermediate-mass Class 0 protostar Cep E-mm. The goal is to determine the structure of the outflow and to constrain the physical conditions of the various components in order to understand the origin of the mass-loss phenomenon. Methods: We have observed the J = 12-11, J = 13-12, and J = 16-15 CO lines at high spectral resolution with SOFIA/GREAT and the J = 5-4, J = 9-8, and J = 14-13 CO lines with HIFI/Herschel towards the position of the terminal bowshock HH377 in the southern outflow lobe. These observations were complemented with maps of CO transitions obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope (J = 1-0, 2-1), the Plateau de Bure interferometer (J = 2-1), and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (J = 3-2, 4-3). Results: We identify three main components in the protostellar outflow: the jet, the cavity, and the bowshock, with a typical size of 1.7″ × 21″, 4.5″, and 22″ × 10″, respectively. In the jet, the emission from the low-J CO lines is dominated by a gas layer at Tkin = 80-100 K, column density N(CO) = 9 × 1016 cm-2, and density n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J CO lines arises from a warmer (Tkin = 400-750 K), denser (n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 106 cm-3), lower column density (N(CO) = 1.5 × 1016 cm-2) gas component. Similarly, in the outflow cavity, two components are detected: the emission of the low-J lines is dominated by a gas layer of column density N(CO) = 7 × 1017 cm-2 at Tkin = 55-85 K and density in the range (1-8) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J lines is dominated by a hot, denser gas layer with Tkin = 500-1500K, n(H2) = (1-5) × 106 cm-3, and N(CO) = 6 × 1016 cm-2. A temperature gradient as a function of the velocity is found in the high-excitation gas

  2. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  3. Rotation and X-Ray Emission from Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, Thierry; Grosso, Nicolas; Tsuboi, Yohko; Koyama, Katsuji

    2000-04-01

    The ASCA satellite has recently detected variable hard X-ray emission from two class I protostars in the ρ Oph cloud, YLW 15 (IRS 43) and WL 6, with a characteristic timescale of ~20 hr. In YLW 15, the X-ray emission is in the form of quasi-periodic energetic flares, which we explain in terms of strong magnetic shearing and reconnection between the central star and the accretion disk. The flare modeling, based on the solar analogy, gives us access to the size of the magnetic structures, which in turn allows us to calculate the rotation parameters of the star and the disk. In WL 6, X-ray flaring is rotationally modulated and appears to be more like the solar-type magnetic activity ubiquitous on T Tauri stars. On the basis of these observations, we find that YLW 15 is a fast rotator (near break-up), while WL 6 rotates with a significantly longer period. We thus use X-ray flaring as a ``clock'' to measure the rotation of protostars. With the help of the mass-radius relation on the stellar ``birthline,'' we derive masses of M*~2 Msolar and <~0.4 Msolar for the central stars of YLW 15 and WL 6, respectively. YLW 15 thus appears to be a future A star. In the long term, the magnetic interactions between the star and the disk result in magnetic braking and angular momentum loss of the star. A comparison of the rotation behavior of YLW 15 and WL 6 confirms that for solar-mass stars magnetic braking takes place on timescales tbr~a fewx105 yr, i.e., of the same order as the estimated duration of the class I protostar stage. The main parameter determining tbr turns out to be the stellar mass, so that close to the birthline there must be a mass-rotation relation, tbr~~M*, such that stars with M*>~1-2 Msolar are fast rotators, while their lower mass counterparts have had the time to spin down and reach synchronous rotation with the inner surrounding accretion disk. The rapid rotation and strong star-disk magnetic interactions of YLW 15 also naturally explain the

  4. Peering to the Heart of Massive Star Birth - III. Surveying Across Evolution and Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    We propose to utilize the unique capabilities of SOFIA-FORCAST to perform a 30-40 micron imaging survey of massive protostars, building upon our Basic Science results on G35.20-0.74 (hereafter G35.2) and our approved Cycle 1 observations of several more sources. We have demonstrated theoretically and observationally that 30-40 micron observations are crucial for defining the spectral energy distribution of massive protostars and thus the bolometric flux directed towards us. The 40 micron peak brightness is typically very close to the actual protostar's position, while at shorter wavelengths this is often not the case due to re-radiation via outflow cavities. SOFIA's relatively high angular resolution at 30-40 microns, i.e. ~3" compared to ~6" of Herschel at 70 microns, is thus important for disentangling massive star formation activity, especially that occurring in crowded regions. With G35.2 we have also demonstrated SOFIA's ability to deliver high contrast imaging revealing fainter extended emission from the protostellar envelope that is impractical to observe from the ground at 10-20 microns. Combined with sophisticated radiative transfer modeling, analysis of this emission constrains the geometry of the outflow cavities, allowing more reliable measurement of the true bolometric luminosity and thus protostellar mass. Our goal now is to apply these techniques to a much larger sample of protostars, spanning a wider range of evolutionary and environmental states, from relatively isolated sources in Infrared Dark Clouds, to less extincted sources with compact (often jet-like) radio emission, to ultra-compact HII regions (where radio emission extends beyond MIR emission), to sources in crowded regions. A typical observation will take ~60 minutes and the ~40 targeted fields of view will yield >~50 protostars: enough to begin to provide statistically significant samples in these different evolutionary and environmental states.

  5. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}ȯ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}ȯ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}ȯ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}ȯ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}ȯ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  6. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}⊙ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}⊙ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}⊙ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}⊙ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi sources with massive YSO associations (Munar-Adrover+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Romero, G. E.

    2011-09-01

    Massive protostars have associated bipolar outflows that can produce strong shocks when they interact with the surrounding medium. At these shocks, particles can be accelerated up to relativistic energies. Relativistic electrons and protons can then produce gamma-ray emission, as some theoretical models predict. To identify young galactic objects that may emit gamma rays, we crossed the Fermi First Year Catalog with some catalogs of known massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), early type stars, and OB associations, and we implemented Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of chance coincidences. We obtained a list of massive MYSOs that are spatially coincident with Fermi sources. (4 data files).

  8. High-velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS 05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, Mark; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multiwavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities up to 350 km/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR bullets'' seen in the Orion Nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a continuum source and a high-velocity CO outflow, which is aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission toward IRAS 05506; these data, together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermediate-mass or massive protostar, and the very short timescale (200 yr) of its outflows indicates that it is very young. If IRAS 05506 is a massive star, then the lack of radio continuum and the late G to early K spectral type we find from our optical spectra imply that in this object we are witnessing the earliest stages of its life, while its temperature is still too low to provide sufficient UV flux for ionization.

  9. A possible OB protostar associated with the molecular outflow in G34.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronfman, L.; May, J.; Nuernberger, D.; Shepherd, D.

    1999-10-01

    The most conspicuous massive molecular outflow candidate identified in our CS(2-1) survey of UC HII regions (Bronfman et al 1996) is G34.4 (IRAS 18507+0121) in the I Galactic quadrant. At a distance of 3.8 kpc, it is near (about 11') the very bright HII region G34.3 (Carral & Welch 1992), embedded in the same GMC with a VLSR of 57 km/s. The CS velocity profile obtained with SEST shows very broad wings, about 25 km/s wide at the 0.1 K level, indicating strong outflow activity. Near infrared images of the field, 90'' in size (0.35'' per pixel), obtained with the du Pont 100'' Telescope at Las Campanas, show a remarkably reddenned source visible only in the K' filter, elongated in shape, about 15'' in extent. We have recently observed the G34.4 region, using the OVRO array, in the 3 mm continuum band and in the H13CO+ line, at a resolution of 5''. Most of the H13CO+ flux (33.64 Jy) comes from two strong cores; while one of these cores is closely associated with the ! NIR source, the other one is associated with a single, unresolved continuum source that has a total flux of 56.8 mJy. The mass of gas and dust in this second, possibly "star-less" core is estimated from the millimeter continuum to be approximately 355 MSun, consistent with the presence of a massive, embedded OB protostar. Bronfman, L., May, J., & Nyman, L. 1996, A&AS 115, 81 Carral & Welch 1992, ApJ 385, 244

  10. HOPS 383: AN OUTBURSTING CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, Emily J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Booker, Joseph; Fischer, William J.; Furlan, Elise; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Stanke, Thomas; Billot, Nicolas; Tobin, John J.; Ali, Babar; Allen, Lori E.; Watson, Dan M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2015-02-10

    We report the dramatic mid-infrared brightening between 2004 and 2006 of Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) 383, a deeply embedded protostar adjacent to NGC 1977 in Orion. By 2008, the source became a factor of 35 brighter at 24 μm with a brightness increase also apparent at 4.5 μm. The outburst is also detected in the submillimeter by comparing APEX/SABOCA to SCUBA data, and a scattered-light nebula appeared in NEWFIRM K{sub s} imaging. The post-outburst spectral energy distribution indicates a Class 0 source with a dense envelope and a luminosity between 6 and 14 L{sub ⊙}. Post-outburst time-series mid- and far-infrared photometry show no long-term fading and variability at the 18% level between 2009 and 2012. HOPS 383 is the first outbursting Class 0 object discovered, pointing to the importance of episodic accretion at early stages in the star formation process. Its dramatic rise and lack of fading over a 6 year period hint that it may be similar to FU Ori outbursts, although the luminosity appears to be significantly smaller than the canonical luminosities of such objects.

  11. Giant Molecular Outflows Powered by Protostars in L1448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony, Mary; Wolf-Chase, Grace A.; O'Linger, Joann

    1999-10-01

    We present sensitive (T*R somewhat equal to 0.1K), large-scale (47' x 7'--corresponding to 4 pc x 6 pc at the source) maps of the CO J = 1 to 0 emission of the L1448 dark cloud at 55" resolution. The maps were acquired using the On-The-Fly (OTF) capability of the NRAO's 12-meter telescope. Careful comparison of the spatial and velocity distribution of the high-velocity CO with previously published optical and near-infrared images and spectra has led to the identification of four distinct, parsec-scale molecular outflows from our maps. These CO flows are powered by four Class 0 protostars: L1448C, L1448N(A), L1448N(B), and L1448 IRS2 and end at the cloud's boundaries. The famous, well-collimated, high-velocity molecular outflow powered by L1448C can now be traced to distances an order of magnitude greater than previously. We present strong evidence for interactions between all four outflows on scales over a parsec from the driving sources. The magnitude of the combined flow momenta, as well as the combined kinetic energy of the flows, are sufficient to disperse the 50 MSun ammonia core in which the protostars are currently forming. It remains to be shown whether the combined directions of the outflow momenta, and the efficiency of momentum transfer from outflow to ambient material, are sufficient for dispersal of the L1448 molecular cloud.

  12. Molecular Anions in Protostars, Prestellar Cores and Dark Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, Steven; Buckle, Jane; Wash, Catherine; Millar, Tom

    2011-01-01

    From our recent survey work using the Green Bank Telescope, microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H have been detected in six new sources. Using HC3N = 10(exp -9) emission maps, we targeted the most carbon-chain-rich sources for our anion survey, which included the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1251A-IRS3, the prestellar cores L1389-SMM1 and L1512, and the interstellar clouds Ll172A, TMC-1C and L1495B. Derived [C6H(-)]/[C6H] anion-to-neutral ratios are approximately 1-10. The greatest C6H(-) column densities are found in the quiescent clouds TMC-1C and L1495B, but the anion-to-neutral ratios are greatest in the prestellar cores and protostars. These results are interpreted in terms of the physical and chemical properties of the sources, and the implications for molecular cloud chemistry are discussed.

  13. Radio variability survey of very low luminosity protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2014-07-01

    Ten very low luminosity objects were observed multiple times in the 8.5 GHz continuum in search of protostellar magnetic activities. A radio outburst of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS was detected, and the variability timescale was about 20 days or shorter. The results of this survey and archival observations suggest that IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is in active states about half the time. Archival data show that L1014 IRS and L1148 IRS were detectable previously and suggest that at least 20%-30% of very low luminosity protostars are radio variables. Considering the variability timescale and flux level of IRAM 04191+1522 IRS and the previous detection of the circular polarization of L1014 IRS, the radio outbursts of these protostars are probably caused by magnetic flares. However, IRAM 04191+1522 IRS is too young and small to develop an internal convective dynamo. If the detected radio emission is indeed coming from magnetic flares, the discovery implies that the flares may be caused by the fossil magnetic fields of interstellar origin.

  14. Massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2013-09-01

    The concept of mass has been central in many areas of physics. Gravitation is not an exception, and it has been one of the long-standing questions whether the graviton, a spin-2 particle that mediates gravity, can have a non-vanishing mass or not. This question is relevant from not only theoretical but also phenomenological viewpoints, since a nonzero graviton mass may lead to late-time acceleration of the universe and thus may be considered as an alternative to dark energy. In 2010, de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley proposed the first example of a fully nonlinear massive gravity theory and showed that the so called Boulware-Deser ghost, which had been one of the major obstacles against a stable nonlinear theory of massive gravity since 1972, can be removed by construction. Since then, nonlinear massive gravity has been attracting significant interest among physicists and cosmologists. The nonlinear theory of massive gravity provides a theoretical framework in which properties of the remaining five physical degrees of freedom of massive gravity can be studied. As always with any low-energy effective theories, one of the first tasks would be to identify good and bad backgrounds. Depending on the choice of backgrounds, some of the five degrees of freedom may become strongly coupled, may exhibit instantaneous propagation, or may lead to ghost/gradient instabilities. A related subject is to seek interesting solutions such as those relevant for astrophysical objects and those describing self-accelerating cosmology. Those solutions will allow us to study phenomenological and cosmological implications of the theory. Yet another important task would be to seek a possible (partial) UV completion that can be applied beyond the regime of validity of the low-energy effective theory that we currently know of. We invited articles to cover those important subjects in massive gravity. Given the recent rapid developments in the field, however, it must be noted that this focus issue

  15. Formation of massive stars by growing accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Andre

    There are at present three scenarios for the formation of massive star. 1) The classical scenario of constant mass pre-Main Sequence (MS) evolution on the Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale. 2) The coalescence scenario, with merging of intermediate mass protostars. 3) The accretion scenario. The various arguments for and against these scenarios are briefly reviewed. We examine the pre-MS evolution of accreting stars for constant accretion rates and for accretion rates which are growing with the stellar masses. The location of the birthlines in the HRD and the lifetimes support accretion rates growing fastly with the stellar masses. Remarkably the dependence found is similar to that of the mass outflows from UC HII regions observed by Churchwell (1999) and Henning et al. (2000). The accretion scenario also leads to a new concept for the maximum stellar mass.

  16. Misaligned Disks in the Binary Protostar IRS 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinch, Christian; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Nelson, Richard P.; Gressel, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Recent high angular resolution (∼ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2) ALMA observations of the 1.1 mm continuum and of HCO+ J = 3–2 and HCN J = 3–2 gas toward the binary protostar IRS 43 reveal multiple Keplerian disks that are significantly misaligned (\\gt 60^\\circ ), both in inclination and position angle and also with respect to the binary orbital plane. Each stellar component has an associated circumstellar disk while the binary is surrounded by a circumbinary disk. Together with archival VLA measurements of the stellar positions over 25 years, and assuming a circular orbit, we use our continuum measurements to determine the binary separation, a=74+/- 4 {au}, and its inclination, i\\lt 30^\\circ . The misalignment in this system suggests that turbulence has likely played a major role in the formation of IRS 43.

  17. DETECTION OF A MAGNETIZED DISK AROUND A VERY YOUNG PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramprasad; Girart, Josep M.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Marrone, Daniel P. E-mail: girart@ice.cat

    2014-01-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution polarimetric observations of the 878 μm thermal dust continuum emission obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward the IRAS 16293–2422 protostellar binary system. We report the detection of linearly polarized dust emission arising from the circumstellar disk associated with the IRAS 16293–2422 B protostar. The fractional polarization of ≅ 1.4% is only slightly lower than that expected from theoretical calculations in such disks. The magnetic field structure on the plane of the sky derived from the dust polarization suggests a complex magnetic field geometry in the disk, possibly associated with a rotating disk that is wrapping the field lines as expected from the simulations. The polarization around IRAS 16293–2422 A at subarcsecond angular resolution is only marginally detected.

  18. Probing the methanol and CO snow lines in young protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, S.; Maret, S.

    2016-05-01

    "Snow lines", marking regions where abundant volatiles freeze out onto the surface of dust grains, play an important role for planet growth and bulk composition in protoplanetary disks. However, they can already be observed in the envelopes of the much younger, low-mass Class 0 protostars that are still in their early phase of heavy accretion. The information on the sublimation regions of different kinds of ices can be used to understand the chemistry of the envelope, its temperature and density structure, and may even hint at the history of the accretion process. As part of the CALYPSO Large Program, we have obtained observations of C18O, N2H+ and CH3OH towards the nearest low-luminosity Class 0 protostars with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at sub-arcsecond resolution. We observe an anti-correlation of C18O and N2H+ in four of these sources, with N2H+ forming a ring (perturbed by the outflow) around the centrally peaked C18O emission. This reveals the CO snow line in these protostellar envelopes with unprecedented resolution. In addition, we observe compact methanol emission towards three of the sources. We have modeled the emission using a chemical model coupled with a radiative transfer module, using the temperature and density profiles self-consistently determined by Kristensen et al. ([4]). We find that for all four sources the CO snow line appears further inwards than expected from the binding energy of pure CO ices. This may hint at CO being frozen out on H2O surfaces or in mixed ices. Our observations can thereby yield clues on the widely unknown composition of interstellar ices, being the initial seeds of complex organic chemistry.

  19. A HERSCHEL AND APEX CENSUS OF THE REDDEST SOURCES IN ORION: SEARCHING FOR THE YOUNGEST PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Krause, Oliver; Tobin, John J.; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, Thomas L.; Allen, Lori; Manoj, P.

    2013-04-10

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 {mu}m and 160 {mu}m that are either too faint (m{sub 24} > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 {mu}m fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log {lambda}F{sub {lambda}}70/{lambda}F{sub {lambda}}24 > 1.65; we name these sources 'PACS Bright Red sources', or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBR sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; T{sub bol} < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L{sub smm}/L{sub bol} > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2-2 M{sub Sun} and luminosities of 0.7-10 L{sub Sun }. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.

  20. A Herschel and APEX Census of the Reddest Sources in Orion: Searching for the Youngest Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Tobin, John J.; Stanke, Thomas; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Robitaille, Thomas; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; di Francesco, James; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, Thomas L.; Allen, Lori; Krause, Oliver; Manoj, P.

    2013-04-01

    We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 μm and 160 μm that are either too faint (m 24 > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log λF λ70/λF λ24 > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 μm fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log λF λ70/λF λ24 > 1.65; we name these sources "PACS Bright Red sources," or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBR sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red spectral energy distributions (SEDs; T bol < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L smm/L bol > 0.6%). Modified blackbody fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2-2 M ⊙ and luminosities of 0.7-10 L ⊙. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.

  1. Searching for Correlations with the HCO+ 4-3 Molecular Spectra of Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acikgoz, Ogulcan; Basturk, Seda

    The assignment is based on HCO+ J=4-3 spectral line molecular observations of protostars from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, which has the 15 m diameter dish and located in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA. Data of 20 protostars are taken from the public LOMASS database and analyzed. We looked for correlations between a few observational quantities. We thank Dr Umut Yildiz (NASA/JPL-Caltech) for providing data and his comments and support to our research project.

  2. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  3. A high-resolution radio survey of Class I protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Roche, P. F.

    2000-10-01

    We report the results of a survey of low-mass Class I protostars in the cm continuum. In the initial survey, seven sources in the Taurus star formation region were observed with the VLA at 0.25-arcsec resolution. All seven sources drive CO outflows and display Herbig-Haro flows in the optical or near-infrared (NIR) wavebands. Four out of seven sources were detected, two of which are new discoveries in systems of very low luminosity, one being the lowest luminosity system detected to date in the cm continuum. Notably, three sources were not detected to a 3σ limit of 0.10mJy/beam, which indicates that significant cm continuum emission is not a universal feature of Class I systems with outflow activity. Subsequent observations of HH30, a more evolved Class II system, found no emission to a 3σ limit of 0.03mJy/beam. After comparison with near infrared data, we suggest that the discriminating feature of the detected systems is a relatively high ionization fraction in the stellar wind. Temporal variability of the outflow may also play a role: only recently ejected knots may have sufficiently dense plasma to be optically thick to free-free emission, and hence produce detectable flux. The one relatively bright source, IRAS 04016+2610 (L1489 IRS), is clearly resolved on a 0.4-arcsec scale at 2 and 3.5cm. Additional imaging with MERLIN did not detect this source with a 0.04-arcsec beam, indicating that the radio emission is generated in a region with a radius of ~25au, which is broadly similar to the radius of the bipolar cavities inferred from models of NIR data. Interpretation of this system is complicated by the existence of a quadrupolar outflow, i.e. two bipolar outflows along roughly perpendicular axes, which we originally detected through polarimetric imaging. We present an NIR H2 image in which a bow shock in the secondary outflow is clearly seen. This complicated structure may have been caused by a gravitational interaction between two protostars.

  4. A Near-infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Class I Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelley, Michael S.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2010-11-01

    We present the results of a near-IR spectroscopic survey of 110 Class I protostars observed from 0.80 μm to 2.43 μm at a spectroscopic resolution of R = 1200. This survey is unique in its selection of targets from the whole sky, its sample size, wavelength coverage, depth, and sample selection. We find that Class I objects exhibit a wide range of lines and the continuum spectroscopic features. Eighty-five percent of Class I protostars exhibit features indicative of mass accretion, and we found that the veiling excess, CO emission, and Br γ emission are closely related. We modeled the spectra to estimate the veiling excess (rk ) and extinction to each target. We also used near-IR colors and emission line ratios, when available, to also estimate extinction. In the course of this survey, we observed the spectra of 10 FU Orionis-like objects, including 2 new ones, as well as 3 Herbig Ae-type stars among our Class I young stellar objects. We used photospheric absorption lines, when available, to estimate the spectral type of each target. Although most targets are late-type stars, there are several A- and F-type stars in our sample. Notably, we found no A or F class stars in the Taurus-Auriga or Perseus star-forming regions. There are several cases where the observed CO and/or water absorption bands are deeper than expected from the photospheric spectral type. We find a correlation between the appearance of the reflection nebula, which traces the distribution of material on very large scales, and the near-IR spectrum, which probes smaller scales. All of the FU Orionis-like objects are associated with reflection nebulae. The spectra of the components of spatially resolved protostellar binaries tend to be very similar. In particular both components tend to have similar veiling and H2 emission, inconsistent with random selection from the sample as a whole. There is a strong correlation between [Fe II] and H2 emission, supporting previous results showing that H2 emission

  5. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HEATING IN A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou; Li Huabai

    2012-02-15

    The dense molecular clump P1 in the infrared dark cloud complex G28.34+0.06 harbors a massive protostellar cluster at its extreme youth. Our previous Submillimeter Array observations revealed several jet-like CO outflows emanating from the protostars, indicative of intense accretion and potential interaction with ambient natal materials. Here, we present the Expanded Very Large Array spectral line observations toward P1 in the NH{sub 3} (J,K) = (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines, as well as H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH masers. Multiple NH{sub 3} transitions reveal the heated gas widely spread in the 1 pc clump. The temperature distribution is highly structured; the heated gas is offset from the protostars, and morphologically matches the outflows very well. Hot spots of spatially compact, spectrally broad NH{sub 3} (3,3) emission features are also found coincident with the outflows. A weak NH{sub 3} (3,3) maser is discovered at the interface between an outflow jet and the ambient gas. These findings suggest that protostellar heating may not be effective in suppressing fragmentation during the formation of massive cores.

  6. ALIGNMENT OF PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DURING THE EMBEDDED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C. E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu

    2014-12-20

    Star formation proceeds via the collapse of a molecular cloud core over multiple dynamical timescales. Turbulence within cores results in a spatially non-uniform angular momentum of the cloud, causing a stochastic variation in the orientation of the disk forming from the collapsing material. In the absence of star-disk angular momentum coupling, such disk-tilting would provide a natural mechanism for the production of primordial spin-orbit misalignments in the resulting planetary systems. However, owing to high accretion rates in the embedded phase of star formation, the inner edge of the circumstellar disk extends down to the stellar surface, resulting in efficient gravitational and accretional angular momentum transfer between the star and the disk. Here, we demonstrate that the resulting gravitational coupling is sufficient to suppress any significant star-disk misalignment, with accretion playing a secondary role. The joint tilting of the star-disk system leads to a stochastic wandering of star-aligned bipolar outflows. Such wandering widens the effective opening angle of stellar outflows, allowing for more efficient clearing of the remainder of the protostar's gaseous envelope. Accordingly, the processes described in this work provide an additional mechanism responsible for sculpting the stellar initial mass function.

  7. Infrared Observations of Hot Gas and Cold Ice Toward the Low Mass Protostar Elias 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ceccarelli, C.; Boonman, A. M. S.; vanDishoeck, E. F.; Keane, J. V.; Whittet, D. C. B.; deGraauw, T.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained the full 1-200 micrometer spectrum of the low luminosity (36 solar luminosity Class I protostar Elias 29 in the rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud. It provides a unique opportunity to study the origin and evolution of interstellar ice and the interrelationship of interstellar ice and hot core gases around low mass protostars. We see abundant hot CO and H2O gas, as well as the absorption bands of CO, CO2, H2O and "6.85 micrometer" ices. We compare the abundances and physical conditions of the gas and ices toward Elias 29 with the conditions around several well studied luminous, high mass protostars. The high gas temperature and gas/solid ratios resemble those of relatively evolved high mass objects (e.g. GL 2591). However, none of the ice band profiles shows evidence for significant thermal processing, and in this respect Elias 29 resembles the least evolved luminous protostars, such as NGC 7538 : IRS9. Thus we conclude that the heating of the envelope of the low mass object Elias 29 is qualitatively different from that of high mass protostars. This is possibly related to a different density gradient of the envelope or shielding of the ices in a circumstellar disk. This result is important for our understanding of the evolution of interstellar ices, and their relation to cometary ices.

  8. Dissociative shocks in the inner 100 AU of low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L. E.

    2013-07-01

    Even for low-mass protostars (Lbol < 100 Lsun) star formation is a violent process. The inner dense envelope is illuminated by X-rays and UV radiation from the accreting protostar, while the same inner envelope is exposed to the protostellar jet and wind, both causing shocks in the dense gas. Thus, the chemical and physical conditions along the outflow cavities are significantly different from the conditions in the bulk of the cold envelope. The hot gas (T > 500 K) remains largely uncharacterized in spite of the fact that it is observed toward nearly every low-mass protostar with Herschel-PACS. Recent observations obtained with Herschel-HIFI as part of the "Water in star-forming regions with Herschel" program (WISH) will be presented. The velocity-resolved line profiles of water and related hydrides (OH+, OH, CH+) point to a physical origin of the hot gas to be in dissociative shocks located in the inner few 100 AU of the protostar. Complementary SubMillimeter Array (SMA) data shed further light on both the spatial location and excitation conditions in these shocks. Finally, ALMA Science Verification data show how and where gas is put in motion on small scales (~ 100 AU). All of these observations pave the way for future studies of shocks and entrainment in low-mass protostars.

  9. An X-ray and radio study of the massive star-forming cluster IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Virginie; Hofner, Peter; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

    2015-08-01

    Two main competitive theories intent to explain massive star formation: the turbulent core model, which is an extension of the low-mass star formation model (McKee & Tan 2003), and models involving competitive accretion or stellar collisions (Bonnell & Bate 2006). The characterization of the cluster in which massive stars remain can help discriminate between the two main scenarios of their formation.Until recently it was believed that massive stars were only formed in dense molecular clouds leading to a substantial cluster. However, a previous study of the massive star forming region IRAS 20126+4104 using Spitzer observations by Qiu et al. (2008), suggested that the massive protostar was isolated, and the region was showing no obvious cluster.Here we adopt a multiwavelength technique to characterize the stellar environment of the IRAS 20126+4104 region combining Chandra X-ray ACIS-I and VLA 6cm continuum observations, and near-infrared (2MASS) data of the region. We detected 150 X-ray sources in the ACIS-I field and 13 radio sources within the 9’.2 VLA primary beam. Associating X-ray sources with their near-infrared counterparts from the 2MASS catalog and a color study of those counterparts, allow us to determine the galactic foreground/background contamination, and we conclude that 90 X-ray sources are associated with the region.This study shows an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and a number of at least 42 YSOs within 1.2 pc distance from the massive protostar. This number is consistent with typical B-type stars clusters (Lada & Lada 2003).

  10. THE RED MSX SOURCE SURVEY: THE MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION OF OUR GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, S. L.; Hoare, M. G.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Cooper, H. D. B.; Urquhart, J. S.; Davies, B.; Moore, T. J. T.; Mottram, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    We present the Red MSX Source survey, the largest statistically selected catalog of young massive protostars and H II regions to date. We outline the construction of the catalog using mid- and near-infrared color selection. We also discuss the detailed follow up work at other wavelengths, including higher spatial resolution data in the infrared. We show that within the adopted selection bounds we are more than 90% complete for the massive protostellar population, with a positional accuracy of the exciting source of better than 2 arcsec. We briefly summarize some of the results that can be obtained from studying the properties of the objects in the catalog as a whole; we find evidence that the most massive stars form: (1) preferentially nearer the Galactic center than the anti-center; (2) in the most heavily reddened environments, suggestive of high accretion rates; and (3) from the most massive cloud cores.

  11. Nonaxisymmetric Dynamic Instabilities of Rotating Polytropes. II. Torques, Bars, and Mode Saturation with Applications to Protostars and Fizzlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Brian K.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic nonaxisymmetric instabilities in rapidly rotating stars and protostars have a range of potential applications in astrophysics, including implications for binary formation during protostellar cloud collapse and for the possibility of aborted collapse to neutron star densities at late stages of stellar evolution (``fizzlers''). We have recently presented detailed linear analyses for polytropes of the most dynamically unstable global modes, the barlike modes. These produce bar distortions in the regions near the rotation axis but have trailing spiral arms toward the equator. In this paper, we use our linear eigenfunctions to predict the early nonlinear behavior of the dynamic instability and compare these ``quasi-linear'' predictions with several fully nonlinear hydrodynamics simulations. The comparisons demonstrate that the nonlinear saturation of the barlike instability is due to the self-interaction gravitational torques between the growing central bar and the spiral arms, where angular momentum is transferred outward from bar to arms. We also find a previously unsuspected resonance condition that accurately predicts the mass of the bar regions in our own simulations and in those published by other researchers. The quasi-linear theory makes other accurate predictions about consequences of instability, including properties of possible end-state bars and increases in central density, which can be large under some conditions. We discuss in some detail the application of our results to binary formation during protostellar collapse and to the formation of massive rotating black holes.

  12. On the nature of the deeply embedded protostar OMC-2 FIR 4

    SciTech Connect

    Furlan, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Fischer, W. J.; Osorio, M.; Stutz, A. M.; Ali, B.; Manoj, P.; Adams, J. D.; Tobin, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    We use mid-infrared to submillimeter data from the Spitzer, Herschel, and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescopes to study the bright submillimeter source OMC-2 FIR 4. We find a point source at 8, 24, and 70 μm, and a compact, but extended source at 160, 350, and 870 μm. The peak of the emission from 8 to 70 μm, attributed to the protostar associated with FIR 4, is displaced relative to the peak of the extended emission; the latter represents the large molecular core the protostar is embedded within. We determine that the protostar has a bolometric luminosity of 37 L {sub ☉}, although including more extended emission surrounding the point source raises this value to 86 L {sub ☉}. Radiative transfer models of the protostellar system fit the observed spectral energy distribution well and yield a total luminosity of most likely less than 100 L {sub ☉}. Our models suggest that the bolometric luminosity of the protostar could be as low as 12-14 L {sub ☉}, while the luminosity of the colder (∼20 K) extended core could be around 100 L {sub ☉}, with a mass of about 27 M {sub ☉}. Our derived luminosities for the protostar OMC-2 FIR 4 are in direct contradiction with previous claims of a total luminosity of 1000 L {sub ☉}. Furthermore, we find evidence from far-infrared molecular spectra and 3.6 cm emission that FIR 4 drives an outflow. The final stellar mass the protostar will ultimately achieve is uncertain due to its association with the large reservoir of mass found in the cold core.

  13. Feedback from deeply embedded low- and high-mass protostars. Surveying hot molecular gas with Herschel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, Agata

    2014-09-01

    Protostars interact violently with their natal cocoons within dense molecular clouds. Characterizing this feedback is key to understanding the efficiency of the star formation process and the chemical processing of material that will be available for planet formation. In this thesis, the imprints of physical processes on molecular gas are analyzed using state-of-the-art far-infrared spectroscopy from Herschel / PACS. Interpretation of the origin of far-infrared line emission allows us to quantify the physical conditions and the role of shocks and ultraviolet radiation during the 'kindergarten years' of low- and high-mass protostars.

  14. Observations of Carbon Chain Chemistry in the Envelopes of Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M.; Charnley, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.; Millar, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Observational results are reported from our surveys in the Northern Hemisphere (using the Onsala 20 m telescope) and the Southern Hemisphere (using the Mopra 22 m telescope) to search for 3 mm emission lines from carbon-chain-bearing species and other complex molecules in the envelopes of low-mass protostars. Based on a sample of approximately 60 sources, we find that carbon-chain-bearing species including HC3N (and C4H) are highly abundant in the vicinity of more than half of the observed protostars. The origin and evolution of these species, including their likely incorporation into ices in protoplanetary disks will be discussed

  15. Massive Stellar Outflows From the Combined Action of Multiple Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Peters, T.; Klaassen, P.; Schrön, M.; Klessen, R.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations seem to suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows are not well understood because radiative feedback and gravitational fragmentation of the accretion flow around the high-mass star impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present the first 3D simulation of massive star formation that simultaneously includes feedback by non-ionizing and ionizing radiation as well as a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We ran this model with the Flash adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of lower-mass companion stars combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H2 and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of this collective outflow is very similar to observed massive outflows, such as Cepheus A and DR 21. The properties of high-mass outflows are therefore generally consistent with the formation of massive stars in gravitationally unstable accretion flows. We acknowledge support from SNF grant 200020 137896, U. Zurich grant FK-13-112, NSF grant AST11-09395, and DFG grant KL 1358/14-1, as well as SBB 811, and computing time at the LRZ (project h1343), the CSCS (Project 364), and the Juelich Supercomputing Center (project HHD14).

  16. Properties of the Youngest Protostars in Perseus, Serpens, and Ophiuchus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Evans, Neal J., II; Sargent, Anneila I.; Glenn, Jason

    2009-02-01

    We present an unbiased census of deeply embedded protostars in Perseus, Serpens, and Ophiuchus, assembled by combining large-scale 1.1 mm Bolocam continuum and Spitzer Legacy surveys. We identify protostellar candidates based on their mid-infrared (mid-IR) properties, correlate their positions with 1.1 mm core positions from Enoch et al. in 2006 and 2007, and Young et al. in 2006, and construct well-sampled spectral energy distributions using our extensive wavelength coverage (λ = 1.25-1100 μm). Source classification based on the bolometric temperature yields a total of 39 Class 0 and 89 Class I sources in the three-cloud sample. We compare to protostellar evolutionary models using the bolometric temperature-luminosity diagram, finding a population of low-luminosity Class I sources that are inconsistent with constant or monotonically decreasing mass accretion rates. This result argues strongly for episodic accretion during the Class I phase, with more than 50% of sources in a "sub-Shu" (dM/dt < 10-6 M sun yr-1) accretion state. Average spectra are compared to protostellar radiative transfer models, which match the observed spectra fairly well in Stage 0, but predict too much near-IR and too little mid-IR flux in Stage I. Finally, the relative number of Class 0 and Class I sources is used to estimate the lifetime of the Class 0 phase; the three-cloud average yields a Class 0 lifetime of 1.7 ± 0.3 × 105 yr, ruling out an extremely rapid early accretion phase. Correcting photometry for extinction results in a somewhat shorter lifetime (1.1 × 105 yr). In Ophiuchus, however, we find very few Class 0 sources (N Class 0/N Class I ~ 0.1-0.2), similar to previous studies of that cloud. The observations suggest a consistent picture of nearly constant average accretion rate through the entire embedded phase, with accretion becoming episodic by at least the Class I stage, and possibly earlier.

  17. A Complex Organic Slushy Bathing Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Complex organic molecules are ubiquitous companions of young forming stars. They were first observed in hot cores surrounding high-mass protostars [e.g., 1], but have since also been detected in the environs of several low-mass counterparts [e.g., 2]. Recent studies have shown that colder envelopes and positions with impinging outflows may also glow with emission from complex organic species [e.g., 3, 4]. For this meeting, I would like to present physicochemical modeling results on the synthesis of complex organics in an envelope-cavity system that is subject to non-thermal processing. This includes wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations with RADMC [5] and a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network [6]. The results show that the morphology of such a system delineates three distinct regions: the cavity wall layer with time-dependent and species-variant enhancements; a torus rich in complex organic ices, but not reflected in gas-phase abundances; and the remaining outer envelope abundant in simpler solid and gaseous molecules. Within the adopted paradigm, complex organic molecules are demonstrated to have unique lifetimes and be grouped into early and late species [7]. Key chemical processes for forming and destroying complex organic molecules will be discussed. In addition, the results of adding newly experimentally verified routes [8] into the existing chemical networks will be shown.[1] Blake G. A., Sutton E. C., Masson C. R., Phillips T. G., 1987, ApJ, 315, 621[2] Jørgensen J. K., Favre C., Bisschop S. E., Bourke T. L., van Dishoeck E. F., Schmalzl M., 2012, ApJ, 757, L4[3] Arce H. G., Santiago-García J., Jørgensen J. K., Tafalla M., Bachiller R., 2008, ApJ, 681, L21[4] Öberg K. I., Bottinelli S., Jørgensen J. K., van Dishoeck E. F., 2010, ApJ, 716, 825[5] Dullemond C. P., Dominik C., 2004, A&A, 417, 159[6] Walsh C., Millar T. J., Nomura H., Herbst E., Widicus Weaver S., Aikawa Y., Laas J. C., Vasyunin A. I., 2014, A&A, 563, A33[7] Drozdovskaya

  18. Heavy water stratification in a low-mass protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Cazaux, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Demyk, K.; Taquet, V.; Wakelam, V.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Despite the low elemental deuterium abundance in the Galaxy, enhanced molecular deuterium fractionation has been found in the environments of low-mass star-forming regions and, in particular, the Class 0 protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Aims: The key program Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS) aims at studying the molecular complexity of the interstellar medium. The high sensitivity and spectral resolution of the Herschel/HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for Far-Infrared) instrument provide a unique opportunity to observe the fundamental 11,1-00,0 transition of ortho-D2O at 607 GHz and the higher energy 21,2-10,1 transition of para-D2O at 898 GHz, both of which are inaccessible from the ground. Methods: The ortho-D2O transition at 607 GHz was previously detected. We present in this paper the first tentative detection for the para-D2O transition at 898 GHz. The spherical Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RATRAN was used to reproduce the observed line profiles of D2O with the same method that was used to reproduce the HDO and H218O line profiles in IRAS 16293-2422. Results: As for HDO, the absorption component seen on the D2O lines can only be reproduced by adding an external absorbing layer, possibly created by the photodesorption of the ices at the edges of the molecular cloud. The D2O column density is found to be about 2.5 × 1012 cm-2 in this added layer, leading to a D2O/H2O ratio of about 0.5%. At a 3σ uncertainty, upper limits of 0.03% and 0.2% are obtained for this ratio in the hot corino and the colder envelope of IRAS 16293-2422, respectively. Conclusions: The deuterium fractionation derived in our study suggests that the ices present in IRAS 16293-2422 formed on warm dust grains (~15-20 K) in dense (~104-5 × 104 cm-3) translucent clouds. These results allow us to address the earliest phases of star formation and the conditions in which ices form. Based on Herschel/HIFI observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with

  19. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2016-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  20. HCO+ and N2H+ as ionisation tracers in the low-mass protostar IRAS16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.

    2016-05-01

    Ionisation in the molecular environment of star-forming regions gives important clues on the chemical processes that take place in the environment of a young protostar. Ionisation can be traced with molecules like HCO+ and N2H+ and it regulates the formation of larger molecules such as complex organic molecules (COMs). The ionisation degree can also play an important role in the free-fall timescale of the protostar since it prevents the neutral material to collapse through collisions with ions and electrons bound to the magnetic field of the central protostar.

  1. SOFIA/FORCAST AND SPITZER/IRAC IMAGING OF THE ULTRACOMPACT H II REGION W3(OH) AND ASSOCIATED PROTOSTARS IN W3

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Lea; Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George E.; Henderson, Charles P.; Schoenwald, Justin; Hora, Joseph L.; De Buizer, James M.; Vacca, William; Megeath, S. Thomas; Keller, Luke D.

    2012-10-01

    We present infrared observations of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH) made by the FORCAST instrument aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and by the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera. We contribute new wavelength data to the spectral energy distribution (SED), which constrains the optical depth, grain size distribution, and temperature gradient of the dusty shell surrounding the H II region. We model the dust component as a spherical shell containing an inner cavity with radius {approx}600 AU, irradiated by a central star of type O9 and temperature {approx}31, 000 K. The total luminosity of this system is 7.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }. An observed excess of 2.2-4.5 {mu}m emission in the SED can be explained by our viewing a cavity opening or clumpiness in the shell structure whereby radiation from the warm interior of the shell can escape. We claim to detect the nearby water maser source W3 (H{sub 2}O) at 31.4 and 37.1 {mu}m using beam deconvolution of the FORCAST images. We constrain the flux densities of this object at 19.7-37.1 {mu}m. Additionally, we present in situ observations of four young stellar and protostellar objects in the SOFIA field, presumably associated with the W3 molecular cloud. Results from the model SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al. suggest that two objects (2MASS J02270352+6152357 and 2MASS J02270824+6152281) are intermediate-luminosity ({approx}236-432 L{sub Sun }) protostars; one object (2MASS J02270887+6152344) is either a high-mass protostar with luminosity 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L{sub Sun} or a less massive young star with a substantial circumstellar disk but depleted envelope; and the other (2MASS J02270743+6152281) is an intermediate-luminosity ({approx}768 L{sub Sun }) protostar nearing the end of its envelope accretion phase or a young star surrounded by a circumstellar disk with no appreciable circumstellar envelope.

  2. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  3. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-09-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion.

  4. Locally linear embedding: dimension reduction of massive protostellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the application of locally linear embedding (LLE) to reduce the dimensionality of dereddened and continuum subtracted near-infrared spectra using a combination of models and real spectra of massive protostars selected from the Red MSX Source survey data base. A brief comparison is also made with two other dimension reduction techniques; principal component analysis (PCA) and Isomap using the same set of spectra as well as a more advanced form of LLE, Hessian locally linear embedding. We find that whilst LLE certainly has its limitations, it significantly outperforms both PCA and Isomap in classification of spectra based on the presence/absence of emission lines and provides a valuable tool for classification and analysis of large spectral data sets.

  5. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  6. Spectroscopic Detection of a Stellar-like Photosphere in an Accreting Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas P.; Lada, Charles J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present high-resolution (R is approximately equal to 18,000), high signal-to-noise 2 micron spectra of two luminous, X-ray flaring Class I protostars in the rho Ophiuchi cloud acquired with the NIRSPEC (near infrared spectrograph) of the Keck II telescope. We present the first spectrum of a highly veiled, strongly accreting protostar which shows photospheric absorption features and demonstrates the stellar nature of its central core. We find the spectrum of the luminous (L (sub bol) = 10 solar luminosity) protostellar source, YLW 15, to be stellar-like with numerous atomic and molecular absorption features, indicative of a K5 IV/V spectral type and a continuum veiling r(sub k) = 3.0. Its derived stellar luminosity (3 stellar luminosity) and stellar radius (3.1 solar radius) are consistent with those of a 0.5 solar mass pre-main-sequence star. However, 70% of its bolometric luminosity is due to mass accretion, whose rate we estimate to be 1.7 x 10(exp -6) solar masses yr(exp -1). We determine that excess infrared emission produced by the circumstellar accretion disk, the inner infalling envelope, and accretion shocks at the surface of the stellar core of YLW 15 all contribute significantly to its near-IR (infrared) continuum veiling. Its rotational velocity v sin i = 50 km s(exp -1) is comparable to those of flat-spectrum protostars but considerably higher than those of classical T Tauri stars in the rho Oph cloud. The protostar may be magnetically coupled to its circumstellar disk at a radius of 2 - 3 R(sub *). It is also plausible that this protostar can shed over half its angular momentum and evolve into a more slowly rotating classical T Tauri star by remaining coupled to its circumstellar disk (at increasing radius) as its accretion rate drops by an order of magnitude during the rapid transition between the Class I and Class II phases of evolution. The spectrum of WL 6 does not show any photospheric absorption features, and we estimate that its continuum

  7. Identifying the Low-Luminosity Population of Embedded Protostars in the c2d Observations of Clouds and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Crapsi, Antonio; Evans, Neal J., II; Bourke, Tyler L.; Huard, Tracy L.; Myers, Philip C.; Kauffmann, Jens

    2008-11-01

    We present the results of a search for all embedded protostars with internal luminosities <=1.0 L⊙ in the full sample of nearby, low-mass star-forming regions surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Project "From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks" (c2d). The internal luminosity of a source, Lint, is the luminosity of the central source and excludes luminosity arising from external heating. On average, the Spitzer c2d data are sensitive to embedded protostars with Lint >= 4 × 10-3(d/140 pc)2 L⊙, a factor of 25 better than the sensitivity of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) to such objects. We present a set of selection criteria used to identify candidates from the Spitzer data and examine complementary data to decide whether each candidate is truly an embedded protostar. We find a tight correlation between the 70 μm flux and internal luminosity of a protostar, an empirical result based on both observations and detailed two-dimensional radiative transfer models of protostars. We identify 50 embedded protostars with Lint <= 1.0 L⊙ 15 have Lint <= 0.1 L⊙. The intrinsic distribution of source luminosities increases to lower luminosities. While we find sources down to the above sensitivity limit, indicating that the distribution may extend to luminosities lower than probed by these observations, we are able to rule out a continued rise in the distribution below Lint = 0.1 L⊙. Between 75% and 85% of cores classified as starless prior to being observed by Spitzer remain starless to our luminosity sensitivity; the remaining 15%-25% harbor low-luminosity, embedded protostars. We compile complete spectral energy distributions for all 50 objects and calculate standard evolutionary signatures (Lbol, Tbol, and Lbol/Lsmm) and argue that these objects are inconsistent with the simplest picture of star formation, wherein mass accretes from the core onto the protostar at a constant rate.

  8. The formation and fragmentation of disks around primordial protostars.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul C; Glover, Simon C O; Smith, Rowan J; Greif, Thomas H; Klessen, Ralf S; Bromm, Volker

    2011-02-25

    The very first stars to form in the universe heralded an end to the cosmic dark ages and introduced new physical processes that shaped early cosmic evolution. Until now, it was thought that these stars lived short, solitary lives, with only one extremely massive star, or possibly a very wide binary system, forming in each dark-matter minihalo. Here we describe numerical simulations that show that these stars were, to the contrary, often members of tight multiple systems. Our results show that the disks that formed around the first young stars were unstable to gravitational fragmentation, possibly producing small binary and higher-order systems that had separations as small as the distance between Earth and the Sun.

  9. The formation and fragmentation of disks around primordial protostars.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul C; Glover, Simon C O; Smith, Rowan J; Greif, Thomas H; Klessen, Ralf S; Bromm, Volker

    2011-02-25

    The very first stars to form in the universe heralded an end to the cosmic dark ages and introduced new physical processes that shaped early cosmic evolution. Until now, it was thought that these stars lived short, solitary lives, with only one extremely massive star, or possibly a very wide binary system, forming in each dark-matter minihalo. Here we describe numerical simulations that show that these stars were, to the contrary, often members of tight multiple systems. Our results show that the disks that formed around the first young stars were unstable to gravitational fragmentation, possibly producing small binary and higher-order systems that had separations as small as the distance between Earth and the Sun. PMID:21292936

  10. THE MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1157-mm

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Ian W.; Looney, Leslie W.; Kwon, Woojin; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Chapman, Nicholas; Novak, Giles; Matthews, Tristan; Davidson, Jacqueline; Vaillancourt, John E.; Shinnaga, Hiroko

    2013-05-20

    We present the first detection of polarization around the Class 0 low-mass protostar L1157-mm at two different wavelengths. We show polarimetric maps at large scales (10'' resolution at 350 {mu}m) from the SHARC-II Polarimeter and at smaller scales (1.''2-4.''5 at 1.3 mm) from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The observations are consistent with each other and show inferred magnetic field lines aligned with the outflow. The CARMA observations suggest a full hourglass magnetic field morphology centered about the core; this is only the second well-defined hourglass detected around a low-mass protostar to date. We apply two different methods to CARMA polarimetric observations to estimate the plane-of-sky magnetic field magnitude, finding values of 1.4 and 3.4 mG.

  11. Two protostar candidates in the bright-rimmed dark cloud LDN 1206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Shure, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of several near IR objects associated with two IRAS point sources in the LDN 1206 region is reported. IRAS 22272 + 6358A is probably a 'protostar' which is seen only in scattered light at near-IR wavelengths because of heavy obscuration by an almost edge-on circumstellar disk. In contrast, IRAS 22272 + 6358B is directly visible at these wavelengths and is perhaps an object which lies between protostars and T-Tauri stars in its evolution. Both direct and polarimetric K-band images of the region are presented, as well as spectral energy distributions constructed from J, H, K, L, L-prime, and M data and published far-IR and mm data.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): SEDs (Furlan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-06-01

    To summarize, starting from a sample of 410 Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) targets (see section 2), but excluding likely contaminants and objects not observed or detected by PACS, there are 330 remaining objects that have Spitzer and Herschel data and are considered protostars (based on their Spitzer classification from Megeath et al. 2012, J/AJ/144/192). They form the sample studied in this work. In order to construct SEDs for our sample of 330 YSOs, we combined our own Herschel/PACS observations (see Proposal KPOTtmegeath2) with data from the literature and existing catalogs (see section 3.1). To extend the SEDs into the submillimeter, most of the YSOs were also observed in the continuum at 350 and 870um with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope (Stutz et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/36). (5 data files).

  13. X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Massive Star-forming Region IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, V. A.; Hofner, P.; Anderson, C.; Rosero, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present results from Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star-forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17‧ × 17‧ ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9.‧2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these observtions are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al., namely, I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio source is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive, we identified 88 near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only four of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color-color analysis and on the Besançon simulation of Galactic stellar populations, we estimate that approximately 80 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star-forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 43 young stellar objects within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive protostar.

  14. X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, V. A.; Hofner, P.; Anderson, C.; Rosero, V.

    2015-08-15

    We present results from Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star-forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17′ × 17′ ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9.′2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these observtions are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al., namely, I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio source is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive, we identified 88 near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only four of the X-ray sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color–color analysis and on the Besançon simulation of Galactic stellar populations, we estimate that approximately 80 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star-forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 43 young stellar objects within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive protostar.

  15. OBSERVING SIMULATED PROTOSTARS WITH OUTFLOWS: HOW ACCURATE ARE PROTOSTELLAR PROPERTIES INFERRED FROM SEDs?

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Hansen, Charles E.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-10

    The properties of unresolved protostars and their local environment are frequently inferred from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using radiative transfer modeling. In this paper, we use synthetic observations of realistic star formation simulations to evaluate the accuracy of properties inferred from fitting model SEDs to observations. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) three-dimensional gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate low-mass star formation in a turbulent molecular cloud including the effects of protostellar outflows. To obtain the dust temperature distribution and SEDs of the forming protostars, we post-process the simulations using HYPERION, a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We find that the ORION and HYPERION dust temperatures typically agree within a factor of two. We compare synthetic SEDs of embedded protostars for a range of evolutionary times, simulation resolutions, aperture sizes, and viewing angles. We demonstrate that complex, asymmetric gas morphology leads to a variety of classifications for individual objects as a function of viewing angle. We derive best-fit source parameters for each SED through comparison with a pre-computed grid of radiative transfer models. While the SED models correctly identify the evolutionary stage of the synthetic sources as embedded protostars, we show that the disk and stellar parameters can be very discrepant from the simulated values, which is expected since the disk and central source are obscured by the protostellar envelope. Parameters such as the stellar accretion rate, stellar mass, and disk mass show better agreement, but can still deviate significantly, and the agreement may in some cases be artificially good due to the limited range of parameters in the set of model SEDs. Lack of correlation between the model and simulation properties in many individual instances cautions against overinterpreting properties inferred from SEDs for unresolved protostellar

  16. Keplerian and Infall Motions Around the Late-Phase Protostar TMC-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Y.; Ohashi, N.; Saigo, K.; Takakuwa, S.; Yen, H.-W.; Koyamatsu, S.; Aikawa, Y.; Machida, M. N.; Saito, M.; Tomida, K.; Tomida, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have observed the protostar TMC-1A (Class I, Tbol = 118 K) using ALMA Cycle 0 in 1.3-mm dust continuum, 12CO (J = 2-1), and C18O (J = 2-1) emission. Our results suggest that TMC-1A has a Keplerian disk (Rkep = 100 AU, M* = 0.68 M⊙) and an envelope showing an infalling velocity 0.3 times as large as the free fall velocity.

  17. Water in embedded low-mass protostars: cold envelopes and warm outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Mottram, Joseph; Schmalzl, Markus; Visser, Ruud

    2015-08-01

    As stars form, gas from the parental cloud is transported through the molecular envelope to the protostellar disk from which planets eventually form. Water plays a crucial role in such systems: it forms the backbone of the oxygen chemistry, it is a unique probe of warm and hot gas, and it provides a unique link between the grain surface and gas-phase chemistries. The distribution of water, both as ice and gas, is a fundamental question to our understanding of how planetary systems, such as the Solar System, form.The Herschel Space Observatory observed many tens of embedded low-mass protostars in a suite of gas-phase water transitions in several programs (e.g. Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel, WISH, and the William Herschel Line Legacy Survey, WILL), and related species (e.g. CO in Protostars with HIFI, COPS-HIFI). I will summarize what Herschel has revealed about the water distribution in the cold outer molecular envelope of low-mass protostars, and the warm gas in outflows, the two components predominantly traced by Herschel observations. I will present our current understanding of where the water vapor is in protostellar systems and the underlying physical and chemical processes leading to this distribution. Through these dedicated observational surveys and complementary modeling efforts, we are now at a stage where we can quantify where the water is during the early stages of star formation.

  18. Hydroxyl (OH) Emission from the Intermediate-mass Protostar LDN 1641N MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Andrew; Bergin, E. A.; Visser, R.; Manoj, P.; Fischer, W. J.; Tobin, J. J.; HOPS Team

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is an important molecule for the formation and destruction of water during protostellar evolution. The ultimate aim of this work is to determine the OH column density and compare it to that of water to explore the chemistry of oxygen in shocked gas near protostars. We present an analysis of hydroxyl emission from 60 to 200 micron within a intermediate-mass embedded protostar (LDN 1641N MM1/HOPS-182) located in the Orion Molecular Cloud. These data were obtained as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) (Manoj et al 2012) using the PACS instrument (Poglitsch, 2010) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory (Pilbratt et al, 2010). We detect 16 rotational transitions of OH, covering energies up to 600 K above the ground state. The emission probably originates on scales of a few 100 AU in shocked gas associated with the bipolar outflow. The OH lines are a sensitive probe of the physical properties of the emitting gas (density, temperature), as well as for the far-infrared radiation field close to the central star (Wampfler et al, 2012). We will present the results of our excitation analysis using the large-velocity gradient code RADEX (Van der Tak et al, 2007).

  19. Searching for coronal radio emission from protostars using very-long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Massi, M.; Ros, E.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:In order to directly study the role of magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity of protostars, we use Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), aiming at the detection of non-thermal centimetric radio emission. This is technically the only possibility to study coronal emission at sub-AU resolution. Methods: We performed VLBI observations of the four nearby protostars HL Tau, LDN 1551 IRS5, EC 95, and YLW 15 in order to look for compact non-thermal centimetric radio emission. For maximum sensitivity, we used the High Sensitivity Array (HSA) where possible, involving the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), the phased Very Large Array (VLA), as well as the Arecibo, Green Bank, and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Results: While all four protostars were detected in VLA-only data, only one source (YLW 15 VLA 2) was detected in the VLBI data. The possibility of non-detections due to free-free absorption, possibly depending on source geometry, is considered.

  20. Study of deuterated water in the low-mass protostar IRAS16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Herschel Chess Team

    2011-05-01

    Observations of deuterated water are an important complement for studies of H2O, since they give strong constraints on the formation processes: grain surfaces versus gas-phase chemistry through energetic process as shocks. The CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions) Key Program has allowed to detect a lot of transitions of HDO (8) and H2O (16) as well as its isotopes H_218O and H_217O towards the low-mass protostar IRAS16293-2422 thanks to the unbiaised spectral survey carried out with the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of HDO from the ground-based telescopes IRAM and JCMT are also available, allowing a precise determination of the abundance of deuterated water through the protostar envelope. In order to reproduce the observed line profiles, we have performed a modeling of HDO from the hot corino through the envelope using the physical structure of the protostar (Crimier et al. 2010) and the spherical Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RATRAN, which takes also into account radiative pumping by continuum emission from dust. We have used new HDO collision rates with H_2, recently computed by Wiesenfeld, Scribano and Faure (2011, PCCP). The same method has been applied to model H_2O and its isotopes H_218O and H_217O. We will present the results of this analysis and discuss the determined abundances.

  1. [HDCO]/[H2CO] ratios toward extremely cold protostars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miju; Choi, Minho; Stutz, Amelia M.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi

    2015-08-01

    One of the principal goals of recent star formation studies is to understand the evolution of protostars. Recently, extremely cold sources, called PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS), have been identified via Herschel dust continuum observations in the Orion molecular cloud complex. The PBRS are the objects with very red colors in 24 μm to 70 μm and proposed as very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We present observations of the HDCO and H2CO emission towards a sample of 11 PBRS and 4 previously identified Class 0 protostars (non-PBRS) in Orion A and B clouds. We derive the column densities of HDCO and H2CO and estimate the degree of deuteration in H2CO ([HDCO]/[H2CO]) between 0.03 and 0.31. While mean [HDCO]/[H2CO] ratios of both PBRS and non-PBRS are similar (~ 0.1), the mean [HDCO]/[H2CO] ratio of highly deuterated PBRS is three times higher than the ratio of non-PBRS. The variation of the deuterium fractionation of the PBRS sample implies that the PBRS with high [HDCO]/[H2CO] ratios are in the very earliest stage of star formation or they have a different formation history.

  2. Constraining massive star evolution from massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, Andre-Nicolas; Herve, Anthony; Martins, Fabrice; Bouret, Jean-Claude; Borissova, Jordanka; Ramirez, Sebastian; Kurtev, Radostin; Kumar, Nanda; Amigo, Pia; Fierro, Celia

    2013-06-01

    The exact evolution of massive stars is not accurately known at present. The general trend is that stars with masses above 40 - 60 Mo go from O-type stars to H-rich WN stars, and Luminous Blue Variables (?), before turning into H-poor WN stars and finally WC stars. At lower masses, the H-rich WN and LBV phases are replaced by a blue and a red supergiant phases, respectively. However, what are the details of such evolutionary sequences? The study of massive clusters is a golden opportunity to establish this. Indeed, the turn-off mass of massive clusters can be directly translated into the mass, and hence the nature, of the progenitors of their evolved objects contents. So far, only the Arches, Quintuplet, NGC3603, NGC2244 and central clusters have been studied this way. But 6 newly discovered heavily-obscured clusters in the large survey â"VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) have been found to have Wolf-Rayet stars as well as blue and/or red supergiants, together with many main sequence OB stars. This poster presents our efforts to model the massive star components of these clusters using CMFGEN, bringing new blocks to the pavement of massive stellar evolution and more than doubling the number of clusters in which such evolutionary sequence are established.

  3. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  4. The Formation Process of Massive Close Spectroscopic Binaries: The Fission Hypothesis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.; Ostriker, J.

    2013-06-01

    The vast majority of massive Main-Sequence stars (M>20 Mo) seem to be born in close interactive binary systems (Chini et al. 2012, Sana et al. 2012). The very process by which these systems form is still a mystery and has received little attention so far. Because the binary separation is so tight (less than 1AU), break-up of a critically rotating protostar ("fission") remains an interesting possibility. However, standard current star formation theory treats fission as unlikely (cf. Tohline 2002, ARAA). We question this view and investigate minimum energy states of compressible polytropic analogs to the well-known incompressible MacLaurin spheroids. Dynamical non-axisymmetric instability at a critical ratio of rotational to gravitational energy (cf. Ostriker and Bodenheimer 1973) during the shrinkage of an accreting, rapidly rotating, bloated, massive protostar AFTER ACCRETION DECLINES may provide the conditions for break-up into a close binary system. Time dependent hydro-dynamical simulations are required to either confirm or reject this hypothesis.

  5. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  6. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  7. Waterfalls around protostars. Infall motions towards Class 0/I envelopes as probed by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schmalzl, M.; Kristensen, L. E.; Visser, R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. For stars to form, material must fall inwards from core scales through the envelope towards the central protostar. While theories of how this takes place have been around for some time, the velocity profile around protostars is poorly constrained. The combination of observations in multiple transitions of a tracer which is sensitive to kinematics and radiative transfer modelling of those lines has the potential to break this deadlock. Aims: Seven protostars observed with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the "Water in star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) survey show infall signatures in water line observations. We aim to constrain the infall velocity and the radii over which infall is taking place within the protostellar envelopes of these sources. We will also use these data to constrain the chemistry of cold water. Methods: We use 1-D non-LTE ratran radiative transfer models of the observed water lines to constrain the infall velocity and chemistry in the protostellar envelopes of six Class 0 protostars and one Class I source. We assume a free-fall velocity profile and, having found the best fit, vary the radii over which infall takes place. Results: In the well-studied Class 0 protostar NGC 1333-IRAS4A we find that our observations probe infall over the whole envelope to which our observations are sensitive (r ≳ 1000 AU). For L1527, L1157, BHR71 and IRAS 15398 infall takes place on core to envelope scales (i.e. ~10 000-3000 AU). In Serpens-SMM4 and GSS30 the inverse P-Cygni profiles seen in the ground-state lines are more likely due to larger-scale motions or foreground clouds. Models including a simple consideration of the chemistry are consistent with the observations, while using step abundance profiles are not. The non-detection of excited water in the inner envelope in six out of seven protostars is further evidence that water must be heavily depleted from the gas

  8. Submillimeter-Wave Observations toward the Low-Mass Protostar IRAS 15398-3359 at Subarcsecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Sakai, T.; Hirota, T.; Lindberg, J. E.; Bisschop, S. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subarcsecond 0."5 images of H2CO and CCH line emission have been obtained in the 0.8 mm band toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398-3359 in the Lupus 1 cloud with ALMA. We have detected a compact component concentrated in the vicinity of the protostar and a well-collimated outflow cavity extending along the northeast-southwest axis. The inclination angle of the outflow is found to be almost edge-on (20°) based on the kinematic structure of the outflow cavity. The centrally concentrated component is interpreted by use of a model of the infalling rotating envelope with the estimated inclination angle, and the mass of the protostar is estimated to be less than 0.09 ⊙.

  9. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. VI. THE PROTOSTARS OF LYNDS DARK NEBULA 1221

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Chadwick H.; Young, Kaisa E.; Popa, Victor; Bourke, Tyler L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Evans, Neal J.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Shirley, Yancy L.; De Vries, Christopher; Claussen, Mark J.

    2009-09-01

    Observations of Lynds Dark Nebula 1221 from the Spitzer Space Telescope are presented. These data show three candidate protostars toward L1221, only two of which were previously known. The infrared observations also show signatures of outflowing material, an interpretation which is also supported by radio observations with the Very Large Array. In addition, molecular line maps from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory are shown. One-dimensional dust continuum modeling of two of these protostars, IRS1 and IRS3, is described. These models show two distinctly different protostars forming in very similar environments. IRS1 shows a higher luminosity and a larger inner radius of the envelope than IRS3. The disparity could be caused by a difference in age or mass, orientation of outflow cavities, or the impact of a binary in the IRS1 core.

  10. Detection of glycolaldehyde toward the solar-type protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Persson, M. V.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Wampfler, S. F.; Lykke, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a key molecule in the formation of biologically relevant molecules such as ribose. We report its detection with the Plateau de Bure interferometer toward the Class 0 young stellar object NGC 1333 IRAS2A, which is only the second solar-type protostar for which this prebiotic molecule is detected. Local thermodynamic equilibrium analyses of glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde), and methyl formate (the most abundant isomer of glycolaldehyde) were carried out. The relative abundance of ethylene glycol to glycolaldehyde is found to be ~5 - higher than in the Class 0 source IRAS 16293-2422 (~1), but similar to the lower limits derived in comets (≥3-6). The different ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde ratios in the two protostars might be related to different CH3OH:CO compositions of the icy grain mantles. In particular, a more efficient hydrogenation on the grains in NGC 1333 IRAS2A would favor the formation of both methanol and ethylene glycol. In conclusion, it is possible that like NGC 1333 IRAS2A, other low-mass protostars show high ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde abundance ratios. The cometary ratios might consequently be inherited from earlier stages of star formation if the young Sun experienced conditions similar to NGC 1333 IRAS2A. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Figures 3-4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Microwave Spectroscopy of Complex Molecules Around the Young Protostar Chamaeleon MMS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirstrom, Eva S.; Smith, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 30-100 GHz in the vicinity of the extremely young, chemically rich, very low-luminosity protostar and candidate first hydrostatic core Chamaeleon MMS1. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon-chains and methanol. Emission from the carbon-chain-bearing species peaks very near to the protostar; methanol peaks about 0.1 pc further away. The mean molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10(exp 6) per cc. and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 4-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains (including C6H and HC7N) are very large -- similar to those found in the most carbon-chain-rich regions of the Galaxy, and indicative of a non-equilibrium carbon chemistry. The observed methanol and acetaldehyde abundances indicate active grain-surface chemistry and desorption processes. The carbon-chain anions C4H- and C6H- were not detected and the upper limit on the anion-to-neutral ratio for C4H- is less than 0.02% and for C6H-, less than 10%. These values are consistent with previous observations in interstellar clouds and low-mass protostars. Deuterated HC3N and c-C3H2 were detected, with fractionation ratios of about 4%, and 22%, respectively. A low c-C3H2 ortho-to-para ratio was measured, which is consistent with a molecular hydrogen ortho-to-para ratio of close to zero and implies a relatively young chemical age (less than about 10(exp 5) yr) for the matter surrounding Cha-MMS1. These observations show that a high level of chemical complexity can be present in star-forming gas.

  12. Star Formation near Photodissociation Regions: Detection of a Peculiar Protostar near Cederblad 201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Berné, Olivier; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Teyssier, David

    2008-06-01

    We present the detection and characterization of a peculiar low-mass protostar (IRAS 22129+7000) located ~0.4 pc from the Cederblad 201 photodissociation region (PDR) and ~0.2 pc from the HH 450 jet. The cold circumstellar envelope surrounding the object has been mapped through its 1.2 mm dust continuum emission with IRAM 30 m/MAMBO. The deeply embedded protostar is clearly detected with Spitzer MIPS (70 μm), IRS (20-35 μm), and IRAC (4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm), but also in the Ks band (2.15 μm). Given the large near- and mid-IR excess in its spectral energy distribution, but large submillimeter-to-bolometric luminosity ratio (simeq2%), IRAS 22129+7000 must be a transition Class 0/I source and/or a multiple stellar system. Targeted observations of several molecular lines from CO,13CO, C18O, HCO+, and DCO+ have been obtained. The presence of a collimated molecular outflow mapped with the CSO telescope in the CO J = 3-2 line suggests that the protostar/disk system is still accreting material from its natal envelope. Indeed, optically thick line profiles from high-density tracers such as HCO+ J = 1-0 show a redshifted absorption asymmetry reminiscent of inward motions. We construct a preliminary physical model of the circumstellar envelope (including radial density and temperature gradients, velocity field, and turbulence) that reproduces the observed line profiles and estimates the ionization fraction. The presence of both mechanical and (nonionizing) far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiative input makes the region an interesting case to study triggered star formation.

  13. Powerful jets driven by intermediate-mass protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Carina nebula hosts the largest known population of powerful HH jets driven by intermediate-mass stars in a single region. These jets are externally irradiated by dozens of O-type stars in Carina that illuminate unshocked material in the jet, allowing for a more complete census of the mass-loss. Despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of these jets remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, FUV radiation, or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. New proper motion measurements using Halpha images with a ~4.25 year baseline reveal tangential velocities of >200 km/s, in some cases exceeding velocities typical for jets from low-mass stars. In addition, these outflows are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of jets from intermediate-mass protostars that demonstrate that they are as collimated as their low-mass counterparts, but support higher densities and velocities, leading to higher mass-loss rates. This scaling of phenomena seen in low-mass star formation offers strong additional evidence that stars up to ~8 Msun form by the same accretion mechanism as low-mass stars.

  14. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  15. Slingshot mechanism in Orion: Kinematic evidence for ejection of protostars by filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Gould, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    By comparing three constituents of Orion A (gas, protostars, and pre-main-sequence stars), both morphologically and kinematically, we derive the following conclusions. The gas surface density near the integral-shaped filament (ISF) is very well represented by a power law, Σ(b) = 37 M⊙ pc-2(b/pc)-5/8, for the entire range to which we are sensitive, 0.05 pc < b < 8.5 pc, of projected separation from the filament ridge. Essentially all Class 0 and Class I protostars lie superposed on the ISF or on identifiable filament ridges farther south, while almost all pre-main-sequence (Class II) stars do not. Combined with the fact that protostars are moving ≲ 1 km s-1 relative to the filaments, while stars are moving several times faster, this implies that protostellar accretion is terminated by a slingshot-like "ejection" from the filaments. The ISF is the third in a series of identifiable star bursts that are progressively moving south, with separations of several Myr in time and 2-3 pc in space. This, combined with the observed undulations in the filament (both spatial and velocity), suggest that repeated propagation of transverse waves through the filament is progressively digesting the material that formerly connected Orion A and B into stars in discrete episodes. We construct a simple, circularly symmetric gas density profile ρ(r) = 17 M⊙ pc-3(r/pc)-13/8 consistent with the two-dimensional data. The model implies that the observed magnetic fields in this region are subcritical on spatial scales of the observed undulations, suggesting that the transverse waves propagating through the filament are magnetically induced. Because the magnetic fields are supercritical on scales of the filament as a whole (as traced by the power law), the system as a whole is relatively stable and long lived. Protostellar "ejection" (i.e., the slingshot) occurs because the gas accelerates away from the protostars, not the other way around. The model also implies that the ISF is

  16. OT2_cceccare_4: Searching for the onset of energetic particle irradiation in Class 0 protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccarelli, C.

    2011-09-01

    Several evidences tell us that the first stages of low mass star formation are very violent, characterized by, among other phenomena, an intense irradiation of energetic (MeV) particles. The goal of this proposal is to search for signs of MeV particle irradiation in a sample of low to intermediate mass Class 0 protostars. At this end, we propose to observe a selected list of high J HCO+ and N2H+ lines in a selected sample of sources. Based on the observations obtained within the KP CHESS, we estimate a total observing time of 20.5 hours.

  17. The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars. III. 12CO Maps and Physical Properties of Dense Clump Envelopes and Their Embedding GMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Hernandez, Audra K.; O’Dougherty, Stefan N.; Schap, William J., III; Muller, Erik

    2016-11-01

    We report the second complete molecular line data release from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), a large-scale, unbiased, uniform mapping survey at sub-parsec resolution, of millimeter-wave line emission from 303 massive, dense molecular clumps in the Milky Way. This release is for all 12CO J = 1 \\to 0 emission associated with the dense gas, the first from Phase II of the survey, which includes 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. The observed clump emission traced by both 12CO and HCO+ (from Phase I) shows very similar morphology, indicating that, for dense molecular clouds and complexes of all sizes, parsec-scale clumps contain Ξ ∼ 75% of the mass, while only 25% of the mass lies in extended (≳10 pc) or “low density” components in these same areas. The mass fraction of all gas above a density of 109 m‑3 is {ξ }9 ≳ 50%. This suggests that parsec-scale clumps may be the basic building blocks of the molecular interstellar medium, rather than the standard GMC concept. Using 12CO emission, we derive physical properties of these clumps in their entirety, and compare them to properties from HCO+, tracing their denser interiors. We compare the standard X-factor converting {I}{12{CO}} to {N}{{{H}}2} with alternative conversions, and show that only the latter give whole-clump properties that are physically consistent with those of their interiors. We infer that the clump population is systematically closer to virial equilibrium than when considering only their interiors, with perhaps half being long-lived (10s of Myr), pressure-confined entities that only terminally engage in vigorous massive star formation, supporting other evidence along these lines that was previously published.

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  19. Supersymmetrizing massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaeb, O.

    2013-07-01

    When four scalar fields with global Lorentz symmetry are coupled to gravity and take a vacuum expectation value, breaking diffeomorphism invariance spontaneously, the graviton becomes massive. This model is supersymmetrized by considering four N=1 chiral superfields with global Lorentz symmetry. The global supersymmetry is promoted to a local one using the rules of tensor calculus of coupling the N=1 supergravity Lagrangian to the four chiral multiplets. When the scalar components of the chiral multiplets zA acquire a vacuum expectation value, both diffeomorphism invariance and local supersymmetry are broken spontaneously. The global Lorentz index A becomes identified with the space-time Lorentz index, making the scalar fields zA vectors and the chiral spinors ψA spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields. We show that the spectrum of the model in the broken phase consists of a massive spin-2 field, two massive spin-3/2 fields with different mass and a massive vector.

  20. THE EXTRAORDINARY FAR-INFRARED VARIATION OF A PROTOSTAR: HERSCHEL/PACS OBSERVATIONS OF LRLL54361

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, Zoltan; Detre, Örs H.; Bouwmann, Jeroen; Nielbock, Markus; Klaas, Ulrich; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Muzerolle, James; Flaherty, Kevin; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Rob; Juhasz, Attila; Bally, John; Marton, Gabor

    2014-07-10

    We report Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) photometric observations at 70 μm and 160 μm of LRLL54361—a suspected binary protostar that exhibits periodic (P = 25.34 days) flux variations at shorter wavelengths (3.6 μm and 4.5 μm) thought to be due to pulsed accretion caused by binary motion. The PACS observations show unprecedented flux variation at these far-infrared wavelengths that are well correlated with the variations at shorter wavelengths. At 70 μm the object increases its flux by a factor of six while at 160 μm the change is about a factor of two, consistent with the wavelength dependence seen in the far-infrared spectra. The source is marginally resolved at 70 μm with varying FWHM. Deconvolved images of the sources show elongations exactly matching the outflow cavities traced by the scattered light observations. The spatial variations are anti-correlated with the flux variation, indicating that a light echo is responsible for the changes in FWHM. The observed far-infrared flux variability indicates that the disk and envelope of this source is periodically heated by the accretion pulses of the central source, and suggests that such long wavelength variability in general may provide a reasonable proxy for accretion variations in protostars.

  1. Detection of Formamide, the Simplest but Crucial Amide, in a Solar-type Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahane, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Faure, A.; Caux, E.

    2013-02-01

    Formamide (NH2CHO), the simplest possible amide, has recently been suggested to be a central species in the synthesis of metabolic and genetic molecules, the chemical basis of life. In this Letter, we report the first detection of formamide in a protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, which may be similar to the Sun and solar system progenitor. The data combine spectra from the millimeter and submillimeter TIMASSS survey with recent, more sensitive observations at the IRAM 30 m telescope. With an abundance relative to H2 of ~10-10, formamide appears as abundant in this solar-type protostar as in the two high-mass star-forming regions, Orion-KL and SgrB2, where this species has previously been detected. Given the largely different UV-illuminated environments of the three sources, the relevance of UV photolysis of interstellar ices in the synthesis of formamide is therefore questionable. Assuming that this species is formed in the gas phase via the neutral-neutral reaction between the radical NH2 and H2CO, we predict an abundance in good agreement with the value derived from our observations. The comparison of the relative abundance [NH2CHO]/[H2O] in IRAS 16293-2422 and in the coma of the comet Hale-Bopp supports the similarity between interstellar and cometary chemistry. Our results thus suggest that the abundance of some cometary organic volatiles could reflect gas phase rather than grain-surface interstellar chemistry.

  2. SMA and ALMA Studies of Protoplanetary-Disk Formation around Low-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Chou, Ti-Lin; Aso, Yusuke; Saigo, Kazuya; Saito, Masao; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomida, Kengo; Aikawa, Yuri; Tomisaka, Kohji; Koyamatsu, Shin; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.

    2015-08-01

    In this presentation, we will report our systematic observational studies of protoplanetary-disk formation around low-mass protostars with the SMA and ALMA. We have identified five Class 0-I protostellar systems (L1551 IRS 5, L1551 NE, L1489 IRS, L1527 IRS, and TMC-1A) associated with the r~100 - 300 AU scale Keplerian disks and the outer infalling envelopes. The infalling velocities of the envelope gas onto the Keplerian disks are found to be a factor ~3 smaller than the free-fall velocities of the central protostellar masses inferred from the inner Keplerian rotation. On the other hand, the rotational angular momenta in the infalling envelopes appear to smoothly connect to those of the inner Keplerian disks. Including the other disk sources found by previous observations, we have also found a growth of the disk radii as a function of the protostellar evolution. These results demonstrate how the central Keplerian disks around protostars, precursors of the protoplanetary disks, grow and evolve. We will compile these observational results in the context of an unified picture of protoplanetary-disk formation, and compare them to the latest theoretical predictions of protoplanetary-disk formation.

  3. A Systematic Search for Molecule Outflows Toward Candiate Low-Luminosity Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Y. L.; Dunham, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    We present a systematic search for molecular outflows toward a sample of 39 candidate low-luminosity protostars in 12CO and 13CO 2-1 using the 10 meter Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30’’ resolution. The sample of sources is drawn from the catalog of Dunham et al. of candidate low-luminosity protostars and VeLLOs in observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope in nearby molecular clouds. We present maps of the previously known outflow L673-7 and L1251-A IRS4 with more sensitivity than previously available and analyze their properties. Potential outflow candidates were identified in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165 based on the presence of line wings. Of these, only one source, in B59, shows a distinct blue outflow lobe in the mapped emission. The remaining sources do not show clear evidence for outflows at our resolution. Partial Funding for KRS was provided by the Arizona Space Grant Consortium. YSL is partially supported by NSF grant AST-1008577.

  4. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: PROPERTIES OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS IN OMC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George E.; Henderson, Charles P.; Schoenwald, Justin; Stacey, Gordon; Osorio, Mayra; Macias, Enrique; Thomas Megeath, S.; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; D'Alessio, Paola; De Buizer, James M.; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Keller, Luke D.; Morris, Mark R.; Remming, Ian S.; Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; and others

    2012-04-20

    We examine eight young stellar objects in the OMC-2 star-forming region based on observations from the SOFIA/FORCAST early science phase, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, and other results in the literature. We show the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these objects from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, and compare the SEDs with those of sheet collapse models of protostars and circumstellar disks. Four of the objects can be modeled as protostars with infalling envelopes, two as young stars surrounded by disks, and the remaining two objects have double-peaked SEDs. We model the double-peaked sources as binaries containing a young star with a disk and a protostar. The six most luminous sources are found in a dense group within a 0.15 Multiplication-Sign 0.25 pc region; these sources have luminosities ranging from 300 L{sub Sun} to 20 L{sub Sun }. The most embedded source (OMC-2 FIR 4) can be fit by a class 0 protostar model having a luminosity of {approx}50 L{sub Sun} and mass infall rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  5. First Science Observations with SOFIA/FORCAST: Properties of Intermediate-luminosity Protostars and Circumstellar Disks in OMC-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Osorio, Mayra; Macias, Enrique; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; De Buizer, James M.; Gull, George E.; Henderson, Charles P.; Keller, Luke D.; Morris, Mark R.; Remming, Ian S.; Schoenwald, Justin; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Stacey, Gordon; Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; Vacca, William

    2012-04-01

    We examine eight young stellar objects in the OMC-2 star-forming region based on observations from the SOFIA/FORCAST early science phase, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, and other results in the literature. We show the spectral energy distributions (SED) of these objects from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, and compare the SEDs with those of sheet collapse models of protostars and circumstellar disks. Four of the objects can be modeled as protostars with infalling envelopes, two as young stars surrounded by disks, and the remaining two objects have double-peaked SEDs. We model the double-peaked sources as binaries containing a young star with a disk and a protostar. The six most luminous sources are found in a dense group within a 0.15 × 0.25 pc region; these sources have luminosities ranging from 300 L ⊙ to 20 L ⊙. The most embedded source (OMC-2 FIR 4) can be fit by a class 0 protostar model having a luminosity of ~50 L ⊙ and mass infall rate of ~10-4 M ⊙ yr-1.

  6. Subarcsecond Analysis of the Infalling-Rotating Envelope around the Class I Protostar IRAS 04365+2535

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Aikawa, Yuri; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Kahane, Claudine; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Subarcsecond images of the rotational line emission of CS and SO have been obtained toward the Class I protostar IRAS 04365+2535 in TMC-1A with ALMA. A compact component around the protostar is clearly detected in the CS and SO emission. The velocity structure of the compact component of CS reveals infalling-rotating motion conserving the angular momentum. It is well explained by a ballistic model of an infalling-rotating envelope with the radius of the centrifugal barrier (one-half of the centrifugal radius) of 50 au, although the distribution of the infalling gas is asymmetric around the protostar. The distribution of SO is mostly concentrated around the radius of the centrifugal barrier of the simple model. Thus, a drastic change in chemical composition of the gas infalling onto the protostar is found to occur at a 50 au scale probably due to accretion shocks, demonstrating that the infalling material is significantly processed before being delivered into the disk.

  7. OT1_sbontemp_1: Water emission from outflows and hot cores in the Cygnus X proto-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontemps, S.

    2010-07-01

    The impressive first results from the WISH GT key program by van Dishoeck et al. indicate that water emission is bright towards the embedded proto-stars of all masses. These emissions are tracing outflows and warm inner regions of the collapsing envelopes (radiatively heated hot cores) which are unique probes of the cooling of these regions and of the kinematics of the dense warm gas. But WISH is limited by the reduced number of targets, and by the unavoidable biases introduced by the stringent selection of sources. The intermediate to high mass range is critical to challenge protostellar evolution models, and we argue that water emission from a complete sample of proto-stars in this mass range will be an important piece of knowledge for outflows to trace indirectly accretion and for hot cores to follow their time of appearance. Only Cygnus X is nearby and rich enough to provide a large sample of such proto-stars. We propose here to dramatically change the level of significance of WISH results by observing as many as 92 proto-stars covering the (final stellar) mass range of 3 to 20 Msun in the single complex of Cygnus X.

  8. Massive Supergravity and Deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, Thomas; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Shadmi, Yael

    2004-03-23

    We present a simple superfield Lagrangian for massive supergravity. It comprises the minimal supergravity Lagrangian with interactions as well as mass terms for the metric superfield and the chiral compensator. This is the natural generalization of the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for massive gravity which comprises mass terms for the metric and its trace. We show that the on-shell bosonic and fermionic fields are degenerate and have the appropriate spins: 2, 3/2, 3/2 and 1. We then study this interacting Lagrangian using goldstone superfields. We find that achiral multiplet of goldstones gets a kinetic term through mixing, just as the scalar goldstone does in the non-supersymmetric case. This produces Planck scale (Mpl) interactions with matter and all the discontinuities and unitarity bounds associated with massive gravity. In particular, the scale of strong coupling is (Mpl m^4)^1/5, where m is the multiplet's mass. Next, we consider applications of massive supergravity to deconstruction. We estimate various quantum effects which generate non-local operators in theory space. As an example, we show that the single massive supergravity multiplet in a 2-site model can serve the function of an extra dimension in anomaly mediation.

  9. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  10. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  11. Characterizing the Youngest Herschel-detected Protostars. II. Molecular Outflows from the Millimeter and the Far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Manoj, P.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Karska, Agata; Nagy, Zsofia; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Fischer, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Stanke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) CO (J=1\\to 0) observations and Herschel PACS spectroscopy, characterizing the outflow properties toward extremely young and deeply embedded protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. The sample comprises a subset of the Orion protostars known as the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS; Stutz et al.). We observed 14 PBRS with CARMA and 8 of these 14 with Herschel, acquiring full spectral scans from 55 to 200 μm. Outflows are detected in CO (J=1\\to 0) from 8 of 14 PBRS, with two additional tentative detections; outflows are also detected from the outbursting protostar HOPS 223 (V2775 Ori) and the Class I protostar HOPS 68. The outflows have a range of morphologies; some are spatially compact, <10,000 au in extent, while others extend beyond the primary beam. The outflow velocities and morphologies are consistent with being dominated by intermediate inclination angles (80° ≥ i ≥ 20°). This confirms the interpretation of the very red 24–70 μm colors of the PBRS as a signpost of high envelope densities, with only one (possibly two) cases of the red colors resulting from edge-on inclinations. We detect high-J (J up > 13) CO lines and/or H2O lines from 5 of 8 PBRS and only for those with detected CO outflows. The far-infrared CO rotation temperatures of the detected PBRS are marginally colder (∼230 K) than those observed for most protostars (∼300 K), and only one of these five PBRS has detected [O i] 63 μm emission. The high envelope densities could be obscuring some [O i] emission and cause a ∼20 K reduction to the CO rotation temperatures. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. II. EFFECTS OF THE OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-04-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 M{sub Sun }) protostar forming from a massive (M{sub c} = 60 M{sub Sun }) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang and Tan. The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities, based in part on the disk-wind model of Blandford and Payne; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. We also include a non-Keplerian potential appropriate for a growing, massive disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the synthetic images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, i.e., looking down the outflow cavity (although not too close to the axis), the SED from the near-IR to about 60 {mu}m is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 {mu}m, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at {approx}20 {mu}m. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow

  13. LOW-METALLICITY PROTOSTARS AND THE MAXIMUM STELLAR MASS RESULTING FROM RADIATIVE FEEDBACK: SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki E-mail: hosokawa@th.nao.ac.j

    2009-10-01

    The final mass of a newborn star is set at the epoch when the mass accretion onto the star is terminated. We study the evolution of accreting protostars and the limits of accretion in low-metallicity environments under spherical symmetry. Accretion rates onto protostars are estimated via the temperature evolution of prestellar cores with different metallicities. The derived rates increase with decreasing metallicity, from M-dot{approx_equal}10{sup -6} M odot yr{sup -1} at Z = Z {sub sun} to 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} at Z = 0. With the derived accretion rates, the protostellar evolution is numerically calculated. We find that, at lower metallicity, the protostar has a larger radius and reaches the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) at higher stellar mass. Using this protostellar evolution, we evaluate the upper stellar mass limit where the mass accretion is hindered by radiative feedback. We consider the effects of radiation pressure exerted on the accreting envelope, and expansion of an H II region. The mass accretion is finally terminated by radiation pressure on dust grains in the envelope for Z approx> 10{sup -3} Z {sub sun} and by the expanding H II region for lower metallicity. The mass limit from these effects increases with decreasing metallicity from M {sub *} {approx_equal} 10 M {sub sun} at Z = Z {sub sun} to {approx_equal}300 M {sub sun} at Z = 10{sup -6} Z {sub sun}. The termination of accretion occurs after the central star arrives at the ZAMS at all metallicities, which allows us to neglect protostellar evolution effects in discussing the upper mass limit by stellar feedback. The fragmentation induced by line cooling in low-metallicity clouds yields prestellar cores with masses large enough that the final stellar mass is set by the feedback effects. Although relaxing the assumption of spherical symmetry will alter feedback effects, our results will be a benchmark for more realistic evolution to be explored in future studies.

  14. Observations of irradiated protostars show a lack of complex organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    In their youngest stages, protostars are deeply enshrouded in envelopes of gas and dust, material that later accretes onto the central object and the protoplanetary disc. The icy grain mantles are the formation sites for complex organic molecules. The formation of such molecules is strongly affected by external effects such as heating and irradiation, both due to changes in reaction rates and the evaporation of key species from the ice mantles. To understand these effects, we have studied the molecular composition of irradiated protostars.We demonstrate the strengths of unbiased single-dish line surveys, which we use to study the chemical and physical properties of protostellar envelopes. We have performed line surveys of more than 50 sources in the nearby Corona Australis and Ophiuchus star-forming regions using the APEX telescope. Many of the Corona Australis sources are located near the intermediate-mass Herbig Be star R CrA, and we find that despite its moderate luminosity, the irradiation from this star enhances the H2CO temperatures of the nearby protostellar envelopes from 10 K to at least 30-40 K. This drastically elevated temperature should be of crucial importance to the chemistry of these envelopes, due to thermal evaporation of many key species from the dust grain surfaces.Towards R CrA-IRS7B, the most thoroughly investigated object in our study, we find that the chemistry differs greatly from other thoroughly investigated deeply embedded protostars (hot corinos and warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, WCCC). We find low abundances of complex organic molecules such as CH3OCH3 and CH3CN, but instead elevated abundances of CN and some carbon-chain species like HC3N and C2H, although not to the same level as towards typical WCCC sources. We interpret the observed chemical properties as a result of thermal evaporation of CO from the grain mantles and photo-dissociation reactions in the IRS7B envelope, both initiated by the irradiation from R CrA.

  15. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  16. Probing the Inner 200 AU of Low-Mass Protostars with the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, J. K.; Bourke, T. L.; Di Francesco, J.; Lee, C.-F.; Myers, P. C.; Ohashi, N.; Schoeier, F. L.; Takakuwa, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wilner, D. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2005-12-01

    We present high angular resolution (1"; 200 AU) observations from a large program studying deeply embedded low-mass protostars (class 0 objects) with the Submillimeter Array. In total 9 different sources have been observed in a wide variety of lines of common molecular species together with continuum. The observations are interpreted on basis of detailed dust and line radiative transfer models. The continuum observations resolve the innermost regions of the protostellar envelopes and place strong constraints on the presence and properties of their circumstellar disks. The line observations reveal the complex structure of these sources, for example, the chemical and dynamical variations throughout the envelopes and the importance of the outflows on both. The research of JKJ was supported by NASA Origins Grant NAG5-13050. The Submillimeter Array is a joint project between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  17. The protostar OMC-2 FIR 4: Results from the CHESS Herschel/HIFI spectral survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, Mihkel; Lopez-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Dominik, Carsten; Caux, Emmanuel; Fuente, Asuncion

    2013-07-01

    The intermediate-mass protostar OMC-2 FIR 4 in Orion is the focus of several ongoing studies, including a CHESS key programme Herschel/HIFI spectral survey. In this poster, we review recent CHESS results on this source, including the properties of the central hot core, the presence of a compact outflow, the spatial variation of the chemical composition, and the discovery of a tenuous foreground cloud. The HIFI spectrum of FIR 4 contains 719 lines from 40 species and isotopologs. Cooling by lines detectable with our sensitivity contributes 2% of the total in the 480 to 1900 GHz range. The total line flux is dominated by CO, followed by H2O and CH3OH. Initial comparisons with spectral surveys of other sources will also be presented.

  18. The HDO Abundance in the Solar-Type Protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caux, E.; Parise, B.; Castets, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Tielens, A.

    2005-12-01

    From JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) and IRAM observations of five HDO lines towards the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422, we derive the HDO abundance, x, and the deuteration ratio, f = HDO/H2O, in the warm inner part and in the cold outer part of the envelope. We find xHDO_in = 1×10-7, xHDO_out ≤ 1×10-9 (3σ), fin = 3% and fout ≤ 0.2% (3σ). This is consistent with the formation of water in the gas phase during the cold prestellar core stage and with the storage of molecules on dust grains. The HDO enhancement is due to ice evaporation from the grains in the inner envelope.

  19. Massive Magnetic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The massive magnetic core of the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory's Synchrocyclotron at NASA's Langley Research Center. The 3000 ton (6 million pound), 36' x 21'x 19.5' assembly of forged steel serves as the heart of the 600 million electron volt, high energy proton accelerator.

  20. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  1. Supertwistors and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mezincescu, Luca; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    In the (super)twistor formulation of massless (super)particle mechanics, the mass-shell constraint is replaced by a “spin-shell” constraint from which the spin content can be read off. We extend this formalism to massive (super)particles (with N-extended space–time supersymmetry) in three and four space–time dimensions, explaining how the spin-shell constraints are related to spin, and we use it to prove equivalence of the massive N=1 and BPS-saturated N=2 superparticle actions. We also find the supertwistor form of the action for “spinning particles” with N-extended worldline supersymmetry, massless in four dimensions and massive in three dimensions, and we show how this simplifies special features of the N=2 case. -- Highlights: •Spin-shell constraints are related to Poincaré Casimirs. •Twistor form of 4D spinning particle for spin N/2. •Twistor proof of scalar/antisymmetric tensor equivalence for 4D spin 0. •Twistor form of 3D particle with arbitrary spin. •Proof of equivalence of N=1 and N=2 BPS massive 4D superparticles.

  2. Update on massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  3. HOPS 136: An edge-on orion protostar near the end of envelope infall

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Kounkel, Marina; Stutz, Amelia M.; Poteet, Charles A.; Ali, Babar; Manoj, P.; Remming, Ian; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.

    2014-02-01

    Edge-on protostars are valuable for understanding the disk and envelope properties of embedded young stellar objects, since the disk, envelope, and envelope cavities are all distinctly visible in resolved images and well constrained in modeling. Comparing Two Micron All Sky Survey, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX photometry and an IRAM limit from 1.2 to 1200 μm, Spitzer spectroscopy from 5 to 40 μm, and high-resolution Hubble imaging at 1.60 and 2.05 μm to radiative transfer modeling, we determine envelope and disk properties for the Class I protostar HOPS 136, an edge-on source in Orion's Lynds 1641 region. The source has a bolometric luminosity of 0.8 L {sub ☉}, a bolometric temperature of 170 K, and a ratio of submillimeter to bolometric luminosity of 0.8%. Via modeling, we find a total luminosity of 4.7 L {sub ☉} (larger than the observed luminosity due to extinction by the disk), an envelope mass of 0.06 M {sub ☉}, and a disk radius and mass of 450 AU and 0.002 M {sub ☉}. The stellar mass is highly uncertain but is estimated to fall between 0.4 and 0.5 M {sub ☉}. To reproduce the flux and wavelength of the near-infrared scattered-light peak in the spectral energy distribution, we require 5.4 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust in each cavity. The disk has a large radius and a mass typical of more evolved T Tauri disks in spite of the significant remaining envelope. HOPS 136 appears to be a key link between the protostellar and optically revealed stages of star formation.

  4. MODELING THE RESOLVED DISK AROUND THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W.; Wilner, David J.; Loinard, Laurent; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution sub/millimeter interferometric imaging of the Class 0 protostar L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) at {lambda} = 870 {mu}m and 3.4 mm from the Submillimeter Array and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We detect the signature of an edge-on disk surrounding the protostar with an observed diameter of 180 AU in the sub/millimeter images. The mass of the disk is estimated to be 0.007 M{sub Sun }, assuming optically thin, isothermal dust emission. The millimeter spectral index is observed to be quite shallow at all the spatial scales probed: {alpha} {approx} 2, implying a dust opacity spectral index {beta} {approx} 0. We model the emission from the disk and surrounding envelope using Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, simultaneously fitting the sub/millimeter visibility amplitudes, sub/millimeter images, resolved L' image, spectral energy distribution, and mid-infrared spectrum. The best-fitting model has a disk radius of R = 125 AU, is highly flared (H{proportional_to}R {sup 1.3}), has a radial density profile {rho}{proportional_to}R {sup -2.5}, and has a mass of 0.0075 M{sub Sun }. The scale height at 100 AU is 48 AU, about a factor of two greater than vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The resolved millimeter observations indicate that disks may grow rapidly throughout the Class 0 phase. The mass and radius of the young disk around L1527 are comparable to disks around pre-main-sequence stars; however, the disk is considerably more vertically extended, possibly due to a combination of lower protostellar mass, infall onto the disk upper layers, and little settling of {approx}1 {mu}m-sized dust grains.

  5. Line survey observations of irradiated protostars - photo-destruction and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    In their youngest stages, protostars are deeply enshrouded in envelopes of gas and dust, material that later accretes onto the central object and the protoplanetary disc. The chemical composition of the molecular gas and the icy grain mantles is strongly affected by external irradiation, and studying the excitation and composition of the molecular gas can provide valuable information on the irradiation history of the envelope.We demonstrate the strengths of unbiased single-dish line surveys, which we use to study the chemical and physical properties of protostellar envelopes. We have performed line surveys of more than 50 sources in the nearby Corona Australis and Ophiuchus star-forming regions using the APEX telescope. Many of the Corona Australis sources are located near the intermediate-mass Herbig Be star R CrA, and we find that despite its moderate luminosity, the irradiation from this star enhances the H2CO temperatures of the nearby protostellar envelopes from 10 K to at least 30-40 K. This drastically elevated temperature should be of crucial importance to the chemistry of these envelopes, due to thermal evaporation of many key species from the dust grain surfaces.Towards R CrA-IRS7B, the most thoroughly investigated object in our study, we find that the chemistry differs greatly from other thoroughly investigated deeply embedded protostars (hot corinos and warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, WCCC). We find low abundances of complex organic molecules such as CH3OCH3 and CH3CN, but instead elevated abundances of CN and some carbon-chain species like HC3N and C2H, although not to the same level as towards typical WCCC sources. We interpret the observed chemical properties as a result of thermal evaporation of CO from the grain mantles and photo-dissociation reactions in the IRS7B envelope, both initiated by the irradiation from R CrA.

  6. DETECTION OF FORMAMIDE, THE SIMPLEST BUT CRUCIAL AMIDE, IN A SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kahane, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Faure, A.

    2013-02-01

    Formamide (NH{sub 2}CHO), the simplest possible amide, has recently been suggested to be a central species in the synthesis of metabolic and genetic molecules, the chemical basis of life. In this Letter, we report the first detection of formamide in a protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, which may be similar to the Sun and solar system progenitor. The data combine spectra from the millimeter and submillimeter TIMASSS survey with recent, more sensitive observations at the IRAM 30 m telescope. With an abundance relative to H{sub 2} of {approx}10{sup -10}, formamide appears as abundant in this solar-type protostar as in the two high-mass star-forming regions, Orion-KL and SgrB2, where this species has previously been detected. Given the largely different UV-illuminated environments of the three sources, the relevance of UV photolysis of interstellar ices in the synthesis of formamide is therefore questionable. Assuming that this species is formed in the gas phase via the neutral-neutral reaction between the radical NH{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO, we predict an abundance in good agreement with the value derived from our observations. The comparison of the relative abundance [NH{sub 2}CHO]/[H{sub 2}O] in IRAS 16293-2422 and in the coma of the comet Hale-Bopp supports the similarity between interstellar and cometary chemistry. Our results thus suggest that the abundance of some cometary organic volatiles could reflect gas phase rather than grain-surface interstellar chemistry.

  7. Detection of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, B.; Du, F.; Liu, F.-C.; Belloche, A.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Hübers, H.-W.; Klein, B.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Although water is an essential and widespread molecule in star-forming regions, its chemical formation pathways are still not very well constrained. Observing the level of deuterium fractionation of OH, a radical involved in the water chemical network, is a promising way to infer its chemical origin. Aims: We aim at understanding the formation mechanisms of water by investigating the origin of its deuterium fractionation. This can be achieved by observing the abundance of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422, where the HDO distribution is already known. Methods: Using the GREAT receiver on board SOFIA, we observed the ground-state OD transition at 1391.5 GHz towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422. We also present the detection of the HDO 111-000 line using the APEX telescope. We compare the OD/HDO abundance ratio inferred from these observations with the predictions of chemical models. Results: The OD line is detected in absorption towards the source continuum. This is the first detection of OD outside the solar system. The SOFIA observation, coupled to the observation of the HDO 111-000 line, provides an estimate of the abundance ratio OD/HDO ~ 17-90 in the gas where the absorption takes place. This value is fairly high compared with model predictions. This may be reconciled if reprocessing in the gas by means of the dissociative recombination of H2DO+ further fractionates OH with respect to water. Conclusions: The present observation demonstrates the capability of the SOFIA/GREAT instrument to detect the ground transition of OD towards star-forming regions in a frequency range that was not accessible before. Dissociative recombination of H2DO+ may play an important role in setting a high OD abundance. Measuring the branching ratios of this reaction in the laboratory will be of great value for chemical models. Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Self-gravitating disc candidates around massive young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ilee, J. D.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    There have been several recent detections of candidate Keplerian discs around massive young protostars. Given the relatively large disc-to-star mass ratios in these systems, and their young ages, it is worth investigating their propensity to becoming self-gravitating. To this end, we compute self-consistent, semi-analytic models of putative self-gravitating discs for five candidate disc systems. Our aim is not to fit exactly the observations, but to demonstrate that the expected dust continuum emission from marginally unstable self-gravitating discs can be quite weak, due to high optical depth at the mid-plane even at millimetre wavelengths. In the best cases, the models produce `observable' disc masses within a factor of <1.5 of those observed, with mid-plane dust temperatures comparable to measured temperatures from molecular line emission. We find in two cases that a self-gravitating disc model compares well with observations. If these discs are self-gravitating, they satisfy the conditions for disc fragmentation in their outer regions. These systems may hence have as-yet-unresolved low-mass stellar companions, and are thus promising targets for future high angular resolution observations.

  9. Formation of Massive Stars in Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2004-12-01

    There are two scenarios for the formation of massive stars: the ``accretion'' and the ``coalescence'' scenario. Here we discuss the conditions for coalescence (mergers) to occur in very dense young star clusters. We also ask whether the observed multiplicity of tight massive stars in young clusters is consistent with failed mergers and tidal capture. Finally, we propose some ideas for the origin of many massive stars in the heart of the 30 Doradus cluster and other extragalactic starburst clusters. We believe that all massive star formation is triggered and propose a 4-stage process of massive star birth in dense clusters.

  10. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  11. Massive Transfusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Karam, Oliver; Tucci, Marisa

    2016-10-01

    Massive transfusions occur frequently in pediatric trauma patients, among some children undergoing surgery, or in children with critical illness. Over the last years, many authors have studied different aspects of massive transfusions, starting with an operative definition. Some information is available on transfusion strategies and adjunctive treatments. Areas that require additional investigation include: studies to assess which children benefit from transfusion protocols based on fixed ratios of blood components vs transfusion strategies based on biophysical parameters and laboratory tests; whether goal-directed therapies that are personalized to the recipient will improve outcomes; or which laboratory tests best define the risk of bleeding and what clinical indicators should prompt the start and stop of massive transfusion protocols. In addition, critical issues that require further study include transfusion support with whole blood vs reconstituted whole blood prepared from packed red blood cells, plasma, and platelets; and the generation of high quality evidence that would lead to treatments which decrease adverse consequences of transfusion and improve outcomes.

  12. The formation of massive primordial stars in the presence of moderate UV backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Spaans, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiative feedback produced by stellar populations played a vital role in early structure formation. In particular, photons below the Lyman limit can escape the star-forming regions and produce a background ultraviolet (UV) flux, which consequently may influence the pristine halos far away from the radiation sources. These photons can quench the formation of molecular hydrogen by photodetachment of H{sup –}. In this study, we explore the impact of such UV radiation on fragmentation in massive primordial halos of a few times 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. To accomplish this goal, we perform high resolution cosmological simulations for two distinct halos and vary the strength of the impinging background UV field in units of J {sub 21} assuming a blackbody radiation spectrum with a characteristic temperature of T {sub rad} = 10{sup 4} K. We further make use of sink particles to follow the evolution for 10,000 yr after reaching the maximum refinement level. No vigorous fragmentation is observed in UV-illuminated halos while the accretion rate changes according to the thermal properties. Our findings show that a few 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} solar mass protostars are formed when halos are irradiated by J {sub 21} = 10-500 at z > 10 and suggest a strong relation between the strength of the UV flux and mass of a protostar. This mode of star formation is quite different from minihalos, as higher accretion rates of about 0.01-0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} are observed by the end of our simulations. The resulting massive stars are potential cradles for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes at earlier cosmic times and contribute to the formation of a global X-ray background.

  13. A RECENT ACCRETION BURST IN THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR IRAS 15398-3359: ALMA IMAGING OF ITS RELATED CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Jørgensen, Jes K.; Brinch, Christian; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A.; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Harsono, Daniel; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Persson, Magnus V.

    2013-12-20

    Low-mass protostars have been suggested to show highly variable accretion rates throughout their evolution. Such changes in accretion, and related heating of their ambient envelopes, may trigger significant chemical variations on different spatial scales and from source-to-source. We present images of emission from C{sup 17}O, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sup 34}S and C{sub 2}H toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398-3359 on 0.''5 (75 AU diameter) scales with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at 340 GHz. The resolved images show that the emission from H{sup 13}CO{sup +} is only present in a ring-like structure with a radius of about 1-1.''5 (150-200 AU) whereas the CO and other high dipole moment molecules are centrally condensed toward the location of the central protostar. We propose that HCO{sup +} is destroyed by water vapor present on small scales. The origin of this water vapor is likely an accretion burst during the last 100-1000 yr increasing the luminosity of IRAS 15398-3359 by a factor of 100 above its current luminosity. Such a burst in luminosity can also explain the centrally condensed CH{sub 3}OH and extended warm carbon-chain chemistry observed in this source and furthermore be reflected in the relative faintness of its compact continuum emission compared to other protostars.

  14. Connecting low- and high-mass star formation: the intermediate-mass protostar IRAS 05373+2349 VLA 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. M.; Johnston, K. G.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies of the protostellar evolution of intermediate-mass (IM) stars, which may bridge the low-and high-mass regimes. This paper aims to investigate whether the properties of an IM protostar within the IRAS 05373+2349 embedded cluster are similar to that of low- and/or high-mass protostars. We carried out Very Large Array as well as Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy continuum and 12CO(J=1-0) observations, which uncover seven radio continuum sources (VLA 1-7). The spectral index of VLA 2, associated with the IM protostar is consistent with an ionised stellar wind or jet. The source VLA 3 is coincident with previously observed H2 emission line objects aligned in the north-south direction (P.A. -20 to -12°), which may be either an ionised jet emanating from VLA 2 or (shock-)ionised cavity walls in the large-scale outflow from VLA 2. The position angle between VLA 2 and 3 is slightly misaligned with the large-scale outflow we map at ˜5-arcsec resolution in 12CO (P.A. ˜30°), which in the case of a jet suggests precession. The emission from the mm core associated with VLA 2 is also detected; we estimate its mass to be 12-23 M⊙, depending on the contribution from ionised gas. Furthermore, the large-scale outflow has properties intermediate between outflows from low- and high-mass young stars. Therefore, we conclude that the IM protostar within IRAS 05373+2349 is phenomenologically as well as quantitatively intermediate between the low- and high-mass domains.

  15. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Yusuke; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the emissions of 12CO and C18O (J = 2–1) and 1.3 mm dust continuum. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.″50 × 0.″37, perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O, although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.″3 × 2.″2, indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power law ∝r‑a with an index of ∼0.5 at higher velocities. This indicates that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keplerian rotation orbiting a protostar with a dynamical mass of 0.68 {M}ȯ (inclination corrected). The additional velocity gradient of C18O along the outflow is considered to be mainly infall motions in the envelope. Position–velocity diagrams made from models consisting of an infalling envelope and a Keplerian disk are compared with the observations, revealing that the observed infall velocity is ∼0.3 times smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by the dynamical mass of the protostar. Magnetic fields could be responsible for the slow infall velocity. A possible scenario of Keplerian disk formation is discussed.

  16. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Yusuke; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the emissions of 12CO and C18O (J = 2-1) and 1.3 mm dust continuum. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.″50 × 0.″37, perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O, although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.″3 × 2.″2, indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power law ∝r-a with an index of ˜0.5 at higher velocities. This indicates that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keplerian rotation orbiting a protostar with a dynamical mass of 0.68 {M}⊙ (inclination corrected). The additional velocity gradient of C18O along the outflow is considered to be mainly infall motions in the envelope. Position-velocity diagrams made from models consisting of an infalling envelope and a Keplerian disk are compared with the observations, revealing that the observed infall velocity is ˜0.3 times smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by the dynamical mass of the protostar. Magnetic fields could be responsible for the slow infall velocity. A possible scenario of Keplerian disk formation is discussed.

  17. Curtain-Lifting Winds Allow Rare Glimpse into Massive Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Formation of Exceedingly Luminous and Hot Stars in Young Stellar Cluster Observed Directly Summary Based on a vast observational effort with different telescopes and instruments, ESO-astronomer Dieter Nürnberger has obtained a first glimpse of the very first stages in the formation of heavy stars. These critical phases of stellar evolution are normally hidden from the view, because massive protostars are deeply embedded in their native clouds of dust and gas, impenetrable barriers to observations at all but the longest wavelengths. In particular, no visual or infrared observations have yet "caught" nascent heavy stars in the act and little is therefore known so far about the related processes. Profiting from the cloud-ripping effect of strong stellar winds from adjacent, hot stars in a young stellar cluster at the center of the NGC 3603 complex, several objects located near a giant molecular cloud were found to be bona-fide massive protostars, only about 100,000 years old and still growing. Three of these objects, designated IRS 9A-C, could be studied in more detail. They are very luminous (IRS 9A is about 100,000 times intrinsically brighter than the Sun), massive (more than 10 times the mass of the Sun) and hot (about 20,000 degrees). They are surrounded by relative cold dust (about 0°C), probably partly arranged in disks around these very young objects. Two possible scenarios for the formation of massive stars are currently proposed, by accretion of large amounts of circumstellar material or by collision (coalescence) of protostars of intermediate masses. The new observations favour accretion, i.e. the same process that is active during the formation of stars of smaller masses. PR Photo 16a/03: Stellar cluster and star-forming region NGC 3603. PR Photo 16b/03: Region near very young, massive stars IRS 9A-C in NGC 3603 (8 bands from J to Q). How do massive stars form? This question is easy to pose, but so far very difficult to answer. In fact, the processes

  18. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  19. H II Regions: Witnesses to Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-01

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  20. Water deuterium fractionation in the low-mass protostar NGC1333-IRAS2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.-C.; Parise, B.; Kristensen, L.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Güsten, R.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Although deuterium enrichment of water may provide an essential piece of information in the understanding of the formation of comets and protoplanetary systems, only a few studies up to now have aimed at deriving the HDO/H2O ratio in low-mass star forming regions. Previous studies of the molecular deuteration toward the solar-type class 0 protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, have shown that the D/H ratio of water is significantly lower than other grain-surface-formed molecules. It is not clear if this property is general or particular to this source. Aims: In order to see if the results toward IRAS 16293-2422 are particular, we aimed at studying water deuterium fractionation in a second low-mass solar-type protostar, NGC1333-IRAS2A. Methods: Using the 1-D radiative transfer code RATRAN, we analyzed five HDO transitions observed with the IRAM 30 m, JCMT, and APEX telescopes. We assumed that the abundance profile of HDO in the envelope is a step function, with two different values in the inner warm (T > 100 K) and outer cold (T < 100 K) regions of the protostellar envelope. Results: The inner and outer abundance of HDO is found to be well constrained at the 3σ level. The obtained HDO inner and outer fractional abundances are xHDO_in = 6.6 × 10-8-1.0 × 10-7(3σ) and x^{HDO}out=9×10-11= 9 × 10-11-1.0-1.8 × 10-9(3σ). These values are close to those in IRAS 16293-2422, which suggests that HDO may be formed by the same mechanisms in these two solar-type protostars. Taking into account the (rather poorly onstrained) H2O abundance profile deduced from Herschel observations, the derived HDO/H2O in the inner envelope is ≥1% and in the outer envelope it is 0.9%-18%. These values are more than one order of magnitude higher than what is measured in comets. If the same ratios apply to the protosolar nebula, this would imply that there is some efficient reprocessing of the material between the protostellar and cometary phases. Conclusions: The H2O inner fractional

  1. Observations of water with Herschel/HIFI toward the high-mass protostar AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Herpin, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Water is an important chemical species in the process of star formation, and a sensitive tracer of physical conditions in star-forming regions because of its rich line spectrum and large abundance variations between hot and cold regions. Aims: We use spectrally resolved observations of rotational lines of H2O and its isotopologs to constrain the physical conditions of the water emitting region toward the high-mass protostar AFGL 2591. Methods: Herschel/HIFI spectra from 552 up to 1669 GHz show emission and absorption in 14 lines of H 2 O, H218O, and H217O. We decompose the line profiles into contributions from the protostellar envelope, the bipolar outflow, and a foreground cloud. We use analytical estimates and rotation diagrams to estimate excitation temperatures and column densities of H2O in these components. Furthermore, we use the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) radiative transfer code RADEX to estimate the temperature and volume density of the H2O emitting gas. Results: Assuming LTE, we estimate an excitation temperature of ~42 K and a column density of ~2 × 1014 cm-2 for the envelope and ~45 K and 4 × 1013 cm-2 for the outflow, in beams of 4″ and 30″, respectively. Non-LTE models indicate a kinetic temperature of ~60-230 K and a volume density of 7 × 106-108 cm-3 for the envelope, and a kinetic temperature of ~70-90 K and a gas density of ~107-108 cm-3 for the outflow. The ortho/para ratio of the narrow cold foreground absorption is lower than three (~1.9 ± 0.4), suggesting a low temperature. In contrast, the ortho/para ratio seen in absorption by the outflow is about 3.5 ± 1.0, as expected for warm gas. Conclusions: The water abundance in the outer envelope of AFGL 2591 is ~10-9 for a source size of 4″, similar to the low values found for other high-mass and low-mass protostars, suggesting that this abundance is constant during the embedded phase of high-mass star formation. The water abundance in the outflow is ~10-10 for a

  2. A DISK-WIND MODEL FOR THE NEAR-INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION IN PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bans, Alissa; Koenigl, Arieh E-mail: akonigl@uchicago.edu

    2012-10-20

    Protostellar systems, ranging from low-luminosity classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars to high-luminosity Herbig Be stars, exhibit a near-infrared (NIR) excess in their spectra that is dominated by a bump in the monochromatic luminosity with a peak near 3 {mu}m. The bump can be approximated by a thermal emission component of temperature {approx}1500 K that is of the order of the sublimation temperature of interstellar dust grains. In the currently popular 'puffed-up rim' scenario, the bump represents stellar radiation that propagates through the optically thin inner region of the surrounding accretion disk and is absorbed and reemitted by the dust that resides just beyond the dust sublimation radius r {sub sub}. However, this model cannot account for the strongest bumps measured in these sources, and it predicts a pronounced secondary bounce in the interferometric visibility curve that is not observed. In this paper we present an alternative interpretation, which attributes the bump to reemission of stellar radiation by dust that is uplifted from the disk by a centrifugally driven wind. Winds of this type are a leading candidate for the origin of the strong outflows associated with protostars, and there is observational evidence for disk winds originating on scales {approx}r {sub sub}. Using a newly constructed Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and focusing on low-luminosity sources, we show that this model can account for the NIR excess emission even in bright Herbig Ae stars such as AB Auriga and MWC 275, and that it successfully reproduces the basic features of the visibilities measured in these protostars. We argue that a robust dusty outflow in these sources could be self-limiting-through shielding of the stellar FUV photons-to a relatively narrow launching region between r {sub sub} and {approx}2 r {sub sub}. We also suggest that the NIR and scattered-light variability exhibited by a source like MWC 275 can be attributed in this picture to the uplifting of

  3. Probing the water and CO snow lines in the young protostar NGC 1333-IRAS4B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, Sibylle; Maret, Sébastien; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle; Belloche, Arnaud; Cabrit, Sylvie; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    Today, we believe that the onset of life requires free energy, water, and complex, probably carbon-based chemistry. In the interstellar medium, complex organic molecules seem to mostly form in reactions happening on the icy surface of dust grains, such that they are released into the gas phase when the dust is heated. The resulting “snow lines”, marking regions where ices start to sublimate, play an important role for planet growth and bulk composition in protoplanetary disks. However, they can already be observed in the envelopes of the much younger, low-mass Class 0 protostars that are still in their early phase of heavy accretion. The information on the sublimation regions of different kinds of ices can be used to understand the chemistry of the envelope, its temperature and density structure, and may even hint at the history of the accretion process. Accordingly, it is a crucial piece of information in order to get the full picture of how organic chemistry evolves already at the earliest stages of the formation of sun-like stars. As part of the CALYPSO Large Program (http://irfu.cea.fr/Projets/Calypso/), we have obtained observations of C18O, N2H+ and CH3OH towards the Class 0 protostar NGC 1333-IRAS4B with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at sub-arcsecond resolution. Of these we use the methanol observations as a proxy for the water snow line, assuming methanol is trapped in water ice. The observed anti-correlation of C18O and N2H+, with N2H+ forming a ring around the centrally peaked C18O emission, reveals for the first time the CO snow line in this protostellar envelope, with a radius of ~300 AU. The methanol emission is much more compact than that of C18O, and traces the water snow line with a radius of ~40 AU. We have modeled the emission using a chemical model coupled with a radiative transfer module. We find that the CO snow line appears further inwards than expected from the binding energy of pure CO ices. This may hint at CO being frozen out

  4. Near-IR spectroscopic monitoring of CLASS I protostars: Variability of accretion and wind indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of a program that monitored the near-IR spectroscopic variability of a sample of 19 embedded protostars. Spectra were taken on time intervals from 2 days to 3 yr, over a wavelength range from 0.85 μm to 2.45 μm, for 4-9 epochs of observations per target. We found that the spectra of all targets are variable and that every emission feature observed is also variable (although not for all targets). With one exception, there were no drastic changes in the continua of the spectra, nor did any line completely disappear, nor did any line appear that was not previously apparent. This analysis focuses on understanding the connection between accretion (traced by H Br γ and CO) and the wind (traced by He I, [Fe II], and sometimes H{sub 2}). For both accretion and wind tracers, the median variability was constant versus the time interval between observations; however, the maximum variability that we observed increased with the time interval between observations. Extinction is observed to vary within the minimum sampling time of 2 days, suggesting extinguishing material within a few stellar radii at high disk latitudes. The variability of [Fe II] and H{sub 2} were correlated for most (but not all) of the 7 young stellar objects showing both features, and the amplitude of the variability depends on the veiling. Although the occurrence of CO and Br γ emission are connected, their variability is uncorrelated, suggesting that these emissions originate in separate regions near the protostar (e.g., disk and wind). The variability of Br γ and wind tracers were found to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated, depending on the target. The variability of Br γ, [Fe II], and H{sub 2} always lies on a plane, although the orientation of the plane in three dimensions depends on the target. While we do not understand all interactions behind the variability that we observed, we have shown that spectroscopic variability is a powerful tool

  5. Protostar L1455 IRS1: A Rotating Disk Connecting to a Filamentary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsuan-Gu; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M.; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    We conducted IRAM-30 m C18O (2-1) and SMA 1.3 mm continuum 12CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) observations toward the Class 0/I protostar L1455 IRS1 in Perseus. The IRAM-30 m C18O results show IRS1 in a dense 0.05 pc core with a mass of 0.54 M ⊙, connecting to a filamentary structure. Inside the dense core, compact components of 350 au and 1500 au are detected in the SMA 1.3 mm continuum and C18O, with a velocity gradient in the latter one perpendicular to a bipolar outflow in 12CO, likely tracing a rotational motion. We measure a rotational velocity profile \\propto {r}-0.75 that becomes shallower at a turning radius of ˜200 au, which is approximately the radius of the 1.3 mm continuum component. These results hint at the presence of a Keplerian disk with a radius <200 au around L1455 IRS1 with a protostellar mass of about 0.28 M ⊙. We derive a core rotation that is about one order of magnitude faster than expected. A significant velocity gradient along a filament toward IRS1 indicates that this filament is dynamically important, providing a gas reservoir and possibly responsible for the faster-than-average core rotation. Previous polarimetric observations show a magnetic field aligned with the outflow axis and perpendicular to the associated filament on a 0.1 pc scale, while on the inner 1000 au scale, the field becomes perpendicular to the outflow axis. This change in magnetic field orientations is consistent with our estimated increase in rotational energy from large to small scales that overcomes the magnetic field energy, wrapping the field lines and aligning them with the disk velocity gradient. These results are discussed in the context of the interplay between filament, magnetic field, and gas kinematics from large to small scales. Possible emerging trends are explored with a sample of 8 Class 0/I protostars.

  6. The Angular Momentum Content and Evolution of Class I and Flat-Spectrum Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Greene, Thomas P.; Doppmann, Greg W.; Lada, Charles J.

    2005-06-01

    We report on the angular momentum content of heavily embedded protostars on the basis of our analysis of the projected rotation velocities (vsini) of 38 Class I/flat-spectrum young stellar objects recently presented by Doppmann and others. After correcting for projection effects, we find that infrared-selected Class I/flat-spectrum objects rotate significantly more quickly (median equatorial rotation velocity ~38 km s-1) than classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs; median equatorial rotation velocity ~18 km s-1) in the ρ Ophiuchi and Taurus-Aurigae regions. Projected rotation velocity (vsini) is weakly correlated with Teff in our sample but does not seem to correlate with Brγ emission (a common accretion tracer), the amount of excess continuum veiling (rk), or the slope of the spectral energy distribution between the near- and mid-IR (α). The detected difference in rotation speeds between Class I/flat-spectrum sources and CTTSs proves difficult to explain without some mechanism that transfers angular momentum out of the protostar between the two phases. Assuming that Class I/flat-spectrum sources possess physical characteristics (M*, R*, and B*) typical of pre-main-sequence stars, fully disk-locked Class I objects should have corotation radii within their protostellar disks that match well (within 30%) with predicted magnetic coupling radii. The factor of 2 difference in rotation rates between Class I/flat-spectrum and CTTS sources when interpreted in the context of disk-locking models also implies a factor of 5 or greater difference in mass accretion rate between the two phases. A lower limit of M˙~10-8 Msolar yr-1 for objects transitioning from the Class I/flat-spectrum stage to CTTSs is required to account for the difference in rotation rates of the two classes by angular momentum extraction through a viscous disk via magnetic coupling. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the

  7. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Cyganowski, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  8. A distance-limited sample of massive star-forming cores from the RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cicchini, A.

    2015-09-01

    We analyse C18O (J = 3-2) data from a sample of 99 infrared (IR)-bright massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions that were identified as potential molecular-outflow sources in the Red MSX Source survey. We extract a distance-limited (D < 6 kpc) sample shown to be representative of star formation covering the transition between the source types. At the spatial resolution probed, Larson-like relationships are found for these cores, though the alternative explanation, that Larson's relations arise where surface-density-limited samples are considered, is also consistent with our data. There are no significant differences found between source properties for the MYSOs and H II regions, suggesting that the core properties are established prior to the formation of massive stars, which subsequently have little impact at the later evolutionary stages investigated. There is a strong correlation between dust-continuum and C18O-gas masses, supporting the interpretation that both trace the same material in these IR-bright sources. A clear linear relationship is seen between the independently established core masses and luminosities. The position of MYSOs and compact H II regions in the mass-luminosity plane is consistent with the luminosity expected from the most massive protostar in the cluster when using an ˜40 per cent star formation efficiency and indicates that they are at a similar evolutionary stage, near the end of the accretion phase.

  9. Massive gravity acausality redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Izumi, K.; Ong, Y. C.; Waldron, A.

    2013-10-01

    Massive gravity (mGR) is a 5(=2s+1) degree of freedom, finite range extension of GR. However, amongst other problems, it is plagued by superluminal propagation, first uncovered via a second order shock analysis. First order mGR shock structures have also been studied, but the existence of superluminal propagation in that context was left open. We present here a concordance of these methods, by an explicit (first order) characteristic matrix computation, which confirms mGR's superluminal propagation as well as acausality.

  10. Observational evidence for dissociative shocks in the inner 100 AU of low-mass protostars using Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Benz, A. O.; Bruderer, S.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: Herschel-HIFI spectra of H2O towards low-mass protostars show a distinct velocity component not seen in observations from the ground of CO or other species. The aim is to characterise this component in terms of excitation conditions and physical origin. Methods: A velocity component with an offset of ~10 km s-1 detected in spectra of the H2O 110-101 557 GHz transition towards six low-mass protostars in the "Water in star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) programme is also seen in higher-excited H2O lines. The emission from this component is quantified and local excitation conditions are inferred using 1D slab models. Data are compared to observations of hydrides (high-J CO, OH+, CH+, C+, OH) where the same component is uniquely detected. Results: The velocity component is detected in all six targeted H2O transitions (Eup ~ 50-250 K), as well as in CO 16-15 towards one source, Ser SMM1. Inferred excitation conditions imply that the emission arises in dense (n ~ 5 × 106-108 cm-3) and hot (T ~ 750 K) gas. The H2O and CO column densities are ≳1016 and 1018 cm-2, respectively, implying a low H2O abundance of ~10-2 with respect to CO. The high column densities of ions such as OH+ and CH+ (both ≳1013 cm-2) indicate an origin close to the protostar where the UV field is strong enough that these species are abundant. The estimated radius of the emitting region is 100 AU. This component likely arises in dissociative shocks close to the protostar, an interpretation corroborated by a comparison with models of such shocks. Furthermore, one of the sources, IRAS 4A, shows temporal variability in the offset component over a period of two years which is expected from shocks in dense media. High-J CO gas detected with Herschel-PACS with Trot ~ 700 K is identified as arising in the same component and traces the part of the shock where H2 reforms. Thus, H2O reveals new dynamical components, even on small spatial scales in low-mass protostars. Herschel is an ESA space

  11. The CEPHEUS Pan-Asian survey: high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment rate among hypercholesterolaemic patients undergoing lipid-lowering treatment in a Hong Kong regional centre.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond H W; Chan, P H; Chan, Kelvin K W; Lam, Simon C C; Hai, Jo Jo; Wong, Michael K L; Tam, Frankie C C; Lam, Linda; Chan, Carmen W S; Lam, Y M; Siu, David C W; Tse, H F; Lee, Stephen W L

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVES. To evaluate attainment of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals among hypercholesterolaemic patients undergoing lipid-lowering drug treatment in Hong Kong and to identify potential determinants of treatment outcomes. DESIGN. Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING. A single site in Hong Kong, as part of the CEPHEUS Pan-Asian survey. PATIENTS. Subjects with hypercholesterolaemia aged 18 years or above, who had been on lipid-lowering drug treatment for at least 3 months with no dose adjustment for at least 6 weeks. RESULTS. A total of 561 such patients (mean age, 65.3; standard deviation, 9.7 years) were evaluated. Most had major cardiovascular risk factors; 534 (95.2%) of 561 patients had coronary heart disease and 534 (95.4%) of 560 patients had low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals set at lower than 70 mg/dL. In all, 465 (82.9%) patients attained their respective low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals. Among 75 patients who had coronary heart disease or equivalent risk, and multiple risk factors with a 10-year coronary heart disease risk of over 20%, 62 (82.7%) attained their respective low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals. Significant predictors of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment included the patient's baseline lipid profile (total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels), blood pressure, and drugs (statin/non-statin) used for treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Hypercholesterolaemic patients undergoing lipid-lowering drug treatment in the present Hong Kong study were able to achieve a very high attainment rate for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal, despite the fact that most of them had major cardiovascular risk factors.

  12. Massively Parallel QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  13. A symmetrically pulsed jet of gas from an invisible protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Zinnecker, H; McCaughrean, M J; Rayner, J T

    1998-08-27

    Young stars are thought to accumulate most of their mass through an accretion disk, which channels the gas and dust of a collapsing cloud onto the central protostellar object. The rotational and magnetic forces in the star-disk system often produce high-velocity jets of outflowing gas. These jets can in principle be used to study the accretion and ejection history of the system, which is hidden from direct view by the dust and dense gas of the parent cloud. But the structures of these jets are often too complex to determine which features arise at the source and which are the result of subsequent interactions with the surrounding gas. Here we present infrared observations of a very young jet driven by an invisible protostar in the vicinity of the Horsehead nebula in Orion. These observations reveal a sequence of geyser-like eruptions occurring at quasi-regular intervals and with near-perfect mirror symmetry either side of the source. This symmetry is strong evidence that such features must be associated with the formation of the jet, probably related to recurrent or even chaotic instabilities in the accretion disk.

  14. A symmetrically pulsed jet of gas from an invisible protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Zinnecker, H; McCaughrean, M J; Rayner, J T

    1998-08-27

    Young stars are thought to accumulate most of their mass through an accretion disk, which channels the gas and dust of a collapsing cloud onto the central protostellar object. The rotational and magnetic forces in the star-disk system often produce high-velocity jets of outflowing gas. These jets can in principle be used to study the accretion and ejection history of the system, which is hidden from direct view by the dust and dense gas of the parent cloud. But the structures of these jets are often too complex to determine which features arise at the source and which are the result of subsequent interactions with the surrounding gas. Here we present infrared observations of a very young jet driven by an invisible protostar in the vicinity of the Horsehead nebula in Orion. These observations reveal a sequence of geyser-like eruptions occurring at quasi-regular intervals and with near-perfect mirror symmetry either side of the source. This symmetry is strong evidence that such features must be associated with the formation of the jet, probably related to recurrent or even chaotic instabilities in the accretion disk. PMID:9732868

  15. TESTING MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS FOR THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J. A.; Li, Z.-Y.; Hull, C. L. H.; Plambeck, R. L.; Kwon, W.; Crutcher, R. M.; Looney, L. W.; Novak, G.; Chapman, N. L.; Matthews, B. C.; Stephens, I. W.; Tobin, J. J.; Jones, T. J.

    2014-12-20

    For the Class 0 protostar L1527 we compare 131 polarization vectors from SCUPOL/JCMT, SHARP/CSO, and TADPOL/CARMA observations with the corresponding model polarization vectors of four ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, cloud core collapse models. These four models differ by their initial magnetic fields before collapse; two initially have aligned fields (strong and weak) and two initially have orthogonal fields (strong and weak) with respect to the rotation axis of the L1527 core. Only the initial weak orthogonal field model produces the observed circumstellar disk within L1527. This is a characteristic of nearly all ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, core collapse models. In this paper we test whether this weak orthogonal model also has the best agreement between its magnetic field structure and that inferred from the polarimetry observations of L1527. We found that this is not the case; based on the polarimetry observations, the most favored model of the four is the weak aligned model. However, this model does not produce a circumstellar disk, so our result implies that a nonturbulent, ideal-MHD global collapse model probably does not represent the core collapse that has occurred in L1527. Our study also illustrates the importance of using polarization vectors covering a large area of a cloud core to determine the initial magnetic field orientation before collapse; the inner core magnetic field structure can be highly altered by a collapse, and so measurements from this region alone can give unreliable estimates of the initial field configuration before collapse.

  16. Observing the Circumstellar Environment of the Eruptive FUor/EXor Protostar V1647 Ori with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Cieza, Lucas A.; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tobin, John J.; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fu Ori (FUor) and EXor objects represent a short-lived stage of protostellar evolution characterized by intense mass accretion events which cause extreme variability in the form of outbursts. While it is well demonstrated that these objects exhibit sudden outbursts (ΔV~2-6), the mechanism causing such variability is not well understood. High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the circumstellar environment of these objects are essential to distinguish between different outbursting mechanisms. We present ALMA observations of the FUor/EXor object V1647 Ori as part of an ALMA campaign, which has observed a combined eight FUor and EXor type objects. Deeply embedded in the dark cloud LDN 1630 (L1630), V1647 Ori is one of a few FUor/EXor objects to have been extensively studied at multiple wavelengths before, during and after an outburst. We present preliminary results derived from ALMA 12CO, 13CO, C18O and continuum observations of the circumstellar environment of V1647 Ori. By measuring gas/dust masses and gas kinematics of the circumstellar disk, we investigate the potential mechanisms producing variability in these eruptive protostars during an essential, yet rarely observed, stage of pre-main sequence stellar evolution.

  17. Unraveling the 10 micron "silicate" feature of protostars: the detection of frozen interstellar ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Faraji, H.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present infrared spectra of four embedded protostars in the 750-1230 cm-1 (13.3-8.1 microns) range. For NGC 7538 IRS 9, a new band is reported at 1110 cm-1 (9.01 microns, and several others may be present near 785, 820, 900, 1030, and 1075 cm-1 (12.7, 12.2, 11.1, 9.71, and 9.30 microns). The band 1110 cm-1 is attributed to frozen NH3. Its position and width imply that the NH3 is frozen in a polar, H2O-rich interstellar ice component. The NH3/H2O ice ratio inferred for NGC 7538 IRS 9 is 0.1, making NH3 as important a component as CH3OH and CO2 in the polar ices along this line of sight. At these concentrations, hydrogen bonding between the NH3 and H2O can account for much of the enigmatic low-frequency wing on the 3240 cm-1 (3.09 microns) H2O interstellar ice band. The strength of the implied NH3 deformation fundamental at 1624 cm-1 (6.158 microns) can also account for the absorption at this position reported by ISO.

  18. Star formation in a turbulent framework: from giant molecular clouds to protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    Turbulence is thought to be a primary driving force behind the early stages of star formation. In this framework large, self-gravitating, turbulent clouds fragment into smaller clouds which in turn fragment into even smaller ones. At the end of this cascade we find the clouds which collapse into protostars. Following this process is extremely challenging numerically due to the large dynamical range, so in this paper we propose a semi-analytic framework which is able to model star formation from the largest, giant molecular cloud scale, to the final protostellar size scale. Because of the simplicity of the framework it is ideal for theoretical experimentation to explore the principal processes behind different aspects of star formation, at the cost of introducing strong assumptions about the collapse process. The basic version of the model discussed in this paper only contains turbulence, gravity and crude assumptions about feedback; nevertheless it can reproduce the observed core mass function and provide the protostellar system mass function (PSMF), which shows a striking resemblance to the observed initial mass function (IMF), if a non-negligible fraction of gravitational energy goes into turbulence. Furthermore we find that to produce a universal IMF protostellar feedback must be taken into account otherwise the PSMF peak shows a strong dependence on the background temperature.

  19. Detection of CH3SH in protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, L.; Gratier, P.; Vidal, T.; Wakelam, V.; Loison, J.-C.; Hickson, K. M.; Caux, E.

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the main sulphur reservoir in star-forming regions is a long standing mystery. The observed abundance of sulphur-bearing species in dense clouds is only about 0.1 per cent of the same quantity in diffuse clouds. Therefore, the main sulphur species in star-forming regions of the interstellar medium are still unknown. IRAS 16293-2422 is one of the regions where production of S-bearing species is favourable due to its conditions which allows the evaporation of ice mantles. We carried out observations in the 3 mm band towards the solar type protostar IRAS 16293-2422 with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We observed a single frequency setup with the EMIR heterodyne 3 mm receiver with an Lower Inner tuning frequency of 89.98 GHz. Several lines of the complex sulphur species CH3SH were detected. Observed abundances are compared with simulations using the NAUTILUS gas-grain chemical model. Modelling results suggest that CH3SH has the constant abundance of 4 × 10-9 (compared to H2) for radii lower than 200 au and is mostly formed on the surfaces. Detection of CH3SH indicates that there may be several new families of S-bearing molecules (which could form starting from CH3SH) which have not been detected or looked for yet.

  20. Inconsistency of topologically massive hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.; Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    The coupled topologically massive spin-5/2 gravity system in D = 3 dimensions whose kinematics represents dynamical propagating gauge invariant massive spin-5/2 and spin-2 excitations, is shown to be inconsistent, or equivalently, not locally hypersymmetric. In contrast to D = 4, the local constraints on the system arising from failure of the fermionic Bianchi identities do not involve the 'highest spin' components of the field, but rather the auxiliary spinor required to construct a consistent massive model.

  1. A ∼0.2-solar-mass protostar with a Keplerian disk in the very young L1527 IRS system.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John J; Hartmann, Lee; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Wilner, David J; Looney, Leslie W; Loinard, Laurent; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola

    2012-12-01

    In their earliest stages, protostars accrete mass from their surrounding envelopes through circumstellar disks. Until now, the smallest observed protostar-to-envelope mass ratio was about 2.1 (ref. 1). The protostar L1527 IRS is thought to be in the earliest stages of star formation. Its envelope contains about one solar mass of material within a radius of about 0.05 parsecs (refs 3, 4), and earlier observations suggested the presence of an edge-on disk. Here we report observations of dust continuum emission and (13)CO (rotational quantum number J = 2 → 1) line emission from the disk around L1527 IRS, from which we determine a protostellar mass of 0.19 ± 0.04 solar masses and a protostar-to-envelope mass ratio of about 0.2. We conclude that most of the luminosity is generated through the accretion process, with an accretion rate of about 6.6 × 10(-7) solar masses per year. If it has been accreting at that rate through much of its life, its age is approximately 300,000 years, although theory suggests larger accretion rates earlier, so it may be younger. The presence of a rotationally supported disk is confirmed, and significantly more mass may be added to its planet-forming region as well as to the protostar itself in the future.

  2. Higher dimensional nonlinear massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by a recent ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity in four-dimensional spacetime, we study its higher dimensional scenarios. As a result, we are able to show the constantlike behavior of massive graviton terms for some well-known metrics such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini (anti-) de Sitter metrics in a specific five-dimensional nonlinear massive gravity under an assumption that its fiducial metrics are compatible with physical ones. In addition, some simple cosmological solutions of the five-dimensional massive gravity are figured out consistently.

  3. A catalog of extended green objects in the Glimpse survey: A new sample of massive young stellar object outflow candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Holden, E.; Braden, E.; Churchwell, E.; Babler, B. L.; Meade, M. R.; Povich, M. S.; Whitney, B. A.; Brogan, C. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Watson, D. F.; Benjamin, R.; Gomez, M.; Robitaille, T. P.; Watson, C. E-mail: bwhitney@spacescience.org

    2008-12-01

    Using images from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE), we have identified more than 300 extended 4.5 μm sources (Extended Green Objects (EGOs), for the common coding of the [4.5] band as green in three-color composite InfraRed Array Camera images). We present a catalog of these EGOs, including integrated flux density measurements at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 μm from GLIMPSE and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey. The average angular separation between a source in our sample and the nearest IRAS point source is greater than 1'. The majority of EGOs are associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), and where high-resolution 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys overlap the GLIMPSE coverage, EGOs and 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers are strongly correlated. Extended 4.5 μm emission is thought to trace shocked molecular gas in protostellar outflows; the association of EGOs with IRDCs and 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers suggests that the extended 4.5 μm emission may pinpoint outflows specifically from massive protostars. The mid-IR colors of EGOs lie in regions of color-color space occupied by young protostars still embedded in infalling envelopes.

  4. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  5. A study of deuterated water in the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bottinelli, S.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Faure, A.; Scribano, Y.; Kahane, C.

    2012-03-01

    Context. Water is a primordial species in the emergence of life, and comets may have brought a large fraction to Earth to form the oceans. To understand the evolution of water from the first stages of star formation to the formation of planets and comets, the HDO/H2O ratio is a powerful diagnostic. Aims: Our aim is to determine precisely the abundance distribution of HDO towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422 and learn more about the water formation mechanisms by determining the HDO/H2O abundance ratio. Methods: A spectral survey of the source IRAS 16293-2422 was carried out in the framework of the CHESS (Chemical Herschel Surveys of Star forming regions) Herschel key program with the HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared) instrument, allowing detection of numerous HDO lines. Other transitions have been observed previously with ground-based telescopes. The spherical Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RATRAN was used to reproduce the observed line profiles of HDO by assuming an abundance jump. To determine the H2O abundance throughout the envelope, a similar study was made of the H218O observed lines, as the H2O main isotope lines are contaminated by the outflows. Results: It is the first time that so many HDO and H218O transitions have been detected towards the same source with high spectral resolution. We derive an inner HDO abundance (T ≥ 100 K) of about 1.7 × 10-7 and an outer HDO abundance (T < 100 K) of about 8 × 10-11. To reproduce the HDO absorption lines observed at 894 and 465 GHz, it is necessary to add an absorbing layer in front of the envelope. It may correspond to a water-rich layer created by the photodesorption of the ices at the edges of the molecular cloud. At a 3σ uncertainty, the HDO/H2O ratio is 1.4-5.8% in the hot corino, whereas it is 0.2-2.2% in the outer envelope. It is estimated at ~4.8% in the added absorbing layer. Conclusions: Although it is clearly higher than the cosmic D/H abundance, the HDO/H2O ratio remains

  6. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  7. A Semianalytic Model for Supercritical Core Collapse: Self-Similar Evolution and the Approach to Protostar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu

    1997-08-01

    We use a semianalytic model to examine the collapse of supercritical cores (i.e., cores with a mass-to-flux ratio exceeding a critical value). Recent numerical simulations of the formation and contraction of supercritical cores show that the inner solution tends toward self-similar evolution. We use this feature to develop analytic expressions for quantities such as the density, angular velocity, and magnetic field. All forces involved in the problem (gravitational, magnetic, thermal, and centrifugal) can be calculated analytically in the thin-disk geometry of the problem. The role of each force during the contraction is analyzed. We identify the key role of ambipolar diffusion in producing a departure from an exact similarity solution. The slow leakage of magnetic flux during the supercritical phase is enough to significantly accelerate an otherwise near-quasi-static contraction. This leads to dynamic collapse with supersonic infall speeds in the innermost region of the core by the time of protostar formation. We find a time-dependent semianalytic solution for the late supercritical phase, and asymptotic forms are obtained for important profiles at the moment that a central protostar is formed. We obtain estimates for the rotational velocity, infall velocity, and mass accretion rate at this moment. The mass accretion rate is significantly greater than the canonical C3/G (where C is the isothermal sound speed and G is the universal gravitational constant) at the moment of protostar formation, although we argue that it is time-dependent and will eventually decrease. Comparisons are made with the predictions of existing spherical similarity solutions.

  8. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS TOWARD CANDIDATE LOW-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Dunham, Michael M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of nine candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L{sub int} {<=} 0.1 L{sub Sun }). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope cataloged by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star-forming regions. Each object was observed in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J = 2 {yields} 1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30'' resolution. Using five-point grid maps, we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A-IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A-IRS3 outflow is detected but not re-mapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with the kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.

  9. A Systematic Search for Molecular Outflows Toward Candidate Low-luminosity Protostars and Very Low Luminosity Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Dunham, Michael M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of nine candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L int <= 0.1 L ⊙). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope cataloged by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star-forming regions. Each object was observed in 12CO and 13CO J = 2 → 1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30'' resolution. Using five-point grid maps, we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A-IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A-IRS3 outflow is detected but not re-mapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with the kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.

  10. Formation of the Unequal-mass Binary Protostars in L1551NE by Rotationally driven Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Yeung, Paul K. H.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saigo, Kazuya

    2016-11-01

    We present observations at 7 mm that fully resolve the two circumstellar disks and a reanalysis of archival observations at 3.5 cm that resolve along their major axes the two ionized jets of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551NE. We show that the two circumstellar disks are better fit by a shallow inner and steep outer power law than a truncated power law. The two disks have very different transition radii between their inner and outer regions of ∼18.6 au and ∼8.9 au, respectively. Assuming that they are intrinsically circular and geometrically thin, we find that the two circumstellar disks are parallel with each other and orthogonal in projection to their respective ionized jets. Furthermore, the two disks are closely aligned if not parallel with their circumbinary disk. Over an interval of ∼10 yr, source B (possessing the circumsecondary disk) has moved northward with respect to and likely away from source A, indicating an orbital motion in the same direction as the rotational motion of their circumbinary disk. All the aforementioned elements therefore share the same axis for their angular momentum, indicating that L1551NE is a product of rotationally driven fragmentation of its parental core. Assuming a circular orbit, the relative disk sizes are compatible with theoretical predictions for tidal truncation by a binary system having a mass ratio of ∼0.2, in agreement with the reported relative separations of the two protostars from the center of their circumbinary disk. The transition radii of both disks, however, are a factor of ≳1.5 smaller than their predicted tidally truncated radii.

  11. Change in the chemical composition of infalling gas forming a disk around a protostar.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Vastel, Charlotte; Coutens, Audrey; Taquet, Vianney; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    IRAS 04368+2557 is a solar-type (low-mass) protostar embedded in a protostellar core (L1527) in the Taurus molecular cloud, which is only 140 parsecs away from Earth, making it the closest large star-forming region. The protostellar envelope has a flattened shape with a diameter of a thousand astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), and is infalling and rotating. It also has a protostellar disk with a radius of 90 AU (ref. 6), from which a planetary system is expected to form. The interstellar gas, mainly consisting of hydrogen molecules, undergoes a change in density of about three orders of magnitude as it collapses from the envelope into the disk, while being heated from 10 kelvin to over 100 kelvin in the mid-plane, but it has hitherto not been possible to explore changes in chemical composition associated with this collapse. Here we report that the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule cyclic-C3H2 resides in the infalling rotating envelope, whereas sulphur monoxide (SO) is enhanced in the transition zone at the radius of the centrifugal barrier (100 ± 20 AU), which is the radius at which the kinetic energy of the infalling gas is converted to rotational energy. Such a drastic change in chemistry at the centrifugal barrier was not anticipated, but is probably caused by the discontinuous infalling motion at the centrifugal barrier and local heating processes there. PMID:24522533

  12. The complex chemistry of outflow cavity walls exposed: the case of low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2015-08-01

    Complex organic molecules are ubiquitous companions of young low-mass protostars. Recent observations suggest that their emission stems, not only from the traditional hot corino, but also from offset positions. In this work, 2D physicochemical modelling of an envelope-cavity system is carried out. Wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations are performed and a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is used to simulate the physical and chemical structure. The morphology of the system delineates three distinct regions: the cavity wall layer with time-dependent and species-variant enhancements; a torus rich in complex organic ices, but not reflected in gas-phase abundances and the remaining outer envelope abundant in simpler solid and gaseous molecules. Strongly irradiated regions, such as the cavity wall layer, are subject to frequent photodissociation in the solid phase. Subsequent recombination of the photoproducts leads to frequent reactive desorption, causing gas-phase enhancements of several orders of magnitude. This mechanism remains to be quantified with laboratory experiments. Direct photodesorption is found to be relatively inefficient. If radicals are not produced directly in the icy mantle, the formation of complex organics is impeded. For efficiency, a sufficient number of FUV photons needs to penetrate the envelope, and elevated cool dust temperatures need to enable grain-surface radical mobility. As a result, a high stellar luminosity and a sufficiently wide cavity favour chemical complexity. Furthermore within this paradigm, complex organics are demonstrated to have unique lifetimes and be grouped into early (formaldehyde, ketene, methanol, formic acid, methyl formate, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) and late (acetaldehyde, dimethyl ether and ethanol) species.

  13. Dynamical structure of the inner 100 AU of the deeply embedded protostar IRAS 16293–2422

    SciTech Connect

    Favre, Cécile; Field, David; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Brinch, Christian; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Frieswijk, Wilfred W. F.

    2014-07-20

    A fundamental question about the early evolution of low-mass protostars is when circumstellar disks may form. High angular resolution observations of molecular transitions in the (sub)millimeter wavelength windows make it possible to investigate the kinematics of the gas around newly formed stars, for example, to identify the presence of rotation and infall. IRAS 16293–2422 was observed with the extended Submillimeter Array (eSMA) resulting in subarcsecond resolution (0.''46 × 0.''29, i.e., ∼55 × 35 AU) images of compact emission from the C{sup 17}O (3-2) and C{sup 34}S (7-6) transitions at 337 GHz (0.89 mm). To recover the more extended emission we have combined the eSMA data with SMA observations of the same molecules. The emission of C{sup 17}O (3-2) and C{sup 34}S (7-6) both show a velocity gradient oriented along a northeast-southwest direction with respect to the continuum marking the location of one of the components of the binary, IRAS 16293A. Our combined eSMA and SMA observations show that the velocity field on the 50-400 AU scales is consistent with a rotating structure. It cannot be explained by simple Keplerian rotation around a single point mass but rather needs to take into account the enclosed envelope mass at the radii where the observed lines are excited. We suggest that IRAS 16293–2422 could be among the best candidates to observe a pseudo-disk with future high angular resolution observations.

  14. UNVEILING THE EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE FROM INFALLING ENVELOPES TO KEPLERIAN DISKS AROUND LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2013-07-20

    We performed Submillimeter Array observations in the C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission line toward six Class 0 and I protostars to study rotational motions of their surrounding envelopes and circumstellar material on 100-1000 AU scales. C{sup 18}O (2-1) emission with intensity peaks located at the protostellar positions is detected toward all six sources. The rotational velocities of the protostellar envelopes as a function of radius were measured from the position-velocity diagrams perpendicular to the outflow directions passing through the protostellar positions. Two Class 0 sources, B335 and NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, show no detectable rotational motion, while L1527 IRS (Class 0/I) and L1448-mm (Class 0) exhibit rotational motions with radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.2} and {proportional_to}r {sup -1.0{+-}0.1}, respectively. The other Class I sources, TMC-1A and L1489 IRS, exhibit the fastest rotational motions among the sample, and their rotational motions have flatter radial profiles of V{sub rot}{proportional_to}r {sup -0.6{+-}0.1} and {proportional_to}r {sup -0.5{+-}0.1}, respectively. The rotational motions with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -1} can be interpreted as rotation with a conserved angular momentum in a dynamically infalling envelope, while those with the radial dependence of {approx}r {sup -0.5} can be interpreted as Keplerian rotation. These observational results demonstrate categorization of rotational motions from infalling envelopes to Keplerian-disk formation. Models of the inside-out collapse where the angular momentum is conserved are discussed and compared with our observational results.

  15. The Census of Complex Organic Molecules in the Solar-type Protostar IRAS16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (gsim30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of gsim100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in lsim20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (lsim30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10-10. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  16. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10{sup –10}. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  17. HDO abundance in the envelope of the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, B.; Caux, E.; Castets, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Loinard, L.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Bacmann, A.; Cazaux, S.; Comito, C.; Helmich, F.; Kahane, C.; Schilke, P.; van Dishoeck, E.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.

    2005-02-01

    We present IRAM 30 m and JCMT observations of HDO lines towards the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Five HDO transitions have been detected on-source, and two were unfruitfully searched for towards a bright spot of the outflow of IRAS 16293-2422. We interpret the data by means of the Ceccarelli et al. (\\cite{Ceccarelli1996}) model, and derive the HDO abundance in the warm inner and cold outer parts of the envelope. The emission is well explained by a jump model, with an inner abundance xHDO_in = 1×10-7 and an outer abundance xHDO_out ≤ 1×10-9 (3σ). This result is in favor of HDO enhancement due to ice evaporation from the grains in the inner envelope. The deuteration ratio HDO/H2O is found to be fin=3% and fout ≤0.2% (3σ) in the inner and outer envelope respectively and therefore, the fractionation also undergoes a jump in the inner part of the envelope. These results are consistent with the formation of water in the gas phase during the cold prestellar core phase and storage of the molecules on the grains, but do not explain why observations of H2O ices consistently derive a H2O ice abundance of several 10-5 to 10-4, some two orders of magnitude larger than the gas phase abundance of water in the hot core around IRAS 16293-2422. Based on observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope in Spain and with The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, operated by The Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation of Scientific Research, and the National Research Council of Canada.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Observations of Two Young Protostars in the R Corona Australis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppi, Christopher E.; Hunter, Todd R.; Blundell, Raymond; Sandell, Göran

    2007-11-01

    We present multiwavelength, high spatial resolution imaging of the IRS 7 region in the R Corona Australis molecular cloud. Our observations include 1.1 mm continuum and HCO+ J=3-->2 images from the Submillimeter Array (SMA), 12CO J=3-->2 outflow maps from the DesertStar heterodyne array receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT), 450 and 850 μm continuum images from SCUBA, and archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm images. The accurate astrometry of the IRAC images allow us to identify IRS 7 with the centimeter source VLA 10W (IRS 7A) and the X-ray source XW. The SMA 1.1 mm image reveals two compact continuum sources that are also distinguishable at 450 μm. SMA 1 coincides with X-ray source CXOU J190156.4-365728 and VLA centimeter source 10E (IRS 7B) and is seen in the IRAC and MIPS images. SMA 2 has no infrared counterpart but coincides with centimeter source VLA 9. Spectral energy distributions constructed from SMA, SCUBA, and Spitzer data yield bolometric temperatures of 83 K for SMA 1 and <=70 K for SMA 2. These temperatures along with the submillimeter to total luminosity ratios indicate that SMA 2 is a Class 0 protostar, while SMA 1 is a Class 0/Class I transitional object (L=17+/-6 Lsolar). The 12CO J=3-->2 outflow map shows one major and possibly several smaller outflows centered on the IRS 7 region, with masses and energetics consistent with previous work. We identify the Class 0 source SMA 2/VLA 9 as the main driver of this outflow. The complex and clumpy spatial and velocity distribution of the HCO+ J=3-->2 emission is not consistent with either bulk rotation, or any known molecular outflow activity.

  19. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  20. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  1. Massive soliton stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hongyee )

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers. 27 refs.

  2. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  3. Chemical differentiation in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, S. D.; Charnley, S. B.

    2001-01-01

    We have reexamined the origin of the apparent differentiation between nitrogen-bearing molecules and complex oxygen-bearing molecules that is observed in hot molecular cores associated with massive protostars. Observations show that methanol is an ubiquitous and abundant component of protostellar ices. Recent observations suggest that ammonia may constitute an appreciable fraction of the ices toward some sources. In contrast to previous theories that suggested that N/O differentiation was caused by an anticorrelation between methanol and ammonia in the precursor grain mantles, we show that the presence of ammonia in mantles and the core temperature are key quantities in determining N/O differentiation. Calculations are presented which show that when large amounts of ammonia are evaporated alkyl cation transfer reactions are suppressed and the abundances of complex O-bearing organic molecules greatly reduced. Cooler cores (100 K) eventually evolve to an oxygen-rich chemical state similar to that attained when no ammonia was injected, but on a timescale that is an order of magnitude longer (10(5) yr). Hotter cores (300 K) never evolve an O-rich chemistry unless ammonia is almost absent from the mantles. In this latter case, a complex O-rich chemistry develops on a timescale of 10(4) yr, as in previous models, but disappears in about 2 x 10(5) yr, after which time the core is rich in NH3, HCN, and other N-bearing molecules. There are thus two ways in which N-rich cores can occur. We briefly discuss the implications for the determination of hot-core ages and for explaining N/O differentiation in several well-studied sources.

  4. Massive star formation in 100,000 years from turbulent and pressurized molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    McKee, Christopher F; Tan, Jonathan C

    2002-03-01

    Massive stars (with mass m* > 8 solar masses Mmiddle dot in circle) are fundamental to the evolution of galaxies, because they produce heavy elements, inject energy into the interstellar medium, and possibly regulate the star formation rate. The individual star formation time, t*f, determines the accretion rate of the star; the value of the former quantity is currently uncertain by many orders of magnitude, leading to other astrophysical questions. For example, the variation of t*f with stellar mass dictates whether massive stars can form simultaneously with low-mass stars in clusters. Here we show that t*f is determined by the conditions in the star's natal cloud, and is typically about 105yr. The corresponding mass accretion rate depends on the pressure within the cloud--which we relate to the gas surface density--and on both the instantaneous and final stellar masses. Characteristic accretion rates are sufficient to overcome radiation pressure from about 100M middle dot in circle protostars, while simultaneously driving intense bipolar gas outflows. The weak dependence of t*f on the final mass of the star allows high- and low-mass star formation to occur nearly simultaneously in clusters.

  5. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION W49

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Hora, J. L.; Willis, S. E.; Koenig, X. P.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Saygac, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective of locating a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color–color and color–magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49, we analyzed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with ≥7 members is found to be 52% for a cutoff distance of 96″, and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star-forming regions and concluded that W49 has the richest population, with seven subclusters of YSOs.

  6. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  7. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  8. On the Identification of High-Mass Star Forming Regions Using IRAS: Contamination by Low-Mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.; Hyland, A. R.; Robinson, Garry

    2005-06-01

    We present the results of a survey of a small sample (14) of low-mass protostars (LIR<103 Lsolar) for 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission performed using the ATNF Parkes radio telescope. No new masers were discovered. We find that the lower luminosity limit for maser emission is near 103 Lsolar by comparison of the sources in our sample with previously detected methanol maser sources. We examine the IRAS properties of our sample and compare them with sources previously observed for methanol maser emission, almost all of which satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for selecting candidate UC H II regions. We find that about half of our sample satisfy this criterion, and in addition, almost all of this subgroup have integrated fluxes between 25 and 60 μm that are similar to sources with detectable methanol maser emission. By identifying a number of low-mass protostars in this work and from the literature that satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for candidate UC H II regions, we show conclusively for the first time that the fainter flux end of their sample is contaminated by lower mass nonionizing sources, confirming the suggestion by van der Walt and Ramesh & Sridharan.

  9. TENTATIVE DETECTION OF DEUTERATED METHANE TOWARD THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR IRAS 04368+2557 IN L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Shirley, Yancy L.; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya

    2012-10-10

    The millimeter-wave rotational transition line (J{sub K} = 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0}) of deuterated methane CH{sub 3}D has tentatively been detected toward the low-mass Class 0 protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527 with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. This is the first detection of CH{sub 3}D in interstellar clouds, if confirmed. The column density and fractional abundance of CH{sub 3}D are determined to be (9.1 {+-} 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} and (3.0 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}, respectively, where we assume the rotational temperature of 25 K. The column density and fractional abundance of the gaseous CH{sub 4} are estimated to be (1.3-4.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and (4.3-15.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively, by adopting the molecular D/H ratios of 2%-7% reported for various molecules in L1527. The fractional abundance of CH{sub 4} is higher than or comparable to that found in high-mass star-forming cores by infrared observations. It is sufficiently high to trigger the efficient production of various carbon-chain molecules in a lukewarm region near the protostar, which supports the scenario of warm carbon-chain chemistry.

  10. Tentative Detection of Deuterated Methane toward the Low-mass Protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Nami; Shirley, Yancy L.; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational transition line (JK = 10-00) of deuterated methane CH3D has tentatively been detected toward the low-mass Class 0 protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527 with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. This is the first detection of CH3D in interstellar clouds, if confirmed. The column density and fractional abundance of CH3D are determined to be (9.1 ± 3.4) × 1015 cm-2 and (3.0 ± 1.1) × 10-7, respectively, where we assume the rotational temperature of 25 K. The column density and fractional abundance of the gaseous CH4 are estimated to be (1.3-4.6) × 1017 cm-2 and (4.3-15.2) × 10-6, respectively, by adopting the molecular D/H ratios of 2%-7% reported for various molecules in L1527. The fractional abundance of CH4 is higher than or comparable to that found in high-mass star-forming cores by infrared observations. It is sufficiently high to trigger the efficient production of various carbon-chain molecules in a lukewarm region near the protostar, which supports the scenario of warm carbon-chain chemistry.

  11. Shockingly low water abundances in Herschel/PACS observations of low-mass protostars in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Mottram, J. C.; Herczeg, G. J.; Bruderer, S.; Cabrit, S.; Evans, N. J.; Fedele, D.; Gusdorf, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kaufman, M. J.; Melnick, G. J.; Neufeld, D. A.; Nisini, B.; Santangelo, G.; Tafalla, M.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Protostars interact with their surroundings through jets and winds impinging on the envelope and creating shocks, but the nature of these shocks is still poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to survey far-infrared molecular line emission from a uniform and significant sample of deeply-embedded low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in order to characterize shocks and the possible role of ultraviolet radiation in the immediate protostellar environment. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectral maps of 22 objects in the Perseus molecular cloud were obtained as part of the William Herschel Line Legacy (WILL) survey. Line emission from H2O, CO, and OH is tested against shock models from the literature. Results: Observed line ratios are remarkably similar and do not show variations with physical parameters of the sources (luminosity, envelope mass). Most ratios are also comparable to those found at off-source outflow positions. Observations show good agreement with the shock models when line ratios of the same species are compared. Ratios of various H2O lines provide a particularly good diagnostic of pre-shock gas densities, nH ~ 105 cm-3, in agreement with typical densities obtained from observations of the post-shock gas when a compression factor on the order of 10 is applied (for non-dissociative shocks). The corresponding shock velocities, obtained from comparison with CO line ratios, are above 20 km s-1. However, the observations consistently show H2O-to-CO and H2O-to-OH line ratios that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by the existing shock models. Conclusions: The overestimated model H2O fluxes are most likely caused by an overabundance of H2O in the models since the excitation is well-reproduced. Illumination of the shocked material by ultraviolet photons produced either in the star-disk system or, more locally, in the shock, would decrease the H2O abundances and reconcile the models with observations. Detections of hot H2O and strong OH

  12. A Substellar-mass Protostar and its Outflow of IRAS 15398-3359 Revealed by Subarcsecond-resolution Observations of H2CO and CCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yoko; Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Hirota, Tomoya; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Subarcsecond (0.''5) images of H2CO and CCH line emission have been obtained in the 0.8 mm band toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398-3359 in the Lupus 1 cloud as one of the Cycle 0 projects of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. We have detected a compact component concentrated in the vicinity of the protostar and a well-collimated outflow cavity extending along the northeast-southwest axis. The inclination angle of the outflow is found to be about 20°, or almost edge-on, based on the kinematic structure of the outflow cavity. This is in contrast to previous suggestions of a more pole-on geometry. The centrally concentrated component is interpreted by use of a model of the infalling rotating envelope with the estimated inclination angle and the mass of the protostar is estimated to be less than 0.09 M ⊙. Higher spatial resolution data are needed to infer the presence of a rotationally supported disk for this source, hinted at by a weak high-velocity H2CO emission associated with the protostar.

  13. A substellar-mass protostar and its outflow of IRAS 15398–3359 revealed by subarcsecond-resolution observations of H{sub 2}CO and CCH

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Yoko; Sakai, Nami; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-11-10

    Subarcsecond (0.''5) images of H{sub 2}CO and CCH line emission have been obtained in the 0.8 mm band toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 15398–3359 in the Lupus 1 cloud as one of the Cycle 0 projects of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. We have detected a compact component concentrated in the vicinity of the protostar and a well-collimated outflow cavity extending along the northeast-southwest axis. The inclination angle of the outflow is found to be about 20°, or almost edge-on, based on the kinematic structure of the outflow cavity. This is in contrast to previous suggestions of a more pole-on geometry. The centrally concentrated component is interpreted by use of a model of the infalling rotating envelope with the estimated inclination angle and the mass of the protostar is estimated to be less than 0.09 M {sub ☉}. Higher spatial resolution data are needed to infer the presence of a rotationally supported disk for this source, hinted at by a weak high-velocity H{sub 2}CO emission associated with the protostar.

  14. Impact of initial models and variable accretion rates on the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive and intermediate-mass stars and the early evolution of H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, Lionel; Peters, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Massive star formation requires the accretion of gas at high rate while the star is already bright. Its actual luminosity depends sensitively on the stellar structure. We compute pre-main-sequence tracks for massive and intermediate-mass stars with variable accretion rates and study the evolution of stellar radius, effective temperature and ionizing luminosity, starting at 2 M⊙ with convective or radiative structures. The radiative case shows a much stronger swelling of the protostar for high accretion rates than the convective case. For radiative structures, the star is very sensitive to the accretion rate and reacts quickly to accretion bursts, leading to considerable changes in photospheric properties on time-scales as short as 100-1000 yr. The evolution for convective structures is much less influenced by the instantaneous accretion rate, and produces a monotonically increasing ionizing flux that can be many orders of magnitude smaller than in the radiative case. For massive stars, it results in a delay of the H II region expansion by up to 10 000 yr. In the radiative case, the H II region can potentially be engulfed by the star during the swelling, which never happens in the convective case. We conclude that the early stellar structure has a large impact on the radiative feedback during the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive protostars and introduces an important uncertainty that should be taken into account. Because of their lower effective temperatures, our convective models may hint at a solution to an observed discrepancy between the luminosity distribution functions of massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions.

  15. Highly extended (r~4000AU) CS(7-6) around low-mass protostars, what does it trace?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ying Chi; Lim, Jeremy Jin Leong; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2015-08-01

    Molecular lines with high critical densities and excitation temperatures are expected to trace the inner dense and warm regions of protostellar cores. Single-dish observations of well-studied protostars in CS(7-6), however, reveal emission extending about ten times further out than is expected by models of the ambient envelope. Furthermore, along the outflow axis, the CS(7-6) emission has a velocity gradient opposite to that of the bipolar molecular outflow. To study the properties of the extended CS(7-6) emission from large to small spatial scales, we combined observations of L483 in CS(7-6) with ASTE and SMA. We find that the extended CS(7-6) emission elongated EW along the outflow direction can be traced inwards to ~600 AU from the protostar. Further inwards, we find a compact central component with a steeper velocity gradient (in the same sense) along the outflow axis. The compact central component also exhibits a velocity gradient along the NS direction, similar to that observed in CO(2-1). We show that the model proposed by Takakuwa et al. (2011) in which the extended CS(7-6) emission originates from outwardly-dispersing gas from the outflow cavity walls is incompatible with the inferred cavity geometry of L483. Instead, the spatial kinematic structures observed in CS(7-6) can be explained if the emission traces infalling gas along the outflow cavity; the compact central component simply corresponds to the most highly foreshortened outflow cavity walls. Our model requires the cavity walls to be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude in density and temperature over the ambient envelope. Theoretical models that invoke compression by the outflow and heating by the stellar radiation indeed predict such enhancements in the cavity walls. The kinematics in CS(7-6) along the outflow axis can be modeled as free fall onto a ~1M⊙ protostar. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of probing infall from a few thousand AU to a few hundred AU in just a single molecular

  16. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. I. DEPENDENCE ON BASIC CORE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2011-05-20

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  17. The complex environment around the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, Frederik L.; Jörgensen, Jes K.; Lahuis, Fred; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoff A.; Evans, Neal J.; C2d Irs Team

    The deeply embedded, low-mass, proto-binary star IRAS 16293-2422 has attained considerable interest over the last decade, in particular, driven by the detection of millimetre line emission from a large number of complex organic molecules and the possibility of this source harbouring a 'hot core', similar to those found in regions of high-mass star formation (e.g. van Dishoeck et al. 1995; Ceccarelli et al. 2000; Schöier et al. 2002; Cazaux et al. 2003). High angular resolution observations of the central core region of IRAS 16293-2422 have been carried out for a number of molecules using the BIMA and OVRO millimetre arrays (Schöier et al. 2005; see Figure 1 for examples). Most molecules show a separation of red (4-7 km s-1) and blue (0-4 km s-1) emission peaks roughly perpendicular to the large-scale outflow, thought to be driven by one of the protostars (MM1), indicative of rotation in the envelope. Some species, e.g. HNC and N2H+, also seem to trace the interaction of the outflow with the circumstellar material. The observed chemical differentiation of C18O, HNC, and N2H+ is consistent with the recent chemical model of IRAS 16293-2422 by Doty et al. (2004). Moreover, SiO and CH3OH appear to be partly associated with outflow activity where the ices are liberated by grain-grain collisions. We also report the detection of mid-infrared (23-35 μm) emission from IRAS 16293-2422 by the Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectrograph, IRS (Jørgensen et al. 2005). The detection of mid-infrared emission suggests that the envelope is optically thin at these wavelengths. A detailed, spherically symmetric, radiative transfer model reproducing the full SED from 23 μm to 1.3mm requires a large, approximately 1000AU, inner cavity of the envelope in order to avoid quenching the emission from the central source (Figure 2). This corroborates a previous suggestion based on high angular resolution millimetre interferometric data (Schöier et al. 2004). An alternative

  18. On the origin of H2CO abundance enhancements in low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöier, F. L.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2004-04-01

    High angular resolution H2CO 218 GHz line observations have been carried out toward the low-mass protostars IRAS 16293-2422 and L1448-C using the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at ˜2 arcsec resolution. Simultaneous 1.37 mm continuum data reveal extended emission which is compared with that predicted by model envelopes constrained from single-dish data. For L1448-C the model density structure works well down to the 400 AU scale to which the interferometer is sensitive. For IRAS 16293-2422, a known proto-binary object, the interferometer observations indicate that the binary has cleared much of the material in the inner part of the envelope, out to the binary separation of ˜800 AU. For both sources there is excess unresolved compact emission centered on the sources, most likely due to accretion disks ⪉200 AU in size with masses of ⪆0.02 M⊙ (L1448-C) and ⪆0.1 M⊙ (IRAS 16293-2422). The H2CO data for both sources are dominated by emission from gas close to the positions of the continuum peaks. The morphology and velocity structure of the H2CO array data have been used to investigate whether the abundance enhancements inferred from single-dish modelling are due to thermal evaporation of ices or due to liberation of the ice mantles by shocks in the inner envelope. For IRAS 16293-2422 the H2CO interferometer observations indicate the presence of rotation roughly perpendicular to the large scale CO outflow. The H2CO distribution differs from that of C18O, with C18O emission peaking near MM1 and H2CO stronger near MM2. For L1448-C, the region of enhanced H2CO emission extends over a much larger scale >1'' than the radius of 50-100 K (0.6 arcsrec - 0.15 arcsec) where thermal evaporation can occur. The red-blue asymmetry of the emission is consistent with the outflow; however the velocities are significantly lower. The H2CO 322-221/303-202 flux ratio derived from the interferometer data is significantly higher than that found from single-dish observations for both

  19. High-J CO survey of low-mass protostars observed with Herschel-HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; San José-García, I.; Karska, A.; Harsono, D.; Tafalla, M.; Fuente, A.; Visser, R.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2013-08-01

    Context. In the deeply embedded stage of star formation, protostars start to heat and disperse their surrounding cloud cores. The evolution of these sources has traditionally been traced through dust continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but the use of CO excitation as an evolutionary probe has not yet been explored due to the lack of high-J CO observations. Aims: The aim is to constrain the physical characteristics (excitation, kinematics, column density) of the warm gas in low-mass protostellar envelopes using spectrally resolved Herschel data of CO and compare those with the colder gas traced by lower excitation lines. Methods: Herschel-HIFI observations of high-J lines of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (up to Ju = 10, Eu up to 300 K) are presented toward 26 deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 and Class I young stellar objects, obtained as part of the Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) key program. This is the first large spectrally resolved high-J CO survey conducted for these types of sources. Complementary lower J CO maps were observed using ground-based telescopes, such as the JCMT and APEX and convolved to matching beam sizes. Results: The 12CO 10-9 line is detected for all objects and can generally be decomposed into a narrow and a broad component owing to the quiescent envelope and entrained outflow material, respectively. The 12CO excitation temperature increases with velocity from ~60 K up to ~130 K. The median excitation temperatures for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O derived from single-temperature fits to the Ju = 2-10 integrated intensities are ~70 K, 48 K and 37 K, respectively, with no significant difference between Class 0 and Class I sources and no trend with Menv or Lbol. Thus, in contrast to the continuum SEDs, the spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) do not show any evolution during the embedded stage. In contrast, the integrated line intensities of all CO isotopologs show a clear decrease with evolutionary stage as the envelope is

  20. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  1. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  2. Dynamic star formation in the massive DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. In addition, magnetic fields may play a decisive role in the star-formation process since they influence the efficiency of gas infall onto the protostar. Aims: By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. Methods: We use molecular line data from our 13CO 1 to 0, CS 2 to 1, and N2H+ 1 to 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO+, N2H+, and H2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, to investigate the distribution of the different phases of molecular gas. Gravitational infall is identified by the presence of inverse P Cygni profiles that are detected in optically thick lines, while the optically thinner isotopomers are found to reach a peak in the self-absorption gap. Results: We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of 0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 105 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter

  3. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF V2775 Ori, AN OUTBURSTING PROTOSTAR IN L 1641: EXPLORING THE EDGE OF THE FU ORIONIS REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Kounkel, Marina; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, T. L.

    2012-09-01

    Individual outbursting young stars are important laboratories for studying the physics of episodic accretion and the extent to which this phenomenon can explain the luminosity distribution of protostars. We present new and archival data for V2775 Ori (HOPS 223), a protostar in the L 1641 region of the Orion molecular clouds that was discovered by Caratti o Garatti et al. to have recently undergone an order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity. Our near-infrared spectra of the source have strong blueshifted He I {lambda}10830 absorption, strong H{sub 2}O and CO absorption, and no H I emission, all typical of FU Orionis sources. With data from the Infrared Telescope Facility, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment that span from 1 to 70 {mu}m pre-outburst and from 1 to 870 {mu}m post-outburst, we estimate that the outburst began between 2005 April and 2007 March. We also model the pre- and post-outburst spectral energy distributions of the source, finding it to be in the late stages of accreting its envelope with a disk-to-star accretion rate that increased from {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} during the outburst. The post-outburst luminosity at the epoch of the FU Orionis-like near-IR spectra is 28 L{sub Sun }, making V2775 Ori the least luminous documented FU Orionis outburster with a protostellar envelope. The existence of low-luminosity outbursts supports the notion that a range of episiodic accretion phenomena can partially explain the observed spread in protostellar luminosities.

  4. HOT WATER IN THE INNER 100 AU OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A.; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2013-05-20

    Evaporation of water ice above 100 K in the inner few 100 AU of low-mass embedded protostars (the so-called hot core) should produce quiescent water vapor abundances of {approx}10{sup -4} relative to H{sub 2}. Observational evidence so far points at abundances of only a few 10{sup -6}. However, these values are based on spherical models, which are known from interferometric studies to be inaccurate on the relevant spatial scales. Are hot cores really that much drier than expected, or are the low abundances an artifact of the inaccurate physical models? We present deep velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the 3{sub 12}-3{sub 03} lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (1097 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 249 K) in the low-mass Class 0 protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A. A spherical radiative transfer model with a power-law density profile is unable to reproduce both the HIFI data and existing interferometric data on the H{sub 2}{sup 18}O 3{sub 13}-2{sub 20} line (203 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 204 K). Instead, the HIFI spectra likely show optically thick emission from a hot core with a radius of about 100 AU. The mass of the hot core is estimated from the C{sup 18}O J = 9-8 and 10-9 lines. We derive a lower limit to the hot water abundance of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, consistent with the theoretical predictions of {approx}10{sup -4}. The revised HDO/H{sub 2}O abundance ratio is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, an order of magnitude lower than previously estimated.

  5. Massive Gravitons on Bohmian Congruences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Mohsen; Mohseni, Morteza

    2016-08-01

    Taking a quantum corrected form of Raychaudhuri equation in a geometric background described by a Lorentz-violating massive theory of gravity, we go through investigating a time-like congruence of massive gravitons affected by a Bohmian quantum potential. We find some definite conditions upon which these gravitons are confined to diverging Bohmian trajectories. The respective behaviour of those quantum potentials are also derived and discussed. Additionally, and through a relativistic quantum treatment of a typical wave function, we demonstrate schematic conditions on the associated frequency to the gravitons, in order to satisfy the necessity of divergence.

  6. Broadbeam for Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Deli; Qian, Haifeng; Li, Geoffrey Ye

    2016-05-01

    Massive MIMO has been identified as one of the promising disruptive air interface techniques to address the huge capacity requirement demanded by 5G wireless communications. For practical deployment of such systems, the control message need to be broadcast to all users reliably in the cell using broadbeam. A broadbeam is expected to have the same radiated power in all directions to cover users in any place in a cell. In this paper, we will show that there is no perfect broadbeam. Therefore, we develop a method for generating broadbeam that can allow tiny fluctuations in radiated power. Overall, this can serve as an ingredient for practical deployment of the massive MIMO systems.

  7. Understanding massively open online courses.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2014-02-01

    Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are an innovative delivery system for educational offerings. MOOCs have been hailed with optimism for making education accessible to many, but at the same time, they have been criticized for poor participant completion rates. Nurse educators are considering whether and how to use MOOCs; this column explains MOOCs and their advantages and disadvantages for nurse educators. PMID:24494660

  8. Massively parallel visualization: Parallel rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.; White, W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume renderer use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  9. Massive large-bowel haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, P.; Thomas, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Operative intervention for massive colonic haemorrhage is fortunately rarely necessary, but planned, low-risk segmental resections can only be performed if the bleeding site is known. This information can most frequently be obtained by using a combination of sigmoidoscopy, barium enema examination, and selective mesenteric angiography. PMID:6972724

  10. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  11. H II REGIONS, EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS, AND STARLESS CORES IN SHARPLESS 2-157

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Williams, Jonathan P.; Pandian, Jagadheep D. E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-06-20

    We present arcsecond resolution 1.4 mm observations of the high-mass star-forming region, Sharpless 2-157, that reveal the cool dust associated with the first stages of star formation. These data are compared with archival images at optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths, and complemented with new arcsecond resolution mid-infrared data. We identify a dusty young H II region, numerous infrared sources within the cluster envelope, and four starless condensations. Three of the cores lie in a line to the south of the cluster peak, but the most massive one is right at the center and associated with a jumble of bright radio and infrared sources. This presents an interesting juxtaposition of high- and low-mass star formation within the same cluster which we compare with similar observations of other high-mass star-forming regions and discuss in the context of cluster formation theory.

  12. Radiation hydrodynamics using characteristics on adaptive decomposed domains for massively parallel star formation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntemeyer, Lars; Banerjee, Robi; Peters, Thomas; Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2016-02-01

    We present an algorithm for solving the radiative transfer problem on massively parallel computers using adaptive mesh refinement and domain decomposition. The solver is based on the method of characteristics which requires an adaptive raytracer that integrates the equation of radiative transfer. The radiation field is split into local and global components which are handled separately to overcome the non-locality problem. The solver is implemented in the framework of the magneto-hydrodynamics code FLASH and is coupled by an operator splitting step. The goal is the study of radiation in the context of star formation simulations with a focus on early disc formation and evolution. This requires a proper treatment of radiation physics that covers both the optically thin as well as the optically thick regimes and the transition region in particular. We successfully show the accuracy and feasibility of our method in a series of standard radiative transfer problems and two 3D collapse simulations resembling the early stages of protostar and disc formation.

  13. THE FORMATION OF MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS IN THE PRESENCE OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J.

    2013-07-20

    Population III stars forming in the infant universe at z = 30 heralded the end of the cosmic dark ages. They are presumed to be assembled in the so-called minihalos with virial temperatures of a few thousand K where collapse is triggered by molecular hydrogen cooling. A central question concerns their final masses, and whether fragmentation occurs during their formation. While studies employing Lagrangian codes suggest fragmentation via a self-gravitating disk, recent high-resolution simulations indicated that disk formation is suppressed. Here we report the first high-resolution large-eddy simulations performed with the Eulerian grid-based code Enzo following the evolution beyond the formation of the first peak to investigate the accretion of the central massive clump and potential fragmentation. For a total of three halos, we see that a disk forms around the first clump. The central clump reaches {approx}10 solar masses after 40 yr, while subsequent accretion is expected at a rate of 10{sup -2} solar masses per year. In one of these halos, additional clumps form as a result of fragmentation which proceeds at larger scales. We note that subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence yields relevant contributions to the stability of the protostellar disks. Both with and without the SGS model, the disk evolution appears rather stable during the timescale considered here. We conclude that the first protostar may reach masses up to 40-100 M{sub Sun }, which are only limited by the effect of radiative feedback.

  14. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Foucar, E; Rosai, J; Dorfman, R F

    1978-12-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) is a newly recognized, distinct, pseudolymphomatous benign entity with very characteristic microscopic features. Most patients are children or young adults with massive painless cervical adenopathy, although other node groups and extranodal sites often are involved. Sixteen patients with SHML involving the upper respiratory tract and/ or salivary gland are presented. Nine of the patients had ear, nose, and throat (ENT) manifestations at the time of presentation. In most cases the ENT involvement resulted in prominent clinical symptoms. Treatment included surgery, antibiotics, irradiation, chemotherapy, and steroids, frequently in combination, but no consistent pattern of response emerged from the study. These 16 patients were very similar clinically to patients with SHML who did not have ENT disease, indicating that extranodal involvement is not associated with more aggressive disease.

  15. Dynamics of disk galaxies under eccentric perturbations and the effect of radiative thermal exchange on the rotation of lower mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linchu

    2000-09-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, the dynamics of disk galaxies are treated using a representation in a number of circular rings*. The rings are assumed to be rigid and oscillate in a plane. Motion of matter within each ring is taken into account. Eccentric perturbations are studied. First the axisymmetric equilibrium configuration of the galaxy is discussed. After that eccentric perturbations are described. The ring representation is then applied and relevant equations of motion derived. Various formulas involving coefficients of terms in the equations of motion are derived. Angular momentum transport is then discussed with the results of numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Besides the disk, two other components: the galactic bulge, and the dark matter halo are also included, but only as passive sources of gravity. The central region of the disk is handled separately; it may contain a black hole. The second part of this dissertation treats protostars. It is shown that radiative thermal exchange can significantly reduce the angular momentum of a rapidly spinning protostar. The mechanism is especially important for high temperature and large surface area. Also, it is expected that the mechanism is most relevant to lower mass protostars, since they may be embedded inside H II regions which have high temperatures. *This first part of the dissertation is related to [15] (Lovelace, R. V. E., Zhang, L., Kornreich, D. A., & Haynes, M. P. 1999, THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 524, 634, published by the University of Chicago Press,© 1999.The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved).

  16. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  17. Constraining the physical structure of the inner few 100 AU scales of deeply embedded low-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, M. V.; Harsono, D.; Tobin, J. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Murillo, N.; Lai, S.-P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The physical structure of deeply embedded low-mass protostars (Class 0) on scales of less than 300 AU is still poorly constrained. While molecular line observations demonstrate the presence of disks with Keplerian rotation toward a handful of sources, others show no hint of rotation. Determining the structure on small scales (a few 100 AU) is crucial for understanding the physical and chemical evolution from cores to disks. Aims: We determine the presence and characteristics of compact, disk-like structures in deeply embedded low-mass protostars. A related goal is investigating how the derived structure affects the determination of gas-phase molecular abundances on hot-core scales. Methods: Two models of the emission, a Gaussian disk intensity distribution and a parametrized power-law disk model, are fitted to subarcsecond resolution interferometric continuum observations of five Class 0 sources, including one source with a confirmed Keplerian disk. Prior to fitting the models to the de-projected real visibilities, the estimated envelope from an independent model and any companion sources are subtracted. For reference, a spherically symmetric single power-law envelope is fitted to the larger scale emission (~1000 AU) and investigated further for one of the sources on smaller scales. Results: The radii of the fitted disk-like structures range from ~90-170 AU, and the derived masses depend on the method. Using the Gaussian disk model results in masses of 54-556 × 10-3 M⊙, and using the power-law disk model gives 9-140 × 10-3 M⊙. While the disk radii agree with previous estimates the masses are different for some of the sources studied. Assuming a typical temperature distribution (r-0.5), the fractional amount of mass in the disk above 100 K varies from 7% to 30%. Conclusions: A thin disk model can approximate the emission and physical structure in the inner few 100 AU scales of the studied deeply embedded low-mass protostars and paves the way for

  18. Probing the CO and methanol snow lines in young protostars. Results from the CALYPSO IRAM-PdBI survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, S.; Maret, S.; Cabrit, S.; Belloche, A.; Maury, A. J.; André, Ph.; Codella, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bontemps, S.; Podio, L.; Gueth, F.; Bergin, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. So-called snow lines, indicating regions where abundant volatiles freeze out onto the surface of dust grains, play an important role for planet growth and bulk composition in protoplanetary disks. They can already be observed in the envelopes of the much younger, low-mass Class 0 protostars, which are still in their early phase of heavy accretion. Aims: We aim to use the information on the sublimation regions of different kinds of ices to understand the chemistry of the envelope, its temperature and density structure, and the history of the accretion process. This information is crucial to get the full picture of the early protostellar collapse and the subsequent evolution of young protostars. Methods: As part of the CALYPSO IRAM Large Program, we have obtained observations of C18O, N2H+, and CH3OH towards nearby Class 0 protostars with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer at sub-arcsecond resolution. For four of these sources, we have modeled the emission using a chemical code coupled with a radiative transfer module. Results: We observe an anti-correlation of C18O and N2H+ in NGC 1333-IRAS4A, NGC 1333-IRAS4B, L1157, and L1448C, with N2H+ forming a ring (perturbed by the outflow) around the centrally peaked C18O emission. This emission morphology, which is due to N2H+ being chemically destroyed by CO, reveals the CO and N2 ice sublimation regions in these protostellar envelopes with unprecedented resolution. We also observe compact methanol emission towards three of the sources. Based on our chemical model and assuming temperature and density profiles from the literature, we find that for all four sources the CO snow line appears further inwards than expected from the binding energy of pure CO ices (~855 K). The emission regions of models and observations match for a higher value of the CO binding energy of 1200 K, corresponding to a dust temperature of ~24 K at the CO snow line. The binding energy for N2 ices is modeled at 1000 K, also higher than for

  19. Analytics for massive heat maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah; Nakamura, Grant; Love, Douglass

    2009-01-01

    High throughput instrumentation for genomics is producing data orders of magnitude greater than even a decade before. Biologists often visualize the data of these experiments through the use of heat maps. For large datasets, heat map visualizations do not scale. These visualizations are only capable of displaying a portion of the data, making it difficult for scientists to find and detect patterns that span more than a subsection of the data. We present a novel method that provides an interactive visual display for massive heat maps [O(108)]. Our process shows how a massive heat map can be decomposed into multiple levels of abstraction to represent the underlying macrostructures. We aggregate these abstractions into a framework that can allow near real-time navigation of the space. To further assist pattern discovery, we ground our system on the principle of focus+context. Our framework also addresses the issue of balancing the memory and display resolution and heat map size. We will show that this technique for biologists provides a powerful new visual metaphor for analyzing massive datasets.

  20. Analytics for Massive Heat Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah A.; Nakamura, Grant C.; Love, Douglas V.

    2009-01-19

    High throughput instrumentation for genomics is producing data orders of magnitude greater than even a decade before. Biologists often visualize the data of these experiments through the use of heat maps. For large datasets, heat map visualizations do not scale. These visualizations are only capable of displaying a portion of the data, making it difficult for scientists to find and detect patterns that span more than a subsection of the data. We present a novel method that provides an interactive visual display for massive heat maps [O(108)]. Our process shows how a massive heat map can be decomposed into multiple levels of abstraction to represent the underlying macrostructures. We aggregate these abstractions into a framework that can allow real-time navigation of the space. To further assist pattern discovery, we ground our system on the principle of focus+context. Our framework also addresses the issue of balancing the memory and display resolution and heat map size. We will show that this technique for biologists provides a powerful new visual metaphor for analyzing massive datasets.

  1. Voids in massive neutrino cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Sutter, P.M. E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: sutter@oats.inaf.it

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic voids are a promising environment to characterize neutrino-induced effects on the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. We perform a comprehensive numerical study of the statistical properties of voids, identified both in the matter and galaxy distributions, in massive and massless neutrino cosmologies. The matter density field is obtained by running several independent N-body simulations with cold dark matter and neutrino particles, while the galaxy catalogs are modeled by populating the dark matter halos in simulations via a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to reproduce the clustering properties observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7. We focus on the impact of massive neutrinos on the following void statistical properties: number density, ellipticities, two-point statistics, density and velocity profiles. Considering the matter density field, we find that voids in massive neutrino cosmologies are less evolved than those in the corresponding massless neutrinos case: there is a larger number of small voids and a smaller number of large ones, their profiles are less evacuated, and they present a lower wall at the edge. Moreover, the degeneracy between σ{sub 8} and Ω{sub ν} is broken when looking at void properties. In terms of the galaxy density field, we find that differences among cosmologies are difficult to detect because of the small number of galaxy voids in the simulations. Differences are instead present when looking at the matter density and velocity profiles around these voids.

  2. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  3. A COLD COMPLEX CHEMISTRY TOWARD THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR B1-b: EVIDENCE FOR COMPLEX MOLECULE PRODUCTION IN ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Joergensen, Jes K.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2010-06-10

    Gas-phase complex organic molecules have been detected toward a range of high- and low-mass star-forming regions at abundances which cannot be explained by any known gas-phase chemistry. Recent laboratory experiments show that UV irradiation of CH{sub 3}OH-rich ices may be an important mechanism for producing complex molecules and releasing them into the gas phase. To test this ice formation scenario, we mapped the B1-b dust core and nearby protostar in CH{sub 3}OH gas using the IRAM 30 m telescope to identify locations of efficient non-thermal ice desorption. We find three CH{sub 3}OH abundance peaks tracing two outflows and a quiescent region on the side of the core facing the protostar. The CH{sub 3}OH gas has a rotational temperature of {approx}10 K at all locations. The quiescent CH{sub 3}OH abundance peak and one outflow position were searched for complex molecules. Narrow, 0.6-0.8 km s{sup -1} wide, HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO lines originating in cold gas are clearly detected, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} is tentatively detected, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and HOCH{sub 2}CHO are undetected toward the quiescent core, while no complex molecular lines were found toward the outflow. The core abundances with respect to CH{sub 3}OH are {approx}2.3% and 1.1% for HCOOCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CHO, respectively, and the upper limits are 0.7%-1.1%, which is similar to most other low-mass sources. The observed complex molecule characteristics toward B1-b and the pre-dominance of HCO-bearing species suggests a cold ice (below 25 K, the sublimation temperature of CO) formation pathway followed by non-thermal desorption through, e.g., UV photons traveling through outflow cavities. The observed complex gas composition together with the lack of any evidence of warm gas-phase chemistry provides clear evidence of efficient complex molecule formation in cold interstellar ices.

  4. Discovery of the Rotating Molecular Outflow and Disk in the CLASS-0/I Protostar [BHB2007]#11 in Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihomi, Hara; Ryohei, Kawabe; Yoshito, Shimajiri; Junko, Ueda; Takashi, Tsukagoshi; Yasutaka, Kurono; Kazuya, Saigo; Fumitaka, Nakamura; Masao, Saito; Wilner, David

    2013-07-01

    The loss of angular momentum is inevitable in star formation processes, and the transportation of angular momentum by a molecular flow is widely thought to be one of the important processes. We present the results of our 2'h resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations in CO, 13CO, and C18O(2-1) emissions toward a low-mass Class-0/I protostar, [BHB2007]#11 (hereafter B59#11) at the nearby star forming region, Barnard 59 in the Pipe Nebula (d=130 pc). B59#11 ejects a molecular outflow whose axis lies almost on the plane of the sky, and one of the best targets to investigate the envelope/disk rotation and the velocity structure of the molecular outflow. The 13CO and C18O observations have revealed that a compact (r ˜ 800 AU) and elongated structure of dense gas is associated with B59#11, which orients perpendicular to the outflow axis. Their distributions show the velocity gradients along their major axes, which are considered to arise from the envelope/disk rotation. The specific angular momentum is estimated to be (1.6+/-0.6)e-3 km/s pc. The power-law index of the radial profile of the rotation velocity changes from steeper one, i.e., ˜ -1 to -1/2 at a radius of 140 AU, suggesting the Keplerian disk is formed inside the radius. The central stellar mass is estimated to be ˜1.3 Msun. A collimated molecular outflow is detected from the CO observations. We found in the outflow a velocity gradient which direction is the same as that seen in the dense gas. This is interpreted to be due to the outflow rotation. The specific angular momentum of the outflow is comparable to that of the envelope, suggesting that this outflow play an important role to the ejection of the angular momentum from the envelope/disk system. This is the first case where both the Keplerian disk and the rotation of the molecular outflow were found in the Class-0 or I protostar, and provides one of good targets for ALMA to address the angular momentum ejection in course of star formation.

  5. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  6. OUTFLOW, INFALL, AND PROTOSTARS IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE W3-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Zhao Junhui; Wright, M. C. H. E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-10-20

    We report new results on outflow and infall in the star-forming cores W3-SE SMA-1 and SMA-2 based on analysis of {approx}2.''5 resolution observations of the molecular lines HCN(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), and CH{sub 3}OH(5{sub 2,3}-4{sub 1,3}) with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A high-velocity bipolar outflow originating from the protostellar core SMA-1 was observed in the HCN(3-2) line, with a projected outflow axis at a position angle of 48{sup 0}. The detection of the outflow is confirmed from other molecular lines. An inverse P-Cygni profile in the HCN(3-2) line toward SMA-1 suggests that at least one of the double cores accretes matter from the molecular core. A filamentary structure in the molecular gas surrounds SMA-1 and SMA-2. Based on the SMA observations, our analysis suggests that the double pre-stellar cores SMA-1 and SMA-2 result from fragmentation in the collapsing massive molecular core W3-SE, and it is likely that they are forming intermediate- to high-mass stars which will be new members of a star cluster in the W3-SE region.

  7. Properties of Massive Stars in VVV Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borrissova, J.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars (Borrissova et al. [1]). We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. For the cluster with the largest number of objects, we establish firmly that the WN and WC stars were initially more massive than the O stars still present in the cluster.

  8. Large-scale numerical simulations of star formation put to the test. Comparing synthetic images and actual observations for statistical samples of protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, S.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Haugbølle, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Both observations and simulations of embedded protostars have progressed rapidly in recent years. Bringing them together is an important step in advancing our knowledge about the earliest phases of star formation. Aims: To compare synthetic continuum images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), calculated from large-scale numerical simulations, to observational studies, thereby aiding in both the interpretation of the observations and in testing the fidelity of the simulations. Methods: The adaptive mesh refinement code, RAMSES, is used to simulate the evolution of a 5 pc × 5 pc × 5 pc molecular cloud. The simulation has a maximum resolution of 8 AU, resolving simultaneously the molecular cloud on parsec scales and individual protostellar systems on AU scales. The simulation is post-processed with the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D, which is used to create synthetic continuum images and SEDs of the protostellar systems. In this way, more than 13 000 unique radiative transfer models, of a variety of different protostellar systems, are produced. Results: Over the course of 0.76 Myr the simulation forms more than 500 protostars, primarily within two sub-clusters. The synthetic SEDs are used to calculate evolutionary tracers Tbol and Lsmm/Lbol. It is shown that, while the observed distributions of the tracers are well matched by the simulation, they generally do a poor job of tracking the protostellar ages. Disks form early in the simulation, with 40% of the Class 0 protostars being encircled by one. The flux emission from the simulated disks is found to be, on average, a factor ~6 too low relative to real observations; an issue that can be traced back to numerical effects on the smallest scales in the simulation. The simulated distribution of protostellar luminosities spans more than three order of magnitudes, similar to the observed distribution. Cores and protostars are found to be closely associated with one another, with the distance distribution

  9. Chemistry of massive young stellar objects with a disk-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokoski, K.; Bottinelli, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: Our goal is to take an inventory of complex molecules in three well-known high-mass protostars for which disks or toroids have been claimed and to study the similarities and differences with a sample of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) without evidence of such flattened disk-like structures. With a disk-like geometry, UV radiation can escape more readily and potentially affect the ice and gas chemistry on hot-core scales. Methods: A partial submillimeter line survey, targeting CH3OH, H2CO, C2H5OH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CN, HNCO, NH2CHO, C2H5CN, CH2CO, HCOOH, CH3CHO, and CH3CCH, was made toward three massive YSOs with disk-like structures, IRAS 20126+4104, IRAS 18089-1732, and G31.41+0.31. Rotation temperatures and column densities were determined by the rotation diagram method, as well as by independent spectral modeling. The molecular abundances were compared with previous observations of massive YSOs without evidence of any disk structure, targeting the same molecules with the same settings and using the same analysis method. Results: Consistent with previous studies, different complex organic species have different characteristic rotation temperatures and can be classified either as warm (>100 K) or cold (<100 K). The excitation temperatures and abundance ratios are similar from source to source and no significant difference can be established between the two source types. Acetone, CH3COCH3, is detected for the first time in G31.41+0.31 and IRAS 18089-1732. Temperatures and abundances derived from the two analysis methods generally agree within factors of a few. Conclusions: The lack of chemical differentiation between massive YSOs with and without observed disks suggest either that the chemical complexity is already fully established in the ices in the cold prestellar phase or that the material experiences similar physical conditions and UV exposure through outflow cavities during the short embedded lifetime. Appendices are available in electronic form

  10. Weak and compact radio emission in early massive star formation regions: an ionized jet toward G11.11–0.12P1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; McCoy, M.; Kurtz, S.; Loinard, L.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Araya, E. D.; Cesaroni, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We report 1.3 cm and 6 cm continuum observations toward the massive proto-stellar candidate G11.11–0.12P1 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We detect a string of four unresolved radio continuum sources coincident with the mid-infrared source in G11P1. The continuum sources have positive spectral indices consistent with a thermal (free-free) ionized jet. The most likely origins of the ionized gas are shocks due to the interaction of a stellar wind with the surrounding high-density material. We also present NIR United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) archival data that show an extended structure detected only at K band (2.2 μm), which is oriented perpendicular to the jet, and that may be scattered light from a circumstellar disk around the massive protostar. Our observations plus the UKIRT archival data thus provide new evidence that a disk/jet system is present in the massive proto-stellar candidate located in the G11.11–0.12P1 core.

  11. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the properties of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.

  12. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    DOE PAGES

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the propertiesmore » of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.« less

  13. THE MAGNETIZED ENVIRONMENT OF THE W3(H{sub 2}O) PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Rao, Ramprasad; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Wilner, David J.

    2012-05-20

    We present the first interferometric polarization map of the W3(OH) massive star-forming region observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 878 {mu}m with an angular resolution of 1.''5 (about 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} AU). Polarization is detected in the W3(H{sub 2}O) hot core, an extended emission structure in the northwest of W3(H{sub 2}O), and part of the W3(OH) ultracompact H II region. The W3(H{sub 2}O) hot core is known to be associated with a synchrotron jet along the east-west direction. In this core, the inferred magnetic field orientation is well aligned with the synchrotron jet and close to the plane of sky. Using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method with the observed dispersion in polarization angle, we estimate a plane-of-sky magnetic field strength of 17.0 mG. Combined with water maser Zeeman measurements, the total magnetic field strength is estimated to be 17.1 mG, comparable to the field strength estimated from the synchrotron model. The magnetic field energy dominates over turbulence in this core. In addition, the depolarization effect is discerned in both SMA and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope measurements. Despite the great difference in angular resolutions and map extents, the polarization percentage shows a similar power-law dependence with the beam averaged column density. We suggest that the column density may be an important factor to consider when interpreting the depolarization effect.

  14. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  15. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  16. Hidden ghost in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2013-03-01

    The Hessian's determinant for a version of massive gravity given by an infinite expansion of a square root function of the induced metric, vanishes. We show that it allows us to eliminate one of four scalar fields used to generate the graviton mass. This, however, gives rise to the appearance of extra terms in the action with the squared time derivative of the metric, thus signaling that a nonlinear ghost survives. We demonstrate this phenomenon considering a simple system with constraint, which is supposed to reduce the number of physical degrees of freedom, however, we explicitly show how the constraint forces the metric to propagate an extra tachyonic state.

  17. G11.92-0.61 MM1: a Keplerian disc around a massive young proto-O star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilee, J. D.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Nazari, P.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Forgan, D. H.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-11-01

    The formation process of massive stars is not well understood, and advancement in our understanding benefits from high-resolution observations and modelling of the gas and dust surrounding individual high-mass (proto)stars. Here, we report subarcsecond (≲1550 au) resolution observations of the young massive star G11.92-0.61 MM1 with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Very Large Array (VLA). Our 1.3 mm SMA observations reveal consistent velocity gradients in compact molecular line emission from species such as CH3CN, CH3OH, OCS, HNCO, H2CO, DCN and CH3CH2CN, oriented perpendicular to the previously reported bipolar molecular outflow from MM1. Modelling of the compact gas kinematics suggests a structure undergoing rotation around the peak of the dust continuum emission. The rotational profile can be well fitted by a model of a Keplerian disc, including infall, surrounding an enclosed mass of ˜30-60 M⊙, of which 2-3 M⊙ is attributed to the disc. From modelling the CH3CN emission, we determine that two temperature components, of ˜150 K and 230 K, are required to adequately reproduce the spectra. Our 0.9 and 3.0 cm VLA continuum data exhibit an excess above the level expected from dust emission; the full centimetre-submillimetre wavelength spectral energy distribution of MM1 is well reproduced by a model including dust emission, an unresolved hypercompact H II region, and a compact ionized jet. In combination, our results suggest that MM1 is an example of a massive proto-O star forming via disc accretion, in a similar way to that of lower mass stars.

  18. Massive Binaries in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.; Kim, S. S.

    We review the status of massive-star interaction research in the Galactic center (GC). Given the short lifetimes of massive stars, massive binaries will necessarily be located near their formation sites in starburst clusters. The GC contains three recently formed clusters having a very high stellar density, as high as 106 stars pc-3. We discuss these extreme environments, and possible massive binaries therein. In addition, we argue that they may host the products of massive stellar mergers and collisions. In particular, we predict that at least one massive star in the Arches cluster has already experienced stellar merger events in its short lifetime. Further, the Pistol Star, in the nearby Quintuplet cluster, might owe its apparent relative youth to a rejuvinating stellar merger. Finally, the apparently young stars in the central arcsecond could be products of either collisions, inducing atmospheric stripping, or mergers.

  19. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA. PMID:25825577

  20. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  1. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  2. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  3. CO{sub 2} ICE TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS: EVIDENCE FOR EPISODIC MASS ACCRETION VIA CHEMICAL HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Evans, Neal J. II; Dunham, Michael M.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2012-10-10

    We present Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of CO{sub 2} ice bending mode spectra at 15.2 {mu}m toward 19 young stellar objects (YSOs) with luminosity lower than 1 L{sub Sun} (3 with luminosity lower than 0.1 L{sub Sun }). Ice on dust grain surfaces can encode the history of heating because pure CO{sub 2} ice forms only at elevated temperature, T > 20 K, and thus around protostars of higher luminosity. Current internal luminosities of YSOs with L < 1L{sub Sun} do not provide the conditions needed to produce pure CO{sub 2} ice at radii where typical envelopes begin. The presence of detectable amounts of pure CO{sub 2} ice would signify a higher past luminosity. Many of the spectra require a contribution from a pure, crystalline CO{sub 2} component, traced by the presence of a characteristic band splitting in the 15.2 {mu}m bending mode. About half of the sources (9 out of 19) in the low-luminosity sample have evidence for pure CO{sub 2} ice, and 6 of these have significant double-peaked features, which are very strong evidence of pure CO{sub 2} ice. The presence of the pure CO{sub 2} ice component indicates that the dust temperature, and hence luminosity of the central star/accretion disk system, must have been higher in the past. An episodic accretion scenario, in which mixed CO-CO{sub 2} ice is converted to pure CO{sub 2} ice during each high-luminosity phase, explains the presence of pure CO{sub 2} ice, the total amount of CO{sub 2} ice, and the observed residual C{sup 18}O gas.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Massive, topologically massive, models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Tekin, Bayram

    2002-06-01

    In three dimensions, there are two distinct mass-generating mechanisms for gauge fields: adding the usual Proca/Pauli-Fierz, or the more esoteric Chern-Simons (CS), terms. Here, we analyse the three-term models where both types are present and their various limits. Surprisingly, in the tensor case, these seemingly innocuous systems are physically unacceptable. If the sign of the Einstein term is 'wrong', as is in fact required in the CS theory, then the excitation masses are always complex; with the usual sign, there is a (known) region of the two mass parameters where reality is restored, but instead a ghost problem arises, while for the 'pure mass' two-term system without an Einstein action, complex masses are unavoidable. This contrasts with the smooth behaviour of the corresponding vector models. Separately, we show that the 'partial masslessness' exhibited by (plain) massive spin-2 models in de Sitter backgrounds is shared by the three-term system: it also enjoys a reduced local gauge invariance when this mass parameter is tuned to the cosmological constant.

  5. Stefan-Boltzmann Law for Massive Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, E. S.; Ribeiro, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the Stefan-Boltzmann law to include massive photons. A crucial ingredient to obtain the correct formula for the radiance is to realize that a massive photon does not travel at the speed of (massless) light. It follows that, contrary to what could be expected, the radiance is not proportional to the energy density times the speed of light.

  6. A massively asynchronous, parallel brain.

    PubMed

    Zeki, Semir

    2015-05-19

    Whether the visual brain uses a parallel or a serial, hierarchical, strategy to process visual signals, the end result appears to be that different attributes of the visual scene are perceived asynchronously--with colour leading form (orientation) by 40 ms and direction of motion by about 80 ms. Whatever the neural root of this asynchrony, it creates a problem that has not been properly addressed, namely how visual attributes that are perceived asynchronously over brief time windows after stimulus onset are bound together in the longer term to give us a unified experience of the visual world, in which all attributes are apparently seen in perfect registration. In this review, I suggest that there is no central neural clock in the (visual) brain that synchronizes the activity of different processing systems. More likely, activity in each of the parallel processing-perceptual systems of the visual brain is reset independently, making of the brain a massively asynchronous organ, just like the new generation of more efficient computers promise to be. Given the asynchronous operations of the brain, it is likely that the results of activities in the different processing-perceptual systems are not bound by physiological interactions between cells in the specialized visual areas, but post-perceptually, outside the visual brain. PMID:25823871

  7. Massively parallel femtosecond laser processing.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Ito, Haruyasu; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2016-08-01

    Massively parallel femtosecond laser processing with more than 1000 beams was demonstrated. Parallel beams were generated by a computer-generated hologram (CGH) displayed on a spatial light modulator (SLM). The key to this technique is to optimize the CGH in the laser processing system using a scheme called in-system optimization. It was analytically demonstrated that the number of beams is determined by the horizontal number of pixels in the SLM NSLM that is imaged at the pupil plane of an objective lens and a distance parameter pd obtained by dividing the distance between adjacent beams by the diffraction-limited beam diameter. A performance limitation of parallel laser processing in our system was estimated at NSLM of 250 and pd of 7.0. Based on these parameters, the maximum number of beams in a hexagonal close-packed structure was calculated to be 1189 by using an analytical equation. PMID:27505815

  8. Massive pneumoperitoneum after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Tak; Kim, Wook; Jeon, Hae-Myung; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kee-Whan; Yoo, Seung-Jin; Kim, Eung-Kuk

    2003-04-01

    Pneumoperitoneum usually indicates rupture of a hollow viscus and considered a surgical emergency. But air may also enter the peritoneum from the lung or the genital organs in female without visceral perforation. While scuba diving, the rapid ascent is usually controlled by placing in a decompression chamber and the excess gas volume is exhaled. Failure to allow this excess gas to escape will result in overdistension of air passage, which may rupture resulting in pulmonary interstitial emphysema or, if air enters the circulation, air embolus can occur. Pneumo-peritoneum is a rare complication of diving accidents. While the majority of cases are not related to an intraabdominal catastrophy, more than 20% have been the result of gastric rupture. We report a 42-yr-old male patient with massive pneumoperitoneum after scuba diving, who presented himself with dyspnea and abdominal distension. Knowledge of this rare condition and its benign course may allow the emergency physician and surgeon to order appropriate studies to help avoid unnecessary surgical treatment. It is important to determine promptly whether the air emanated from a ruptured viscus or was introduced from an extraperitoneal source. Free air in the abdomen does not always indicate a ruptured intra-abdominal viscus.

  9. Massive Galaxies at z>4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiklind, Tommy G.; Mobasher, B.

    2008-03-01

    Combining observational data from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths, it has become possible to search for galaxies at look-back times of 12-13 Gyrs. The expectation is to find small and actively star forming systems. While these type of galaxies are indeed seen, a different type of galaxies are also found. These are characterized by having a stellar population which is old, relative to the age of the universe at that epoch, formation redshifts are in the range z=9-15, and to have a large stellar mass, in excess of (5-10) 10^10 Mo. In addition, these stellar systems are extra-odinarily compact, with half-ligth radii of just a few kpc. No counterpart to these objects can be identified in the local universe. In a recent study, we searched for such galaxies at redshifts zɱ in the GOODS South field, finding 11 candidates. Here we extend the search to include old and massive galaxies in the redshift range 4

  10. Mixing in massive stellar mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaburov, E.; Lombardi, J. C.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2008-01-01

    The early evolution of dense star clusters is possibly dominated by close interactions between stars, and physical collisions between stars may occur quite frequently. Simulating a stellar collision event can be an intensive numerical task, as detailed calculations of this process require hydrodynamic simulations in three dimensions. We present a computationally inexpensive method in which we approximate the merger process, including shock heating, hydrodynamic mixing and mass loss, with a simple algorithm based on conservation laws and a basic qualitative understanding of the hydrodynamics of stellar mergers. The algorithm relies on Archimedes' principle to dictate the distribution of the fluid in the stable equilibrium situation. We calibrate and apply the method to mergers of massive stars, as these are expected to occur in young and dense star clusters. We find that without the effects of microscopic mixing, the temperature and chemical composition profiles in a collision product can become double-valued functions of enclosed mass. Such an unphysical situation is mended by simulating microscopic mixing as a post-collision effect. In this way we find that head-on collisions between stars of the same spectral type result in substantial mixing, while mergers between stars of different spectral type, such as type B and O stars (~10 and ~40Msolar respectively), are subject to relatively little hydrodynamic mixing. Our algorithm has been implemented in an easy-to-use software package, which we have made publicly available for download.1

  11. L-band (3.5 μm) IR-excess in massive star formation. II. RCW 57/NGC 3576

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Burton, M. G.; Wright, C. M.

    2006-04-01

    Context: .We present a JHKsL survey of the massive star forming region RCW 57 (NGC 3576) based on L-band data at 3.5 μm taken with SPIREX (South Pole Infrared Explorer), and 2MASS JHKs data at 1.25-2.2 μm. This is the second of two papers, the first one concerning a similar JHKsL survey of 30 Doradus. Aims: .Colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams are used to detect sources with infrared excess. This excess emission is interpreted as coming from circumstellar disks, and hence gives the cluster disk fraction (CDF). Based on the CDF and the age of RCW 57, it is possible to draw conclusions on the formation and early evolution of massive stars. Methods: .The infrared excess is detected by comparing the locations of sources in JHKsL colour-colour and L vs. (K_s-L) colour-magnitude diagrams to the reddening band due to interstellar extinction. Results: .A total of 251 sources were detected. More than 50% of the 209 sources included in the diagrams have an infrared excess. Conclusions: .Comparison with other JHKsL surveys, including the results on 30 Doradus from the first paper, support a very high initial disk fraction (>80%) even for massive stars, although there is an indication of a possible faster evolution of circumstellar disks around high mass stars. 33 sources only found in the L-band indicate the presence of heavily embedded, massive Class I protostars. We also report the detection of diffuse PAHs emission throughout the RCW 57 region.

  12. A massive dense gas cloud close to the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Ray S.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Using the ALMA archival data of both 12CO (6-5) line and 689-GHz continuum emission towards the archetypical Seyfert galaxy, NGC 1068, we identified a distinct continuum peak separated by 15 pc from the nuclear radio component S1 in projection. The continuum flux gives a gas mass of ˜2 × 105 M⊙ and bolometric luminosity of ˜108 L⊙, leading to a star formation rate of ˜0.1 M⊙ yr-1. Subsequent analysis on the line data suggest that the gas cloud has a size of ˜10 pc, yielding to a mean H2 number density of ˜105 cm-3. We therefore refer to the gas as a "massive dense gas cloud": the gas density is high enough to form a "protostar cluster" with a stellar mass of ˜104 M⊙. We found that the gas stands at a unique position between galactic and extraglactic clouds in the diagrams of start formation rate (SFR) vs. gas mass proposed by Lada et al. (2012, ApJ, 745, 190) and surface density of gas vs. SFR density by Krumholz and McKee (2005, ApJ, 630, 250). All the gaseous and star-formation properties may be understood in terms of the turbulence-regulated star formation scenario. Since there are two stellar populations with ages of 300 Myr and 30 Myr in the 100 pc scale circumnulear region, we discuss that NGC 1068 has experienced at least three episodic star-formation events with the likelihood that the inner star-forming region is the younger. Together with several lines of evidence that the dynamics of the nuclear region is decoupled from that of the entire galactic disk, we discuss that the gas inflow towards the nuclear region of NGC 1068 may be driven by a past minor merger.

  13. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XIV. Physical Properties of Massive Starless and Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Battersby, Cara; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Ginsburg, Adam G.; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Pestalozzi, Michele R.; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bally, John; Glenn, Jason

    2016-05-01

    We sort 4683 molecular clouds between 10° < ℓ < 65° from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey based on observational diagnostics of star formation activity: compact 70 μm sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, and UCH ii regions. We also present a combined NH3-derived gas kinetic temperature and H2O maser catalog for 1788 clumps from our own GBT 100 m observations and from the literature. We identify a subsample of 2223 (47.5%) starless clump candidates (SCCs), the largest and most robust sample identified from a blind survey to date. Distributions of flux density, flux concentration, solid angle, kinetic temperature, column density, radius, and mass show strong (>1 dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median SCC is marginally subvirial (α ˜ 0.7) with >75% of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound (α < 2). These samples show a statistically significant increase in the median clump mass of ΔM ˜ 170-370 M ⊙ from the starless candidates to clumps associated with protostars. This trend could be due to (i) mass growth of the clumps at \\dot{M}˜ 200{--}440 M ⊙ Myr-1 for an average freefall 0.8 Myr timescale, (ii) a systematic factor of two increase in dust opacity from starless to protostellar phases, and/or (iii) a variation in the ratio of starless to protostellar clump lifetime that scales as ˜M -0.4. By comparing to the observed number of CH3OH maser containing clumps, we estimate the phase lifetime of massive (M > 103 M ⊙) starless clumps to be 0.37 ± 0.08 Myr (M/103 M ⊙)-1 the majority (M < 450 M ⊙) have phase lifetimes longer than their average freefall time.

  14. ALMA observations of infalling flows toward the Keplerian disk around the class I protostar L1489 IRS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aikawa, Yuri; Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Saito, Masao; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2014-09-20

    We have conducted ALMA observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and {sup 12}CO (2-1), C{sup 18}O (2-1), and SO (5{sub 6}-4{sub 5}) lines toward L1489 IRS, a Class I protostar surrounded by a Keplerian disk and an infalling envelope. The Keplerian disk is clearly identified in the {sup 12}CO and C{sup 18}O emission, and its outer radius (∼700 AU) and mass (∼0.005 M {sub ☉}) are comparable to those of disks around T Tauri stars. The protostellar mass is estimated to be 1.6 M {sub ☉} with the inclination angle of 66°. In addition to the Keplerian disk, there are blueshifted and redshifted off-axis protrusions seen in the C{sup 18}O emission pointing toward the north and the south, respectively, adjunct to the middle part of the Keplerian disk. The shape and kinematics of these protrusions can be interpreted as streams of infalling flows with a conserved angular momentum following parabolic trajectories toward the Keplerian disk, and the mass infalling rate is estimated to be ∼5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The specific angular momentum of the infalling flows (∼2.5 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc) is comparable to that at the outer radius of the Keplerian disk (∼4.8 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc). The SO emission is elongated along the disk major axis and exhibits a linear velocity gradient along the axis, which is interpreted to mean that the SO emission primarily traces a ring region in the flared Keplerian disk at radii of ∼250-390 AU. The local enhancement of the SO abundance in the ring region can be due to the accretion shocks at the centrifugal radius where the infalling flows fall onto the disk. Our ALMA observations unveiled both the Keplerian disk and the infalling gas onto the disk, and the disk can further grow by accreting material and angular momenta from the infalling gas.

  15. Morganella morganii sepsis with massive hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Chong Rae; Um, Tae Hyun; Rhu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Eu Suk; Jeong, Jae Won; Lee, Hye Ran

    2007-12-01

    Morganella morganii is a facultative gram-negative and anaerobic rod. It may be a cause of devastating infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Some bacterial infections such as Clostridium and Vibrio are associated with hemolysis. However, massive hemolysis caused by M. morganii sepsis has not yet been reported. We observed a 59-yr-old man who had chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and was found to have massive hemolysis and metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. He died 6 hr after admission in spite of aggressive treatment. Two sets of blood cultures revealed the growth of M. morganii. We report here that M. morganii sepsis can cause fatal massive hemolysis leading to death.

  16. Topologically massive gravity with extended supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauf, Frederik; Sachs, Ivo

    2016-09-01

    We describe the construction of 2 +1 -dimensional toplogically massive anti-de Sitter gravity with N -extended supersymmetry in superspace by means of introducing a compensating hypermultiplet for the super-Weyl invariance. For N ≥3 , the scalar multiplet must be on shell and the potential for the scalar compensator is completely determined by the geometry. As a consequence, the resulting massive theory has no free parameter for N ≥4 . For N =4 , we show that this leads to topologically massive gravity at the chiral point and construct the corresponding off-shell component action.

  17. Accretion Disks in Massive Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurašević, G. R.; Vince, I.; Atanacković, O.

    2010-12-01

    The results of our investigations of some massive close binaries (CB) (RY Sct, V448 Cyg, UU Cas and V455 Cyg), based on the photometric and spectroscopic observations indicate the existance of the accretion disk around the more massive component, located deep inside the Roche lobe. The light curve shapes of some of this systems are similar to the ones of the overcontact systems like W UMa, but the nature of these massive CBs is completely different. Here we present the models of these systems and their basic elements.

  18. Massive Black Hole Binary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Milosavljević, Milos

    2005-11-01

    Coalescence of binary supermassive black holes (SBHs) would constitute the strongest sources of gravitational waves to be observed by LISA. While the formation of binary SBHs during galaxy mergers is almost inevitable, coalescence requires that the separation between binary components first drop by a few orders of magnitude, due presumably to interaction of the binary with stars and gas in a galactic nucleus. This article reviews the observational evidence for binary SBHs and discusses how they would evolve. No completely convincing case of a bound, binary SBH has yet been found, although a handful of systems (e.g. interacting galaxies; remnants of galaxy mergers) are now believed to contain two SBHs at projected separations of <~ 1kpc. N-body studies of binary evolution in gas-free galaxies have reached large enough particle numbers to reproduce the slow, "diffusive" refilling of the binary's loss cone that is believed to characterize binary evolution in real galactic nuclei. While some of the results of these simulations - e.g. the binary hardening rate and eccentricity evolution - are strongly N-dependent, others - e.g. the "damage" inflicted by the binary on the nucleus - are not. Luminous early-type galaxies often exhibit depleted cores with masses of ~ 1-2 times the mass of their nuclear SBHs, consistent with the predictions of the binary model. Studies of the interaction of massive binaries with gas are still in their infancy, although much progress is expected in the near future. Binary coalescence has a large influence on the spins of SBHs, even for mass ratios as extreme as 10:1, and evidence of spin-flips may have been observed.

  19. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  20. DECIPHERING THE IONIZED GAS CONTENT IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX G75.78+0.34

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Kurtz, Stan; Lizano, Susana; Palau, Aina; Estalella, Robert; Shepherd, Debra; Franco, Jose; Garay, Guido

    2013-04-01

    We present subarcsecond observations toward the massive star-forming region G75.78+0.34. We used the Very Large Array to study the centimeter continuum and H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH maser emission, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Submillimeter Array to study the millimeter continuum and recombination lines (H40{alpha} and H30{alpha}). We found radio continuum emission at all wavelengths, coming from three components: (1) a cometary ultracompact (UC) H II region with an electron density {approx}3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, excited by a B0 type star, and with no associated dust emission; (2) an almost unresolved UCH II region (EAST), located {approx}6'' to the east of the cometary UCH II region, with an electron density {approx}1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and associated with a compact dust clump detected at millimeter and mid-infrared wavelengths; and (3) a compact source (CORE), located {approx}2'' to the southwest of the cometary arc, with a flux density increasing with frequency, and embedded in a dust condensation of 30 M{sub Sun }. The CORE source is resolved into two compact and unresolved sources which can be well fit by two homogeneous hypercompact H II regions each one photoionized by a B0.5 zero-age main sequence star, or by free-free radiation from shock-ionized gas resulting from the interaction of a jet/outflow system with the surrounding environment. The spatial distribution and kinematics of water masers close to the CORE-N and S sources, together with excess emission at 4.5 {mu}m and the detected dust emission, suggest that the CORE source is a massive protostar driving a jet/outflow.

  1. Massive tongue necrosis secondary to temporal arteritis.

    PubMed

    Roseman, B B; Granite, E

    1984-10-01

    A case of unusually massive necrosis of the tongue secondary to temporal arteritis is presented. The clinician must include temporal arteritis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with signs and symptoms of tongue ischemia.

  2. Magnetic monopole solutions with a massive dilaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, P.; Gyürüsi, J.

    1998-11-01

    Static, spherically symmetric monopole solutions of a spontaneously broken SU(2) gauge theory coupled to a massive dilaton field are studied in detail in function of the dilaton coupling strength and of the dilaton mass.

  3. Management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Mehta, Nimeshkumar; Rawat, Naveen; Lehrman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterized by systemic hypotension (defined as a systolic arterial pressure < 90 mm Hg or a drop in systolic arterial pressure of at least 40 mm Hg for at least 15 min which is not caused by new onset arrhythmias) or shock (manifested by evidence of tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia, including an altered level of consciousness, oliguria, or cool, clammy extremities). Massive pulmonary embolism has a high mortality rate despite advances in diagnosis and therapy. A subgroup of patients with nonmassive PE who are hemodynamically stable but with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or hypokinesis confirmed by echocardiography is classified as submassive PE. Their prognosis is different from that of others with non-massive PE and normal RV function. This article attempts to review the evidence-based risk stratification, diagnosis, initial stabilization, and management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism. PMID:23319967

  4. Dwarf Galaxies with Active Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, J. E.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the birth and growth of the first supermassive BH "seeds" is far from understood. While direct observations of these distant BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, massive BHs in present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on the masses, formation path, and hosts of supermassive BH seeds. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting active massive BHs to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known.

  5. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  6. Massive obstetric haemorrhage with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Lin Lin; Chong, Yap Seng

    2012-02-01

    Massive obstetric haemorrhage is a major contributor towards maternal morbidity and mortality. The main causes are abruptio placentae, placenta praevia and postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians managing pregnant women should be equipped with the knowledge and skills for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage to institute timely and appropriate life-saving treatment. Prompt resuscitation and reversal of coagulopathy are critical while definitive measures are carried out to arrest the bleeding. Massive antepartum haemorrhage necessitates deliveries whereas interventions for postpartum haemorrhage range from medical to surgical measures. Algorithms such as haemostasis are useful aids to the systematic and stepwise management of postpartum haemorrhage. Surgical measures used to avoid peripartum haemorrhage include uterine compression sutures, uterine balloon tamponade, uterine artery, and internal iliac artery ligation. Tranexamic acid and recombinant factor VII are more recent medical interventions in massive postpartum haemorrhage. Education, regular drills and adherence to guidelines and protocols are important to reduce haemorrhage-related maternal deaths. PMID:22101177

  7. Massive Stars: Input Physics and Stellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, M. F.; The, L.-S.; Meyer, B. S.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general overview of the structure and evolution of massive stars of masses ≥12 M ⊙ during their pre-supernova stages. We think it is worth reviewing this topic owing to the crucial role of massive stars in astrophysics, especially in the evolution of galaxies and the universe. We have performed several test computations with the aim to analyze and discuss many physical uncertainties still encountered in massive-star evolution. In particular, we explore the effects of mass loss, convection, rotation, 12C( α, γ)16O reaction and initial metallicity. We also compare and analyze the similarities and differences among various works and ours. Finally, we present useful comments on the nucleosynthesis from massive stars concerning the s-process and the yields for 26Al and 60Fe.

  8. Recovering General Relativity from Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Deffayet, C.; Ziour, R.

    2009-11-13

    We obtain static, spherically symmetric, and asymptotically flat numerical solutions of massive gravity with a source. Those solutions show, for the first time explicitly, a recovery of the Schwarzschild solution of general relativity via the so-called Vainshtein mechanism.

  9. Self-protection of massive cosmological gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhahn, Felix; Dietrich, Dennis D.; Hofmann, Stefan E-mail: dietrich@cp3.sdu.dk

    2010-11-01

    Relevant deformations of gravity present an exciting window of opportunity to probe the rigidity of gravity on cosmological scales. For a single-graviton theory, the leading relevant deformation constitutes a graviton mass term. In this paper, we investigate the classical and quantum stability of massive cosmological gravitons on generic Friedman backgrounds. For a Universe expanding towards a de Sitter epoch, we find that massive cosmological gravitons are self-protected against unitarity violations by a strong coupling phenomenon.

  10. HIGH D{sub 2}O/HDO RATIO IN THE INNER REGIONS OF THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect

    Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Persson, M. V.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Vastel, C.; Taquet, V.

    2014-09-01

    Water plays a crucial role both in the interstellar medium and on Earth. To constrain its formation mechanisms and its evolution through the star formation process, the determination of the water deuterium fractionation ratios is particularly suitable. Previous studies derived HDO/H{sub 2}O ratios in the warm inner regions of low-mass protostars. We here report a detection of the D{sub 2}O 1{sub 1,} {sub 0}-1{sub 0,} {sub 1} transition toward the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer: this represents the first interferometric detection of D{sub 2}O—and only the second solar-type protostar for which this isotopologue is detected. Using the observations of the HDO 5{sub 4,} {sub 2}-6{sub 3,} {sub 3} transition simultaneously detected and three other HDO lines previously observed, we show that the HDO line fluxes are well reproduced with a single excitation temperature of 218 ± 21 K and a source size of ∼0.''5. The D{sub 2}O/HDO ratio is ∼(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10{sup –2}, while the use of previous H{sub 2}{sup 18}O observations give an HDO/H{sub 2}O ratio of ∼(1.7 ± 0.8) × 10{sup –3}, i.e., a factor of seven lower than the D{sub 2}O/HDO ratio. These results contradict the predictions of current grain surface chemical models and indicate that either the surface deuteration processes are poorly understood or that both sublimation of grain mantles and water formation at high temperatures (≳230 K) take place in the inner regions of this source. In the second scenario, the thermal desorption of the grain mantles would explain the high D{sub 2}O/HDO ratio, while water formation at high temperature would explain significant extra production of H{sub 2}O leading to a decrease of the HDO/H{sub 2}O ratio.

  11. Protostars and Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The research concentrated on high angular resolution (arc-second scale) studies of molecular cloud cores associated with very young star formation. New ways to study disks and protoplanetary systems were explored. Findings from the areas studied are briefly summarized: (1) molecular clouds; (2) gravitational contraction; (3) jets, winds, and outflows; (4) Circumstellar Disks (5) Extrasolar Planetary Systems. A bibliography of publications and submitted papers produced during the grant period is included.

  12. Massive relic galaxies prefer dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, Luis; Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio; Cebrián, María; Balcells, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We study the preferred environments of z ˜ 0 massive relic galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies with little or no growth from star formation or mergers since z ˜ 2). Significantly, we carry out our analysis on both a large cosmological simulation and an observed galaxy catalogue. Working on the Millennium I-WMAP7 simulation we show that the fraction of today massive objects which have grown less than 10 per cent in mass since z ˜ 2 is ˜0.04 per cent for the whole massive galaxy population with M⋆ > 1010 M⊙. This fraction rises to ˜0.18 per cent in galaxy clusters, confirming that clusters help massive galaxies remain unaltered. Simulations also show that massive relic galaxies tend to be closer to cluster centres than other massive galaxies. Using the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, and defining relics as M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ early-type galaxies with colours compatible with single-stellar population ages older than 10 Gyr, and which occupy the bottom 5-percentile in the stellar mass-size distribution, we find 1.11 ± 0.05 per cent of relics among massive galaxies. This fraction rises to 2.4 ± 0.4 per cent in high-density environments. Our findings point in the same direction as the works by Poggianti et al. and Stringer et al. Our results may reflect the fact that the cores of the clusters are created very early on, hence the centres host the first cluster members. Near the centres, high-velocity dispersions and harassment help cluster core members avoid the growth of an accreted stellar envelope via mergers, while a hot intracluster medium prevents cold gas from reaching the galaxies, inhibiting star formation.

  13. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  14. HOW TO FIND YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTER PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Bressert, E.; Longmore, S.; Testi, L.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.

    2012-10-20

    We propose that bound, young massive stellar clusters form from dense clouds that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We estimate the observable properties of the massive proto-clusters (MPCs) for existing Galactic plane surveys and suggest how they may be sought in recent and upcoming extragalactic observations. These surveys will potentially provide a significant sample of MPC candidates that will allow us to better understand extreme star-formation and massive cluster formation in the Local Universe.

  15. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  16. Massive Particle Reflection from Moving Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarti, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the reflection of massive particles from moving mirrors. The adoption of the formalism based on the energy-momentum allowed us to derive the most general set of formulas, valid for massive and, in the limit, also for massless particles. We show that the momentum change of the reflecting particle always lies along the normal to the mirror, independent of the mirror speed. The subject is interesting not only to physicists designing concentrators for fascicles of massive particles and electron microscopes but also to computer scientists working in raytracing operating in the photon sector. The paper, far from being only theoretical, has profound and novel practical applications in both domains of engineering design and computer science.

  17. Eruptive outflow phases of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    I review recent progress on understanding eruptions of unstable massive stars, with particular attention to the diversity of observed behavior in extragalatic optical transient sources that are generally associated with giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs). These eruptions are thought to represent key mass loss episodes in the lives of massive stars. I discuss the possibility of dormant LBVs and implications for the duration of the greater LBV phase and its role in stellar evolution. These eruptive variables show a wide range of peak luminosity, decay time, expansion speeds, and progenitor luminosity, and in some cases they have been observed to suffer multiple eruptions. This broadens our view of massive star eruptions compared to prototypical sources like Eta Carinae, and provides important clues for the nature of the outbursts. I will also review and discuss some implications about the possible physical mechanisms involved, although the cause of the eruptions is not yet understood.

  18. Massive Ovarian Oedema- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Harke, Arun B; Sigamani, Karthik; Thukkaram, Chitra; Ramamurthy, Madhumittha; Sekar, Manjani

    2016-08-01

    Massive ovarian oedema is defined by WHO as formation of tumour like enlargement of one or both ovaries by oedema fluid. We report a case of a 18-year-old unmarried girl who presented with three months amenorrhoea and left sided lower abdominal pain with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cystic ovarian neoplasm. Patient underwent lapratomy with left salpingo-oophorectomy. A definitive diagnosis of Massive Ovarian Oedema (MOE) was offered on histopathological examination. The MOE should be differentiated from ovarian fibromatosis, ovarian fibroma, sclerosing stromal tumour and ovarian myxoma. The usual management of massive oedema of ovary is unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, as the lesion is mistaken for primary ovarian neoplasm at laparotomy. Recognition of MOE is of great importance to prevent unnecessary oophorectomy in young patients and can be managed conservatively. We report this case of MOE for its rarity. PMID:27656451

  19. The holographic fermions dual to massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li-Qing; Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Wu, Jian-Pin

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the spectral function of the fermionic operator in the field theory which is dual to a 4-dimensional massive gravity. We first study the Fermi surface and the dispersion relation in the dual boundary theory. We find that as the massive parameters is decreased, the Fermi momentum becomes lower and the low energy excitation near Fermi surface behaves more like non-Fermi liquid. Then, we introduce a dipole coupling in the bulk theory and explore the emergence of a gap in the fermionic spectral function. It is found that larger critical dipole coupling is needed to open the gap than that in Einstein gravity. Accordingly, in the field theory dual to massive gravity, it requires stronger negative dipole coupling to generate the marginal Fermi liquid.

  20. NATURE OF W51e2: MASSIVE CORES AT DIFFERENT PHASES OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.c

    2010-02-10

    We present high-resolution continuum images of the W51e2 complex processed from archival data of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 0.85 and 1.3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 and 13 mm. We also made line images and profiles of W51e2 for three hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs; H26alpha, H53alpha, and H66alpha) and absorption of two molecular lines of HCN(4-3) and CO(2-1). At least four distinct continuum components have been detected in the 3'' region of W51e2 from the SMA continuum images at 0.85 and 1.3 mm with resolutions of 0.''3 x 0.''2 and 1.''4 x 0.''7, respectively. The west component, W51e2-W, coincides with the ultracompact H II region reported from previous radio observations. The H26alpha line observation reveals an unresolved hyper-compact ionized core (<0.''06 or <310 AU) with a high electron temperature of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} K, with the corresponding emission measure EM>7 x 10{sup 10} pc cm{sup -6} and the electron density N{sub e} >7 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. The inferred Lyman continuum flux implies that the H II region W51e2-W requires a newly formed massive star, an O8 star or a cluster of B-type stars, to maintain the ionization. W51e2-E, the brightest component at 0.85 mm, is located 0.''9 east from the hyper-compact ionized core. It has a total mass of {approx}140 M{sub sun} according to our spectral energy distribution analysis and a large infall rate of >1.3 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} inferred from the absorption of HCN. W51e2-E appears to be the accretion center in W51e2. Given the fact that no free-free emission and no RRLs have been detected, the massive core of W51e2-E appears to host one or more growing massive proto-stars. Located 2'' northwest from W51e2-E, W51e2-NW is detected in the continuum emission at 0.85 and 1.3 mm. No continuum emission has been detected at lambda>= 7 mm. Along with the maser activities previously observed, our analysis suggests that W51e2-NW is at an earlier phase of star formation. W51e2-N is

  1. NON-AQUEOUS DISSOLUTION OF MASSIVE PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Walsh, K.A.

    1959-05-12

    A method is presented for obtaining non-aqueous solutions or plutonium from massive forms of the metal. In the present invention massive plutonium is added to a salt melt consisting of 10 to 40 weight per cent of sodium chloride and the balance zinc chloride. The plutonium reacts at about 800 deg C with the zinc chloride to form a salt bath of plutonium trichloride, sodium chloride, and metallic zinc. The zinc is separated from the salt melt by forcing the molten mixture through a Pyrex filter.

  2. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  3. Discovering Event Evidence Amid Massive, Dynamic Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Automated event extraction remains a very difficult challenge requiring information analysts to manually identify key events of interest within massive, dynamic data. Many techniques for extracting events rely on domain specific natural language processing or information retrieval techniques. As an alternative, this work focuses on detecting events based on identifying event characteristics of interest to an analyst. An evolutionary algorithm is developed as a proof of concept to demonstrate this approach. Initial results indicate that this approach represents a feasible approach to identifying critical event information in a massive data set with no apriori knowledgeof the data set.

  4. Physics of Mass Loss in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Markova, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We review potential mass-loss mechanisms in the various evolutionary stages of massive stars, from the well-known line-driven winds of O-stars and BA-supergiants to the less-understood winds of Red Supergiants. We discuss optically thick winds from Wolf-Rayet stars and Very Massive Stars, and the hypothesis of porosity-moderated, continuum-driven mass loss from stars formally exceeding the Eddington limit, which might explain the giant outbursts from Luminous Blue Variables. We finish this review with a glance on the impact of rapid rotation, magnetic fields and small-scale inhomogeneities in line-driven winds.

  5. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  6. Complete recovery after massive ethylene glycol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Curtin, L; Kraner, J; Wine, H; Savitt, D; Abuelo, J G

    1992-06-01

    We treated a 64-year-old man who recovered completely from a massive antifreeze ingestion with ethylene glycol levels well above those of previously described survivors. Rapid and aggressive treatment of the patient with recognized methods, including hemodialysis, resulted in the favorable outcome.

  7. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto; Wade, Charles E; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Holcomb, John B

    2014-11-13

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids, and red blood cells (RBCs) in the early phase and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid-1990s, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by proactive resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced, and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.

  8. Interactions in Massive Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.

    2012-01-01

    The most massive stars (M> 60 Solar Mass) play crucial roles in altering the chemical and thermodynamic properties of their host galaxies. Stellar mass is the fundamental stellar parameter that determines their ancillary properties and which ultimately determines the fate of these stars and their influence on their galactic environs. Unfortunately, stellar mass becomes observationally and theoretically less well constrained as it increases. Theory becomes uncertain mostly because very massive stars are prone to strong, variable mass loss which is difficult to model. Observational constraints are uncertain too. Massive stars are rare, and massive binary stars (needed for dynamical determination of mass) are rarer still: and of these systems only a fraction have suitably high orbital inclinations for direct photometric and spectroscopic radial-velocity analysis. Even in the small number of cases in which a high-inclination binary near the upper mass limit can be identified, rotational broadening and contamination of spectral line features from thick circumstellar material (either natal clouds or produced by strong stellar wind driven mass loss from one or both of he stellar components) biases the analysis. In the wilds of the upper HR diagram, we're often left with indirect and circumstantial means of determining mass, a rather unsatisfactory state of affairs.

  9. A Taxonomy of Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilli, Olga; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a new approach to distance education, which originated from the open education resources (OER) movement, are becoming widespread throughout the world. Over time, early versions of cMOOCs have undergone changes in terms of use, name and structure. In their short life, MOOCs have been categorized into different…

  10. Massive Open Online Courses and Economic Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu R.; Lundqvist, Karsten O.; Williams, Shirley A.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of users around the world have registered on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offered by hundreds of universities (and other organizations) worldwide. Creating and offering these courses costs thousands of pounds. However, at present, revenue generated by MOOCs is not sufficient to offset these costs. The sustainability of MOOCs is a…

  11. Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huisman, Bart; Pilli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lecture content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in…

  12. Some correlations for massive MS stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, T.

    1994-11-01

    Criteria are derived for estimating the values of photospheric density, of the core mass and of the energy-generation rate for massive main-sequence stars. Based on the observational material concerning M, L and Te the demarcation lines are determined for the domain of values expected for these quantities in cor relation with measured Mb.

  13. Young Massive Clusters in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.

    2004-12-01

    The three young clusters in the Galactic Center represent the closest examples of massive starbursts and they define the upper mass limit of the Galactic cluster mass functions. In this review, I describe the characteristics and content of the Arches, Quintuplet, and Central clusters. They each are more massive than any other cluster in the Galaxy, and the Arches cluster, in particular, has a mass and age that make it ideal for studies of massive stellar evolution and dense stellar systems. A preliminary measurement indicates that the initial mass function in the Galactic center is top-heavy, suggesting an environmental effect that has otherwise been absent in similar observations for Galactic clusters. Given the relatively more evolved nature of the Quintuplet and Central clusters, these clusters contain stars in a wide range of evolutionary states, including Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet stars. The Quintuplet cluster provides a particularly interesting view of the most massive stars that are known, the Pistol Star and FMM362. An analysis of the mass spectrum in the Arches cluster suggests an upper mass cutoff of ˜150-200 M⊙.

  14. Embeddings of the "New Massive Gravity"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Here we apply different types of embeddings of the equations of motion of the linearized "New Massive Gravity" in order to generate alternative and even higher-order (in derivatives) massive gravity theories in D=2+1. In the first part of the work we use the Weyl symmetry as a guiding principle for the embeddings. First we show that a Noether gauge embedding of the Weyl symmetry leads to a sixth-order model in derivatives with either a massive or a massless ghost, according to the chosen overall sign of the theory. On the other hand, if the Weyl symmetry is implemented by means of a Stueckelberg field we obtain a new scalar-tensor model for massive gravitons. It is ghost-free and Weyl invariant at the linearized level around Minkowski space. The model can be nonlinearly completed into a scalar field coupled to the NMG theory. The elimination of the scalar field leads to a nonlocal modification of the NMG. In the second part of the work we prove to all orders in derivatives that there is no local, ghost-free embedding of the linearized NMG equations of motion around Minkowski space when written in terms of one symmetric tensor. Regarding that point, NMG differs from the Fierz-Pauli theory, since in the latter case we can replace the Einstein-Hilbert action by specific f(R,Box R) generalizations and still keep the theory ghost-free at the linearized level.

  15. State of the art: massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, L M; Etchill, E W; Raval, J S; Neal, M D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article was to review recent developments in the resuscitation of both trauma and non-trauma patients in haemorrhagic shock. Strategies for the resuscitation of massively haemorrhaging patients and the use of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) have been a major focus of the trauma literature over the past several years. The application of haemostatic resuscitation practices and MTPs to non-trauma populations has long been in practice, but has only recently been the subject of active research. Medline and PubMed were reviewed for 'massive transfusion' (MT) from 2012 to present. Non-English and paediatric articles were excluded. Articles were systematically reviewed for their relevance to MT. There were eight major areas of development identified. In recent MT literature, there was an increased focus on massively haemorrhaging non-trauma patients, the role of acute traumatic coagulopathy, the use of thromboelastography (TEG), and the impact of MTPs on blood product waste and efficiency of product delivery. Other developments included additional MT prediction tools and The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. There was also interest in re-evaluating the clinical relevance of the current MT definition and identifying new foci for MT. These recent developments reflect efforts to better understand and manage non-traumatic haemorrhage and to address prior limitations in the trauma literature. Inevitably, new questions have been raised, which will likely direct ongoing and future research in MT.

  16. Modeling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brott, I.

    2011-02-01

    Massive stars can be considered as cosmic engines. With their high luminosities, strong stellar winds and violent deaths they drive the evolution of galaxies through-out the history of the universe. Despite the importance of massive stars, their evolution is still poorly understood. Two major issues have plagued evolutionary models of massive stars until today: mixing and mass loss On the main sequence, the effects of mass loss remain limited in the considered mass and metallicity range, this thesis concentrates on the role of mixing in massive stars. This thesis approaches this problem just on the cross road between observations and simulations. The main question: Do evolutionary models of single stars, accounting for the effects of rotation, reproduce the observed properties of real stars. In particular we are interested if the evolutionary models can reproduce the surface abundance changes during the main-sequence phase. To constrain our models we build a population synthesis model for the sample of the VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive stars, for which star-formation history and rotational velocity distribution are well constrained. We consider the four main regions of the Hunter diagram. Nitrogen un-enriched slow rotators and nitrogen enriched fast rotators that are predicted by theory. Nitrogen enriched slow rotators and nitrogen unenriched fast rotators that are not predicted by our model. We conclude that currently these comparisons are not sufficient to verify the theory of rotational mixing. Physical processes in addition to rotational mixing appear necessary to explain the stars in the later two regions. The chapters of this Thesis have been published in the following Journals: Ch. 2: ``Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars I: Grids of Evolutionary Models and Isochrones'', I. Brott, S. E. de Mink, M. Cantiello, N. Langer, A. de Koter, C. J. Evans, I. Hunter, C. Trundle, J.S. Vink submitted to Astronomy & Astrop hysics Ch. 3: ``The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive

  17. Topical perspective on massive threading and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Farber, Robert M

    2011-09-01

    Unquestionably computer architectures have undergone a recent and noteworthy paradigm shift that now delivers multi- and many-core systems with tens to many thousands of concurrent hardware processing elements per workstation or supercomputer node. GPGPU (General Purpose Graphics Processor Unit) technology in particular has attracted significant attention as new software development capabilities, namely CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) and OpenCL™, have made it possible for students as well as small and large research organizations to achieve excellent speedup for many applications over more conventional computing architectures. The current scientific literature reflects this shift with numerous examples of GPGPU applications that have achieved one, two, and in some special cases, three-orders of magnitude increased computational performance through the use of massive threading to exploit parallelism. Multi-core architectures are also evolving quickly to exploit both massive-threading and massive-parallelism such as the 1.3 million threads Blue Waters supercomputer. The challenge confronting scientists in planning future experimental and theoretical research efforts--be they individual efforts with one computer or collaborative efforts proposing to use the largest supercomputers in the world is how to capitalize on these new massively threaded computational architectures--especially as not all computational problems will scale to massive parallelism. In particular, the costs associated with restructuring software (and potentially redesigning algorithms) to exploit the parallelism of these multi- and many-threaded machines must be considered along with application scalability and lifespan. This perspective is an overview of the current state of threading and parallelize with some insight into the future. PMID:21764615

  18. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  19. High Resolution 4.7 Micron Keck/NIRSPEC Spectra of Protostars. 1; Ices and Infalling Gas in the Disk of L1489 IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Blake, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    We explore the infrared M band (4.7 micron) spectrum of the class I protostar L1489 IRS in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. This is the highest resolution wide coverage spectrum at this wavelength of a low mass protostar observed to date (R =25,000; (Delta)v =12 km s(exp -1). A large number of narrow absorption lines of gas phase (12)CO, (13)CO, and C(sup 18)O are detected, as well as a prominent band of solid (12)CO. The gas phase (12)CO lines have red shifted absorption wings (up to 100 km s(exp -1)), which likely originate from warm disk material falling toward the central object. Both the isotopes and the extent of the (12)CO line wings are successfully fitted with a contracting disk model of this evolutionary transitional object. This shows that the inward motions seen in millimeter wave emission lines continue to within approx. 0.1 AU from the star. The amount of high velocity infalling gas is however overestimated by this model, suggesting that only part of the disk is infalling, e.g. a hot surface layer or hot gas in magnetic field tubes. The colder parts of the disk are traced by the prominent CO ice band. The band profile results from CO in 'polar' ices (CO mixed with H2O), and CO in 'apolar' ices. At the high spectral resolution, the 'apolar' component is, for the first time, resolved into two distinct components, likely due to pure CO and CO mixed with CO2, O2 and/or N2. The ices have probably experienced thermal processing in the upper disk layer traced by our pencil absorption beam: much of the volatile 'apolar' ices has evaporated, the depletion factor of CO onto grains is remarkably low (approx. 7%), and the CO2 traced in the CO band profile was possibly formed energetically. This study shows that high spectral resolution 4.7 micron observations provide important and unique information on the dynamics and structure of protostellar disks and the origin and evolution of ices in these disks.

  20. [Implementation of a massive transfusion protocol in an emergency department].

    PubMed

    Tonglet, M; Minon, J M; Damas, F; Clanet, M; Vergnion, M

    2014-02-01

    We present here the massive transfusion protocol implemented in our institution in 2013. It will improve our management of critical massive bleeding, a situation which is rare in in our hospital, but carries a high mortality risk.

  1. G305.136+0.068: A Massive and Dense Cold Core in an Early Stage of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Guido; Mardones, Diego; Contreras, Yanett; Pineda, Jaime E.; Servajean, Elise; Guzmán, Andrés E.

    2015-01-01

    We report molecular line observations, made with ASTE and SEST, and dust continuum observations at 0.87 mm, made with APEX, toward the cold dust core G305.136+0.068. The molecular observations show that the core is isolated and roughly circularly symmetric and imply that it has a mass of 1.1 × 103 M ⊙. A simultaneous model fitting of the spectra observed in four transitions of CS, using a non-LTE radiative transfer code, indicates that the core is centrally condensed, with the density decreasing with radius as r -1.8, and that the turbulent velocity increases toward the center. The dust observations also indicate that the core is highly centrally condensed and that the average column density is 1.1 g cm-2, a value slightly above the theoretical threshold required for the formation of high-mass stars. A fit to the spectral energy distribution of the emission from the core indicates a dust temperature of 17 ± 2 K, confirming that the core is cold. Spitzer images show that the core is seen in silhouette from 3.6 to 24.0 μm and that it is surrounded by an envelope of emission, presumably tracing an externally excited photo-dissociated region. We found two embedded sources within a region of 20'' centered at the peak of the core, one of which is young, has a luminosity of 66 L ⊙, and is accreting mass with a high accretion rate of ~1 × 10-4 M ⊙ yr-1. We suggest that this object corresponds to the seed of a high-mass protostar still in the process of formation. The present observations support the hypothesis that G305.136+0.068 is a massive and dense cold core in an early stage of evolution, in which the formation of a high-mass star has just started.

  2. Massive nonplanar two-loop maximal unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søgaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2014-12-01

    We explore maximal unitarity for nonplanar two-loop integrals with up to four massive external legs. In this framework, the amplitude is reduced to a basis of master integrals whose coefficients are extracted from maximal cuts. The hepta-cut of the nonplanar double box defines a nodal algebraic curve associated with a multiply pinched genus-3 Riemann surface. All possible configurations of external masses are covered by two distinct topological pictures in which the curve decomposes into either six or eight Riemann spheres. The procedure relies on consistency equations based on vanishing of integrals of total derivatives and Levi-Civita contractions. Our analysis indicates that these constraints are governed by the global structure of the maximal cut. Lastly, we present an algorithm for computing generalized cuts of massive integrals with higher powers of propagators based on the Bezoutian matrix method.

  3. Superdense Massive Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Cenarro, A. Javier; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana; Vazdekis, Alexandre; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Cava, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Superdense massive galaxies (re ~ 1 kpc; M ~ 1011 M sun) were common in the early universe (z gsim 1.5). Within some hierarchical merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1%-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch, retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the present universe. Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re lsim 1.5 kpc and M sstarf gsim 8 × 1010 M sun in the local universe (z < 0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2 Gyr) and metal-rich ([Z/H] ~0.2). The consequences of these findings within the current two competing size evolution scenarios for the most massive galaxies ("dry" mergers vs. "puffing up" due to quasar activity) are discussed.

  4. The initial conditions of massive star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Massive stars are some of the most energetic building blocks of galaxies. They are the progenitors of supernovae and of neutrons stars and black holes, the coallescence of which is one of the most likely detectable sources of gravitational waves. Yet their formation remains poorly understood. As a consequence, the mechanisms that set initial parameters such as rotation rates, multiplicity and orbital distributions are also ill constrained. These quantities are however critical as they affect the internal mixing, the rate and nature of the interactions, the stars final fates and their end-of-life products. In this presentation, I will review existing and new observations that allow us to better constraints these parameters, hence the initial conditions for massive star evolution.

  5. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  6. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  7. Massive binaries in R136 using Hubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Nieves, Saida; Crowther, Paul; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Maíz Apellániz, Jesus

    2014-09-01

    We have undertaken a complete HST/STIS spectroscopic survey of R136, the young, central dense starburst cluster of the LMC 30 Doradus nebula, which hosts the most massive stars currently known. Our CCD datasets, comprising 17 adjacent 0.2"×52" long slits, were split across Cycles 19 and 20 to allow us to search for spectroscopic binaries. We will present the results of our survey, including a comparison with the massive-star population in the wider 30 Doradus region from the VLT Flames Tarantula survey. We will also describe upcoming HST/FGS observations, which will probe intermediate-separation binaries in R136, and discuss this cluster in the context of unresolved young extragalactic star clusters.

  8. Carcinoma of the cervix with massive eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Lowe, D G

    1988-04-01

    Massive local eosinophilia of 100 or more eosinophils per high power field was found in 3.2% cases of invasive carcinoma of the cervix. The prevalence, length of history before presentation to surgery and histological features were similar in patients from Great Britain and Malawi, but in both populations the mean age at diagnosis was lower than in patients with cervical carcinomas without tissue eosinophilia. In some of the tumours, the malignant cells were very difficult to find because of the eosinophil infiltrate, and misinterpretation as an inflammatory lesion was possible. In the absence of circulating eosinophilia, cervical carcinomas with massive eosinophilia were found to have a better prognosis than tumours without. Five patients had circulating eosinophilia as well as local tumour eosinophil infiltration, and each of them had extensive tumour spread.

  9. Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

    1999-05-06

    The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

  10. Massive mesons in Weyl-Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabotalebi, S.; Ahmadi, F.; Salehi, H.

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the mass generation of the vector fields in the framework of a conformal invariant gravitational model, the Weyl-Dirac theory is considered. The mass of the Weyl’s meson fields plays a principal role in this theory, it connects basically the conformal and gauge symmetries. We estimate this mass by using the large-scale characteristics of the observed universe. To do this we firstly specify a preferred conformal frame as a cosmological frame, then in this frame, we introduce an exact possible solution of the theory. We also study the dynamical effect of the massive vector meson fields on the trajectories of an elementary particle. We show that a local change of the cosmological frame leads to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation describing a particle with an adjustable mass. The dynamical effect of the massive vector meson field presents itself in the form of a correction term for the mass of the particle.

  11. Cosmological perturbations in extended massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji; Trodden, Mark

    2013-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations around self-accelerating solutions to two extensions of nonlinear massive gravity: the quasi-dilaton theory and the mass-varying theory. We examine stability of the cosmological solutions, and the extent to which the vanishing of the kinetic terms for scalar and vector perturbations of self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity is generic when the theory is extended. We find that these kinetic terms are in general nonvanishing in both extensions, though there are constraints on the parameters and background evolution from demanding that they have the correct sign. In particular, the self-accelerating solutions of the quasi-dilaton theory are always unstable to scalar perturbations with wavelength shorter than the Hubble length.

  12. Very Massive Stars in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Heger, Alexander; Krumholz, Mark R.; Puls, Joachim; Banerjee, S.; Castro, N.; Chen, K.-J.; Chenè, A.-N.; Crowther, P. A.; Daminelli, A.; Gräfener, G.; Groh, J. H.; Hamann, W.-R.; Heap, S.; Herrero, A.; Kaper, L.; Najarro, F.; Oskinova, L. M.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Rosen, A.; Sander, A.; Shirazi, M.; Sugawara, Y.; Tramper, F.; Vanbeveren, D.; Voss, R.; Wofford, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have claimed the existence of very massive stars (VMS) up to 300 M ⊙ in the local Universe. As this finding may represent a paradigm shift for the canonical stellar upper-mass limit of 150 M ⊙, it is timely to discuss the status of the data, as well as the far-reaching implications of such objects. We held a Joint Discussion at the General Assembly in Beijing to discuss (i) the determination of the current masses of the most massive stars, (ii) the formation of VMS, (iii) their mass loss, and (iv) their evolution and final fate. The prime aim was to reach broad consensus between observers and theorists on how to identify and quantify the dominant physical processes.

  13. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  14. Massive Smash-up at Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist concept illustrates how a massive collision of objects perhaps as large as the planet Pluto smashed together to create the dust ring around the nearby star Vega. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicate the collision took place within the last one million years. Astronomers think that embryonic planets smashed together, shattered into pieces, and repeatedly crashed into other fragments to create ever finer debris.

    In the image, a collision is seen between massive objects that measured up to 2,000 kilometers (about 1,200 miles) in diameter. Scientists say the big collision initiated subsequent collisions that created dust particles around the star that were a few microns in size. Vega's intense light blew these fine particles to larger distances from the star, and also warmed them to emit heat radiation that can be detected by Spitzer's infrared detectors.

  15. The Stellar Halos of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' × 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of ~20-70 pixel-1 in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions σ* > 150 km s-1, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by ~50%, and only a weak correlation between σ* and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are ~ an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 Re , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high α-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  16. Massive Multi-Agent Systems Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campagne, Jean-Charles; Gardon, Alain; Collomb, Etienne; Nishida, Toyoaki

    2004-01-01

    In order to build massive multi-agent systems, considered as complex and dynamic systems, one needs a method to analyze and control the system. We suggest an approach using morphology to represent and control the state of large organizations composed of a great number of light software agents. Morphology is understood as representing the state of the multi-agent system as shapes in an abstract geometrical space, this notion is close to the notion of phase space in physics.

  17. Have massive cosmological neutrinos already been detected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility is investigated that the decay of massive cosmological neutrinos may have produced a spectral signature which has already been detected in observations of the ultraviolet background radiation. Various implications are discussed including a possible implied neutrino mass of 13.8-14.8 eV. A lower limit is also placed on the lifetime of heavy neutrinos with respect to decay into light neutrinos and gamma rays based on the cosmic UV observations.

  18. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  19. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  20. Antenna Splitting Functions for Massive Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    An antenna shower is a parton shower in which the basic move is a color-coherent 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting process. In this paper, we give compact forms for the spin-dependent antenna splitting functions involving massive partons of spin 0 and spin 1/2. We hope that this formalism we have presented will be useful in describing the QCD dynamics of the top quark and other heavy particles at LHC.

  1. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  2. Comments on the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, M. F.; The, L.-S.; Meyer, B. S.

    We describe in a brief form present results we have obtained from a careful and up to date study of the evolution of massive stars including their advanced evolutionary phases beyond the oxygen burning phase. We describe the effects of mass loss, treatment of convection in inhomogeneous stellar layers and the rate of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction on the properties of stellar models in the interesting case of a 25 M⊙ star of solar-like initial metallicity.

  3. Massive graph visualization : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, Brian Neil; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2007-10-01

    Graphs are a vital way of organizing data with complex correlations. A good visualization of a graph can fundamentally change human understanding of the data. Consequently, there is a rich body of work on graph visualization. Although there are many techniques that are effective on small to medium sized graphs (tens of thousands of nodes), there is a void in the research for visualizing massive graphs containing millions of nodes. Sandia is one of the few entities in the world that has the means and motivation to handle data on such a massive scale. For example, homeland security generates graphs from prolific media sources such as television, telephone, and the Internet. The purpose of this project is to provide the groundwork for visualizing such massive graphs. The research provides for two major feature gaps: a parallel, interactive visualization framework and scalable algorithms to make the framework usable to a practical application. Both the frameworks and algorithms are designed to run on distributed parallel computers, which are already available at Sandia. Some features are integrated into the ThreatView{trademark} application and future work will integrate further parallel algorithms.

  4. Hyper massive black holes in evolved galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cruz, Fernando J.

    2015-09-01

    From the SDSS DR7 we took a sample of 16733 galaxies which do not show all of the emission lines required to classify their activity according to the classical BPT diagram (Baldwin et al. 1981 PASP). Since they do not show these emission lines they are thought to be evolved enough so to host Hyper Massive Black holes. We compared their statistical properties with other galaxies from the SDSS DR7 which do show emission lines and confirmed that their M-sigma relationship correspond to HMBHs (Gutelkin et al. 2009 ApJ) and also that their SFH confirms evolution. We also analyzed them with a new Diagnostic Diagram in the IR (Coziol et al. 2015 AJ) and found that their position in the IR color space (W3W4 vs W2W3) correspond to AGN activity with current low SF, another confirmation of an evolved galaxy. The position of our final sample in the IR diagram is in the same region in which Holm 15A lies, this galaxy is considered to host the most massive BHs in the nearby universe (Lopez-Cruz et al. 2014 ApJL). The morphology of these galaxies (all of them are classified as elliptical) confirms that they are very evolved. We claim that the hyper massive BH lie in galaxies very evolved and with very low SF and without clear AGN activity in the BPT diagram.

  5. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  6. Radio jet interactions with massive clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Wang, Zhongxiang; Hooda, Jagbir S.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of light hydrodynamic jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. We employ parameters corresponding to moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. These simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive dense clouds within the galactic halo. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and nominally correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for the off-center collisions considered, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. Slow, dense jets may be bent, yet remain stable for fairly extended times, thereby explaining some Wide-Angle-Tail and most "dog-leg" morphologies.

  7. Radio Jet Interactions with Massive Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wiita, P. J.; Joyce, J.; Hooda, J. S.

    1998-12-01

    Rather high resolution three-dimensional simulations of hydrodynamical jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. The parameters we employ are suitable for moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. Before they cross this interface, these simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive clouds within the galactic halo, with densities 10 or more times higher than the ambient atmospheric density, and 100's of times the jet density. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and could correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for off-center collisions, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets crossing tilted interfaces in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions, particularly with weaker jets, could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. The possibility of jets being bent, yet remaining stable, after such collisions is also investigated. This work was supported by NPACI allocation GSU200 on the Cray T90 and by RPE funds at Georgia State University.

  8. Massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage: Surgical management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Thomas; Brockmann, Claudia; Bornfeld, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe options for vitreoretinal surgery in the management of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage (SCH). Methods: Visual acuity (VA), ocular findings, timing of surgical intervention, surgical procedures, and outcomes of four patients diagnosed with massive SCH and admitted to the University Eye Clinic Essen were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Four eyes of four patients (mean age, 82 years; range, 74–89 years) were studied. In three cases the occurrence of SCH was related to cataract surgery and occurred intra- or postoperatively. One patient developed spontaneous SCH of unclear origin. Three patients had a history of arterial hypertension; one eye had high myopia, two patients suffered from cardiovascular diseases, and two patients had glaucoma. Postoperative follow up of the patients ranged from 5 to 29.5 months (mean, 19.6 months). Transscleral drainage of SCH was in all cases combined with pars plana vitrectomy, use of heavy liquids (perfluorodecalin) and silicone oil tamponade. The mean time interval from hemorrhage to surgical intervention was 16.5 days (range 5–29 days). Preoperative VA of all eyes was light perception. Two patients achieved a final postoperative visual acuity of 20/20 and 20/320, respectively, one patient improved to hand motion, and one patient resulted in no light perception. Conclusions: Surgical interventions including transscleral drainage of SCH, vitrectomy, and silicone oil tamponade are valuable options in the management of massive SCH to save the eye and possibly improve the otherwise extreme poor prognosis.

  9. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  10. [Albumin and artificial colloids for massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and massive bleeding has to be counteracted by efficient volume restoration against rapid loss of intravascular volume. There are two phases of volume management for massive bleeding, uncontrolled phase and controlled phase. During initial uncontrolled phase, rapid infusion of crystalloid with RCC (red cell concentrate) is the first choice of volume management to prevent shock and profound decline of hemoglobin level. After shifting to the next controlled phase, artificial colloids and RCC become the next choice for efficient volume restoration. Although albumin has not been proven to improve prognosis in clinical studies, anti-inflammatory effect could be expected. Albumin infusion may be followed in this phase, and also albumin concentrate may be beneficial to reduce subsequent tissue edema due to massive infusion of crystalloid and artificial colloid. A new generation of hydroxyethyl starch is a promising blood substitute, designed with minimum side effect. Although renal damage especially in septic patient and coagulation disorder are theoretically suspected, beneficial effect as volume expansion overwhelms these stochastic side effects. Since the side effect depends on the dose and how much it remains in the body, a purposeful use during volume expansion phase should be recommended.

  11. On General Relativity with Massive Graviton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    We begin this thesis by studying the properties of horizons in the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley model of massive GR. In massive gravity the generic black hole (BH) solutions on Minkowski space happen to convert horizons into a certain type of singularities. Here we explore whether these singularities can be avoided if space-time is not asymptotically Minkowskian. We find an exact analytic BH solution which evades the above problem by a transition at large scales to self-induced de Sitter (dS) space-time, with the curvature scale set by the graviton mass. The solution demonstrates that in massive GR, in the Schwarzschild coordinate system, a BH metric has to be accompanied by the Stückelberg fields with nontrivial backgrounds to prevent the horizons to convert into the singularities. We also find an analogous solution for a Reissner-Nordström BH on dS space. The second part concerns with the geometrical construction of massive gravity. Namely, the theory of gravity with an auxiliary extra dimension is known to give a ghost-free cubic completion of the Fierz-Pauli mass term in the decoupling limit. Yet, the theory propagates ghost in quartic order and beyond. Our work proposes a completion of the boundary condition in the auxiliary dimension that avoids ghosts order-by-order in the decoupling limit. Furthermore, we show that the multi-dimensional extension, with the rotationally invariant boundaries of the bulk, is equivalent to the model with a single auxiliary dimension. Therefore, all these constructions require the appropriate adjustment of the boundary condition. The other possible extension of the original model, by the Gauss-Bonnet term, is studied as well. In the last part we analyze the models known as "gravitational Higgs theories" against instabilities. We show that these models, although seemingly different from the effective field theories of massive gravity, are in fact equivalent to them. We also show the equivalence between the non-covariant mode

  12. Hydrodynamical simulations of realistic massive cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, David J.; Henson, Monique A.; Kay, Scott T.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Bahe, Yannick M.; Eagle Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Galaxy clusters are seeded by density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow via hierarchical collapse to become the most massive virialised objects we observed today. They are powerful probes that study both cosmology and astrophysical processes. Their internal structure at the current epoch is the result of a non-trivial interplay between gravitational collapse and the energy fed into the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). These processes shape the ICM during its formation at high redshift, but current observations of galaxy clusters are limited to z<0.5. The resolution and sensitivity of textit{Athena+} will allow it to study galaxy clusters in unprecedented detail. It will constrain cluster properties, such as its entropy, temperature and gas fraction, out to z˜2, enabling it to investigate the progenitors of today's massive clusters and observing the evolution of the properties of the ICM for the first time. Athena+ will produce a significant change in our understanding of the formation of galaxy clusters. Recently the theoretical modelling of clusters has advanced significantly and issues, such as the 'cooling catastophea', have been overcome by including feedback from star formation and AGN. We present the MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures (MACSIS) project. The MACSIS project is a representative sample of 390 of galaxy clusters, with M_{FOF} > 10(15} M_{⊙) , re-simulated using the cosmo-OWLS model (Le Brun et al. 2014, McCarthy et al. in prep.) to extend it to the most massive and rarest objects. We demonstrate that this sample reproduces the scaling relations, with intrinsic scatter, observed with current instruments at low redshift. Under the hierarchical paradigm, the progenitors of these systems will be the first objects to collapse at high redshift and we examine to z=2 how the scaling relations of these massive objects evolve with redshift. Finally, we investigate methods of defining a

  13. Massive Stars in the Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; McLean, Ian S.; Morris, Mark

    1999-03-01

    We present near-infrared photometry and K-band spectra of newly identified massive stars in the Quintuplet cluster, one of the three massive clusters projected within 50 pc of the Galactic center. We find that the cluster contains a variety of massive stars, including more unambiguously identified Wolf-Rayet stars than any cluster in the Galaxy, and over a dozen stars in earlier stages of evolution, i.e., luminous blue variables (LBVs), Ofpe/WN9, and OB supergiants. One newly identified star is the second luminous blue variable in the cluster, after the ``Pistol star.'' Although we are unable to provide certain spectral classifications for the five enigmatic Quintuplet-proper members, we tentatively propose that they are extremely dusty versions of the WC stars found elsewhere in the cluster and similar to the dozen or so known examples in the Galaxy. Although the cluster parameters are uncertain because of photometric errors and uncertainties in stellar models, i.e., extrapolating initial masses and estimating ionizing fluxes, we have the following conclusions. Given the evolutionary stages of the identified stars, the cluster appears to be about 4+/-1 Myr old, assuming coeval formation. The total mass in observed stars is ~103 Msolar, and the implied mass is ~104 Msolar, assuming a lower mass cutoff of 1 Msolar and a Salpeter initial mass function. The implied mass density in stars is greater than or similar to a few thousand Msolar pc-3. The newly identified stars increase the estimated ionizing flux from this cluster by about an order of magnitude with respect to earlier estimates, to 1050.9 photons s-1, or roughly what is required to ionize the nearby ``Sickle'' H II region (G0.18-0.04). The total luminosity from the massive cluster stars is ~107.5 Lsolar, enough to account for the heating of the nearby molecular cloud, M0.20-0.033. We propose a picture that integrates most of the major features in this part of the sky, excepting the nonthermal filaments. We

  14. MASSIVE TRANSFUSION PROTOCOL: STANDARDIZING CARE TO IMPROVE PATIENT OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Porteous, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Providing rapid response is a primary goal when caring for surgical patients with injuries involving massive blood loss. Massive transfusion protocols have been developed in some tertiary care health care facilities to ensure a rapid and efficient response in the provision of care to patients with a massive and uncontrolled hemorrhage. The purpose of this article is to discuss a massive transfusion protocol and to describe the process used to implement a massive transfusion protocol at Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre (the site) as well as to describe its impact in the operating room department. PMID:26310036

  15. MASSIVE TRANSFUSION PROTOCOL: STANDARDIZING CARE TO IMPROVE PATIENT OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Porteous, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Providing rapid response is a primary goal when caring for surgical patients with injuries involving massive blood loss. Massive transfusion protocols have been developed in some tertiary care health care facilities to ensure a rapid and efficient response in the provision of care to patients with a massive and uncontrolled hemorrhage. The purpose of this article is to discuss a massive transfusion protocol and to describe the process used to implement a massive transfusion protocol at Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre (the site) as well as to describe its impact in the operating room department.

  16. A VERY LARGE TELESCOPE/NACO STUDY OF STAR FORMATION IN THE MASSIVE EMBEDDED CLUSTER RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, K. L.; Bourke, T. L.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Wolk, S. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Alves, J.

    2009-07-15

    We present the results of high angular resolution adaptive optics (AO) near-infrared (JHK{sub s} ) observations of the deeply embedded massive cluster RCW 38 using NACO on the Very Large Telescope. Narrowband AO observations centered at wavelengths of 1.28 {mu}m, 2.12 {mu}m, and 2.17 {mu}m were also obtained. The area covered by these observations is about 0.5 pc{sup 2}, centered on the O-star RCW 38 IRS 2. We use the JHK{sub s} colors to identify young stars with infrared (IR) excess in this region. Through a detailed comparison to a nearby control field, we find that most of the 337 stars detected in all three IR bands are cluster members ({approx}317), with essentially no contamination due to background (likely due to the high cluster extinction of A{sub V} {approx} 15) or foreground sources. Five sources with three band detections have colors suggestive of deeply embedded protostars, while 53 sources are detected at K{sub s} only; their spatial distribution with respect to the extinction suggests they are highly reddened cluster members but their evolutionary status is unclear. Detectable K{sub s} -band excess is found toward 29% {+-} 3% of the stars. For comparison to a similar area of Orion Nebula Cluster observed in the near-IR, mass and extinction cuts are applied, and the excess fractions redetermined. The resulting excesses are then 25% {+-} 5% for RCW 38, and 42% {+-} 8% for Orion. RCW 38 IRS 2 is shown to be a massive star binary with a projected separation of {approx}500 AU. Two regions of molecular hydrogen emission are revealed through the 2.12 {mu}m imaging. One of these shows a morphology suggestive of a protostellar jet, and is clearly associated with a star only detected at H and K{sub s} , and previously identified as a highly obscured X-ray source. Three spatially extended cometary-like objects, suggestive of photoevaporating disks, are identified, but only one is clearly directly influenced by RCW 38 IRS 2. The structure of the inner core of

  17. Birth of Massive Black Hole Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Dotti, M.; Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-19

    If massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in galaxies and galaxies experience multiple mergers during their cosmic assembly, then BH binaries should be common albeit temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observationally, the paucity of active BH pairs points toward binary lifetimes far shorter than the Hubble time, indicating rapid inspiral of the BHs down to the domain where gravitational waves lead to their coalescence. Here, we review a series of studies on the dynamics of massive BHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers that underscore the vital role played by a cool, gaseous component in promoting the rapid formation of the BH binary. The BH binary is found to reside at the center of a massive self-gravitating nuclear disc resulting from the collision of the two gaseous discs present in the mother galaxies. Hardening by gravitational torques against gas in this grand disc is found to continue down to sub-parsec scales. The eccentricity decreases with time to zero and when the binary is circular, accretion sets in around the two BHs. When this occurs, each BH is endowed with it own small-size ({approx}< 0.01 pc) accretion disc comprising a few percent of the BH mass. Double AGN activity is expected to occur on an estimated timescale of {approx}< 1 Myr. The double nuclear point-like sources that may appear have typical separation of {approx}< 10 pc, and are likely to be embedded in the still ongoing starburst. We note that a potential threat of binary stalling, in a gaseous environment, may come from radiation and/or mechanical energy injections by the BHs. Only short-lived or sub-Eddington accretion episodes can guarantee the persistence of a dense cool gas structure around the binary necessary for continuing BH inspiral.

  18. Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

  19. Body contouring following massive weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Vijay; Singh, Amitabh; Aly, Al S.; Cram, Albert E.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a global disease with epidemic proportions. Bariatric surgery or modified lifestyles go a long way in mitigating the vast weight gain. Patients following these interventions usually undergo massive weight loss. This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body. Loose skin causes increased morbidity and psychological trauma. This demands various body contouring procedures that are usually excisional. These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon. As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them. PMID:21713202

  20. Covariant constraints in ghost free massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, C.; Mourad, J.; Zahariade, G. E-mail: mourad@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-01-01

    We show that the reformulation of the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity theory using vielbeins leads to a very simple and covariant way to count constraints, and hence degrees of freedom. Our method singles out a subset of theories, in the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley family, where an extra constraint, needed to eliminate the Boulware Deser ghost, is easily seen to appear. As a side result, we also introduce a new method, different from the Stuckelberg trick, to extract kinetic terms for the polarizations propagating in addition to those of the massless graviton.

  1. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Kentaro; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation. PMID:27738545

  2. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  3. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

  4. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  5. Investigations in massive 3D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayeel-Neto, Jose; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Scatena, Eslley

    2011-05-15

    Some interesting gravitational properties of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend model (massive 3D gravity), such as the presence of a short-range gravitational force in the nonrelativistic limit and the existence of an impact-parameter-dependent gravitational deflection angle, are studied. Interestingly enough, these phenomena have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity. In order to better understand the two aforementioned gravitational properties, they are also analyzed in the framework of 3D higher-derivative gravity with the Einstein-Hilbert term with the 'wrong sign'.

  6. Searching for Massive Photons with Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Neyenhuis, Brian; Christensen, Dan

    2008-05-01

    We will discuss an ion interferometer under construction that should enable the detection of a possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. In the apparatus a beam of ^87Sr^+ ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions inside of a conducting cylinder. Deviations from Coulomb's law can then be detected by measuring the phase shift of the interferometer as the potential applied to the conducting cylinder is changed. We will discuss both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons.

  7. Instability considerations for massive star eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of 'supernova imposters' such as {eta} Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be very deep-seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core grow slowly to sufficient amplitude to cause an episode of mixing. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy deep in the star that is responsible for the observed large mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  8. A massive early atmosphere on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nolan, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of an early greenhouse atmosphere for Triton is presented and the conditions under which it may have been sustained are quantified. The volatile content of primordial Triton is modeled, and tidal heating rates are assessed to set bounds on the available energy. The atmospheric model formalism is presented, and it is shown how a massive atmosphere could have been raised by modest tidal heating fluxes. The implications of the model atmospheres for the atmospheric escape rates, the chemical evolution, and the cratering record are addressed.

  9. A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    We present a new quasidilaton theory of Poincare invariant massive gravity, based on the recently proposed framework of matter coupling that makes it possible for the kinetic energy of the quasidilaton scalar to couple to both physical and fiducial metrics simultaneously. We find a scaling-type exact solution that expresses a self-accelerating de Sitter universe, and then analyze linear perturbations around it. It is shown that in a range of parameters all physical degrees of freedom have non-vanishing quadratic kinetic terms and are stable in the subhorizon limit, while the effective Newton's constant for the background is kept positive.

  10. Treatment of massive haematuria with aluminous salts.

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, M; Extramiana, J; Parra, J L; Ramos, C; Díaz González, R; Leiva, O

    1987-09-01

    Fifteen patients with massive vesical haematuria were treated with a 1% aluminium potassium sulphate solution in sterile distilled water, using continuous intravesical lavage with a double channel catheter. The haematuria was caused by vesical tumours in 13 patients, radiation cystitis in one and transurethral resection in one. Immediate side effects were few and none were noted in the long term, as judged by randomised biopsies from vesical mucosa. A complete response was noted in 66% of the patients, partial response in 15% and failure in 20%. This treatment is recommended for intractable bleeding from radiation cystitis and bladder tumours. PMID:3676666

  11. The exceptional story of massive IIA supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, Franz; Guarino, Adolfo; Inverso, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    The framework of exceptional field theory is extended by introducing consistent deformations of its generalised Lie derivative. For the first time, massive type IIA super-gravity is reproduced geometrically as a solution of the section constraint. This provides a unified description of all ten- and eleven-dimensional maximal supergravities. The actionof the E7(7) deformed theory is constructed, and reduces to those of exceptional field theory and gauged maximal supergravity in respective limits. The relation of this new framework to other approaches for generating the Romans mass non-geometrically is discussed.

  12. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  13. Herschel-HIFI view of mid-IR quiet massive protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpin, F.; Chavarría, L.; Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Baudry, A.; Bontemps, S.; Kristensen, L.; Schmalzl, M.; Mata, J.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 14 water lines in a small sample of Galactic massive protostellar objects: NGC 6334I(N), DR21(OH), IRAS 16272-4837, and IRAS 05358+3543. Using water as a tracer of the structure and kinematics, we individually study each of these objects with the aim to estimate the amount of water around them, but to also to shed light on the high-mass star formation process. Methods: We analyzed the gas dynamics from the line profiles using Herschel-HIFI observations acquired as part of the WISH key-project of 14 far-IR water lines (H_216O, H_217O, H_218O) and several other species. Then through modeling the observations using the RATRAN radiative transfer code, we estimated outflow, infall, turbulent velocities, and molecular abundances and investigated the correlation with the evolutionary status of each source. Results: The four sources (and the previously studied W43-MM1) have been ordered in terms of evolution based on their spectral energy distribution from youngest to older: 1) NGC 64334I(N); 2) W43-MM1; 3) DR21(OH); 4) IRAS 16272-4837; 5) IRAS 05358+3543. The molecular line profiles exhibit a broad component coming from the shocks along the cavity walls that is associated with the protostars, and an infalling (or expanding, for IRAS 05358+3543) and passively heated envelope component, with highly supersonic turbulence that probably increases with the distance from the center. Accretion rates between 6.3 × 10-5 and 5.6 × 10-4M⊙ yr-1 are derived from the infall observed in three of our sources. The outer water abundance is estimated to be at the typical value of a few 10-8, while the inner abundance varies from 1.7 × 10-6 to 1.4 × 10-4 with respect to H2 depending on the source. Conclusions: We confirm that regions of massive star formation are highly turbulent and that the turbulence probably increases in the envelope with the distance to the star. The inner abundances are lower than the expected, 10-4, perhaps because

  14. Two cases of asymptomatic massive fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Peedin, Alexis R; Mazepa, Marshall A; Park, Yara A; Weimer, Eric T; Schmitz, John L; Raval, Jay S

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) in the immediate postpartum period is critical for the timely administration of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) prophylaxis to minimize the risk of alloimmunization in D-negative mothers of D-positive newborns. We report a series of two clinically-unsuspected cases of massive FMHs identified at our university medical center. Retrospective records of two cases of massive FMH were investigated using the electronic medical record. After positive fetal bleed screens, flow cytometric analysis for hemoglobin F was performed to quantify the volume of the hemorrhages in both cases. Flow cytometric enumeration with anti-D was also performed in one case. The two patients had 209.5 and 75 mL of fetal blood in circulation, resulting in 8 and 4 doses of RhIG administered, respectively. For the former patient, flow cytometric analysis with anti-D ruled out hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and supported the fetal origin of the red cells. Due to the clinically-silent nature of both hemorrhages, further evaluation of the newborns' blood was not performed. These cases highlight the importance of rapidly obtaining accurate measurements of fetal blood loss via flow cytometric analysis in cases of FMH, particularly in clinically-unsuspected cases, to ensure timely administration of adequate immunoprophylaxis to D-negative mothers. PMID:25736586

  15. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Schryver, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  16. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  17. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  18. Fracture simulations via massively parallel molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.; Abraham, F.F.; Ravelo, R.

    1993-09-01

    Fracture simulations at the atomistic level have heretofore been carried out for relatively small systems of particles, typically 10,000 or less. In order to study anything approaching a macroscopic system, massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) must be employed. In two spatial dimensions (2D), it is feasible to simulate a sample that is 0.1 {mu}m on a side. We report on recent MD simulations of mode I crack extension under tensile loading at high strain rates. The method of uniaxial, homogeneously expanding periodic boundary conditions was employed to represent tensile stress conditions near the crack tip. The effects of strain rate, temperature, material properties (equation of state and defect energies), and system size were examined. We found that, in order to mimic a bulk sample, several tricks (in addition to expansion boundary conditions) need to be employed: (1) the sample must be pre-strained to nearly the condition at which the crack will spontaneously open; (2) to relieve the stresses at free surfaces, such as the initial notch, annealing by kinetic-energy quenching must be carried out to prevent unwanted rarefactions; (3) sound waves emitted as the crack tip opens and dislocations emitted from the crack tip during blunting must be absorbed by special reservoir regions. The tricks described briefly in this paper will be especially important to carrying out feasible massively parallel 3D simulations via MD.

  19. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  20. Massive Star Formation: The Role of Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallscheer, Cassandra L.; Beuther, H.; Sauter, J.; Wolf, S.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E.; Sridharan, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained multiple data sets from the SMA, PdBI, and IRAM 30m telescope of the Infrared Dark Cloud IRDC18223-3, the High-Mass Protostellar Object IRAS18151-1208, and the hot core source IRAS18507+0121 in order to search for clues regarding the role of rotation and disks in high mass star formation. These three objects allow us to compare the central-most regions surrounding the embedded continuum source at three different evolutionary stages of the formation process. Toward all three regions we see rotational or elongated structures perpendicular to the molecular outflows. Similarities and differences in the evolutionary sequence are discussed in the context of core and disk evolution. We have also carried out continuum and line radiative transfer modeling of the disk-like structures. Having a more complete picture of the evolutionary process that a massive star experiences will contribute significantly to the future of massive star formation research. Support for this project comes from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the International Max-Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg.

  1. Massive Science with VO and Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, R.; Smith, G.; Miller, C.; Freeman, P.; Genovese, C.; Wasserman, L.; Bryan, B.; Gray, A.; Schneider, J.; Moore, A.

    2006-07-01

    There is a growing need for massive computational resources for the analysis of new astronomical datasets. To tackle this problem, we present here our first steps towards marrying two new and emerging technologies; the Virtual Observatory (e.g, AstroGrid) and the computational grid (e.g. TeraGrid, COSMOS etc.). We discuss the construction of VOTechBroker, which is a modular software tool designed to abstract the tasks of submission and management of a large number of computational jobs to a distributed computer system. The broker will also interact with the AstroGrid workflow and MySpace environments. We discuss our planned usages of the VOTechBroker in computing a huge number of n--point correlation functions from the SDSS data and massive model-fitting of millions of CMBfast models to WMAP data. We also discuss other applications including the determination of the XMM Cluster Survey selection function and the construction of new WMAP maps.

  2. Exact supersymmetric massive and massless white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei

    1995-12-01

    We study special points in the moduli space of vacua at which supersymmetric electric solutions of the heterotic string theory become massless. We concentrate on configurations for which the supersymmetric nonrenormalization theorem is valid. These are ten-dimensional supersymmetric string waves and generalized fundamental strings with SO(8) holonomy group. From these we find the four-dimensional spherically symmetric configurations which saturate the BPS bound, in particular, near the points of the vanishing ADM mass. The nontrivial massless supersymmetric states in this class exist only in the presence of non-Abelian vector fields. We also find a new class of supersymmetric massive solutions, closely related to the massless ones. A distinctive property of all these objects, either massless or massive, is the existence of gravitational repulsion. They reflect all particles with nonvanishing mass and/or angular momentum, and therefore they can be called white holes (repulsons), in contrast with black holes which tend to absorb particles of all kinds. If such objects can exist we will have the first realization of the universal gravitational force which repels all particles with the strength proportional to their mass and therefore can be associated with antigravity.

  3. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective. PMID:27184441

  4. [Surgical decompression for massive cerebellar infarction].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, K; Koshu, K; Nagamine, Y; Fujiwara, S; Mizoi, K; Yoshimoto, T

    1995-01-01

    The authors report 10 patients with progressive neurological deterioration due to massive cerebellar infarctions. Computerized tomography scans confirmed obstructive hydrocephalus and brain stem compression. All 10 patients (seven men, three women; mean age, 59 years) were treated by external ventricular drainage and decompressive suboccipital craniectomy. After discharge from the hospital, they were followed up (23-101 months) and their functional independence was evaluated by the Barthel Index. The condition of three patients with brain-stem infarction had deteriorated despite decompressive surgery. Two of these died during the acute stage and one because severely disabled. The remaining seven patients showed neurological improvement during the postoperative period. Four patients with preoperative Japan Coma Scale of 100 returned to their previous jobs within the follow-up period and three patients with preoperative Japan Coma Scale of 200 required some assistance in daily activities. It is suggested that decompressive surgery may be beneficial for massive cerebellar infarction. The postoperative prognosis depends mainly on the presence or absence of coexisting brain-stem infarction. It is possible that, without brain-stem infarction, patients who remained in a "dependent" state may have recovered better if they had been operated on earlier.

  5. Circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; van Marle, A. J.; Marcowith, A.

    2013-11-01

    The massive stars are formed in clusters then numerical models of wind-blown bubble should evolve bubble created by several stars. Aims. We develop a two-dimensional (2D) model of the circumstellar bubble created by two massive stars, a 40 M_{odot} star and a 25 M_{odot} star, and follow its evolution with MPI-AMRVAC hydrodynamics code until the end of the stellar evolution and he supernova explosion of each star. The stars are separated by approximately 16 pc and surrounded by a cold medium with a density of 20 particles per cm3. The simulations showed that the evolution of a wind-blown bubble created by two stars deviates from that of the bubbles around single stars. In particular, once one of the stars has exploded, the bubble is too large for the wind of the remaining star to maintain and the outer shell starts to disintegrate. The lack of thermal pressure inside the bubble also changes the behavior of circumstellar features close to the remaining star. The supernovae are contained inside the bubble, which reflects part of the energy back into the circumstellar medium.

  6. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter. PMID:27015472

  7. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: laviniah@kth.se

    2015-12-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  8. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  9. Seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.A.; Womble, D.E.; Mosher, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    A key to reducing the risks and costs associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Pre-stack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar-wave equation using finite differences. Current industry computational capabilities are insufficient for the application of finite-difference, 3-D, prestack, depth-migration algorithms. High performance computers and state-of-the-art algorithms and software are required to meet this need. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, the authors have developed a finite-difference, 3-D prestack, depth-migration code for massively parallel computer systems. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers (thousands of processors) can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite-difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration.

  10. Massive intrathoracic lipoma in men1 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Giudici, Francesco; Alemanno, Giovanni; Cavalli, Tiziana; Addasi, Rami; Santomaggio, Carmine; Meoni, Giulia; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Tonelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by the onset of hyperparathyroidism, gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and pituitary lesions. Presentation of case This appears to be the first described case of a massive intrathoracic lipoma in MEN1. The patient was affected with primary hyperparathyroidism treated with a total parathyroidectomy followed by a distal pancreatectomy for insulinoma. At follow-up, the computed tomography showed a massive lesion on the left emithorax suggestive of a lipoma. At the onset of a mild dyspnea we decided to perform the surgical excision of the mass obtaining a complete relief of the symptoms. Discussion This case is evidence of the importance of a strict follow-up of such patients. Conclusion Lipomas are the most frequent benign soft tissue tumors. They are usually sporadic but are sometimes related to hereditary syndromes. Intrathoracic localizations are rare and can arise mainly in the mediastinum, bronchus or lung. The diagnosis is often incidental; despite preoperative imaging will accurately show the features of the lesions, it is impossible obtain an accurate diagnosis-hence, the treatment of choice remains the surgical excision. PMID:25545711

  11. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  12. The hot core towards the intermediate-mass protostar NGC 7129 FIRS 2. Chemical similarities with Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, A.; Cernicharo, J.; Caselli, P.; McCoey, C.; Johnstone, D.; Fich, M.; van Kempen, T.; Palau, Aina; Yıldız, U. A.; Tercero, B.; López, A.

    2014-08-01

    Context. This paper is dedicated to the study of the chemistry of the intermediate-mass (IM) hot core NGC 7129 FIRS 2, probably the most compact warm core found in the 2-8 M⊙ stellar mass range. Aims: Our aim is to determine the chemical composition of the IM hot core NGC 7129 FIRS 2, and to provide new insights on the chemistry of hot cores in a more general context. Methods: NGC 7129 FIRS 2 (hereafter, FIRS 2) is located at a distance of 1250 pc and high spatial resolution observations are required to resolve the hot core at its center. We present a molecular survey from 218 200 MHz to 221 800 MHz carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). These observations were complemented with a long integration single-dish spectrum taken with the IRAM 30 m telescope in Pico de Veleta (Spain). We used a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) single temperature code to model the whole dataset. Results: The interferometric spectrum is crowded with a total of ≈300 lines from which a few dozen remain unidentified. The spectrum has been modeled with a total of 20 species and their isomers, isotopologues, and deuterated compounds. Complex molecules like methyl formate (CH3OCHO), ethanol (CH3CH2OH), glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), acetone (CH3COCH3), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN), and the aGg' conformer of ethylene glycol (aGg'-(CH2OH)2) are among the detected species. The detection of vibrationally excited lines of CH3CN, CH3OCHO, CH3OH, OCS, HC3N, and CH3CHO proves the existence of gas and dust at high temperatures. The gas kinetic temperature estimated from the vibrational lines of CH3CN, ~405-67+100 K, is similar to that measured in massive hot cores. Our data allow an extensive comparison of the chemistry in FIRS 2 and the Orion hot core. Conclusions: We find a quite similar chemistry in FIRS 2 and Orion. Most of the studied fractional molecular abundances agree within a factor of 5. Larger differences are only found for the deuterated

  13. Massive General Relativity: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    The Universe, at very large scales, is expanding with acceleration. The fundamental reason for the accelerated expansion is not understood. One way to model such an expansion is to postulate a small cosmological constant in the Einstein equations. However, it could also be that Nature made a different choice: The acceleration could be a first observational evidence of a new scale at which laws of gravity itself are modified, and if so, the acceleration could have a purely gravitational origin. To account for the observed expansion, the new scale should roughly be equal to 1/H0 ~ 10^28 cm -- the present-day value of the Hubble length. Theories that may modify gravity consistently at these scales present a great challenge, and this has been a topic of an active research for the past decade or so. Furthermore, modified gravity models make predictions that could be distinguished from those of more conventional frameworks, e.g., from the scenario with a small cosmological constant. Moreover, the case for modified gravity is strengthened by a long-standing Cosmological Constant Problem (CCP). According to a well- known theorem, the CCP cannot be solved as long as one remains in a conventional framework of General Relativity (GR), or in other theory that reduces to GR at large scales. Contrary to this, theories that truly modify GR at large scales, can evade this theorem, and thus offer a hope for solving the CCP. The Principal Investigator (PI) is proposing to address the cosmic acceleration, and related to it CCP, in the framework of massive extension of GR. Construction of massive GR began as early as in 1939, however, for the last 40 years or so the theory was tabooed by no-go theorems. Only very recently, PI and his collaborators were able to show that there is a class of theories to which the no-go theorems do not apply, and proposed a candidate covariant theory for massive GR, that passes all the initial consistency tests. Moreover, PI with his collaborators found

  14. Infrared Spectro-Interferometry of Massive Stars: Disks, Winds, Outflows, and Stellar Multiplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    complemented with archival Spitzer/IRS spectra. Surprisingly, we found that passive disk models, which can reproduce the SED well, are in strong conflict with the interferometric data. However, when including emission from an optically thick inner gaseous disk, good quantitative agreement was found for all observables, suggesting that MWC 147 harbours a still actively accreting disk. NGC 7538 IRS1/2: NGC 7538 IRS1 is a high-mass (O7-type) protostar with a CO outflow, an associated ultracompact H II region, and a linear methanol maser structure, which might trace a Keplerian-rotating circumstellar disk. We investigated the NIR morphology of the source with unprecedented resolution using NIR bispectrum speckle interferometry obtained at the BTA 6 m and the MMT 6.5 m telescopes. Our high-dynamic range images show fan-shaped outflow structures, in which we detected 18 stars and several blobs of diffuse emission. Complementary archival Spitzer/IRAC images were used to relate the detected structures with the outflow at larger scales. We found a misalignment of various outflow axes and interpreted this in the context of a disk precession model, also using molecular hydrodynamic simulations. As a possible triggering mechanism, we identified non-coplanar tidal interaction of an (yet undiscovered) close companion with the circumbinary disk. Finally, our observations resolved the nearby massive protostar NGC 7538 IRS2 as a close binary with a separation of 195 mas, finding indications for shock interaction between the outflows from IRS1 and IRS2. Theta 1 Orionis C/D: Located in the Orion Trapezium Cluster, Theta 1 C is one of the youngest and nearest high-mass (O5-O7) stars. The star is also known to be a close binary system. We traced the orbital motion from 1997.8 to 2004.8 using visual and NIR bispectrum speckle interferometry at the BTA 6 m telescope. In 2005.9, we obtained first IOTA long-baseline interferometry on the Theta 1 C system, allowing us to derive preliminary solutions

  15. Mapping the Magnetic Field in Massive Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Anglada, Guillem; Rodriguez, Luis Felipe; Marti, Josep

    2011-10-01

    Recently, through highly sensitive VLA observations at 6 cm, we have detected linearly polarized emission in the HH 80-81 jet, providing for the first time conclusive evidence of the presence of synchrotron emission in a jet from a YSO (Carrasco-Gonzalez et al. 2010). We propose to use ATCA to complete the study of the magnetic field in the HH 80-81 jet (IRAS 18162-2048) through sensitive observations at 20, 13, 6, and 3 cm, and to extend this study to two additional powerful radio jets associated with protostars, IRAS 16547-4247 and IRAS 16562-3959, with signs of non-thermal emission. The three sources have negative declinations and, therefore, they are well suited to be studied with ATCA. Detection of linearly polarized radio continuum emission in these sources will demonstrate the presence of synchrotron radiation, and will allow us to infer the properties of the magnetic field.

  16. The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars. II. Luminosities and Evolutionary States of a Complete Sample of Dense Gas Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Barnes, Peter J.

    2013-12-01

    The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280° < l < 300°, -4° < b < 2°), unbiased, subparsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. presented the source catalog of ~300 clumps based on HCO+(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival midinfrared-to-millimeter continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature gray-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find that the clumps have 10 <~ L/L ⊙ <~ 106.5 and 0.1 <~ L/M/[L ⊙/M ⊙] <~ 103, consistent with a clump population spanning a range of instantaneous star-formation efficiencies from 0 to ~50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm-to-cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near-linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness); thus, this relation may also be useful as a star-formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump L/M distribution suggests that the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time is epsilonff < 0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion, or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L_HCO^+(1{--0)}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale, bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.

  17. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of protostar L1527 as obtained from ALMA observations of the C18O(2-1) line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan-Anh, P.; Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using ALMA observations of the C18O(2-1) line emission of the gas envelope of protostar L1527, we have reconstructed its morphology and kinematics under the assumption of axisymmetry about the west-east axis. The main original contribution to our understanding of the formation process of L1527 is the presentation of a simple 3D parameterisation based solely on regions that are not dominated by absorption. In the explored range (˜0.7 to 5 arcsec from the star) the model reproduces observations better than earlier attempts. The main results include: a measurement of the rotation velocity that confirms its evolution to Keplerian toward short distances; a measurement of the mean in-fall velocity, 0.43±0.10 km s-1, lower than free fall velocity, with no evidence for the significant r-dependence suggested by an earlier analysis; a measurement of the central mass, 0.23±0.06 M⊙ within a distance of 1.5 arcsec from the star, in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from a different range of distances; evidence for a strong disc plane depression of the in-falling flux resulting in an X shaped flow possibly caused by the freeze-out of CO molecules on dust grains; a measurement of the accretion rate, 3.5±1.0 10-7M⊙ yr-1at a distance of 1 arcsec (140 au) from the star; evidence for a 10° tilt of the symmetry plane of the envelope about the line of sight, cancelling below ˜3 arcsec from the star, but matching infrared observations and being also apparent on the sky map of the mean Doppler velocity.

  18. DISK MASSES AT THE END OF THE MAIN ACCRETION PHASE: CARMA OBSERVATIONS AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH MODELING OF CLASS I PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, J. A.

    2012-08-10

    We present imaging observations at the 1.3 mm wavelength of Class I protostars in the Taurus star-forming region, obtained with the CARMA interferometer. Of an initial sample of 10 objects, we detected and imaged millimeter wavelength emission from 9. One of the nine is resolved into two sources and detailed analysis of this binary protostellar system is deferred to a future paper. For the remaining eight objects, we use the CARMA data to determine the basic morphology of the millimeter emission. Combining the millimeter data with 0.9 {mu}m images of scattered light, Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra, and broadband spectral energy distributions (all from the literature), we attempt to determine the structure of the circumstellar material. We consider models including both circumstellar disks and envelopes, and constrain the masses (and other structural parameters) of each of these components. We show that the disk masses in our sample span a range from {approx}< 0.01 to {approx}> 0.1 M{sub Sun }. The disk masses for our sample are significantly higher than for samples of more evolved Class II objects. Thus, Class I disk masses probably provide a more accurate estimate of the initial mass budget for star and planet formation. However, the disk masses determined here are lower than required by theories of giant planet formation. The masses also appear too low for gravitational instability, which could lead to high mass accretion rates. Even in these Class I disks, substantial particle growth may have hidden much of the disk mass in hard-to-see larger bodies.

  19. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae. PMID:22837522

  20. Proper Motions of Massive Stars in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We propose an ambitious proper motion survey of massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud using the unique capabilities of HST. We will derive the directions of motion of massive runaway stars, searching in particular for massive stars which have been ejected from the central very massive cluster R136. These data will be combined with radial velocities from the VLT-FLAMES Survey of the Tarantula Nebula and with atmospheric analyses and stellar evolution models to constrain their origins. We will also search for very young isolated massive stars to test models of single-star formation. This work is highly relevant to star formation, cluster dynamics, the origin of field WR stars and GRBs, the creation of very massive stars by runaway mergers, and the possible formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  1. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae.

  2. Ghost free massive gravity with singular reference metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2016-06-01

    An auxiliary metric (reference metric) is inevitable in massive gravity theory. In the scenario of the gauge/gravity duality, massive gravity with a singular reference metric is used to study momentum dissipation, which describes the electric and heat conductivity for normal conductors. We demonstrate in detail that the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity with a singular reference metric is ghost free.

  3. Massive stars in the galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The star-forming galaxies of the Local Group act as our laboratories for testing massive star evolutionary models. In this review, I briefly summarize what we believe we know about massive star evolution, and the connection between OB stars, Luminous Blue Variables, yellow supergiants, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. The difficulties and recent successes in identifying these various types of massive stars in the neighboring galaxies of the Local Group will be discussed.

  4. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  5. Stability and Coalescence of Massive Twin Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V.

    2015-06-01

    Massive stars are usually found in binaries, and binaries with periods less than 10 days may have a preference for near equal component masses (“twins”). In this paper we investigate the evolution of massive twin binaries all the way to contact and the possibility that these systems can be progenitors of double neutron star binaries. The small orbital separations of observed double neutron star binaries suggest that the progenitor systems underwent a common envelope phase at least once during their evolution. Bethe & Brown proposed that massive binary twins will undergo a common envelope evolution while both components are ascending the red giant branch (RGB) or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) simultaneously, also known as double-core evolution. Using models generated from the stellar evolution code EZ (evolve zero-age main sequence), we determine the range of mass ratios resulting in a contact binary with both components simultaneously ascending the RGB or AGB as a function of the difference in birth times, Δτ. We find that, even for a generous Δτ = 5 Myr, the minimum mass ratio {{q}min }=0.933 for an 8 {{M}⊙ } primary and increases for larger mass primaries. We use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, StarSmasher, to study specifically the evolution of q = 1 common envelope systems as a function of initial component mass, age, and orbital separation. We also consider a q = 0.997 system to test the effect of relaxing the constraint of strictly identical components. We find the dynamical stability limit, the largest orbital separation where the binary becomes dynamically unstable, as a function of the component mass and age. Finally, we calculate the efficiency of ejecting matter during the inspiral phase to extrapolate the properties of the remnant binary from our numerical results, assuming the common envelope is completely ejected. We find that for the nominal core masses, there is a minimum orbital separation for a given component mass such that the

  6. Massive obesity in a migrant Samoan population.

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, I G; Janes, C

    1981-01-01

    Peoples of the Pacific Islands tend to become overweight when they migrate or are exposed to modernization in situ. Recent evidence suggests that Samoans are particularly susceptible, exhibiting a high prevalence of obesity and hypertension following migration to Hawaii. We report the preliminary results of a survey of height, weight, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) among an urbanized Samoan community the the San Francisco Bay Area. Although the participants' average height fell between the 25th and 50th percentile of the US population, about one-half our sample exceeded the 95th percentile for weight. The extreme overweight was accompanied by elevated blood pressure and, in females, by elevated FPG. The massive adult weight of migrants from the Pacific Islands carries serious public health implications for areas that support large migrant communities. PMID:7212139

  7. Mirage simulations of the massiv sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, P.; Perret, V.; Epinat, B.; Bournaud, F.; Contini, T.; Divoy, C.; Garilli, B.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Lopez-Sanjuan, C.; Moultaka, J.; Pairo, L.; Perez-Montero, E.; Queyrel, J.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.

    2015-02-01

    The MIRAGE sample (Merging & isolated high-redshift AMR galaxies; Perret 2014, PhD dissertation; Perret et al. 2014, AA 562, 1) has been built in order to understand the contribution of the merger processes to the mass assembly in the MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS, Contini et al. 2012, AA 539, 91) sample. It consists of a sample of idealized simulations based on the RAMSES code; the initial conditions were designed to reproduce the physical properties of the most gas-rich young galaxies. The sample is composed of 20 simulations of mergers exploring the initial parameters of mass and orientation of the disks with a spatial resolution reaching 7 parsecs.

  8. A nanofluidic system for massively parallel PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin; Morrison, Tom; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2008-02-01

    Massively parallel nanofluidic systems are lab-on-a-chip devices where solution phase biochemical and biological analyses are implemented in high density arrays of nanoliter holes micro-machined in a thin platen. Polymer coatings make the interior surfaces of the holes hydrophilic and the exterior surface of the platen hydrophobic for precise and accurate self-metered loading of liquids into each hole without cross-contamination. We have created a "nanoplate" based on this concept, equivalent in performance to standard microtiter plates, having 3072 thirty-three nanoliter holes in a stainless steel platen the dimensions of a microscope slide. We report on the performance of this device for PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping or quantitative measurement of gene expression by real-time PCR in applications ranging from plant and animal diagnostics, agricultural genetics and human disease research.

  9. Massive Open Online Courses in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Ira; Klaas, Brian; Yager, James D.; Kanchanaraksa, Sukon

    2013-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) represent a new and potentially transformative model for providing educational opportunities to learners not enrolled in a formal educational program. The authors describe the experience of developing and offering eight MOOCs on a variety of public health topics. Existing institutional infrastructure and experience with both for-credit online education and open educational resources mitigated the institutional risk and resource requirements. Although learners are able to enroll easily and freely and do so in large numbers, there is considerable variety in the level of participation and engagement among enrollees. As a result, comprehensive and accurate assessment of meaningful learning progress remains a major challenge for evaluating the effectiveness of MOOCs for providing public health education. PMID:24350228

  10. Hamiltonian formalism of minimal massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavian Yekta, Davood

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the three-dimensional minimal massive gravity (MMG) in the Hamiltonian formalism. At first, we define the canonical gauge generators as building blocks in this formalism and then derive the canonical expressions for the asymptotic conserved charges. The construction of a consistent asymptotic structure of MMG requires introducing suitable boundary conditions. In the second step, we show that the Poisson bracket algebra of the improved canonical gauge generators produces an asymptotic gauge group, which includes two separable versions of the Virasoro algebras. For instance, we study the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole as a solution of the MMG field equations, and the conserved charges give the energy and angular momentum of the BTZ black hole. Finally, we compute the black hole entropy from the Cardy formula in the dual conformal field theory and show our result is consistent with the value obtained by using the Smarr formula from the holographic principle.

  11. Instability Considerations for Massive Star Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of `supernova imposters' such as η Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be deep seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core near the hydrogen-burning shell grow slowly to an amplitude sufficient to cause an episode of mixing of hydrogen-rich material downward into hotter denser layers. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy production that is responsible for the observed mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  12. [An unusual case of massive funicular lipoma].

    PubMed

    Masciovecchio, Stefano; Saldutto, Pietro; Del Rosso, Alessandro; Galatioto, Giuseppe Paradiso; Vicentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Intrascrotal lipomas are benign diseases that originate from adipose tissue inside the scrotal sac or constituting the scrotal wall itself. Paratesticular spermatic cord lipomas are a rare type of intrascrotal lipomas. A 78 years old patient in good health comes to our attention for massive tense-elastic swelling of left hemiscrotum appeared about 3 years ago and slowly increasing. Ultrasound evaluation of the intrascrotal mass showed inhomogeneous images mainly hyperechoic, not infiltrating the ipsilateral testis and scrotal wall. The ultrasonography found a lipomatous lesion with benign characteristics and a surgical excision has been performed. The lipomatous mass removed presented a size equal to 25 cm x 14 cm x 11 cm and a weight of about 490 gr. The microscopic examination of the tissue showed only the presence of mature adipocytes in the absence of cellular atypia, of other cellular types and of vascular abnormalities.

  13. Massive young clusters in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, Jesús

    We analyze the properties of the Massive Young Clusters in the Local Group, concentrating on the youngest segment of this population and, more specifically, on the two best studied cases: 30 Doradus and NGC 604. 30 Doradus is a Super Star Cluster and will likely evolve to become a Globular Cluster in the future. NGC 604, on the other hand, is a Scaled OB Association that will be torn apart by the tidal effects of its host galaxy, M33. Given their extreme youth, each cluster is surrounded by a Giant H II Region produced by the high ionizing fluxes from O and WR stars. The two Giant H II Regions are found to be rather thin structures located on the surfaces of Giant Molecular Clouds, and their geometry turns out to be not too different from that of classical H II regions such as the Orion or Eagle Nebulae.

  14. Hot, Massive Stars in I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, D.; Malumuth, E.

    2011-01-01

    I Zw 18 is one of the most primitive blue, compact dwarf galaxies. The ionized gas in I Zw 18 has a low oxygen abundance (O approx.1/30 Osun) and nitrogen abundance (N-1/100 Nsun) (Pequignot 2008). We have obtained a far-UV spectrum of the northwest massive star cluster of I Zw 18 using Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). The spectrum is compatible with continuous star-formation over the past approx.10 Myr, and a very low metallicity, log Z/Zsun 1.7, although the stellar surface may be enhanced in carbon. Stellar wind lines are very weak, and the edge velocity of wind lines is very low (approx.250 km/s).

  15. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    SciTech Connect

    He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi

    2011-03-15

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  16. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    PubMed

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  17. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    PubMed

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. PMID:26976813

  18. Time sharing massively parallel machines. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Gorda, B.; Wolski, R.

    1995-03-01

    As part of the Massively Parallel Computing Initiative (MPCI) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors have developed a simple, effective and portable time sharing mechanism by scheduling gangs of processes on tightly coupled parallel machines. By time-sharing the resources, the system interleaves production and interactive jobs. Immediate priority is given to interactive use, maintaining good response time. Production jobs are scheduled during idle periods, making use of the otherwise unused resources. In this paper the authors discuss their experience with gang scheduling over the 3 year life-time of the project. In section 2, they motivate the project and discuss some of its details. Section 3.0 describes the general scheduling problem and how gang scheduling addresses it. In section 4.0, they describe the implementation. Section 8.0 presents results culled over the lifetime of the project. They conclude this paper with some observations and possible future directions.

  19. The Massive Star Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    An increasing number of non-terminal giant eruptions are being observed by modern supernova and transient surveys. Very little is known about the origin of these giant eruptions and their progenitors which are presumably very-massive, evolved stars such as luminous blue variables, hypergiants, and supergiants. Motivated by the small number of progenitors positively associated with these giant eruptions, we have begun a survey of the luminous and evolved massive star populations in several nearby galaxies. We aim to identify the likely progenitors of the giant eruptions, study the spatial variations in the stellar populations, and examine the relationship between massive star populations and their environment. The work presented here is focused on stellar populations in the relatively nearby, giant, spiral galaxy M101 from sixteen archival BVI HST/ACS images. We create a catalog of stars in the direction to M101 with photometric errors < 10% for V < 24.5 and 50% completeness down to V ˜ 26.5 even in regions of high stellar crowding. Using color and magnitude criteria we have identified candidate luminous OB type stars and blue supergiants, yellow supergiants, and red supergiants for future observation. We examine their spatial distributions across the face of M101 and find that the ratio of blue to red supergiants decreases by two orders of magnitude over the radial extent. From our catalog, we derive the star formation history (SFH) for the stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli by fitting the color-magnitude diagrams. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to populations traced by Halpha, far ultraviolet (FUV), and near ultraviolet (NUV) emission, we show that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Halpha is 15% " 35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Halpha emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our

  20. Hadronic production of massive lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    A review is presented of recent experimental and theoretical progress in studies of the production of massive lepton pairs in hadronic collisions. I begin with the classical Drell-Yan annihilation model and its predictions. Subsequently, I discuss deviations from scaling, the status of the proofs of factorization in the parton model, higher-order terms in the perturbative QCD expansion, the discrepancy between measured and predicted yields (K factor), high-twist terms, soft gluon effects, transverse-momentum distributions, implications for weak vector boson (W/sup + -/ and Z/sup 0/) yields and production properties, nuclear A dependence effects, correlations of the lepton pair with hadrons in the final state, and angular distributions in the lepton-pair rest frame.

  1. Cosmic expansion in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Kar, Arjun; Lavrelashvili, George; Agarwal, Nishant; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Quasidilaton massive gravity offers a physically well-defined gravitational theory with nonzero graviton mass. We present the full set of dynamical equations governing the expansion history of the Universe, valid during radiation domination, matter domination, and a late-time self-accelerating epoch related to the graviton mass. The existence of self-consistent solutions constrains the amplitude of the quasidilaton field and the graviton mass, as well as other model parameters. We point out that the effective mass of gravitational waves can be significantly larger than the graviton mass, opening the possibility that a single theory can explain both the late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion and modifications of structure growth leading to the suppression of large-angle correlations observed in the cosmic microwave background.

  2. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  3. Energetic Supernovae of Very Massive Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan

    2015-08-01

    Current models of the formation of the first stars in the universe suggest that these stars were very massive, having a typical mass scale of hundreds of solar masses. Some of them would die as pair instability supernovae (PSNe) which might be the biggest explosions of the universe. We present the results from multidimensional numerical studies of PSNe with a new radiation-hydrodynamics code, CASTRO and with realistic nuclear reaction networks. We simulate the fluid instabilities that occur in multiple spatial dimensions and discuss how the resulting mixing affects the explosion, mixing, and nucleosynthesis of these supernovae. Our simulations provide useful predictions for the observational signatures of PSNe, which might soon be examined by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  4. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang, Yi

    2011-03-01

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  5. On the cosmology of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Emir Gümrükçüoğlu, A.; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2013-09-01

    We present a review of cosmological solutions in nonlinear massive gravity, focusing on the stability of perturbations. Although homogeneous and isotropic solutions have been found, these are now known to suffer from either the Higuchi ghost or a new nonlinear ghost instability. We discuss two approaches to alleviate this issue. By relaxing the symmetry of the background by e.g. breaking isotropy in the hidden sector, it is possible to accommodate a stable cosmological solution. Alternatively, extending the theory to allow for new dynamical degrees of freedom can also remove the conditions which lead to the instability. As examples for this case, we study the stability of self-accelerating solutions in the quasi-dilatonic extension and generic cosmological solutions in the varying mass extension. While the quasi-dilaton case turns out to be unstable, the varying mass case allows stable regimes of parameters. Viable self-accelerating solutions in the varying mass theory yet remain to be found.

  6. Massive parallelism in the future of science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Massive parallelism appears in three domains of action of concern to scientists, where it produces collective action that is not possible from any individual agent's behavior. In the domain of data parallelism, computers comprising very large numbers of processing agents, one for each data item in the result will be designed. These agents collectively can solve problems thousands of times faster than current supercomputers. In the domain of distributed parallelism, computations comprising large numbers of resource attached to the world network will be designed. The network will support computations far beyond the power of any one machine. In the domain of people parallelism collaborations among large groups of scientists around the world who participate in projects that endure well past the sojourns of individuals within them will be designed. Computing and telecommunications technology will support the large, long projects that will characterize big science by the turn of the century. Scientists must become masters in these three domains during the coming decade.

  7. The outer haloes of massive, elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Payel; Gerhard, Ortwin; de Lorenzi, Flavio; McNeil, Emily; Churazov, Eugene; Coccato, Lodovico

    2010-11-01

    The outer haloes of massive elliptical galaxies are dark-matter dominated regions where stellar orbits have longer dynamical timescales than the central regions and therefore better preserve their formation history. Dynamical models out to large radii suffer from a degeneracy between mass and orbital structure, as the outer kinematics are unable to resolve higher moments of the line-of-sight velocity distribution. We mitigate this degeneracy for a sample of quiescent, massive, nearby ellipticals by determining their mass distributions independently using a non-parametric method on X-ray observations of the surrounding hot interstellar medium. We then create dynamical models using photometric and kinematic constraints consisting of integral-eld, long-slit and planetary nebulae (PNe) data extending to ~50 kpc. The rst two galaxies of our sample, NGC 5846 and NGC 1399, were found to have very shallow pro jected light distributions with a power law index of ~1.5 and a dark matter content of 70-80% at 50 kpc. Spherical Jeans models of the data show that, in the outer haloes of both galaxies, the pro jected velocity dispersions are almost inde- pendent of the anisotropy and that the PNe prefer the lower end of the range of mass distributions consistent with the X-ray data. Using the N-body code NMAGIC, we cre- ated axisymmetric models of NGC 5846 using the individual PNe radial velocities in a likelihood method and found them to be more constraining than the binned velocity dispersions. Characterising the orbital structure in terms of spherically averaged proles of the velocity dispersions we nd σψ > σr > σθ.

  8. Linear stability of magnetized massive protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2014-07-20

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) and gravitational instability (GI) are the two principle routes to turbulent angular momentum transport in accretion disks. Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) may develop both. This paper aims to reinvigorate interest in the study of magnetized massive PPDs, starting from the basic issue of stability. The local linear stability of a self-gravitating, uniformly magnetized, differentially rotating, three-dimensional stratified disk subject to axisymmetric perturbations is calculated numerically. The formulation includes resistivity. It is found that the reduction in the disk thickness by self-gravity (SG) can decrease MRI growth rates; the MRI becomes global in the vertical direction, and MRI modes with small radial length scales are stabilized. The maximum vertical field strength that permits the MRI in a strongly self-gravitating polytropic disk with polytropic index Γ = 1 is estimated to be B{sub z,max}≃c{sub s0}Ω√(μ{sub 0}/16πG), where c{sub s0} is the midplane sound speed and Ω is the local angular velocity. In massive disks with layered resistivity, the MRI is not well localized to regions where the Elsasser number exceeds unity. For MRI modes with radial length scales on the order of the disk thickness, SG can enhance density perturbations, an effect that becomes significant in the presence of a strong toroidal field, and which depends on the symmetry of the underlying MRI mode. In gravitationally unstable disks where GI and MRI growth rates are comparable, the character of unstable modes can transition smoothly between MRI and GI. Implications for nonlinear simulations are discussed briefly.

  9. The Deuteration Clock for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, S.; Tan, J. C.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2016-05-01

    To understand massive star formation requires study of its initial conditions. Two massive starless core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, have been detected in IRDC G028.37+00.07 in N2D+(3-2) with ALMA. From their line widths, either the cores are subvirial and are thus young structures on the verge of near free-fall collapse, or they are threaded by ˜1 mG B-fields that help support them in near virial equilibrium and potentially have older ages. We modeled the deuteration rate of N2H+ to constrain collapse rates of the cores. First, to measure their current deuterium fraction, D≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+], we observed multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ with CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m and IRAM 30 m, to complement the ALMA data. For both cores we derived D ˜ 0.3, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. We then carried out chemodynamical modeling, exploring how collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff, affects the level of D that is achieved from a given initial condition. To reach the observed D, most models require slow collapse with αff˜0.1, i.e., ˜1/10th of free-fall. This makes it more likely that the cores have been able to reach a near virial equilibrium state and we predict that strong B-fields will eventually be detected. The methods developed here will be useful for measurement of the pre-stellar core mass function.

  10. Evolution and Nucleosynthesis of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschi, Raphael

    In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M > 100 M_{odot } ) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M_{odot } . A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of neon and magnesium at the surface of WC stars. At solar metallicity, mass loss is so strong that even if a star is born with several hundred solar masses, it will end its life with less than 50 M_{odot } (using current mass loss prescriptions). At the metallicity of the LMC and lower, on the other hand, mass loss is weaker and might enable stars to undergo pair-instability supernovae.

  11. MASSIVE INFANT STARS ROCK THEIR CRADLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Extremely intense radiation from newly born, ultra-bright stars has blown a glowing spherical bubble in the nebula N83B, also known as NGC 1748. A new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image has helped to decipher the complex interplay of gas and radiation of a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy. The image graphically illustrates just how these massive stars sculpt their environment by generating powerful winds that alter the shape of the parent gaseous nebula. These processes are also seen in our Milky Way in regions like the Orion Nebula. The Hubble telescope is famous for its contribution to our knowledge about star formation in very distant galaxies. Although most of the stars in the Universe were born several billions of years ago, when the Universe was young, star formation still continues today. This new Hubble image shows a very compact star-forming region in a small part of one of our neighboring galaxies - the Large Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy lies only 165,000 light-years from our Milky Way and can easily be seen with the naked eye from the Southern Hemisphere. Young, massive, ultra-bright stars are seen here just as they are born and emerge from the shelter of their pre-natal molecular cloud. Catching these hefty stars at their birthplace is not as easy as it may seem. Their high mass means that the young stars evolve very rapidly and are hard to find at this critical stage. Furthermore, they spend a good fraction of their youth hidden from view, shrouded by large quantities of dust in a molecular cloud. The only chance is to observe them just as they start to emerge from their cocoon - and then only with very high-resolution telescopes. Astronomers from France, the U.S., and Germany have used Hubble to study the fascinating interplay between gas, dust, and radiation from the newly born stars in this nebula. Its peculiar and turbulent structure has been revealed for the first time. This high-resolution study has also uncovered several individual stars

  12. The B and Be States of the Star EM Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Marchev, Dragomir; Sigut, T. A. A.; Dimitrov, Dinko

    2016-09-01

    We present 11 yr of high-resolution, spectroscopic observations for the star EM Cep. EM Cep switches between B and Be star states, as revealed by the level of Hα emission, but spends most of its time in the B star state. EM Cep has been considered to be an eclipsing, near-contact binary of nearly equal-mass B stars in order to reproduce regular photometric variations; however, this model is problematic due to the lack of any observed Doppler shift in the spectrum. Our observations confirm that there are no apparent Doppler shifts in the wide spectral lines Hα and He i λ6678 in either the B or Be star states. The profiles of He i λ6678 typically exhibited a filled-in absorption core, but we detected weak emission in this line during the highest Be state. Given the lack of observed Doppler shifts, we model EM Cep as an isolated Be star with a variable circumstellar disk. We can reproduce the observed Hα emission profiles over the 11 yr period reasonably well with disk masses on the order of 3{--}10× {10}-11 {M}* in the Be state with the circumstellar disk seen at an inclination of 78° to the line of sight. From a disk ejection episode in 2014, we estimate a mass-loss rate of ≈ 3× {10}-9 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The derived disk density parameters are typical of those found for the classical Be stars. We therefore suggest that the EM Cep is a classical Be star and that its photometric variations are the result of β Cep or nonradial pulsations.

  13. The B and Be States of the Star EM Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Marchev, Dragomir; Sigut, T. A. A.; Dimitrov, Dinko

    2016-09-01

    We present 11 yr of high-resolution, spectroscopic observations for the star EM Cep. EM Cep switches between B and Be star states, as revealed by the level of Hα emission, but spends most of its time in the B star state. EM Cep has been considered to be an eclipsing, near-contact binary of nearly equal-mass B stars in order to reproduce regular photometric variations; however, this model is problematic due to the lack of any observed Doppler shift in the spectrum. Our observations confirm that there are no apparent Doppler shifts in the wide spectral lines Hα and He i λ6678 in either the B or Be star states. The profiles of He i λ6678 typically exhibited a filled-in absorption core, but we detected weak emission in this line during the highest Be state. Given the lack of observed Doppler shifts, we model EM Cep as an isolated Be star with a variable circumstellar disk. We can reproduce the observed Hα emission profiles over the 11 yr period reasonably well with disk masses on the order of 3{--}10× {10}-11 {M}* in the Be state with the circumstellar disk seen at an inclination of 78° to the line of sight. From a disk ejection episode in 2014, we estimate a mass-loss rate of ≈ 3× {10}-9 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1. The derived disk density parameters are typical of those found for the classical Be stars. We therefore suggest that the EM Cep is a classical Be star and that its photometric variations are the result of β Cep or nonradial pulsations.

  14. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger. PMID:25146286

  15. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger.

  16. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - II. Disruption of bound clusters by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O-type stars on star-forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to Ekin/|Epot|= 0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (106 M⊙) clouds prevent the H II regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower density 104 and 105 M⊙ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of per cent of the neutral gas in the 3-Myr time-scale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.

  17. Atypical CML with massive splenic infarct: an extremely rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Manna, Satyaki; Hajra, Adrija; Bhattacharya, Tanima Das

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old man who presented with hepatosplenomegaly, anaemia and massive splenic infarct. A series of investigations led us to a diagnosis of atypical chronic myeloid leucaemia, a rare variety of a mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm. This is the first case of atypical CML presenting with massive splenic infarction.

  18. Massive vulvar edema in 2 prepartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert O

    2014-05-01

    Two late gestation Holstein cows about to begin the third lactation developed massive vulvar edema. These were the only affected animals in the herd of 500 milking cows. The vulvar edema spontaneously regressed postpartum for both cows. Massive vulvar swelling is seldom observed in dairy cows in advanced pregnancy and is not described in the literature.

  19. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  20. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.