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Sample records for massive vector-meson model

  1. Structure of Vector Mesons in Holographic Model with Linear Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anatoly Radyushkin; Hovhannes Grigoryan

    2007-11-01

    We investigate wave functions and form factors of vector mesons in the holographic dual model of QCD with oscillator-like infrared cutoff. We introduce wave functions conjugate to solutions of the 5D equation of motion and develop a formalism based on these wave functions, which are very similar to those of a quantum-mechanical oscillator. For the lowest bound state (rho-meson), we show that all its elastic form factors can be built from the basic form factor which, in this model, exhibits a perfect vector meson dominance, i.e., is given by the rho-pole contribution alone. We calculate the electric radius of the rho-meson and find the value _C = 0.655 fm, which is larger than in the case of the hard-wall cutoff. We calculate the coupling constant f_rho and find that the experimental value is in the middle between the values given by the oscillator and hard-wall models.

  2. Vector-meson-dominance model for radiative decays involving light scalar mesons.

    PubMed

    Black, Deirdre; Harada, Masayasu; Schechter, Joseph

    2002-05-06

    We study a vector-dominance model which predicts quite a large number of currently interesting decay amplitudes of the types S-->gammagamma, V-->Sgamma, and S-->Vgamma, where S and V denote scalar and vector mesons, in terms of three parameters. As an application, the model makes it easy to study in detail a recent proposal to boost the ratio Gamma(phi-->f(0)gamma)/Gamma(phi-->a(0)(0)gamma) by including the isospin violating a(0)(0)-f(0) mixing. However, we find that this effect is actually small in our model.

  3. Study of Chiral Confining Model with Vector Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ching-Yun

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation consists of two parts, the study of the chiral confining model and the investigation of vacuum instability. In the first part we present a chiral confining model in which a bag is formed dynamically. The major topics addressed are: construction of the model, mean-field solution, anomalously large rho nucleon tensor coupling, and a projection method including the quantum effects of mesons. Two features of QCD, namely, chiral invariance and vacuum condensates, are crucial ingredients of our chiral confining model. The interaction of the valence quarks with the quark condensate is described via the sigma field. It generates the quark dynamical mass. The interaction of the quarks with the gluon condensate is described in our model through the color dielectric function, epsilon. This interaction generates the bag within which quarks are absolutely confined. The introduction of the color dielectric function epsilon modifies the quark-meson interaction by multiplying a factor epsilon ^{-1/2}. Thus the quark part of the rho meson source current is structurally different from the isovector part of the electromagnetic current. Thus the chiral confining model provides a natural explanation why the tensor coupling of the rho meson, kappa_rho, is larger than the isovector part of the anomalous magnetic moment of the nucleon, kappa_upsilon . We have improved a simple method of calculating expectation values of operators in states of good angular momentum projected from a hedgehog baryon state. We have included the contributions of quantum mesons. The symmetry of the hedgehog state under grand-reversal introduces remarkable simplification in the calculation of matrix elements of operators which do not contain time derivatives of meson fields. The quantum meson contributions turn out to be (3/2)/< B|{bf J }^2| B> times the classical meson fields contributions, with | B> being the hedgehog state. In the second part we show that the perturbative vacuum of model

  4. Decays of heavy vector mesons in the quark confinement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Valit, Yu. M.

    1995-12-01

    We analyze the radiative and hadronic decays of vector heavy mesons within the relativistic quark model with confined light quarks. The only adjustable parameters in this approach are the values of constituent masses of heavy quarks ( M c and M b). We adjust them using the available experimental data from CLEO and ARGUS-collaborations for the D *→ Dγ and D *→ Dπ branching ratios. It is found that the value of M c varies approximately in the interval 1.3 GeV< M c<1.65 GeV. We give the predictions for the absolute values of decay widths and compare our results with those obtained in other approaches. Also we consider the heavy quark limit M Q→∞ with E=M H-MQ=const for the decay amplitudes.

  5. Chiral bag plus skyrmion hybrid model with vector mesons for nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashita, H.; Yoro, S.; Toki, H.

    1988-08-01

    The chiral bag plus skyrmion hybrid model (CSH) is extended to include the vector mesons (ω and ϱ mesons) following the hidden local symmetry prescription for nucleon. The hedgehog ansatz is taken for π, ω and ϱ meson fields and the coupled differential equations for quarks and mesons are solved numerically. It is found that the magnitude of the rho-meson field drops suddenly at R ≈ 0.2 fm as the bag radius increases. The hedgehog masses and the axial coupling gA are calculated as a function of the bag radius. It is found that gA behaves non-monotonically with the bag radius.

  6. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-25

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  7. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  8. Mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants in the bilocal relativistic potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Ablakulov, Kh. Narzikulov, Z.

    2015-01-15

    A phenomenological model is developed in terms of bilocal meson fields in order to describe a vector meson and its leptonic decays. A new Salpeter equation for this particle and the Schwinger-Dyson equation allowing for the presence of an arbitrary potential and for a modification associated with the renormalization of the quark (antiquark ) wave function within the meson are given. An expression for the constant of the leptonic decay of the charged rho meson is obtained from an analysis of the decay process τ → ρν via parametrizing in it the hadronization of intermediate charged weak W bosons into a bilocal vector meson. The potential is chosen in the form of the sum of harmonic-oscillator and Coulomb potentials, and the respective boundary-value problem is formulated. It is shown that the solutions to this problem describe both the mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on nucleons and nuclei in generalized vector meson dominance model

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey; Klaus Goeke; Marat Siddikov

    2008-02-01

    We consider Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) on nucleons and nuclei in the framework of generalized vector meson dominance (GVMD) model. We demonstrate that the GVMD model provides a good description of the HERA data on the dependence of the proton DVCS cross section on $Q^2$, $W$ (at $Q^2=4$ GeV$^2$) and $t$. At $Q^2 = 8$ GeV$^2$, the soft $W$-behavior of the GVMD model somewhat underestimates the $W$-dependence of the DVCS cross section due to the hard contribution not present in the GVMD model. We estimate $1/Q^2$ power-suppressed corrections to the DVCS amplitude and the DVCS cross section and find them large. We also make predictions for the nuclear DVCS amplitude and cross section in the kinematics of the future Electron-Ion Collider. We predict significant nuclear shadowing, which matches well predictions of the leading-twist nuclear shadowing in DIS on nuclei.

  10. Meson vacuum phenomenology in a three-flavor linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    We study scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons with nonstrange and strange quantum numbers in the framework of a linear sigma model with global chiral U(Nf)L×U(Nf)R symmetry. We perform a global fit of meson masses, decay widths, as well as decay amplitudes. The quality of the fit is, for a hadronic model that does not consider isospin-breaking effects, surprisingly good. We also investigate the question whether the scalar q¯q states lie below or above 1 GeV and find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as q¯q states. Additionally, we also describe the axial-vector resonances as q¯q states.

  11. Light axial vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  12. Chiral bag with vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, A.; Toki, H.; Weise, W.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate nucleon structure in a (non-linear) chiral bag model with vector mesons. The model incorporates two different degrees of freedom: mesons outside the bag at long and intermediate ranges, and quarks inside the bag at short distances. The ρ, a 1 and ω mesons outside the bag are included in a chiral effective lagrangian based on the non-linear sigma model. The classical solution is obtained using the hedgehog ansatz, and the cranking method is applied to construct the physical nucleon states. Static properties of the nucleon such as its mass, axial vector coupling constant, magnetic moments and charge radii are studied in detail as functions of the bag radius. Quark and meson contributions to these quantities are calculated separately. In particular, we discuss the extent to which the vector-meson dominance picture holds in the chiral bag.

  13. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  14. Vector meson electroproduction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Juan; Cai, Xian-Hao; Zhou, Li-Juan

    2012-08-01

    Based on the generalized QCD vector meson dominance model, we study the electroproduction of a vector meson off a proton in the QCD inspired eikonalized model. Numerical calculations for the total cross section σtot and differential cross section dσ/dt are performed for ρ, ω and varphi meson electroproduction in this paper. Since gluons interact among themselves (self-interaction), two gluons can form a glueball with quantum numbers IG, JPC = 0+,2++, decay width Γt ≈ 100 MeV, and mass of mG = 2.23 GeV. The three gluons can form a three-gluon colorless bound state with charge conjugation quantum number C = -1, called the Odderon. The mediators of interactions between projectiles (the quark and antiquark pair fluctuated from the virtual photon) and the proton target (a three-quark system) are the tensor glueball and the Odderon. Our calculated results in the tensor glueball and Odderon exchange model fit to the existing data successfully, which evidently shows that our present QCD mechanism is a good description of meson electroproduction off a proton. It should be emphasized that our mechanism is different from the theoretical framework of Block et al. We also believe that the present study and its success are important for the investigation of other vector meson electro- and photoproduction at high energies, as well as for searching for new particles such as tensor glueballs and Odderons, which have been predicted by QCD and the color glass condensate model (CGC). Therefore, in return, it can test the validity of QCD and the CGC model.

  15. Vector meson dominance and the {rho} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; OConnell, H.B.; Williams, A.G.

    1999-04-01

    We discuss the properties of vector mesons, in particular the {rho}{sup 0}, in the context of the hidden local symmetry (HLS) model. This provides a unified framework to study several aspects of the low energy QCD sector. First, we show that in the HLS model the physical photon is massless, without requiring off field diagonalization. We then demonstrate the equivalence of HLS and the two existing representations of vector meson dominance, VMD1 and VMD2, at both the tree level and one loop order. Finally the S matrix pole position is shown to provide a model and process independent means of specifying the {rho} mass and width, in contrast with the real axis prescription currently used in the Particle Data Group tables. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Light Vector Mesons in the Nuclear Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Michael; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Weygand, Dennis; Djalali, Chaden; Tur, Clarisse; Mosel, Ulrich; Muehlich, Pascal; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Carnahan, Bryan; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dickson, Richard; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Li, Ji; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Williams, Michael; Wolin, Elliott; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-07-01

    The light vector mesons ($\\rho$, $\\omega$, and $\\phi$) were produced in deuterium, carbon, titanium, and iron targets in a search for possible in-medium modifications to the properties of the $\\rho$ meson at normal nuclear densities and zero temperature. The vector mesons were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) via their decays to $e^{+}e^{-}$. The rare leptonic decay was chosen to reduce final-state interactions. A combinatorial background was subtracted from the invariant mass spectra using a well-established event-mixing technique. The $\\rho$ meson mass spectrum was extracted after the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ signals were removed in a nearly model-independent way. Comparisons were made between the $\\rho$ mass spectra from the heavy targets ($A > 2$) with the mass spectrum extracted from the deuterium target. With respect to the $\\rho$-meson mass, we obtain a small shift compatible with zero. Also, we measure widths consistent with standard nuclear many-body eff

  17. Vector Meson Form Factors and Wave Functions from Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannes Grigoryan; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-10-10

    Based on the holographic dual model of QCD, we study 2- and 3-point functions of vector currents and derive form factors as well as wave functions for the vector mesons. As a result, generalized vector-meson dominance representation for form factors is obtained with a very specific VMD pattern. The calculated electric radius of the rho-meson is shown to be in a good agreement with predictions from lattice QCD.

  18. Role of σ exchange in the γ p →ϕ p process and scaling with the f1 axial vector meson from a Reggeized model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byung-Geel; Kim, Hungchong; Kong, Kook-Jin

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role driven by the scalar meson σ exchange in the photoproduction of the vector meson ϕ (1020 ) off a proton by using a Reggeized model. Based on the π0(135 )+σ (500 )+f2(1270 ) +Pomeron exchanges, we demonstrate that the σ exchange plays the role to reproduce the bump structure at the forward angle in the differential cross section as well as the peaking behavior in the total cross section observed in the CLAS Collaboration. We also discuss the possible observation of the scaled cross section s7d σ /d t at the production angle θ =9 0 ° from the CLAS data. It is found that the axial vector meson f1(1285 ) exchange with the trajectory αf 1(t )=0.028 t +0.9 ±0.2 arising from the axial anomaly of the QCD vacuum plays the role to clarify the scaling up to 5 GeV.

  19. Quantum electrodynamics for vector mesons.

    PubMed

    Djukanovic, Dalibor; Schindler, Matthias R; Gegelia, Jambul; Scherer, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamics for rho mesons is considered. It is shown that, at the tree level, the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the rho+ is fixed to 2 in a self-consistent effective quantum field theory. Further, the mixing parameter of the photon and the neutral vector meson is equal to the ratio of electromagnetic and strong couplings, leading to the mass difference M(rho0)-M(rho+/-) approximately 1 MeV at tree order.

  20. Holographic picture of heavy vector meson melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Nelson R. F.; Martin Contreras, Miguel Angel; Diles, Saulo

    2016-11-01

    The fraction of heavy vector mesons produced in a heavy ion collision, as compared to a proton-proton collision, serves as an important indication of the formation of a thermal medium, the quark-gluon plasma. This sort of analysis strongly depends on understanding the thermal effects of a medium like the plasma on the states of heavy mesons. In particular, it is crucial to know the temperature ranges where they undergo a thermal dissociation, or melting. AdS/QCD models are know to provide an important tool for the calculation of hadronic masses, but in general are not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with excitation level. It has recently been shown that this problem can be overcome using a soft wall background and introducing an extra energy parameter, through the calculation of correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space. This approach leads to the evaluation of masses and decay constants of S wave quarkonium states with just one flavor dependent and one flavor independent parameter. Here we extend this more realistic model to finite temperatures and analyze the thermal behavior of the states 1 S, 2 S and 3 S of bottomonium and charmonium. The corresponding spectral function exhibits a consistent picture for the melting of the states where, for each flavor, the higher excitations melt at lower temperatures. We estimate for these six states the energy ranges in which the heavy vector mesons undergo a transition from a well-defined peak in the spectral function to complete melting in the thermal medium. A very clear distinction between the heavy flavors emerges, with the bottomonium state Υ (1S) surviving a deconfinement transition at temperatures much larger than the critical deconfinement temperature of the medium.

  1. Hard Exclusive Vector Meson Leptoproduction At HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Golembiovskaya, M.

    2011-07-15

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg collected a set of data on hard exclusive vector meson ({rho}{sup 0}{phi},{omega}) leptoproduction using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized lepton beam of HERA accelerator and longitudinally or transversely polarized or unpolarized gas targets. Measurements of exclusive vector meson production provide access to the structure of the nucleon since the process can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). An overview of the HERMES results on exclusive vector mesons production is presented.

  2. Skyrmions with vector mesons in the hidden local symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Liang; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Oh, Yongseok; Harada, Masayasu

    2013-02-01

    The roles of light ρ and ω vector mesons in the Skyrmion are investigated in a chiral Lagrangian derived from the hidden local symmetry (HLS) up to O(p4) including the homogeneous Wess-Zumino terms. We write a general “master formula” that allows us to determine the parameters of the HLS Lagrangian from a class of holographic QCD models valid at the large-Nc and -λ (’t Hooft constant) limit by integrating out the infinite towers of vector and axial-vector mesons other than the lowest ρ and ω mesons. Within this approach we find that the physical properties of the Skyrmion as the solitonic description of baryons are independent of the HLS parameter a. Therefore the only parameters of the model are the pion decay constant and the vector-meson mass. Once determined in the meson sector, we have a totally parameter-free theory that allows us to study unequivocally the role of light vector mesons in the Skyrmion structure. We find, as suggested by Sutcliffe, that the inclusion of the ρ meson reduces the soliton mass, which makes the Skyrmion come closer to the Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield soliton, but the role of the ω meson is found to increase the soliton mass. In stark contrast, the Δ-N mass difference, which is determined by the moment of inertia in the adiabatic collective quantization of the Skyrmion, is increased by the ρ vector meson, while it is reduced by the inclusion of the ω meson. All these observations show the importance of the ω meson in the properties of the nucleon and nuclear matter in the Skyrme model.

  3. Diffractive vector meson photoproduction from dual string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, Peter G. O.; Nastase, Horatiu

    2009-04-15

    We study diffractive vector-meson photoproduction using string theory via AdS/CFT. The large s behavior of the cross sections for the scattering of the vector meson V on a proton is dominated by the soft Pomeron, {sigma}{sub V}{approx}s{sup 2{epsilon}}{sup -2{alpha}{sub P}{sup '}}{sup /B}, where from the string theory model of [arXiv:hep-th/0501039], {epsilon} is approximately 1/7 below 10 GeV, and 1/11 for higher, but still sub-Froissart, energies. This is due to the production of black holes in the dual gravity. In {phi} photoproduction the mesonic Regge poles do not contribute, so that we deal with a pure Pomeron contribution. This allows for an experimental test. At the gauge theory 'Planck scale' of about 1-2 GeV, the ratios of the soft Pomeron contributions to the photoproduction cross sections of different vector mesons involve not only the obvious quark model factors, but also the Boltzmann factors e{sup -4M{}sub V}{sup /T{}sub 0}, with T{sub 0} the temperature of the dual black hole. The presence of these factors is confirmed in the experimental data for {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{psi}, and {psi}(2S) photoproduction and is compatible with the meager {upsilon} photoproduction data. Throughout, we use vector-meson dominance, and from the data we obtain T{sub 0} of about 1.3 GeV, i.e. the gauge theory ''Planck scale,'' as expected. The ratio of the experimental soft Pomeron onset scale E-circumflex{sub R}{approx}9 GeV and of the gauge theory Planck scale, T{sub 0}{approx}1.3 GeV, conforms to the theoretical prediction of N{sub c}{sup 2}/N{sub c}{sup 1/4}.

  4. Holographic correspondence applied to vector meson emission from a heavy accelerated nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Hoodbhoy, Pervez

    2008-12-01

    We consider a classical source, moving on the 4D boundary of a 5D anti-de Sitter space, that is coupled to quantum fields residing in the bulk. Bremsstrahlung-like radiation of the corresponding quanta is shown to occur and the S matrix is derived assuming that the source is sufficiently massive so that recoil effects are negligible. As an illustrative example, using the anti-de Sitter hard-wall model, we consider vector mesons coupled to a heavy nucleus that is moved around at high speed in an accelerator ring. The meson radiation rate is found to be finite but small. Much higher accelerations, such as when a pair of heavy ions suffer an ultra peripheral collision, cause substantial emission of various excited vector mesons. Predictions are made for the spectrum of this radiation. A comparison is made against existing photon-pomeron fusion calculations for the transverse momentum spectra of rho mesons. These have the same overall shape as the recently measured transverse momentum distributions at RHIC.

  5. Dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions with in-medium spectral functions of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, E.; Faessler, Amand; Fuchs, C.; Cozma, M. D.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Martemyanov, B.

    2008-09-15

    The in-medium spectral functions of {rho} and {omega} mesons and the broadening of nucleon resonances at finite baryon density are calculated self-consistently by combining a resonance dominance model for the vector meson production with an extended vector meson dominance model. The influence of the in-medium modifications of the vector meson properties on the dilepton spectrum in heavy-ion collisions is investigated. The dilepton spectrum is generated for the C+C reaction at 2.0A GeV and compared with recent HADES Collaboration data. The collision dynamics is then described by the Tuebingen relativistic quantum molecular dynamics transport model. We find that an iterative calculation of the vector meson spectral functions that takes into account the broadening of the nucleon resonances due to their increased in-medium decay branchings is convergent and provides a reasonable description of the experimental data in the mass region 0.45{<=}M{<=}0.75 GeV. On the other side, the theoretical calculations slightly underestimate the region m{sub {pi}}{<=}M{<=}0.4 GeV. Popular in-medium scenarios such as a schematic collisional broadening and dropping vector mesons masses are discussed as well.

  6. Multisolitons with vector mesons on the two-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, F. L.; Reula, Oscar A.

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested a strong connection between the static solutions of the 3D Skyrme model and those corresponding to its low-dimensional analog (baby-Skyrme model) on a two-sphere. We have found almost identical solutions considering an alternative two-dimensional model in which a vector meson field is introduced and coupled to the system, instead of the usual Skyrme term. It has been known that including this vector meson field in three dimensions stabilizes the nonlinear sigma model without the need for a term that is quartic on derivatives of the pion fields (Skyrme term). The resulting model has proven to share many of the features that the usual Skyrme theory has, but with a better mathematical formulation in terms of the well posedness of its evolution equations. In the present work, we have numerically searched for static multisolitonic solutions of this alternative stabilization, for the case in which the base space is a two-sphere. Moreover, we analyze the stability of these solutions under small perturbations in a fully dynamical setting. We have also considered the inclusion of a particular potential term in the Lagrangian and explored the low- and high-density phases of solitons for different ranges of the parameter space, achieving solitons localized enough, which allows for a comparison with planar (two-dimensional) studies.

  7. Incoherent vector mesons production in PbPb ultraperipheral collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ping; Chen, Xurong

    2017-03-01

    The incoherent rapidity distributions of vector mesons are computed in dipole model in PbPb ultraperipheral collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IIM model fitted from newer data is employed in the dipole amplitude. The Boosted Gaussian and Gaus-LC wave functions for vector mesons are implemented in the calculations as well. Predictions for the J / ψ, ψ (2 s), ρ and ϕ incoherent rapidity distributions are evaluated and compared with experimental data and other theoretical predictions in this paper. We obtain closer predictions of the incoherent rapidity distributions for J / ψ than previous calculations in the IIM model.

  8. Spin alignment of vector mesons in heavy ion and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Cuautle, Eleazar; Corral, G. Herrera; Magnin, J.; Montaño, Luis Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The spin alignment matrix element ρ00 for the vector mesons K and ϕ(1020) has been measured in RHIC at central rapidities. These measurements are consistent with the absence of polarization with respect to the reaction plane in mid-central Au+Au collisions whereas, when measured with respect to the production plane in the same reactions and in p+p collisions, a non-vanishing and p⊥-dependent ρ00 is found. We show that this behavior can be understood in a simple model of vector meson production where the spin of their constituent quarks is oriented during hadronization as the result of Thomas precession.

  9. Vector meson production in ultra-peripheral collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James O.

    Charged ions moving at relativistic speeds generate strong electromagnetic fields (E/M) that, at regions outside the source (important when the E/M sources are nuclei), behave like the fields from a beam of real photons. These equivalent, or virtual photons, can induce an excitation in another nucleus as the source flies by. Existing theories attempt to explain such processes and predict their outcome. One way to study such Ultra-Peripheral Collisions (UPCs) is to simulate them using a Monte-Carlo Multi-Collisional (MCMC) model based on nucleon degrees of freedom. The CRISP (acronym for Collaboration Rio-Illheus-Sao Paulo) model is one such theory. It is basically at the stage of a well-documented software package that implements the MCMC. This model has successfully predicted observables, such as neutron multiplicity, from central collisions and also in UPCs with relativistic heavy ions. However, the photoproduction of vector mesons has only recently been added to the CRISP model. A completely different approach to study UPCs focuses on the role of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) in the excitation process. Here, instead of nucleons, the degrees of freedom are quarks and gluons (generically known as partons). Several distinct PDFs exist in the literature and are continually being updated. This work used experimental results released from the ALICE collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility located at the international particle physics laboratory CERN in Switzerland. Our outputs from the CRISP model, and from the sub-nucleon degrees of freedom model, were photonuclear cross sections for vector meson production. A comparison of our results with the experimental data allowed us to constrain different PDFs, as well as the effect of multiple collisions on the production of mesons with nucleons in the final channel. Upon completion of the calculations, it was seen that the hadronic models could accurately predict the production of the J/psi meson, but

  10. Glueballs and vector mesons at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Two interconnected fields of interest are suggested for NICA. Firstly, existence of glueballs is predicted by the theory of strong interaction but --even after decades of research-- glueball identification in the physical spectrum is still unclear. NICA can help to ascertain experimental glueball candidates via J/Ψ decays whose yield is expected to be large. Importance of glueballs is not limited to vacuum: since they couple to other meson states, glueballs can also be expected to influence signatures of chiral-symmetry restoration in the high-energy phase of strong dynamics. Mass shifting or in-medium broadening of vector and axial-vector mesons may occur there but the extent of such phenomena is still uncertain. Additionally, glueball properties could also be modified in medium. Exploration of these issues is the second suggested field of interest that can be pursued at NICA.

  11. Electromagnetic form factors of heavy flavored vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarsini, M.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita; Patra, Sweta P.; Barik, N.

    2016-12-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of heavy flavored vector mesons such as (D*,Ds*,J /Ψ ) , (B*,Bs*,ϒ ) via one photon radiative decays (V →P γ ) in the relativistic independent quark (RIQ) model based on a flavor independent average interaction potential in the scalar vector harmonic form. The momentum dependent spacelike (q2<0 ) form factors calculated in this model are analytically continued to the physical timelike region 0 ≤q2≤(MV-MP)2 . The predicted coupling constant gV P γ=FV P(q2=0 ) for real photon case in the limit q2→0 and decay widths Γ (V →P γ ) are found in reasonable agreement with experimental data and other model predictions.

  12. Vector meson modification in nuclear matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Djalali, Chaden; Wood, Michael; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Weygand, Dennis

    2008-09-01

    Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei were performed at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The properties of the A vector mesons were investigated via their rare leptonic decay to e+e . After subtracting the combinatorial background, the A meson mass distributions were extracted for each of the targets. We observe no effects on the mass of the A meson, some widening in titanium and iron is observed consistent with the collisional broadening.

  13. Vector meson production in ultra-peripheral collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, R.; Jenkovszky, L.; Salii, A.; Libov, V.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2015-04-10

    By using a Regge-pole model for vector meson production (VMP), that successfully describes the HERA data, we analyse the connection of VMP cross sections in photon-induced reactions at HERA with those in ultra-peripheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The role of the low-energy behaviour of VMP cross sections in γp collisions is scrutinized.

  14. Exclusive heavy vector meson photoproduction in hadronic collisions at the LHC: Predictions of the color glass condensate model for Run 2 energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Moreira, B. D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we update the predictions for exclusive J /Ψ , Ψ (2 S ), and ϒ photoproduction in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Run 2 LHC energies obtained with the color dipole formalism and considering the impact-parameter color glass condensate model (bCGC) for the forward dipole-target scattering amplitude. The impact of the charm mass on the predictions is investigated, and a comparison with the LHCb data on rapidity distributions and photon-hadron cross sections is presented. Our results demonstrate that the current data can be quite well described by the bCGC model, which takes into account nonlinear effects in the QCD dynamics and reproduces the very precise HERA data, without introducing any additional effect or free parameter.

  15. In-medium properties of light vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    C. Djalali; R. Nasseripour; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood

    2007-08-01

    The photoproduction of vector mesons on various nuclei has been studied using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Laboratory. All three vector mesons ρ, ω and phi are observed via their decay to e+e-. The possible in-medium effects on the properties of the ρ meson are of particular interest. The ρ spectral function is extracted from the data on carbon, iron and titanium, and compared to the spectrum from liquid deuterium, which is relatively free of nuclear effects. We observe no effects on the mass of the ρ meson, some widening in titanium and iron is observed consistent with the collisional broadening.

  16. Medium Modification of the Light Vector Mesons in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nasseripour, R.; Djalali, C.; Wood, M.; Weygand, D.

    2008-10-13

    Theoretical calculations predict the modification of properties of vector mesons, such as a shift in their masses and/or broadening of their widths in dense nuclear matter. These effects can be related to partial restoration of chiral symmetry at high density or temperature. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei were performed at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were taken with a beam of tagged photons with energies up to 4 GeV on various nuclear targets. The properties of the {rho} vector mesons were investigated via their rare leptonic decay to e+e{sup -}. This decay channel is preferred over hadronic modes in order to eliminate final state interactions in the nuclear matter. The combinatorial background in the mass spectrum was removed by a self-normalizing mixed-event technique. The {rho} meson mass distributions were extracted for each of the targets. Statistically significant results regarding medium modification of the rho meson in the nuclear medium rule out large medium effects. Transparency studies of the {omega} and {phi} vector mesons allows a determination of their widths in the medium.

  17. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-22

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  18. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  19. A fresh look at exclusive electroproduction of light vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meškauskas, M.; Müller, D.

    2014-02-01

    Relying on the collinear factorization approach, we demonstrate that H1 and ZEUS measurements of exclusive light vector meson and photon electroproduction cross sections can be simultaneously described for photon virtualities of . Our findings reveal that quark exchanges are important in this small region and that in leading order approximation the gluonic component is suppressed, e.g., the skewness ratio can be much smaller than one.

  20. The coherent cross section of vector mesons in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-ping; Chen, Xurong

    2016-06-01

    The coherent cross section of J/ψ , ρ , and φ are computed in the dipole model in the ultraperipheral PbPb collisions. The IP-Sat and IIM model are applied in the calculation of the differential cross section of the dipole scattering off the nucleon, and three kinds of forward vector meson wave functions are used in the overlap. The prediction of J/ψ and ρ is compared with the experimental data of the ALICE collaboration, and the prediction of φ is also given in this paper.

  1. Electroproduction of the Φ(1020) Vector Meson at 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Loukachine, Konstantin

    2000-02-01

    We studied the reaction ep → e'p'Φ with a 4.2 GeV incident electron beam in the region of the electroproduction variables Q2 from 0.7 to 2.2 GeV2 and W from 2.0 to 2.6 GeV. The data were taken and analyzed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For the first time, we observe the expected t-slope dependence on Q2 and Δτ in Φ vector meson production. We find that the width of the forward Φ-meson diffraction peak increases rapidly as the interaction time decreases below cΔτ of 1 fm. Within a simple optical model framework, the data show that Φ meson has a smaller size than the ρ. The measured Φ cross-section dependence on Q2 is in a good agreement with previous measurements and well-described by the phenomenological Pomeron exchange model. Our cross-section data do not favor the standard Vector Meson Dominance and s$\\bar{s}$-knockout model predictions. From the angular distribution of the decay Φ → K+ K-, assuming the s-channel helicity conservation, we extracted the longitudinal-to-transverse cross-section ratio, R, and Vector Meson Dominance scaling parameter, ζ2, which are consistent with the previous measurements and the model expectations.

  2. Dilepton yields from brown-rho scaled vector mesons including memory effects.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-01-12

    Scenarios with dropping vector meson masses, motivated by the work of Brown and Rho, have been strongly discussed after recent NA60 Collaboration data were presented. In this Letter they are investigated within a nonequilibrium field theoretical description that includes quantum mechanical memory. Dimuon yields are calculated by application of a model for the fireball, and strong modifications are found in the comparison to quasiequilibrium calculations, which assume instantaneous adjustment of all meson properties to the surrounding medium. In addition, results for the situation of very broad excitations are presented.

  3. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged ρ -mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that ρ -meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the ρ -meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and ρ -mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  4. Hidden local symmetry and infinite tower of vector mesons for baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Liang; Oh, Yongseok; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Harada, Masayasu; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to access dense baryonic matter relevant for compact stars in a unified framework that handles both single baryon and multibaryon systems on the same footing, we first address a holographic dual action for a single baryon focusing on the role of the infinite tower of vector mesons deconstructed from five dimensions. To leading order in ’t Hooft coupling λ=NcgYM2, one has the Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) Skyrmion that results when the warping of the bulk background and the Chern-Simons term in the Sakai-Sugimoto (SS) D4/D8-D8¯ model are ignored. The infinite tower was found by Sutcliffe to induce flow to a conformal theory, i.e., the BPS. We compare this structure to that of the SS model consisting of a 5D Yang-Mills action in warped space and the Chern-Simons term in which higher vector mesons are integrated out while preserving hidden local symmetry and valid to O(λ0) and O(p4) in the chiral counting. We point out the surprisingly important role of the ω meson that figures in the Chern-Simons term that encodes chiral anomaly in the baryon structure and that may be closely tied to short-range repulsion in nuclear interactions.

  5. Electro- and Photoproduction of Vector Mesons at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2002-09-01

    The total and differential cross section for exclusive electro- and photoproduction of vector mesons in the resonance region and above (1.6 < W < 2.9 GeV) was measured at Jefferson Laboratory in a wide kinematic range (0 < Q2 < 4 GeV2 and 0< -t < 5 GeV2). The measurement of the total and differential cross section down to 100 pb/GeV2 with the full kinematic coverage, was possible for the first time thanks to the combination of the 100% duty cycle of CEBAF and the large acceptance of the CLAS detector. The main results from the CLAS Collaboration activity in this field will be presented and discussed.

  6. Vector meson J/Ψ,phi electro-production in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Juan; Zhou, Li-Juan

    2010-04-01

    We study the vector meson electro-production off the proton in a QCD inspired model. A calculation of the differential cross section is performed for the J/Ψ,phi meson off the proton. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data, and remind us to consider the contribution from the tensor glueball and Odderon to the differential cross section. Since gluons interact among themselves via self-interaction, the gluons can form a glueball with quantum numbers IG, JPC = 0+, 2++, with a decay width Γt = 100 MeV and mass of mG = 2.23 GeV. The three gluons can form a three gluon color bound state with charge conjugation quantum number C = -1. This study is quite important to verify the validity of QCD and to search for new particles (tensor glueball and Odderon) as well as quest for new physics.

  7. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2011-10-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range {radical}t {approx}< 1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b {approx} 0.5 - 1.5 fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the {rho} meson region, with only a {approx}10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the {omega} are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transverse charge density in the neutron at b {approx} 1 fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the isoscalar strength in the {approx}1 GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the transverse densities in the vector meson region b {approx} 1 fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.

  8. Baryon-number-induced Chern-Simons couplings of vector and axial-vector mesons in holographic QCD.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Sophia K; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2007-10-05

    We show that holographic models of QCD predict the presence of a Chern-Simons coupling between vector and axial-vector mesons at finite baryon density. In the Anti de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory dictionary, the coefficient of this coupling is proportional to the baryon number density and is fixed uniquely in the five-dimensional holographic dual by anomalies in the flavor currents. For the lightest mesons, the coupling mixes transverse rho and a1 polarization states. At sufficiently large baryon number densities, it produces an instability, which causes the rho and a1 mesons to condense in a state breaking both rotational and translational invariance.

  9. Light Vector Meson Photoproduction off of H at Jefferson Lab and rho-omega Interference in the Leptonic Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies of light vector meson production in heavy nuclear targets has generated interest in {rho}-{omega} interference in the leptonic e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. An experimental study of the elementary process provides valuable input for theoretical models and calculations. In experiment E04-005 (g12), high statistics photoproduction data has been taken in Jefferson Lab's Hall B with the Cebaf Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The invariant mass spectrum is fitted with two interfering relativistic Breit-Wigner functions to determine the interference phase. Preliminary analysis indicate a measurable {rho}-{omega} interference.

  10. K* vector meson resonance dynamics in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilner, Andrej; Cabrera, Daniel; Markert, Christina; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We study the strange vector meson (K*,K¯* ) dynamics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on the microscopic parton-hadron-string dynamics (PHSD) transport approach which incorporates partonic and hadronic degrees of freedom, a phase transition from hadronic to partonic matter—quark-gluon-plasma (QGP)—and a dynamical hadronization of quarks and antiquarks as well as final hadronic interactions. We investigate the role of in-medium effects on the K*,K¯* meson dynamics by employing Breit-Wigner spectral functions for the K* with self-energies obtained from a self-consistent coupled-channel G -matrix approach. Furthermore, we confront the PHSD calculations with experimental data for p +p , Cu+Cu , and Au+Au collisions at energies up to √{sN N}=200 GeV. Our analysis shows that, at relativistic energies, most of the final K* (observed experimentally) are produced during the late hadronic phase, dominantly by the K +π →K* channel, such that the fraction of the K* from the QGP is small and can hardly be reconstructed from the final observables. The influence of the in-medium effects on the K* dynamics at energies typical of the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is rather modest due to their dominant production at low baryon densities (but high meson densities); however, it increases with decreasing beam energy. Moreover, we find that the additional cut on the invariant-mass region of the K* further influences the shape and the height of the final spectra. This imposes severe constraints on the interpretation of the experimental results.

  11. Photoproduction of vector mesons in ultra-peripheral p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Broz, Michal

    2015-04-10

    Vector mesons are copiously produced in ultra-peripheral collisions. In these collisions, the impact parameter is larger than the sum of the radii of the two projectiles, implying that electromagnetic processes become dominant. The cross section of production of vector mesons is expected to be sensitive to the gluon distribution and can therefore probe nuclear gluon shadowing (Pb–Pb) and the gluon structure function in the nucleon (p-Pb). The ALICE Collaboration has performed the first measurements of the production of ρ{sup 0}, J/ψ and ψ/(2S) in Pb–Pb ultra-peripheral collision as well as the cross section for exclusive J/ψ photoproduction off protons in ultra-peripheral proton-lead collisions at the LHC. The results are compared to the STARLIGHT Monte Carlo and to QCD based models.

  12. Glueball enhancements in p(gamma,VV)p through vector meson dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Cotanch; Robert A. Williams

    2004-03-01

    Double vector meson photoproduction, p(gamma, G {yields} VV)p, mediated by a scalar glueball G is investigated. Using vector meson dominance (VMD) and Regge/pomeron phenomenology, a measureable glueball enhancement is predicted in the invariant VV = rho rho and omega omega mass spectra. The scalar glueball is assumed to be the lightest physical state on the daughter pomeron trajectory governing diffractive vector meson photoproduction. In addition to cross sections, calculations for hadronic and electromagnetic glueball decays, G -> V V' (V,V'= rho, omega, phi, gamma), and gamma{sub v} V {yields} G transition form factors are presented based upon flavor universality, VMD and phenomenological couplings from phi photoproduction analyses. The predicted glueball decay widths are similar to an independent theoretical study. A novel signature for glueball detection is also discussed.

  13. Vector meson masses from a hidden local symmetry in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the magnetic responses of vector meson masses based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) model in a constant magnetic field, described by the lightest two-flavor system including the pion, rho and omega mesons in the spectrum. The effective masses influenced under the magnetic field are evaluated according to the derivative or chiral expansion established in the HLS model. At the leading order O (p2), the g factor of the charged rho meson is fixed to be 2, implying that the rho meson at this order is treated just like a pointlike spin-1 particle. Beyond the leading order, one finds anomalous magnetic interactions of the charged rho meson, involving the anomalous magnetic moment, which give corrections to the effective mass. It is then suggested that up to O (p4) the charged rho meson tends to become massless. Of interest is that nontrivial magnetic dependence of neutral mesons emerges to give rise to the significant mixing among neutral mesons. Consequently, it leads to the dramatic enhancement of the omega meson mass, which is testable in future lattice simulations. Corrections from terms beyond O (p4) are also addressed.

  14. Holographic vector mesons from spectral functions at finite baryon or isospin density

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Kaminski, Matthias; Rust, Felix

    2008-02-15

    We consider gauge/gravity duality with flavor for the finite-temperature field theory dual of the AdS-Schwarzschild black hole background with embedded D7-brane probes. In particular, we investigate spectral functions at finite baryon density in the black hole phase. We determine the resonance frequencies corresponding to meson-mass peaks as function of the quark mass over temperature ratio. We find that these frequencies have a minimum for a finite value of the quark mass. If the quotient of quark mass and temperature is increased further, the peaks move to larger frequencies. At the same time the peaks narrow, in agreement with the formation of nearly stable vector meson states which exactly reproduce the meson-mass spectrum found at zero temperature. We also calculate the diffusion coefficient, which has finite value for all quark mass to temperature ratios, and exhibits a first-order phase transition. Finally we consider an isospin chemical potential and find that the spectral functions display a resonance peak splitting, similar to the isospin meson-mass splitting observed in effective QCD models.

  15. On pseudosupersymmetric oscillators and reality of relativistic energies for vector mesons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckers, Jules; Debergh, Nathalie

    1995-01-01

    Specific oscillators - hereafter called pseudosupersymmetric oscillators - appear as interesting nonrelativistic concepts in connection with the study of relativistic vector mesons interacting with an external constant magnetic field when the real character of the energy eigenvalues is required as expected. A new pseudosupersymmetric quantum mechanics can then be developed and the corresponding pseudosupersymmetries can be pointed out.

  16. An effective approach to VMD at one loop order and the departure from ideal mixing vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, H.B.

    2000-03-28

    The authors examine the mechanisms producing departures from ideal mixing for vector mesons within the context of the Hidden Local Symmetry (HLS) model. The authors show that kaon loop transitions between the ideal combinations of the {omega} and {phi} mesons necessitate a field transformation in order to get the mass eigenstates. It is shown that this transformation is close to a rotation for processes involving, like meson decays, on-shell {omega} and {phi} mesons. The HLS model predicts a momentum dependent, slowly varying mixing angle between the ideal states. The authors examine numerically the consequences of this for radiative and leptonic decays of light mesons. The mean {omega}--{phi} mixing angle is found smaller than its ideal value; this is exhibited separately in radiative and in leptonic decays. Effects of nonet symmetry breaking in the vector sector are compared to those produced by the field rotation implied by the HLS model.

  17. In-medium spectral functions of vector- and axial-vector mesons from the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christopher; Rennecke, Fabian; Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; von Smekal, Lorenz; Wambach, Jochen

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present the first results on vector- and axial-vector meson spectral functions as obtained by applying the nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach to an effective low-energy theory motivated by the gauged linear sigma model. By using a recently proposed analytic continuation method, we study the in-medium behavior of the spectral functions of the ρ and a1 mesons in different regimes of the phase diagram. In particular, we demonstrate explicitly how these spectral functions degenerate at high temperatures as well as at large chemical potentials, as a consequence of the restoration of chiral symmetry. In addition, we also compute the momentum dependence of the ρ and a1 spectral functions and discuss the various timelike and spacelike processes that can occur.

  18. Nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, G.; Munoz, J. H.; Vera, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    We present a systematic study of exclusive charmless nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state. We calculate branching ratios of B{yields}PA, VA, and AA decays, where A, V, and P denote an axial vector, a vector, and a pseudoscalar meson, respectively. We assume a naive factorization hypothesis and use the improved version of the nonrelativistic Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise quark model for form factors in B{yields}A transitions. We include contributions that arise from the effective {delta}B=1 weak Hamiltonian H{sub eff}. The respective factorized amplitudes of these decays are explicitly shown and their penguin contributions are classified. We find that decays B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup +}K{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup -}, B{sup -}{yields}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400){eta}{sup (')}, B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(K{sup -}) have branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -5}. We also study the dependence of branching ratios for B{yields}K{sub 1}P(V,A) decays [K{sub 1}=K{sub 1}(1270), K{sub 1}(1400)] with respect to the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}.

  19. The In-medium Mass and Widths of Light Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    C. Djalali, M. Paolone, D. Weygand, M. H. Wood, R. Nasseripour

    2011-05-01

    Partial restoration of chiral symmetry in ordinary nuclear matter suggests the modification of properties of vector mesons, such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei were performed at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The properties of the rho, omega and [cursive phi] mesons were investigated via their rare leptonic decay to e+e-. This decay channel has an advantage over hadronic modes as it eliminates final state interactions in the nuclear matter. After subtracting the combinatorial background, the meson mass distributions were extracted for each of the nuclear targets. No significant mass shift is observed, however substantial increase in the widths of the mesons is reported.

  20. Transverse momentum distribution of vector mesons produced in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Hencken, Kai; Baur, Gerhard; Trautmann, Dirk

    2006-01-13

    We study the transverse momentum distribution of vector mesons produced in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions (UPCs). In UPCs there is no strong interaction between the nuclei, and the vector mesons are produced in photon-nucleus collisions where the (quasireal) photon is emitted from the other nucleus. Exchanging the role of both ions leads to interference effects. A detailed study of the transverse momentum distribution, which is determined by the transverse momentum of the emitted photon, the production process on the target, and the interference effect, is done. We study the unrestricted cross section and the one with an additional electromagnetic excitation of one or both ions; in the latter case small impact parameters are emphasized.

  1. On parasupersymmetric oscillators and relativistic vector mesons in constant magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debergh, Nathalie; Beckers, Jules

    1995-01-01

    Johnson-Lippmann considerations on oscillators and their connection with the minimal coupling schemes are visited in order to introduce a new Sakata-Taketani equation describing vector mesons in interaction with a constant magnetic field. This new proposal, based on a specific parasupersymmetric oscillator-like system, is characterized by real energies as opposed to previously pointed out relativistic equations corresponding to this interacting context.

  2. Rotation-invariant relations in vector meson decays into fermion pairs.

    PubMed

    Faccioli, Pietro; Lourenço, Carlos; Seixas, João

    2010-08-06

    The covariance properties of angular momentum eigenstates imply the existence of a rotation-invariant relation among the parameters of the difermion decay distribution of inclusively observed vector mesons. This relation is a generalization of the Lam-Tung identity, a result specific to Drell-Yan production in perturbative QCD, here shown to be equivalent to the dynamical condition that the dilepton is always produced transversely polarized with respect to quantization axes belonging to the production plane.

  3. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider

    DOE PAGES

    Lappi, T.; Venugopalan, R.; Mantysaari, H.

    2015-02-25

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multi-parton Fock states in the nuclear wavefunctions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multi-parton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we examine the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  4. Ballistic protons in incoherent exclusive vector meson production as a measure of rare parton fluctuations at an electron-ion collider.

    PubMed

    Lappi, T; Mäntysaari, H; Venugopalan, R

    2015-02-27

    We argue that the proton multiplicities measured in Roman pot detectors at an electron ion collider can be used to determine centrality classes in incoherent diffractive scattering. Incoherent diffraction probes the fluctuations in the interaction strengths of multiparton Fock states in the nuclear wave functions. In particular, the saturation scale that characterizes this multiparton dynamics is significantly larger in central events relative to minimum bias events. As an application, we study the centrality dependence of incoherent diffractive vector meson production. We identify an observable which is simultaneously very sensitive to centrality triggered parton fluctuations and insensitive to details of the model.

  5. Procedure for measuring photon and vector meson circular polarization variation with respect to the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, A. H.; Wang, G.

    2016-08-30

    The electromagnetic (EM) eld pattern created by spectators in relativistic heavy-ion collisions plants a seed of positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the hemisphere above (below) the reaction plane. Owing to the chiral anomaly, the magnetic helicity interacts with the fermionic helicity of the collision system, and causes photons emitted in upper- and lower-hemispheres to have different preferences in the circular polarization. Similar helicity separation for massive particles, due to the global vorticity, is also possible. In this paper, we lay down a procedure to measure the variation of the circular polarization w.r.t the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions formore » massless photons, as well as similar polarization patterns for vector mesons decaying into two daughters. We propose to study the yield differentially and compare the yield between upper- and lower-hemispheres in order to identify and quantify such effects.« less

  6. Procedure for measuring photon and vector meson circular polarization variation with respect to the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, A. H.; Wang, G.

    2016-08-30

    The electromagnetic (EM) eld pattern created by spectators in relativistic heavy-ion collisions plants a seed of positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the hemisphere above (below) the reaction plane. Owing to the chiral anomaly, the magnetic helicity interacts with the fermionic helicity of the collision system, and causes photons emitted in upper- and lower-hemispheres to have different preferences in the circular polarization. Similar helicity separation for massive particles, due to the global vorticity, is also possible. In this paper, we lay down a procedure to measure the variation of the circular polarization w.r.t the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions for massless photons, as well as similar polarization patterns for vector mesons decaying into two daughters. We propose to study the yield differentially and compare the yield between upper- and lower-hemispheres in order to identify and quantify such effects.

  7. Procedure for measuring photon and vector meson circular polarization variation with respect to the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, A. H.; Wang, G.

    2016-08-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) field pattern created by spectators in relativistic heavy-ion collisions plants a seed of positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the hemisphere above (below) the reaction plane. Owing to the chiral anomaly, the magnetic helicity interacts with the fermionic helicity of the collision system and causes photons emitted in upper and lower hemispheres to have different preferences in the circular polarization. Similar helicity separation for massive particles, owing to the global vorticity, is also possible. In this paper, we lay out a procedure to measure the variation of the circular polarization with respect to the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions for massless photons, as well as similar polarization patterns for vector mesons decaying into two daughters. We propose to study the yield differentially and compare the yield between upper and lower hemispheres to identify and quantify such effects.

  8. Exclusive central diffractive production of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebiedowicz, P.; Nachtmann, O.; Szczurek, A.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss exclusive central diffractive production of scalar (ƒ0(980), ƒ0(1370), ƒ0(1500)), pseudoscalar (η, η'(958)), and vector (ρ0) mesons in proton-proton collisions. The amplitudes are formulated in terms of effective vertices required to respect standard rules of Quantum Field Theory and propagators for the exchanged pomeron and reggeons. Different pomeron-pomeron-meson tensorial (vectorial) coupling structures are possible in general. In most cases two lowest orbital angular momentum - spin couplings are necessary to describe experimental differential distributions. For the ƒ0(980) and η production the reggeon-pomeron, pomeron-reggeon, and reggeon-reggeon exchanges are included in addition, which seems to be necessary at relatively low energies. The theoretical results are compared with the WA102 experimental data, in order to determine the model parameters. For the ρ0 production the photon-pomeron and pomeron-photon exchanges are considered. The coupling parameters of tensor pomeron and/or reggeon are fixed from the H1 and ZEUS experimental data of the γp → ρ0 p reaction. We present first predictions of this mechanism for pp → ppπ+π- reaction being studied at COMPASS, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC. Correlation in azimuthal angle between outgoing protons and distribution in pion rapidities at √s = 7 TeV are presented. We show that high-energy central production of mesons could provide crucial information on the spin structure of the soft pomeron.

  9. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.Y.

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed.

  10. Inclusive production of vector mesons in e/sup +/e/sup minus/ annihilation at. sqrt. s = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Edberg, T.K.

    1988-08-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of multiplicities and differential cross-sections of the /rho//sup 0/, K*/sup 0/, and /phi/ in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV, using data collected by the TPC/2..gamma.. Detector Facility at PEP. The number of vector mesons per event is determined to be N(/rho//sup 0/) = 0.77 +- 0.08 +- 0.15, N(K*/sup 0/ + /bar K/*/sup 0/) = 0.58 +- 0.05 +- 0.11, and N(/phi/) = 0.076 +- 0.010 +- 0.012. These multiplicities are used to find that the ratio of strange quarks to up quarks produced in the hadronization process is 0.30 +- 0.07, and that the ratio of light vector mesons to all light mesons produced in the hadronization process is 0.45 +- 0.08. All results agree with previous measurements. Measurements are compared with predictions of the Lund and Webber hadronization models, neither model is particularly favored nor disfavored. 60 refs., 32 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Measurement of Vector Meson Decays in Nuclei at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Y.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; En'yo, H.; Hamagaki, H.; Kanaya, J.; Kanno, K.; Kawama, D.; Kiyomichi, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Masumoto, S.; Murakami, H.; Muto, R.; Nakai, W.; Naruki, M.; Obara, Y.; Ozawa, K.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sekimoto, M.; Shibukawa, T.; Shigaki, K.; Takahashi, T. N.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Yokkaichi, S.

    Mass modification of vector meson has been studied in order to investigate the restoration of the chiral symmetry in hot and/or dense matter. Systematical measurement is necessary to confirm the mass modification due to the chiral symmetry restoration. For this purpose, E16 experiment at J-PARC will detect the vector mesons via e + e - decay. A goal of the E16 experiment is to reveal the target mass dependence and the meson velocity dependence of the mass modification through systematic measurement. For that purpose, it is aimed to collect slowly moving φ with typical β γ < 1.25 via di-electron decay as many as possible. The experiment will be performed at the high momentum beam line at J-PARC hadron hall, which supplies a 30-GeV proton beam with an intensity of 2 × 1010 protons per pulse. To cope with the high particle-rate environment, GEMs are used in the E16 spectrometer as the main detectors. To observe a possible second peak due to the modified mass of the φ inside nuclei, 5 MeV/c2 is our goal for the mass resolution. Preparation of the spectrometer construction is now in progress for the first beam time planned at 2016.

  12. Photoproduction of vector mesons: from ultraperipheral to semi-central heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-11-01

    We discuss nuclear cross sections for AA → AAV and AA → AAVV reactions with one or two vector mesons in the final state. Our analysis is done in the impact parameter space equivalent photon approximation. This approach allows to consider the above processes taking into account distance between colliding nuclei. We consider both ultraperipheral and semi-central collisions. We are a first group which undertook a study of single J/ψ photoproduction for different centrality bins. We show that one can describe new ALICE experimental data by including geometrical effects of collisions in the flux factor. Next, total and differential cross section for double-scattering mechanism in the exclusive AA → AAVV reaction in ultrarelativistic ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions is presented. In this context we consider double photoproduction and photon-photon processes. Simultaneously, we get very good agreement of our results with STAR (RHIC), CMS and ALICE (LHC) experimental data for single ρ0 and J/ψ vector meson production. A comparison of our predictions for exclusive four charged pions production is also presented.

  13. Exclusive production of vector mesons in pp and pp-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cisek, Anna; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Szczurek, Antoni

    2011-07-15

    Protons and antiprotons at collider energies are a source of high energy Weizsaecker-Williams photons. This opens up a possibility to study at the LHC exclusive photoproduction of heavy vector mesons at energies much larger than possible at the HERA accelerator.We present selected results on the production of vector mesons {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{Psi} and {Upsilon}. We show distributions in rapidity, transverse momentum of mesons and azimuthal angle between outgoing protons for RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies. The absorption effects are discussed.The amplitude for {gamma}p{yields}Vp is calculated in a pQCD k{sub T}-factorization approach with an unintegrated gluon distribution constrained by inclusive deep-inelastic structure function. The total cross section for diffractive meson (virtual) photo-production as a function of energy and photon virtuality is calculated and compared to HERA data. We also discuss the ratio of the first radial excitation state (2S) to the ground state (1S) in diffractive J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production.

  14. Observation of chicJ radiative decays to light vector mesons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J V; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2008-10-10

    Using a total of 2.74 x 10(7) decays of the psi(2S) collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present a study of chi(cJ)-->gammaV, where V=rho(0), omega, phi. The transitions chi(c1)-->gammarho(0 and chi(c1)-->gammaomega are observed with B(chi(c1)-->gammarho(0))=(2.43+/-0.19+/-0.22) x 10(-4) and B(chi(c1)-->gammaomega)=(8.3+/-1.5+/-1.2) x 10(-5). In the chi(c1)-->gammarho(0) transition, the final state meson is dominantly longitudinally polarized. Upper limits on the branching fractions of other chi(cJ) states to light vector mesons are presented.

  15. Exclusive vector meson photoproduction at the LHC and a future circular collider: A closer look on the final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, G. Gil; Gonçalves, V. P.; Jaime, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past years, the LHC experiments have reported experimental evidence for processes associated to photon-photon and photon-hadron interactions, showing their potential to investigate the production of low- and high-mass systems in exclusive events. In the particular case of the photoproduction of vector mesons, the experimental study of this final state is expected to shed light on the description of the QCD dynamics at small values of the Bjorken-x variable. In this paper, we extend previous studies for the exclusive J /Ψ and ϒ photoproduction in p p collisions based on the nonlinear QCD dynamics by performing a detailed study of the final-state distributions that can be measured experimentally at the LHC and at a future circular collider. Predictions for the rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of the vector mesons and of final-state dimuons are presented for p p collisions at √{s }=7 , 13, and 100 TeV.

  16. Vector meson and associated strangeness production using a linearly polarized photon beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Philip L. Cole

    2004-09-01

    The set of experiments forming the g8a run took place in the summer of 2001 in Hall B of Jefferson Lab. The g8a run was the commissioning experiment for the linearly-polarized photon beam at CLAS. The aim of these experiments is to improve the understanding of the underlying symmetry of the quark degrees of freedom in the nucleon, the nature of the parity exchange between the incident photon and the target nucleon, and the mechanism of associated strangeness production in electromagnetic reactions. A beam of tagged and collimated linearly polarized photons (energy range 1.8-2.2 GeV) in conjunction with the large solid angle coverage of CLAS make possible the extraction of the differential cross-sections and polarization observables for the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons. The reaction channels are under investigation to search for possibly missing nucleon resonances. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results on the measurement of the photon asymmetries of the aforementioned reactions will be presented in this paper.

  17. Beyond gauge theory: positivity and causal localization in the presence of vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2016-07-01

    The Hilbert space formulation of interacting s=1 vector-potentials stands is an interesting contrast with the point-local Krein space setting of gauge theory. Already in the absence of interactions the Wilson loop in a Hilbert space setting has a topological property which is missing in the gauge-theoretic description (Haag duality, Aharonov-Bohm effect); the conceptual differences increase in the presence of interactions. The Hilbert space positivity weakens the causal localization properties of interacting fields, which results in the replacement of the gauge-variant point-local matter fields in Krein space by string-local physical fields in Hilbert space. The gauge invariance of the perturbative S-matrix corresponds to its independence of the space-like string direction of its interpolating fields. In contrast to gauge theory, whose direct physical range is limited to a gauge-invariant perturbative S-matrix and local observables, its Hilbert space string-local counterpart is a full-fledged quantum field theory (QFT). The new setting reveals that the Lie structure of self-coupled vector mesons results from perturbative implementation of the causal localization principles of QFT.

  18. Comparison of isoscalar vector meson production cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Clement, H.; Dietrich, J.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dshemuchadse, S.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Eyrich, W.; Filippi, A.; Freiesleben, H.; Fritsch, M.; Gillitzer, A.; Hesselbarth, D.; Jä, R.; Karsch, L.; Kilian, K.; Kuhlmann, E.; Marcello, S.; Michel, P.; Mö, K.; Morsch, H. P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plettner, Ch.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Schö, P.; Schroeder, W.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Steinke, M.; Sun, G. J.; Ullrich, W.; Wenzel, R.; Wintz, P.; Wagner, M.; Wilms, A.; Wirth, S.; Zupranski, P.; COSY-TOF Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    The reaction pp → ppω was investigated with the TOF spectrometer, which is an external experiment at the accelerator COSY (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany). Total as well as differential cross sections were determined at an excess energy of 93 MeV (pbeam = 2950 MeV / c). Using the total cross section of (9.0 ± 0.7 ± 1.1) μb for the reaction pp → ppω determined here and existing data for the reaction pp → ppϕ, the ratio Rϕ / ω =σϕ /σω turns out to be significantly larger than expected by the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule. The uncertainty of this ratio is considerably smaller than in previous determinations. The differential distributions show that the ω production is still dominated by S-wave production at this excess energy, however higher partial waves clearly contribute. A comparison of the measured angular distributions for ω production to published distributions for ϕ production at 83 MeV shows that the data are consistent with an identical production mechanism for both vector mesons.

  19. Comparison of isoscalar vector meson production cross sections in proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosy-Tof Collaboration; Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Clement, H.; Dietrich, J.; Doroshkevich, E.; Dshemuchadse, S.; Ehrhardt, K.; Erhardt, A.; Eyrich, W.; Filippi, A.; Freiesleben, H.; Fritsch, M.; Gillitzer, A.; Hesselbarth, D.; Jä, R.; Karsch, L.; Kilian, K.; Kuhlmann, E.; Marcello, S.; Michel, P.; Mö, K.; Morsch, H. P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plettner, Ch.; Ritman, J.; Roderburg, E.; Schö, P.; Schroeder, W.; Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Steinke, M.; Sun, G. J.; Ullrich, W.; Wenzel, R.; Wintz, P.; Wagner, M.; Wilms, A.; Wirth, S.; Zupranski, P.

    2007-04-01

    The reaction pp→ppω was investigated with the TOF spectrometer, which is an external experiment at the accelerator COSY (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany). Total as well as differential cross sections were determined at an excess energy of 93 MeV (p=2950 MeV/c). Using the total cross section of (9.0±0.7±1.1) μb for the reaction pp→ppω determined here and existing data for the reaction pp→ppϕ, the ratio R=σ/σ turns out to be significantly larger than expected by the Okubo Zweig Iizuka (OZI) rule. The uncertainty of this ratio is considerably smaller than in previous determinations. The differential distributions show that the ω production is still dominated by S-wave production at this excess energy, however higher partial waves clearly contribute. A comparison of the measured angular distributions for ω production to published distributions for ϕ production at 83 MeV shows that the data are consistent with an identical production mechanism for both vector mesons.

  20. Test of the OZI rule in vector meson production with the COMPASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Johannes; Compass Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN collected a large set of data with hadron beams (p, π K) and different targets (H2, Pb, Ni, W) in the years 2008 and 2009. The main goal is the search for exotic bound states of quarks and gluons (glueballs, hybrids) and several preliminary results from the ongoing analysis have already emerged. The production of exotic states is known to be favoured in glue-rich environments, e.g. so-called OZI-forbidden processes. The Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule states that processes with disconnected quark line diagrams are suppressed. As a consequence, states with an sbar s component should be suppressed with respect to states containing mainly u and d quarks. The numerous reported violations of the OZI rule show that the underlying physics is more complicated. By studying the degree of OZI violation a lot can learned about the production mechanism and possibly also about the nucleon structure itself. The uniquely large COMPASS data sample allows for detailed studies with respect to kinematic variables (e.g. xF). Results from the ongoing analysis on the comparison of ω and phi vector mesons production in pp → pp (ω/phi) are presented and an outlook on the prospect of spin alignment measurements with COMPASS is given.

  1. Simulations for an experiment to probe the in-medium properties of photoproduced vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Tur, Clarisse

    2003-01-01

    The g7 experiment has been devised to measure the modifications of the vector meson properties, such as mass or width, inside nuclear medium, based on the ideas presented in the numerous papers published during the fifteen years that preceded its run. It consisted in sending a bremstrahlung photon beam on a target that contained elements with different densities, a liquid deuterium cell, and seven solid foils: carbon, iron, carbon, lead, carbon, titanium, carbon. The goal of the experiment is to examine the inclusive e+e- photoproduction in the incoherent region. The reaction of interest to g7 is γA → VA' → e+e-A' where V could be a ρ an ω or a Ψ meson. The goal of the present thesis was to present the simulation work done prior to the g7 run in the fall of 2002 at Jlab, essential for the choice of the ideal experimental setup and conditions, as well as the test run of June 2002. The simulations needed a particular attention, given the many experimental challenges that awaited the g7 team. First, one had to prove that the resolution of the CLAS detector was sufficient to properly locate the vertices of the events given the multi-segmented target, and the simulations proved that fact. They also provided a rough idea of the systematic errors that one had to expect. Using nuclei bigger than carbon was a first time for CLAS. Given the very small branching ratio for ρ → e+e-, a very intense beam had to be sent on the target containing high-Z material. Thus, a huge background, formed of low energy e+e- pairs, was expected around the target and the region I of the drift chambers and which one had to reduce in an efficient way. The simulations showed that using the mini torus with its current set to 75% of its maximum value would give a reduction of about a factor of 3 in the number of hits in the region I of the drift chambers, compared to the case with no mini torus in

  2. Modeling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brott, I.

    2011-02-01

    Massive stars can be considered as cosmic engines. With their high luminosities, strong stellar winds and violent deaths they drive the evolution of galaxies through-out the history of the universe. Despite the importance of massive stars, their evolution is still poorly understood. Two major issues have plagued evolutionary models of massive stars until today: mixing and mass loss On the main sequence, the effects of mass loss remain limited in the considered mass and metallicity range, this thesis concentrates on the role of mixing in massive stars. This thesis approaches this problem just on the cross road between observations and simulations. The main question: Do evolutionary models of single stars, accounting for the effects of rotation, reproduce the observed properties of real stars. In particular we are interested if the evolutionary models can reproduce the surface abundance changes during the main-sequence phase. To constrain our models we build a population synthesis model for the sample of the VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive stars, for which star-formation history and rotational velocity distribution are well constrained. We consider the four main regions of the Hunter diagram. Nitrogen un-enriched slow rotators and nitrogen enriched fast rotators that are predicted by theory. Nitrogen enriched slow rotators and nitrogen unenriched fast rotators that are not predicted by our model. We conclude that currently these comparisons are not sufficient to verify the theory of rotational mixing. Physical processes in addition to rotational mixing appear necessary to explain the stars in the later two regions. The chapters of this Thesis have been published in the following Journals: Ch. 2: ``Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars I: Grids of Evolutionary Models and Isochrones'', I. Brott, S. E. de Mink, M. Cantiello, N. Langer, A. de Koter, C. J. Evans, I. Hunter, C. Trundle, J.S. Vink submitted to Astronomy & Astrop hysics Ch. 3: ``The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive

  3. Masses of Axial-Vector Resonances in a Linear Sigma Model with N{sub f} = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, Denis; Giacosa, Francesco; Kovacs, Peter; Wolf, Gyoergy

    2011-05-23

    We discuss an N{sub f} = 3 linear sigma model with vector and axial-vector mesons (extended Linear Sigma Model-eLSM). We present first results regarding the masses of axial-vector mesons determined from the extended model.

  4. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  5. Accessing transverse nucleon and gluon distributions in heavy nuclei using coherent vector meson photoproduction at high energies in ion ultraperipheral collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.; Zhalov, M.

    2017-02-01

    By using the theoretical approaches that describe well the available data on t -integrated coherent photoproduction of light and heavy vector mesons in Pb-Pb ultraperipheral collisions (UPCs) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Run 1, we calculate the momentum transfer distributions for this process for ρ and J /ψ vector mesons in the kinematics of Run 2 at the LHC. We demonstrate that nuclear shadowing not only suppresses the absolute value of the cross sections but also shifts the momentum transfer distributions toward smaller values of the momentum transfer |t | . This result can be interpreted as a broadening in the impact parameter space of the effective nucleon density in nuclei by 14% in the case of ρ and the nuclear gluon distribution by 5%-11% in the case of J /ψ .

  6. Vector Meson Mass Corrections at O(a{sup 2}) in PQChPT with Wilson and Ginsparg-Wilson quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Anthony W. Thomas

    2005-07-01

    We derive the mixed as well as unmixed lattice heavy meson chiral Lagrangian up to order O(a{sup 2}), with Wilson and Ginsparg-Wilson fermions. We consider two flavor partially quenched theory and calculate vector meson mass corrections up to order O(a{sup 2}), including the corrections associated with the violation of O(4) rotational symmetry down to hypercubic group. The chiral extrapolation formula is then compared with that used in numerical simulations.

  7. Population Models for Massive Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Wook; Joo, Seok-Joo; Han, Sang-Il; Na, Chongsam; Lim, Dongwook; Roh, Dong-Goo

    2015-03-01

    Increasing number of massive globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way are now turned out to host multiple stellar populations having different heavy element abundances enriched by supernovae. Recent observations have further shown that [CNO/Fe] is also enhanced in metal-rich subpopulations in most of these GCs, including ω Cen and M22 (Marino et al. 2011, 2012). In order to reflect this in our population modeling, we have expanded the parameter space of Y 2 isochrones and horizontal-branch (HB) evolutionary tracks to include the cases of normal and enhanced nitrogen abundances ([N/Fe] = 0.0, 0.8, and 1.6). The observed variations in the total CNO content were reproduced by interpolating these nitrogen enhanced stellar models. Our test simulations with varying N and O abundances show that, once the total CNO sum ([CNO/Fe]) is held constant, both N and O have almost identical effects on the HR diagram (see Fig. 1).

  8. Observation of a New Narrow Axial-Vector Meson a1(1420).

    PubMed

    Adolph, C; Akhunzyanov, R; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C; Badełek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Büchele, M; Burtin, E; Chang, W-C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Dünnweber, W; Duic, V; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hahne, D; von Harrach, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Hsieh, C-Yu; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jörg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuß, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W-D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J-C; Pereira, F; Pesek, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rocco, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schmeing, S; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Schlüter, T; Selyunin, A; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Veloso, J; Virius, M; Wallner, S; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

    2015-08-21

    The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has measured diffractive dissociation of 190  GeV/c pions into the π(-)π(-)π(+) final state using a stationary hydrogen target. A partial-wave analysis (PWA) was performed in bins of 3π mass and four-momentum transfer using the isobar model and the so far largest PWA model consisting of 88 waves. A narrow peak is observed in the f0(980)π channel with spin, parity and C-parity quantum numbers J(PC)=1(++). We present a resonance-model study of a subset of the spin-density matrix selecting 3π states with J(PC)=2(++) and 4(++) decaying into ρ(770)π and with J(PC)=1(++) decaying into f0(980)π. We identify a new a1 meson with mass (1414(-13)(+15))  MeV/c2 and width (153(-23)(+8))  MeV/c2. Within the final states investigated in our analysis, we observe the new a1(1420) decaying only into f0(980)π, suggesting its exotic nature.

  9. Observation of {chi}{sub c1} Decays into Vector Meson Pairs {phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y.

    2011-08-26

    Using (106{+-}4)x10{sup 6} {psi}(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we present the first measurement of decays of {chi}{sub c1} to vector meson pairs {phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4{+-}0.3{+-}0.5)x10{sup -4}, (6.0{+-}0.3{+-}0.7)x10{sup -4}, and (2.2{+-}0.6{+-}0.2)x10{sup -5}, for {chi}{sub c1}{yields}{phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in {chi}{sub cJ} decays. In addition, the measurement of {chi}{sub cJ}{yields}{omega}{phi} provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed {chi}{sub cJ} decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of {chi}{sub c0} and {chi}{sub c2} to vector meson pairs.

  10. Observation of χc1 Decays into Vector Meson Pairs ΦΦ, ωω and, ωΦ

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; ...

    2011-08-22

    Using (106±4)×10⁶ ψ(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider, we present the first measurement of decays of χc1 to vector meson pairs ΦΦ, ωω, and ωΦ. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4±0.3±0.5)×10⁻⁴, (6.0±0.3±0.7)×10⁻⁴, and (2.2±0.6±0.2)×10⁻⁵, for χc1 →ΦΦ, ωω, and ωΦ, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in χcJ decays. In addition, the measurement of χcJ→ωΦ provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed χcJ decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of χc0 and χc2 to vector meson pairs.

  11. Observation of χ(c1) decays into vector meson pairs φφ, ωω, and ωφ.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; An, L; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Baldini, R; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cao, G F; Cao, X X; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, M Y; Fan, R R; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Greco, M; Grishin, S; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kavatsyuk, M; Komamiya, S; Kuehn, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G C; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y W; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z Q; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X; Ma, X Y; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Sonoda, S; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tang, X F; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Varner, G S; Wan, X; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xu, Z Z; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, M; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, L; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhao, Z L; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhong, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X; Zweber, P

    2011-08-26

    Using (106±4)×10⁻⁶ ψ(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider, we present the first measurement of decays of χ(c1) to vector meson pairs φφ, ωω, and ωφ. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4±0.3±0.5)×10⁻⁴, (6.0±0.3±0.7)×10⁻⁴, and (2.2±0.6±0.2)×10⁻⁵, for χ(c1)→φφ, ωω, and ωφ, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in χ(cJ) decays. In addition, the measurement of χ(cJ)→ωφ provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed χ(cJ) decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of χ(c0) and χ(c2) to vector meson pairs.

  12. Combined stellar evolution and spectroscopic modeling of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose H.

    The morphological appearance of massive stars during their evolution and at the pre-SN stage is very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. We recently developed coupled stellar evolution and atmospheric modeling of stars done with the Geneva and CMFGEN codes, for initial masses between 9 and 120 M ⊙. We are able to predict the observables such as the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry. Here I discuss how the spectrum of a massive star changes across its evolution and before death. Our models allow, for the first time, direct comparison between predictions from stellar evolution models and observations of SN progenitors.

  13. Periodic ground state for the charged massive Schwinger model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, S.; Sailer, K.; Polonyi, J.

    2004-11-15

    It is shown that the charged massive Schwinger model supports a periodic vacuum structure for arbitrary charge density, similar to the common crystalline layout known in solid state physics. The dynamical origin of the inhomogeneity is identified in the framework of the bosonized model and in terms of the original fermionic variables.

  14. Generalized universality in the massive sine-Gordon model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, S.; Sailer, K.; Nandori, I.; Polonyi, J.

    2008-01-15

    A nontrivial interplay of the UV and IR scaling laws, a generalization of the universality is demonstrated in the framework of the massive sine-Gordon model, as a result of a detailed study of the global behavior of the renormalization group flow and the phase structure.

  15. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  16. The halo model in a massive neutrino cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it

    2014-12-01

    We provide a quantitative analysis of the halo model in the context of massive neutrino cosmologies. We discuss all the ingredients necessary to model the non-linear matter and cold dark matter power spectra and compare with the results of N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos. Our neutrino halo model is able to capture the non-linear behavior of matter clustering with a ∼20% accuracy up to very non-linear scales of k = 10 h/Mpc (which would be affected by baryon physics). The largest discrepancies arise in the range k = 0.5 – 1 h/Mpc where the 1-halo and 2-halo terms are comparable and are present also in a massless neutrino cosmology. However, at scales k < 0.2 h/Mpc our neutrino halo model agrees with the results of N-body simulations at the level of 8% for total neutrino masses of < 0.3 eV. We also model the neutrino non-linear density field as a sum of a linear and clustered component and predict the neutrino power spectrum and the cold dark matter-neutrino cross-power spectrum up to k = 1 h/Mpc with ∼30% accuracy. For masses below 0.15 eV the neutrino halo model captures the neutrino induced suppression, casted in terms of matter power ratios between massive and massless scenarios, with a 2% agreement with the results of N-body/neutrino simulations. Finally, we provide a simple application of the halo model: the computation of the clustering of galaxies, in massless and massive neutrinos cosmologies, using a simple Halo Occupation Distribution scheme and our halo model extension.

  17. Spectroscopic evolution of massive stars from unified stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of different classes of massive stars is often built by comparing evolutionary models and observations. However, this comparison is far from trivial, in particular when the effects of mass loss are significant. To tackle this problem, we recently combined stellar evolution calculations using the Geneva code with atmospheric/wind CMFGEN model. This allowed us to determine the interior and spectroscopic evolution of massive stars from the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) to the pre-supernova (SN) stage. In this talk, I will discuss the spectroscopic evolution stars at solar metallicity, the lifetimes of the different spectroscopic phases (O-type, LBV, WR), how they are related to evolutionary phases (H-core burning, H-shell burning, He-core burning), and their ionizing output. I will also discuss how this is affected by mass loss at different stages of the evolution.

  18. Development of a Massively Parallel NOGAPS Forecast Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    to exploit massively parallel processor (MPP), distributed memory computer architectures. Future increases in computer power from MPP’s will allow...substantial increases in model resolution, more realistic physical processes, and more sophisticated data assimilation methods, all of which will...immediate objective of the project is to redesign the model’s numerical algorithms and data structures to allow efficient execution on MPP

  19. A symmetric approach to the massive nonlinear sigma model

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrari, Ruggero

    2011-09-28

    In the present study we extend to the massive case the procedure of divergences subtraction, previously introduced for the massless nonlinear sigma model (D = 4). Perturbative expansion in the number of loops is successfully constructed. The resulting theory depends on the Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking parameter v, on the mass m and on the radiative correction parameter Λ. Fermions are not considered in the present work. SU(2) Ⓧ SU(2) is the group used.

  20. Massive-Scale Tree Modelling from Tls Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raumonen, P.; Casella, E.; Calders, K.; Murphy, S.; Åkerbloma, , M.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method for reconstructing automatically the quantitative structure model of every tree in a forest plot from terrestrial laser scanner data. A new feature is the automatic extraction of individual trees from the point cloud. The method is tested with a 30-m diameter English oak plot and a 80-m diameter Australian eucalyptus plot. For the oak plot the total biomass was overestimated by about 17 %, when compared to allometry (N = 15), and the modelling time was about 100 min with a laptop. For the eucalyptus plot the total biomass was overestimated by about 8.5 %, when compared to a destructive reference (N = 27), and the modelling time was about 160 min. The method provides accurate and fast tree modelling abilities for, e.g., biomass estimation and ground truth data for airborne measurements at a massive ground scale.

  1. Higher derivative massive spin-3 models in D =2 +1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    We find new higher derivative models describing a parity doublet of massive spin-3 modes in D =2 +1 dimensions. One of them is of fourth order in derivatives while the other one is of sixth order. They are complete, in the sense that they contain the auxiliary scalar field required to remove spurious degrees of freedom. Both of them are obtained through the master action technique starting with the usual (second-order) spin-3 Singh-Hagen model, which guarantees that they are ghost free. The fourth- and sixth-order terms are both invariant under (transverse) Weyl transformations, quite similarly to the fourth-order K -term of the "new massive gravity." The sixth-order term slightly differs from the product of the Schouten by the Einstein tensor, both of third order in derivatives. It is also possible to write down the fourth-order term as a product of a Schouten-like by an Einstein-like tensor (both of second order in derivatives) in close analogy with the K -term.

  2. The influence of the enhanced vector meson sector on the properties of the matter of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Ilona; Manka, Ryszard; Pienkos, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the model of a neutron star with non-zero strangeness constructed within the framework of the nonlinear realization of the chiral SU(3)L x SU(3)R symmetry. The emphasis is put on the physical properties of the matter of a neutron star as well as on its internal structure. The obtained solution is particularly aimed at the problem of the construction of a theoretical model of a neutron star matter with hyperons that will give high value of the maximum mass.

  3. The Influence of the Enhanced Vector Meson Sector on the Properties of the Matter of Neutron Stars

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Ilona; Manka, Ryszard; Pienkos, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the model of a neutron star with non-zero strangeness constructed within the framework of the nonlinear realization of the chiral symmetry. The emphasis is put on the physical properties of the matter of a neutron star as well as on its internal structure. The obtained solution is particularly aimed at the problem of the construction of a theoretical model of a neutron star matter with hyperons that will give high value of the maximum mass. PMID:25188304

  4. Charge transport and vector meson dissociation across the thermal phase transition in lattice QCD with two light quark flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Francis, Anthony; Jäger, Benjamin; Meyer, Harvey B.

    2016-03-01

    We compute and analyze correlation functions in the isovector vector channel at vanishing spatial momentum across the deconfinement phase transition in lattice QCD. The simulations are carried out at temperatures T /Tc=0.156 , 0.8, 1.0, 1.25 and 1.67 with Tc≃203 MeV for two flavors of Wilson-Clover fermions with a zero-temperature pion mass of ≃270 MeV . Exploiting exact sum rules and applying a phenomenologically motivated Ansatz allows us to determine the spectral function ρ (ω ,T ) via a fit to the lattice correlation function data. From these results we estimate the electrical conductivity across the deconfinement phase transition via a Kubo formula and find evidence for the dissociation of the ρ meson by resolving its spectral weight at the available temperatures. We also apply the Backus-Gilbert method as a model-independent approach to this problem. At any given frequency, it yields a local weighted average of the true spectral function. We use this method to compare kinetic theory predictions and previously published phenomenological spectral functions to our lattice study.

  5. Modeling Broadband X-Ray Absorption of Massive Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen,David H.; Zsargo, Janos; Martell, Erin M.; MacArthur, James P.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Gagne, Marc; Hillier, D. John

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for computing the net transition of X-rays emitted by shock-heated plasma distributed throughout a partially optically thick stellar wind from a massive star. We find the transmission by an exact integration of the formal solution, assuming the emitting plasma and absorbing plasma are mixed at a constant mass ratio above some minimum radius, below which there is assumed to be no emission. This model is more realistic than either the slab absorption associated with a corona at the base of the wind or the exospheric approximation that assumes all observed X-rays are emitted without attenuation from above the radius of optical depth unity. Our model is implemented in XSPEC as a pre-calculated table that can be coupled to a user-defined table of the wavelength dependent wind opacity. We provide a default wind opacity model that is more representative of real wind opacities than the commonly used neutral ISM tabulation. Preliminary modeling of Chandra grating data indicates that the X-ray hardness trend of OB stars with spectral subtype cars largely be understood as a wind absorption effect.

  6. MODELING BROADBAND X-RAY ABSORPTION OF MASSIVE STAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Zsargo, Janos; Martell, Erin M.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Gagne, Marc; Hillier, D. John

    2010-08-20

    We present a method for computing the net transmission of X-rays emitted by shock-heated plasma distributed throughout a partially optically thick stellar wind from a massive star. We find the transmission by an exact integration of the formal solution, assuming that the emitting plasma and absorbing plasma are mixed at a constant mass ratio above some minimum radius, below which there is assumed to be no emission. This model is more realistic than either the slab absorption associated with a corona at the base of the wind or the exospheric approximation that assumes that all observed X-rays are emitted without attenuation from above the radius of optical depth unity. Our model is implemented in XSPEC as a pre-calculated table that can be coupled to a user-defined table of the wavelength-dependent wind opacity. We provide a default wind opacity model that is more representative of real wind opacities than the commonly used neutral interstellar medium (ISM) tabulation. Preliminary modeling of Chandra grating data indicates that the X-ray hardness trend of OB stars with spectral subtype can largely be understood as a wind absorption effect.

  7. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  8. Efficiently modeling neural networks on massively parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Neural networks are a very useful tool for analyzing and modeling complex real world systems. Applying neural network simulations to real world problems generally involves large amounts of data and massive amounts of computation. To efficiently handle the computational requirements of large problems, we have implemented at Los Alamos a highly efficient neural network compiler for serial computers, vector computers, vector parallel computers, and fine grain SIMD computers such as the CM-2 connection machine. This paper describes the mapping used by the compiler to implement feed-forward backpropagation neural networks for a SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) architecture parallel computer. Thinking Machines Corporation has benchmarked our code at 1.3 billion interconnects per second (approximately 3 gigaflops) on a 64,000 processor CM-2 connection machine (Singer 1990). This mapping is applicable to other SIMD computers and can be implemented on MIMD computers such as the CM-5 connection machine. Our mapping has virtually no communications overhead with the exception of the communications required for a global summation across the processors (which has a sub-linear runtime growth on the order of O(log(number of processors)). We can efficiently model very large neural networks which have many neurons and interconnects and our mapping can extend to arbitrarily large networks (within memory limitations) by merging the memory space of separate processors with fast adjacent processor interprocessor communications. This paper will consider the simulation of only feed forward neural network although this method is extendable to recurrent networks.

  9. Chronology protection in Galileon models and massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, Clare; Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: claudia.deRham@case.edu E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2012-07-01

    Galileon models are a class of effective field theories that have recently received much attention. They arise in the decoupling limit of theories of massive gravity, and in some cases they have been treated in their own right as scalar field theories with a specific nonlinearly realized global symmetry (Galilean transformation). It is well known that in the presence of a source, these Galileon theories admit superluminal propagating solutions, implying that as quantum field theories they must admit a different notion of causality than standard local Lorentz invariant theories. We show that in these theories it is easy to construct closed timelike curves (CTCs) within the naive regime of validity of the effective field theory. However, on closer inspection we see that the CTCs could never arise since the Galileon inevitably becomes infinitely strongly coupled at the onset of the formation of a CTC. This implies an infinite amount of backreaction, first on the background for the Galileon field, signaling the break down of the effective field theory, and subsequently on the spacetime geometry, forbidding the formation of the CTC. Furthermore the background solution required to create CTCs becomes unstable with an arbitrarily fast decay time. Thus Galileon theories satisfy a direct analogue of Hawking's chronology protection conjecture.

  10. Modeling and analysing massive star spectra: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Todt, Helge; Sander, Andreas; Hainich, Rainer; Shenar, Tomer; Oskinova, Lidia

    2013-06-01

    Depending on their mass-loss rate, the spectra of massive stars are more or less formed in the expanding parts of their atmosphere, i.e. in the stellar wind. Over decades we have developed a sophisticated non-LTE code for modeling such spectra adequately. Originally, the "Potsdam WR PoWR" code aimed at Wolf-Rayet stars with their emission-line dominated spectra. Meanwhile we have added a more detailed treatment of the lower, nearly static parts of the atmosphere, including pressure broadening of lines. This extends the applicability of the models to spectra showing both, photospheric absorption lines and stellar wind features, e.g. from O and B-type stars. The ionizing effect of X-rays, which are intrinsically produced in stellar winds, can be taken into account. Instead of a one-temperature plasma, a power-law distribution of the X-ray emission measure can be chosen and gives the best fit of the EUV spectral energy distribution. The effect of rotation on the emergent spectrum can be simulated under suitable assumptions on the angular motions in the wind. When clumping is accounted for in the approximation of optically thin structures, this leads to a reduction of empirical mass-loss rates when determined from recombination lines. A more general, but not fully consistent formalism has been incorporated to account for the effect of "macroclumping" on resonance lines. PoWR calculations were also combined with a 3-D Monte Carlo code for resonance line scattering in a structured stellar wind. A formalism has been developed to establish the hydrodynamically consistent solution for radiation-driven winds, including all multiple-scattering effects that are essential e.g. for WR stars, but this branch of the code is not ready yet for routinely use. PoWR models have been used extensively for analyzing WR stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, and for a couple of OB-type stars and LBVs. An increasing number of models is made available via internet.

  11. Properties of young massive clusters obtained with different massive-star evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Aida; Charlot, Stéphane

    We undertake a comprehensive comparative test of seven widely-used spectral synthesis models using multi-band HST photometry of a sample of eight YMCs in two galaxies. We provide a first quantitative estimate of the accuracies and uncertainties of new models, show the good progress of models in fitting high-quality observations, and highlight the need of further comprehensive comparative tests.

  12. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can be obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.

  13. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    DOE PAGES

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can bemore » obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.« less

  14. Photometrically-derived properties of massive-star clusters obtained with different massive-star evolution tracks and deterministic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Aida; Charlot, Stéphane; Eldridge, John

    2015-08-01

    We compute libraries of stellar + nebular spectra of populations of coeval stars with ages of <100 Myr and metallicities of Z=0.001 to 0.040, using different sets of massive-star evolution tracks, i.e., new Padova tracks for single non-rotating stars, the Geneva tracks for single non-rotating and rotating stars, and the Auckland tracks for single non-rotating and binary stars. For the stellar component, we use population synthesis codes galaxev, starburst99, and BPASS, depending on the set of tracks. For the nebular component we use photoionization code cloudy. From these spectra, we obtain magnitudes in filters F275W, F336W, F438W, F547M, F555W, F657N, and F814W of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera Three. We use i) our computed magnitudes, ii) new multi-band photometry of massive-star clusters in nearby (<11 Mpc) galaxies spanning the metallicity range 12+log(O/H)=7.2-9.2, observed as part of HST programs 13364 (PI Calzetti) and 13773 (PI Chandar), and iii) Bayesian inference to a) establish how well the different models are able to constrain the metallicities, extinctions, ages, and masses of the star clusters, b) quantify differences in the cluster properties obtained with the different models, and c) assess how properties of lower-mass clusters are affected by the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In our models, the stellar evolution tracks, stellar atmospheres, and nebulae have similar chemical compositions. Different metallicities are available with different sets of tracks and we compare results from models of similar metallicities. Our results have implications for studies of the formation and evolution of star clusters, the cluster age and mass functions, and the star formation histories of galaxies.

  15. A study of interference effects in photoproduced rho, omega and phi vector mesons decaying into the muon+ muon- final state and a measurement of the psi meson decaying to muon+ muon- branching fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisullo, Valeria

    This thesis is a study of the photoproduction of light and charmed-anticharmed mesons, using data collected by the FOCUS experiment. FOCUS is a fixed target photoproduction experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermi-lab), that collected data during 1996-1997. The experiment had a dimuon trigger which allowed us to obtain a very large sample of dimuon events. The first analysis focuses on the study of the low mass vector mesons rho, o and φ, and provides the first high statistics measurement of the rho -- φ and rho -- o interference phases using muons. Attempts to determine such parameters, necessary for a better understanding of the production mechanisms of these vector mesons, date back to the end of the '60's, but a consistent analysis using leptonic final states ( e+e- or mu +mu-) is still missing. Our results are: frf=-31.2+/- 26.8∘a ndfrw= 184.5+/-3.5+/-3.1∘ . Our second analysis studies the psi' charmonium state and determines its branching fraction (BF) into the mu+mu- decay channel. The technique used to extract the BFpsi'→mu +mu- consists of measuring the yield of the psi' → mu+mu- decay (Y2b) relative to the yield of psi' → J/psipi+pi -, where the J/psi decays in mu +mu- (Y4 b). Fitting the psi' peak in the mu+mu - and mu+mu- pi +pi- mass plots, we report signal event yields of Y2b = 563 +/- 35 and Y4b = 1262 +/- 39. These measurements allow us to evaluate the psi' branching fraction as: BFy'→m+m-= 7.51+/-0.55stat+/- 0.55sys x10-3. This result significantly improves the precision of the world average value.

  16. Network-oriented massive spatio-temporal data model and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renyi; Liu, Nan; Bao, Weizheng; Zhu, Yan

    2006-10-01

    It is foundation and key of developing GIS platforms of new generation to study the network-oriented massive spatial and spatio-temporal data model. But the research has met many difficulties. The paper combines two models of massive spatial data and spatio-temporal data seemed to be independent to study together in theory and technique. On the base of analyzing the limitations of present geographical spatial data model and spatio-temporal data model, a new model with characteristics of new generation's GIS platform, that is, Feature-Oriented Massive Spatio-temporal Object Tree (FOMSOT) with four-tier architectures is presented. The FOMSOT breaks down the constraint of map layer. It can deal with the massive spatio-temporal data better. The dynamic multi-base state with amendment (DMSA), fast index of base state with amendment in section, storage factors of variable granularity (SFVG) are used in FOMSOT which can manage the massive spatio-temporal data in high efficiency. A prototype "LyranMap" of new generation's GIS platform with the theory and technical method of FOMSOT has been realized, and it has been used in some application systems, for example, the land planning system "LandPlanner", land investigation system "LandExplorer" and land cadastral system "LandReGIS". These verify the correctness and effectiveness of the FOMSOT.

  17. A new interpretation of Bethe ansatz solutions for massive Thirring model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, T.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-04-01

    We reexamine Bethe ansatz solutions of the massive Thirring model. We solve equations of periodic boundary conditions numerically without referring to the density of states. It is found that there is only one bound state in the massive Thirring model. The bound state spectrum obtained here is consistent with Fujita-Ogura{close_quote}s solutions of the infinite momentum frame prescription. Further, it turns out that there exist no solutions for {ital string}-like configurations. Instead, we find boson-boson scattering states in two-particle two-hole configurations where all the rapidity variables turn out to be real. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  18. Ocean Modeling and Visualization on Massively Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, P. Peggy; Wang, Ping; Katz, Daniel S.; Cheng, Benny N.

    1997-01-01

    Climate modeling is one of the grand challenges of computational science, and ocean modeling plays an important role in both understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting future climate change.

  19. Massively parallel implementation of a high order domain decomposition equatorial ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; McCaffrey, J.W.; Piacsek, S.

    1999-06-01

    The present work is about the algorithms and parallel constructs of a spectral element equatorial ocean model. It shows that high order domain decomposition ocean models can be efficiently implemented on massively parallel architectures, such as the Connection Machine Model CM5. The optimized computational efficiency of the parallel spectral element ocean model comes not only from the exponential convergence of the numerical solution, but also from the work-intensive, medium-grained, geometry-based data parallelism. The data parallelism is created to efficiently implement the spectral element ocean model on the distributed-memory massively parallel computer, which minimizes communication among processing nodes. Computational complexity analysis is given for the parallel algorithm of the spectral element ocean model, and the model's parallel performance on the CM5 is evaluated. Lastly, results from a simulation of wind-driven circulation in low-latitude Atlantic Ocean are described.

  20. MASSIVELY PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A HIGH ORDER DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION EQUATORIAL OCEAN MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    MA,H.; MCCAFFREY,J.W.; PIACSEK,S.

    1998-07-15

    The present work is about the algorithms and parallel constructs of a spectral element equatorial ocean model. It shows that high order domain decomposition ocean models can be efficiently implemented on massively parallel architectures, such as the Connection Machine Model CM5. The optimized computational efficiency of the parallel spectral element ocean model comes not only from the exponential convergence of the numerical solution, but also from the work-intensive, medium-grained, geometry-based data parallelism. The data parallelism is created to efficiently implement the spectral element ocean model on the distributed-memory massively parallel computer, which minimizes communication among processing nodes. Computational complexity analysis is given for the parallel algorithm of the spectral element ocean model, and the model's parallel performance on the CM5 is evaluated. Lastly, results from a simulation of wind-driven circulation in low-latitude Atlantic ocean are described.

  1. Main sequence models for massive zero-metal stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, N.

    1974-01-01

    Zero-age main-sequence models for stars of 20, 10, 5, and 2 solar masses with no heavy elements are constructed for three different possible primordial helium abundances: Y=0.00, Y=0.23, and Y=0.30. The latter two values of Y bracket the range of primordial helium abundances cited by Wagoner. With the exceptions of the two 20 solar mass models that contain helium, these models are found to be self-consistent in the sense that the formation of carbon through the triple-alpha process during premain sequence contraction is not sufficient to bring the CN cycle into competition with the proton-proton chain on the ZAMS. The zero-metal models of the present study have higher surface and central temperatures, higher central densities, smaller radii, and smaller convective cores than do the population I models with the same masses.

  2. Magnetic Models of Circumstellar Clouds around Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.; Townsend, R.; Ud-Doula, A.

    2008-08-01

    This talk reviewed recent efforts to develop dynamical models for the effects of a surface dipole field on radiatively driven wind outflows. One particular project applies magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of a Magnetically Confined Wind Shock (MCWS) model (originally developed by Babel & Montmerle 1997) to explain X-ray emission observed by Rosat (Gagné et al. 1997) from the magnetic O7V star θ^{1 Ori C.

  3. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CORE CONVECTION IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-20

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M{sub Sun} star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  4. Low Mach Number Modeling of Core Convection in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-01

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M ⊙ star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  5. Biomimetic Models for An Ecological Approach to Massively-Deployed Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2005-01-01

    Promises of ubiquitous control of the physical environment by massively-deployed wireless sensor networks open avenues for new applications that will redefine the way we live and work. Due to small size and low cost of sensor devices, visionaries promise systems enabled by deployment of massive numbers of sensors ubiquitous throughout our environment working in concert. Recent research has concentrated on developing techniques for performing relatively simple tasks with minimal energy expense, assuming some form of centralized control. Unfortunately, centralized control is not conducive to parallel activities and does not scale to massive size networks. Execution of simple tasks in sparse networks will not lead to the sophisticated applications predicted. We propose a new way of looking at massively-deployed sensor networks, motivated by lessons learned from the way biological ecosystems are organized. We demonstrate that in such a model, fully distributed data aggregation can be performed in a scalable fashion in massively deployed sensor networks, where motes operate on local information, making local decisions that are aggregated across the network to achieve globally-meaningful effects. We show that such architectures may be used to facilitate communication and synchronization in a fault-tolerant manner, while balancing workload and required energy expenditure throughout the network.

  6. Self-consistent Models of Strong Interaction with Chiral Symmetry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nambu, Y.; Pascual, P.

    1963-04-01

    Some simple models of (renormalizable) meson-nucleon interaction are examined in which the nucleon mass is entirely due to interaction and the chiral ( gamma {sub 5}) symmetry is "broken'' to become a hidden symmetry. It is found that such a scheme is possible provided that a vector meson is introduced as an elementary field. (auth)

  7. Wall-layer model for LES with massive separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Ahmad; Armenio, Vincenzo; Roman, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Currently, Wall Functions (WF) work well under specific conditions, mostly exhibit drawbacks specially in flows with separation beyond curvatures. In this work, we propose a more general WF which works well in attached and detached flows, in presence and absence of Immersed Boundaries (IB). First we modified an equilibrium stress WF for boundary-fitted geometry making dynamic the computation of the k (von Karman constant) of the log-law; the model was first applied to a periodic open channel flow, and then to the flow over a 2D single hill using uniform coarse grids; the model captured separation with reasonable accuracy. Thereafter IB Method by Roman et al. was improved to avoid momentum loss at the interface between the fluid-solid regions. This required calibration of interfacial eddy viscosity; also a random stochastic forcing was used in wall-normal direction to increase Reynolds stresses and improve mean velocity profile. Finally, to reproduce flow separation, a simplified boundary layer equation was applied to construct velocity at near wall computational nodes. The new scheme was tested on the 2D single hill and periodic hills applying Cartesian and curvilinear grids; good agreement with references was obtained with reduction in cost and complexity. Financial support from project COSMO "CFD open source per opera morta" PAR FSC 2007-2013, Friuli Venezia Giulia.

  8. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  9. Combined stellar evolution and atmospheric modeling of massive stars: implications for how stars evolve and die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose

    2015-08-01

    Our big picture of stellar evolution and the links between the different classes of massive stars is often built by comparing evolutionary models and observations. However, this comparison is far from trivial, in particular when the effects of mass loss are significant. To tackle this problem, we recently combined stellar evolution calculations using the Geneva code with atmospheric/wind CMFGEN modeling. For the first time, we determined the interior and spectroscopic evolution of massive stars from the zero-age main sequence to the pre-supernova stage. In this talk, I will discuss the spectroscopic evolution of massive stars at solar metallicity, the lifetimes of the different spectroscopic phases (e.g. O-type, RSG, BSG, LBV, WR), and how they are related to evolutionary phases (H-core burning, H-shell burning, He-core burning). I will also show how this is affected by mass loss at different stages of the evolution and the implications for our understanding of massive star evolution and death.

  10. Synthetic clusters of massive stars to test stellar evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Granada, Anahi; Meynet, Georges; Bastian, Nate; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2015-08-01

    During the recent years, the Geneva stellar evolution group has published several sets of grids of stellar models, including the effect of rotation and with up to date input physics. These sets cover a wide range of initial masses, initial rotation rates and metallicities. In addition to these grids, we have also developed a toolbox (the SYCLIST code), allowing for the study of stellar populations as a function of time, and to build synthetic clusters of a given age.In this talk, I will present the SYCLIST code and the various effects that it is able to account for: initial distributions of rotation velocities, effect of the angle of view on the look of fast rotating stars (gravity darkening). I will show how the account for a rotation velocities distribution affects the HRD and CMD of clusters at different ages.Eventually, I will discuss how comparing our synthetic clusters with observed ones can help in understanding stellar physics. For example, I will show how the effects of rotation and of gravity darkening affects the region of the turn-off of young clusters. Rotation has also an impact on the look of the Hertzsprung gap of intermediate age clusters, by broadening the sequence of stars that lie in this region of the HRD.

  11. Massive neutrinos in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalapillil, Arun Madhav

    The generation of the fermion mass hierarchy in the standard model of particle physics is a long-standing puzzle. The recent discoveries from neutrino physics suggests that the mixing in the lepton sector is large compared to the quark mixings. To understand this asymmetry between the quark and lepton mixings is an important aim for particle physics. In this regard, two promising approaches from the theoretical side are grand unified theories and family symmetries. In the first part of my thesis we try to understand certain general features of grand unified theories with Abelian family symmetries by taking the simplest SU(5) grand unified theory as a prototype. We construct an SU(5) toy model with U(1) F ⊗Z'2 ⊗Z'' 2⊗Z''' 2 family symmetry that, in a natural way, duplicates the observed mass hierarchy and mixing matrices to lowest approximation. The system for generating the mass hierarchy is through a Froggatt-Nielsen type mechanism. One idea that we use in the model is that the quark and charged lepton sectors are hierarchical with small mixing angles while the light neutrino sector is democratic with larger mixing angles. We also discuss some of the difficulties in incorporating finer details into the model without making further assumptions or adding a large scalar sector. In the second part of my thesis, the interaction of high energy neutrinos with weak gravitational fields is explored. The form of the graviton-neutrino vertex is motivated from Lorentz and gauge invariance and the non-relativistic interpretations of the neutrino gravitational form factors are obtained. We comment on the renormalization conditions, the preservation of the weak equivalence principle and the definition of the neutrino mass radius. We associate the neutrino gravitational form factors with specific angular momentum states. Based on Feynman diagrams, spin-statistics, CP invariance and symmetries of the angular momentum states in the neutrino-graviton vertex, we deduce

  12. Local Hamiltonian Monte Carlo study of the massive schwinger model, the decoupling of heavy flavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranft, J.

    1983-12-01

    The massive Schwinger model with two flavours is studied using the local hamiltonian lattice Monte Carlo method. Chiral symmetry breaking is studied using the fermion condensate as order parameter. For a small ratio of the two fermion masses, degeneracy of the two flavours is found. For a large ratio of the masses, the heavy flavour decouples and the light fermion behaves like in the one flavour Schwinger model. On leave from Sektion Physik, Karl-Marx-Universität, Leipzig, GDR.

  13. Effect of Turbulence Models on Two Massively-Separated Benchmark Flow Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2003-01-01

    Two massively-separated flow cases (the 2-D hill and the 3-D Ahmed body) were computed with several different turbulence models in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D as part of participation in a turbulence modeling workshop held in Poitiers, France in October, 2002. Overall, results were disappointing, but were consistent with results from other RANS codes and other turbulence models at the workshop. For the 2-D hill case, those turbulence models that predicted separation location accurately ended up yielding a too-long separation extent downstream. The one model that predicted a shorter separation extent in better agreement with LES data did so only by coincidence: its prediction of earlier reattachment was due to a too-late prediction of the separation location. For the Ahmed body, two slant angles were computed, and CFD performed fairly well for one of the cases (the larger slant angle). Both turbulence models tested in this case were very similar to each other. For the smaller slant angle, CFD predicted massive separation, whereas the experiment showed reattachment about half-way down the center of the face. These test cases serve as reminders that state- of-the-art CFD is currently not a reliable predictor of massively-separated flow physics, and that further validation studies in this area would be beneficial.

  14. The Translation Invariant Massive Nelson Model: III. Asymptotic Completeness Below the Two-Boson Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybalski, Wojciech; Møller, Jacob Schach

    2015-11-01

    We show asymptotic completeness of two-body scattering for a class of translation invariant models describing a single quantum particle (the electron) linearly coupled to a massive scalar field (bosons). Our proof is based on a recently established Mourre estimate for these models. In contrast to previous approaches, it requires no number cutoff, no restriction on the particle-field coupling strength, and no restriction on the magnitude of total momentum. Energy, however, is restricted by the two-boson threshold, admitting only scattering of a dressed electron and a single asymptotic boson. The class of models we consider include the UV-cutoff Nelson and polaron models.

  15. Regression models tolerant to massively missing data: a case study in solar-radiation nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žliobaitė, I.; Hollmén, J.; Junninen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Statistical models for environmental monitoring strongly rely on automatic data acquisition systems that use various physical sensors. Often, sensor readings are missing for extended periods of time, while model outputs need to be continuously available in real time. With a case study in solar-radiation nowcasting, we investigate how to deal with massively missing data (around 50% of the time some data are unavailable) in such situations. Our goal is to analyze characteristics of missing data and recommend a strategy for deploying regression models which would be robust to missing data in situations where data are massively missing. We are after one model that performs well at all times, with and without data gaps. Due to the need to provide instantaneous outputs with minimum energy consumption for computing in the data streaming setting, we dismiss computationally demanding data imputation methods and resort to a mean replacement, accompanied with a robust regression model. We use an established strategy for assessing different regression models and for determining how many missing sensor readings can be tolerated before model outputs become obsolete. We experimentally analyze the accuracies and robustness to missing data of seven linear regression models. We recommend using the regularized PCA regression with our established guideline in training regression models, which themselves are robust to missing data.

  16. Regression models tolerant to massively missing data: a case study in solar radiation nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žliobaitė, I.; Hollmén, J.; Junninen, H.

    2014-07-01

    Statistical models for environmental monitoring strongly rely on automatic data acquisition systems, using various physical sensors. Often, sensor readings are missing for extended periods of time while model outputs need to be continuously available in real time. With a case study in solar radiation nowcasting, we investigate how to deal with massively missing data (around 50% of the time some data are unavailable) in such situations. Our goal is to analyze the characteristics of missing data and recommend a strategy for deploying regression models, which would be robust to missing data in situations, where data are massively missing. We are after one model that performs well at all times, with and without data gaps. Due to the need to provide instantaneous outputs with minimum energy consumption for computing in the data streaming setting, we dismiss computationally demanding data imputation methods, and resort to a simple mean replacement. We use an established strategy for comparing different regression models, with the possibility of determining how many missing sensor readings can be tolerated before model outputs become obsolete. We experimentally analyze accuracies and robustness to missing data of seven linear regression models and recommend using regularized PCA regression. We recommend using our established guideline in training regression models, which themselves are robust to missing data.

  17. Low-metallicity massive single stars with rotation. Evolutionary models applicable to I Zwicky 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szécsi, Dorottya; Langer, Norbert; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Sanyal, Debashis; de Mink, Selma; Evans, Christopher J.; Dermine, Tyl

    2015-09-01

    Context. Low-metallicity environments such as the early Universe and compact star-forming dwarf galaxies contain many massive stars. These stars influence their surroundings through intense UV radiation, strong winds and explosive deaths. A good understanding of low-metallicity environments requires a detailed theoretical comprehension of the evolution of their massive stars. Aims: We aim to investigate the role of metallicity and rotation in shaping the evolutionary paths of massive stars and to provide theoretical predictions that can be tested by observations of metal-poor environments. Methods: Massive rotating single stars with an initial metal composition appropriate for the dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 ([Fe/H] = -1.7) are modelled during hydrogen burning for initial masses of 9-300 M⊙ and rotational velocities of 0-900 km s-1. Internal mixing processes in these models were calibrated based on an observed sample of OB-type stars in the Magellanic Clouds. Results: Even moderately fast rotators, which may be abundant at this metallicity, are found to undergo efficient mixing induced by rotation resulting in quasi chemically-homogeneous evolution. These homogeneously-evolving models reach effective temperatures of up to 90 kK during core hydrogen burning. This, together with their moderate mass-loss rates, make them transparent wind ultraviolet intense stars (TWUIN star), and their expected numbers might explain the observed He II ionising photon flux in I Zw 18 and other low-metallicity He II galaxies. Our slowly rotating stars above ~80 M⊙ evolve into late B- to M-type supergiants during core hydrogen burning, with visual magnitudes up to 19m at the distance of I Zw 18. Both types of stars, TWUIN stars and luminous late-type supergiants, are only predicted at low metallicity. Conclusions: Massive star evolution at low metallicity is shown to differ qualitatively from that in metal-rich environments. Our grid can be used to interpret observations of local star

  18. Extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and hidden local symmetry of low energy QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, M.

    1996-11-01

    Using the standard auxiliary field method, we derive from the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model an effective meson action containing vector and axial-vector mesons in addition to Goldstone bosons. The vector and axial-vector mesons in this effective action transform as gauge fields of hidden local symmetry Glocal=[U(n)L×U(n)R]local. Here, the realization of enlarged hidden local symmetry is accomplished via the introduction of two kinds of ``compensating'' fields. For obtaining the intrinsic-parity-violating part of the action, we generalize the standard gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action such that it also contains two kinds of ``compensators'' in addition to the usual Goldstone bosons as well as the vector and axial-vector mesons. This generalized gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action turns out to have Gglobal×Glocal symmetry, where Gglobal is the usual U(n)L×U(n)R global chiral symmetry while Glocal is the U(n)L×U(n)R hidden local symmetry. This means that Glocal has no gauge anomaly and its associated vector and axial-vector mesons can be regarded as gauge bosons of Glocal. The introduction of the coupling with the external electroweak fields requires us to gauge some appropriate subgroup of Gglobal. To make it consistent with the anomaly structure of QCD is a nontrivial problem. We explain how this can be done, following the recent suggestion by several authors.

  19. Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

  20. Evidence against the Sciama Model of Radiative Decay of Massive Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Korpela, Eric J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Lampton, Michael; Morales, Carmen; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Gómez, José F.; Trapero, Joaquín

    1999-11-01

    We report on spectral observations of the night sky in the band around 900 Å where the emission line in the Sciama model of radiatively decaying massive neutrinos would be present. The data were obtained with a high-resolution, high-sensitivity spectrometer flown on the Spanish satellite MINISAT. The observed emission is far less intense than that expected in the Sciama model. Based on the development and utilization of the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta de Radiación Difusa, a collaboration of the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial and the Center for EUV Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley.

  1. Massive integration of diverse protein quality assessment methods to improve template based modeling in CASP11.

    PubMed

    Cao, Renzhi; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Adhikari, Badri; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-09-01

    Model evaluation and selection is an important step and a big challenge in template-based protein structure prediction. Individual model quality assessment methods designed for recognizing some specific properties of protein structures often fail to consistently select good models from a model pool because of their limitations. Therefore, combining multiple complimentary quality assessment methods is useful for improving model ranking and consequently tertiary structure prediction. Here, we report the performance and analysis of our human tertiary structure predictor (MULTICOM) based on the massive integration of 14 diverse complementary quality assessment methods that was successfully benchmarked in the 11th Critical Assessment of Techniques of Protein Structure prediction (CASP11). The predictions of MULTICOM for 39 template-based domains were rigorously assessed by six scoring metrics covering global topology of Cα trace, local all-atom fitness, side chain quality, and physical reasonableness of the model. The results show that the massive integration of complementary, diverse single-model and multi-model quality assessment methods can effectively leverage the strength of single-model methods in distinguishing quality variation among similar good models and the advantage of multi-model quality assessment methods of identifying reasonable average-quality models. The overall excellent performance of the MULTICOM predictor demonstrates that integrating a large number of model quality assessment methods in conjunction with model clustering is a useful approach to improve the accuracy, diversity, and consequently robustness of template-based protein structure prediction. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):247-259. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. γ-Ray emission signals in the massive graviton mediated dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cun; Cui, Ming-Yang; Feng, Lei; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Dark matter may interact with Standard Model (SM) particle through the exchange of a massive spin-2 graviton producing signals that can be detected. In this work we examine the γ-ray emission signals, including the line emission and the continuous spectrum component in such a massive graviton-mediated dark matter model. The constraints of LHC data, dark matter relic density as well as the dark matter indirect detection data have been applied to narrow down the parameter space. We focus on the vector dark matter model which could produce detectable γ-ray line signal. It is found that the γ-ray line data is effective on constraining the model parameters and the ongoing and upcoming space or ground-based γ-ray experiments can constrain the model further. As for the continuous γ-ray emission, the total effective annihilation cross section is ∼10-26 cm3s-1 except at the region where dark matter mass is around the graviton mass or half of it, which is consistent with current observational data and will be reliably probed by the upcoming CTA.

  3. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. I. DEPENDENCE ON BASIC CORE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2011-05-20

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  4. Steady-State Models of X-ray Emission from Massive-Star Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Christopher; Townsend, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    In the subset of OB stars with large-scale, organized magnetic fields, the stellar wind is forced to flow along magnetic field lines and is trapped within a magnetosphere corotating with its host star. As the wind turns on itself, shocks heat the plasma to millions of degrees and produce X-ray emission. Such magnetospheres are typically classified with the "wind magnetic confinement parameter", a simplified ratio between the magnetic energy density and the wind kinetic energy density. This parameter is often used to estimate magnetosphere properties, such as size, mass-loss rate, and spin-down time. Unfortunately, the strong magnetic fields in magnetospheres (polar strength: 100 G - 10 kG) and resulting Alfven velocities make magnetohydrodynamics simulations computationally difficult due to very small timesteps. To get around this issue, we approximate a massive-star magnetosphere as a series of one-dimensional flows along magnetic dipole field lines and develop a steady-state model from the resulting hydrodynamic equations. With this model, we derive scaling relations for the stellar mass-loss rate as a function of surface colatitude and find agreement with previous scaling results derived from simulations. These relations are further extended to include the effects of rigid-body rotation within the magnetosphere. Additionally, we develop an X-ray emission model from this steady-state analysis and compare it against both the "XADM" model for X-ray emission from massive star magnetospheres and observations of massive magnetic stars. Finally, we discuss improvements to the traditional wind magnetic confinement parameter to take into account the effect of a magnetic field on the wind kinetic energy density.

  5. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. I. Dependence on Basic Core Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2011-05-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  6. Developing a Massively Parallel Forward Projection Radiography Model for Large-Scale Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bauerle, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    This project utilizes Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to compute radiograph simulations for arbitrary objects. The generation of radiographs, also known as the forward projection imaging model, is computationally intensive and not widely utilized. The goal of this research is to develop a massively parallel algorithm that can compute forward projections for objects with a trillion voxels (3D pixels). To achieve this end, the data are divided into blocks that can each t into GPU memory. The forward projected image is also divided into segments to allow for future parallelization and to avoid needless computations.

  7. A scalable approach to modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1995-12-01

    We describe a fully scalable approach to the simulation of groundwater flow on a hierarchy of computing platforms, ranging from workstations to massively parallel computers. Specifically, we advocate the use of scalable conceptual models in which the subsurface model is defined independently of the computational grid on which the simulation takes place. We also describe a scalable multigrid algorithm for computing the groundwater flow velocities. We axe thus able to leverage both the engineer`s time spent developing the conceptual model and the computing resources used in the numerical simulation. We have successfully employed this approach at the LLNL site, where we have run simulations ranging in size from just a few thousand spatial zones (on workstations) to more than eight million spatial zones (on the CRAY T3D)-all using the same conceptual model.

  8. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R., II; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    An unusual feature of VMS deposits is the common association of stratiform "exhalative" deposits precipitated from hydrothermal fluids emanating into bottom waters. These deposits may extend well beyond the margins of massive sulfide and are typically composed of silica, iron, and manganese oxides, carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and tourmaline.

  9. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. III. The Evolutionary Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of evolutionary sequences of massive protostars forming from massive dense cores in environments of high mass surface densities, based on the Turbulent Core Model. The protostellar evolution is calculated with a multi-zone numerical model, with the accretion rate regulated by feedback from an evolving disk wind outflow cavity. The disk evolution is calculated assuming a fixed ratio of disk to protostellar mass, while the core envelope evolution assumes an inside-out collapse of the core with a fixed outer radius. In this framework, an evolutionary track is determined by three environmental initial conditions: the core mass Mc , the mass surface density of the ambient clump Σcl, and the ratio of the core's initial rotational to gravitational energy β c . Evolutionary sequences with various Mc , Σcl, and β c are constructed. We find that in a fiducial model with Mc = 60 M ⊙, Σcl = 1 g cm-2, and β c = 0.02, the final mass of the protostar reaches at least ~26 M ⊙, making the final star formation efficiency >~ 0.43. For each of the evolutionary tracks, radiation transfer simulations are performed at selected stages, with temperature profiles, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and multiwavelength images produced. At a given stage, the envelope temperature depends strongly on Σcl, with higher temperatures in a higher Σcl core, but only weakly on Mc . The SED and MIR images depend sensitively on the evolving outflow cavity, which gradually widens as the protostar grows. The fluxes at <~ 100 μm increase dramatically, and the far-IR peaks move to shorter wavelengths. The influence of Σcl and β c (which determines disk size) are discussed. We find that, despite scatter caused by different Mc , Σcl, β c , and inclinations, sources at a given evolutionary stage appear in similar regions of color-color diagrams, especially when using colors with fluxes at >~ 70 μm, where scatter due to inclination is minimized

  10. A New Occurrence Model for National Assessment of Undiscovered Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Koski, Randolph; Morgan, Lisa A.; Mosier, Dan; Piatak, Nadine M.; Ridley, Ian; Seal, Robert R., II; Schulz, Klaus J.; Slack, John F.; Thurston, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits are very significant current and historical resources of Cu-Pb-Zn-Au-Ag, are active exploration targets in several areas of the United States and potentially have significant environmental effects. This new USGS VMS deposit model provides a comprehensive review of deposit occurrence and ore genesis, and fully integrates recent advances in the understanding of active seafloor VMS-forming environments, and integrates consideration of geoenvironmental consequences of mining VMS deposits. Because VMS deposits exhibit a broad range of geological and geochemical characteristics, a suitable classification system is required to incorporate these variations into the mineral deposit model. We classify VMS deposits based on compositional variations in volcanic and sedimentary host rocks. The advantage of the classification method is that it provides a closer linkage between tectonic setting and lithostratigraphic assemblages, and an increased predictive capability during field-based studies.

  11. Detecting variability in massive astronomical time series data - I. Application of an infinite Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min-Su; Sekora, Michael; Byun, Yong-Ik

    2009-12-01

    We present a new framework to detect various types of variable objects within massive astronomical time series data. Assuming that the dominant population of objects is non-variable, we find outliers from this population by using a non-parametric Bayesian clustering algorithm based on an infinite Gaussian mixture model (GMM) and the Dirichlet process. The algorithm extracts information from a given data set, which is described by six variability indices. The GMM uses those variability indices to recover clusters that are described by six-dimensional multivariate Gaussian distributions, allowing our approach to consider the sampling pattern of time series data, systematic biases, the number of data points for each light curve and photometric quality. Using the Northern Sky Variability Survey data, we test our approach and prove that the infinite GMM is useful at detecting variable objects, while providing statistical inference estimation that suppresses false detection. The proposed approach will be effective in the exploration of future surveys such as Gaia, Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will produce massive time series data.

  12. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  13. Asteroseismological Study of Massive ZZ Ceti Stars with Fully Evolutionary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Fraga, L.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M ⊙ known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  14. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. II. EFFECTS OF THE OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-04-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 M{sub Sun }) protostar forming from a massive (M{sub c} = 60 M{sub Sun }) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang and Tan. The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities, based in part on the disk-wind model of Blandford and Payne; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. We also include a non-Keplerian potential appropriate for a growing, massive disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the synthetic images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, i.e., looking down the outflow cavity (although not too close to the axis), the SED from the near-IR to about 60 {mu}m is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 {mu}m, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at {approx}20 {mu}m. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow

  15. Mass loss from evolved massive stars: self-consistent modeling of the wind and photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J. H.

    2007-03-01

    This work analyzes the mass loss phenomenon in evolved massive stars through self-consistent modeling of the wind and photosphere of such stars, using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN. In the first part, fundamental physical parameters of Wolf-Rayet stars of spectral types WN3-w (WR 46 e WR 152) and WN6-s (WR 136) were obtained. The results clearly indicate that hydrogen is present on the surface of those stars in a considerable fraction, defying current evolutionary models. For both WN subtypes, significant difference between the physical parameters obtained here and in previous works were noticed. The 20-year evolution of the luminous blue variable (LBV) AG Carinae was analyzed in detail in the second part of this work. The results indicate unexpected changes in the current paradigm of massive star evolution during the S Dor cycle. In this work, the high rotational velocity obtained during the hot phases, and the transition between the bistability regimes of line-driven winds were detected for the first time in LBVs. Those results need to be considered in future analysis of such massive stars. This Thesis also presents a pioneering study about the impact of the time variability effects on the analysis of the winds of LBVs. The results achieved here are valid for the whole LBV class, and show that the mass-loss rates derived from Hα and radio free-free emission are affected by time-dependent effects. The mass-loss rate evolution during the S Dor cycle, derived using time-dependent models, implies that LBV eruptions begin well before the maximum in the visual lightcurve during this phase. The analysis of the full S Dor cycle of AG Car rule out that the S Dor variability is caused exclusively by an expanding pseudo-photosphere. The AG Car hydrostatic radius was found to vary by a factor of six between cool and hot phases, while the bolometric luminosity is 50% higher during the hot phase. Both results provide observational contraints for the physical mechanism

  16. Climate systems modeling on massively parallel processing computers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, W.F.; Mirin, A.A.; Bolstad, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    A comprehensive climate system model is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The basis for this model is a consistent coupling of multiple complex subsystem models, each describing a major component of the Earth`s climate. Among these are general circulation models of the atmosphere and ocean, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model, and models of the chemical processes occurring in the air, sea water, and near-surface land. The computational resources necessary to carry out simulations at adequate spatial resolutions for durations of climatic time scales exceed those currently available. Distributed memory massively parallel processing (MPP) computers promise to affordably scale to the computational rates required by directing large numbers of relatively inexpensive processors onto a single problem. We have developed a suite of routines designed to exploit current generation MPP architectures via domain and functional decomposition strategies. These message passing techniques have been implemented in each of the component models and in their coupling interfaces. Production runs of the atmospheric and oceanic components performed on the National Environmental Supercomputing Center (NESC) Cray T3D are described.

  17. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  18. The massive O(N) non-linear sigma model at high orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnens, Johan; Carloni, Lisa

    2011-02-01

    We extend our earlier work on the massive O(N) non-linear sigma model to other observables. We derive expressions at leading order in the large N expansion at all orders in the loop expansion for the decay constant, vacuum expectation value, meson-meson scattering and the scalar and vector form factors. This is done using cactus diagram resummation using a generalized gap equation and other recursion relations. For general N we derive the expressions for the n-th-loop-order leading logarithms (M/Flog (/M))n, up to five loops for the decay constant and vacuum expectation value (VEV) and up to four loops for meson-meson scattering, the scalar and vector form factors. We also quote our earlier result for the mass. The large N results do not give a good approximation for the case N=3. We use our results to study the convergence of the perturbative series and compare with elastic unitarity.

  19. Massive separation around bluff bodies: comparisons among different cfd solvers and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenio, Vincenzo; Fakhari, Ahmad; Petronio, Andrea; Padovan, Roberta; Pittaluga, Chiara; Caprino, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Massive flow separation is ubiquitous in industrial applications, ruling drag and hydrodynamic noise. In spite of considerable efforts, its numerical prediction still represents a challenge for CFD models in use in engineering. Aside commercial software, over the latter years the opensource software OpenFOAMR (OF) has emerged as a valid tool for prediction of complex industrial flows. In the present work, we simulate two flows representative of a class of situations occurring in industrial problems: the flow around sphere and that around a wall-mounted square cylinder at Re = 10000 . We compare the performance two different tools, namely OF and ANSYS CFX 15.0 (CFX) using different unstructured grids and turbulence models. The grids have been generated using SNAPPYHEXMESH and ANSYS ICEM CFD 15.0 with different near wall resolutions. The codes have been run in a RANS mode using k - ɛ model (OF) and SST - k - ω (CFX) with and without wall-layer models. OF has been also used in LES, WMLES and DES mode. Regarding the sphere, RANS models were not able to catch separation, while good prediction of separation and distribution of stresses over the surface were obtained using LES, WMLES and DES. Results for the second test case are currently under analysis. Financial support from COSMO ``cfd open source per opera mortta'' PAR FSC 2007-2013, Friuli Venezia Giulia.

  20. Strong Lens Models for Massive Galaxy Clusters in the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerny, Catherine; Sharon, Keren; Coe, Dan A.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Jones, Christine; Czakon, Nicole G.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Stark, Daniel; Bradley, Larry D.; Trenti, Michele; Johnson, Traci; Bradac, Marusa; Dawson, William; Rodney, Steven A.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; RELICS Team

    2017-01-01

    We present strong lensing models for five galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ cluster catalog as a part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS), a program that seeks to constrain the galaxy luminosity function past z~9 by conducting a wide field survey of massive galaxy clusters with HST (GO-14096, PI: Coe). The strong gravitational lensing effects of these clusters significantly magnify background galaxies, which enhances our ability to discover the large numbers of high redshift galaxies at z~9-12 needed to create a representative sample. We use strong lensing models for these clusters to study their mass distribution and magnification, which allows us to quantify the lensing effect on the background galaxies. These models can then be utilized in the RELICS survey in order to identify high redshift galaxy candidates that may be lensed by the clusters. The intrinsic properties of these galaxy candidates can be derived by removing the lensing effect as predicted by our models, which will meet the science goals of the RELICS survey. We use HST WFC3 and ACS imaging to create lensing models for the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, ACO-2537, ACO-2163, RXCJ2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151.

  1. Raining on black holes and massive galaxies: the top-down multiphase condensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Temi, P.; Brighenti, F.

    2017-04-01

    The plasma haloes filling massive galaxies, groups and clusters are shaped by active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating and subsonic turbulence (σv ∼ 150 km s-1), as probed by Hitomi. Novel 3D high-resolution simulations show the soft X-ray, keV hot plasma cools rapidly via radiative emission at the high-density interface of the turbulent eddies, stimulating a top-down condensation cascade of warm 104 K filaments. The kpc-scale ionized (optical/ultraviolet) filaments form a skin enveloping the neutral filaments (optical/infrared/21 cm). The peaks of the warm filaments further condense into cold molecular clouds (<50 K; radio) with total mass of several 107 M⊙ and inheriting the turbulent kinematics. In the core, the clouds collide inelastically, mixing angular momentum and leading to Chaotic Cold Accretion (CCA). The black hole accretion rate (BHAR) can be modelled via quasi-spherical viscous accretion, dot{M}_bullet ∝ ν _c, with clump collisional viscosity νc ≡ λc σv and λc ∼ 100 pc. Beyond the core, pressure torques shape the angular momentum transport. In CCA, the BHAR is recurrently boosted up to 2 dex compared with the disc evolution, which arises as turbulence becomes subdominant. With negligible rotation too, compressional heating inhibits the molecular phase. The CCA BHAR distribution is lognormal with pink noise, f-1 power spectrum characteristic of fractal phenomena. Such chaotic fluctuations can explain the rapid luminosity variability of AGN and high-mass X-ray binaries. An improved criterium to trace non-linear condensation is proposed: σv/vcool ≲ 1. The three-phase CCA reproduces key observations of cospatial multiphase gas in massive galaxies, including Chandra X-ray images, SOAR Hα filaments and kinematics, Herschel [C+] emission and ALMA molecular associations. CCA plays important role in AGN feedback and unification, the evolution of BHs, galaxies and clusters.

  2. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Grade and tonnage models are useful in quantitative mineral-resource assessments. The models and database presented in this report are an update of earlier publications about volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. These VMS deposits include what were formerly classified as kuroko, Cyprus, and Besshi deposits. The update was necessary because of new information about some deposits, changes in information in some deposits, such as grades, tonnages, or ages, revised locations of some deposits, and reclassification of subtypes. In this report we have added new VMS deposits and removed a few incorrectly classified deposits. This global compilation of VMS deposits contains 1,090 deposits; however, it was not our intent to include every known deposit in the world. The data was recently used for mineral-deposit density models (Mosier and others, 2007; Singer, 2008). In this paper, 867 deposits were used to construct revised grade and tonnage models. Our new models are based on a reclassification of deposits based on host lithologies: Felsic, Bimodal-Mafic, and Mafic volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types vary significantly, and (2) deposits of different types occur in distinct geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models combine the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features and demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed deposit models allow geologists to deduce possible mineral-deposit types in a given geologic environment and economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources. Thus, mineral-deposit models play a central role in presenting geoscience

  3. The evolution of massive stars including mass loss - Presupernova models and explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Langer, Norbert; Weaver, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars of 35, 40, 60, and 85 solar masses is followed through all stages of nuclear burning to the point of Fe core collapse. Critical nuclear reaction and mass-loss rates are varied. Efficient mass loss during the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stage is likely to lead to final masses as small as 4 solar masses. For a reasonable parameterization of the mass loss, there may be convergence of all WR stars, both single and in binaries, to a narrow band of small final masses. Our representative model, a 4.25 solar-mass WR presupernova derived from a 60 solar mass star, is followed through a simulated explosion, and its explosive nucleosynthesis and light curve are determined. Its properties are similar to those observed in Type Ib supernovae. The effects of the initial mass and mass loss on the presupernova structure of small mass WR models is also explored. Important properties of the presupernova star and its explosion can only be obtained by following the complete evolution starting on the main sequence.

  4. Integration and management of massive remote-sensing data based on GeoSOT subdivision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Cheng, Chengqi; Chen, Bo; Meng, Li

    2016-07-01

    Owing to the rapid development of earth observation technology, the volume of spatial information is growing rapidly; therefore, improving query retrieval speed from large, rich data sources for remote-sensing data management systems is quite urgent. A global subdivision model, geographic coordinate subdivision grid with one-dimension integer coding on 2n-tree, which we propose as a solution, has been used in data management organizations. However, because a spatial object may cover several grids, ample data redundancy will occur when data are stored in relational databases. To solve this redundancy problem, we first combined the subdivision model with the spatial array database containing the inverted index. We proposed an improved approach for integrating and managing massive remote-sensing data. By adding a spatial code column in an array format in a database, spatial information in remote-sensing metadata can be stored and logically subdivided. We implemented our method in a Kingbase Enterprise Server database system and compared the results with the Oracle platform by simulating worldwide image data. Experimental results showed that our approach performed better than Oracle in terms of data integration and time and space efficiency. Our approach also offers an efficient storage management system for existing storage centers and management systems.

  5. Three-dimensional electromagnetic modeling and inversion on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.A.; Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report has demonstrated techniques that can be used to construct solutions to the 3-D electromagnetic inverse problem using full wave equation modeling. To this point great progress has been made in developing an inverse solution using the method of conjugate gradients which employs a 3-D finite difference solver to construct model sensitivities and predicted data. The forward modeling code has been developed to incorporate absorbing boundary conditions for high frequency solutions (radar), as well as complex electrical properties, including electrical conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. In addition both forward and inverse codes have been ported to a massively parallel computer architecture which allows for more realistic solutions that can be achieved with serial machines. While the inversion code has been demonstrated on field data collected at the Richmond field site, techniques for appraising the quality of the reconstructions still need to be developed. Here it is suggested that rather than employing direct matrix inversion to construct the model covariance matrix which would be impossible because of the size of the problem, one can linearize about the 3-D model achieved in the inverse and use Monte-Carlo simulations to construct it. Using these appraisal and construction tools, it is now necessary to demonstrate 3-D inversion for a variety of EM data sets that span the frequency range from induction sounding to radar: below 100 kHz to 100 MHz. Appraised 3-D images of the earth`s electrical properties can provide researchers opportunities to infer the flow paths, flow rates and perhaps the chemistry of fluids in geologic mediums. It also offers a means to study the frequency dependence behavior of the properties in situ. This is of significant relevance to the Department of Energy, paramount to characterizing and monitoring of environmental waste sites and oil and gas exploration.

  6. Implementation of a Message Passing Interface into a Cloud-Resolving Model for Massively Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Zeng, Xi-Ping; Shie, Chung-Lin; Simpson, Joanne; Lang, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The capability for massively parallel programming (MPP) using a message passing interface (MPI) has been implemented into a three-dimensional version of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The design for the MPP with MPI uses the concept of maintaining similar code structure between the whole domain as well as the portions after decomposition. Hence the model follows the same integration for single and multiple tasks (CPUs). Also, it provides for minimal changes to the original code, so it is easily modified and/or managed by the model developers and users who have little knowledge of MPP. The entire model domain could be sliced into one- or two-dimensional decomposition with a halo regime, which is overlaid on partial domains. The halo regime requires that no data be fetched across tasks during the computational stage, but it must be updated before the next computational stage through data exchange via MPI. For reproducible purposes, transposing data among tasks is required for spectral transform (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT), which is used in the anelastic version of the model for solving the pressure equation. The performance of the MPI-implemented codes (i.e., the compressible and anelastic versions) was tested on three different computing platforms. The major results are: 1) both versions have speedups of about 99% up to 256 tasks but not for 512 tasks; 2) the anelastic version has better speedup and efficiency because it requires more computations than that of the compressible version; 3) equal or approximately-equal numbers of slices between the x- and y- directions provide the fastest integration due to fewer data exchanges; and 4) one-dimensional slices in the x-direction result in the slowest integration due to the need for more memory relocation for computation.

  7. Galactic models with massive coronae. V. The spiral SAB galaxy M 81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenjes, P.; Haud, U.; Einasto, J.

    1998-07-01

    Stellar populations in spiral galaxy M 81 are studied by using modelling. The galaxy is assumed to be stationary and consisting of a superposition of several subsystems. Each subsystem corresponds to a certain stellar/gas/dark matter population with a certain density distribution, chemical composition and kinematical characteristics. We presume that equidensity surfaces of the galactic populations are similar concentric ellipsoids or can be represented as sums of such ellipsoids. The input observational data base consists of surface photometry along the minor and major axis in UBVRI colours, rotation velocities of gas, stellar velocity dispersions, distribution and kinematics of globular clusters, distribution of the young stellar component and gas, kinematics of M 81 satellite galaxies. These data are used to decompose the galaxy into a central nucleus, a metal-rich core and a bulge, a metal-poor halo, an old stellar disk, a young gaseous-stellar disk and a massive dark matter component. Each population is characterized by its ellipticity, radius, mass, luminosity, structure parameter and colour indices. These population parameters are found using the least-squares algorithm. The algorithm minimizes the sum of squares of relative deviations of the model from observations. The values of the parameters were calculated in several steps from a preliminary crude model to the final model. The sensitivity of the population parameters to various observational data is analysed. Particular attention is devoted to the dark matter problem. In the final model the mean mass-to-luminosity ratio of the optically visible parts of the galaxy is found to be M/L_B = 5.4+/- 2.4 M_{sun/Lsun, and the ratio of the total mass to the visible one M_T/M_vis = 44. In the inner regions the best fit with observations is obtained when a central point mass 2.7* 10(8) M_{sun is added to the nucleus.

  8. Modeling and Observations of Massive Binaries with the B[e] Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.; Martayan, C.; Mehner, A.; Groh, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    We report a long-term high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring program of LBVs and candidate LBVs with Mercator-HERMES. Based on 7 years of data, we recently showed that supergiant MWC 314 is a (Galactic) semi-detached eccentric binary with stationary permitted and forbidden emission lines in the optical and near-IR region. MWC 314 is a luminous and massive probable LBV star showing a strongly orbitally-modulated wind variability. We observe discrete absorption components in P Cyg He I lines signaling large-scale wind structures. In 2014 XMM observed X-rays indicating strong wind-wind collision in the close binary system (a ≃1 AU). A VLT-NACO imaging survey recently revealed that MWC 314 is a triple hierarchical system. We present a 3-D non-LTE radiative transfer model of the extended asymmetric wind structure around the primary B0 supergiant for modeling the orbital variability of P Cyg absorption (v∞˜1200 km s-1) in He I lines. An analysis of the HERMES monitoring spectra of the Galactic LBV star MWC 930 however does not show clear indications of a spectroscopic binary. The detailed long-term spectroscopic variability of this massive B[e] star is very similar to the spectroscopic variability of the prototypical blue hypergiant S Dor in the LMC. We observe prominent P Cyg line shapes in MWC 930 that temporarily transform into split absorption line cores during variability phases of its S Dor cycle over the past decade with a brightening in V of ˜ 1.2 mag. The line splitting phenomenon is very similar to the split metal line cores observed in pulsating Yellow Hypergiants ρ Cas (F-K Ia+) and HR 8752 (A-K Ia+) with [Ca II] and [N II] emission lines. We propose the line core splitting in MWC 930 is due to optically thick central line emission produced in the inner ionized wind region becoming mechanically shock-excited with the increase of R* and decrease of Teff of the LBV.

  9. On the Vainshtein mechanism in the minimal model of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien

    2014-03-01

    We reinvestigate the fate of the Vainhstein mechanism in the minimal model of dRGT massive gravity. As the latter is characterised by the complete absence of interactions in the decoupling limit, we study their structure at higher energies. We show that in static spherically symmetric configurations, the lowest energy scale of interactions is pushed up to the Planck mass. This fact points towards an absence of Vainshtein mechanism in this framework, but does not prove it. By resorting to the exact vacuum equations of motion, we show that there is indeed an obstruction that precludes any recovery of General Relativity under the conditions of stationarity and spherical symmetry. However, we argue that the latter are too restrictive and might miss some important physical phenomena. Indeed, we point out that in generic non spherically symmetric or time-dependent situations, interactions arising at energies arbitrarily close to the energy scale of the decoupling limit reappear. This leads us to question whether the small degree of spherical symmetry breaking in the solar system can be sufficient to give rise to a successful Vainshtein mechanism.

  10. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  11. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  12. Modeling the NIR-silhouette massive disk candidate in M 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Chini, R.; Nielbock, M.; Nürnberger, D.; Hoffmeister, V.; Huré, J.-M.; Semenov, D.

    2006-09-01

    Aims.The physical properties of the massive disk candidate in the star-forming region M 17 are analyzed. Methods: .Making use of the rare configuration in which the gas and dust structure is seen in silhouette against the background radiation at λ=2.2~μm, we determine the column density distribution from a high-resolution NAOS/CONICA image. The influence of scattered light on the mass determination is analyzed using 3D radiative transfer calculations. Further upper flux limits derived from observations with the Spitzer telescope at MIR wavelengths are used together with the NACO image to estimate the flux from the central object. For a range of stellar radii, stellar surface temperatures, and dust grain sizes, we apply three different models to account for the observed fluxes. The stability of the disk against self-gravitational forces is analyzed calculating the ratio of the gravitational acceleration by the central object and the disk, and the deviations from a Keplerian profile. Results: .We find that the column density is consistent with a central source surrounded by a rotationally symmetric distribution of gas and dust. The extent of the symmetric disk part is about 3000 AU, with a warped point-symmetrical extension beyond that radius, and therefore larger than any circumstellar disk yet detected. The modeling yields a radial density powerlaw exponent of -1.1 indicating a flat radial density distribution, and a large e-folding scale height ratio H/R of about 0.5. The mass of the entire disk estimated from the column density is discussed depending on the assumed distance and the dust model and ranges between 0.02 and 5 M⊙. We conclude that unless a star is located close to the disk in the foreground, scattered light will have little influence on the mass determination. We present a Spitzer image taken at λ=7.8~μm with the disk seen in emission and identify polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission on the disk surface excited by the nearby massive

  13. Implications of the measurement of pulsars with two solar masses for quark matter in compact stars and heavy-ion collisions: A Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klähn, T.; Łastowiecki, R.; Blaschke, D.

    2013-10-01

    The precise measurements of the high masses of the pulsars PSR J1614-2230 (M1614=1.97±0.04M⊙) and PSR J0348-0432 (M0348=2.01±0.04M⊙) provide an important constraint for the equation of state of cold, dense matter and are suited to give interesting insights regarding the nature and existence of the possible phase transition to deconfined quark matter in the cores of neutron stars. We analyze the stability and composition of compact star sequences for a class of hybrid nuclear-quark-matter equations of state. The quark matter phase is described in the framework of a standard color superconducting 3-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and the hadronic phase is given by the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equation of state for the Bonn-A potential. The phase transition is obtained by a Maxwell construction. Within this model setup, we aim to constrain otherwise not strictly fixed parameters of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, namely, the coupling strengths in the vector meson and diquark interaction channels. We perform this investigation for two different parametrizations characterized by a different scalar coupling constant. The analysis of flow data obtained in heavy-ion collisions resulted in a further constraint that we account for in our discussion. Massive hybrid stars with extended quark matter cores can be obtained in accordance with all of the considered constraints.

  14. Seismic waves modeling with the Fourier pseudo-spectral method on massively parallel machines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klin, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The Fourier pseudo-spectral method (FPSM) is an approach for the 3D numerical modeling of the wave propagation, which is based on the discretization of the spatial domain in a structured grid and relies on global spatial differential operators for the solution of the wave equation. This last peculiarity is advantageous from the accuracy point of view but poses difficulties for an efficient implementation of the method to be run on parallel computers with distributed memory architecture. The 1D spatial domain decomposition approach has been so far commonly adopted in the parallel implementations of the FPSM, but it implies an intensive data exchange among all the processors involved in the computation, which can degrade the performance because of communication latencies. Moreover, the scalability of the 1D domain decomposition is limited, since the number of processors can not exceed the number of grid points along the directions in which the domain is partitioned. This limitation inhibits an efficient exploitation of the computational environments with a very large number of processors. In order to overcome the limitations of the 1D domain decomposition we implemented a parallel version of the FPSM based on a 2D domain decomposition, which allows to achieve a higher degree of parallelism and scalability on massively parallel machines with several thousands of processing elements. The parallel programming is essentially achieved using the MPI protocol but OpenMP parts are also included in order to exploit the single processor multi - threading capabilities, when available. The developed tool is aimed at the numerical simulation of the seismic waves propagation and in particular is intended for earthquake ground motion research. We show the scalability tests performed up to 16k processing elements on the IBM Blue Gene/Q computer at CINECA (Italy), as well as the application to the simulation of the earthquake ground motion in the alluvial plain of the Po river (Italy).

  15. Large-scale modeling of the Antarctic ice sheet using a massively-parallelized finite element model (CIELO).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Morlighem, M.; Seroussi, H.

    2008-12-01

    We implemented a fully-three-dimensional, thermo-mechanical, finite element model of the Antarctic Ice Sheet with a spatial resolution varying from 10 km inland to 2 km along the coast on a massively-parallelized architecture named CIELO and developed at JPL. The model is based on a "Pattyn" type formulation for ice sheets, and a "MacAyeal shelf-stream" formulation for ice shelves. Both types of formulations are coupled using penalty methods, which enables a considerable reduction of the computational load. Using a simple law of basal friction (based on locally computed balanced velocities), the model is able to replicate the location and order-magnitude speed of major ice streams and ice shelves. We then coupled the model with observations of ice motion from SAR interferometry to refine the pattern of basal friction using an inverse control method (MacAyeal 1993). The result provides an excellent agreement with observations and a first complete mapping of the pattern of basal friction along the coast of Antarctica at a resolution compatible with the size of its glaciers and ice streams.

  16. Massive Hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Tariq, Cheema

    2016-01-01

    Hemoptysis, or coughing of blood, oftentimes triggers anxiety and fear for patients. The etiology of hemoptysis will determine the clinical course, which includes watchful waiting or intensive care admission. Any amount of hemoptysis that compromises the patient's respiratory status is considered massive hemoptysis and should be considered a medical emergency. In this article, we review introduction, definition, bronchial circulation anatomy, etiology, and management of massive hemoptysis.

  17. Structure of dark matter halos in warm dark matter models and in models with long-lived charged massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Ayuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Kohri, Kazunori; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: naoki.yoshida@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We study the formation of non-linear structures in warm dark matter (WDM) models and in a long-lived charged massive particle (CHAMP) model. CHAMPs with a decay lifetime of about 1 yr induce characteristic suppression in the matter power spectrum at subgalactic scales through acoustic oscillations in the thermal background. We explore structure formation in such a model. We also study three WDM models, where the dark matter particles are produced through the following mechanisms: i) WDM particles are produced in the thermal background and then kinematically decoupled; ii) WDM particles are fermions produced by the decay of thermal heavy bosons; and iii) WDM particles are produced by the decay of non-relativistic heavy particles. We show that the linear matter power spectra for the three models are all characterised by the comoving Jeans scale at the matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, we can also describe the linear matter power spectrum for the long-lived CHAMP model in terms of a suitably defined characteristic cut-off scale k{sub Ch}, similarly to the WDM models. We perform large cosmological N-body simulations to study the non-linear growth of structures in these four models. We compare the halo mass functions, the subhalo mass functions, and the radial distributions of subhalos in simulated Milky Way-size halos. For the characteristic cut-off scale k{sub cut} = 51 h Mpc{sup −1}, the subhalo abundance ( ∼ 10{sup 9}M{sub sun}) is suppressed by a factor of ∼ 10 compared with the standard ΛCDM model. We then study the models with k{sub cut} ≅ 51, 410, 820 h Mpc{sup −1}, and confirm that the halo and the subhalo abundances and the radial distributions of subhalos are indeed similar between the different WDM models and the long-lived CHAMP model. The result suggests that the cut-off scale k{sub cut} not only characterises the linear power spectra but also can be used to predict the non-linear clustering properties. The radial distribution of subhalos

  18. Mapping and Modeling the Extended Winds of the Massive Interacting Binary, Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Ted

    2010-01-01

    The combination HST/STIS high spatial and moderate spectral resolutions have revealed the massive interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae by forbidden lines of singly and doubly ionized elements. Throughout the 5.54-year period, lines of Fe++, Ne++, Ar++, S++ and N+ reveal the interacting wind structures, near critical electron densities of 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 7)cu cm, photoionized by the hot secondary, Eta Car B, Lines of Fe+ and Ni+ trace the denser (>10(exp 7)cu cm. less-ionized (< 8 eV) primary wind of Eta Car A as it wraps around the interacting binary stars. For 5 years of the 5.54 year period, the FUV radiation from Eta Car B escapes the orbital region, ionizing the boundaries of the expanding wind structures. But for three to six months, Eta Car B plunges into the primary wind approaching to within 1 to 2 AU, leading to cutoff of FUV and X-ray fluxes. The interacting wind structure, resolved out to 0.8", drops io ionization and then rebuilds as Eta Car B emerges from the primary wind envelope. Solid Particle Hydrodynamical(SPH) models have been developed extending out to 2000 AU and adapted to include FUV radiation effects of the winds. In turn, synthetic spectroimages of selected forbidden lines have been constructed and compared to the spectroimages recorded by the HST/STIS throughout 1998.0 to 2004.3, extending across the 1998 and 2003.5 minima. By this method, we show that the orbital axis of the binary system must bc within 15 degrees of the Homunculus axis of symmetry and that periastron occurs with Eta Car B passing on the far side of Eta Car B. This result ties the current binary orbit with the bipolar ejection with intervening skirt and leads to implications that the binary system influenced the mass ejection of the l840s and the lesser ejection of the 1890s.

  19. Quantum cosmological Friedman models with a massive Yang-Mills field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2009-07-01

    We prove the existence of a spectral resolution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation when the matter field is provided by a massive Yang-Mills field. The resolution is achieved by first solving the free eigenvalue problem for the gravitational field and then the constrained eigenvalue problem for the Yang-Mills field. In the latter case, the mass of the Yang-Mills field assumes the role of the eigenvalue.

  20. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  1. The Global Nonlinear Stability of Minkowski Space for Self-gravitating Massive Fields. The Wave-Klein-Gordon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFloch, Philippe G.; Ma, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The Hyperboloidal Foliation Method (introduced by the authors in 2014) is extended here and applied to the Einstein equations of general relativity. Specifically, we establish the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime for self-gravitating massive scalar fields, while existing methods only apply to massless scalar fields. First of all, by analyzing the structure of the Einstein equations in wave coordinates, we exhibit a nonlinear wave-Klein-Gordon model defined on a curved background, which is the focus of the present paper. For this model, we prove here the existence of global-in-time solutions to the Cauchy problem, when the initial data have sufficiently small Sobolev norms. A major difficulty comes from the fact that the class of conformal Killing fields of Minkowski space is significantly reduced in the presence of a massive scalar field, since the scaling vector field is not conformal Killing for the Klein-Gordon operator. Our method relies on the foliation (of the interior of the light cone) of Minkowski spacetime by hyperboloidal hypersurfaces and uses Lorentz-invariant energy norms. We introduce a frame of vector fields adapted to the hyperboloidal foliation and we establish several key properties: Sobolev and Hardy-type inequalities on hyperboloids, as well as sup-norm estimates, which correspond to the sharp time decay for the wave and the Klein-Gordon equations. These estimates allow us to control interaction terms associated with the curved geometry and the massive field by distinguishing between two levels of regularity and energy growth and by a successive use of our key estimates in order to close a bootstrap argument.

  2. Quark-Novae in massive binaries: a model for double-humped, hydrogen-poor, superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2015-12-01

    LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz are superluminous, hydrogen-poor, SNe with double-humped light curves. We show that a Quark-Nova (QN; explosive transition of the Neutron Star - NS - to a quark star -QS) occurring in a massive binary, experiencing two Common Envelope (CE) phases, can quantitatively explain the light curves of LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz. The more massive component (A) explodes first as a normal SN, yielding a NS which ejects the hydrogen envelope of the companion when the system enters its first CE phase. During the second CE phase, the NS spirals into and inflates the second He-rich CE. In the process it gains mass and triggers a QN, outside of the CO core, leaving behind a QS. The first hump in our model is the QN shock re-energizing the expanded He-rich CE. The QN occurs when the He-rich envelope is near maximum size (˜1000 R⊙) and imparts enough energy to unbind and eject the envelope. Subsequent merging of the QS with the CO core of component B, driven by gravitational radiation, turns the QS to a black hole. The ensuing black hole accretion provides sufficient power for the second brighter and long lasting hump. Our model suggests a possible connection between SLSNe-I and type Ic-BL SNe which occur when the QN is triggered inside the CO core. We estimate the rate of QNe in massive binaries during the second CE phase to be ˜5 × 10-5 of that of core-collapse SNe.

  3. Cosmology with massive neutrinos I: towards a realistic modeling of the relation between matter, haloes and galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Marulli, Federico; Castorina, Emanuele; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Saito, Shun E-mail: federico.marulli3@unibo.it E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it E-mail: esefusat@ictp.it

    2014-03-01

    By using a suite of large box-size N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos as an extra set of particles, with total masses of 0.15, 0.30, and 0.60 eV, we investigate the impact of neutrino masses on the spatial distribution of dark matter haloes and on the distribution of galaxies within the haloes. We compute the bias between the spatial distribution of dark matter haloes and the overall matter and cold dark matter distributions using statistical tools such as the power spectrum and the two-point correlation function. Overall we find a scale-dependent bias on large scales for the cosmologies with massive neutrinos. In particular, we find that the bias decreases with the scale, being this effect more important for higher neutrino masses and at high redshift. However, our results indicate that the scale-dependence in the bias is reduced if the latter is computed with respect to the cold dark matter distribution only. We find that the value of the bias on large scales is reasonably well reproduced by the Tinker fitting formula once the linear cold dark matter power spectrum is used, instead of the total matter power spectrum. We also investigate whether scale-dependent bias really comes from purely neutrino's effect or from nonlinear gravitational collapse of haloes. For this purpose, we address the Ω{sub ν}-σ{sub 8} degeneracy and find that such degeneracy is not perfect, implying that neutrinos imprint a slight scale dependence on the large-scale bias. Finally, by using a simple halo occupation distribution (HOD) model, we investigate the impact of massive neutrinos on the distribution of galaxies within dark matter haloes. We use the main galaxy sample in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7 to investigate if the small-scale galaxy clustering alone can be used to discriminate among different cosmological models with different neutrino masses. Our results suggest that different choices of the HOD parameters can reproduce the

  4. Inconsistency of topologically massive hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.; Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    The coupled topologically massive spin-5/2 gravity system in D = 3 dimensions whose kinematics represents dynamical propagating gauge invariant massive spin-5/2 and spin-2 excitations, is shown to be inconsistent, or equivalently, not locally hypersymmetric. In contrast to D = 4, the local constraints on the system arising from failure of the fermionic Bianchi identities do not involve the 'highest spin' components of the field, but rather the auxiliary spinor required to construct a consistent massive model.

  5. A model for the non-thermal emission of the very massive colliding-wind binary HD 93129A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Palacio, S.; Romero, G. E.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Benaglia, P.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the wind collision region of the system HD 93129A was resolved for the first time using very large baseline interferometry. This system is one of the most massive known binaries in our Galaxy. In this work we develop a broadband radiative model for the wind collision region. The model takes into account the evolution of accelerated particles streaming along the shocked region, their emission through different radiative processes, and the attenuation of the radiation while it propagates across all local fields. We reproduce the available radio data, and analyze the consequent detectability of the source in hard X/gamma-rays. We predict how the emission from the system will evolve in the forthcoming years when the stars come closer, and we also provide synthetic radio maps that allow to interpret the future observations with very large baseline interferometry in 2.3 GHz and 8.6 GHz. According to our results, the non-thermal emission from this system will enhance in the near future. With instruments such as NuSTAR, Fermi, and CTA, it will be possible to determine whether the relativistic particle content is hadron or lepton dominated, and other parameters such as the strength of the magnetic field in the wind collision region and, indirectly, the magnetic field in the surface of the very massive stars.

  6. Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2015-07-10

    A recent proposal is that dark matter could be a thermal relic of 3→2 scatterings in a strongly coupled hidden sector. We present explicit classes of strongly coupled gauge theories that admit this behavior. These are QCD-like theories of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, where the pions play the role of dark matter. The number-changing 3→2 process, which sets the dark matter relic abundance, arises from the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. The theories give an explicit relationship between the 3→2 annihilation rate and the 2→2 self-scattering rate, which alters predictions for structure formation. This is a simple calculable realization of the strongly interacting massive-particle mechanism.

  7. Modeling gas-phase H2O between 5 μ m and 540 μ m toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; Doty, S. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Melnick, G. J.; Wright, C. M.; Stark, R.

    2003-08-01

    We present models and observations of gas-phase H2O lines between 5 and 540 mu m toward deeply embedded massive protostars, involving both pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions. The data have been obtained for 6 sources with both the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrometers (SWS and LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). For comparison, CO J=7-6 spectra have been observed with the MPIfR/SRON 800 GHz heterodyne spectrometer at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). A radiative transfer model in combination with different physical/chemical scenarios has been used to model these H2O lines for 4 sources to probe the chemical structure of these massive protostars. The results indicate that pure gas-phase production of H2O cannot explain the observed spectra. Ice evaporation in the warm inner envelope and freeze-out in the cold outer part are important for most of our sources and occur at T ~ 90-110 K. The ISO-SWS data are particularly sensitive to ice evaporation in the inner part whereas the ISO-LWS data are good diagnostics of freeze-out in the outer region. The modeling suggests that the 557 GHz SWAS line includes contributions from both the cold and the warm H2O gas. The SWAS line profiles indicate that for some of the sources a fraction of up to 50% of the total flux may originate in the outflow. Shocks do not seem to contribute significantly to the observed emission in other H2O lines, however, in contrast with the case for Orion. The results show that three of the observed and modeled H2O lines, the 303-212, 212-101, and 110-101 lines, are good candidates to observe with the Herschel Space Observatory in order to further investigate the physical and chemical conditions in massive star-forming regions. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, The Netherlands and UK) and with the

  8. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  9. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  10. A model for the non-thermal emission of the very massive colliding-wind binary HD 93129A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Palacio, Santiago; Bosch-Ramon, Valentí; Romero, Gustavo E.; Benaglia, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Context. Recently, the colliding-wind region of the binary stellar system HD 93129A was resolved for the first time using Very Large Baseline Interferometry. This system, one of the most massive known binaries in our Galaxy, presents non-thermal emission in the radio band, which can be used to infer the physical conditions in the system, and make predictions for the high-energy band. Aims: We intend to constrain some of the unknown parameters of HD 93129A through modeling the non-thermal emitter. We also aim to analyse the detectability of this source in hard X-rays and γ-rays. Finally, we want to predict how the non-thermal emission will evolve in the future, when the stars approach periastron. Methods: A broadband radiative model for the wind-collision region (WCR) has been developed taking into account the evolution of the accelerated particles streaming along the shocked region, the emission by different radiative processes, and the attenuation of the emission propagating through the local matter and radiation fields. We reproduce the available radio data, and make predictions of the emission in hard X-rays and γ-rays under different assumptions. Results: From the analysis of the radio emission, we find that the binary HD 93129A is more likely to have a low inclination and a high eccentricity, with the more massive star being currently closer to the observer. The minimum energy of the non-thermal electrons seems to be between ~20-100 MeV, depending on the intensity of the magnetic field in the WCR. The latter can be in the range ~20-1500 mG. Conclusions: Our model is able to reproduce the observed radio emission, and predicts that the non-thermal radiation from HD 93129A will increase in the near future. With instruments such as NuSTAR, Fermi, and CTA, it will be possible to constrain the relativistic particle content of the source, and other parameters such as the magnetic field strength in the WCR which, in turn, can be used to obtain upper-limits of the

  11. A Milky Way with a massive, centrally concentrated thick disc: new Galactic mass models for orbit computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliasis, E.; Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, two new axisymmetric models for the Galactic mass distribution are presented. Motivated by recent results, these two models include the contribution of a stellar thin disc and of a thick disc, as massive as the thin counterpart but with a shorter scale-length. Both models satisfy a number of observational constraints: stellar densities at the solar vicinity, thin and thick disc scale lengths and heights, rotation curve(s), and the absolute value of the perpendicular force Kz as a function of distance to the Galactic centre. We numerically integrate into these new models the motion of all Galactic globular clusters for which distances, proper motions, and radial velocities are available, and the orbits of about one thousand stars in the solar vicinity. The retrieved orbital characteristics are compared to those obtained by integrating the clusters and stellar orbits in pure thin disc models. We find that, due to the possible presence of a thick disc, the computed orbital parameters of disc stars can vary by as much as 30-40%. We also show that the systematic uncertainties that affect the rotation curve still plague computed orbital parameters of globular clusters by similar amounts.

  12. Simulation of the world ocean climate with a massively parallel numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Ibrayev, R. A.; Kalmykov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The INM-IO numerical World Ocean model is verified through the calculation of the model ocean climate. The numerical experiment was conducted for a period of 500 years following the CORE-I protocol. We analyze some basic elements of the large-scale ocean circulation and local and integral characteristics of the model solution. The model limitations and ways they are overcome are described. The results generally fit the level of leading models. This experiment is a necessary step preceding the transition to high-resolution diagnostic and prognostic calculations of the state of the World Ocean and its individual basins.

  13. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR MASSIVE GAS GIANTS WITH THICK CLOUDS: APPLICATION TO THE HR 8799 PLANETS AND PREDICTIONS FOR FUTURE DETECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam; Currie, Thayne E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have generated an extensive new suite of massive giant planet atmosphere models and used it to obtain fits to photometric data for the planets HR 8799b, c, and d. We consider a wide range of cloudy and cloud-free models. The cloudy models incorporate different geometrical and optical thicknesses, modal particle sizes, and metallicities. For each planet and set of cloud parameters, we explore grids in gravity and effective temperature, with which we determine constraints on the planet's mass and age. Our new models yield statistically significant fits to the data, and conclusively confirm that the HR 8799 planets have much thicker clouds than those required to explain data for typical L and T dwarfs. Both models with (1) physically thick forsterite clouds and a 60 {mu}m modal particle size and (2) clouds made of 1 {mu}m sized pure iron droplets and 1% supersaturation fit the data. Current data are insufficient to accurately constrain the microscopic cloud properties, such as composition and particle size. The range of best-estimated masses for HR 8799b, HR 8799c, and HR 8799d conservatively span 2-12 M{sub J} , 6-13 M{sub J} , and 3-11 M{sub J} , respectively, and imply coeval ages between {approx}10 and {approx}150 Myr, consistent with previously reported stellar ages. The best-fit temperatures and gravities are slightly lower than values obtained by Currie et al. using even thicker cloud models. Finally, we use these models to predict the near-to-mid-IR colors of soon-to-be imaged planets. Our models predict that planet-mass objects follow a locus in some near-to-mid-IR color-magnitude diagrams that is clearly separable from the standard L/T dwarf locus for field brown dwarfs.

  14. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  15. Interactive analysis and visualization of massive earth system models using VAPOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Alan; Clyne, John

    2013-04-01

    Recent trends in earth system modeling are leading to a dramatic increase in the size of simulation outputs; however current visualization and analysis capabilities do not readily scale with the increased simulation size. VAPOR is a visualization and analysis package that was designed to enable interactive visualization and analysis of these large datasets, using a wavelet-based multiscale data model. VAPOR runs on Mac, Windows and Linux desktops, exploiting the power of modern graphics cards. VAPOR includes several features to facilitate interactive analysis of earth system data, such as built-in support for Python/NumPy scripting, streamlines, particle tracing and geo-referencing. In this presentation the capabilities of VAPOR will be described and applied to various earth system models. We shall show how to use VAPOR to interactively browse and analyze these large datasets, such as the results of the POP ocean model and the WRF-ARW weather model.

  16. Shear-free axial model in massive Brans-Dicke gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Manzoor, Rubab

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the influences of dark energy on the shear-free axially symmetric evolution by considering self-interacting Brans-Dicke gravity as a dark energy candidate. We describe energy source of the model and derive all the effective dynamical variables as well as effective structure scalars. It is found that scalar field is one of the sources of anisotropy and dissipation. The resulting effective structure scalars help to study the dynamics associated with dark energy in any axial configuration. In order to investigate shear-free evolution, we formulate a set of governing equations along with heat transport equation. We discuss consequences of shear-free condition upon different SBD fluid models like dissipative non-geodesic and geodesic models. For dissipative non-geodesic case, the rotational distribution turns out to be the necessary and sufficient condition for radiating model. The dissipation depends upon inhomogeneous expansion. The geodesic model is found to be irrotational and non-radiating. The non-dissipative geodesic model leads to FRW model for positive values of the expansion parameter.

  17. Modeling cardiovascular hemodynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method on massively parallel supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, Amanda Elizabeth

    Accurate and reliable modeling of cardiovascular hemodynamics has the potential to improve understanding of the localization and progression of heart diseases, which are currently the most common cause of death in Western countries. However, building a detailed, realistic model of human blood flow is a formidable mathematical and computational challenge. The simulation must combine the motion of the fluid, the intricate geometry of the blood vessels, continual changes in flow and pressure driven by the heartbeat, and the behavior of suspended bodies such as red blood cells. Such simulations can provide insight into factors like endothelial shear stress that act as triggers for the complex biomechanical events that can lead to atherosclerotic pathologies. Currently, it is not possible to measure endothelial shear stress in vivo, making these simulations a crucial component to understanding and potentially predicting the progression of cardiovascular disease. In this thesis, an approach for efficiently modeling the fluid movement coupled to the cell dynamics in real-patient geometries while accounting for the additional force from the expansion and contraction of the heart will be presented and examined. First, a novel method to couple a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann fluid model to the microscopic molecular dynamics model of cell movement is elucidated. A treatment of red blood cells as extended structures, a method to handle highly irregular geometries through topology driven graph partitioning, and an efficient molecular dynamics load balancing scheme are introduced. These result in a large-scale simulation of the cardiovascular system, with a realistic description of the complex human arterial geometry, from centimeters down to the spatial resolution of red-blood cells. The computational methods developed to enable scaling of the application to 294,912 processors are discussed, thus empowering the simulation of a full heartbeat. Second, further extensions to enable

  18. UV-extended E-MILES stellar population models: young components in massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazdekis, A.; Koleva, M.; Ricciardelli, E.; Röck, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present UV-extended E-MILES stellar population synthesis models covering the spectral range λλ 1680-50 000 Å at moderately high resolution. We employ the NGSL space-based stellar library to compute spectra of single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations in the wavelength range from 1680 to 3540 Å. These models represent a significant improvement in resolution and age/metallicity coverage over previous studies based on earlier space-based libraries. These model spectra were joined with those we computed in the visible using MILES, and other empirical libraries for redder wavelengths. The models span the metallicity range -1.79≤ [M/H]≤ +0.26 and ages above 30 Myr, for a suite of initial mass function types with varying slopes. We focus on the behaviour of colours, spectra and line-strength indices in the UV range as a function of relevant stellar population parameters. Whereas some indices strengthen with increasing age and metallicity, as most metallicity indicators in the visible, other indices peak around 3 Gyr for metal-rich stellar populations, such as Mg at 2800 Å. Our models provide reasonably good fits to the integrated colours and most line strengths of the stellar clusters of the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud. Our full spectrum fits in the UV range for a representative set of early-type galaxies (ETGs) of varying mass yield age and metallicity estimates in very good agreement with those obtained in the optical range. The comparison of UV colours and line strengths of massive ETGs with our models reveals the presence of young stellar components, with ages in the range 0.1-0.5 Gyr and mass fractions 0.1-0.5 per cent, on the top of an old stellar population.

  19. Investigating Massive Dust Events Using a Coupled Weather-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, A.; Arellano, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Prediction of local to regional scale dust events is challenging due to the complex nature of key processes driving emission, transport, and deposition of mineral dust. In particular, it is difficult to map precisely the sources of mineral dust across heterogeneous land surface properties and land-use changes. This is especially true for Arizona haboobs. These dust storm events are typically driven by thunderstorms and down-bursts over arid regions generating high atmospheric loading of dust in the order of hundreds to thousands of microgram per cubic meter. Modeling and prediction of these events are further complicated by the limitations in satellite-derived and in-situ measurements of dust and related geophysical variables. Here, we investigate the capability of a coupled weather-chemistry model in predicting Arizona haboobs. In particular, this research focuses on the simulation of July 5, 2011 Phoenix haboob using Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) dust scheme. We evaluate the ability of WRF-Chem in simulating the haboob using satellite retrievals of aerosol extinction properties and mass concentrations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) and high resolution SEVIRI false color dust product, in conjunction with in-situ PM10 and PM2.5 measurements. The study uses a nested modeling domain covering Utah, California and Arizona at a horizontal resolution of 5.4 km (outer) and 1.8 km (inner). Boundary conditions for the model are obtained from NOAA Global Forecasting System six-hourly forecast. We present results illustrating the key features of the haboobs, such as the cold pools and surface wind speeds driving the horizontal and vertical structure of the dust, as well as the patterns of dust transport and deposition. Although the spatio-temporal patterns of the haboob

  20. Predictive Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Binding Agents Using Advanced Cheminformatics Tools and Massive Public Data

    PubMed Central

    Ribay, Kathryn; Kim, Marlene T.; Wang, Wenyi; Pinolini, Daniel; Zhu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα) are a critical target for drug design as well as a potential source of toxicity when activated unintentionally. Thus, evaluating potential ERα binding agents is critical in both drug discovery and chemical toxicity areas. Using computational tools, e.g., Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models, can predict potential ERα binding agents before chemical synthesis. The purpose of this project was to develop enhanced predictive models of ERα binding agents by utilizing advanced cheminformatics tools that can integrate publicly available bioassay data. The initial ERα binding agent data set, consisting of 446 binders and 8307 non-binders, was obtained from the Tox21 Challenge project organized by the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC). After removing the duplicates and inorganic compounds, this data set was used to create a training set (259 binders and 259 non-binders). This training set was used to develop QSAR models using chemical descriptors. The resulting models were then used to predict the binding activity of 264 external compounds, which were available to us after the models were developed. The cross-validation results of training set [Correct Classification Rate (CCR) = 0.72] were much higher than the external predictivity of the unknown compounds (CCR = 0.59). To improve the conventional QSAR models, all compounds in the training set were used to search PubChem and generate a profile of their biological responses across thousands of bioassays. The most important bioassays were prioritized to generate a similarity index that was used to calculate the biosimilarity score between each two compounds. The nearest neighbors for each compound within the set were then identified and its ERα binding potential was predicted by its nearest neighbors in the training set. The hybrid model performance (CCR = 0.94 for cross validation; CCR = 0.68 for external prediction) showed significant improvement over the original QSAR

  1. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  2. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs.

  3. Drilling the Messinian Salinity Crisis as a Model Analogue for Dolomite Deposition at the End of Massive Salt Deposition Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Judith A.; Aloisi, Giovanni; Anjos, Sylvia; Latgé, Ricardo; Matsuda, Nilo; Bontognali, Tomaso; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentologic and stratigraphic studies of the Lower Cretaceous sequence, deposited in the economically important Campos Basin, southeast Brazil, document the occurrence of ~20-m-thick dolomite intervals overlying the "massive salt" megasequences of the Lagoa Feia Formation. This stratigaphic succession marks the Aptian/Albian transition from extreme evaporitic conditions of the Lagoa Feia Formation to shallow marine conditions of the Macaé Formation, related to the early opening of the South Atlantic. The facies change from evaporites to dolomite is interpreted as a product of dolomitization resulting from the refuxing of hypersaline fluids from shallow embayments with intense evaporation (Latgé, 2001). Although the reflux model provides a mechanism to produce fluids with geochemical composition favorable for dolomite precipitation, it cannot account for all of the factors required to promote dolomite precipitation. In this study, we propose a different model to explain the post-evaporite deposition of massive dolomite based on the study of sequences deposited at the end Messinian Salinity Crisis, which were recovered from the deep basins of the Mediterranean Sea during DSDP/ODP drilling campaigns. At most of these deep-water sites, the cored interval contained unusual dolomite deposits overlying the uppermost evaporite sections. For example, the upper Messinian sedimentary sequence at DSDP Site 374 comprises non-fossiliferous dolomitic mudstone overlying dolomitic mudstone/gypsum cycles, which in turn overlie anhydrite and halite (Hsü, Montadert et al., 1978). We postulate that the end Messinian dolomite is a product of microbial activity under extreme hypersaline conditions. In the last 20 years, research into the factors controlling dolomite precipitation under Earth surface conditions has led to the development of new models involving the metabolism of microorganisms and associated biofilms to overcome the kinetic inhibitions associated with primary

  4. A Structural Equation Modelling Approach for Massive Blended Synchronous Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kannan, Kalpana; Narayanan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a structural equation modelling (SEM) approach for blended synchronous teacher training workshop. It examines the relationship among various factors that influence the Satisfaction (SAT) of participating teachers. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire from about 500 engineering college teachers. These teachers…

  5. Quenching vs. Quiescence: forming realistic massive ellipticals with a simple starvation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutcke, Thales A.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Greg S.

    2017-01-01

    The decrease in star formation (SF) and the morphological change necessary to produce the z = 0 elliptical galaxy population are commonly ascribed to a sudden quenching event, which is able to rid the central galaxy of its cold gas reservoir in a short time. Following this event, the galaxy is able to prevent further SF and stay quiescent via a maintenance mode. We test whether such a quenching event is truly necessary using a simple model of quiescence. In this model, hot gas (all gas above a temperature threshold) in a ˜1012 M⊙ halo mass galaxy at redshift z ˜ 3 is prevented from cooling. The cool gas continues to form stars at a decreasing rate and the galaxy stellar mass, morphology, velocity dispersion and position on the color magnitude diagram (CMD) proceed to evolve. By z = 0, the halo mass has grown to 1013 M⊙ and the galaxy has attained characteristics typical of an observed z = 0 elliptical galaxy. Our model is run in the framework of a cosmological, smooth particle hydrodynamic code which includes SF, early stellar feedback, supernova feedback, metal cooling and metal diffusion. Additionally, we post-process our simulations with a radiative transfer code to create a mock CMD. In contrast to previous assumptions that a pure "fade away" model evolves too slowly to account for the sparsity of galaxies in the "green valley", we demonstrate crossing times of ≲ 1 Gyr. We conclude that no sudden quenching event is necessary to produce such rapid colour transitions.

  6. Preventing Return of Fear in an Animal Model of Anxiety: Additive Effects of Massive Extinction and Extinction in Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Fear conditioning and experimental extinction have been presented as models of anxiety disorders and exposure therapy, respectively. Moreover, the return of fear serves as a model of relapse after exposure therapy. Here we present two experiments, with rats as subjects in a lick suppression preparation, in which we assessed the additive effects of two different treatments to attenuate the return of fear. First, we evaluated whether two phenomena known to generate return of fear (i.e., spontaneous recovery and renewal) summate to produce a stronger reappearance of extinguished fear. At test, rats evaluated outside the extinction context following a long delay after extinction (i.e., a delayed context shift) exhibited greater return of extinguished fear than rats evaluated outside the extinction context alone, but return of extinguished fear following a delayed context shift did not significantly differ from the return of fear elicited in rats tested following a long delay after extinction alone. Additionally, extinction in multiple contexts and a massive extinction treatment each attenuated the strong return of fear produced by a delayed context shift. Moreover, the conjoint action of these treatments was significantly more successful in preventing the reappearance of extinguished fear, suggesting that extensive cue exposure administered in several different therapeutic settings has the potential to reduce relapse after therapy for anxiety disorders, more than either manipulation alone. PMID:23611075

  7. Preventing return of fear in an animal model of anxiety: additive effects of massive extinction and extinction in multiple contexts.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2013-06-01

    Fear conditioning and experimental extinction have been presented as models of anxiety disorders and exposure therapy, respectively. Moreover, the return of fear serves as a model of relapse after exposure therapy. Here we present two experiments, with rats as subjects in a lick suppression preparation, in which we assessed the additive effects of two different treatments to attenuate the return of fear. First, we evaluated whether two phenomena known to generate return of fear (i.e., spontaneous recovery and renewal) summate to produce a stronger reappearance of extinguished fear. At test, rats evaluated outside the extinction context following a long delay after extinction (i.e., a delayed context shift) exhibited greater return of extinguished fear than rats evaluated outside the extinction context alone, but return of extinguished fear following a delayed context shift did not significantly differ from the return of fear elicited in rats tested following a long delay after extinction alone. Additionally, extinction in multiple contexts and a massive extinction treatment each attenuated the strong return of fear produced by a delayed context shift. Moreover, the conjoint action of these treatments was significantly more successful in preventing the reappearance of extinguished fear, suggesting that extensive cue exposure administered in several different therapeutic settings has the potential to reduce relapse after therapy for anxiety disorders, more than either manipulation alone.

  8. Massively Parallel Genetics.

    PubMed

    Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Human genetics has historically depended on the identification of individuals whose natural genetic variation underlies an observable trait or disease risk. Here we argue that new technologies now augment this historical approach by allowing the use of massively parallel assays in model systems to measure the functional effects of genetic variation in many human genes. These studies will help establish the disease risk of both observed and potential genetic variants and to overcome the problem of "variants of uncertain significance."

  9. Comparison of BT Settl Model Spectra in NIR to Brown Dwarfs and Massive Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popinchalk, Mark; Buzard, Cam; Alam, Munazza; Camnasio, Sara; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rice, Emily L.

    2017-01-01

    Brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets are difficult to observe, which hampers our understanding of their properties. Model spectra, such as the BT Settl model grid, can provide an opportunity to augment and validate our understanding of these faint objects by serving to contrast and complement our analysis of their observed spectra. We present work from an upcoming paper that leverages this opportunity. The near infrared (NIR) wavelength region is favorable for analysis of low mass brown dwarfs and high mass gaseous companions, in particular the K band (1.97 - 2.40 µm) due to its relatively high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio wavelength range for spectra of planetary companions. We present a method to analyze two regions of the K band spectral structure (2.03 - 2.10 µm and 2.215 - 2.290 µm), and apply it to a sample of objects with field gravity, low gravity, and planetary mass as well as the BT Settl model grid for a similar range of effective temperatures and surface gravities. A correlation between spectral structure and effective temperature is found for the shorter wavelength region and there is evidence of gravity dependence for the longer wavelength range. This work suggests that the K band has the potential to be an indicator for brown dwarf and exoplanet surface gravity and effective temperature. We also present preliminary analysis from another upcoming paper. We examine equivalent widths of K I absorption lines at 1.1693 µm, 1.1773 µm, 1.2436 µm and 1.2525 µm in a selection of L dwarfs to explore their physical properties by comparing them to equivalent measurements in the BT Settl model grid.

  10. Modeling Large Scale Circuits Using Massively Parallel Descrete-Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    1,966,080 cores of the Sequoia Blue Gene/Q supercomputer system. For the PHOLD benchmark model, we demonstrate the ability to process 33 trillion...events in 65 seconds yielding a peak event-rate in excess of 504 billion events/second using 120 racks of Sequoia . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Circuit...13 Table 7 - SEQUOIA : Raw PHOLD Performance Data for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 48 Rack Runs ............ 18 Table 8 - SEQUOIA : Raw PHOLD Performance

  11. Dilepton production with the SMASH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Janus; Staudenmaier, Jan; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    In this work the SMASH model is presented (“Simulating Many Accelerated Strongly-Interacting Hadrons”), a next-generation hadronic transport approach, which is designed to describe the non-equilibrium evolution of hadronic matter in heavy-ion collisions. We discuss first dilepton spectra obtained with SMASH in the few-GeV energy range of GSI/FAIR, where the dynamics of hadronic matter is dominated by the production and decay of various resonance states. In particular we show how electromagnetic transition form factors can emerge in a transport picture under the hypothesis of vector-meson dominance.

  12. Comparative assessment of SAS and DES turbulence modeling for massively separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilin; Yan, Chao; Liu, Hongkang; Luo, Dahai

    2016-02-01

    Numerical studies of the flow past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 1.4× 105 and NACA0021 airfoil at the angle of attack 60° have been carried out by scale-adaptive simulation (SAS) and detached eddy simulation (DES), in comparison with the existing experimental data. The new version of the model developed by Egorov and Menter is assessed, and advantages and disadvantages of the SAS simulation are analyzed in detail to provide guidance for industrial application in the future. Moreover, the mechanism of the scale-adaptive characteristics in separated regions is discussed, which is obscure in previous analyses. It is concluded that: the mean flow properties satisfactorily agree with the experimental results for the SAS simulation, although the prediction of the second order turbulent statistics in the near wake region is just reasonable. The SAS model can produce a larger magnitude of the turbulent kinetic energy in the recirculation bubble, and, consequently, a smaller recirculation region and a more rapid recovery of the mean velocity outside the recirculation region than the DES approach with the same grid resolution. The vortex shedding is slightly less irregular with the SAS model than with the DES approach, probably due to the higher dissipation of the SAS simulation under the condition of the coarse mesh.

  13. Submm Observations of Massive Star Formation in the Giant Molecular Cloud NGC 6334 : Gas Kinematics with Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernickel, A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. How massive stars (M>8 Ms) form and how they accrete gas is still an open research field, but it is known that their influence on the interstellar medium (ISM) is immense. Star formation involves the gravitational collapse of gas from scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) down to dense hot molecular cores (HMCs). Thus, it is important to understand the mass flows and kinematics in the ISM. Aims. This dissertation focuses on the detailed study of the region NGC 6334, located in the Galaxy at a distance of 1.7 kpc. It is aimed to trace the gas velocities in the filamentary, massive star-forming region NGC 6334 at several scales and to explain its dynamics. For that purpose, different scales are examined from 0.01-10 pc to collect information about the density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity, and consequently to gain insights about the physio-chemical conditions of molecular clouds. The two embedded massive protostellar clusters NGC 6334I and I(N), which are at different stages of development, were selected to determine their infall velocities and mass accretion rates. Methods. This astronomical source was surveyed by a combination of different observatories, namely with the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the single-dish telescope Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), and the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO). It was mapped with APEX in carbon monoxide (13CO and C18O, J=2-1) at 220.4 GHz to study the filamentary structure and turbulent kinematics on the largest scales of 10 pc. The spectral line profiles are decomposed by Gaussian fitting and a dendrogram algorithm is applied to distinguish velocity-coherent structures and to derive statistical properties. The velocity gradient method is used to derive mass flow rates. The main filament was mapped with APEX in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and oxomethylium (HCO+, J=3-2) at 267.6 GHz to trace the dense gas. To reproduce the position- velocity diagram (PVD), a cylindrical model with the radiative transfer

  14. Digital relief 3D model of the Khibiny massive (Kola peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesalova, Elena; Asavin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of maps of 1: 50,000 and 1: 200,000 3D model Khibiny massif developed. We used software ARC / INFO v10.2 ESRI. This project will be organised to build background for gas pollution monitoring network. We planned to use the model to estimate local heterogeneities in the composition of the atmosphere at the emanation of greenhouse gases in the area, the construction of models of vertical distribution of the content of trace gases in the rock mass. In addition to the project GIS digital elevation model contains layers of geological and tectonic map that allows us to estimate the area of the output of certain petrographic rock groups characterized by different ratios of emitted hydrocarbons (CH4/ H2). The model allows to construct a classification of fault in the array. At first glance, there are two groups of faults - the ancient associated with the formation of the intrusive phases sequence, and the young - due to recent tectonic shifts. Ancient faults form a common semicircular structure of the pluton cause overall asymmetry Khibin heights with the transition to the border area between the Khibiny and Lovoozero. Modern tectonics mainly represented by radial and chord faults which are formed narrow mountain valleys and troughs. It remains an open question as to which system fault (old or young) is more productive to gas emanations? On the one hand the system characterized by a large old depth, on the other hand a young more active faults. Address these issues require further detailed observations. The essential question is to assess the possibility of maintaining a constant concentration gradient of these impurities in the atmosphere due to gas emanations of fracture zones and areas enriched occluded gases. In the simulation of these processes can be used initially set parameters: 1 the flow rate of the gas impurities 2 the value of wind flows in closed and open valley 3 Assessment of thermal diffusion coefficients determined by the temperature gradient

  15. Transition between order and chaos in a composite disk galaxy model with a massive nucleus and a dark matter halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caranicolas, Nicolaos D.; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the transition from regular to chaotic motion in a composite galaxy model with a disk-halo, a massive dense nucleus and a dark halo component. We obtain relationships connecting the critical value of the mass of the nucleus or the critical value of the angular momentum Lzc, with the mass Mh of the dark halo, where the transition from regular motion to chaos occurs. We also present 3D diagrams connecting the mass of nucleus the energy and the percentage of stars that can show chaotic motion. The fraction of the chaotic orbits observed in the (r,pr) phase plane, as a function of the mass of the dark halo is also computed. We use a semi-numerical method, that is a combination of theoretical and numerical procedure. The theoretical results obtained using the version 8.0 of the Mathematica package, while all the numerical calculations were made using a Bulirsch-Stöer FORTRAN routine in double precision. The results can be obtained in semi-numerical or numerical form and give good description for the connection of the physical quantities entering the model and the transition between regular and chaotic motion. We observe that the mass of the dark halo, the mass of the dense nucleus and the Lz component of the angular momentum, are important physical quantities, as they are linked to the regular or chaotic character of orbits in disk galaxies described by the model. Our numerical experiments suggest, that the amount of the dark matter plays an important role in disk galaxies represented by the model, as the mass of the halo affects, not only the regular or chaotic nature of motion but it is also connected with the existence of the different families of regular orbits. Comparison of the present results with earlier work is also presented.

  16. An open source massively parallel solver for Richards equation: Mechanistic modelling of water fluxes at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgogozo, L.; Renon, N.; Soulaine, C.; Hénon, F.; Tomer, S. K.; Labat, D.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Sekhar, M.; Ababou, R.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a massively parallel open source solver for Richards equation, named the RichardsFOAM solver. This solver has been developed in the framework of the open source generalist computational fluid dynamics tool box OpenFOAM® and is capable to deal with large scale problems in both space and time. The source code for RichardsFOAM may be downloaded from the CPC program library website. It exhibits good parallel performances (up to ˜90% parallel efficiency with 1024 processors both in strong and weak scaling), and the conditions required for obtaining such performances are analysed and discussed. These performances enable the mechanistic modelling of water fluxes at the scale of experimental watersheds (up to few square kilometres of surface area), and on time scales of decades to a century. Such a solver can be useful in various applications, such as environmental engineering for long term transport of pollutants in soils, water engineering for assessing the impact of land settlement on water resources, or in the study of weathering processes on the watersheds.

  17. The Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM): a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J. M.; García, A.; Llinares, A.; Rodríguez-Losada, J. A.; Ortiz, R.

    2010-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most awesome and powerful displays of nature's force, constituting a major natural hazard for society (a single eruption can claim thousands of lives in an instant). Consequently, assessment and management of volcanic risk have become critically important goals of modern volcanology. Over recent years, numerous tools have been developed to evaluate volcanic risk and support volcanic crisis management: probabilistic analysis of future eruptions, hazard and risk maps, event trees, etc. However, there has been little improvement in the tools that may help Civil Defense officials to prepare Emergency Plans. Here we present a new tool for simulating massive evacuation processes during volcanic crisis: the Variable Scale Evacuation Model (VSEM). The main objective of the VSEM software is to optimize the evacuation process of Emergency Plans during volcanic crisis. For this, the VSEM allows the simulation of an evacuation considering different strategies depending on diverse impact scenarios. VSEM is able to calculate the required time for the complete evacuation taking into account diverse evacuation scenarios (number and type of population, infrastructure, road network, etc.) and to detect high-risk or "blackspots" of the road network. The program is versatile and can work at different scales, thus being capable of simulating the evacuation of small villages as well as huge cities.

  18. Globular Cluster Formation at High Density: A Model for Elemental Enrichment with Fast Recycling of Massive-star Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2017-02-01

    The self-enrichment of massive star clusters by p-processed elements is shown to increase significantly with increasing gas density as a result of enhanced star formation rates and stellar scatterings compared to the lifetime of a massive star. Considering the type of cloud core where a globular cluster (GC) might have formed, we follow the evolution and enrichment of the gas and the time dependence of stellar mass. A key assumption is that interactions between massive stars are important at high density, including interactions between massive stars and massive-star binaries that can shred stellar envelopes. Massive-star interactions should also scatter low-mass stars out of the cluster. Reasonable agreement with the observations is obtained for a cloud-core mass of ∼4 × 106 M ⊙ and a density of ∼2 × 106 cm‑3. The results depend primarily on a few dimensionless parameters, including, most importantly, the ratio of the gas consumption time to the lifetime of a massive star, which has to be low, ∼10%, and the efficiency of scattering low-mass stars per unit dynamical time, which has to be relatively large, such as a few percent. Also for these conditions, the velocity dispersions of embedded GCs should be comparable to the high gas dispersions of galaxies at that time, so that stellar ejection by multistar interactions could cause low-mass stars to leave a dwarf galaxy host altogether. This could solve the problem of missing first-generation stars in the halos of Fornax and WLM.

  19. Renormalizable Electrodynamics of Scalar and Vector Mesons. Part II

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, Abdus; Delbourgo, Robert

    1964-01-01

    The "gauge" technique" for solving theories introduced in an earlier paper is applied to scalar and vector electrodynamics. It is shown that for scalar electrodynamics, there is no {lambda}φ*2φ2 infinity in the theory, while with conventional subtractions vector electrodynamics is completely finite. The essential ideas of the gauge technique are explained in section 3, and a preliminary set of rules for finite computation in vector electrodynamics is set out in Eqs. (7.28) - (7.34).

  20. Phases of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei L.

    2004-10-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity is described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff ~ (mMPl)1/2. This theory is free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of arbitrary higher dimension operators without assuming any fine-tunings among the coefficients of these operators, besides those enforced by the symmetries. These theories can be thought of as generalizations of the ghost condensate model with a smaller residual symmetry group. We briefly discuss what kind of cosmology can one expect in massive gravity and argue that the allowed values of the graviton mass may be quite large, affecting growth of primordial perturbations, structure formation and, perhaps, enhancing the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe.

  1. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  2. Towards Anatomic Scale Agent-Based Modeling with a Massively Parallel Spatially Explicit General-Purpose Model of Enteric Tissue (SEGMEnT_HPC)

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Robert Chase; Christley, Scott; Chang, Eugene; An, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest challenge currently facing the biomedical research community is the ability to integrate highly detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms to represent clinical disease states as a pathway to engineer effective therapeutics. This is particularly evident in the representation of organ-level pathophysiology in terms of abnormal tissue structure, which, through histology, remains a mainstay in disease diagnosis and staging. As such, being able to generate anatomic scale simulations is a highly desirable goal. While computational limitations have previously constrained the size and scope of multi-scale computational models, advances in the capacity and availability of high-performance computing (HPC) resources have greatly expanded the ability of computational models of biological systems to achieve anatomic, clinically relevant scale. Diseases of the intestinal tract are exemplary examples of pathophysiological processes that manifest at multiple scales of spatial resolution, with structural abnormalities present at the microscopic, macroscopic and organ-levels. In this paper, we describe a novel, massively parallel computational model of the gut, the Spatially Explicitly General-purpose Model of Enteric Tissue_HPC (SEGMEnT_HPC), which extends an existing model of the gut epithelium, SEGMEnT, in order to create cell-for-cell anatomic scale simulations. We present an example implementation of SEGMEnT_HPC that simulates the pathogenesis of ileal pouchitis, and important clinical entity that affects patients following remedial surgery for ulcerative colitis. PMID:25806784

  3. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  4. An enhanced model of the contemporary and long-term (200 ka) sublimation of the massive subsurface ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Sletten, Ronald S.; Hagedorn, Birgit; Hallet, Bernard; McKay, Christopher P.; Stone, John O.

    2015-08-01

    A massive ice body buried under several decimeters of dry regolith in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, is believed to be more than 1 Ma old and perhaps over 8.1 Ma; however, vapor diffusion models suggest that subsurface ice in this region is not stable under current climate conditions. To better understand the controls on sublimation rates and stability of this massive ice, we have modeled vapor diffusion using 12 years of climate and soil temperature data from 1999 to 2011, including field measurements of episodic snow cover and snowmelt events that have not been represented in previous models of ground ice sublimation. The model is then extended to reconstruct the sublimation history over the last 200 ka using paleotemperatures estimated from ice core data from nearby Taylor Dome and a relationship between atmospheric temperature and humidity derived from our meteorological records. The model quantifies the impact of episodic snow events; they account for a nearly 30% reduction in the massive ice loss. The sublimation rate of ground ice averages 0.11 mm a-1 between 1999 and 2011 in Beacon Valley. Parameterized with past environmental conditions and assuming the same regolith thickness, the modeled sublimation rate of ground ice in Beacon Valley averages 0.09 mm a-1 for the last 200 ka, comparable to the long-term average rate estimated independently from various studies based on cosmogenic isotopes. This study provides a realistic estimate of the long-term sublimation history and supports the inference that the buried ice in Beacon Valley is older than 1 Ma.

  5. In-vent column collapse as an alternative model for massive volcaniclastic kimberlite emplacement: An example from the Fox kimberlite, Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Cas, R. A. F.; Crawford, B. B.

    2008-06-01

    The origins of massive, poorly sorted fragmental kimberlite and kimberlite breccias in the diatremes of kimberlite volcanic pipes is currently poorly understood. Studies of the textural features of the major infill of the Fox kimberlite, Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada, show that it may have formed as a result of the collapse of the explosive eruption column above the vent into the deep open pipe during the climactic stage of the eruption. As the eruption intensity increased the column became critically overloaded with dense particles and rapidly collapsed onto itself. Unlike deposits typically preserved from column collapse events, such as ignimbrites, some portion of the collapsing mass was trapped in the deep pipe, forming a distinct type of pyroclastic deposit, "in-vent/vent-fill column collapse lapilli-tuff". This deposit has previously been tentatively identified as tuffisitic kimberlite (TK) or massive volcaniclastic kimberlite (MVK), based on broadly similar textural characteristics with these lithologies. Though every individual deposit will have formed under slightly different circumstances, mass emplacement from column collapse is proposed as a viable model for massive volcaniclastic kimberlite emplacement, based on extrapolation of modern volcanological processes.

  6. Massively Parallel Assimilation of TOGA/TAO and Topex/Poseidon Measurements into a Quasi Isopycnal Ocean General Circulation Model Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele; Borovikov, Anna Y.; Suarez, Max

    1999-01-01

    A massively parallel ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF)is used to assimilate temperature data from the TOGA/TAO array and altimetry from TOPEX/POSEIDON into a Pacific basin version of the NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP)ls quasi-isopycnal ocean general circulation model. The EnKF is an approximate Kalman filter in which the error-covariance propagation step is modeled by the integration of multiple instances of a numerical model. An estimate of the true error covariances is then inferred from the distribution of the ensemble of model state vectors. This inplementation of the filter takes advantage of the inherent parallelism in the EnKF algorithm by running all the model instances concurrently. The Kalman filter update step also occurs in parallel by having each processor process the observations that occur in the region of physical space for which it is responsible. The massively parallel data assimilation system is validated by withholding some of the data and then quantifying the extent to which the withheld information can be inferred from the assimilation of the remaining data. The distributions of the forecast and analysis error covariances predicted by the ENKF are also examined.

  7. Hamiltonian Lattice Studies of Pionic Collective Excitations in the Non-linear Sigma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Siu A.

    2001-04-01

    The latticization of the non-linear sigma model reduces a chiral meson field theory to an O(4) spin system with quantum fluctuations. By solving the resulting lattice Hamiltonian by Monte Carlo methods, the dynamics and thermodynamics of pions can be determined non-perturbatively. In particular, the mas gap of pionic collective excitations with quantum number of vector mesons can be determined as the chiral phase transition is approached. Results based on a newly discovered 4th order method of solving for the ground state of a quantum many-body Hamitonian will be presented.

  8. Hadronic matter at finite temperature and density within an effective relativistic mean-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.

    2012-10-01

    We study hot and dense hadronic matter by means of an effective relativistic mean-field model with the inclusion of the full octet of baryons, the Δ-isobar degrees of freedom and the lightest pseudoscalar and vector mesons. These last particles are considered by taking into account an effective chemical potential and an effective mass depending on the self-consistent interaction between baryons. The analysis is performed by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge fraction and zero net strangeness.

  9. A comprehensive comparative test of seven widely used spectral synthesis models against multi-band photometry of young massive-star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, A.; Charlot, S.; Bruzual, G.; Eldridge, J. J.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Cignoni, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Lee, J. C.; Östlin, G.; Smith, L. J.; Ubeda, L.; Zackrisson, E.

    2016-04-01

    We test the predictions of spectral synthesis models based on seven different massive-star prescriptions against Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) observations of eight young massive clusters in two local galaxies, NGC 1566 and NGC 5253, chosen because predictions of all seven models are available at the published galactic metallicities. The high angular resolution, extensive cluster inventory, and full near-ultraviolet to near-infrared photometric coverage make the LEGUS data set excellent for this study. We account for both stellar and nebular emission in the models and try two different prescriptions for attenuation by dust. From Bayesian fits of model libraries to the observations, we find remarkably low dispersion in the median E(B - V) (˜0.03 mag), stellar masses (˜104 M⊙), and ages (˜1 Myr) derived for individual clusters using different models, although maximum discrepancies in these quantities can reach 0.09 mag and factors of 2.8 and 2.5, respectively. This is for ranges in median properties of 0.05-0.54 mag, 1.8-10 × 104 M⊙, and 1.6-40 Myr spanned by the clusters in our sample. In terms of best fit, the observations are slightly better reproduced by models with interacting binaries and least well reproduced by models with single rotating stars. Our study provides a first quantitative estimate of the accuracies and uncertainties of the most recent spectral synthesis models of young stellar populations, demonstrates the good progress of models in fitting high-quality observations, and highlights the needs for a larger cluster sample and more extensive tests of the model parameter space.

  10. Scientific development of a massively parallel ocean climate model. Progress report for 1992--1993 and Continuing request for 1993--1994 to CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    During the second year of CHAMMP funding to the principal investigators, progress has been made in the proposed areas of research, as follows: investigation of the physics of the thermohaline circulation; examination of resolution effects on ocean general circulation; and development of a massively parallel ocean climate model.

  11. Gauged linear sigma model and pion-pion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Schechter, Joseph; Shahid, M. Naeem

    2009-12-01

    A simple gauged linear sigma model with several parameters to take the symmetry breaking and the mass differences between the vector meson and the axial vector meson into account is considered here as a possibly useful 'template' for the role of a light scalar in QCD as well as for (at a different scale) an effective Higgs sector for some recently proposed walking technicolor models. An analytic procedure is first developed for relating the Lagrangian parameters to four well established (in the QCD application) experimental inputs. One simple equation distinguishes three different cases: i. QCD with axial vector particle heavier than vector particle, ii. possible technicolor model with vector particle heavier than the axial vector one, iii. the unphysical QCD case where both the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayazuddin and Weinberg relations hold. The model is applied to the s-wave pion-pion scattering in QCD. Both the near threshold region and (with an assumed unitarization) the 'global' region up to about 800 MeV are considered. It is noted that there is a little tension between the choice of 'bare' sigma mass parameter for describing these two regions. If a reasonable 'global' fit is made, there is some loss of precision in the near threshold region.

  12. Modeling the early evolution of massive OB stars with an experimental wind routine. The first bi-stability jump and the angular momentum loss problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Z.; Puls, J.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Stellar evolution models of massive stars are very sensitive to the adopted mass-loss scheme. The magnitude and evolution of mass-loss rates significantly affect the main sequence evolution, and the properties of post-main sequence objects, including their rotational velocities. Aims: Driven by potential discrepancies between theoretically predicted and observationally derived mass-loss rates in the OB star range, we aim in particular to investigate the response to mass-loss rates that are lower than currently adopted, in parallel with the mass-loss behavior at the "first" bi-stability jump. Methods: We performed 1D hydrodynamical model calculations of single 20-60 M⊙ Galactic (Z = 0.014) stars where the effects of stellar winds are already significant in the main sequence phase. We have developed an experimental wind routine to examine the behavior and response of the models under the influence of different mass-loss rates. This observationally guided, simple and flexible wind routine is not a new mass-loss description but a useful tool based on the wind-momentum luminosity relation and other scaling relations, and provides a meaningful base for various tests and comparisons. Results: The main result of this study indicates a dichotomy between solutions of currently debated problems regarding mass-loss rates of hot massive stars. In a fully diffusive approach, and for commonly adopted initial rotational velocities, lower mass-loss rates than theoretically predicted require to invoke an additional source of angular momentum loss (either due to bi-stability braking, or yet unidentified) to brake down surface rotational velocities. On the other hand, a large jump in the mass-loss rates due to the bi-stability mechanism (a factor of 5-7 predicted by Vink et al. (2000, A&A, 362, 295), but a factor of 10-20 in modern models of massive stars) is challenged by observational results, and might be avoided if the early mass-loss rates agreed with the theoretically

  13. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  14. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  15. Quark fragmentation functions in NJL-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Matevosyan, Hrayr; Thomas, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. We report on our studies of quark fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) - jet model. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations for the fragmentation functions to mesons and nucleons, as well as to pion and kaon pairs (dihadron fragmentation functions) are presented. The important role of intermediate vector meson resonances for those semi-inclusive deep inelastic production processes is emphasized. Our studies are very relevant for the extraction of transverse momentum dependent quark distribution functions from measured scattering cross sections. Supported by Grant in Aid for Scientific Research, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Project No. 20168769.

  16. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  17. [Massive traumatic hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Bourdereau, J M; Mathé, D; Voultoury, J C

    1985-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who suffered a rupture of one lung as result of thoracic trauma. This gave rise to respiratory distress with massive haemoptysis which was initially treated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube, with separate lung ventilation, a chest drain and massive transfusion. A haemostatic pneumonectomy had to be performed because of the persisting and profuse bleeding.

  18. Strange mode instability driven finite amplitude pulsations and mass-loss in models of massive zero-age main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Abhay Pratap; Glatzel, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    The stability with respect to radial perturbations of massive zero-age main-sequence stars having solar chemical composition and masses between 50 and 150 M⊙ is reinvestigated. As a first step, a linear non-adiabatic stability analysis is performed, confirming the existence of dynamical strange mode instabilities for models with masses above 58 M⊙. For selected models, the evolution of the strange mode instabilities into the non-linear regime is followed by numerical simulation. The final results of strange mode instabilities are thus found to be finite amplitude pulsations with periods between 3 and 24 h. Mean acoustic luminosities capable to drive winds with mass-loss rates of the order of 0.5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, which can at most marginally affect stellar evolution in the vicinity of the zero-age main sequence, are associated with these finite amplitude pulsations.

  19. Chiral bag model for the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Toki, Hiroshi

    1996-12-01

    We review the chiral bag model for the nucleon at low energy. The model is a hybrid model of quark and meson degrees of freedom, interpolating the two limits of the Skyrme model at R → 0 and the MIT bag model at R → ∞, where R is the bag radius. Baryon number one ( B = 1) solutions are obtained in the semiclassical method, where the nucleon is regarded as a slowly rotating hedgehog. We investigate static properties of the nucleon such as masses and magnetic moments as functions of R, first in the original chiral bag model and second in the models with vector mesons. We find a reasonably good description for the nucleon in both cases at an intermediate bag radius R ~ 0.6 fm. Results of the model calculations are then re-derived using a group theoretical method in the large- Nc limit.

  20. Transverse Instability of Line Solitary Waves in Massive Dirac Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry; Shimabukuro, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Working in the context of localized modes in periodic potentials, we consider two systems of the massive Dirac equations in two spatial dimensions. The first system, a generalized massive Thirring model, is derived for the periodic stripe potentials. The second one, a generalized massive Gross-Neveu equation, is derived for the hexagonal potentials. In both cases, we prove analytically that the line solitary waves are spectrally unstable with respect to periodic transverse perturbations of large periods. The spectral instability is induced by the spatial translation for the generalized massive Thirring model and by the gauge rotation for the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model. We also observe numerically that the spectral instability holds for the transverse perturbations of any period in the generalized massive Thirring model and exhibits a finite threshold on the period of the transverse perturbations in the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model.

  1. Progress in understanding disruptions triggered by massive gas injection via 3D non-linear MHD modelling with JOREK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardon, E.; Fil, A.; Hoelzl, M.; Huijsmans, G.; contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    3D non-linear MHD simulations of a D 2 massive gas injection (MGI) triggered disruption in JET with the JOREK code provide results which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations and shed light on the physics at play. In particular, it is observed that the gas destabilizes a large m/n  =  2/1 tearing mode, with the island O-point coinciding with the gas deposition region, by enhancing the plasma resistivity via cooling. When the 2/1 island gets so large that its inner side reaches the q  =  3/2 surface, a 3/2 tearing mode grows. Simulations suggest that this is due to a steepening of the current profile right inside q  =  3/2. Magnetic field stochastization over a large fraction of the minor radius as well as the growth of higher n modes ensue rapidly, leading to the thermal quench (TQ). The role of the 1/1 internal kink mode is discussed. An I p spike at the TQ is obtained in the simulations but with a smaller amplitude than in the experiment. Possible reasons are discussed.

  2. PFLOTRAN User Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model for Describing Surface and Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lu, Chuan; Karra, Satish; Bisht, Gautam; Andre, Benjamin; Mills, Richard; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-01-20

    PFLOTRAN solves a system of generally nonlinear partial differential equations describing multi-phase, multicomponent and multiscale reactive flow and transport in porous materials. The code is designed to run on massively parallel computing architectures as well as workstations and laptops (e.g. Hammond et al., 2011). Parallelization is achieved through domain decomposition using the PETSc (Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) libraries for the parallelization framework (Balay et al., 1997). PFLOTRAN has been developed from the ground up for parallel scalability and has been run on up to 218 processor cores with problem sizes up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. Written in object oriented Fortran 90, the code requires the latest compilers compatible with Fortran 2003. At the time of this writing this requires gcc 4.7.x, Intel 12.1.x and PGC compilers. As a requirement of running problems with a large number of degrees of freedom, PFLOTRAN allows reading input data that is too large to fit into memory allotted to a single processor core. The current limitation to the problem size PFLOTRAN can handle is the limitation of the HDF5 file format used for parallel IO to 32 bit integers. Noting that 232 = 4; 294; 967; 296, this gives an estimate of the maximum problem size that can be currently run with PFLOTRAN. Hopefully this limitation will be remedied in the near future.

  3. Complex network modeling of spectral remotely sensed imagery: A case study of massive green algae blooms detection based on MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Shao, Fengjing; Wang, Changying; Sun, Rencheng; Ji, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Feature bands selection and targets classification is of great importance in spectral remotely sensed imagery interpretation. In this work, complex network is adopted for modeling spectral remotely sensed imagery. Subnet is constructed for each band based on spatial neighboring characteristic. Feature bands could be obtained by analyzing and comparing topological characteristics between subnets. After finding feature bands, subnets of feature bands are compounded. Targets classification could be measured by degree distribution of the composited network. This approach is evaluated with empirical experiments based on detecting massive green algae blooms with MODIS data. Feature bands found are coincided with spectral mechanism of green algae. By comparing with FAI, RVI, NDVI, EVI and OSABI methods, our approach improves correct classification rates.

  4. Massive sulfide exploration models of the Iberian Pyrite Belt Neves Corvo mine region, based in a 3D geological, geophysical and geochemical ProMine study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Mário Castelo-Branco, José; Granado, Isabel; Carvalho, João; João Baptista, Maria; Represas, Patrícia; Pereira, Zélia; Oliveira, Tomás; Araujo, Vitor

    2013-04-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts one of the largest concentrations of massive sulfides in the Earth's crust. This highly productive VMS belt contains more than 85 massive sulfide deposits, totalling an estimate of 1600 Mt of massive ore and about 250 Mt of stockwork ore (Leistel et al., 1998; Oliveira et al., 2005; Tornos, 2006). Included in the South Portuguese Zone the IPB is represented by the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQG) composed of shales and quartzites of late Devonian age followed by the Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) a submarine succession of sediments and felsic and basic volcanic rocks (late Famennian-late Viséan age). Above the IPB a turbidite sedimentary unit occurs being represented by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (BAFG). The ore deposits are hosted by felsic volcanic rocks and sediments that are dominant in the lower part of the VSC succession. The Neves Corvo (ProMine, EU FP7) project area is focused on the Neves Corvo deposit, an active copper mine. The project area is located between the Messejana Fault and the Portuguese/Spanish border which has been selected for the 3D geological and geophysical modelling study, based on high exploration potential of the Neves Corvo area (Oliveira et al. 2006, Relvas et al. 2006, Pereira et al. 2008, Rosa et al. 2008, Matos et al. 2011, Oliveira et al. 2013). In this study existing LNEG and AGC geological, geophysical and geochemistry databases were considered. New surveys were done: i) - A physical volcanology and palynostratigraphic age data study and log of the Cotovio drill-hole core (1,888 m, drilled by AGC). ii) - Interpretation of 280 km of Squid TEM performed by AGC. Based on the TEM data, significant conductors have been identified related with: shallow conductive cover, graphitic shale, black shale and sulphide mineralizations. The most important TEM conductors are related with the Neves Corvo massive sulphides lenses (1-10 Ωm). iii) - Ground and residual gravimetry studies including

  5. Voids in massive neutrino cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Sutter, P.M. E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: sutter@oats.inaf.it

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic voids are a promising environment to characterize neutrino-induced effects on the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. We perform a comprehensive numerical study of the statistical properties of voids, identified both in the matter and galaxy distributions, in massive and massless neutrino cosmologies. The matter density field is obtained by running several independent N-body simulations with cold dark matter and neutrino particles, while the galaxy catalogs are modeled by populating the dark matter halos in simulations via a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to reproduce the clustering properties observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Data Release 7. We focus on the impact of massive neutrinos on the following void statistical properties: number density, ellipticities, two-point statistics, density and velocity profiles. Considering the matter density field, we find that voids in massive neutrino cosmologies are less evolved than those in the corresponding massless neutrinos case: there is a larger number of small voids and a smaller number of large ones, their profiles are less evacuated, and they present a lower wall at the edge. Moreover, the degeneracy between σ{sub 8} and Ω{sub ν} is broken when looking at void properties. In terms of the galaxy density field, we find that differences among cosmologies are difficult to detect because of the small number of galaxy voids in the simulations. Differences are instead present when looking at the matter density and velocity profiles around these voids.

  6. Numerical prediction of heat-flux to massive calorimeters engulfed in regulatory fires with the cask analysis fire environment (CAFE) model

    SciTech Connect

    KOSKI,JORMAN A.; SUO-ANTITLA,AHTI; KRAMER,M. ALEX; GREINER,MILES

    2000-05-11

    Recent observations show that the thermal boundary conditions within large-scale fires are significantly affected by the presence of thermally massive objects. These objects cool the soot and gas near their surfaces, and these effects reduce the incoming radiant heat-flux to values lower than the levels expected from simple {sigma}T{sub fire}{sup 4} models. They also affect the flow and temperature fields in the fire far from their surfaces. The Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to provide an enhanced fire boundary condition for the design of radioactive material packages. CAFE is a set of computer subroutines that use computational fluid mechanics methods to predict convective heat transfer and mixing. It also includes models for fuel and oxygen transport, chemical reaction, and participating-media radiation heat transfer. This code uses two-dimensional computational models so that it has reasonably short turnaround times on standard workstations and is well suited for design and risk studies. In this paper, CAFE is coupled with a commercial finite-element program to model a large cylindrical calorimeter fully engulfed in a pool fire. The time-dependent heat-flux to the calorimeter and the calorimeter surface temperature are determined for several locations around the calorimeter circumference. The variation of heat-flux with location is determined for calorimeters with different diameters and wall thickness, and the observed effects discussed.

  7. Rapid comparison and correlation analysis among massive number of microbial community samples based on MDV data model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaoquan; Hu, Jianqiang; Huang, Shi; Ning, Kang

    2014-09-01

    The research in microbial communities would potentially impact a vast number of applications in ``bio''-related disciplines. Large-scale analyses became a clear trend in microbial community studies, thus it is increasingly important to perform efficient and in-depth data mining for insightful biological principles from large number of samples. However, as microbial communities are from different sources and of different structures, comparison and data-mining from large number of samples become quite difficult. In this work, we have proposed a data model to represent large-scale comparison of microbial community samples, namely the ``Multi-Dimensional View'' data model (the MDV model) that should at least include 3 aspects: samples profile (S), taxa profile (T) and meta-data profile (V). We have also proposed a method for rapid data analysis based on the MDV model and applied it on the case studies with samples from various environmental conditions. Results have shown that though sampling environments usually define key variables, the analysis could detect bio-makers and even subtle variables based on large number of samples, which might be used to discover novel principles that drive the development of communities. The efficiency and effectiveness of data analysis method based on the MDV model have been validated by the results.

  8. Rapid comparison and correlation analysis among massive number of microbial community samples based on MDV data model.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoquan; Hu, Jianqiang; Huang, Shi; Ning, Kang

    2014-09-17

    The research in microbial communities would potentially impact a vast number of applications in "bio"-related disciplines. Large-scale analyses became a clear trend in microbial community studies, thus it is increasingly important to perform efficient and in-depth data mining for insightful biological principles from large number of samples. However, as microbial communities are from different sources and of different structures, comparison and data-mining from large number of samples become quite difficult. In this work, we have proposed a data model to represent large-scale comparison of microbial community samples, namely the "Multi-Dimensional View" data model (the MDV model) that should at least include 3 aspects: samples profile (S), taxa profile (T) and meta-data profile (V). We have also proposed a method for rapid data analysis based on the MDV model and applied it on the case studies with samples from various environmental conditions. Results have shown that though sampling environments usually define key variables, the analysis could detect bio-makers and even subtle variables based on large number of samples, which might be used to discover novel principles that drive the development of communities. The efficiency and effectiveness of data analysis method based on the MDV model have been validated by the results.

  9. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  10. Massively parallel multiple interacting continua formulation for modeling flow in fractured porous media using the subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fracture dominated flows occur in numerous subsurface geochemical processes and at many different scales in rock pore structures, micro-fractures, fracture networks and faults. Fractured porous media can be modeled as multiple interacting continua which are connected to each other through transfer terms that capture the flow of mass and energy in response to pressure, temperature and concentration gradients. However, the analysis of large-scale transient problems using the multiple interacting continuum approach presents an algorithmic and computational challenge for problems with very large numbers of degrees of freedom. A generalized dual porosity model based on the Dual Continuum Disconnected Matrix approach has been implemented within a massively parallel multiphysics-multicomponent-multiphase subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN. Developed as part of the Department of Energy's SciDAC-2 program, PFLOTRAN provides subsurface simulation capabilities that can scale from laptops to ultrascale supercomputers, and utilizes the PETSc framework to solve the large, sparse algebraic systems that arises in complex subsurface reactive flow and transport problems. It has been successfully applied to the solution of problems composed of more than two billions degrees of freedom, utilizing up to 131,072 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is the world’s fastest supercomputer. Building upon the capabilities and computational efficiency of PFLOTRAN, we will present an implementation of the multiple interacting continua formulation for fractured porous media along with an application case study.

  11. Quaternary Morphodynamics of Fluvial Dispersal Systems Revealed: The Fly River, PNG, and the Sunda Shelf, SE Asia, simulated with the Massively Parallel GPU-based Model 'GULLEM'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Lauer, J. W.; Darby, S. E.; Best, J.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    During glacial-marine transgressions vast volumes of sediment are deposited due to the infilling of lowland fluvial systems and shallow shelves, material that is removed during ensuing regressions. Modelling these processes would illuminate system morphodynamics, fluxes, and 'complexity' in response to base level change, yet such problems are computationally formidable. Environmental systems are characterized by strong interconnectivity, yet traditional supercomputers have slow inter-node communication -- whereas rapidly advancing Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) technology offers vastly higher (>100x) bandwidths. GULLEM (GpU-accelerated Lowland Landscape Evolution Model) employs massively parallel code to simulate coupled fluvial-landscape evolution for complex lowland river systems over large temporal and spatial scales. GULLEM models the accommodation space carved/infilled by representing a range of geomorphic processes, including: river & tributary incision within a multi-directional flow regime, non-linear diffusion, glacial-isostatic flexure, hydraulic geometry, tectonic deformation, sediment production, transport & deposition, and full 3D tracking of all resulting stratigraphy. Model results concur with the Holocene dynamics of the Fly River, PNG -- as documented with dated cores, sonar imaging of floodbasin stratigraphy, and the observations of topographic remnants from LGM conditions. Other supporting research was conducted along the Mekong River, the largest fluvial system of the Sunda Shelf. These and other field data provide tantalizing empirical glimpses into the lowland landscapes of large rivers during glacial-interglacial transitions, observations that can be explored with this powerful numerical model. GULLEM affords estimates for the timing and flux budgets within the Fly and Sunda Systems, illustrating complex internal system responses to the external forcing of sea level and climate. Furthermore, GULLEM can be applied to most ANY fluvial system to

  12. Massive Warm/Hot Galaxy Coronae as Probed by UV/X-Ray Oxygen Absorption and Emission. I. Basic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    We construct an analytic phenomenological model for extended warm/hot gaseous coronae of L* galaxies. We consider UV O vi Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS)-Halos absorption line data in combination with Milky Way (MW) X-ray O vii and O viii absorption and emission. We fit these data with a single model representing the COS-Halos galaxies and a Galactic corona. Our model is multi-phased, with hot and warm gas components, each with a (turbulent) log-normal distribution of temperatures and densities. The hot gas, traced by the X-ray absorption and emission, is in hydrostatic equilibrium in an MW gravitational potential. The median temperature of the hot gas is 1.5× {10}6 K and the mean hydrogen density is ∼ 5× {10}-5 {{cm}}-3. The warm component as traced by the O vi, is gas that has cooled out of the high density tail of the hot component. The total warm/hot gas mass is high and is 1.2× {10}11 {M}ȯ . The gas metallicity we require to reproduce the oxygen ion column densities is 0.5 solar. The warm O vi component has a short cooling time (∼ 2× {10}8 years), as hinted by observations. The hot component, however, is ∼ 80 % of the total gas mass and is relatively long-lived, with {t}{cool}∼ 7× {10}9 years. Our model supports suggestions that hot galactic coronae can contain significant amounts of gas. These reservoirs may enable galaxies to continue forming stars steadily for long periods of time and account for “missing baryons” in galaxies in the local universe.

  13. A Strict Test of Stellar Evolution Models: The Absolute Dimensions of the Massive Benchmark Eclipsing Binary V578 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pavlovski, K.; Hensberge, H.; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Claret, A.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P = 2.40848 days) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of 5.41 ± 0.04 R⊙ and 4.29 ± 0.05 R⊙, and temperatures of 30,000 ± 500 K and 25,750 ± 435 K, respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well with previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of 14.54 ± 0.08 M⊙ and 10.29 ± 0.06 M⊙ are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of the Granada group. We find that all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within the uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrones. However, there are some apparent age discrepancies for the corresponding mass-radius isochrones. Models with larger convective overshoot, >0.35, worked best. Combined with our previously determined apsidal motion of 0.07089^{+0.00021}_{-0.00013} deg cycle-1, we compute the internal structure constants (tidal Love number) for the Newtonian and general relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion as log k 2 = -1.975 ± 0.017 and log k 2 = -3.412 ± 0.018, respectively. We find the relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion to be small, <4%. We find that the prediction of log k 2, theo = -2.005 ± 0.025 of the Granada models fully agrees with our observed log k 2.

  14. A strict test of stellar evolution models: The absolute dimensions of the massive benchmark eclipsing binary V578 Mon

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pavlovski, K.; Hensberge, H.; Chew, Y. Gómez Maqueo; Claret, A.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P = 2.40848 days) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of 5.41 ± 0.04 R{sub ☉} and 4.29 ± 0.05 R{sub ☉}, and temperatures of 30,000 ± 500 K and 25,750 ± 435 K, respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well with previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of 14.54 ± 0.08 M{sub ☉} and 10.29 ± 0.06 M{sub ☉} are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of the Granada group. We find that all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within the uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrones. However, there are some apparent age discrepancies for the corresponding mass-radius isochrones. Models with larger convective overshoot, >0.35, worked best. Combined with our previously determined apsidal motion of 0.07089{sub −0.00013}{sup +0.00021} deg cycle{sup –1}, we compute the internal structure constants (tidal Love number) for the Newtonian and general relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion as log k {sub 2} = –1.975 ± 0.017 and log k {sub 2} = –3.412 ± 0.018, respectively. We find the relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion to be small, <4%. We find that the prediction of log k {sub 2,theo} = –2.005 ± 0.025 of the Granada models fully agrees with our observed log k {sub 2}.

  15. Two bi-stability jumps in theoretical wind models for massive stars and the implications for luminous blue variable supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Blagovest; Vink, Jorick S.; Gräfener, Götz

    2016-05-01

    Luminous blue variables (LBVs) have been suggested to be the direct progenitors of supernova Types IIb and IIn, with enhanced mass loss prior to explosion. However, the mechanism of this mass loss is not yet known. Here, we investigate the qualitative behaviour of theoretical stellar wind mass loss as a function of Teff across two bi-stability jumps in blue supergiant regime and also in proximity to the Eddington limit, relevant for LBVs. To investigate the physical ingredients that play a role in the radiative acceleration we calculate blue supergiant wind models with the CMFGEN non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmosphere code over an effective temperature range between 30 000 and 8800 K. Although our aim is not to provide new mass-loss rates for BA supergiants, we study and confirm the existence of two bi-stability jumps in mass-loss rates predicted by Vink et al. However, they are found to occur at somewhat lower Teff (20 000 and 9000 K, respectively) than found previously, which would imply that stars may evolve towards lower Teff before strong mass loss is induced by the bi-stability jumps. When the combined effects of the second bi-stability jump and the proximity to Eddington limit are accounted for, we find a dramatic increase in the mass-loss rate by up to a factor of 30. Further investigation of both bi-stability jumps is expected to lead to a better understanding of discrepancies between empirical modelling and theoretical mass-loss rates reported in the literature, and to provide key inputs for the evolution of both normal AB supergiants and LBVs, as well as their subsequent supernova Type II explosions.

  16. MASSIVELY PARALLEL FULLY COUPLED IMPLICIT MODELING OF COUPLED THERMAL-HYDROLOGICAL-MECHANICAL PROCESSES FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston

    2010-02-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing) to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. In order to increase our understanding of how reservoirs behave under these conditions, we have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a continuum multiphase flow and heat transport model. In DEM simulations, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external load is applied. DEM models have been applied to a very wide range of fracturing processes from the molecular scale (where thermal fluctuations play an important role) to scales on the order of 1 km or greater. In this approach, the continuum flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite element grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms and

  17. Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    date of determination). DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). "Massively Redundant Electromechanical Actuators" August... electromechanical systems) processes are used to manufacture reliable and reproducible stators and sliders for the actuators. These processes include

  18. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  19. A Massively Parallel Hybrid Dusty-Gasdynamics and Kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important. At the University of Michigan we have an established base of experience and expertise in numerical simulations based on particle codes which address these physical regimes. The Principal Investigator, Dr. Michael Combi, has over 20 years of experience in the development of particle-kinetic and hybrid kinetichydrodynamics models and their direct use in data analysis. He has also worked in ground-based and space-based remote observational work and on spacecraft instrument teams. His research has involved studies of cometary atmospheres and ionospheres and their interaction with the solar wind, the neutral gas clouds escaping from Jupiter s moon Io, the interaction of the atmospheres/ionospheres of Io and Europa with Jupiter s corotating magnetosphere, as well as Earth s ionosphere. This report describes our progress during the year. The contained in section 2 of this report will serve as the basis of a paper describing the method and its application to the cometary coma that will be continued under a research and analysis grant that supports various applications of theoretical comet models to understanding the

  20. Galaxy Formation with Self-Consistently Modeled Stars and Massive Black Holes. I: Feedback-Regulated Star Formation and Black Hole Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-04

    There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10{sup 11} M {circle_dot} galactic halo and its 10{sup 5} {circle_dot} M embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological CDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10{sup 6} K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

  1. Evolution of massive AGB stars. II. model properties at non-solar metallicity and the fate of Super-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siess, L.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Massive AGB (hereafter super-AGB or SAGB) stars ignite carbon off-center and have initial masses ranging between Mup, the minimum initial mass for carbon ignition, and M_mas the minimum mass for the formation of an iron core collapse supernova. In this mass interval, stars more massive than Mn will undergo an electron capture supernova (EC-SN). Aims: We study the fate and selected evolutionary properties of SAGB stars up to the end of the carbon burning phase as a function of metallicity and core overshooting. Methods: The method is based on the analysis of a large set of stellar models covering the mass range 5-13 M⊙ and calculated for 7 different metallicities between Z=10-5 and twice solar. Core overshooting was considered in two subsets for Z=10-4 and 0.02. The models are available online at http://www-astro.ulb.ac.be/ siess/database.html. The fate of SAGB stars is investigated through a parametric model which allows us to assess the role of mass loss and of the third dredge-up. Results: Our main results can be summarized as follows: a) prior to C-burning, the evolution of SAGB stars is very similar to that of intermediate-mass stars, being more luminous, b) SAGB stars suffer a large He enrichment at the end of the second dredge-up, c) the limiting masses Mup, Mn and M_mas present a nonlinear behavior with Z, characterized by a minimum around Z=10-4, d) the values of Mup, Mn and M_mas are decreased by 2 M⊙ when core overshooting is considered, e) our models predict a minimum oxygen-neon white dwarf mass of 1.05 M⊙, f) the determination of Mn is highly dependent on the mass loss and core growth rates, g) the evolutionary channel for EC-SN is limited to a very narrow mass range of ⪉1-1.5 M⊙ width and this mass window can be further decreased if some metallicity scaling factor is applied to the mass loss rate, h) the final fate of SAGB stars is connected to the second dredge-up and this property allowed us to refine the initial mass range for

  2. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  3. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Gauge-String Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, Lorenzo; Bigazzi, Francesco; Bolognesi, Stefano; Cotrone, Aldo L.; Manenti, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We compute the electric dipole moment of nucleons in the large Nc QCD model by Witten, Sakai, and Sugimoto with Nf=2 degenerate massive flavors. Baryons in the model are instantonic solitons of an effective five-dimensional action describing the whole tower of mesonic fields. We find that the dipole electromagnetic form factor of the nucleons, induced by a finite topological θ angle, exhibits complete vector meson dominance. We are able to evaluate the contribution of each vector meson to the final result—a small number of modes are relevant to obtain an accurate estimate. Extrapolating the model parameters to real QCD data, the neutron electric dipole moment is evaluated to be dn=1.8 ×10-16θ e cm . The electric dipole moment of the proton is exactly the opposite.

  4. Impact of initial models and variable accretion rates on the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive and intermediate-mass stars and the early evolution of H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, Lionel; Peters, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Massive star formation requires the accretion of gas at high rate while the star is already bright. Its actual luminosity depends sensitively on the stellar structure. We compute pre-main-sequence tracks for massive and intermediate-mass stars with variable accretion rates and study the evolution of stellar radius, effective temperature and ionizing luminosity, starting at 2 M⊙ with convective or radiative structures. The radiative case shows a much stronger swelling of the protostar for high accretion rates than the convective case. For radiative structures, the star is very sensitive to the accretion rate and reacts quickly to accretion bursts, leading to considerable changes in photospheric properties on time-scales as short as 100-1000 yr. The evolution for convective structures is much less influenced by the instantaneous accretion rate, and produces a monotonically increasing ionizing flux that can be many orders of magnitude smaller than in the radiative case. For massive stars, it results in a delay of the H II region expansion by up to 10 000 yr. In the radiative case, the H II region can potentially be engulfed by the star during the swelling, which never happens in the convective case. We conclude that the early stellar structure has a large impact on the radiative feedback during the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive protostars and introduces an important uncertainty that should be taken into account. Because of their lower effective temperatures, our convective models may hint at a solution to an observed discrepancy between the luminosity distribution functions of massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions.

  5. BFKL Pomeron with massive gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Eugene; Lipatov, Lev; Siddikov, Marat

    2014-04-01

    We solve the BFKL equation in the leading logarithmic approximation numerically in the Yang-Mills theory with the Higgs mechanism for the vector boson mass generation. It can be considered as a model for the amplitude with the correct behavior of the s-channel partial waves at large impact parameters. The Pomeron spectrum of the massive BFKL kernel in the ω space for t=0 coincides with the continuous spectrum for the massless case although the density of its eigenvalues is 2 times smaller for ω>ω0, where ω0 is a negative number. We find a simple parametrization for the corresponding eigenfunctions. Because the leading singularity in the ω plane in this Higgs model for t=0 is a fixed cut, the Regge pole contributions could be only for nonphysical positive t. Hence we can state that the correct behavior at large b does not influence the main properties of the BFKL equation.

  6. Solid holography and massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  7. The Fate of Massive Closed Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Li Miao; She Jianhuang

    2005-12-02

    We calculate the semi-inclusive decay rate of an average string state with toroidal compactification in the the superstring theory. We also apply this calculation to a brane-inflation model in a warped geometry and find that the decay rate is greatly suppressed if the final strings are both massive and enhanced for massless radiation.

  8. THE RELATION BETWEEN DYNAMICAL MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIO AND COLOR FOR MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES OUT TO z ∼ 2 AND COMPARISON WITH STELLAR POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2015-02-01

    We explore the relation between the dynamical mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and rest-frame color of massive quiescent galaxies out to z ∼ 2. We use a galaxy sample with measured stellar velocity dispersions in combination with Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based multi-band photometry. Our sample spans a large range in log M {sub dyn}/L {sub g} (of 1.6 dex) and log M {sub dyn}/L {sub K} (of 1.3 dex). There is a strong, approximately linear correlation between the M/L for different wavebands and rest-frame color. The root-mean-square scatter in log M {sub dyn}/L residuals implies that it is possible to estimate the M/L with an accuracy of ∼0.25 dex from a single rest-frame optical color. Stellar population synthesis (SPS) models with a Salpeter stellar initial mass function (IMF) cannot simultaneously match M {sub dyn}/L {sub g} versus (g – z){sub rest-frame} and M {sub dyn}/L {sub K} versus (g – K){sub rest-frame}. By changing the slope of the IMF we are still unable to explain the M/L of the bluest and reddest galaxies. We find that an IMF with a slope between α = 2.35 and α = 1.35 provides the best match. We also explore a broken IMF with a Salpeter slope at M < 1 M {sub ☉} and M > 4 M {sub ☉} and a slope α in the intermediate region. The data favor a slope of α = 1.35 over α = 2.35. Nonetheless, our results show that variations between different SPS models are comparable to the IMF variations. In our analysis we assume that the variation in M/L and color is driven by differences in age, and that other contributions (e.g., metallicity evolution, dark matter) are small. These assumptions may be an important source of uncertainty as galaxies evolve in more complex ways.

  9. On 3D minimal massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Qaemmaqami, Mohammad M.; Naseh, Ali; Shirzad, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    We study linearized equations of motion of the newly proposed three dimensional gravity, known as minimal massive gravity, using its metric formulation. By making use of a redefinition of the parameters of the model, we observe that the resulting linearized equations are exactly the same as that of TMG. In particular the model admits logarithmic modes at critical points. We also study several vacuum solutions of the model, specially at a certain limit where the contribution of Chern-Simons term vanishes.

  10. The nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M. F.; Maeder, A.; Meynet, G.

    We discuss how the nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars can be employed as a quality indicator for model atmosphere analyses and for the derivation of tight observational constraints for developing a better understanding of the evolution of rotating massive stars.

  11. The nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda; Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges

    2015-08-01

    We discuss how the nuclear path of the CNO cycles in massive stars can be employed as a quality indicator for model atmosphere analyses and for the derivation of tight observational constraints for developing a better understanding of the evolution of rotating massive stars.

  12. Evolutionary tracks of massive stars during formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. We investigate specified accretion histories of constant, decelerating and accelerating forms and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disc accretion, respectively. Diagnostic tools for the interpretation of the phases of massive star formation and testing the evolutionary models are then developed. Evolutionary tracks able to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations, thus being consistent with clump star formation efficiencies of 10-15 per cent. However, for these cold Herschel clumps, the bolometric temperature is not a good diagnostic to differentiate between accretion models. We also find that neither spherical nor disc accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hotspots covering less than 10 per cent of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. We show that these conclusions are independent of the imposed accretion history. This suggests that massive stars form via gas accretion through discs which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  13. Embeddings of the "New Massive Gravity"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Here we apply different types of embeddings of the equations of motion of the linearized "New Massive Gravity" in order to generate alternative and even higher-order (in derivatives) massive gravity theories in D=2+1. In the first part of the work we use the Weyl symmetry as a guiding principle for the embeddings. First we show that a Noether gauge embedding of the Weyl symmetry leads to a sixth-order model in derivatives with either a massive or a massless ghost, according to the chosen overall sign of the theory. On the other hand, if the Weyl symmetry is implemented by means of a Stueckelberg field we obtain a new scalar-tensor model for massive gravitons. It is ghost-free and Weyl invariant at the linearized level around Minkowski space. The model can be nonlinearly completed into a scalar field coupled to the NMG theory. The elimination of the scalar field leads to a nonlocal modification of the NMG. In the second part of the work we prove to all orders in derivatives that there is no local, ghost-free embedding of the linearized NMG equations of motion around Minkowski space when written in terms of one symmetric tensor. Regarding that point, NMG differs from the Fierz-Pauli theory, since in the latter case we can replace the Einstein-Hilbert action by specific f(R,Box R) generalizations and still keep the theory ghost-free at the linearized level.

  14. The 2nd Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Ronnie (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Programming languages, computer graphics, neural networks, massively parallel computers, SIMD architecture, algorithms, digital terrain models, sort computation, simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor and image processing are among the topics discussed.

  15. Derivative couplings in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xian; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: lavinia.heisenberg@eth-its.ethz.ch

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity in the presence of non-minimal derivative couplings. For this purpose we consider a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions that live on the unique composite effective metric. For the viability of the model both metrics have to be dynamical. Nevertheless, the number of allowed kinetic terms is crucial. We adapt to the restriction of having one single kinetic term. After deriving the full set of equations of motion for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker background, we study linear perturbations on top of it. We show explicitly that only four tensor, two vector and two scalar degrees of freedom propagate, one of which being the Horndeski scalar, while the Boulware-Deser ghost can be integrated out.

  16. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  17. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same ‘minimal’ bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new ‘minimal massive gravity’ has both a positive energy graviton and positive central charges for the asymptotic AdS-boundary conformal algebra.

  18. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  19. Massive higher spins from BRST and tractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Waldron, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    We obtain the higher spin tractor equations of motion conjectured by Gover et al. from a BRST approach and use those methods to prove that they describe massive, partially massless and massless higher spins in conformally flat backgrounds. The tractor description makes invariance under local choices of unit systems manifest. In this approach, physical models are described by conformal, rather than (pseudo-)Riemannian geometry. In particular masses become geometric quantities, namely the weights of tractor fields. Massive models can therefore be handled in a unified and simple manner mimicking the gauge principle usually employed for massless models. From a holographic viewpoint, these models describe both the bulk and boundary theories in terms of conformal geometry. This is an important advance, because tying the boundary conformal structure to that of the bulk theory gives greater control over a bulk-boundary correspondence.

  20. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Kong, S.; Butler, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Progress towards resolving a decade-long debate about how massive stars form can be made by determining if massive starless cores exist in a state of near virial equilibrium. These are the initial conditions invoked by the Core Accretion model of McKee & Tan (2003). Alternatively, the Competitive Accretion model of Bonnell et al. (2001) requires sub-virial conditions. We have identified 4 prime examples of massive ( 50 Msun) cores from mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping (Butler & Tan 2009, 2012) of Infrared Dark Clouds. We have found spectacularly high deuterated fractions of N_2H+ of 0.5 in these objects with the IRAM 30m telescope (Fontani et al. 2011). Thus N_2D+ is expected to be an excellent tracer of the kinematics of these cold, dark cores, where most other molecular tracers are thought to be depleted from the gas phase. We report on ALMA Cycle 0 Compact Configuration Band 6 observations of these 4 cores that probe the N_2D+(3-2) line on scales from 9" down to 2.3", well-matched to the structures we see in MIR extinction and discuss their implications for massive star formation theories.

  1. The Rb problem in massive AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, O.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2017-03-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is formed by low- and intermediate-mass stars (0.8 M_{⊙} < M < 8 M_{⊙}) in their last nuclear-burning phase, when they develop thermal pulses (TP) and suffer extreme mass loss. AGB stars are the main contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, the more massive AGB stars (M > 4 M_{⊙}) are expected to produce light (e.g., Li, N) and heavy neutron-rich s-process elements (such as Rb, Zr, Ba, Y, etc.), which are not formed in lower mass AGB stars and Supernova explosions. Classical chemical analyses using hydrostatic atmospheres revealed strong Rb overabundances and high [Rb/Zr] ratios in massive AGB stars of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds (MC), confirming for the first time that the ^{22}Ne neutron source dominates the production of s-process elements in these stars. The extremely high Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios observed in the most massive stars (specially in the low-metallicity MC stars) uncovered a Rb problem; such extreme Rb and [Rb/Zr] values are not predicted by the s-process AGB models, suggesting fundamental problems in our present understanding of their atmospheres. We present more realistic dynamical model atmospheres that consider a gaseous circumstellar envelope with a radial wind and we re-derive the Rb (and Zr) abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars. The new Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios derived with these dynamical models significantly resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the theoretical predictions of the more massive AGB stars.

  2. Spatial Disrtribution and Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghakhanlootakanloo, Mojgan; Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    2017-01-01

    Observations show that luminous blue variables (LBVs) are far more dispersed than other massive stars, and Smith & Tombleson (2015) suggested that these large separations are inconsistent with the standard single-star evolution model of LBVs. Instead, they suggest that the large distances are most consistent with some sort of binary evolution. To test these suggestions, we modeled young stellar clusters and their passive dissolution, and we find that, indeed, the single-star evolution model is inconsistent with observations. Most importantly, we find two binary scenario models that are consistent. Our crude models suggest that LBVs are either the result of mergers and are rejuvenated stars, or they are mass gainers and received a kick when the primary star exploded. In the merger scenario, LBVs have more time to disperse because they are the merger of two lesser mass, in which the primary has a mass of about 19 solar masses. In the mass gainer and kick scenario, we find that LBV isolation is consistent with an average kick of 200 km/s. In either scenario, binarity plays a major role in the isolation of LBVs. In addition to constraining the evolution of LBVs, we suggest that careful scrutiny of the spatial distribution of massive stars in general will lead to a greater understanding for the evolution of massive stars.

  3. Interactions in Massive Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.

    2012-01-01

    The most massive stars (M> 60 Solar Mass) play crucial roles in altering the chemical and thermodynamic properties of their host galaxies. Stellar mass is the fundamental stellar parameter that determines their ancillary properties and which ultimately determines the fate of these stars and their influence on their galactic environs. Unfortunately, stellar mass becomes observationally and theoretically less well constrained as it increases. Theory becomes uncertain mostly because very massive stars are prone to strong, variable mass loss which is difficult to model. Observational constraints are uncertain too. Massive stars are rare, and massive binary stars (needed for dynamical determination of mass) are rarer still: and of these systems only a fraction have suitably high orbital inclinations for direct photometric and spectroscopic radial-velocity analysis. Even in the small number of cases in which a high-inclination binary near the upper mass limit can be identified, rotational broadening and contamination of spectral line features from thick circumstellar material (either natal clouds or produced by strong stellar wind driven mass loss from one or both of he stellar components) biases the analysis. In the wilds of the upper HR diagram, we're often left with indirect and circumstantial means of determining mass, a rather unsatisfactory state of affairs.

  4. Two-dimensional thermofield bosonization II: Massive fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2008-11-15

    We consider the perturbative computation of the N-point function of chiral densities of massive free fermions at finite temperature within the thermofield dynamics approach. The infinite series in the mass parameter for the N-point functions are computed in the fermionic formulation and compared with the corresponding perturbative series in the interaction parameter in the bosonized thermofield formulation. Thereby we establish in thermofield dynamics the formal equivalence of the massive free fermion theory with the sine-Gordon thermofield model for a particular value of the sine-Gordon parameter. We extend the thermofield bosonization to include the massive Thirring model.

  5. Mesonic quasinormal modes of the Sakai-Sugimoto model at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nick; Threlfall, Ed

    2008-06-15

    We examine the mesonic thermal spectrum of the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD by finding the quasinormal frequencies of the supergravity dual. If flavor is added using D8-D8 branes there exist embeddings where the D-brane world volume contains a black hole. For these embeddings (the high-temperature phase of the Sakai-Sugimoto model) we determine the quasinormal spectra of scalar and vector mesons arising from the world volume Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of the D-brane. We stress the importance of a coordinate change that makes the infalling quasinormal modes regular at the horizon allowing a simple numerical shooting technique. Finally we examine the effect of finite spatial momentum on quasinormal spectra.

  6. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  7. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  8. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  9. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  10. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  11. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  12. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  13. Reconstructing the massive black hole cosmic history through gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sesana, Alberto; Gair, Jonathan; Berti, Emanuele; Volonteri, Marta

    2011-02-15

    The massive black holes we observe in galaxies today are the natural end-product of a complex evolutionary path, in which black holes seeded in proto-galaxies at high redshift grow through cosmic history via a sequence of mergers and accretion episodes. Electromagnetic observations probe a small subset of the population of massive black holes (namely, those that are active or those that are very close to us), but planned space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can measure the parameters of 'electromagnetically invisible' massive black holes out to high redshift. In this paper we introduce a Bayesian framework to analyze the information that can be gathered from a set of such measurements. Our goal is to connect a set of massive black hole binary merger observations to the underlying model of massive black hole formation. In other words, given a set of observed massive black hole coalescences, we assess what information can be extracted about the underlying massive black hole population model. For concreteness we consider ten specific models of massive black hole formation, chosen to probe four important (and largely unconstrained) aspects of the input physics used in structure formation simulations: seed formation, metallicity ''feedback'', accretion efficiency and accretion geometry. For the first time we allow for the possibility of 'model mixing', by drawing the observed population from some combination of the 'pure' models that have been simulated. A Bayesian analysis allows us to recover a posterior probability distribution for the ''mixing parameters'' that characterize the fractions of each model represented in the observed distribution. Our work shows that LISA has enormous potential to probe the underlying physics of structure formation.

  14. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    evolved stars that have shed their outer envelopes. Swift XRT Image Swift XRT Image (Credit: NASA / GSFC / CXC /S.Immler) Most astronomers did not expect that a massive star would explode so soon after a major outburst, or that a Wolf-Rayet star would produce such a luminous eruption, so SN 2006jc represents a puzzle for theorists. "It challenges some aspects of our current model of stellar evolution," says Foley. "We really don't know what caused this star to have such a large eruption so soon before it went supernova." "SN 2006jc provides us with an important clue that LBV-style eruptions may be related to the deaths of massive stars, perhaps more closely than we used to think," adds coauthor and UC Berkeley astronomer Nathan Smith. "The fact that we have no well-established theory for what actually causes these outbursts is the elephant in the living room that nobody is talking about." SN 2006jc occurred in galaxy UGC 4904, located 77 million light years from Earth in the constellation Lynx. The supernova explosion, a peculiar variant of a Type Ib, was first sighted by Itagaki, American amateur astronomer Tim Puckett and Italian amateur astronomer Roberto Gorelli. See also NASA Goddard press release at: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/topstory/ 2007/supernova_imposter.html

  15. Large N phase transitions in massive N = 2 gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, J. G.

    2014-07-23

    Using exact results obtained from localization on S{sup 4}, we explore the large N limit of N = 2 super Yang-Mills theories with massive matter multiplets. In this talk we discuss two cases: N = 2* theory, describing a massive hypermultiplet in the adjoint representation, and super QCD with massive quarks. When the radius of the four-sphere is sent to infinity these theories are described by solvable matrix models, which exhibit a number of interesting phenomena including quantum phase transitions at finite 't Hooft coupling.

  16. Massive gravity with mass term in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasone, Masashi; Oda, Ichiro

    2009-05-15

    We analyze the effect of the Pauli-Fierz mass term on a recently established, new massive gravity theory in three space-time dimensions. We show that the Pauli-Fierz mass term makes the new massive gravity theory nonunitary. Moreover, although we add the gravitational Chern-Simons term to this model, the situation remains unchanged and the theory stays nonunitary despite that the structure of the graviton propagator is greatly changed. Thus, the Pauli-Fierz mass term is not allowed to coexist with mass-generating higher-derivative terms in the new massive gravity.

  17. Fundamental Parameters of 4 Massive Eclipsing Binaries in Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Koumpia, E.

    2011-05-01

    We present fundamental parameters of 4 massive eclipsing binaries in the young massive cluster Westerlund 1. The goal is to measure accurate masses and radii of their component stars, which provide much needed constraints for evolutionary models of massive stars. Accurate parameters can further be used to determine a dynamical lower limit for the magnetar progenitor and to obtain an independent distance to the cluster. Our results confirm and extend the evidence for a high mass for the progenitor of the magnetar. The authors acknowledge research and travel support from the European Commission Framework Program Seven under the Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG04-GA-2008-239335.

  18. A massive early atmosphere on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nolan, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of an early greenhouse atmosphere for Triton is presented and the conditions under which it may have been sustained are quantified. The volatile content of primordial Triton is modeled, and tidal heating rates are assessed to set bounds on the available energy. The atmospheric model formalism is presented, and it is shown how a massive atmosphere could have been raised by modest tidal heating fluxes. The implications of the model atmospheres for the atmospheric escape rates, the chemical evolution, and the cratering record are addressed.

  19. AIMS: Asteroseismic Inference on a Massive Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel R.

    2016-11-01

    AIMS (Asteroseismic Inference on a Massive Scale) estimates stellar parameters and credible intervals/error bars in a Bayesian manner from a set of seismic frequency data and so-called classic constraints. To achieve reliable parameter estimates and computational efficiency it searches through a grid of pre-computed models using an MCMC algorithm; interpolation within the grid of models is performed by first tessellating the grid using a Delaunay triangulation and then doing a linear barycentric interpolation on matching simplexes. Inputs for the modeling consists of individual frequencies from peak-bagging, which can be complemented with classic spectroscopic constraints.

  20. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  1. Holographically viable extensions of topologically massive and minimal massive gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altas, Emel; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Recently [E. Bergshoeff et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 145008 (2014)], an extension of the topologically massive gravity (TMG) in 2 +1 dimensions, dubbed as minimal massive gravity (MMG), which is free of the bulk-boundary unitarity clash that inflicts the former theory and all the other known three-dimensional theories, was found. Field equations of MMG differ from those of TMG at quadratic terms in the curvature that do not come from the variation of an action depending on the metric alone. Here we show that MMG is a unique theory and there does not exist a deformation of TMG or MMG at the cubic and quartic order (and beyond) in the curvature that is consistent at the level of the field equations. The only extension of TMG with the desired bulk and boundary properties having a single massive degree of freedom is MMG.

  2. Solitonic solutions of the SU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with σ, π, ρ, A1 and ω mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, F.; Schüren, C.; Arriola, E. Ruiz; Goeke, K.

    1993-01-01

    We present the first solitonic solutions of the SU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model including σ, π, ρ, A1 and ω mesons for hedgehog configurations on the chiral circle. The lagrangian incorporates Sakurai's universality and vector meson dominance by means of current-field identities. In order to fix the parameters of the lagrangian we make use of the full momentum dependent mesonic two point functions in the one quark loop approximation. For reasonable values of the consistuent quark mass we find that solitons exist provided that mω>870 MeV. In addition, whether the baryon number is carried by valence quarks or by the Dirac sea, depends strongly on the particular values of the constituent quark mass and the ω meson mass.

  3. Massive-Star Nucleosynthesis: Lessons from INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland; Lang, Michael; Kretschmer, Karsten; Martin, Pierrick; Ohlendorf, Henrike; Voss, Rasmus

    2010-08-01

    Gamma-ray line observations with INTEGRAL measure decay of unstable isotopes which are ejected from sites of nucleosynthesis. Massive stars are believed to be producers of gamma-ray emitting isotopes 44Ti, 26Al, 60Fe. Measurements with the Ge spectrometer have shown that (1) inner core-collapse supernova ejecta from the Cas A supernova remnant appear to still travel at velocities beyond a few hundred km/sec (2) 26Al synthesis occurs throughout the Galaxy corresponds to a supernova rate from core collapses of about one every 50 years; (3) 60Fe synthesis expected from massive stars is above the constraints from gamma-ray observations; 26Al synthesis in the Cygnus region appears on the high side of predictions from models; 26Al emission from the nearby Sco-Cen group of stars has been identified demonstrates massive-star activity close to the Sun. 26Al gamma-rays have been used to determine a longitude-velocity distribution of the presumably hot tenuous ISM which carries 26Al, which can be compared to molecular-gas star motions to help understand the Galaxy's bar spiral-arm structure. Implications of the above nucleosynthesis constraints suggest that INTEGRAL's observed positron annihilation gamma-rays need a contribution from another source located in the central regions of our Galaxy, and/or positrons may propagate kpc-distances away from their sources before annihilating.

  4. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  5. The feeding and feedback of massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. The framework requires the accretion rate from the clump to be specified. We investigate constant, decelerating and accelerating accretion rate scenarios and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disk accretion, respectively. We find that accelerated accretion is not favoured on the basis of the often-used diagnostic diagram which correlates the bolometric luminosity and clump mass. Instead, source counts as a function of the bolometric temperature can distinguish the accretion mode. Specifically, accelerated accretion yields a relatively high number of lowtemperatureob jects. On this basis, we demonstrate that evolutionary tracks to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations. Neither spherical nor disk accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hot spots covering less than 20% of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. This suggest that massive stars form via gas accretion through disks which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  6. Observational constraints on massive-star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina

    1997-07-01

    Massive stars are important constitutents of galaxies and are increasingly used as probes of galaxy evolution out to high redshifts. Yet, a very basic problem remains in understanding the distribution of massive stars across the Hertzsprung- Russell Diagram. This is known as the problem of the blue-to- red supergiant ratios in galaxies of different metallicities, a very sensitive indicator of the evolutionary paths that massive stars in different chemical environments appear to follow. Observations suggest a trend that the numbers of red supergiants increase with decreasing metallicity, but stellar- evolution models predict the opposite. We discuss various limitations of ground-based observations which have so far restricted accurate star counts to a few, nearby galaxies. We then argue that the HST archive contains a perfect set of photometric data to determine number counts of red supergiants in galaxies out to 5 Mpc. We propose to analyze WFPC2 observations in F555W {V} and F814W {I} filters to derive color-magnitude diagrams and complete luminosity functions of the red supergiant populations in 6 galaxies spanning a factor of 60 in metallicity. This systematic approach will put the functional form of the blue-to-red supergiant ratio with metallicity on firm observational footing.

  7. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  8. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  9. Positive signs in massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  10. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  11. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  12. Generalized massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions and its Hamiltonian formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Chao; Zhou, Shuang-Yong E-mail: zkc@itp.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    We extend the four-dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model to a general scalar massive-tensor theory in arbitrary dimensions, coupling a dRGT massive graviton to multiple scalars and allowing for generic kinetic and mass matrix mixing between the massive graviton and the scalars, and derive its Hamiltonian formulation and associated constraint system. When passing to the Hamiltonian formulation, two different sectors arise: a general sector and a special sector. Although obtained via different ways, there are two second class constraints in either of the two sectors, eliminating the BD ghost. However, for the special sector, there are still ghost instabilities except for the case of two dimensions. In particular, for the special sector with one scalar, there is a ''second BD ghost''.

  13. TWO MASSIVE, LOW-LUMINOSITY CORES TOWARD INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Jonathan J.

    2009-11-10

    This article presents high-resolution interferometric mosaics in the 850 mum wave band of two massive, quiescent infrared dark clouds. The two clouds were chosen based on their likelihood to represent environments preceding the formation of massive stars. The brightest compact sources detected in each cloud have masses approx110 M{sub sun} and approx60 M{sub sun} with radii <0.1 pc, implying mean densities of (n) approx 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} and (N) approx 1 g cm{sup -2}. Supplementary data show these cores to be cold and inactive. Low upper limits to their bolometric luminosities and temperatures place them at a very early stage of evolution, while current models of massive star formation suggest they have the potential to form massive stars.

  14. Topologically massive gravity and Ricci-Cotton flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Nima; Maloney, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    We consider topologically massive gravity (TMG), which is three-dimensional general relativity with a cosmological constant and a gravitational Chern-Simons term. When the cosmological constant is negative the theory has two potential vacuum solutions: anti-de Sitter space and warped anti-de Sitter space. The theory also contains a massive graviton state which renders these solutions unstable for certain values of the parameters and boundary conditions. We study the decay of these solutions due to the condensation of the massive graviton mode using Ricci-Cotton flow, which is the appropriate generalization of Ricci flow to TMG. When the Chern-Simons coupling is small the AdS solution flows to warped AdS by the condensation of the massive graviton mode. When the coupling is large the situation is reversed, and warped AdS flows to AdS. Minisuperspace models are constructed where these flows are studied explicitly.

  15. Processing massive datasets in genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiguenave, F.

    2011-02-01

    Life science researches have been profoundly impacted by technological advances allowing faster and cheaper DNA sequencing. Opening a wide range of applications in medical and biology, the last generation sequencing platforms raised new challenges, in particular in processing, analysing and interpreting massive data. In this talk, the growing role of bioinformatics will be illustrated by providing some figures about genome sequencing and others applications aimed at unravelling biological mechanisms. Methods to gather insights from massive amount of data will be illustrated by the genome annotation process, by which genes are identified in the genome sequence.

  16. Broadbeam for Massive MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Deli; Qian, Haifeng; Li, Geoffrey Ye

    2016-05-01

    Massive MIMO has been identified as one of the promising disruptive air interface techniques to address the huge capacity requirement demanded by 5G wireless communications. For practical deployment of such systems, the control message need to be broadcast to all users reliably in the cell using broadbeam. A broadbeam is expected to have the same radiated power in all directions to cover users in any place in a cell. In this paper, we will show that there is no perfect broadbeam. Therefore, we develop a method for generating broadbeam that can allow tiny fluctuations in radiated power. Overall, this can serve as an ingredient for practical deployment of the massive MIMO systems.

  17. Massive photons and Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiaso, Mauro; Lehnert, Ralf; Potting, Robertus

    2012-04-01

    All quadratic translation- and gauge-invariant photon operators for Lorentz breakdown are included into the Stueckelberg Lagrangian for massive photons in a generalized Rξ gauge. The corresponding dispersion relation and tree-level propagator are determined exactly, and some leading-order results are derived. The question of how to include such Lorentz-violating effects into a perturbative quantum-field expansion is addressed. Applications of these results within Lorentz-breaking quantum-field theories include the regularization of infrared divergences as well as the free propagation of massive vector bosons.

  18. Dimuon radiation at relativistic energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron within a (3 + 1)D hydrodynamic + cascade model

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, E.; Steinheimer, J.; Bleicher, M.; Schramm, S.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze dilepton emission from hot and dense matter using a hybrid approach based on the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) transport model with an intermediate hydrodynamic stage for the description of heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. During the hydrodynamic stage, the production of lepton pairs is described by radiation rates for a strongly interacting medium in thermal equilibrium. In the low-mass region, hadronic thermal emission is evaluated by assuming vector meson dominance including in-medium modifications of the {rho} meson spectral function through scattering from nucleons and pions in the heat bath. In the intermediate-mass region, the hadronic rate is essentially determined by multipion annihilation processes. Emission from quark-antiquark annihilation in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) is taken into account as well. When the system is sufficiently dilute, the hydrodynamic description breaks down and a transition to a final cascade stage is performed. In this stage dimuon emission is evaluated as commonly done in transport models. By focusing on the enhancement with respect to the contribution from long-lived hadron decays after freezeout observed at the SPS in the low-mass region of the dilepton spectra, the relative importance of the different thermal contributions and of the two dynamical stages is investigated. We find that three separated regions can be identified in the invariant mass spectra. Whereas the very low and the intermediate-mass regions mostly receive contribution from the thermal dilepton emission, the region around the vector meson peak is dominated by the cascade emission. Above the {rho}-peak region the spectrum is driven by QGP radiation. Analysis of the dimuon transverse mass spectra reveals that the thermal hadronic emission shows an evident mass ordering not present in the emission from the QGP. A comparison of our calculation to recent acceptance-corrected NA60 data on invariant as well as

  19. Hydrodynamical simulations of realistic massive cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, David J.; Henson, Monique A.; Kay, Scott T.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Bahe, Yannick M.; Eagle Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Galaxy clusters are seeded by density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow via hierarchical collapse to become the most massive virialised objects we observed today. They are powerful probes that study both cosmology and astrophysical processes. Their internal structure at the current epoch is the result of a non-trivial interplay between gravitational collapse and the energy fed into the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). These processes shape the ICM during its formation at high redshift, but current observations of galaxy clusters are limited to z<0.5. The resolution and sensitivity of textit{Athena+} will allow it to study galaxy clusters in unprecedented detail. It will constrain cluster properties, such as its entropy, temperature and gas fraction, out to z˜2, enabling it to investigate the progenitors of today's massive clusters and observing the evolution of the properties of the ICM for the first time. Athena+ will produce a significant change in our understanding of the formation of galaxy clusters. Recently the theoretical modelling of clusters has advanced significantly and issues, such as the 'cooling catastophea', have been overcome by including feedback from star formation and AGN. We present the MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures (MACSIS) project. The MACSIS project is a representative sample of 390 of galaxy clusters, with M_{FOF} > 10(15} M_{⊙) , re-simulated using the cosmo-OWLS model (Le Brun et al. 2014, McCarthy et al. in prep.) to extend it to the most massive and rarest objects. We demonstrate that this sample reproduces the scaling relations, with intrinsic scatter, observed with current instruments at low redshift. Under the hierarchical paradigm, the progenitors of these systems will be the first objects to collapse at high redshift and we examine to z=2 how the scaling relations of these massive objects evolve with redshift. Finally, we investigate methods of defining a

  20. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  1. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: laviniah@kth.se

    2015-12-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  2. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  3. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  4. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  5. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  6. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  7. Implementation and scaling of the fully coupled Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) in a massively parallel supercomputing environment - a case study on JUQUEEN (IBM Blue Gene/Q)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasper, F.; Goergen, K.; Kollet, S.; Shrestha, P.; Sulis, M.; Rihani, J.; Geimer, M.

    2014-06-01

    Continental-scale hyper-resolution simulations constitute a grand challenge in characterizing non-linear feedbacks of states and fluxes of the coupled water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial systems. Tackling this challenge requires advanced coupling and supercomputing technologies for earth system models that are discussed in this study, utilizing the example of the implementation of the newly developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) on JUQUEEN (IBM Blue Gene/Q) of the Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Germany. The applied coupling strategies rely on the Multiple Program Multiple Data (MPMD) paradigm and require memory and load balancing considerations in the exchange of the coupling fields between different component models and allocation of computational resources, respectively. These considerations can be reached with advanced profiling and tracing tools leading to the efficient use of massively parallel computing environments, which is then mainly determined by the parallel performance of individual component models. However, the problem of model I/O and initialization in the peta-scale range requires major attention, because this constitutes a true big data challenge in the perspective of future exa-scale capabilities, which is unsolved.

  8. Reconstruction of the 1997/1998 El Nino from TOPEX/POSEIDON and TOGA/TAO Data Using a Massively Parallel Pacific-Ocean Model and Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppenne, C. L.; Rienecker, M.; Borovikov, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Two massively parallel data assimilation systems in which the model forecast-error covariances are estimated from the distribution of an ensemble of model integrations are applied to the assimilation of 97-98 TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry and TOGA/TAO temperature data into a Pacific basin version the NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP)ls quasi-isopycnal ocean general circulation model. in the first system, ensemble of model runs forced by an ensemble of atmospheric model simulations is used to calculate asymptotic error statistics. The data assimilation then occurs in the reduced phase space spanned by the corresponding leading empirical orthogonal functions. The second system is an ensemble Kalman filter in which new error statistics are computed during each assimilation cycle from the time-dependent ensemble distribution. The data assimilation experiments are conducted on NSIPP's 512-processor CRAY T3E. The two data assimilation systems are validated by withholding part of the data and quantifying the extent to which the withheld information can be inferred from the assimilation of the remaining data. The pros and cons of each system are discussed.

  9. A MASSIVE PROTOSTAR FORMING BY ORDERED COLLAPSE OF A DENSE, MASSIVE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Telesco, Charles; De Buizer, James M.; Sandell, Goeran; Shuping, Ralph; Beltran, Maria T.; Churchwell, Ed; Whitney, Barbara; McKee, Christopher F.; Staff, Jan E.

    2013-04-10

    We present 30 and 40 {mu}m imaging of the massive protostar G35.20-0.74 with SOFIA-FORCAST. The high surface density of the natal core around the protostar leads to high extinction, even at these relatively long wavelengths, causing the observed flux to be dominated by that emerging from the near-facing outflow cavity. However, emission from the far-facing cavity is still clearly detected. We combine these results with fluxes from the near-infrared to mm to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED). For isotropic emission the bolometric luminosity would be 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }. We perform radiative transfer modeling of a protostar forming by ordered, symmetric collapse from a massive core bounded by a clump with high-mass surface density, {Sigma}{sub cl}. To fit the SED requires protostellar masses {approx}20-34 M{sub Sun} depending on the outflow cavity opening angle (35 Degree-Sign -50 Degree-Sign ), and {Sigma}{sub cl} {approx} 0.4-1 g cm{sup -2}. After accounting for the foreground extinction and the flashlight effect, the true bolometric luminosity is {approx}(0.7-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }. One of these models also has excellent agreement with the observed intensity profiles along the outflow axis at 10, 18, 31, and 37 {mu}m. Overall our results support a model of massive star formation involving the relatively ordered, symmetric collapse of a massive, dense core and the launching bipolar outflows that clear low-density cavities. Thus a unified model may apply for the formation of both low- and high-mass stars.

  10. Construction of a massive ABJM theory without Higgs superfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2017-01-01

    A massive Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) model in N =1 superspace is analysed by considering a Proca-type mass term into the most general Faddeev-Popov action in a covariant gauge. The presence of a mass term breaks the original BRST and anti-BRST invariance of the model. Further, the symmetry of the massive ABJM model is restored by extending the BRST and anti-BRST transformations. We show that the supergauge dependence of the generating functional for connected diagrams occurs in the presence of mass and ghost–anti-ghost condensates in the theory.

  11. Massively-Parallel Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V; Pierce, T G; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Bartelt, M; Tang, M

    2003-06-18

    Prediction of the plastic strength of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of the existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, in order to be statistically representative and to reproduce experimentally observed microstructures. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss the general aspects of this code that make such large scale simulations possible, as well as a few initial simulation results.

  12. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens of modern trauma care are targeted to the early correction of acute traumatic coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of trauma massive transfusion based on clinical outcomes. We also examined whether the concept was useful in that early prediction of massive transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. Methods Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability of death. A logistic regression model for the prediction of massive transfusion, defined as 10 or more units of red cell transfusions, was developed. Results In total, 5,693 patient records were available for analysis. Mortality increased as transfusion requirements increased, but the model indicated no threshold effect. Mortality was 9% in patients who received none to five PRBC units, 22% in patients receiving six to nine PRBC units, and 42% in patients receiving 10 or more units. A logistic model for prediction of massive transfusion was developed and validated at multiple sites but achieved only moderate performance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.81, with specificity of only 50% at a sensitivity of 90% for the prediction of 10 or more PRBC units. Performance varied widely at different trauma centers, with specificity varying from 48% to 91%. Conclusions No threshold for definition exists at which a massive transfusion specifically results in worse outcomes. Even with a large sample size across multiple trauma datasets, it was not possible to develop a

  13. Massive stars. A chemical signature of first-generation very massive stars.

    PubMed

    Aoki, W; Tominaga, N; Beers, T C; Honda, S; Lee, Y S

    2014-08-22

    Numerical simulations of structure formation in the early universe predict the formation of some fraction of stars with several hundred solar masses. No clear evidence of supernovae from such very massive stars has, however, yet been found in the chemical compositions of Milky Way stars. We report on an analysis of a very metal-poor star SDSS J001820.5-093939.2, which possesses elemental-abundance ratios that differ significantly from any previously known star. This star exhibits low [α-element Fe] ratios and large contrasts between the abundances of odd and even element pairs, such as scandium/titanium and cobalt/nickel. Such features have been predicted by nucleosynthesis models for supernovae of stars more than 140 times as massive as the Sun, suggesting that the mass distribution of first-generation stars might extend to 100 solar masses or larger.

  14. New branches of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Crisostomi, M.; Koyama, K.; Pilo, L.; Tasinato, G.

    2015-06-01

    The basic building block for Lorentz-invariant and ghost-free massive gravity is the square root of the combination g-1η , where g-1 is the inverse of the physical metric and η is a reference metric. Since the square root of a matrix is not uniquely defined, it is possible to have physically inequivalent potentials corresponding to different branches. We show that around the Minkowski background, the only perturbatively well-defined branch is the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley. On the other hand, if Lorentz symmetry is broken spontaneously, other potentials exist with a standard perturbative expansion. We show this explicitly building new Lorentz-invariant, ghost-free massive gravity potentials for theories that in the background preserve rotational invariance but break Lorentz boosts.

  15. Black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Brito, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We review the black hole (BH) solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension, and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact BH solutions, analogous to those of general relativity (GR). In addition to these solutions, hairy BHs—solutions with no correspondent in GR—have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of Birkhoff’s theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these BHs richer and more complex than those of GR. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild BH exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical BHs are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability of the Kerr solution imposes stringent bounds on the graviton mass.

  16. Topologically massive higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Lal, Shailesh; Saha, Arunabha; Sahoo, Bindusar

    2011-10-01

    We look at the generalisation of topologically massive gravity (TMG) to higher spins, specifically spin-3. We find a special "chiral" point for the spin-three, analogous to the spin-two example, which actually coincides with the usual spin-two chiral point. But in contrast to usual TMG, there is the presence of a non-trivial trace and its logarithmic partner at the chiral point. The trace modes carry energy opposite in sign to the traceless modes. The logarithmic partner of the traceless mode carries negative energy indicating an instability at the chiral point. We make several comments on the asymptotic symmetry and its possible deformations at this chiral point and speculate on the higher spin generalisation of LCFT2 dual to the spin-3 massive gravity at the chiral point.

  17. Spin-3 topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wu, Jun-bao

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the spin-3 topologically massive gravity (TMG), paying special attention to its properties at the chiral point. We propose an action describing the higher spin fields coupled to TMG. We discuss the traceless spin-3 fluctuations around the AdS3 vacuum and find that there is an extra local massive mode, besides the left-moving and right-moving boundary massless modes. At the chiral point, such extra mode becomes massless and degenerates with the left-moving mode. We show that at the chiral point the only degrees of freedom in the theory are the boundary right-moving graviton and spin-3 field. We conjecture that spin-3 chiral gravity with generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary condition is holographically dual to 2D chiral CFT with classical W3 algebra and central charge cR = 3 l / G.

  18. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  19. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  20. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  1. The Application of a Massively Parallel Computer to the Simulation of Electrical Wave Propagation Phenomena in the Heart Muscle Using Simplified Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpoukhin, Mikhii G.; Kogan, Boris Y.; Karplus, Walter J.

    1995-01-01

    The simulation of heart arrhythmia and fibrillation are very important and challenging tasks. The solution of these problems using sophisticated mathematical models is beyond the capabilities of modern super computers. To overcome these difficulties it is proposed to break the whole simulation problem into two tightly coupled stages: generation of the action potential using sophisticated models. and propagation of the action potential using simplified models. The well known simplified models are compared and modified to bring the rate of depolarization and action potential duration restitution closer to reality. The modified method of lines is used to parallelize the computational process. The conditions for the appearance of 2D spiral waves after the application of a premature beat and the subsequent traveling of the spiral wave inside the simulated tissue are studied.

  2. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  3. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  4. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  5. 3D geological to geophysical modelling and seismic wave propagation simulation: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS (Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides) mining camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Khalid; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for base metals, uranium and precious metals has been pushing mineral explorations at greater depth. Seismic techniques and surveys have become essential in finding and extracting mineral rich ore bodies, especially for deep VMS mining camps. Geophysical parameters collected from borehole logs and laboratory measurements of core samples provide preliminary information about the nature and type of subsurface lithologic units. Alteration halos formed during the hydrothermal alteration process contain ore bodies, which are of primary interests among geologists and mining industries. It is known that the alteration halos are easier to detect than the ore bodies itself. Many 3D geological models are merely projection of 2D surface geology based on outcrop inspections and geochemical analysis of a small number of core samples collected from the area. Since a large scale 3D multicomponent seismic survey can be prohibitively expensive, performance analysis of such geological models can be helpful in reducing exploration costs. In this abstract, we discussed challenges and constraints encountered in geophysical modelling of ore bodies and surrounding geologic structures from the available coarse 3D geological models of the Lalor Lake mining camp, located in northern Manitoba, Canada. Ore bodies in the Lalor lake VMS camp are rich in gold, zinc, lead and copper, and have an approximate weight of 27 Mt. For better understanding of physical parameters of these known ore bodies and potentially unknown ones at greater depth, we constructed a fine resolution 3D seismic model with dimensions: 2000 m (width), 2000 m (height), and 1500 m (vertical depth). Seismic properties (P-wave, S-wave velocities, and density) were assigned based on a previous rock properties study of the same mining camp. 3D finite-difference elastic wave propagation simulation was performed in the model using appropriate parameters. The generated synthetic 3D seismic data was then compared to

  6. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 M ⊙) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N2D+ (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N2D+ cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ~ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ~60 M ⊙, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that mA ~= 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  7. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  8. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  9. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  10. Implementation and scaling of the fully coupled Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP v1.0) in a massively parallel supercomputing environment - a case study on JUQUEEN (IBM Blue Gene/Q)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasper, F.; Goergen, K.; Shrestha, P.; Sulis, M.; Rihani, J.; Geimer, M.; Kollet, S.

    2014-10-01

    Continental-scale hyper-resolution simulations constitute a grand challenge in characterizing nonlinear feedbacks of states and fluxes of the coupled water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial systems. Tackling this challenge requires advanced coupling and supercomputing technologies for earth system models that are discussed in this study, utilizing the example of the implementation of the newly developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP v1.0) on JUQUEEN (IBM Blue Gene/Q) of the Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Germany. The applied coupling strategies rely on the Multiple Program Multiple Data (MPMD) paradigm using the OASIS suite of external couplers, and require memory and load balancing considerations in the exchange of the coupling fields between different component models and the allocation of computational resources, respectively. Using the advanced profiling and tracing tool Scalasca to determine an optimum load balancing leads to a 19% speedup. In massively parallel supercomputer environments, the coupler OASIS-MCT is recommended, which resolves memory limitations that may be significant in case of very large computational domains and exchange fields as they occur in these specific test cases and in many applications in terrestrial research. However, model I/O and initialization in the petascale range still require major attention, as they constitute true big data challenges in light of future exascale computing resources. Based on a factor-two speedup due to compiler optimizations, a refactored coupling interface using OASIS-MCT and an optimum load balancing, the problem size in a weak scaling study can be increased by a factor of 64 from 512 to 32 768 processes while maintaining parallel efficiencies above 80% for the component models.

  11. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - II. Disruption of bound clusters by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O-type stars on star-forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to Ekin/|Epot|= 0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (106 M⊙) clouds prevent the H II regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower density 104 and 105 M⊙ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of per cent of the neutral gas in the 3-Myr time-scale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.

  12. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  13. Massive neutrinos and invisible axion minimally connected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Stefano; Di Luzio, Luca; Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We survey a few minimal scalar extensions of the standard electroweak model that provide a simple setup for massive neutrinos in connection with an invisible axion. The presence of a chiral U (1 ) à la Peccei-Quinn drives the pattern of Majorana neutrino masses while providing a dynamical solution to the strong C P problem and an axion as a dark matter candidate. We paradigmatically apply such a renormalizable framework to type-II seesaw and to two viable models for neutrino oscillations where the neutrino masses arise at one and two loops, respectively. We comment on the naturalness of the effective setups as well as on their implications for vacuum stability and electroweak baryogenesis.

  14. Plasma simulation using the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Thring, A. L.; Koga, J.; Janetzke, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Two dimensional electrostatic simulation codes using the particle-in-cell model are developed on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). The conventional plasma simulation procedure that computes electric fields at particle positions by means of a gridded system is found inefficient on the MPP. The MPP simulation code is thus based on the gridless system in which particles are assigned to processing elements and electric fields are computed directly via Discrete Fourier Transform. Currently, the gridless model on the MPP in two dimensions is about nine times slower that the gridded system on the CRAY X-MP without considering I/O time. However, the gridless system on the MPP can be improved by incorporating a faster I/O between the staging memory and Array Unit and a more efficient procedure for taking floating point sums over processing elements. The initial results suggest that the parallel processors have the potential for performing large scale plasma simulations.

  15. Massive Contingency Analysis with High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw

    2009-07-26

    Contingency analysis is a key function in the Energy Management System (EMS) to assess the impact of various combinations of power system component failures based on state estimates. Contingency analysis is also extensively used in power market operation for feasibility test of market solutions. Faster analysis of more cases is required to safely and reliably operate today’s power grids with less marginal and more intermittent renewable energy sources. Enabled by the latest development in the computer industry, high performance computing holds the promise of meet the need in the power industry. This paper investigates the potential of high performance computing for massive contingency analysis. The framework of "N-x" contingency analysis is established and computational load balancing schemes are studied and implemented with high performance computers. Case studies of massive 300,000-contingency-case analysis using the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model are presented to illustrate the application of high performance computing and demonstrate the performance of the framework and computational load balancing schemes.

  16. QCD and strings

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Tadakatsu; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2005-12-02

    We propose a holographic dual of QCD with massless flavors on the basis of a D4/D8-brane configuration within a probe approximation. We are led to a five-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on a curved space-time along with a Chern-Simons five-form on it, both of which provide us with a unifying framework to study the massless pion and an infinite number of massive vector mesons. We make sample computations of the physical quantities that involve the mesons and compare them with the experimental data. It is found that most of the results of this model are compatible with the experiments.

  17. PORTA: A three-dimensional multilevel radiative transfer code for modeling the intensity and polarization of spectral lines with massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, Javier

    2013-09-01

    The interpretation of the intensity and polarization of the spectral line radiation produced in the atmosphere of the Sun and of other stars requires solving a radiative transfer problem that can be very complex, especially when the main interest lies in modeling the spectral line polarization produced by scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. One of the difficulties is that the plasma of a stellar atmosphere can be highly inhomogeneous and dynamic, which implies the need to solve the non-equilibrium problem of the generation and transfer of polarized radiation in realistic three-dimensional (3D) stellar atmospheric models. Here we present PORTA, an efficient multilevel radiative transfer code we have developed for the simulation of the spectral line polarization caused by scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in 3D models of stellar atmospheres. The numerical method of solution is based on the non-linear multigrid iterative method and on a novel short-characteristics formal solver of the Stokes-vector transfer equation which uses monotonic Bézier interpolation. Therefore, with PORTA the computing time needed to obtain at each spatial grid point the self-consistent values of the atomic density matrix (which quantifies the excitation state of the atomic system) scales linearly with the total number of grid points. Another crucial feature of PORTA is its parallelization strategy, which allows us to speed up the numerical solution of complicated 3D problems by several orders of magnitude with respect to sequential radiative transfer approaches, given its excellent linear scaling with the number of available processors. The PORTA code can also be conveniently applied to solve the simpler 3D radiative transfer problem of unpolarized radiation in multilevel systems.

  18. WHAT SETS THE INITIAL ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    The physical mechanisms that set the initial rotation rates in massive stars are a crucial unknown in current star formation theory. Observations of young, massive stars provide evidence that they form in a similar fashion to their low-mass counterparts. The magnetic coupling between a star and its accretion disk may be sufficient to spin down low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to well below breakup at the end stage of their formation when the accretion rate is low. However, we show that these magnetic torques are insufficient to spin down massive PMS stars due to their short formation times and high accretion rates. We develop a model for the angular momentum evolution of stars over a wide range in mass, considering both magnetic and gravitational torques. We find that magnetic torques are unable to spin down either low-mass or high-mass stars during the main accretion phase, and that massive stars cannot be spun down significantly by magnetic torques during the end stage of their formation either. Spin-down occurs only if massive stars' disk lifetimes are substantially longer or their magnetic fields are much stronger than current observations suggest.

  19. Cosmological stability bound in massive gravity and bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2013-12-01

    We give a simple derivation of a cosmological bound on the graviton mass for spatially flat FRW solutions in massive gravity with an FRW reference metric and for bigravity theories. This bound comes from the requirement that the kinetic term of the helicity zero mode of the graviton is positive definite. The bound is dependent only on the parameters in the massive gravity potential and the Hubble expansion rate for the two metrics. We derive the decoupling limit of bigravity and FRW massive gravity, and use this to give an independent derivation of the cosmological bound. We recover our previous results that the tension between satisfying the Friedmann equation and the cosmological bound is sufficient to rule out all observationally relevant FRW solutions for massive gravity with an FRW reference metric. In contrast, in bigravity this tension is resolved due to different nature of the Vainshtein mechanism. We find that in bigravity theories there exists an FRW solution with late-time self-acceleration for which the kinetic terms for the helicity-2, helicity-1 and helicity-0 are generically nonzero and positive making this a compelling candidate for a model of cosmic acceleration. We confirm that the generalized bound is saturated for the candidate partially massless (bi)gravity theories but the existence of helicity-1/helicity-0 interactions implies the absence of the conjectured partially massless symmetry for both massive gravity and bigravity.

  20. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  1. One-loop divergences in massive gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Pereira, D. D.; Shapiro, I. L.

    2012-05-01

    The one-loop divergences are calculated for the recently proposed ghost-free massive gravity model, where the action depends on both metric and external tensor field f. The non-polynomial structure of the massive term is reduced to a more standard form by means of auxiliary tensor field, which is settled on-shell after quantum calculations are performed. As one should expect, the counter-terms do not reproduce the form of the classical action. Moreover, the result has the form of the power series in f.

  2. A New Framework for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenack, Lindsie

    2013-01-01

    The challenges that massive open online courses (MOOCs) bring to the learning arena spur adult educators to improve delivery. A framework for a new type of MOOC is presented to address some of the challenges presented by earlier models. This new MOOC, called a mesoMOOC, can bridge several challenges that hinder current effective delivery of MOOCs…

  3. The Evolution and Properties of Rotating Massive Star Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jieun; Conroy, Charlie; Byler, Nell

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the integrated properties of massive (> 10 {M}ȯ ) rotating single-star stellar populations for a variety of initial rotation rates (v/{v}{crit}=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6). We couple the new MESA Isochrone and Stellar Tracks (MIST) models to the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis (FSPS) package, extending the stellar population synthesis models to include the contributions from very massive stars (> 100 {M}ȯ ), which can be significant in the first ∼4 Myr after a starburst. These models predict ionizing luminosities that are consistent with recent observations of young nuclear star clusters. We also construct composite stellar populations assuming a distribution of initial rotation rates. Even in low-metallicity environments where rotation has a significant effect on the evolution of massive stars, we find that stellar population models require a significant contribution from fast-rotating (v/{v}{crit}> 0.4) stars in order to sustain the production of ionizing photons beyond a few Myr following a starburst. These results have potentially important implications for cosmic reionization by massive stars and the interpretation of nebular emission lines in high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

  4. Consistent quantization of massive chiral electrodynamics in four dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A. ); Bassetto, A.; Soldati, R.

    1989-10-09

    We discuss the quantization of a four-dimensional model in which a massive Abelian vector field interacts with chiral massless fermions. We show that, by introducing extra scalar fields, a renormalizable unitary {ital S} matrix can be obtained in a suitably defined Hilbert space of physical states.

  5. Simulating nonlinear cosmological structure formation with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arka; Dalal, Neal

    2016-11-01

    We present a new method for simulating cosmologies that contain massive particles with thermal free streaming motion, such as massive neutrinos or warm/hot dark matter. This method combines particle and fluid descriptions of the thermal species to eliminate the shot noise known to plague conventional N-body simulations. We describe this method in detail, along with results for a number of test cases to validate our method, and check its range of applicability. Using this method, we demonstrate that massive neutrinos can produce a significant scale-dependence in the large-scale biasing of deep voids in the matter field. We show that this scale-dependence may be quantitatively understood using an extremely simple spherical expansion model which reproduces the behavior of the void bias for different neutrino parameters.

  6. Massively parallel sequencing reveals the complex structure of an irradiated human chromosome on a mouse background in the Tc1 model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Susan M; Wiseman, Frances K; Clayton, Stephen; Prigmore, Elena; Langley, Elizabeth; Yang, Fengtang; Maguire, Sean; Fu, Beiyuan; Rajan, Diana; Sheppard, Olivia; Scott, Carol; Hauser, Heidi; Stephens, Philip J; Stebbings, Lucy A; Ng, Bee Ling; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Quail, Michael A; Banerjee, Ruby; Rothkamm, Kai; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Carter, Nigel P

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype--phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1) presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2) overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439.

  7. Massively Parallel Sequencing Reveals the Complex Structure of an Irradiated Human Chromosome on a Mouse Background in the Tc1 Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Stephen; Prigmore, Elena; Langley, Elizabeth; Yang, Fengtang; Maguire, Sean; Fu, Beiyuan; Rajan, Diana; Sheppard, Olivia; Scott, Carol; Hauser, Heidi; Stephens, Philip J.; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Ng, Bee Ling; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Quail, Michael A.; Banerjee, Ruby; Rothkamm, Kai; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype – phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1) presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2) overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439. PMID:23596509

  8. Metallicity dependence of envelope inflation in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, D.; Langer, N.; Szécsi, D.; -C Yoon, S.; Grassitelli, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Recently it has been found that models of massive stars reach the Eddington limit in their interior, which leads to dilute extended envelopes. Aims: We perform a comparative study of the envelope properties of massive stars at different metallicities, with the aim to establish the impact of the stellar metallicity on the effect of envelope inflation. Methods: We analysed published grids of core-hydrogen burning massive star models computed with metallicities appropriate for massive stars in the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud, and the Small Magellanic Cloud, the very metal poor dwarf galaxy I Zwicky 18, and for metal-free chemical composition. Results: Stellar models of all the investigated metallicities reach and exceed the Eddington limit in their interior, aided by the opacity peaks of iron, helium, and hydrogen, and consequently develop inflated envelopes. Envelope inflation leads to a redward bending of the zero-age main sequence and a broadening of the main-sequence band in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We derive the limiting L/M-values as a function of the stellar surface temperature above which inflation occurs, and find them to be higher for lower metallicity. While Galactic models show inflation above 29 M⊙, the corresponding mass limit for Population III stars is 150 M⊙. While the masses of the inflated envelopes are generally low, we find that they can reach 1-100 M⊙ in models with effective temperatures below 8000 K, with higher masses reached by models of lower metallicity. Conclusions: Envelope inflation is expected to occur in sufficiently massive stars at all metallicities, and is expected to lead to rapidly growing pulsations, high macroturbulent velocities, and might well be related to the unexplained variability observed in luminous blue variables such as S Doradus and η Carina.

  9. Computational chaos in massively parallel neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep

    1989-01-01

    A fundamental issue which directly impacts the scalability of current theoretical neural network models to massively parallel embodiments, in both software as well as hardware, is the inherent and unavoidable concurrent asynchronicity of emerging fine-grained computational ensembles and the possible emergence of chaotic manifestations. Previous analyses attributed dynamical instability to the topology of the interconnection matrix, to parasitic components or to propagation delays. However, researchers have observed the existence of emergent computational chaos in a concurrently asynchronous framework, independent of the network topology. Researcher present a methodology enabling the effective asynchronous operation of large-scale neural networks. Necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing concurrent asynchronous convergence are established in terms of contracting operators. Lyapunov exponents are computed formally to characterize the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are presented to illustrate network convergence to the correct results, even in the presence of large delays.

  10. The Massive Star Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    An increasing number of non-terminal giant eruptions are being observed by modern supernova and transient surveys. Very little is known about the origin of these giant eruptions and their progenitors which are presumably very-massive, evolved stars such as luminous blue variables, hypergiants, and supergiants. Motivated by the small number of progenitors positively associated with these giant eruptions, we have begun a survey of the luminous and evolved massive star populations in several nearby galaxies. We aim to identify the likely progenitors of the giant eruptions, study the spatial variations in the stellar populations, and examine the relationship between massive star populations and their environment. The work presented here is focused on stellar populations in the relatively nearby, giant, spiral galaxy M101 from sixteen archival BVI HST/ACS images. We create a catalog of stars in the direction to M101 with photometric errors < 10% for V < 24.5 and 50% completeness down to V ˜ 26.5 even in regions of high stellar crowding. Using color and magnitude criteria we have identified candidate luminous OB type stars and blue supergiants, yellow supergiants, and red supergiants for future observation. We examine their spatial distributions across the face of M101 and find that the ratio of blue to red supergiants decreases by two orders of magnitude over the radial extent. From our catalog, we derive the star formation history (SFH) for the stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli by fitting the color-magnitude diagrams. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to populations traced by Halpha, far ultraviolet (FUV), and near ultraviolet (NUV) emission, we show that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Halpha is 15% " 35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Halpha emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our

  11. Massive Open Online Courses in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Ira; Klaas, Brian; Yager, James D.; Kanchanaraksa, Sukon

    2013-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) represent a new and potentially transformative model for providing educational opportunities to learners not enrolled in a formal educational program. The authors describe the experience of developing and offering eight MOOCs on a variety of public health topics. Existing institutional infrastructure and experience with both for-credit online education and open educational resources mitigated the institutional risk and resource requirements. Although learners are able to enroll easily and freely and do so in large numbers, there is considerable variety in the level of participation and engagement among enrollees. As a result, comprehensive and accurate assessment of meaningful learning progress remains a major challenge for evaluating the effectiveness of MOOCs for providing public health education. PMID:24350228

  12. Effect of massive disks on bulge isophotes

    SciTech Connect

    Monet, D.G.; Richstone, D.O.; Schechter, P.L.

    1981-04-15

    Massive disks produce flattened equipotentials. Unless the stars in a galaxy bulge are preferentially hotter in the z direction than in the plane, the isophotes will be at least as flat as the equipotentials. The comparison of two galaxy models having flat rotation curves with the available surface photometry for five external galaxies does not restrict the mass fraction which might reside in the disk. However, star counts in our own Galaxy indicate that unless the disk terminates close to the solar circle, no more than half the mass within that circle lies in the disk. The remaining half must lie either in the bulge or, more probably, in a third dark, round, dynamically distinct component.

  13. Energetic Supernovae of Very Massive Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan

    2015-08-01

    Current models of the formation of the first stars in the universe suggest that these stars were very massive, having a typical mass scale of hundreds of solar masses. Some of them would die as pair instability supernovae (PSNe) which might be the biggest explosions of the universe. We present the results from multidimensional numerical studies of PSNe with a new radiation-hydrodynamics code, CASTRO and with realistic nuclear reaction networks. We simulate the fluid instabilities that occur in multiple spatial dimensions and discuss how the resulting mixing affects the explosion, mixing, and nucleosynthesis of these supernovae. Our simulations provide useful predictions for the observational signatures of PSNe, which might soon be examined by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  14. Neutrinos and the Deaths of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. R.; Mezzacappa, A.; Messer, O. E. B.

    2005-06-01

    Observationally categorized as Type II or Ib/c supernovae, core collapse supernovae mark the end of the life of a massive star and the formation of a neutron star or black hole. These explosions are among the most energetic events in the universe, emitting 1046 J of energy, primarily in the form of neutrinos. They play a preeminent role in the cosmic origin of the elements and serve as a principal heating mechanism for the interstellar medium. Numerical simulations of the textbook neutrino-reheating mechanism for core collapse supernovae frequently fail to match the most fundamental observable property: an explosion with roughly 1044 J of kinetic energy. We review recent improvements in the modeling of core collapse supernovae, including improved tracking of the neutrino distribution and better accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the hydrodynamic flows. We also discuss how continued improvements in the treatment of microscopic nuclear and neutrino physics has important macroscopic consequences.

  15. Experimental and clinical observations on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Lakhanpal, V

    1993-01-01

    We have been able to create a reproducible experimental model of nonexpulsive massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage in a rabbit eye. Massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage was demonstrated on echography and confirmed on histopathologic examination in all eyes. The natural course of the disease suggests that there is very little change in the size of the choroidal detachment in the first 7 days. Maximum liquefaction of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage clot was seen to occur between 7 and 14 days. However, increased retinal and ciliary body atrophy was also noted at 14 days. Therefore, the optimum time to drain massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage appears to be between 7 and 14 days. Immediate sclerotomy during the acute formation of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage resulted in further increase in the suprachoroidal hemorrhage, with marked extension of the hemorrhage into the retina and vitreous. Therefore, in our opinion, immediate sclerotomy during massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is detrimental to the eye. Our clinical data have shown that eyes with massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage can be treated successfully by secondary surgery, and the majority of the eyes can be salvaged with good visual results. No serious complications of this surgery were encountered in our cases. We advocate early surgical intervention between 7 and 14 days. Aggressive anterior and posterior segment reconstruction by anterior and posterior vitrectomy after sclerotomy drainage of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage is essential for better anatomic and visual results. Our animal data and clinical experience suggest that the optimum time of drainage of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is between 7 and 14 days. The results of our animal experiments in relation to human clinical application should be taken with caution. Furthermore, we had a small number of animals to study the various groups. In addition, longer follow-up may be needed for comparing controls with the treatment groups. Our animal model may help

  16. Interferometric Radio Observations of the Interactive Winds of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Diane Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars have very strong stellar winds which interact with their environment. This work has involved the study of these interactive winds at radio and other wavelengths. Radio observations have been made of the massive runaway star BD+43 3654 and its bow shock which is interacting with the inter-stellar medium. These observations, together with archive data at other wavelengths, have revealed stratified dust and turbulent gas in this interaction zone. Further radio studies have been undertaken of the interaction zones of the colliding winds of massive binary systems. Observations of the colliding wind binary WR 147 at 5GHz have revealed a curved collision zone, suggestive of simple interactive models. Measurements of the flux from the Wolf-Rayet component of this massive binary system has allowed a mass-loss rate to be derived and though the companion O-star is not detected, an upper flux limit has allowed upper limits on the mass-loss rate and limits on the terminal velocity to be inferred. Also revealed is a curious ’bridge’ feature previously observed in WR 147 which occurs between the two binary components. One mechanism is suggested to explain this anomalous feature, the ionising flux of one binary component, the O-star, may be ionising the wind of the other, the WR component. Modelling of the ionisation structure of the stellar winds has been undertaken to verify that this may be occurring. Radio observations of massive stars made at low-frequency have produced detections of WR 147 and the brighter colliding wind binary, WR 146. These detections have allowed modelling of the non-thermal emission in order to deduce where the non-thermal absorption turn-over occurs in these systems. The resultant modelling has illustrated that these colliding wind regions are complex, with multiple absorption regions best describing their nature.

  17. Gravitational Collapse and Neutrino Emission of Population III Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2006-07-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars are the first stars in the universe. They do not contain metals, and their formation and evolution may be different from that of stars of later generations. In fact, according to the theory of star formation, Pop III stars might have very massive components (~100-10000 Msolar). In this paper, we compute the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of these Pop III massive stars. We solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics and neutrino transfer equations simultaneously, treating neutrino reactions in detail. Unlike supermassive stars (>~105 Msolar), the stars of concern in this paper become opaque to neutrinos. The collapse is simulated until after an apparent horizon is formed. We confirm that the neutrino transfer plays a crucial role in the dynamics of gravitational collapse and find also that the β-equilibration leads to a somewhat unfamiliar evolution of electron fraction. Contrary to the naive expectation, the neutrino spectrum does not become harder for more massive stars. This is mainly because the neutrino cooling is more efficient and the outer core is more massive as the stellar mass increases. Here the outer core is the outer part of the iron core falling supersonically. We also evaluate the flux of relic neutrinos from Pop III massive stars. As expected, the detection of these neutrinos is difficult for the currently operating detectors. However, if ever observed, the spectrum will enable us to obtain information on the formation history of Pop III stars. We investigate 18 models covering the mass range of 300-104 Msolar, making this study the most detailed numerical exploration of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of Pop III massive stars. This will also serve as an important foundation for multidimensional investigations.

  18. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  19. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  20. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  1. New Frontiers in Stellar Astrophysics: Massive Stars as Cosmological Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars are crucial building blocks in the study of star-forming galaxies, stellar evolution, and transient events, and their applications as fundamental astrophysical tools span a broad range of subfields. Unfortunately, many key traits of massive stars - from their physical properties and ionizing radiation to their evolution and core-collapse deaths - remain poorly understood. I will discuss several current research programs focused on developing a comprehensive picture of massive stars across the cosmos. These include observational surveys and population synthesis models of star-forming galaxies; progenitor and host environment studies of transient phenomena such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; and the remarkable reach of extragalactic stellar observations, which recently led to the discovery of the first Thorne-Zytkow object candidate. With cutting-edge theoretical models and the capabilities of current ground-based and orbital observatories, we are ideally poised to make substantial progress in our understanding of massive stars over the coming decade. This in turn will equip us with the tools we need to take full advantage of the frontiers opened up by new observational facilities such as JWST, the ELTs, and LSST, allowing us to immediately begin probing the new corners of the universe that they reveal.

  2. X-ray emission from massive stars with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Brown, J. C.; Todt, H.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the connections between the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission from massive stars. Our study shows that the X-ray properties of known strongly magnetic stars are diverse: while some comply to the predictions of the magnetically confined wind model, others do not. We conclude that strong, hard, and variable X-ray emission may be a sufficient attribute of magnetic massive stars, but it is not a necessary one. We address the general properties of X-ray emission from ``normal'' massive stars, especially the long standing mystery about the correlations between the parameters of X-ray emission and fundamental stellar properties. The recent development in stellar structure modeling shows that small-scale surface magnetic fields may be common. We suggest a ``hybrid'' scenario which could explain the X-ray emission from massive stars by a combination of magnetic mechanisms on the surface and shocks in the stellar wind. The magnetic mechanisms and the wind shocks are triggered by convective motions in sub-photospheric layers. This scenario opens the door for a natural explanation of the well established correlation between bolometric and X-ray luminosities. Based on observations obtained with \\xmm and \\cxo.

  3. Completing Lorentz violating massive gravity at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, D.; Sibiryakov, S.

    2015-03-15

    Theories with massive gravitons are interesting for a variety of physical applications, ranging from cosmological phenomena to holographic modeling of condensed matter systems. To date, they have been formulated as effective field theories with a cutoff proportional to a positive power of the graviton mass m{sub g} and much smaller than that of the massless theory (M{sub P} ≈ 10{sup 19} GeV in the case of general relativity). In this paper, we present an ultraviolet completion for massive gravity valid up to a high energy scale independent of the graviton mass. The construction is based on the existence of a preferred time foliation combined with spontaneous condensation of vector fields. The perturbations of these fields are massive and below their mass, the theory reduces to a model of Lorentz violating massive gravity. The latter theory possesses instantaneous modes whose consistent quantization we discuss in detail. We briefly study some modifications to gravitational phenomenology at low-energies. The homogeneous cosmological solutions are the same as in the standard cosmology. The gravitational potential of point sources agrees with the Newtonian one at distances small with respect to m{sub g}{sup −1}. Interestingly, it becomes repulsive at larger distances.

  4. Aerodynamic simulation on massively parallel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeuser, Jochem; Simon, Horst D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly addresses the computational requirements for the analysis of complete configurations of aircraft and spacecraft currently under design to be used for advanced transportation in commercial applications as well as in space flight. The discussion clearly shows that massively parallel systems are the only alternative which is both cost effective and on the other hand can provide the necessary TeraFlops, needed to satisfy the narrow design margins of modern vehicles. It is assumed that the solution of the governing physical equations, i.e., the Navier-Stokes equations which may be complemented by chemistry and turbulence models, is done on multiblock grids. This technique is situated between the fully structured approach of classical boundary fitted grids and the fully unstructured tetrahedra grids. A fully structured grid best represents the flow physics, while the unstructured grid gives best geometrical flexibility. The multiblock grid employed is structured within a block, but completely unstructured on the block level. While a completely unstructured grid is not straightforward to parallelize, the above mentioned multiblock grid is inherently parallel, in particular for multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) machines. In this paper guidelines are provided for setting up or modifying an existing sequential code so that a direct parallelization on a massively parallel system is possible. Results are presented for three parallel systems, namely the Intel hypercube, the Ncube hypercube, and the FPS 500 system. Some preliminary results for an 8K CM2 machine will also be mentioned. The code run is the two dimensional grid generation module of Grid, which is a general two dimensional and three dimensional grid generation code for complex geometries. A system of nonlinear Poisson equations is solved. This code is also a good testcase for complex fluid dynamics codes, since the same datastructures are used. All systems provided good speedups, but

  5. Evolution and Nucleosynthesis of Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschi, Raphael

    In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M > 100 M_{odot } ) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M_{odot } . A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of neon and magnesium at the surface of WC stars. At solar metallicity, mass loss is so strong that even if a star is born with several hundred solar masses, it will end its life with less than 50 M_{odot } (using current mass loss prescriptions). At the metallicity of the LMC and lower, on the other hand, mass loss is weaker and might enable stars to undergo pair-instability supernovae.

  6. Long-Term Stored Hemoglobin-Vesicles, a Cellular Type of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier, Has Resuscitative Effects Comparable to That for Fresh Red Blood Cells in a Rat Model with Massive Hemorrhage without Post-Transfusion Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Keishi; Sakai, Hiromi; Otagiri, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbV), encapsulating highly concentrated human hemoglobin in liposomes, were developed as a substitute for red blood cells (RBC) and their safety and efficacy in transfusion therapy has been confirmed in previous studies. Although HbV suspensions are structurally and physicochemically stabile for least 1-year at room temperature, based on in vitro experiments, the issue of whether the use of long-term stored HbV after a massive hemorrhage can be effective in resuscitations without adverse, post-transfusion effects remains to be clarified. We report herein on a comparison of the systemic response and the induction of organ injuries in hemorrhagic shock model rats resuscitated using 1-year-stored HbV, freshly packed RBC (PRBC-0) and by 28-day-stored packed RBC (PRBC-28). The six-hour mortality after resuscitation was not significantly different among the groups. Arterial blood pressure and blood gas parameters revealed that, using HbV, recovery from the shock state was comparable to that when PRBC-0 was used. Although no significant change was observed in serum parameters reflecting liver and kidney injuries at 6 hours after resuscitation among the three resuscitation groups, results based on Evans Blue and protein leakage in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological findings indicated that HbV as well as PRBC-0 was less predisposed to result in a post-transfusion lung injury than PRBC-28, as evidenced by low levels of myeloperoxidase accumulation and subsequent oxidative damage in the lung. The findings reported herein indicate that 1-year-stored HbV can effectively function as a resuscitative fluid without the induction of post-transfused lung injury and that it is comparable to fresh PRBC, suggesting that HbV is a promising RBC substitute with a long shelf-life. PMID:27798697

  7. Remark on massive particle's de Sitter tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Chen, De-You; Wen, Dan E-mail: deyouchen@126.com

    2013-11-01

    In the work [J. Y. Zhang and Z. Zhao, Massive particles's black hole tunneling and de Sitter tunneling, Nucl. Phys. B 725 (2005) 173.], the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon has been first described in the tunneling framework. However, the geodesic equation of the massive particle was unnaturally and awkwardly defined there by investigating the relation between the group and phase velocity. In this paper, we start from the Lagrangian analysis on the action to naturally produce the geodesic equation of the tunneling massive particle. Then, based on the new definition for the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon. It is noteworthy that, the highlight of our work is a new and important development of the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method, which can make it more physical.

  8. ON THE ASSEMBLY HISTORY OF STELLAR COMPONENTS IN MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2013-03-20

    Matsuoka and Kawara showed that the number density of the most massive galaxies (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.5-12.0) increases faster than that of the next massive group (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.0-11.5) during 0 < z < 1. This appears to be in contradiction to the apparent 'downsizing effect'. We attempt to understand the two observational findings in the context of the hierarchical merger paradigm using semi-analytic techniques. Our models closely reproduce the result of Matsuoka and Kawara. Downsizing can also be understood as larger galaxies have, on average, smaller assembly ages but larger stellar ages. Our fiducial models further reveal details of the history of the stellar mass growth of massive galaxies. The most massive galaxies (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.5-12.0 at z = 0), which are mostly the brightest cluster galaxies, obtain roughly 70% of their stellar components via merger accretion. The role of merger accretion monotonically declines with galaxy mass: 40% for log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.0-11.5 and 20% for log M/M{sub Sun} = 10.5-11.0 at z = 0. The specific accreted stellar mass rates via galaxy mergers decline very slowly during the whole redshift range, while specific star formation rates sharply decrease with time. In the case of the most massive galaxies, merger accretion becomes the most important channel for the stellar mass growth at z {approx} 2. On the other hand, in situ star formation is always the dominant channel in L{sub *} galaxies.

  9. Classical and quantum cosmology of minimal massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.; Mousavi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time background we study the classical cosmological models in the context of recently proposed theory of nonlinear minimal massive bigravity. We show that in the presence of perfect fluid the classical field equations acquire contribution from the massive graviton as a cosmological term which is positive or negative depending on the dynamical competition between two scale factors of bigravity metrics. We obtain the classical field equations for flat and open universes in the ordinary and Schutz representation of perfect fluid. Focusing on the Schutz representation for flat universe, we find classical solutions exhibiting singularities at early universe with vacuum equation of state. Then, in the Schutz representation, we study the quantum cosmology for flat universe and derive the Schrodinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We find its exact and wave packet solutions and discuss on their properties to show that the initial singularity in the classical solutions can be avoided by quantum cosmology. Similar to the study of Hartle-Hawking no-boundary proposal in the quantum cosmology of de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, it turns out that the mass of graviton predicted by quantum cosmology of the minimal massive bigravity is large at early universe. This is in agreement with the fact that at early universe the cosmological constant should be large.

  10. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Thushara

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom-made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  11. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, G. S. Thushara

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom--made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  12. THE ROLE OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Kagan, Daniel; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across ''boundaries'' from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed ''initial'' rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ∼10{sup 12} G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M {sub ☉} model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  13. The dynamics of massive starless cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-20

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (∼100 M {sub ☉}) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N{sub 2}H{sup +} in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N{sub 2}D{sup +} cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number m{sub A} ∼ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ∼60 M {sub ☉}, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that m{sub A} ≅ 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  14. Mass loss from very young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Th.

    The physics of mass loss from very young massive stars is reviewed, and mass-loss rates are determined for several objects on the basis of published observational data. The observational evidence for mass loss of 0.0001-0.001 solar mass/yr with velocity 10-60 km/s, dynamical timescale 1000-100,000 yr, and kinetic energy (1-100) x 10 to the 38th W from these objects is chracterized; techniques for estimating mass-loss rates from H recombination lines, CO line profiles maser data, and IR-continuum observations are described; rates for molecular outflows and ionized winds are presented in tabels; and theoretical models developed to explain the mechanism driving bipolar mass loss are examined critically. It is found that neither radiation pressure on dust grins nor the ionized winds can drive the molecular outflow. The models considered most probable are those involving production of holes by original spherical stellar winds (Canto, 1980, rotationally driven magnetic pressure (Draine, 1983), and infall from an accretion disk (Torbett, 1984).

  15. Linear growth of structure in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Adam R.; Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S. E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no

    2014-10-01

    The ghost-free theory of massive gravity with two dynamical metrics has been shown to produce viable cosmological expansion, where the late-time acceleration of the Universe is due to the finite range of the gravitational interaction rather than a nonzero cosmological constant. Here the cosmological perturbations are studied in this theory. The full perturbation equations are presented in a general gauge and analyzed, focusing on subhorizon scales in the quasistatic limit during the matter-dominated era. An evolution equation for the matter inhomogeneities and the parameters quantifying the deviations from general relativistic structure formation are expressed in terms of five functions whose forms are determined directly by the coupling parameters in the theory. The evolution equation has a similar structure to Horndeski-type scalar-tensor theories, exhibiting a modified growth rate and scale-dependence at intermediate wavenumbers. Predictions of the theory are confronted with observational data on both background expansion and large-scale structure, although care must be taken to ensure a model is stable. It is found that while the stable models fit the data well, they feature deviations from the standard cosmology that could be detected or ruled out by near-future experiments.

  16. Inside-out formation of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    A significant fraction of the present day massive galaxies have compact cores embedded inside their disks or halos. Strikingly, those compact cores are similar to the massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies, nicknamed red-nuggets. We present observational evidence supporting an inside-out formation scenario, where present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red-nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disk are accreted later. This contribution is based on the paper by de la Rosa et al. (2016).

  17. Fluid/gravity correspondence for massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid/gravity correspondence in the framework of massive Einstein gravity. Treating the gravitational mass terms as an effective energy-momentum tensor and utilizing the Petrov-like boundary condition on a timelike hypersurface, we find that the perturbation effects of massive gravity in bulk can be completely governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation living on the cutoff surface under the near horizon and nonrelativistic limits. Furthermore, we have concisely computed the ratio of dynamical viscosity to entropy density for two massive Einstein gravity theories, and found that they still saturate the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound.

  18. Observational studies of regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Heather Danielle Blythe

    2013-03-01

    Massive stars have a profound influence on their surroundings. However, relatively little is known about their formation. The study of massive star formation is hindered by a lack of observational evidence, primarily due to difficulties observing massive stars at early stages in their development. The Red MSX Source survey (RMS survey) is a valuable tool with which to address these issues. Near-infrared H- and K-band spectra were taken for 247 candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), selected from the RMS survey. 195 (∼80%) of the targets are YSOs, of which 131 are massive YSOs (LBOL>5E3L⊙, M>8 M⊙). This is the largest spectroscopic study of massive YSOs to date. This study covers minimally obscured objects right through to very red, dusty sources. Almost all YSOs show some evidence for emission lines, though there is a wide variety of observed properties, with HI, H2 Fe II, and CO among the most commonly observed lines. Evidence for disks and outflows was frequently seen. Comparisons of Brγ and H2 emission with low mass YSOs suggest that the emission mechanism for these lines is the same for low-, intermediate-, and high-mass YSOs, i.e. high-mass YSOs appear to resemble scaled-up versions of low-mass YSOs. It was found that the YSOs form an evolutionary sequence, based on their spectra, consistent with the existing theoretical models. Type I YSOs have strong H2 emission, no ionized lines, and are redder than the other two subtypes. As such, these are considered to be the youngest sources. The Type III sources are bluest, and therefore considered to be the oldest subtype. They have strong H I lines and fluorescent Fe II 1.6878 μm emission. They may also have weak H2 emission. Type III sources may even be beginning to form a mini-H II region. XSHOOTER data from 10 Herbig Be stars were analysed. The evidence suggests that winds and disks are common among Herbig stars, as they are among their main sequence classical Be star counterparts. Line

  19. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  20. Cosmology with massive neutrinos coupled to dark energy.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, A W; van de Bruck, C; Mota, D F; Tocchini-Valentini, D

    2006-02-17

    Cosmological consequences of a coupling between massive neutrinos and dark energy are investigated. In such models, the neutrino mass is a function of a scalar field, which plays the role of dark energy. The evolution of the background and cosmological perturbations are discussed. We find that mass-varying neutrinos can leave a significant imprint on the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background and even lead to a reduction of power on large angular scales.

  1. Constraints on massive gravity theory from big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, G.

    2012-10-01

    The massive gravity cosmology is studied in the scenario of big bang nucleosynthesis. By making use of current bounds on the deviation from the fractional mass, we derive the constraints on the free parameters of the theory. The cosmological consequences of the model are also analyzed in the framework of the PAMELA experiment, i.e. an excess of positron events, that the conventional cosmology and particle physics cannot explain.

  2. Massive and massless higher spinning particles in odd dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Bonezzi, Roberto; Corradini, Olindo; Latini, Emanuele

    2014-09-01

    We study actions for massive bosonic particles of higher spins by dimensionally reducing an action for massless particles. For the latter we take a model with a SO( N) extended local supersymmetry on the worldline, that is known to describe massless (conformal) particles of higher spins in flat spacetimes of even dimensions. Dimensional reduction produces an action for massive spinning particles in odd dimensions. The field equations that emerge in a quantization à la Dirac are shown to be equivalent to the Fierz-Pauli ones. The massless limit generates a multiplet of massless states with higher spins, whose first quantized field equations have a geometric form with fields belonging to various types of Young tableaux. These geometric equations can be partially integrated to show their equivalence with the standard Fronsdal-Labastida equations. We covariantize our model to check whether an extension to curved spacetimes can be achieved. Restricting to (A)dS spaces, we find that the worldline gauge algebra becomes nonlinear, but remains first class. This guarantees consistency on such backgrounds. A light cone analysis confirms the presence of the expected propagating degrees of freedom. A covariant analysis is worked out explicitly for the massive case, which is seen to give rise to the Fierz-Pauli equations extended to (A)dS spaces. It is worth noting that in D = 3 the massless limit of our model with N → ∞ has the same field content of the Vasiliev's theory that accommodates each spin exactly once.

  3. Massive-Star Magnetospheres: Now in 3-D!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard

    Magnetic fields are unexpected in massive stars, due to the absence of a dynamo convection zone beneath their surface layers. Nevertheless, kilogauss-strength, ordered fields were detected in a small subset of these stars over three decades ago, and the intervening years have witnessed the steady expansion of this subset. A distinctive feature of magnetic massive stars is that they harbor magnetospheres --- circumstellar environments where the magnetic field interacts strongly with the star's radiation-driven wind, confining it and channelling it into energetic shocks. A wide range of observational signatures are associated with these magnetospheres, in diagnostics ranging from X-rays all the way through to radio emission. Moreover, these magnetospheres can play an important role in massive-star evolution, by amplifying angular momentum loss in the wind. Recent progress in understanding massive-star magnetospheres has largely been driven by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. However, these have been restricted to two- dimensional axisymmetric configurations, with three-dimensional configurations possible only in certain special cases. These restrictions are limiting further progress; we therefore propose to develop completely general three-dimensional models for the magnetospheres of massive stars, on the one hand to understand their observational properties and exploit them as plasma-physics laboratories, and on the other to gain a comprehensive understanding of how they influence the evolution of their host star. For weak- and intermediate-field stars, the models will be based on 3-D MHD simulations using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP code. For strong-field stars, we will extend our existing Rigid Field Hydrodynamics (RFHD) code to handle completely arbitrary field topologies. To explore a putative 'photoionization-moderated mass loss' mechanism for massive-star magnetospheres, we will also further develop a photoionization code we have recently

  4. Evolution of Massive Stars at Low Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Walborn, Nolan R.; Hunter, Ian; Martayan, Christophe; van Marle, Allard Jan; Marchenko, Sergey; Vink, Jorick S.; Limongi, Marco; Levesque, Emily M.; Modjaz, Maryam

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports the contributions made on the occasion of the Special Session entitled “Evolution of Massive Stars at Low Metallicity” which was held on Sunday, December 9, 2007 in Kauai (USA).

  5. Dwarf Galaxies with Active Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, J. E.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the birth and growth of the first supermassive BH "seeds" is far from understood. While direct observations of these distant BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, massive BHs in present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on the masses, formation path, and hosts of supermassive BH seeds. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting active massive BHs to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known.

  6. The origin of massive clusters: from hyper-massive clouds to mini-bursts of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Frederique; Louvet, Fabien; Nguyen Luong, Quang

    2015-08-01

    Herschel revealed high-density cloud filaments of several pc^3, which are forming clusters of OB-type stars. Counting Herschel protostars gives a direct measure of the mass of stars forming in a period of ~10^5 yrs, the ``instantaneous'' star formation activity. Given their activity, these so-called mini-starburst cloud ridges could be seen as "miniature and instant models" of starburst galaxies. Their characteristics could shed light on the origin of massive clusters.

  7. Self-protection of massive cosmological gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhahn, Felix; Dietrich, Dennis D.; Hofmann, Stefan E-mail: dietrich@cp3.sdu.dk

    2010-11-01

    Relevant deformations of gravity present an exciting window of opportunity to probe the rigidity of gravity on cosmological scales. For a single-graviton theory, the leading relevant deformation constitutes a graviton mass term. In this paper, we investigate the classical and quantum stability of massive cosmological gravitons on generic Friedman backgrounds. For a Universe expanding towards a de Sitter epoch, we find that massive cosmological gravitons are self-protected against unitarity violations by a strong coupling phenomenon.

  8. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  9. Measuring Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of two massive black holes produces gravitational waves (GWs) which can be detected by the space-based detector LISA. By measuring these waves, LISA can determine the various parameters which characterize the source. Measurements of the black hole masses and spins will provide information about the growth of black holes and their host galaxies over time. Measurements of a source's sky position and distance may help astronomers identify an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW event. The counterpart's redshift, combined with the GW-measured luminosity distance, can then be used to measure the Hubble constant and the dark energy parameter $w$. Because the potential science output is so high, it is useful to know in advance how well LISA can measure source parameters for a wide range of binaries. We calculate expected parameter estimation errors using the well-known Fisher matrix method. Our waveform model includes the physics of spin precession, as well as subleading harmonics. When these higher-order effects are not included, strong degeneracies between some parameters cause them to be poorly determined by a GW measurement. When precession and subleading harmonics are properly included, the degeneracies are broken, reducing parameter errors by one to several orders of magnitude.

  10. MASSIVE HYBRID PARALLELISM FOR FULLY IMPLICIT MULTIPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Cody J. Permann; David Andrs; John W. Peterson; Derek R. Gaston

    2013-05-01

    As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided.

  11. Massive hybrid parallelism for fully implicit multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, D. R.; Permann, C. J.; Andrs, D.; Peterson, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided. (authors)

  12. Dark aspects of massive spinor electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive spinor electrodynamics when torsion is non-vanishing. A non-minimal interaction is introduced between the torsion and the vector field and the coupling constant between them plays an important role in subsequential cosmology. It is shown that the mass of the vector field and torsion conspire to generate dark energy and pressureless dark matter, and for generic values of the coupling constant, the theory effectively provides an interacting model between them with an additional energy density of the form ~ 1/a6. The evolution equations mimic ΛCDM behavior up to 1/a3 term and the additional term represents a deviation from ΛCDM. We show that the deviation is compatible with the observational data, if it is very small. We find that the non-minimal interaction is responsible for generating an effective cosmological constant which is directly proportional to the mass squared of the vector field and the mass of the photon within its current observational limit could be the source of the dark energy.

  13. New Bi-Gravity from New Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, A.; Alishahiha, M.; Naseh, A.; Nemati, A.; Shirzad, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using the action of three dimensional New Massive Gravity (NMG) we construct a new bi-gravity in three dimensions. This can be done by promoting the rank two auxiliary field appearing in the expression of NMG's action into a dynamical field. We show that small fluctuations around the AdS vacuum of the model are non-tachyonic and ghost free within certain range of the parameters of the model. We study central charges of the dual field theory and observe that in this range they are positive too. This suggests that the proposed model might be a consistent three dimensional bi-gravity.

  14. Massive spin-2 fields of geometric origin in curved spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, V. P.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2009-11-15

    We study the consistency of a model which includes torsion as well as the metric as dynamical fields and has massive spin-2 particle in its spectrum. It is known that this model is tachyon free and ghost free in Minkowski background. We show that this property remains valid and no other pathologies emerge in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter backgrounds, with some of our results extending to arbitrary Einstein space backgrounds. This suggests that the model is consistent, at least at the classical level, unlike, e.g., the Fierz-Pauli theory.

  15. Apsidal motion in the massive binary HD 152218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Rosu, S.; Noels, A.; Mahy, L.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Godart, M.; Dupret, M.-A.; Gosset, E.

    2016-10-01

    Massive binary systems are important laboratories in which to probe the properties of massive stars and stellar physics in general. In this context, we analysed optical spectroscopy and photometry of the eccentric short-period early-type binary HD 152218 in the young open cluster NGC 6231. We reconstructed the spectra of the individual stars using a disentangling code. The individual spectra were then compared with synthetic spectra obtained with the CMFGEN model atmosphere code. We furthermore analysed the light curve of the binary and used it to constrain the orbital inclination and to derive absolute masses of (19.8 ± 1.5) and (15.0 ± 1.1) M⊙. Combining radial velocity measurements from over 60 yr, we show that the system displays apsidal motion at a rate of (2.04+ .23-.24)° yr-1. Solving the Clairaut-Radau equation, we used stellar evolution models, obtained with the CLES code, to compute the internal structure constants and to evaluate the theoretically predicted rate of apsidal motion as a function of stellar age and primary mass. In this way, we determine an age of 5.8 ± 0.6 Myr for HD 152218, which is towards the higher end of, but compatible with, the range of ages of the massive star population of NGC 6231 as determined from isochrone fitting.

  16. Shifting from Stewardship to Analytics of Massive Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Doyle, R.; Law, E.; Hughes, S.; Huang, T.; Mahabal, A.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the analysis of large data collections is executed through traditional computational and data analysis approaches, which require users to bring data to their desktops and perform local data analysis. Data collection, archiving and analysis from future remote sensing missions, be it from earth science satellites, planetary robotic missions, or massive radio observatories may not scale as more capable instruments stress existing architectural approaches and systems due to more continuous data streams, data from multiple observational platforms, and measurements and models from different agencies. A new paradigm is needed in order to increase the productivity and effectiveness of scientific data analysis. This paradigm must recognize that architectural choices, data processing, management, analysis, etc are interrelated, and must be carefully coordinated in any system that aims to allow efficient, interactive scientific exploration and discovery to exploit massive data collections. Future observational systems, including satellite and airborne experiments, and research in climate modeling will significantly increase the size of the data requiring new methodological approaches towards data analytics where users can more effectively interact with the data and apply automated mechanisms for data reduction, reduction and fusion across these massive data repositories. This presentation will discuss architecture, use cases, and approaches for developing a big data analytics strategy across multiple science disciplines.

  17. The evolution of high-redshift massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Habouzit, Melanie; Pacucci, Fabio; Tremmel, Michael

    Massive black holes (MBHs) are nowadays recognized as integral parts of galaxy evolution. Both the approximate proportionality between MBH and galaxy mass, and the expected importance of feedback from active MBHs in regulating star formation in their host galaxies point to a strong interplay between MBHs and galaxies. MBHs must form in the first galaxies and be fed by gas in these galaxies, with continuous or intermittent inflows that, at times, can be larger than the Eddington rate. Feedback from supernovae and from the MBHs themselves modulates the growth of the first MBHs. While current observational data only probe the most massive and luminous MBHs, the tip of the iceberg, we will soon be able to test theoretical models of MBH evolution on more ``normal'' MBHs: the MBHs that are indeed relevant in building the population that we observe in local galaxies, including our own Milky Way.

  18. Solving mazes with memristors: A massively parallel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2011-10-01

    Solving mazes is not just a fun pastime: They are prototype models in several areas of science and technology. However, when maze complexity increases, their solution becomes cumbersome and very time consuming. Here, we show that a network of memristors—resistors with memory—can solve such a nontrivial problem quite easily. In particular, maze solving by the network of memristors occurs in a massively parallel fashion since all memristors in the network participate simultaneously in the calculation. The result of the calculation is then recorded into the memristors’ states and can be used and/or recovered at a later time. Furthermore, the network of memristors finds all possible solutions in multiple-solution mazes and sorts out the solution paths according to their length. Our results demonstrate not only the application of memristive networks to the field of massively parallel computing, but also an algorithm to solve mazes, which could find applications in different fields.

  19. Cosmological perturbations in massive gravity and the Higuchi bound

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2012-11-01

    In de Sitter spacetime there exists an absolute minimum for the mass of a spin-2 field set by the Higuchi bound m{sup 2} ≥ 2H{sup 2}. We generalize this bound to arbitrary spatially flat FRW geometries in the context of the recently proposed ghost-free models of Massive Gravity with an FRW reference metric, by performing a Hamiltonian analysis for cosmological perturbations. We find that the bound generically indicates that spatially flat FRW solutions in FRW massive gravity, which exhibit a Vainshtein mechanism in the background as required by consistency with observations, imply that the helicity zero mode is a ghost. In contradistinction to previous works, the tension between the Higuchi bound and the Vainshtein mechanism is equally strong regardless of the equation of state for matter.

  20. The massive star population of Cygnus OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Nicholas J.; Drew, Janet E.; Mohr-Smith, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We have compiled a significantly updated and comprehensive census of massive stars in the nearby Cygnus OB2 association by gathering and homogenizing data from across the literature. The census contains 169 primary OB stars, including 52 O-type stars and 3 Wolf-Rayet stars. Spectral types and photometry are used to place the stars in a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, which is compared to both non-rotating and rotating stellar evolution models, from which stellar masses and ages are calculated. The star formation history and mass function of the association are assessed, and both are found to be heavily influenced by the evolution of the most massive stars to their end states. We find that the mass function of the most massive stars is consistent with a `universal' power-law slope of Γ = 1.3. The age distribution inferred from stellar evolutionary models with rotation and the mass function suggest the majority of star formation occurred more or less continuously between 1 and 7 Myr ago, in agreement with studies of low- and intermediate-mass stars in the association. We identify a nearby young pulsar and runaway O-type star that may have originated in Cyg OB2 and suggest that the association has already seen its first supernova. Finally we use the census and mass function to calculate the total mass of the association of 16 500^{+3800}_{-2800} M⊙, at the low end, but consistent with, previous estimates of the total mass of Cyg OB2. Despite this Cyg OB2 is still one of the most massive groups of young stars known in our Galaxy making it a prime target for studies of star formation on the largest scales.

  1. Isospin Symmetry Breaking within the HLS Model: A Full (rho, omega, phi) Mixing Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B

    2001-07-16

    We study the way isospin symmetry violation can be generated within the Hidden Local Symmetry (HLS) Model. We show that isospin symmetry breaking effects on pseudoscalar mesons naturally induces correspondingly effects within the physics of vector mesons, through kaon loops. In this way, one recovers all features traditionally expected from {rho}-{omega} mixing and one finds support for the Orsay phase modeling of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} amplitude. We then examine an effective procedure which generates mixing in the whole {rho}, {omega}, {phi} sector of the HLS Model. The corresponding model allows us to account for all two body decays of light mesons accessible to the HLS model in modulus and phase, leaving aside the {rho} {yields} {pi}{pi} and K* {yields} K{pi} modes only, which raise a specific problem. Comparison with experimental data is performed and covers modulus and phase information; this represents 26 physics quantities successfully described with very good fit quality within a constrained model which accounts for SU(3) breaking, nonet symmetry breaking in the pseudoscalar sector and, now, isospin symmetry breaking.

  2. Satellite galaxies: the infalling pieces of the puzzle of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mármol-Queraltó, E.

    2013-05-01

    Accretion of minor satellites has been postulated as the most likely mechanism to explain the significant size evolution of the massive galaxies over cosmic time. A direct way of probing this scenario is to measure the frequency of satellites around massive galaxies at different redshifts. In this contribution, I present the study that we have performed to search for satellites around 629 massive ({M}_* ˜ 10^{11} {M}_{⊙}) galaxies up to z˜2 from the near-infrared Palomar/DEEP-2 survey. We find that the fraction of massive galaxies with satellites remains basically constant and close to 30% for satellites with a mass ratio down to 1:100 up to z=1, and ˜15% for satellites with a 1:10 mass ratio up to z=2. In addition, at low redshift the satellites are, in average, 1.5 Gyr younger than the massive galaxies that host them. In the minor merging model, this rejuvenated material is likely to be placed in the outskirts of the massive objects, and negative age gradients should be observed in local massive galaxies. Hence, this work gives new clues to explore the minor merging scenario from the study of nearby galaxies.

  3. A comparison of evolutionary tracks for single Galactic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Palacios, A.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars is not fully understood. The relation between different types of evolved massive stars is not clear, and the role of factors such as binarity, rotation or magnetism needs to be quantified. Aims: Several groups make available the results of 1D single stellar evolution calculations in the form of evolutionary tracks and isochrones. They use different stellar evolution codes for which the input physics and its implementation varies. In this paper, we aim at comparing the currently available evolutionary tracks for massive stars. We focus on calculations aiming at reproducing the evolution of Galactic stars. Our main goal is to highlight the uncertainties on the predicted evolutionary paths. Methods: We compute stellar evolution models with the codes MESA and STAREVOL. We compare our results with those of four published grids of massive stellar evolution models (Geneva, STERN, Padova and FRANEC codes). We first investigate the effects of overshooting, mass loss, metallicity, chemical composition. We subsequently focus on rotation. Finally, we compare the predictions of published evolutionary models with the observed properties of a large sample of Galactic stars. Results: We find that all models agree well for the main sequence evolution. Large differences in luminosity and temperatures appear for the post main sequence evolution, especially in the cool part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Depending on the physical ingredients, tracks of different initial masses can overlap, rendering any mass estimate doubtful. For masses between 7 and 20 M⊙, we find that the main sequence width is slightly too narrow in the Geneva models including rotation. It is (much) too wide for the (STERN) FRANEC models. This conclusion is reached from the investigation of the HR diagram and from the evolution of the surface velocity as a function of surface gravity. An overshooting parameter α between 0.1 and 0.2 in models with rotation is

  4. Multigrid on massively parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D; Jones, J E

    1999-09-17

    The scalable implementation of multigrid methods for machines with several thousands of processors is investigated. Parallel performance models are presented for three different structured-grid multigrid algorithms, and a description is given of how these models can be used to guide implementation. Potential pitfalls are illustrated when moving from moderate-sized parallelism to large-scale parallelism, and results are given from existing multigrid codes to support the discussion. Finally, the use of mixed programming models is investigated for multigrid codes on clusters of SMPs.

  5. Dark matter via massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the existence of relativistic models for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity, used here to reproduce the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) at galactic scales. For this purpose we consider two different species of dark matter particles that separately couple to the two metrics of bigravity. These two sectors are linked together via an internal U (1 ) vector field, and some effective composite metric built out of the two metrics. Among possible models only certain classes of kinetic and interaction terms are allowed without invoking ghost degrees of freedom. Along these lines we explore the number of allowed kinetic terms in the theory and point out the presence of ghosts in a previous model. Finally, we propose a promising class of ghost-free candidate theories that could provide the MOND phenomenology at galactic scales while reproducing the standard cold dark matter model at cosmological scales.

  6. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  7. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) and 1.3 mm continuum survey of 32 high-mass surface density regions of seven infrared dark clouds, with the aim of finding massive starless cores that may form the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C18O(2-1), DCN(3-2), and DCO+(3-2). Over 100 {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm, based on connected structures in position–velocity space. The most massive core has ∼ 70 {M}ȯ (potentially ∼ 170 {M}ȯ ) and so may be representative of the initial conditions or early stages of massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores with strongest {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) line emission, finding results that are generally consistent with virial equilibrium of pressure confined cores.

  8. Impact of massive neutrinos on the nonlinear matter power spectrum.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Takada, Masahiro; Taruya, Atsushi

    2008-05-16

    We present the first attempt to analytically study the nonlinear matter power spectrum for a mixed dark matter model containing neutrinos of total mass ~0.1 eV, based on cosmological perturbation theory. The suppression in the power spectrum amplitudes due to massive neutrinos is enhanced in the weakly nonlinear regime. We demonstrate that, thanks to this enhanced effect, the use of such a nonlinear model may enable a precision of sigma(m(nu,tot)) ~ 0.07 eV in constraining the total neutrino mass for the planned galaxy redshift survey, a factor of 2 improvement compared to the linear regime.

  9. Discussion on massive gravitons and propagating torsion in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaski, C. A.; Vargas-Paredes, A. A.; Helayeel-Neto, J. A.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we reassess a particular R{sup 2}-type gravity action in D dimensions, recently studied by Nakasone and Oda, now taking torsion effects into account. Considering that the vielbein and the spin connection carry independent propagating degrees of freedom, we conclude that ghosts and tachyons are absent only if torsion is nonpropagating, and we also conclude that there is no room for massive gravitons. To include these excitations, we understand how to enlarge Nakasone-Oda's model by means of explicit torsion terms in the action and we discuss the unitarity of the enlarged model for arbitrary dimensions.

  10. Environment and Structure of Massive Central Galaxies through the Eye of Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song; HSC Survey Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Although the environmental dependence of structures for massive central galaxies is predicted by the promising hierarchical assembly model, observations at low redshift seem to find no convincing evidence of that. With the help of deep i-band images of a large sample of massive central galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.5 from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we map their stellar mass distributions out to radius larger than 100 kpc, and discover subtle, but systematic and robust structural differences that depend on halo mass. At fixed stellar mass within 100 kpc, the massive central galaxies in more massive (M_{200,c} > 1.6x10^14 M_sun$) halos have a slightly flattened inner profile within ~15-20 kpc, and a more prominent outer envelope compared to ones in less massive (M_{200,c} < 8.7\\x10^13 M_sun) halos. For centrals with M_* > 10^11.5 M_sun, the ones in more massive halos show very significant excess of mass in the outskirt when the two samples are matched using proxies of mass assembled at z > 1. Such differences are broadly consistent with richer recent merging history for more massive halos. We suggest that the relation between total stellar mass and mass within inner 5 or 10 kpc is potentially interesting for diagnosing the role played by host halo in shaping the structures of massive central galaxies. These results also highlight the importance of deep photometry and the usage of detailed structural information in the study of the assembly history of galaxies. We also show that the radial profiles of ellipticity and optical color, along with the preliminary weak lensing signals will enable us gain more insights about the evolution of massive galaxies.

  11. 3D seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.

    1997-02-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is a key to reducing the risk and cost associated with oil and gas exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive. Datasets can be terabytes in size, and the processing time required for the multiple iterations needed to produce a velocity model can take months, even with the massively parallel computers available today. Some algorithms, such as 3D, finite-difference, prestack, depth migration remain beyond the capacity of production seismic processing. Massively parallel processors (MPPs) and algorithms research are the tools that will enable this project to provide new seismic processing capabilities to the oil and gas industry. The goals of this work are to (1) develop finite-difference algorithms for 3D, prestack, depth migration; (2) develop efficient computational approaches for seismic imaging and for processing terabyte datasets on massively parallel computers; and (3) develop a modular, portable, seismic imaging code.

  12. High Resolution Studies of Mass Loss from Massive Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richardson, Noel; Madura, Thomas; Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Teodoro, Mairan; Nichols, Joy S.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss from hot luminous single and binary stars has a significant, perhaps decisive, effect on their evolution. The combination of X-ray observations of hot shocked gas embedded in the stellar winds and high-resolution optical/UV spectra of the cooler mass in the outflow provides unique ways to study the unstable process by which massive stars lose mass both through continuous stellar winds and rare, impulsive, large-scale mass ejections. The ability to obtain coordinated observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) and the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and other X-ray observatories has allowed, for the first time, studies of resolved line emisssion over the temperature range of 104- 108K, and has provided observations to confront numerical dynamical models in three dimensions. Such observations advance our knowledge of mass-loss asymmetries, spatial and temporal variabilities, and the fundamental underlying physics of the hot shocked outflow, providing more realistic constraints on the amount of mass lost by different luminous stars in a variety of evolutionary stages. We discuss the impact that these joint observational studies have had on our understanding of dynamical mass outflows from massive stars, with particular emphasis on two important massive binaries, Delta Ori Aa, a linchpin of the mass luminosity relation for upper HRD main sequence stars, and the supermassive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae.

  13. NoMaDS: The Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Anne; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Barbá, R. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present the Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey (NoMaDS), a high-resolution spectroscopic campaign at the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The project aims at building the most complete and homogeneous spectroscopic database of hot, massive Galactic OB stars. NoMaDS is part of an international collaboration that combines observations from Chilean, Spanish, and Texan facilities. The contribution of NoMaDS is to complement the other sister surveys by providing high signal-to-noise echelle spectra (R=30000) of Galactic OB stars that are too faint for smaller ground-based telescopes. NoMaDS will provide a sample of about 200 stars, many of which have never been observed before at such a high resolution. Here we present the details of the survey, as well as echelle spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph since May 2011. This includes spectra of standard OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, binary systems, and oblique magnetic rotators. This survey will provide unprecedented spectroscopic database for a more accurate spectral classification, a quantitative analysis using atmosphere modeling, the detection and follow up of the orbits of massive spectroscopic binaries as well as the study of diffuse interstellar bands.

  14. The evolutionary tracks of young massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, S.; Steinhausen, M.; Vincke, K.; Menten, K.; Parmentier, G.

    2014-10-20

    Stars mostly form in groups consisting of a few dozen to several ten thousand members. For 30 years, theoretical models have provided a basic concept of how such star clusters form and develop: they originate from the gas and dust of collapsing molecular clouds. The conversion from gas to stars being incomplete, the leftover gas is expelled, leading to cluster expansion and stars becoming unbound. Observationally, a direct confirmation of this process has proved elusive, which is attributed to the diversity of the properties of forming clusters. Here we take into account that the true cluster masses and sizes are masked, initially by the surface density of the background and later by the still present unbound stars. Based on the recent observational finding that in a given star-forming region the star formation efficiency depends on the local density of the gas, we use an analytical approach combined with N-body simulations to reveal evolutionary tracks for young massive clusters covering the first 10 Myr. Just like the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is a measure for the evolution of stars, these tracks provide equivalent information for clusters. Like stars, massive clusters form and develop faster than their lower-mass counterparts, explaining why so few massive cluster progenitors are found.

  15. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram (HRD); extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a low-metallicity galaxy (Z=0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE+STIS+optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C=0.085 solar C and N=0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe. This study was supported in part by grants from NASA's ADP, HST GO-7437, and FUSE B134.

  16. The Role of Rotation in the Evolution of Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lanz, Thierry M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent evolutionary models of massive stars predict important effects of rotation including: increasing the rate of mass-loss; lowering the effective gravity; altering the evolutionary track on the HRD; extending the main-sequence phase (both on the HR diagram and in time); and mixing of CNO-processed elements up to the stellar surface. Observations suggest that rotation is a more important factor at lower metallicities because of higher initial rotational velocities and weaker winds. This makes the SMC, a low-metallicity galaxy (Z= 0.2 solar Z), an excellent environment for discerning the role of rotation in massive stars. We report on a FUSE + STIS + optical spectral analysis of 17 O-type stars in the SMC, where we found an enormous range in N abundances. Three stars in the sample have the same (low) CN abundances as the nebular material out of which they formed, namely C = 0.085 solar C and N = 0.034 solar N. However, more than half show N approx. solar N, an enrichment factor of 30X! Such unexpectedly high levels of N have ramifications for the evolution of massive stars including precursors to supernovae. They also raise questions about the sources of nitrogen in the early universe.

  17. Einstein gravity, massive gravity, multi-gravity and nonlinear realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Joyce, Austin; Trodden, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The existence of a ghost free theory of massive gravity begs for an interpre-tation as a Higgs phase of General Relativity. We revisit the study of massive gravity as a Higgs phase. Absent a compelling microphysical model of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gravity, we approach this problem from the viewpoint of nonlinear realizations. We employ the coset construction to search for the most restrictive symmetry breaking pattern whose low energy theory will both admit the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) potentials and nonlinearly realize every symmetry of General Relativity, thereby providing a new perspective from which to build theories of massive gravity. In addition to the known ghost-free terms, we find a novel parity violating interaction which preserves the constraint structure of the theory, but which vanishes on the normal branch of the theory. Finally, the procedure is extended to the cases of bi-gravity and multi-vielbein theories. Analogous parity violating interactions exist here, too, and may be non-trivial for certain classes of multi-metric theories.

  18. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  19. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  20. HST Infrared Imaging of MASSIVE Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Goullaud, Charles; Blakeslee, John; Mitchiner, Casey; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Jens

    2017-01-01

    We have recently obtained high-resolution HST WFC3/IR F110W (J-band) images of 34 early-type galaxies in the MASSIVE study sample. These galaxies are among the most massive in the local universe, and were chosen to study the connection between supermassive central black holes and their host galaxies. To determine accurate masses for the black holes, we are measuring high-precision surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distances to the galaxies. The WFC3/IR data also allow us to measure high spatial resolution central surface brightness profiles to understand better the nuclear structure and dynamics of the galaxies. We present a first look at the IR images, profiles, and SBF magnitudes for 34 galaxies in the MASSIVE sample.

  1. Gyromagnetic ratio of a massive body.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Tiomno, J.; Wald, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    It is well known that the gyromagnetic ratio (g factor) of a classical, slowly rotating body whose charge density is proportional to its mass density must be equal to unity. However, if the body is very massive, the spacetime curvature effects of general relativity become important and the result g = 1 is no longer valid. We calculate here the gyromagnetic ratio of a slowly rotating, massive shell with uniform charge density. When the shell is large compared with the Schwarzschild radius we have g = 1, but as the shell becomes more massive the g factor increases. In the limit as the shell approaches its Schwarzschild radius we obtain g approaching 2 (the same value as for an electron).

  2. Massive Particle Reflection from Moving Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarti, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the reflection of massive particles from moving mirrors. The adoption of the formalism based on the energy-momentum allowed us to derive the most general set of formulas, valid for massive and, in the limit, also for massless particles. We show that the momentum change of the reflecting particle always lies along the normal to the mirror, independent of the mirror speed. The subject is interesting not only to physicists designing concentrators for fascicles of massive particles and electron microscopes but also to computer scientists working in raytracing operating in the photon sector. The paper, far from being only theoretical, has profound and novel practical applications in both domains of engineering design and computer science.

  3. Influence of binary fraction on the fragmentation of young massive clusters—a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Sinha, Abisa; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A stochastic model has been developed to study the hierarchical fragmentation process of young massive clusters in external galaxies considering close binary components along with individual ones. Stellar masses for individual ones have been generated from truncated Pareto distribution and stellar masses for close binary components have been generated from a truncated Bi-variate Gumbel Exponential distribution. The above distribution is identified by fitting the observed bi-variate distribution of masses of eclipsing binary stars computed from the light curves catalogued in the package Binary Maker 3.0. The resulting mass spectra computed at different projected distances, show signature of mass segregation. Degree of mass segregation becomes reduced due to the inclusion of binary fraction. This might be due to the reduction of massive stars and inclusion of less massive stars rather than inclusion of single massive stars and the effect of line of sight length projected to an observer.

  4. Massively parallel computing at Sandia and its application to national defense

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Two years ago, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories showed that a massively parallel computer with 1024 processors could solve scientific problems more than 1000 times faster than a single processor. Since then, interest in massively parallel processing has increased dramatically. This review paper discusses some of the applications of this emerging technology to important problems at Sandia. Particular attention is given here to the impact of massively parallel systems on applications related to national defense. New concepts in heterogenous programming and load balancing for MIMD computers are drastically increasing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and SDI modeling capabilities. Also, researchers are showing that the current generation of massively parallel MIMD and SIMD computers are highly competitive with a CRAY on hydrodynamic and structural mechanics codes that are optimized for vector processors. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Massive Hemorrhage From Multiple Hepatic Artery Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S Lowell; McClain, Jonathan; Kaufman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    A 66-year-old man, with an abnormal porta hepatis, consistent with tumor or inflammation, developed massive bleeding from one of numerous hepatic artery aneurysms, and coil embolization achieved control of bleeding. He died of subsequent multisystem organ failure, and the most likely diagnosis was either polyarteritis nodosa or segmental arterial mediolysis. Although the dual hepatic blood supply allows a degree of arterial embolization, this case demonstrates the risks associated with large territory hepatic arterial embolization in the presence of hemodynamic instability. We discuss the management issues related to massive hepatic bleeding when no surgical approach is possible.

  6. Factors associated with massive fibrosis in silicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Chan, S L

    1991-01-01

    Data on 1432 patients with silicosis on a register in Hong Kong were analysed to examine the association of massive fibrosis with possible predisposing factors. Detailed occupational and clinical histories, clinical records, radiographic readings according to the International Standard Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses, and environmental dust measurements from hygiene surveys were used to obtain information for several variables--namely, age at first exposure, relative dust exposure level, duration of exposure, smoking, previous recorded history of tuberculosis, and background profusion of small opacities. The most significant risk factors associated with massive fibrosis were high relative dust exposure level, a history of tuberculosis, and increased background profusion of small opacities. PMID:2038729

  7. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  8. Physics of Mass Loss in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Markova, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We review potential mass-loss mechanisms in the various evolutionary stages of massive stars, from the well-known line-driven winds of O-stars and BA-supergiants to the less-understood winds of Red Supergiants. We discuss optically thick winds from Wolf-Rayet stars and Very Massive Stars, and the hypothesis of porosity-moderated, continuum-driven mass loss from stars formally exceeding the Eddington limit, which might explain the giant outbursts from Luminous Blue Variables. We finish this review with a glance on the impact of rapid rotation, magnetic fields and small-scale inhomogeneities in line-driven winds.

  9. NON-AQUEOUS DISSOLUTION OF MASSIVE PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Walsh, K.A.

    1959-05-12

    A method is presented for obtaining non-aqueous solutions or plutonium from massive forms of the metal. In the present invention massive plutonium is added to a salt melt consisting of 10 to 40 weight per cent of sodium chloride and the balance zinc chloride. The plutonium reacts at about 800 deg C with the zinc chloride to form a salt bath of plutonium trichloride, sodium chloride, and metallic zinc. The zinc is separated from the salt melt by forcing the molten mixture through a Pyrex filter.

  10. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  11. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  12. A high abundance of massive galaxies 3-6 billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Karl; Abraham, Roberto G; McCarthy, Patrick J; Savaglio, Sandra; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Crampton, David; Murowinski, Rick; Jørgensen, Inger; Roth, Kathy; Hook, Isobel; Marzke, Ronald O; Carlberg, R G

    2004-07-08

    Hierarchical galaxy formation is the model whereby massive galaxies form from an assembly of smaller units. The most massive objects therefore form last. The model succeeds in describing the clustering of galaxies, but the evolutionary history of massive galaxies, as revealed by their visible stars and gas, is not accurately predicted. Near-infrared observations (which allow us to measure the stellar masses of high-redshift galaxies) and deep multi-colour images indicate that a large fraction of the stars in massive galaxies form in the first 5 Gyr (refs 4-7), but uncertainties remain owing to the lack of spectra to confirm the redshifts (which are estimated from the colours) and the role of obscuration by dust. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic redshift survey that probes the most massive and quiescent galaxies back to an era only 3 Gyr after the Big Bang. We find that at least two-thirds of massive galaxies have appeared since this era, but also that a significant fraction of them are already in place in the early Universe.

  13. Molecular Line Emission from Massive Protostellar Disks: Predictions for ALMA and the EVLA

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2007-05-07

    We compute the molecular line emission of massive protostellar disks by solving the equation of radiative transfer through the cores and disks produced by the recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Krumholz, Klein, & McKee. We find that in several representative lines the disks show brightness temperatures of hundreds of Kelvin over velocity channels {approx} 10 km s{sup -1} wide, extending over regions hundreds of AU in size. We process the computed intensities to model the performance of next-generation radio and submillimeter telescopes. Our calculations show that observations using facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA should be able to detect massive protostellar disks and measure their rotation curves, at least in the nearest massive star-forming regions. They should also detect significant sub-structure and non-axisymmetry in the disks, and in some cases may be able to detect star-disk velocity offsets of a few km s{sup -1}, both of which are the result of strong gravitational instability in massive disks. We use our simulations to explore the strengths and weaknesses of different observational techniques, and we also discuss how observations of massive protostellar disks may be used to distinguish between alternative models of massive star formation.

  14. The massive stellar population of W49: A spectroscopic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shi-Wei; Bik, Arjan; Bestenlehner, Joachim M.; Henning, Thomas; Pasquali, Anna; Brandner, Wolfgang; Stolte, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Context. Massive stars form on different scales that range from large, dispersed OB associations to compact, dense starburst clusters. The complex structure of regions of massive star formation and the involved short timescales provide a challenge for our understanding of their birth and early evolution. As one of the most massive and luminous star-forming region in our Galaxy, W49 is the ideal place to study the formation of the most massive stars. Aims: By classifying the massive young stars that are deeply embedded in the molecular cloud of W49, we aim to investigate and trace the star formation history of this region. Methods: We analyse near-infrared K-band spectroscopic observations of W49 from LBT/LUCI combined with JHK images obtained with NTT/SOFI and LBT/LUCI. Based on JHK-band photometry and K-band spectroscopy, the massive stars are placed in a Hertzsprung Russell diagram. By comparison with evolutionary models, their age and hence the star formation history of W49 can be investigated. Results: Fourteen O-type stars, as well as two young stellar objects (YSOs), are identified by our spectroscopic survey. Eleven O stars are main sequence stars with subtypes ranging from O3 to O9.5 and masses ranging from ~20 M⊙ to ~120 M⊙. Three of the O stars show strong wind features and are considered to be Of-type supergiants with masses beyond 100 M⊙. The two YSOs show CO emission, which is indicative of the presence of circumstellar disks in the central region of the massive cluster. The age of the cluster is estimated as ~1.5 Myr, with star formation continuing in different parts of the region. The ionising photons from the central massive stars have not yet cleared the molecular cocoon surrounding the cluster. W49 is comparable to extragalactic star-forming regions, and it provides us with a unique chance to study a starburst in detail. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among

  15. Tracing the Formation and Evolution of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Roozbeh

    Massive galaxies at higher redshift, z > 2, show different characteristics than their local counterparts. They are compact and most likely have a disk. Understanding the evolutionary path of these massive galaxies can give us some clues on how the universe has been behaving in the last 10 billion years. How well can we measure the bulge and disk properties of these systems? We perform two sets of comprehensive simulations in order to systematically quantify the effects of non-homology in structures and the methods employed. For the first set of simulations, by accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. For the second set of simulations, we employ empirical scaling relations to produce realistic-looking two-component local galaxies with a uniform and wide range of bulge-to-total ratios (B/T), and then rescale them to mimic the signal-to-noise ratios and sizes of observed galaxies at z ≈ 2. This provides the first set of simulations for which we can examine the robustness of two-component decomposition of compact disk galaxies at different B/T . We can measure B/T accurately without imposing any constraints on the light profile shape of the bulge, but, due to the small angular sizes of bulges at high redshift, their detailed properties can only be recovered for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.2. The disk component, by contrast, can be measured with little difficulty. Next, we trace back the evolution of local massive galaxies but performing detailed morphological analysis: namely, single Swrsic fitting and bulge+disk decomposition. CANDELS images and catalogues offer an ideal dataset for this study. We

  16. Recent results from the STAR experiment on vector meson production in ultra peripheral AuAu collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Leszek

    2017-03-01

    In 2010, the STAR Collaboration collected a large sample of low-multiplicity triggers for ultraperipheral collision studies. We present preliminary results involving photonuclear interactions in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions (UPCs), based on an analysis of photoproduced pion pairs, from ρ0, ω and direct ππ pair production. The relative amplitudes of the three components have been measured, along with the phase angle between the ρ0 and ω0 components. The ρ0 squared momentum transfer (t) spectrum exhibits a spectrum with both coherent and incoherent production. The coherent component shows two characteristic diffraction minima, with positions that are sensitive to the hadronic radius of the gold nucleus. Using a two-year (2010 and 2011) dataset, we explore higher mass final states, and observe a ππ state roughly compatible with the ρ3(1690). Preliminary results for the J/ψ production cross section as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum pT are also presented; the dominant component at low pT demonstrates the coherent production of J/ψ of the entire Au nucleus, and a significant component at higher pT indicates incoherent production of individual nucleons within the nucleus. Future RHIC runs with polarized protons will provide the opportunity to measure J/ψ production in ultra-peripheral pp and pAu collisions. The STAR Roman Pot system will allow measurement of the final state protons. A non-zero transverse asymmetry of the produced J/ψ's would be the first measure of the nucleon helicity-flip Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD)-E for gluons, which is connected with the orbital angular momentum of gluons in the nucleon.

  17. How can young massive clusters reach their present-day sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Context. The classic question of how young massive star clusters attain the shapes and sizes, as we find them today, is still a difficult one. Both observational and computational studies of star-forming massive molecular gas clouds suggest that massive cluster formation is primarily triggered along the small-scale (≲0.3 pc) filamentary substructures within the clouds. Aims: The present study investigates the possible ways in which a filament-like, compact, massive star cluster (effective radius 0.1-0.3 pc) can expand more than 10 times, still remaining massive enough (≳ 104M⊙) to become the young massive star cluster that we observe today. Methods: To this end, model massive clusters (initially 104-105M⊙) are evolved using Sverre Aarseth's state-of-the-art N-body code NBODY7. Apart from the accurate calculation of two-body relaxation of the constituent stars, these evolutionary models take into account stellar-evolutionary mass loss and dynamical energy injection due to massive, tight primordial binaries and stellar-remnant black holes and neutron stars. These calculations also include a solar-neighbourhood-like external tidal field. All the computed clusters expand with time, and their sizes (effective radii) are compared with those observed for young massive clusters (≲ 100 Myr) in the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies. Results: In this study, it is found that beginning from the above compact sizes, a star cluster cannot expand on its own, i.e., due to two-body relaxation, stellar mass loss, and dynamical heating by primordial binaries and compact stars up to the observed sizes of young massive clusters; star clusters always remain much more compact than the observed ones. Conclusions: This calls for additional mechanisms that boost the expansion of a massive cluster after its assembly. Using further N-body calculations, it is shown that a substantial residual gas expulsion with ≈ 30% star formation efficiency can indeed swell the newborn embedded

  18. Chiral model of the nucleon: Projecting the hedgehog as a coherent state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birse, Michael C.

    1986-04-01

    The construction of baryon states with good spin and isospin is studied in a chiral model. This is a linear σ model, describing quarks interacting with pions and σ mesons. It has previously been investigated in the mean-field approximation (MFA), using the hedgehog ansatz. The ansatz corresponds to a mixture of spin-isospin eigenstates. A coherent state is used to provide a quantum description for the mesonic part of the wave function. The hedgehog baryon is projected onto states with good spin and isospin. The Peierls-Yoccoz projection is used, in analogy with the treatment of deformed nuclei. As well as N and Δ, a J=T=(5/2) baryon state is obtained. The wave functions are varied after projection. For the N and Δ, the resulting field distributions are fairly similar to those from the MFA. Various nucleon properties are calculated. These include proton and neutron charge radii, for which reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained. Results for other properties are similar to those obtained with an approximate projection method, and indicate the need to extend the present approach to include vector mesons and the effects of vacuum polarization. Comparisons are made with wave functions used in the cloudy bag and Skyrme models.

  19. Massive Open Online Courses and Economic Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu R.; Lundqvist, Karsten O.; Williams, Shirley A.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of users around the world have registered on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offered by hundreds of universities (and other organizations) worldwide. Creating and offering these courses costs thousands of pounds. However, at present, revenue generated by MOOCs is not sufficient to offset these costs. The sustainability of MOOCs is a…

  20. Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huisman, Bart; Pilli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lecture content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in…

  1. A Taxonomy of Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilli, Olga; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a new approach to distance education, which originated from the open education resources (OER) movement, are becoming widespread throughout the world. Over time, early versions of cMOOCs have undergone changes in terms of use, name and structure. In their short life, MOOCs have been categorized into different…

  2. Recovery From Giant Eruptions in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, A.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We perform radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study how very massive stars recover from giant eruptions. The post eruption star experience strong mass loss due to strong winds, driven by radial pulsations in the star*s interior, that operate by the κ-mechanism. The mass loss history obtained in our simulations resembles η Car*s history.

  3. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  4. NOTE: Circular symmetry in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Franklin, J.

    2010-05-01

    We re-derive, compactly, a topologically massive gravity (TMG) decoupling theorem: source-free TMG separates into its Einstein and Cotton sectors for spaces with a hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector, here concretely for circular symmetry. We then generalize the theorem to include matter; surprisingly, the single Killing symmetry also forces conformal invariance, requiring the sources to be null.

  5. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  6. Positivity constraints for pseudolinear massive spin-2 and vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, James; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2016-11-01

    We derive analyticity constraints on a nonlinear ghost-free effective theory of a massive spin-2 particle known as pseudolinear massive gravity, and on a generalized theory of a massive spin-1 particle, both of which provide simple IR completions of Galileon theories. For pseudolinear massive gravity we find that, unlike de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley massive gravity, there is no window of parameter space which satisfies the analyticity constraints. For massive vectors which reduce to Galileons in the decoupling limit, we find that no two-derivative actions are compatible with positivity but that higher derivative actions can be made compatible.

  7. Tachyon field non-minimally coupled to massive neutrino matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Safia; Myrzakulov, Nurgissa; Myrzakulov, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider rolling tachyon, with steep run-away type of potentials non-minimally coupled to massive neutrino matter. The coupling dynamically builds up at late times as neutrino matter turns non-relativistic. In case of scaling and string inspired potentials, we have shown that non-minimal coupling leads to minimum in the field potential. Given a suitable choice of model parameters, it is shown to give rise to late-time acceleration with the desired equation of state.

  8. Supersymmetric solutions of N = (2, 0) topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik Deger, Nihat; Moutsopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We first make a Killing spinor analysis for a general three-dimensional off-shell N=(2,0) supergravity and find conditions for a bosonic background to preserve at least one real supercharge. We then consider a particular model, namely N=(2,0) topologically massive supergravity and impose its field equations. By making a suitable ansatz on metric functions we find a large class of solutions that include spacelike, timelike and null warped AdS 3 among others. Isometric quotients of spacelike and timelike squashed AdS 3 solutions yield extremal black holes without closed causal curves.

  9. Massive Star Formation in the Cygnus-X DR15 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Anna; Hora, Joseph L.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-01-01

    To unravel the mysteries of massive star formation it is necessary to observe Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in a variety of environments and evolutionary stages. The Cygnus-X region, at a distance of 1.4kpc, is one of the closest massive star-forming complexes and so offers an excellent view of the earliest stages of massive stars and clusters. A key area in this complex is DR15, a cluster population with many intriguing objects including a molecular pillar and InfraRed Dark Cloud (IRDC) that is likely to host newly forming massive stars. Previous infrared studies incorporating data from Spitzer and Herschel have built catalogs of YSOs in the DR15 region, revealing its abundance of massive star formation. To improve on these catalogs and to probe the earliest stages of star formation, we have observed the region at high spatial resolution using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA data are more sensitive to objects in earlier evolutionary phases and provide additional constraints when modeling the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of each star, resulting in more accurate values for each star’s mass and accretion rate. The SMA data allow us to trace the particular YSOs that are actively accreting and drive molecular outflows, which influence the ISM and chemical trends across the region. DR15 offers an exciting chance to expand our understanding of the processes behind massive star formation.

  10. The formation and gravitational-wave detection of massive stellar black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cantiello, Matteo; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ilya; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-07-10

    If binaries consisting of two ∼100 M{sub ☉} black holes exist, they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z ∼ 2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several ≳ 150 M{sub ☉} stars in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black hole-black hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black hole-black hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.

  11. Nucleosynthesis of Short-lived Radioactivities in Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.

    2004-01-01

    A leading model for the source of many of the short-lived radioactivities in the early solar nebula is direct incorporation from a massive star [1]. A recent and promising incarnation of this model includes an injection mass cut, which is a boundary between the stellar ejecta that become incorporated into the solar cloud and those ejecta that do not [2-4]. This model also includes a delay time between ejection from the star and incorporation into early solar system solid bodies. While largely successful, this model requires further validation and comparison against data. Such evaluation becomes easier if we have a better sense of the nature of the synthesis of the various radioactivities in the star. That is the goal of this brief abstract.

  12. Introduction to the physics of the total cross section at LHC. A review of data and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheri, Giulia; Srivastava, Yogendra N.

    2017-03-01

    This review describes the development of the physics of hadronic cross sections up to recent LHC results and cosmic ray experiments. We present here a comprehensive review - written with a historical perspective - about total cross sections from medium to the highest energies explored experimentally and studied through a variety of methods and theoretical models for over 60 years. We begin by recalling the analytic properties of the elastic amplitude and the theorems about the asymptotic behavior of the total cross section. A discussion of how proton-proton cross sections are extracted from cosmic rays at higher than accelerator energies and help the study of these asymptotic limits, is presented. This is followed by a description of the advent of particle colliders, through which high energies and unmatched experimental precisions have been attained. Thus the measured hadronic elastic and total cross sections have become crucial instruments to probe the so called soft part of QCD physics, where quarks and gluons are confined, and have led to test and refine Regge behavior and a number of diffractive models. As the c.m. energy increases, the total cross section also probes the transition into hard scattering describable with perturbative QCD, the so-called mini-jet region. Further tests are provided by cross section measurements of γ p, γ ^* p and γ ^* γ ^* for models based on vector meson dominance, scaling limits of virtual photons at high Q^2 and the BFKL formalism. Models interpolating from virtual to real photons are also tested.

  13. Learning Quantitative Sequence-Function Relationships from Massively Parallel Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwal, Gurinder S.; Kinney, Justin B.

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental aspect of biological information processing is the ubiquity of sequence-function relationships—functions that map the sequence of DNA, RNA, or protein to a biochemically relevant activity. Most sequence-function relationships in biology are quantitative, but only recently have experimental techniques for effectively measuring these relationships been developed. The advent of such "massively parallel" experiments presents an exciting opportunity for the concepts and methods of statistical physics to inform the study of biological systems. After reviewing these recent experimental advances, we focus on the problem of how to infer parametric models of sequence-function relationships from the data produced by these experiments. Specifically, we retrace and extend recent theoretical work showing that inference based on mutual information, not the standard likelihood-based approach, is often necessary for accurately learning the parameters of these models. Closely connected with this result is the emergence of "diffeomorphic modes"—directions in parameter space that are far less constrained by data than likelihood-based inference would suggest. Analogous to Goldstone modes in physics, diffeomorphic modes arise from an arbitrarily broken symmetry of the inference problem. An analytically tractable model of a massively parallel experiment is then described, providing an explicit demonstration of these fundamental aspects of statistical inference. This paper concludes with an outlook on the theoretical and computational challenges currently facing studies of quantitative sequence-function relationships.

  14. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    measurement of the local star formation rate per gas mass surface density in the Milky Way, as well as examining arm versus interarm dependencies. Methods and Techniques: We will primarily use archival cryogenic-Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel data, and support this with existing data from ground- and space-based facilities, to conduct a comprehensive assay of critical metrics (as above) and provide observational calibration of theoretical models over the entire massive star formation process. The mm-wave molecular maps of 303 dense gas clumps in multiple species, comprising all the gas above a column density limit of 100 Msun/pc^2, are already inhand. We have also surveyed the embedded stellar content of these clumps, down to subsolar masses, in the near-infrared J, H, and K bands and with deep Warm Spitzer data. Relevance to NASA programs: Analysis to date of the space- and ground-based data has yielded several new insights into evolutionary timescales and the chemical & energy evolution of clumps during the cluster formation process. Investigations as described in this proposal will yield new demographic insights on how the properties and evolution of molecular clouds relate to the properties of massive stars and clusters that form within them, and significantly enhance the science return from these spacecraft missions. The large number of resulting data products are already being made publicly available to the astronomical community, providing crucial information for future NASA science targets. This research will be performed within the framework of a broad international collaboration spanning four continents. This ambitious but practical program will therefore maximise the science payoff from these archival data sets, provide enhanced legacy data for more advanced studies with the next generation of ground- and space-based instruments such as JWST, and open up several new windows into the discovery space of Galactic star formation & interstellar medium studies.

  15. Decay constants and radiative decays of heavy mesons in light-front quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the magnetic dipole decays V{yields}P{gamma} of various heavy-flavored mesons such as (D,D*,D{sub s},D{sub s}*,{eta}{sub c},J/{psi}) and (B,B*,B{sub s},B{sub s}*,{eta}{sub b},{upsilon}) using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian. The momentum dependent form factors F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}) for V{yields}P{gamma}* decays are obtained in the q{sup +}=0 frame and then analytically continued to the timelike region by changing q{sub perpendicular} to iq{sub perpendicular} in the form factors. The coupling constant g{sub VP{gamma}} for real photon case is then obtained in the limit as q{sup 2}{yields}0, i.e. g{sub VP{gamma}}=F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}=0). The weak decay constants of heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons are also calculated. Our numerical results for the decay constants and radiative decay widths for the heavy-flavored mesons are overall in good agreement with the available experimental data as well as other theoretical model calculations.

  16. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  17. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  18. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  19. Massively Parallel Algorithms for Solution of Schrodinger Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Barhen, Jacob; Toomerian, Nikzad

    1994-01-01

    In this paper massively parallel algorithms for solution of Schrodinger equation are developed. Our results clearly indicate that the Crank-Nicolson method, in addition to its excellent numerical properties, is also highly suitable for massively parallel computation.

  20. Massive ovarian edema, due to adjacent appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Callen, Andrew L; Illangasekare, Tushani; Poder, Liina

    2017-04-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a benign clinical entity, the imaging findings of which can mimic an adnexal mass or ovarian torsion. In the setting of acute abdominal pain, identifying massive ovarian edema is a key in avoiding potential fertility-threatening surgery in young women. In addition, it is important to consider other contributing pathology when ovarian edema is secondary to another process. We present a case of a young woman presenting with subacute abdominal pain, whose initial workup revealed marked enlarged right ovary. Further imaging, diagnostic tests, and eventually diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that the ovarian enlargement was secondary to subacute appendicitis, rather than a primary adnexal process. We review the classic ultrasound and MRI imaging findings and pitfalls that relate to this diagnosis.

  1. Superdense massive galaxies in the nearby universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    At high-z the most superdense massive galaxies are supposed to be the result of gas-rich mergers resulting in compact remnant (Khochfar & Silk (2006); Naab et al. (2007)). After this, dry mergers are expected to be the mechanism that moves these very massive galaxies towards the current stellar mass size relation. Whitin these merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the past universe.Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (DR6), we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re ≤ 1.5 kpc and M* ≥ 8x1010M⊙ in the local Universe (z~0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2Gyr) and metal rich ([Z/H]~0.2) These results have been published in Trujillo et al. (2009)

  2. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  3. Stable FLRW solutions in generalized massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia; Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2014-12-01

    We present exact Friedmann Lemaítre Robertson Walkers (FLRW) solutions in generalized massive gravity where the mass parameters are naturally promoted to Lorentz-invariant functions of the Stückelberg fields. This new dependence relaxes the constraint that would otherwise prevent massive gravity from possessing exact FLRW solutions. It does so without the need to introduce additional degrees of freedom. We find self-accelerating cosmological solutions and show that, with a mild restriction on the region of phase space, these cosmological solutions exhibit full stability, i.e. absence of ghosts and gradient instabilities for all the tensor, vector and scalar modes, for all cosmic time. We perform the full decoupling limit analysis, including vector degrees of freedom, which can be used to confirm the existence of an active Vainshtein mechanism about these solutions.

  4. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  5. Massively Parallel Computing: A Sandia Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Sudip S.; Greenberg, David S.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Heroux, Michael A.; Plimpton, Steve J.; Tomkins, James L.; Womble, David E.

    1999-05-06

    The computing power available to scientists and engineers has increased dramatically in the past decade, due in part to progress in making massively parallel computing practical and available. The expectation for these machines has been great. The reality is that progress has been slower than expected. Nevertheless, massively parallel computing is beginning to realize its potential for enabling significant break-throughs in science and engineering. This paper provides a perspective on the state of the field, colored by the authors' experiences using large scale parallel machines at Sandia National Laboratories. We address trends in hardware, system software and algorithms, and we also offer our view of the forces shaping the parallel computing industry.

  6. Bipartite entanglement entropy in massive two-dimensional quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2009-01-23

    Recently, Cardy, Castro Alvaredo, and the author obtained the first exponential correction to saturation of the bipartite entanglement entropy at large region lengths in massive two-dimensional integrable quantum field theory. It depends only on the particle content of the model, and not on the way particles scatter. Based on general analyticity arguments for form factors, we propose that this result is universal, and holds for any massive two-dimensional model (also out of integrability). We suggest a link of this result with counting pair creations far in the past.

  7. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' Multiplication-Sign 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of {approx}20-70 pixel{sup -1} in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} > 150 km s{sup -1}, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by {approx}50%, and only a weak correlation between {sigma}{sub *} and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are {approx} an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 R{sub e} , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high {alpha}-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  8. Massive Multi-Agent Systems Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campagne, Jean-Charles; Gardon, Alain; Collomb, Etienne; Nishida, Toyoaki

    2004-01-01

    In order to build massive multi-agent systems, considered as complex and dynamic systems, one needs a method to analyze and control the system. We suggest an approach using morphology to represent and control the state of large organizations composed of a great number of light software agents. Morphology is understood as representing the state of the multi-agent system as shapes in an abstract geometrical space, this notion is close to the notion of phase space in physics.

  9. Are All Magnetic White Dwarf Stars Massive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Kulebi, B.; Koester, D.; Kleinman, S. J.; Winget, D. E.; Castanheira, B. G.; Corsico, A. H.

    2017-03-01

    We obtained follow-up spectra on 25 white dwarf stars identified in our white dwarf catalog of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as massive or magnetic. We identified over 300 magnetic white dwarf stars from SDSS with some uncertainties due to the low S/N of the spectra. With much higher S/N Gemini data, our sample should be able to help us confirm accuracy of our determinations. We present here our results so far from the follow up observations.

  10. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  11. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  12. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors.

  13. The Stellar Halos of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' × 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of ~20-70 pixel-1 in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions σ* > 150 km s-1, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by ~50%, and only a weak correlation between σ* and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are ~ an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 Re , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high α-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  14. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  15. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Antonio De; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-15

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  16. Efficient discovery of overlapping communities in massive networks

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, Prem K.; Blei, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting overlapping communities is essential to analyzing and exploring natural networks such as social networks, biological networks, and citation networks. However, most existing approaches do not scale to the size of networks that we regularly observe in the real world. In this paper, we develop a scalable approach to community detection that discovers overlapping communities in massive real-world networks. Our approach is based on a Bayesian model of networks that allows nodes to participate in multiple communities, and a corresponding algorithm that naturally interleaves subsampling from the network and updating an estimate of its communities. We demonstrate how we can discover the hidden community structure of several real-world networks, including 3.7 million US patents, 575,000 physics articles from the arXiv preprint server, and 875,000 connected Web pages from the Internet. Furthermore, we demonstrate on large simulated networks that our algorithm accurately discovers the true community structure. This paper opens the door to using sophisticated statistical models to analyze massive networks. PMID:23950224

  17. Simulating the Birth of Massive Star Clusters: Is Destruction Inevitable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Very early in its operation, the Hubble Space Telescope {HST} opened an entirely new frontier: study of the demographics and properties of star clusters far beyond the Milky Way. However, interpretation of HST's observations has proven difficult, and has led to the development of two conflicting models. One view is that most massive star clusters are disrupted during their infancy by feedback from newly formed stars {i.e., "infant mortality"}, independent of cluster mass or environment. The other model is that most star clusters survive their infancy and are disrupted later by mass-dependent dynamical processes. Since observations at present have failed to discriminate between these views, we propose a theoretical investigation to provide new insight. We will perform radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive star clusters, including for the first time a realistic treatment of the most important stellar feedback processes. These simulations will elucidate the physics of stellar feedback, and allow us to determine whether cluster disruption is mass-dependent or -independent. We will also use our simulations to search for observational diagnostics that can distinguish bound from unbound clusters, and to predict how cluster disruption affects the cluster luminosity function in a variety of galactic environments.

  18. Core Collapse and Then? The Route to Massive Star Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas; Buras, Robert; Kifonidis, Konstantinos; Plewa, Tomek; Rampp, Markus

    The rapidly growing base of observational data for supernova explosions of massive stars demands theoretical explanations. Central to these is a self-consistent model for the physical mechanism that provides the energy to start and drive the disruption of the star. We give arguments why the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism should still be regarded as the standard paradigm to explain most explosions of massive stars and show how large-scale and even global asymmetries can result as a natural consequence of convective overturn in the neutrino-heating region behind the supernova shock. Since the explosion is a threshold phenomenon and depends sensitively on the efficiency of the energy transfer by neutrinos, even relatively minor differences in numerical simulations can matter on the secular timescale of the delayed mechanism. To enhance this point, we present some results of recent one- and two-dimensional computations, which we have performed with a Boltzmann solver for the neutrino transport and a state-of-the-art description of neutrino-matter interactions. Although our most complete models fail to explode, the simulations demonstrate that one is encouragingly close to the critical threshold because a modest variation of the neutrino transport in combination with postshock convection leads to a weak neutrino-driven explosion with properties that fulfill important requirements from observations.

  19. Massive star formation at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-05-01

    This thesis studies the early phases of massive stars and their impact on the surrounding. The capabilities of continuum radiative transfer (RT) codes to interpret the observations are also investigated. The main results of this work are: 1) Two massive star-forming regions are observed in the infrared. The thermal emission from the ultra-compact H II regions is resolved and the spectral type of the ionizing stars is estimated. The hot cores are not detected thus implying line-of-sight extinction larger than 200 visual magnitude. 2) The first mid-infrared interferometric measurements towards a young massive star resolve thermal emission on scales of 30-50 AU probing the size of the predicted disk. The visibility curve differs from those of intermediate-mass stars. 3) The close vicinity of Θ1C Ori are imaged using the NACO adaptive optics system. The binary proplyd Orion 168-326 and its interaction with the wind from Θ1C Ori are resolved. A proplyd uniquely seen face-on is also identified. 4) Five RT codes are compared in a disk configuration. The solutions provide the first 2D benchmark and serve to test the reliability of other RT codes. The images/visibilities from two RT codes are compared for a distorted disk. The parameter range in which such a distortion is detectable with MIDI is explored.

  20. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, L.; Ellerbroek, L.; Ochsendorf, B.; Bik, A.

    2012-12-01

    The birth process and (early) evolution of massive stars is still poorly understood. Heavy extinction hides their birthplaces from view and the short formation timescale limits the sample of objects to be studied. So far, our physical knowledge of massive YSOs has been derived from near-IR imaging and spectroscopy, revealing populations of young OB-type stars, some still surrounded by a disk, others apparently ‘normal’ main sequence stars powering H II regions. The most important spectral features of OB-type stars are, however, located in the UV and optical range. With the new optical/near-infrared spectrograph X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope it is possible to extend the spectral coverage of these massive YSOs into the optical range. Our first results are very promising: the discovery of a jet demonstrates that one of our mYSOs is still actively accreting. Furthermore, the first firm spectral classification of another mYSO results in the precise location on a pre-main-sequence track.