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Sample records for mast cell-depleted rats

  1. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Daniël; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Wezel, Anouk; Launay, Pierre; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Bot, Ilze; Stoop, Jeroen N

    2016-06-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

  2. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  3. Early changes of graft function, cytokines and superoxide dismutase serum levels after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in a rat-to-rat liver transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Marco, Catena; Gianfranco, Ferla

    2009-04-01

    Hepatic reperfusion injury may cause acute inflammatory damage, producing significant organ dysfunction, and is an important problem in liver transplantation. This experiment aimed to study early changes of hepatic function after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in rat-to-rat liver transplantation and to evaluate the effect of pre-treatment on liver reperfusion injury. Donor rats were divided into four groups: control group; group G was pre-treated with gadolinium chloride (G), an inhibitor of Kupffer cells; group H with hexamethonium (H), a sympathetic ganglionic blocking agent; and group HG, with combined H and G pre-treatment. Under the same conditions, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), arterial ketone body ratio (AKBR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of recipient rats were assessed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after liver transplantation. Histological studies of the grafts were compared. HG pre-treatment significantly decreased ALT, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 levels, increased AKBR and SOD levels, and demonstrated less pathological damage at 8, 16 and 24 hours compared with the control group. Similar trends were also found in the other groups (G and H). However, the differences among them were not significant at 4 post-operative hours. Donor denervation and Kupffer cell depletion had preventive effect on liver reperfusion injury. HG pre-treatment is a feasible and reproducible method to protect grafts from reperfusion injury.

  4. High plasma levels of arginine and liver arginase in Kupffer-cell-depleted rats after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Prins, H A; Meijer, C; Nijveldt, R J; Wiezer, M J; van Leeuwen, P A

    2000-03-01

    The remnant liver after partial hepatectomy releases arginase into the plasma, which is a reliable indicator of hepatocellular damage. Little information is available on how this release affects arginine plasma levels. We hypothesized that Kupffer cells after partial hepatectomy may prevent further hepatocellular damage, contributing to lower arginase release. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of Kupffer cells in plasma arginase activity and arginine plasma levels after partial hepatectomy. Wag/Rij rats (n=72, 250-275 g) were randomly assigned to receive 1 ml liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene-diphosphonate in order to eliminate Kupffer cells (DMDP, n=24), 1 ml liposome encapsulated-phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n=24) or 1 ml NaCl 0.9% (NaCl, n=24) intravenously. Forty-eight hours later, all rats had a two-third liver resection. Rats were killed at 0, 24, 48 and 96 h after partial hepatectomy. Arginase plasma activity was higher in the DMDP-treated group compared to NaCl and PBS (both p<0.01, p<0.05, p<0.01 and p<0.05 for 0, 24, 48 and 96 h after partial hepatectomy respectively). Arginine plasma levels increased, but were lower in the DMDP group compared to NaCl and PBS (both p<0.05, 24 h after hepatectomy). The study showed that Kupffer cell depletion results in a higher arginase release from the remnant liver after partial hepatectomy, indicating a hepatocellular protective function of Kupffer cells. Despite this arginase release, arginine plasma levels were increased after partial hepatectomy.

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis and phospholipid metabolism in rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid in mast cell response to antigen was investigated using an isolated rat serosal mast cell model. The cells were incubated with monoclonal murine immunoglobulin E to the dinitrophenyl hapten and prelabeled with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate or /sup 3/H-fatty acids. Lysophosphatidic acid was isolated form cell extracts by 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, and the incorporated radioactivity was assessed by liquid scintillation counting. Lysophosphatidic acid labeling with /sup 32/P was increased 2-4 fold within 5 minutes after the addition of antigen or three other mast cell agonists. Functional group analyses unequivocally showed that the labeled compound was lysophosphatidic acid. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis was dependent on the activity of diacylglycerol lipase, suggesting formation from monoacylglycerol. In addition, the studies of lysophosphatidic acid synthesis suggest that the addition of antigen to mast cells may initiate more than one route of phospholipid degradation and resynthesis. Whatever the origin of lysophosphatidic acid, the results of this study demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid synthesis is stimulated by a variety of mast cell agonists. Dose-response, kinetic, and pharmacologic studies showed close concordance between histamine release and lysophosphatidic acid labeling responses. These observations provide strong evidence that lysophosphatidic acid plays an important role in mast cell activation.

  6. Effect of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Yasutake, A.; Aramai, R.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Methylmercury is the well-known neurotoxicant as weil as a modulator of the immune system. We investigated the effects of MeHg on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by nonimmunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. In 8, 12 and 15 days afterthe final administration of MeHg we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187-and 48/80-induced histamine release, which enhanced with time. In experiments in vitro incubation of peritoneal mast cells with MeHg alone in the dose range 10^{-8} to 10^{-6} did not induce mast cell degranulation, however modified the activation of mast cells by compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187. We observed activation of stimulated secretion by preliminary incubation with low dose of MeHg 10^{-8} M and inhibition by dose of MeHg 10^{-6} M. These results show that MeHg treatment can modify mast cell function in vivo and in vitro and provide insight into the understanding what role this cell has in the pathogenesis of Minamata disease-comlected disorders.

  7. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  8. Protamine and mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, A.; Sörbo, J.; Norrby, K.

    1990-01-01

    Different doses of protamine sulphate (PS) given s.c. (at 12-h intervals) were tested for signs of non-specific toxicity measured as effect on body weight and small-gut proliferation as well as on mast-cell secretion and mast-cell-mediated mitogenesis in the mesenteric windows following i.p. injection of Compound 48/80, a potent mast cell secretagogue, in normal rats. In a non-toxic dose range, the effect of PS on mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis, effected by 48/80, was quantified as the number of vessels per mm of mesenteric window in histological sections at x 400. No intelligible dose-effect relationship was discernible between the dose of PS given and the effect on angiogenesis. Only in a tight interval, at 40 mg PS/kg but not at 20 or 60 mg PS/kg, was the angiogenesis statistically significantly suppressed. Hence, it was concluded that PS can be angiostatic but does not exert a more general angiostatic effect in the autogenous systems used. PMID:1691920

  9. Isolation and characterization of hepatic mast cells from cholestatic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Laura; Graf-Eaton, Allyson; Kennedy, Lindsey; Demieville, Jennifer; Owens, Jennifer; Hodges, Kyle; Ladd, Brittany; Francis, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are immune cells that release histamine and other mediators. MC number increases after bile duct ligation (BDL) and blocking mast cell-derived histamine decrease biliary proliferation. We aimed to isolate and characterize MCs from cholestatic livers. Rats were subjected to BDL starting at 6 hrs and up to 14 days. MC infiltration was evaluated by toluidine blue. BDL rats were perfused using standard collagenase perfusion. Following enzymatic digestion, tissue was passed through a fine gauge needle. Suspensions were incubated with MAb AA4, washed and incubated with goat anti-mouse coated Dynal® beads. MCs were stained with toluidine blue, and in isolated MCs, the expression of FCεRI and MC proteases was measured. The expression of histidine decarboxylase, histamine receptors, VEGF-receptors and TIE 1 and 2 was evaluated by qPCR. Histamine and VEGF-A secretion was measured in MC supernatants. MC purity was evaluated by CK-19, CK-8, albumin, VAP-1 and α-SMA expression. In vitro, cholangiocytes and HSCs were treated with isolated MC supernatants from BDL rats treated with either NaCl or cromolyn sodium (to block MC histamine release) and biliary proliferation and hepatic fibrosis were measured. MCs infiltrate the liver and surround bile ducts starting at day 2. We isolated a virtually pure preparation of mature, functional MCs. TEM images reveal distinct secretory granules and isolated MCs secrete histamine. MCs express FCεRI, chymase, tryptase, RMCPI and RMCPII, but were virtually void of other cell markers. Biliary proliferation and fibrosis increased following treatment with MC supernatants from BDL rats + NaCl and these parameters decreased in cells treated with MC supernatants from BDL + cromolyn sodium. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized MCs from cholestatic livers. MCs regulate cholestatic liver injury and hepatic fibrosis. This tool provides a better understanding of the paracrine influence of mast cells on biliary

  10. [³H]serotonin release assay using antigen-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with increased accumulation of mast cells. Mast cells, which are of hematopoietic lineage, and NGF appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Mast cells themselves are capable of producing and responding to NGF. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation and culture of peritoneal-derived rat mast cells, together with a [(3)H]serotonin release assay which is useful in assessing the effects of antigens and neurotrophic factors on mast-cell activation.

  11. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Incubation of /sup 125/I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 0/sup 0/C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu). Degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis.

  12. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  13. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-01-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell. Images Fig. 2 PMID:791546

  14. Pharmacologic modulation of inflammatory mediator release by rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, T. J.; Parker, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    Current knowledge of the mechanism of inflammatory mediator release from mast cells is reviewed with particular reference to the role of cyclic nucleotides and calcium and their interrelationship with one another as defined by studies in highly purified rat peritoneal mast cells. Data are presented indicating an important role for intracellular cAMP and calcium in the mediation or modulation of release, as well as evidence for a close relationship between these two regulatory systems. Releasing agents which clearly act at the level of the plasma membrane (concanavalin A and anti-IgE antibody) are shown to differ from releasing agents that may not (48/80 and the ionophore A23187) in regard to the early cellular cAMP response, dependency of the release reaction on phosphatidyl serine, and kinetics of release. Pharmacologic modulators of release are discussed; these include: PGE1 and theophylline, which raise cAMP and inhibit release; and diazoxide, adenine, and carbachol which lower cAMP and potentiate release. Adenosine was also found to enhance release with marked effects at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. PMID:63247

  15. Mast cells accumulate in the renal capsule adjacent to transplanted pancreatic islets in rats.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Jansson, Leif

    2006-12-01

    Mast cells are important mediators of normal angiogenesis, and participate in normal would healing, i.e. processes involved in pancreatic islet engraftment. The aim of the study was to evaluate if mast cells are present in islet grafts. For this purpose, male normoglycaemic Wistar-Furth rats were either untreated or syngeneically implanted with 250 islets under the renal capsule. The animals were killed 1 month later, and the kidneys and endogenous pancreas were removed, fixed and embedded in paraffin. The distribution of mast cells was studied in Alcian Blue stained sections. Mast cells were rarely encountered in endogenous islets, but were frequent in the renal capsule adjacent to islet grafts. Mast cells interspersed between graft endocrine cells were as rare as in the endogenous pancreas. We conclude that mast cells may contribute to the engraftment after islet transplantation.

  16. No attenuation of ischemic and reperfusion injury in Kupffer cell-depleted, cold-preserved rat livers.

    PubMed

    Reinders, M E; van Wagensveld, B A; van Gulik, T M; Corssmit, N P; Frederiks, W M; Chamuleau, R A; van Rooijen, N; Obertop, H

    1997-02-15

    Activated Kupffer cells (KC) have been implicated in the damage sustained by preserved liver grafts during ischemia and reperfusion. The aim of this study was to compare ischemia/reperfusion injury in preserved, KC-depleted rat livers and preserved control livers, with special regard to sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) injury. Wistar rats were injected with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, 48 hr before hepatectomy, to eliminate KC, or were withheld this pretreatment (controls). Livers were flushed with cold University of Wisconsin solution and after 0, 8, 16, or 24 hr of storage at 4 degrees C, were reperfused in a recirculation system with 200 ml of oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C for 90 min. Damage to SEC was measured by the uptake of hyaluronic acid (HA) from the perfusate and release of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Perfusate samples were, furthermore, analyzed for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Carbon particles were infused in the perfusate to determine the phagocytotic capacity of KC. Biopsies were taken for histological examination and sections were stained with ED2 monoclonal antibodies to confirm the absence of KC. After 90 min of reperfusion, immediately after cold flush (t0), the uptake of HA was 72.2+/-2.3% and 69.3+/-1.3% in KC-depleted livers and in control livers, respectively (n.s.). After 8 hr of storage, HA uptake was 21.6+/-4.5% and 34.6+/-8.0%, respectively (n.s.). After 16 and 24 hr of storage and reperfusion, no uptake of HA was found in either KC-depleted or control livers, indicating abolished SEC function. PNP activities in the perfusate were higher in control livers (after 8 and 24 hr of storage), presumably due to release from damaged KC. No difference was found in AST and no tumor necrosis factor-alpha was measured in the perfusates of normal and KC-depleted livers. Electron microscopic studies showed that after 8 and 24 hr of storage and reperfusion

  17. The effects of nonidet P40 on the function of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, K W; Stanworth, D R

    1981-01-01

    1 Treatment of purified rat peritoneal mast cells at 37 degrees C with concentrations of the non-ionic detergent nonidet P40 (NP40) up to 0.005% (v/v) failed to reduce their viability. 2 There was a marked reduction in the histamine releasing capacity of NP40-treated mast cells upon challenge with a variety of selective (adrenocorticotrophic hormone 1-24 (Synacthen), rabbit anti-rat IgE antiserum, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the calcium ionophore, A 23187) and non-selective (rabbit anti-rat mast cell antiserum plus complement) histamine liberators. 3 Nonidet P40 (0.005%) was found to reduce the activity of a mast cell membrane 'ecto-enzyme', calcium-activated ATPase, by about 45% when presented at the time of its assay.

  18. Effects of a Moderately Lower Temperature on the Proliferation and Degranulation of Rat Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Yin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiwei; Chen, Lin; Chen, Jingwen; Han, Xiaodong; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are traditionally considered as key effector cells in IgE-mediated allergic diseases. However, the roles of mast cells have also been implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells are distributed in various organs and tissues of various species. Some of the organs and tissues, such as testis, skin, and the upper part of the respiratory tract, have a temperature that is lower than the body's core temperature. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a lower temperature on the proliferation and degranulation of rat mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that cell growth was retarded at 35°C compared to 37°C for both rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) and RBL-2H3, a rat mast cell line. Furthermore, RPMC became more susceptible to degranulation at 35°C compared to 37°C. In contrast, degranulation of RBL-2H3 was not as sensitive to temperature change as RPMC. The functionality of mast cells in unique organs with a lower temperature warrants further analysis.

  19. Abolishment of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2008-02-13

    Mucosal mast cells are implicated in visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we investigated the role of mast cells in the development of visceral hypersensitivity by using mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rats and their control (W+/W+). In W+/W+ rats, an injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon. Severe mucosal necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity were observed in the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, whereas neither necrosis nor increased myeloperoxidase activity occurred in the distal colon, indicating that TNBS-induced hypersensitivity is not caused by the local tissue damage or inflammation in the region of the gut where distention stimuli were applied. On the other hand, TNBS failed to elicit visceral hypersensitivity in Ws/Ws rats. This finding indicates that mast cells are essential for development of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats. Since the severity of TNBS-induced proximal colon injury and MPO activity was not affected by mast cell deficiency, it is unlikely that abolishment of visceral hypersensitivity in mast cell deficient rats was a result of altered development of the primary injury in the proximal colon. There was no difference between sham-operated Ws/Ws and W+/W+ rats in colonic pain threshold to distention stimuli, indicating that mast cells play no modulatory roles in normal colonic nociception. The present results support the view that mucosal mast cells play key roles in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  20. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent.

  1. Mast Cells Mediate Hyperoxia-Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric D.; Potts, Erin N.; Mason, Stanley N.; Foster, W. Michael; Auten, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk of developing airway hyper-reactivity following oxidative stress and inflammation. Mast cells contribute to airway hyper-reactivity partly by mediator release, so we sought to determine if blocking mast cell degranulation or recruitment prevents hyperoxia-induced airway hyper-reactivity, mast cell accumulation, and airway smooth muscle changes. Rats were exposed at birth to air or 60% O2 for 14 days, inducing significantly increased airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in the latter group, induced by nebulized methacholine challenge, measured by forced oscillometry. Daily treatment (postnatal days 1-14) with intraperitoneal cromolyn prevented hyperoxia-induced AHR, as did treatment with imatinib on postnatal days 5-14, compared with vehicle treated controls. Cromolyn prevented mast cell degranulation in the trachea but not hilar airways, and blocked mast cell accumulation in the hilar airways. Imatinib treatment completely blocked mast cell accumulation in tracheal/hilar airway tissues. Hyperoxia-induced AHR in neonatal rats is mediated, at least in part, via the mast cell. PMID:20386143

  2. Olopatadine inhibits exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells by counteracting membrane surface deformation.

    PubMed

    Baba, Asuka; Tachi, Masahiro; Maruyama, Yoshio; Kazama, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    Besides its anti-allergic properties as a histamine receptor antagonist, olopatadine stabilizes mast cells by inhibiting the release of chemokines. Since olopatadine bears amphiphilic features and is preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane, it would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of olopatadine and other anti-allergic drugs on the membrane capacitance (Cm) in rat peritoneal mast cells during exocytosis. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on the deformation of the plasma membrane. Low concentrations of olopatadine (1 or 10 µM) did not significantly affect the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm. However, 100 µM and 1 mM olopatadine almost totally suppressed the increase in the Cm. Additionally, these doses completely washed out the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, indicating that olopatadine counteracted the membrane surface deformation induced by exocytosis. As shown by electron microscopy, olopatadine generated inward membrane bending in mast cells. This study provides electrophysiological evidence for the first time that olopatadine dose-dependently inhibits the process of exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Such mast cell stabilizing properties of olopatadine may be attributed to its counteracting effects on the plasma membrane deformation in degranulating mast cells. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The Lectin ArtinM Induces Recruitment of Rat Mast Cells from the Bone Marrow to the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Moulin, Maria Raquel Isnard; Souza, Devandir Antonio; Jamur, Maria Célia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Background The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM is known to recruit neutrophils, to degranulate mast cells and may have potential therapeutic applications. However, the effect of ArtinM on mast cell recruitment has not been investigated. Methodology Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with ArtinM or ConA (control). The ability of the lectin to degranulate peritoneal and mesenteric mast cells was examined. Recruitment of mast cells to the peritoneal cavity and mesentery after ArtinM injection was examined with or without depletion of peritoneal mast cells by distilled water. Results ArtinM degranulated both peritoneal and mesentery mast cells in vitro. Three days after i.p. injection of the lectin there were reduced numbers of mast cells in the peritoneal lavage, while at 7 days post injection of ArtinM, the number of peritoneal mast cells was close to control values. Since immature mast cells are recruited from the bone marrow, the effect of the lectin on bone marrow mast cells was examined. Injection of ArtinM resulted in an increased number of mast cells in the bone marrow. To determine if degranulation of mast cells in the peritoneal cavity was required for the increase in bone marrow mast cells, the peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells with ultrapure water. Exposure to ArtinM increased the number of mast cells in the bone marrow of rats depleted of peritoneal mast cells. Conclusions The ArtinM induced recruitment of mast cells from the bone marrow to the peritoneal cavity may partially explain the therapeutic actions of ArtinM. PMID:20339538

  4. Mast cells respond to urticating extract from lepidoptera larva Morpheis ehrenbergii in the rat.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Curiel, María Fernanda; Quintanar, J Luis; Jiménez, Mariela; Salinas, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells and histamine participate in toxic effects of hairs from some caterpillars. This study reports that a crude extract of Morpheis ehrenbergii caterpillar hairs induces in vitro mast cells activation, triggers the release of histamine and causes a rapid urticarial reaction in the rat skin. Heating of the extract abolishes the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that the use of antihistamines may improve the adverse skin reactions caused by the Mexican caterpillar M. ehrenbergii.

  5. Colonic mast cell infiltration in rats with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Katsuyo; Sato, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2007-12-01

    Colonic mucosal mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndromes. This study was designed to investigate the roles of mucosal mast cells in development of an experimental visceral hypersensitivity induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. TNBS, when injected into the proximal colon through laparotomy, produced a significant decrease in pain threshold of the distal colon to mechanical distention, indicating a visceral hypersensitivity. In the proximal colon that was directly insulted by TNBS, mucosal necrosis and extensive inflammatory cell infiltration were observed with concomitant increase in tissue myeloperoxide (MPO) activity. In the distal colon where distention stimuli were applied, the number of mucosal mast cells significantly increased following TNBS treatment, although neither mucosal injury nor increase in tissue MPO activity was observed. In an organ culture, spontaneous release of a mucosal mast cell-specific protease (RMCP-2) from the distal colon tissue of TNBS-treated rats was significantly larger than that of sham animals. Furthermore, TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed by subcutaneous pretreatment with a mast cell stabilizer doxantrazole in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that prominent colonic mast cell infiltration associated with an enhanced spontaneous mediator release is responsible, at least partly, for development of visceral hypersensitivity induced by TNBS in rats.

  6. Nature of the thymus dependency of mucosal mast cells. III. Mucosal mast cells in nude mice and nude rats, in B rats and in a child with the Di George syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, G; Bazin, H

    1981-01-01

    Mucosal mast cells have been examined in the small intestinal mucosae of nude mice and nude rats, B rats and a child with the DiGeorge syndrome. In all three species, mast cells were present in normal numbers despite the athymic status of the nude mice and nude rats, the vestigial nature of the thymus in the child, and the functionally T lymphocyte-deprived status of the B rats. Connective tissue mast cells were also plentiful in skins and tongues of the nude mice and the child with thymic aplasia. It is concluded that normally neither population of mast cells has a obligatory dependence on the thymus or T lymphocytes for its differentiation, but that mucosal mast cells, under certain conditions of rapid hyperplasia, require an inductive influence provided by T lymphocytes.

  7. Mechanism of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effects on rat mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Gennady K.; Solovyova, Ludmila I.; Kosel, Arnold I.

    2000-11-01

    The low power laser radiation is widely applied for treatment of various diseases. In our research we investigated the influence of low power laser radiation on the mast cells degranulation process. The object of the research were the mesentery mast cells of the rat thin intestine. A loop of thin intestine was irradiated by the therapeutic diode laser device Uley - 2K (lambda - 890 nm, pulse). The process of mast cells degranulation served as a criterion for their functional activity estimation. The estimation was fulfilled with the help of light microscope (toluidine blue staining, pH02,0; degranulating mast cells counting on 100 cells; immersion technique; X 980). To study the dependence of degranulation process of mast cells irradiated with lasre from intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration we applied 0,000015 M solution of verapamil, which was applied to the mesentery for 2 minutes. Laser radiation (890 nm) stimulates mesentery mast cells degranulation. This effect is dose-dependent. Maximal degranulation was registered after laser irradiation wiht power 25 mW, exposure time 15-30 s (energy density 7.5 x 103 J/m2 to 6 x 104 j/m2). Further increasing of exposure time caused the effect decreasing. The results of our experiments with verpamil let us suppose light interaction with the voltage-dependent subunit of calcium channel, changing intracellular Ca2+ and leading to stimulatory effects.

  8. Some characteristics of histamine secretion from rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, F L; Thompson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) isolated from mouse submandibular gland or from snake venom produced a dose-dependent release of histamine from isolated rat peritoneal mast cells. The response was almost totally dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium ions and on added phosphatidylserine or its lyso-derivative. At high concentrations, strontium ions could substitute for calcium. The process was non-cytotoxic, relatively slow, pH dependent and blocked by polyclonal antibodies to NGF. Binding of NGF to the mast cell was not dependent on added calcium. The release was unaffected by low molecular weight glucose polymers or specific quaternary ammonium salts and thus differed from that evoked by clinical dextran or polyamines. The release was not inhibited by soluble rat IgE or IgG and was unimpaired in mast cells recovered from specific pathogen free rats. As such it did not appear to be mediated through interaction with cell-fixed antibodies. The process further differed from anaphylactic histamine release in that there was no accompanying change in the intracellular level of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), the activated state induced by NGF was much more persistent than that evoked by antigen, and there was no cross-desensitization between the two latter stimuli. In total, these data suggest that NGF may induce secretion from rat mast cells by interaction with a specific receptor on the plasma membrane, possibly similar to that present on sensory and sympathetic neurones. PMID:2425086

  9. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and nematode-infected rat intestines are in intimate contact with peptidergic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, R H; Tomioka, M; Quinonez, G; Simon, G T; Felten, S Y; Bienenstock, J

    1987-01-01

    Inflammatory or allergic conditions, as well as situations where healing and repair processes occur, are characterized by the presence of increased numbers of mast cells. Previous work on the effect of neuropeptides on mast cell mediator release showed that only substance P caused such release from intestinal mucosal mast cells [Shanahan, F., Denburg, J. A., Fox, J., Bienenstock, J. & Befus, A. D. (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 1331-1337]. Accordingly, we investigated the microanatomical relationship between mast cells and enteric nerves in normal rat intestine and parasite-infected rat intestine, in which mucosal mast cell hyperplasia occurs. Combined immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific enolase and staining with alcian blue at pH 0.5 was employed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rat jejunum. Sixty-seven percent of intestinal mucosal mast cells were touching subepithelial nerves, and an additional 20% were within 2 micron of nerves. Assessment of the proportion of the lamina propria occupied by mast cells (12.5%), the average mast cell area (121 +/- 28 microns 2), and the density of enteric nerves (one per 788 +/- 151 microns 2) suggested that the association was 5 times greater than would be expected by chance alone (P less than 0.0001). In consecutive sections, the nerves in contact with mast cells were also shown to contain substance P and/or calcitonin-gene-related peptide. Electron microscopy confirmed this association: 8% of the mast cells in infected rats exhibited membrane-membrane contact with unmyelinated axons containing 70- to 170-nm dense-core vesicles, and an additional 31% were situated less than 250 nm from nerves. Other mast cells appeared to embrace nerve bundles through the projection of lamellopodia. These data provide systematic quantitative evidence that a structural foundation for communication between the immune and nervous systems exists in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:2437589

  10. Ghrelin and obestatin promote the allergic action in rat peritoneal mast cells as basic secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Tatsuya; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushima, Miyoko; Nishimura, Yuko; Kobe, Yuko; Ota, Yui; Baba, Kenji; Takagi, Kenzo

    2010-11-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand of the type 1a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) that regulates energy balance. Ghrelin and obestatin, derived from the post-translational processing of preproghrelin, are involved in a diverse range of biological activities, yet their effect on the immune system is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the roles of ghrelin and obestatin on mast cell degranulation and found that both ghrelin and obestatin induce the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells. This induced histamine release was inhibited by the pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gα(i) protein, and extracellular Ca(2+). Rat peritoneal mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells did not express the ghrelin receptor GHSR1a, suggesting that histamine release induced by ghrelin occurs via a receptor-independent mechanism. We report here that ghrelin and obestatin, belonging to the family of basic secretagogues, stimulate mast cells independent of a receptor, and this may play a crucial role at the site of allergy or inflammation.

  11. Agarwood Inhibits Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells and Reduces Scratching Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Eiji; Shimizu, Yasuharu; Masui, Ryo; Tsubonoya, Tomoe; Hayakawa, Tomomi; Sudoh, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to clarify the effects of agarwood on histamine release from mast cells in rats and on the scratching behaviors in mice. Methods: Histamine release from rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or concanavalin A (Con A) and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice were examined to investigate the effects of agarwood. The hyaluronidase activity and the 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in mast cells were examined to investigate the mechanisms for the inhibition of histamine release. The correlation between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the content of its typical ingredients, a 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives, was analyzed using thin-layer chromatography. Results: Agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on mast-cell histamine release induced by compound 48/80 or Con A without any effect on hyaluronidase activity; this effect involves an increase in the cAMP levels in mast cells. Oral administration of agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. The inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release were quite different, depending on the area where the agarwood was produced, its quality, and its market price. No correlation was found between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the typical ingredients of agarwood, which are 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives. Conclusion: These results show that agarwood inhibits histamine release from mast cells partially through an increase in the cAMP levels in cells. We suggest that some active ingredients of agarwood must be effective on oral intake and that agarwood can be used to treat patients with a number of conditions, including urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and bronchial asthma, in which an increase in histamine release occurs. Differences in the pharmacological effects of this crude drug among markets may provide important information for the quality

  12. Effects of human hair and nail proteins and their films on rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Murai, Shinya; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2008-06-01

    Human hair and nail are valuable materials for producing individual corresponding biocompatible materials. A rapid and convenient protein extraction method (Shindai method) and novel procedures for preparing their protein films from their extracts have been developed using human hair and nail. The effects of the human hair and nail proteins and their films on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells were investigated. Both protein solutions and their films, mainly consisting of keratins and matrix proteins, did not induce histamine release from the mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed that the mast cells were only slightly affected by adding the human hair and nail proteins or by incubating on their protein films. The IgE-dependent histamine release was inhibited by the hair and nail proteins and their films. Incubation of the mast cells with the hair and nail proteins prior to the addition of the IgE serum resulted in a high inhibition (50%) of the histamine release, while the inhibition was approximately 10% when the protein solutions were mixed with the mast cells after incubation with the IgE serum. These results suggest that the human hair and nail proteins and their films will be useful materials for antiallergic actions.

  13. Endogenous nitric oxide does not modulate mesenteric mast cell degranulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Tavares de Lima, Wothan; Bakhle, Y S; Jancar, Sonia

    2003-06-15

    The inhibitory effects of endogenous nitric oxide could explain the decreased mesenteric mast cell degranulation after anaphylaxis in genetically hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR and normotensive rats (NT) were sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged 14 days later. Degranulation of mast cells was assessed in duodenum, mesentery and skin by increased microvascular permeability using extravasation of Evans blue dye (20mg/kg, i.v.), and in the mesentery also by light microscopy after staining with toluidine blue. Pretreatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.v.) did not change dye extravasation after immunological challenge or after compound 48/80 in mesentery of either SHR or NT. PCA was also defective in SHR. Pretreatment with L-NAME did not affect either the defective PCA in SHR or the normal PCA reaction in NT. Our results show that inhibition by endogenous nitric oxide is not the cause of the defective mast cell degranulation in the SHR nor did it modulate degranulation of mesenteric or skin mast cells in NT.

  14. Induction of mast cell proliferation, maturation, and heparin synthesis by the rat c-kit ligand, stem cell factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.; Takeishi, Takashi; Geissler, E.N. ); Thompson, H.; Metcalfe, D.D. ); Langley, K.E.; Zsebo, K.M.; Galli, S.J. )

    1991-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of a newly recognized multifunctional growth factor, the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF), on mouse mast cell proliferation and phenotype. Recombinant rat SCF{sup 164} (rrSCF{sup 164}) induced the development of large numbers of dermal mast cells in normal mice in vivo. Many of these mast cells had features of connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC), in that they were reactive both with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and with safranin. In vitro, rrSCF{sup 164} induced the proliferation of cloned interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent mouse mast cells and primary populations of IL-3-dependent, bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMCMC), which represent immature mast cells, and purified peritoneal mast cells, which represent a type of mature CTMC> BMCMC maintained in rrSCF{sup 164} not only proliferated but also matured. These findings identify SCF as a single cytokine that can induce immature, IL-3-dependent mast cells to mature and to acquire multiple characteristics of CTMC. These findings also directly demonstrate that SCF can regulate the development of a cellular lineage expressing c-kit through effects on both proliferation and maturation.

  15. Effects of relaxin on mast cells. In vitro and in vivo studies in rats and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Masini, E; Bani, D; Bigazzi, M; Mannaioni, P F; Bani-Sacchi, T

    1994-01-01

    The results of the current study demonstrate that relaxin inhibits histamine release by mast cells. This effect is related to the peptide concentrations, and could be observed in both isolated rat serosal mast cells stimulated with compound 48/80 or calcium ionophore A 23187, and in serosal mast cells isolated from sensitized guinea pigs and challenged with the antigen. The morphological findings agree with the functional data, revealing that relaxin attenuates calcium ionophore-induced granule exocytosis by isolated rat serosal mast cells. Similar effects of relaxin have also been recognized in vivo by light microscopic and densitometric analysis of the mesenteric mast cells of rats which received the hormone intraperitoneally 20 min before local treatment of the mesentery with calcium ionophore. Moreover, evidence is provided that relaxin stimulates endogenous production of nitric oxide and attenuates the rise of intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by calcium ionophore. The experiments with drugs capable of influencing nitric oxide production also provide indirect evidence that the inhibiting effect of relaxin on mast cell histamine release is related to an increased generation of nitric oxide. It is suggested that relaxin may have a physiological role in modulating mast cell function through the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Images PMID:7525651

  16. Cardiac mast cell stabilization and cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Parikh, V; Singh, M

    1998-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a mast cell stabilizer, on cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Isolated rat heart was subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning was provided by four episodes of 5-min global ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before sustained ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning and DSCG (10 and 100 microM) treatment markedly decreased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) in coronary effluent and percentage incidence of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) and ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) during reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning and DSCG treatment also significantly reduced ischemia/reperfusion-induced mast cell peroxidase (MPO) release, a marker of mast cell degranulation. A significant increase in MPO release was observed immediately after ischemic preconditioning, and the release was found to be inhibited in hearts perfused with DSCG (10 and 100 microM) during ischemic preconditioning. DSCG administered during ischemic preconditioning (DSCG in ischemic preconditioning) attenuated the cardioprotective and antiarrhythmic effects of ischemic preconditioning. DSCG in ischemic preconditioning produced no marked effect on ischemia/reperfusion-induced MPO release. These findings tentatively suggest that DSCG administration during ischemic preconditioning abolishes its cardioprotective effect, perhaps by stabilizing resident cardiac mast cells.

  17. Alpha-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine protects intensive swimming exercise-mediated germ-cell depletion, pro-oxidant generation, and alteration of steroidogenesis in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Dutta, Ananya; Chakraborty, Pratip; Manna, Indranil; Firdaus, Syed Benazir; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Chattopadhyay, Ratna; Chakravarty, Baidyanath

    2014-09-01

    Prolonged and strenuous exercise has been proposed as a possible source of male-factor infertility. Forced intensive swimming has also been identified as one source of a dysfunctional male reproduction system. The present study evaluated the possible protective role of α-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on intensive swimming-induced germ-cell depletion in adult male rats. Forced exhaustive swimming of 1 hr/day, 6 days/week for 8 consecutive weeks resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in epididymal sperm; testicular androgenic enzyme activities; and plasma and intra-testicular testosterone; and produced different types of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Conversely, plasma corticosterone levels and sperm-head abnormalities increased. Western-blot analysis showed a considerable decrease in testicular StAR protein expression whereas reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis showed no significant change in cytochrome P450scc (Cyp11a1) gene expression. Significant (P < 0.05) elevation in testicular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content versus reduction in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and caspase-3 activities along with a depletion in the glutathione pool, mitochondrial membrane potential (▵ψm ), and intracellular ATP generation. A considerable level of DNA damage in testicular spermatogenic cells were also noted following forced extensive swimming. Alpha-lipoic acid and NAC supplementation prevented the swimming-induced testicular spermatogenic and steroidogenic disorders by lowering ROS generation. We therefore conclude that intensive forced swimming causes germ-cell depletion through the generation of ROS and depletion of steroidogenesis in the testis, which can be protected by the co-administration of α-lipoic acid and NAC.

  18. Membrana shrapnelli of maturing rats. The occurrence of mast cells, and histamine content in relation to otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Widemar, L; Alm, P E; Bloom, G D; Hellström, S; Stenfors, L E

    1984-01-01

    The membrana shrapnelli or pars flaccida of 12 day old rats is thick (84 micron) and almost completely fills the lateral attic compartment. Histologically it is characterized by a thickened layer of stratified squamous epithelium and a lamina propria whereas an inner epithelial lining is difficult to discern. Mast cells are numerous and distributed throughout the lamina propria. At day 21 and day 30 the thickness of the pars flaccida is reduced and histologically it resembles that of the adult. Mast cells are mainly located in the vicinity of blood vessels and in a layer just beneath the squamous epithelium. The number of mast cells per unit area of pars flaccida is considerably higher in young rats as compared to adults. At day 12 their number is roughly 2.1 times that of the adult and at day 21 and 30 about 1.5 times. Except for a slightly raised level of histamine at day 30 the concentration of histamine in the pars flaccida of young rats did not differ from values obtained in the adult. Previous experimental studies have indicated that mast cells in the pars flaccida may play an important role in the pathogenesis of OME. It is interesting to note that the pars flaccida of young rats contains more mast cells than that of the adult. Should this also be the case in the pars flaccida of young humans it is tempting to suggest that mast cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of OME in children too.

  19. Mast Cell Inhibition Attenuates Myocardial Damage, Adverse Remodeling and Dysfunction during Fulminant Myocarditis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Yair; Rinkevich-Shop, Shunit; Konen, Eli; Goitein, Orly; Kushnir, Tammar; Epstein, Frederick H.; Feinberg, Micha S.; Leor, Jonathan; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a life-threatening heart disease characterized by myocardial inflammation, necrosis and chronic fibrosis. While mast cell inhibition has been suggested to prevents fibrosis in rat myocarditis, little is known about its effectiveness in attenuating cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. Thus, we sought to test the hypothesis that mast cell inhibition will attenuate the inflammatory reaction and associated left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction after fulminant autoimmune myocarditis. Methods and Results To induce experimental autoimmune myocarditis, we immunized 30 rats with porcine cardiac myosin twice at a 7-day interval. On day 8 animals were randomized into treatment either with an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 25mg/kg of cromolyn sodium (n=13), or an equivalent volume (~0.5ml IP) of normal saline (n=11). All animals were scanned by serial echocardiography studies before treatment (baseline echocardiogram) and after 20 days of cromolyn sodium (28 days after immunization). Furthermore, serial cardiac magnetic resonance was performed in a subgroup of 12 animals. After 20 days of treatment (28 days from first immunization), hearts were harvested for histopathological analysis. By echocardiography, cromolyn sodium prevented LV dilatation and attenuated LV dysfunction, compared with controls. Postmortem analysis of hearts showed that cromolyn sodium reduced myocardial fibrosis, as well as the number and size of cardiac mast cells in the inflamed myocardium, compared with controls. Conclusions Our study suggests that mast cell inhibition with cromolyn sodium attenuates adverse LV remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. This mechanism-based therapy is clinically relevant and could improve the outcome of patients at risk for inflammatory cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:23172937

  20. The Effect of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang on Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells in Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Ji, Haijie; Yin, Xiaolan; Tian, Yaxin; Zheng, Rui; Duan, Yuanzhi

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang (TXYF) on intestinal mucosal mast cells in rats with postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). Design. PI-IBS rat models were established using a multistimulation paradigm. Then, rats were treated with TXYF intragastrically at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 g·kg−1·d−1 for 14 days, respectively. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content (FWC). Mast cell counts and the immunofluorescence of tryptase and c-Fos in intestinal mucosa were measured; and serum IL-1β, TNF-α, and histamine levels were determined. Results. AWR reactivity and FWC which were significantly increased could be observed in PI-IBS rats. Remarkably increased mast cell activation ratio in intestinal mucosa, together with increased serum TNF-α and histamine levels, could also be seen in PI-IBS rats; furthermore, PI-IBS-induced changes in mast cell activation and level of serum TNF-α and histamine could be reversed by TXYF treatment. Meanwhile, tryptase and c-Fos expression were also downregulated. Conclusion. TXYF improves PI-IBS symptoms by alleviating behavioral hyperalgesia and antidiarrhea, the underlying mechanism of which involves the inhibitory effects of TXYF on activating mucosal mast cells, downregulating tryptase and c-Fos expression, and reducing serum TNF-α and histamine levels. PMID:28331524

  1. Local cutaneous nerve terminal and mast cell responses to manual acupuncture in acupoint LI4 area of the rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Ling; Xu, Dong-Sheng; Bai, Wan-Zhu; Cui, Jing-Jing; Shu, Hong-Ming; He, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Shi, Hong; Su, Yang-Shuai; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Bing; Jing, Xiang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the effects of manual acupuncture (MA) are contributed by collagen fibers and mast cells in local acupoints, at which acupuncture stimulation causes various afferent fiber groups to be excited. However what happens in local nerve fibers and mast cells after MA remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the response of cutaneous nerve fibers and mast cells to MA stimulation in acupoint Hegu (LI4). The contralateral LI4 of the same rat was used as a non-stimulated control. Immnohistochemistry analysis were carried out to observe the expression of histamine (HA), serotonin (5-HT) and nociceptive neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), in the LI4 area. Mast cells were labeled with anti-mast cell tryptase antibody and simultaneously with HA or 5-HT primary antibodies to observe their co-expression. Our results showed that SP and CGRP were expressed more highly on the cutaneous nerve fibers of LI4 after MA stimulation than that of the control. Mast cells aggregated in close proximity to the blood vessels in intra-epidermis and dermis and some of them with degranulation in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissue of LI4. Both mast cells and their granules appeared with HA (+) and 5-HT (+) expression at stimulated L14 sites, while a few intact mast cells with a little expression of 5-HT and HA were distributed in areas of non-stimulated L14. The results indicated that local cutaneous nerve terminals and mast cells responded to MA with higher expression of SP and CGRP in nerve fibers, as well as with aggregation and degranulation of mast cells with HA and 5-HT granules at acupoint LI4. These neuroactive substances may convey signals to certain pathways that contribute to the effects of acupuncture.

  2. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, A.; Gigli, I.; Barrett, K.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases.

  3. Mast cells and MMP-9 in the lamina propria during eruption of rat molars: quantitative and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Paulo Sérgio; Pereira-Júnior, Jorge Alonso; Biselli, Natalia Barrionuevo; Sasso-Cerri, Estela

    2010-08-01

    During the active tooth eruption process, structural changes in the lamina propria are necessary to provide extracellular matrix remodelling and for the establishment of the eruptive pathway. A large number of resident cells, recruited cells and proteases have been demonstrated in the eruptive process, but the participation of MMP-9 and mast cells has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we set out to evaluate the intensity of MMP-9 immunoexpression, the frequency of mast cells and the correlation between the incidence of mast cells and bone resorption in different phases of tooth eruption. Fragments of maxilla containing first molars, obtained from 9-, 11-, 13- and 16-day-old rats, were fixed in 4% formaldehyde, decalcified and embedded in paraffin. Sagittal sections were stained with Masson's trichrome or submitted to the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase method for quantification of osteoclasts. Sections stained by 1% toluidine blue were used for quantification of metachromatic mast cells mm(-2) of lamina propria. The expression of MMP-9 in the lamina propria was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In the 9-day-old rats, the lamina propria contained few mast cells and occasional osteoclasts were found in the bone surface overlying the occlusal portion of the tooth germs. Otherwise, a significant increase in the number of mast cells was observed in the intra-osseous phase of tooth eruption (11-day-old rats), period in which numerous TRAP-positive osteoclasts were found in the bone surface. MMP-9 immunolabelling was detected in fibroblasts, mast cells and macrophage-like cells of the lamina propria in all ages studied. However, an enhanced immunolabelling was evident in the advanced phase of tooth eruption (16-day-old rats). During the intra-osseous phase, the parallel between the high frequency of both mast cells and osteoclasts suggests that mast cells could exert a paracrine function on the osteoclasts and then stimulate bone resorption. The

  4. Kupffer cell depletion protects against the steatosis, but not the liver damage, induced by marginal-copper, high-fructose diet in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Schuschke, Dale A.; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayuan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yuhua; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    High-fructose feeding impairs copper status and leads to low copper availability, which is a novel mechanism in obesity-related fatty liver. Copper deficiency-associated hepatic iron overload likely plays an important role in fructose-induced liver injury. Excess iron in the liver is distributed throughout hepatocytes and Kupffer cells (KCs). The aim of this study was to examine the role of KCs in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by a marginal-copper high-fructose diet (CuMF). Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a copper-adequate or a marginally copper-deficient diet for 4 wk. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (wt/vol) was also given ad libitum. KCs were depleted by intravenous administration of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) before and/or in the middle of the experimental period. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation was completely eliminated with KC depletion in CuMF consumption rats, which was associated with the normalization of elevated plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and increased hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 expression. However, hepatic copper and iron content were not significantly affected by KC depletion. In addition, KC depletion reduced body weight and epididymal fat weight as well as adipocyte size. Plasma endotoxin and gut permeability were markedly increased in CuMF rats. Moreover, MCP-1 was robustly increased in the culture medium when isolated KCs from CuMF rats were treated with LPS. Our data suggest that KCs play a critical role in the development of hepatic steatosis induced by marginal-copper high-fructose diet. PMID:25813056

  5. Separate effects of irradiation and of graft-versus-host reaction on rat mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, A G; Munro, G H; Huntley, J F; Miller, H R; Ferguson, A

    1989-01-01

    T cell mediated immune responses in the gut can produce enteropathy and malabsorption. We have investigated the relevance of mucosal mast cells (MMC) to the mechanisms of this enteropathy by using graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) in the rat as a model of mucosal delayed type hypersensitivity. Measurements of mucosal architecture, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) and MMC counts were performed in control and experimental rats, and release of rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) into the bloodstream was used as an index of MMC activation. In unirradiated rats, jejunal MMC count was increased on day 14 of the GvHR (mean 272/mm2 v 182 in controls, p less than 0.01), as was serum RMCPII (p less than 0.01). Irradiated rats (4.5 Gy, reconstituted with isogeneic spleen cells) had low counts of IEL and crypt hyperplasia seven to 14 days after irradiation. Irradiated rats with GvHR (induced by ip injection of parental strain spleen cells) and studied on days 7, 10 and 14, had significant enteropathy with longer crypts and higher CCPR than matched irradiated animals (p less than 0.05 on day 14 when compared with irradiation alone). Intraepithelial lymphocytes counts, however, reflected only the effect of radiation. Irradiation, with or without GvHR, led to the virtual disappearance of jejunal MMC, undetectable jejunal RMCPII and very low levels of RMCPII in serum (all p less than 0.01 when compared with unirradiated controls). These experiments show that there is a modest expansion in jejunal MMC in unirradiated rats with semiallogeneic GvHR, whereas irradiation, alone or associated with GvHR, profoundly depletes MMC for at least two weeks. The enteropathy of GvHR can evolve in the virtual absence of MMC. PMID:2707634

  6. Elemental levels in mast cell granules differ in sections from normal and diabetic rats: an X-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, M.D.

    1988-03-01

    Mast cells around the thymus of rats stain red with alcian blue and safranin indicating that the mast cells are probably of the peritoneal (connective tissue) type. After the onset of streptozotocin induced diabetes some cells contain both red and blue granules and blue staining cells may appear. X-ray microanalysis of frozen freeze-dried sections from diabetic male CSE Wistar rats showed electron dense granules to have similar amounts of S to normal rat mast cell granules but reduced levels of Na, Mg, P, Cl and K. Two cells also had electron lucent granules with very high levels of Na, Cl, K and Ca and reduced concentrations of S. The differences in elemental composition suggest that the mast cells from diabetic rats are not immature, but are related to the condition of induced diabetes, and that granules of very different composition can occur within a single cell. X-ray microanalysis has given an insight into mast cell granule elemental content which was not possible by conventional biochemical methods.

  7. Rapid microwave fixation of rat mast cells. I. Localization of granule chymase with an ultrastructural postembedding immunogold technique.

    PubMed

    Login, G R; Galli, S J; Morgan, E; Arizono, N; Schwartz, L B; Dvorak, A M

    1987-11-01

    We defined the ultrastructural localization of chymase in rat peritoneal mast cells using standard aldehyde fixation and a newly described microwave fixation method (Login GR, Dvorak AM: Microwave energy fixation for electron microscopy. Am J Pathol 120: 230, 1985; Login GR, Stavinoha WB, Dvorak AM: Ultrafast microwave energy fixation for electron microscopy. J Histochem Cytochem 34:381, 1986) and postembedding immunogold labeling. Thin sections were exposed first to goat IgG anti-rat chymase and second to gold-conjugated rabbit Ig directed against goat IgG. By transmission electron microscopy, gold particles were localized to the matrix of cytoplasmic granules. Control sections treated with nonimmune sera did not exhibit labeling of mast cells. Thin sections treated simultaneously with purified rat mast cell chymase and anti-chymase antibody in competition studies, showed a marked reduction in granule staining. These findings demonstrate that a microwave fixation method can be used to rapidly fix cell suspensions for postembedding immunocytochemical studies.

  8. Regional Differences in Chronic Stress-induced Alterations in Mast Cell and Protease-activated Receptor-2-positive Cell Numbers in the Colon of Ws/Ws Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Moon Young; Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Eul-Sig; Oh, Jung Taek; Yun, Ki Jung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2014-01-01

    There have been no reports on the effect of chronic psychological stress on colonic immune cells or the regional differences. We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic psychological stress on the number of mast cells and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2-positive cells in the rat colonic mucosa. Six-week-old and 14-week-old Ws/Ws rats, which lack mast cells after 10 weeks, were used as control and mast cell-deficient groups, respectively. The rats were divided into stress and sham-treated groups. Rats in the stressed group were exposed to water avoidance stress (WAS, 1 hour/day) for 13 days. Fecal pellet output and the number of mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells in colonic mucosa were compared between the WAS and sham groups. In 6-week-old rats, the WAS group showed a significantly higher number of mast cells compared to the sham group. In 14-week-old rats, mast cells were nearly absent in the colonic mucosa. WAS significantly increased PAR-2-positive cells in 14-week-old rats, but not in 6-week-old rats. Indirect estimation of PAR-2-positive mast cells in 6-week-old rats suggested that the majority of increased mast cells following WAS did not express PAR-2. WAS increased mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells mainly in the proximal colon. Fecal pellet output was continuously higher in the WAS group than in the sham group, and the difference was significant for both 6-week-old and 14-week-old rats. Chronic psychological stress increased the number of mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells in rat colonic mucosa, and these increases were more prominent in the proximal colon.

  9. Influence of laser and LED irradiation on mast cells of cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher Rosa, Cristiane; Oliveira Sampaio, Susana C. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Ferreira, Maria F. L.; Zanini, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Jean N.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to study histologically the effect of Laser or LED phototherapy on mast cells on cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency. 18 rats were used and fed with special peleted iron-free diet. An excisional wound was created on the dorsum of each animal which were divided into: Group I - Control with anemia + no treatment; Group II - Anemia + Laser; Group III - Anemia + LED; Group IV - Healthy + no treatment; Group V - Healthy + Laser; Group VI - Healthy + LED. Irradiation was performed using a diode Laser (λ660nm, 40mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2, 4X2.5J/cm2) or a RED-LED ( λ700nm, 15mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2). Histological specimens were routinely processed, cut and stained with toluidine blue and mast cell counts performed. No significant statistic difference was found between groups as to the number of degranulated, non-degradulated or total mast cells. Greater mean values were found for degranulated mast cells in the Anemia + LED. LED irradiation on healthy specimens resulted in a smaller number of degranulated mast cells. Our results leads to conclude that there are no significant differences in the number of mast cells seven days after irradiation following Laser or LED phototherapy.

  10. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chiaming; Georgiou, Kristen R; McKinnon, Ross A; Keefe, Dorothy M K; Howe, Peter R C; Xian, Cory J

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10 mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5 mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10 mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation.

  11. Treatment of adult neural progenitor cells prior to transplantation affects graft survival and integration in a neonatal and adult rat model of selective retinal ganglion cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Mellough, Carla B; Cui, Qi; Harvey, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether microenvironmental changes surrounding apoptotic neural degeneration, cellular pre-treatment and timing of transplant can influence the survival and differentiation of transplanted cells. This was done by transplanting adult hippocampal precursor cells (AHPCs) into normal and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depleted rat retinae. Apoptotic RGC death was induced in neonates by removal of the contralateral superior colliculus (SC) and in adults by unilateral optic nerve transection, with or without a peripheral nerve (PN) graft. AHPCs were transplanted 24 h after SC ablation, or 5, 7 or 14 days following optic nerve (ON) transection. Hosts received untreated grafts, or grafts treated by co-culture with embryonic retinal explants or the neuropeptide somatostatin. AHPCs integrated within all neonatal and 65% of adult retinae. Greater numbers of AHPCs were observed within the ganglion cell layer (GCL) in SC lesioned hosts. Explant co-culture induced proliferation of grafted AHPCs within host retinae. Somatostatin-treatment resulted in reduced overall engraftment but increased integration within the GCL. In lesioned adults, greatest GCL engraftment was observed following 7 or 14 day grafts. Some AHPCs in the inner retina expressed neuronal antigens and extended processes into the ON. These data indicate that various factors can influence the behaviour of grafted cells and work towards encouraging the functional restoration of retinal circuitry.

  12. Influence of salmeterol and benzalkonium chloride on G-protein-mediated exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Krebs, D; Ziegler, A

    2000-05-26

    The long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salmeterol and the invert soap benzalkonium chloride share physicochemically important structures, namely a polar head group and a long aliphatic chain. Low concentrations of benzalkonium chloride have been shown to inhibit exocytotic responses in rat peritoneal mast cells by selectively interacting with heterotrimeric G-proteins of the G(i)-type. The present study investigates whether salmeterol inhibits, independently of beta-adrenoceptors, exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by the direct agonists at G-proteins mastoparan or guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (++GTP gamma S++). Exocytosis was studied by secretion assays ([3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT)-release) using intact, streptolysin O-permeabilised or metabolically inhibited (antimycin, deoxyglucose) rat peritoneal mast cells. Both amphiphilics, salmeterol, and benzalkonium chloride, dose-dependently exerted biphasic effects on mastoparan-induced [3H]5-HT release in intact mast cells. In contrast to benzalkonium chloride, the dose-response curves for secretostatic and celltoxic effects of salmeterol markedly overlapped. Similar to benzalkonium chloride, salmeterol in non-cytotoxic concentrations (1-25 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited exocytosis induced by mastoparan (intact cells) or ++GTP gamma S (permeabilised cells). These findings indicate a direct, adrenoceptor-independent affection of G proteins by salmeterol in mast cells.

  13. Immunocytochemical localization of chymase to cytoplasmic vesicles after rat peritoneal mast cell stimulation by compound 48/80.

    PubMed

    Login, G R; Aoki, M; Yamakawa, M; Lunardi, L O; Digenis, E C; Tanda, N; Schwartz, L B; Dvorak, A M

    1997-10-01

    The subcellular events responsible for release of mediators by mast cells may help to clarify roles for mast cells in health and disease. In this study we show that the granule-associated protease chymase is also within cytoplasmic vesicles in appropriately stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells. Rat peritoneal mast cells were recovered before or 1-10 sec after exposure to the secretogogue compound 48/80 (10 micrograms/ml) and then were examined by radioimmunoassay to quantify histamine release or were processed, using routine methods for postembedding immunoelectron microscopy, to identify the subcellular localization of chymase. In comparison to unstimulated cells, compound 48/80 stimulated cells in two independent experiments showed an increase (15%, 28%) in the surface area of the cell and a decrease (12%, 6%) in the surface area of the total granule compartment before degranulation channel formation. These global cellular changes occurred in a background of transient but significant (p < 0.01) increases in the area and number of chymase-immunoreactive vesicles per microns2 cytoplasm. These changes were detectable at 5 or 7 sec after stimulation with compound 48/80 but returned to near prestimulation levels by 9 or 10 sec after addition of compound 48/80 (total cumulative histamine release was 28% by 8 sec and 47% by 14 sec). These observations suggest that vesicles participate in the early stages of regulated secretion of chymase from rat peritoneal mast cells.

  14. Cannabinoids reduce granuloma-associated angiogenesis in rats by controlling transcription and expression of mast cell protease-5

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, D; Russo, A; D'Amico, A; Esposito, G; Concetta, P; Cinelli, M; Russo, G; Iuvone, T

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Chronic inflammatory conditions, such as granulomas, are associated with angiogenesis. Mast cells represent the main cell type orchestrating angiogenesis, through the release of their granule content. Therefore, compounds able to modulate mast cell behaviour may be considered as a new pharmacological approach to treat angiogenesis-dependent events. Here, we tested the effect of selective cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists in a model of angiogenesis-dependent granuloma formation induced by λ-carrageenin in rats. Experimental approach: Granulomas were induced by λ-carrageenin-soaked sponges implanted subcutaneously on the back of male Wistar rats. After 96 h, implants were removed and granuloma formation was measured (wet weight); angiogenesis was evaluated by histological analysis and by the measurement of haemoglobin content. Mast cells in the granulomas were evaluated histologically and by RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis for mast cell-derived proteins (rat mast cell protease-5 (rMCP-5) and nerve growth factor). Selective CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists, ACEA and JWH-015 (0.001–0.1 mg mL−1), were given locally only once, at the time of implantation. Key results: The CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists decreased the weight and vascularization of granulomas after 96 h. This treatment also reduced mast cell number and activation in granulomatous tissue. Specifically, these compounds prevented the transcription and expression of rMCP-5, a protein involved in sprouting and advance of new blood vessels. Conclusion and implications: Modulation of mast cell function by cannabinoids reduced granuloma formation and associated angiogenesis. Therefore cannabinoid-related drugs may be useful in the management of granulomatous diseases accompanied by angiogenesis. PMID:18552882

  15. Cyclic GMP signaling in rat urinary bladder, prostate, and epididymis: tissue-specific changes with aging and in response to Leydig cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dieter; Mukhopadhyay, Amal K; Davidoff, Michail S; Middendorff, Ralf

    2011-08-01

    Aging of the male reproductive system leads to changes in endocrine signaling and is frequently associated with the emergence of prostate hyperplasia and bladder dysfunctions. Recent reports highlight prostate and bladder as promising targets for therapeutic interventions with inhibitors of the cyclic GMP (cGMP)-degrading phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). However, the cGMP signaling system in these organs is as yet poorly characterized, and the possibility of age-related alterations has not been addressed. This study investigates key proteins of cGMP pathways in bladder, prostate, and epididymis of young (3 months) and old (23-24 months) Wistar rats. Local differences in the abundance of PDE5, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and particulate guanylyl cyclases (GC-A, GC-B), endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PRKG1 (cGKI)) revealed pronounced tissue-specific peculiarities. Although cGMP-generating enzymes were not affected by age in all organs, we recognized age-related decreases of PDE5 expression in bladder and a selective diminishment of membrane-associated PRKG1 in epididymis. In disagreement with published data, all cGMP pathway proteins including PDE5 are poorly expressed in prostate. However, prostatic PRKG1 expression increases with aging. Androgen withdrawal during temporary Leydig cell elimination induced a massive (>12-fold) upregulation of PRKG1 in prostate but not in other (penis and epididymis) androgen-dependent organs. These findings identify PRKG1 as a key androgen-sensitive signaling protein in prostate of possible importance for growth regulation. The elucidated effects may have significance for age-associated pathologies in the male lower-urinary tract.

  16. The stem of sinomenium acutum inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, H M; Moon, P D; Chae, H J; Kim, H R; Chung, J G; Kim, J J; Lee, E J

    2000-05-01

    The aqueous extract of Sinomenium acutum stem (SSAE) (0.1-1000 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited systemic anaphylactic reaction induced by compound 48/80 in mice. In particular, SSAE reduced compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic reaction with 50% at the dose of 1000 mg/kg. SSAE (100-1000 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited local anaphylactic reaction activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE. When mice were pretreated with SSAE at a concentration ranging from 0.1 to 1000 mg/kg, the plasma histamine levels were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. SSAE (1-1000 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. In addition, SSAE (0.1 microg/ml) had a significant inhibitory effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. These results indicate that SSAE inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and TNF-alpha production from mast cells.

  17. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms.

  18. Fibroblasts maintain the phenotype and viability of the rat heparin-containing mast cell in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Levi-Schaffer, F.; Austen, K.F.; Caulfield, J.P.; Hein, A.; Bloes, W.F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1985-11-01

    Rat serosal heparin-containing mast cells (HP-MC) were maintained in vitro for as long as 30 days when co-cultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. In contrast, when the mast cells were cultured alone, on fibronectin-, gelatin-, or dermal-collagen-coated dishes, on acid and heat-killed fibroblasts in the presence or absence of 24 hr fibroblast-conditioned medium, or on a monolayer of mouse serosal macrophages, they failed to adhere to the dishes, released significant amounts of their histamine and lactate dehydrogenase, and stained with trypan blue, indicating a loss of viability. The rat serosal HP-MC cultured with the 3T3 fibroblasts became so adherent to the fibroblasts that the two cell types could be separated from one another only by trypsinization. The cultured HP-MC stained with both alcian blue and safranin and continued to synthesize proteoglycan at a rate comparable to that of freshly isolated cells. The /sup 35/S-labeled proteoglycan synthesized by these cultured cells, like that produced by freshly isolated rat serosal HP-MC, was a 750,000 to 1,000,000 m.w. proteoglycan containing only heparin glycosaminoglycans of 50,000 to 100,000 m.w. As assessed by electron microscopy, many of the cultured HP-MC resembled freshly isolated cells except that some secretory granules had fused with one another in some cells. These results demonstrate that the in vivo differentiated rat HP-MC maintain their histology, morphology, immunologic responsiveness, histamine content, and ability to synthesize heparin proteoglycan when co-cultured with living fibroblasts.

  19. Effects of Nigella sativa seeds and certain species of fungi extracts on number and activation of dural mast cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, E; Dagistan, Y; Kotan, B; Cetinkaya, A

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa seeds and certain species of fungi extracts on the number and degranulation states of dural mast cells in rats. Rats were fed ad libitum with normal tap water or tap water with extract of N. sativa seed, Ramaria condensata, Lactarius salmonicolor, Lactarius piperatus, and Tricholoma terreum for 3 days. Mast cells in dura mater were counted and evaluated in terms of granulation and degranulation states. Compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulating agent, and T. terreum significantly increased the percent of degranulated mast cells in dura mater, respectively (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). Moreover, T. terreum causes a significant increase in the total number of mast cells (p < 0.05). N. sativa significantly inhibited mast cell degranulation induced by both the compound 48/80 and T. terreum (p < 0.05), and significantly decreased the mast cell numbers increased by T. terreum (p < 0.05). Our results suggested that T. terreum following ingestion can contribute to headaches like migraine via dural mast cell degranulation and N. sativa may be able to exert analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects by stabilizing dural mast cells. However, investigation is needed to determine the ingredients of N. sativa that may be responsible for these beneficial effects.

  20. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p < 0.001) and neuronal damage in dentate gyrus, CA1 and CA3. In contrast to SS-SE group, rats from the CG-SE group showed increased latency to the establishment of the status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stimulation of 14-3-3 protein and its isoform on histamine secretion from permeabilized rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Ueeda, Takayuki

    2002-12-01

    The effect of the 14-3-3 protein, an adaptor protein of intracellular signal pathways, on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells was investigated. The exogenous 14-3-3 protein from bovine brain increased the Ca(2+)-dependent histamine release from permeabilized mast cells, but only slightly affected the non-permeabilized cells. Partial amino acid sequences showed that the bovine brain 14-3-3 protein contained 14-3-3beta, gamma and zeta isoforms, and that these recombinant isoforms were prepared. Among them, 14-3-3zeta was an active species while the 14-3-3beta and gamma were inactive for histamine release from the permeabilized mast cells. Approximately 15% of the histamine release was stimulated by 14-3-3zeta at 2.5 microM, and half-maximal stimulation occurred at 1 microM. Treatment of the mast cells with wortmannin or staurosporine completely inhibited the stimulatory effect on histamine release caused by Ca(2+) or Ca(2+)/14-3-3zeta, and genistein partially inhibited both stimulatory effects. PD 98059, however, had little effect on the histamine release. These results suggest the possibility that 14-3-3zeta is associated with signal transduction for degranulation of the mast cells.

  2. The use of microelectrode array (MEA) to study rat peritoneal mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chi-Kong; Law, Jessica Ka-Yan; Sam, Sze-Wing; Ingebrandt, Sven; Lau, Hang-Yung Alaster; Rudd, John Anthony; Chan, Mansun

    2008-06-01

    We performed this study to demonstrate the applicability of the microelectrode array (MEA) to study electrophysiological changes of rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of compound 48/80 under normal, Ca(2+)-free, Ca(2+)-free with EDTA, and Cl(-)-free conditions. The use of high extracellular K(+) (KCl, 150 mM), charybdotoxin (ChTX, 100 nM), and Cl(-)-free containing ChTX buffers verified that the hyperpolarizing signal was due to the activation of mainly K(+) and, to a lesser extent, Cl(-) channels. Compound 48/80 concentration-dependently shortened the latent periods (the onset of response) and increased both the spatial (the K(+) and Cl(-) hyperpolarizing field potentials, HFP) and temporal measurements (the duration of response). Ca(2+)-free buffer had no effect on the latent period of compound 48/80 but increased the HFP at high concentrations. The latent period increased while the HFP diminished when cells were equilibrated in Ca(2+)-free buffer containing EDTA. Durations of the HFP were generally longer when cells were in either Ca(2+)-free or Ca(2+)-free containing EDTA buffers than when cells were in normal buffer. The EC(50) values confirmed that effects were only affected in Ca(2+)-free buffer containing EDTA but not in Ca(2+)-free or Cl(-)-free buffers, further reinforcing the hypothesis that the presence of Ca(2+) is not essential to the action of compound 48/80. The present study is the first application of MEA to study rat peritoneal mast cells, and our results indicate that it could be of value in future pharmacological research on other non-excitable cells.

  3. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  4. Rat intestinal mast cell amines are released during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Northover, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increases microvascular permeability in rat small intestinal villi. To determine the mechanism(s) whereby this occurs we have perfused the vasculature of rat isolated small intestines with a gelatin-containing physiological salt solution. Inclusion of N-nitro-L-argintne methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM) or indomethacin (1 μM) in the perfusate increased leakage of injected colloidal carbon into microvessel walls. Pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (10 μM) significantly reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, whereas carbacyclin (1 μM) only reduced the effects of indomethacin. PD151242 (1 μM) showed some antagonism towards the effects of L-NAME, but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3 μM) was inactive. Pre-tment with cyproheptadine (10 μM) reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, and also significantly reduced background (control) colloidal carbon leakage. Small intestines from polymixin B-treated rats showed significantly reduced colloidal carbon leakage in response to L-NAME. This suggests that the leakage-enhancing effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin in this preparation may be mediated by mast cell-derived amines. PMID:18475694

  5. The strain difference in the effect of mercuric chloride on antigen-triggered serotonin release from rat mast cells is not mediated via interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, D; Oliveira, D B

    1996-01-01

    Previous work has shown that in vitro exposure of Brown-Norway (BN) rat peritoneal mast cells to mercuric chloride (HgCl2) causes enhancement of subsequent mediator release induced by cross-linking of surface immunoglobulin E (IgE). This enhancing effect is seen significantly less often with peritoneal cells from Lewis rats. In addition HgCl2 has been shown to suppress interferon (IFN)-gamma production by BN but not Lewis splenocytes. Given that IFN-gamma is known to inhibit mediator release by mast cells, we hypothesized that the strain difference in the effect of HgCl2 on mediator release was mediated via a differential effect on IFN-gamma release from T cells in the mixed peritoneal cell population: IFN-gamma release would be suppressed in the case of the BN rat, releasing the mast cells from inhibition and resulting in the enhancing effect of HgCl2. The aim of the study was to test two predictions of this hypothesis. Exposure of BN rat mast cells to IFN-gamma inhibited subsequent antigen-induced mediator release but did not significantly reduce HgCl2-mediated enhancement of this release. Exposure of Lewis rat mast cells to blocking concentrations of anti-IFN-gamma did not reveal any HgCl2-mediated enhancement of mediator release. These observations provide strong evidence against the hypothesis that the differential effects of HgCl2 on BN and Lewis rat mast cells are mediated via IFN-gamma. In addition the results revealed that BN rat mast cells are significantly more sensitive than Lewis rat mast cells to the inhibitory effects of IFN-gamma on antigen-induced mediator release. PMID:8958063

  6. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Sugarbaker, D.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5{prime} end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes.

  7. Vitamin A and the biosynthesis of sulphated mucopolysaccharides. Experiments with rats and cultured neoplastic mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D. B.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. The uptake and incorporation of [35S]sulphate into mucopolysaccharides by colon and duodenum in vitro are unaffected by the vitamin A status of the animals. 2. Uptake and incorporation in vivo are unaffected at 4hr. after injection of [35S]sulphate, but at later times are decreased in some tissues of vitamin A-deficient animals. 3. The rate of removal of 35S from blood, its rate of appearance in urine, the plasma concentration of sulphate and the uronic acid content of several tissues are not significantly altered in vitamin A deficiency. 4. These results, and direct measurement of 35S in mucopolysaccharides at various times after injection of [35S]sulphate, suggest that the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides is unaffected but that their turnover is increased in vitamin A deficiency. 5. Neither the growth rate of, nor the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into heparin by, P815Y and HC cultured neoplastic mast cells is decreased when the horse serum necessary for growth is treated with ultraviolet light or is replaced by serum from vitamin A-deficient rats. 6. The addition of citral is no more toxic to growth rate or to incorporation of 35S than is the addition of vitamin A itself. 7. It is concluded that neoplastic mast cells in culture do not require vitamin A for growth or for the synthesis of heparin. 8. None of these results is compatible with the view that vitamin A or a derivative is directly involved in the biosynthesis of sulphated mucopolysaccharides. PMID:4237718

  8. Degranulation, density, and distribution of mast cells in the rat thalamus: a light and electron microscopic study in basal conditions and after intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F; Bentivoglio, M

    2000-09-04

    In the adult rat brain mast cells reside selectively in the thalamus. We investigated thalamic mast cells stained by acidic toluidine blue or pinacyanol, and with histamine immunocytochemistry, focusing on their state of activity revealed by degranulation. Mast cells exhibited perivascular prevalence and high quantitative variability, between cases and in different sections, with no asymmetry or topographical selectivity in thalamic nuclei. Pinacyanol, alone or with erythrosine, stained mast cells with higher sensitivity than toluidine blue. However, toluidine blue was highly predictive of pinacyanol staining and provided the best resolution of mast cell cytoplasmic features. Histamine immunocytochemistry labeled 61% of pinacyanol-stained mast cells. Intensely toluidine blue-stained granulated cells, as well as cells exhibiting different degrees of degranulation that paralleled lighter staining, were observed. The response of thalamic mast cells to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) and control cytochrome-c injections was evaluated after 2, 24, and 72 hours. No obvious changes in mast cell number or distribution were found after treatment, but massive degranulation was frequently observed after NGF administration. Significant decrease of staining intensity of mast cells, supporting enhanced degranulation, was documented in NGF-treated animals by quantitative image analysis. Ultrastructural features of mast cell degranulation, with granule coalescence and matrix dissolution, were detected in untreated and NGF-treated cases. The findings point out that mast cells are active in the thalamus in basal conditions and that NGF has the potential to elicit long-lasting degranulation of thalamic mast cells in vivo, exerting a direct effect and/or priming these cells to react to endogenous stimuli.

  9. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  10. Study on the Dynamic Compound Structure Composed of Mast Cells, Blood Vessels, and Nerves in Rat Acupoint

    PubMed Central

    Mingfu, Luo; Xiaotong, Dong; Xiaojing, Song; Jin, Jiang; Jinling, Zhann; Ying, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background. Circulation system, immunity system, and nervous system have a close relationship with meridian phenomen. However, there is still lack of the results of dynamic changes of these structures in acupoint. The aim of this study is to explore the interrelationship by composite staining techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings. Twenty rats were separated into electroacupuncture group (EA) and control group (Con) randomly. In EA group, the Zusanli and Weishu were stimulated with the 0.1 mA for 25 min. The tissue of these acupoints was double-stained with acetylcholinesterase and Toluidine blue. The compound structure of mast cells, nervous fibers, and mast cells in the acupoint was observed. Conclusions/Significance. The blood vessels, mast cells and acetylcholinesterase responded nerves were clearly observed in acupoint tissues. EA can result in the mast cell recruitment and migration along the blood vessels and nervous bundle, which conformed the dynamic compound structure and played important roles in acupuncture. PMID:23878591

  11. Effect of Prolyl-Glycyl-Proline (PGP) and Its Acetylated Form (N-AcPGP) on Calcium Level in the Cytoplasm of Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N S; Kurenkova, A D; Nikishin, D A; Umarova, B A

    2016-08-01

    Tripeptide glycyl-prolyl-proline (PGP), a regulatory peptide of the glyproline family, possesses a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect primarily due to its ability to prevent secretion of the proinflammatory mediator histamine by rat peritoneal mast cells. Activation of mast cell with synacthen (ACTH1-24) and substance 48/80 leads to an increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Pretreatment of mast cells with PGP prevented calcium entry into the cytoplasm from both intercellular space and intracellular stores. Acetylated peptide (N-AcPGP) produced a similar effect on histamine release and intracellular calcium content in mast cells activated with synacthen. These findings indicate that both forms of the peptide can stabilize mast cells and prevent intracellular calcium increase.

  12. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  13. Do variations in mast cell hyperplasia account for differences in radiation-induced lung injury among different mouse strains, rats and nonhuman primates?

    PubMed

    Down, Julian D; Medhora, Meetha; Jackson, Isabel L; Cline, J Mark; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2013-08-01

    The role of mast cell infiltrates in the pathology of radiation damage to the lung has been a subject of continuing investigation over the past four decades. This has been accompanied by a number of proposals as to how mast cells and the secretory products thereof participate in the generation of acute inflammation (pneumonitis) and the chronic process of collagen deposition (fibrosis). An additional pathophysiology examines the possible connection between mast cell hyperplasia and pulmonary hypertension through the release of vasoactive mediators. The timing and magnitude of pneumonitis and fibrosis are known to vary tremendously among different genetic mouse strains and animal species. Therefore, we have systematically compared mast cell numbers in lung sections from nine mouse strains, two rat strains and nonhuman primates (NHP) after whole thorax irradiation (WTI) at doses ranging from 10-15 Gy and at the time of entering respiratory distress. Mice of the BALB/c strain had a dramatic increase in interstitial mast cell numbers, similar to WAG/Rij and August rats, while relatively low levels of mast cell infiltrate were observed in other mouse strains (CBA, C3H, B6, C57L, WHT and TO mice). Enumeration of mast cell number in five NHPs (rhesus macaque), exhibiting severe pneumonitis at 17 weeks after 10 Gy WTI, also indicated a low response shared by the majority of mouse strains. There appeared to be no relationship between the mast cell response and the strain-dependent susceptibility towards pneumonitis or fibrosis. Further investigations are required to explore the possible participation of mast cells in mediating specific vascular responses and whether a genetically diverse mast cell response occurs in humans.

  14. Do Variations in Mast Cell Hyperplasia Account for Differences in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury among Different Mouse Strains, Rats and Nonhuman Primates?

    PubMed Central

    Down, Julian D.; Medhora, Meetha; Jackson, Isabel L.; Cline, J. Mark; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    The role of mast cell infiltrates in the pathology of radiation damage to the lung has been a subject of continuing investigation over the past four decades. This has been accompanied by a number of proposals as to how mast cells and the secretory products thereof participate in the generation of acute inflammation (pneumonitis) and the chronic process of collagen deposition (fibrosis). An additional pathophysiology examines the possible connection between mast cell hyperplasia and pulmonary hypertension through the release of vasoactive mediators. The timing and magnitude of pneumonitis and fibrosis are known to vary tremendously among different genetic mouse strains and animal species. Therefore, we have systematically compared mast cell numbers in lung sections from nine mouse strains, two rat strains and nonhuman primates (NHP) after whole thorax irradiation (WTI) at doses ranging from 10–15 Gy and at the time of entering respiratory distress. Mice of the BALB/c strain had a dramatic increase in interstitial mast cell numbers, similar to WAG/Rij and August rats, while relatively low levels of mast cell infiltrate were observed in other mouse strains (CBA, C3H, B6, C57L, WHT and TO mice). Enumeration of mast cell number in five NHPs (rhesus macaque), exhibiting severe pneumonitis at 17 weeks after 10 Gy WTI, also indicated a low response shared by the majority of mouse strains. There appeared to be no relationship between the mast cell response and the strain-dependent susceptibility towards pneumonitis or fibrosis. Further investigations are required to explore the possible participation of mast cells in mediating specific vascular responses and whether a genetically diverse mast cell response occurs in humans. PMID:23819595

  15. Calcium- and guanine-nucleotide-dependent exocytosis in permeabilized rat mast cells. Modulation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, W R; Jackson, R C

    1990-01-01

    We have used a digitonin-permeabilized cell system to study the signal transduction pathways responsible for stimulus-secretion coupling in the rat peritoneal mast cell. Conditions were established for permeabilizing the mast cell plasma membrane without disrupting secretory vesicles. Exocytotic release of histamine from digitonin-permeabilized cells required a combination of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ and the stable guanine nucleotide analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]), but was independent of exogenous ATP. In the presence of 40 microM-GTP[S], exocytosis was half-maximal at 1.3 microM-Ca2+ and maximal at 10 microM-Ca2+; GTP[S] alone (100 microM) had no effect on histamine release in the absence of added Ca2+. In the presence of 10 microM free Ca2+, 5 microM-GTP[S] was required for half-maximal exocytosis. To examine the possible role of protein kinase C (PKC) in exocytosis, we utilized 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to activate PKC and studied its effect on histamine release from permeabilized mast cells. Cells that had been incubated with TPA (25 nM for 5 min) exhibited increased sensitivity to both GTP[S] and Ca2+. The PKC inhibitor staurosporine blocked the effect of TPA without inhibiting normal exocytosis in response to the combination of GTP[S] and Ca2+. In addition, down-regulation of mast-cell PKC by long-term TPA treatment (25 nM for 20 h) blocked the ability of the cells to respond to TPA and inhibited exocytosis in response to Ca2+ and GTP[S] by 40-50%. These results suggest that the sensitivity of the exocytotic machinery of the mast cell can be altered by PKC-catalysed phosphorylation events, but that activation of PKC is not required for exocytosis to occur. Images Fig. 7. PMID:1689146

  16. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

  17. Mast cell activation and response to tolterodine in the rat urinary bladder in a chronic model of intravesical protamine sulfate and bacterial endotoxin-induced cystitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo-Hwa; Jin, Long-Hu; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Han, Jee-Young; Kang, Ju-Hee; Yoon, Sang-Min; Park, Chang-Shin; Lee, Tack

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use an animal model of interstitial cystitis (IC) in order to investigate the histology and function of the bladder, with a particular focus on mast cell degranulation and response to detrusor overactivity (DO) to tolterodine. A total of 18 female Sprague‑Dawley rats were used. In 12 rats, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was intravesically instilled following the induction of IC by protamine sulfate (PS) and six rats were subjected to sham instillations. Following 1 month, cystometry was performed. The effects of tolterodine were tested in half of the animals with IC. All rats in the IC group demonstrated DO during the filling phase and no significant changes in the frequency or pressure compared with that following tolterodine injection were identified. Histological examination revealed a significant increase in the total number of infiltrated mast cells in IC rats compared with that in the sham rats (P<0.05). Degranulated mast cells were evident in 80% of rats with IC; however, they were not apparent in the sham rats. Urinary bladder inflammation, similar to that in human IC in terms of degranulated mast cells and bladder function, was induced in rats. The animal model used in the present study provided insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the ineffectiveness of anticholinergics in patients with overlapping IC and overactive bladder (OAB).

  18. Resveratrol efficiently improves pulmonary function via stabilizing mast cells in a rat intestinal injury model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Weicheng; Hu, Dan; Han, Xue; Wang, Hanbin; Yang, Jianyu; Xu, Yang; Li, Yuantao; Yao, Weifeng; Chen, Chaojin

    2017-09-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (IIR) leads to acute lung injury (ALI) distally by aggravating pulmonary oxidative stress. Resveratrol is effective in attenuating ALI through its antioxidant capacity. This study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on IIR-induced ALI and to explore the role of mast cells (MCs) activation in a rat model of IIR. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to IIR by occluding the superior mesenteric artery for 60min followed by 4-hour reperfusion. Resveratrol was intraperitoneally injected at a dose of 15mg/kg for 5days before IIR. MCs stabilizer/inhibitor cromolyn sodium and degranulator compound 48/80 were used to explore the interaction between resveratrol and MCs. Lung tissues were collected for pathological detection and MCs staining. Pulmonary protein expression of surfactant protein-C (SP-C), tryptase, p47(phox) and gp91(phox) (two NADPH oxidase subunits), ICAM-1(intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and P-selectin were detected. The levels of oxidative stress markers (SOD, MDA, H2O2 and MPO) and β-hexosaminidase were also measured. At the end of IIR, lung injury was significantly increased and was associated with decreased expression of SP-C and increased lung oxidative stress. Increased inflammation as well as activation of MCs was also observed in the lungs after IIR. All these changes were prevented or reversed by resveratrol pretreatment or MCs inhibition with cromolyn sodium. However, these protective effects of resveratrol or cromolyn sodium were reduced by MCs degranulator compound 48/80. These findings reveal that resveratrol attenuates IIR-induced ALI by reducing NADPH oxidase protein expression and inflammation through stabilizing MCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Acute stress modulates the histamine content of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract through interleukin-1 and corticotropin-releasing factor release in rats.

    PubMed

    Eutamene, Helene; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2003-12-15

    Stress results in activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and affects illnesses such as neuroinflammatory syndrome. In vivo acute stress (restraint stress) induces gastrointestinal function disturbances through colonic mast cell activation. This study investigated the effect of acute stress in histamine content of colonic mast cells, and the central role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in this effect. After a restraint stress session colonic segments were isolated and submitted to three protocols: (i) determination of histamine levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after incubation with 48/80 compound, (ii) evaluation by histology of mucosal mast cell (MMC) number and (iii) determination of histamine immunoreactivity of MMC. These procedures were conducted (1) in sham or stressed rats, (2) in stressed rats previously treated with intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41, (3) in naive rats pretreated with I.C.V. rhIL-1beta or CRF and (4) in rats treated with central IL-1beta and CRF plus alpha-helical CRF and IL-1ra, respectively (cross-antagonism reaction). Acute stress increases histamine content in colonic mast cells, without degranulation. I.C.V. pretreatment with IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41 blocked stress-induced mast cell histamine content increase. Both I.C.V. rhIL-1beta and CRF injections reproduced the stress-linked changes. I.C.V. treatment with CRF antagonist blocked I.C.V. rhIL-1beta-induced mast cell histamine content increase, whereas central IL-1ra did not affect stress events induced by I.C.V. CRF administration. These results suggest that in rats acute stress increases colonic mast cell histamine content. This effect is mediated by the release in cascade in the brain first of IL-1 and secondly of CRF.

  20. The effects of histamine and prostaglandin D2 on rat mast-cell cyclic AMP and mediator release

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, S.; Kaliner, M.

    1981-11-01

    The possibility that histamine may play a functional role in modulating mast-cell secretion, as has been suggested for basophil degranulation, has both physiologic and pharmacologic implications. Therefore the capacity of histamine to influence rat peritoneal mast-cell (RPMC) cyclic AMP levels and reversed anaphylatic degranulation as reflected in the release of 3H-serotonin (5-HT) was examined. To ascertain that RPMC were functionally responsive to exogenous hormonal stimulation, assessment of prostaglandin (PG) D2 effects on cyclic AMP and 5-HT release were determined in parallel. Although PGD2 (100 microM) increased cyclic AMP and inhibited 5-HT release in the presence of 50 microM aminophylline, histamine (up to 1000 microM) was ineffective was ineffective in both. However, 1000 microM histamine in the presence of 500 microM aminophylline was capable of transiently increasing RPMC cyclic AMP (for 15 to 30 sec) and under these conditions of suppressing 5-HT release. The receptor subtype involved in the suppressive actions of histamine appeared to be of the H-1 type as reflected in the capacity of specific H-1 agonists to reproduce the inhibition of 5-HT release, whereas neither H-2 agonists nor H-2 antagonists had any influence. Thus, under conditions in which phosphodiesterase enzymatic action is impaired, histamine in extremely high concentrations is able to modulate mast-cell secretion. However, it seems very unlikely that this action of histamine has any physiologic significance.

  1. Role of mast cells in wound healing process after glass - fiber composite implant in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodella, L F; Rezzani, Rita; Buffoli, Barbara; Bonomini, Francesca; Tengattini, Sandra; Laffranchi, Laura; Paganelli, C; Sapelli, P L; Bianchi, Rossella

    2006-01-01

    Glass-fiber composites are frequently used in dentistry. In order to evaluate their biocompatibility we tested, in an experimental model “in vivo”, their tissue response pointing our attention on presence of mast cells (MCs) and fibrotic process. Sprague Dawley rats were used for the experimental design. The fibers were introduced in a subcutaneous pocket along the middle dorsal line between the two scapulas for 7, 14 or 21 days. At the end of the treatments the skins were excised and then processed for Toluidine Blue, to determine the presence of MCs, and Picrosirius Red staining, to evaluate the presence of fibrotic tissue. Our preliminary results showed and increase of both MC number and deposition of collagen type I, which characterized the fibrotic tissue. So, subsequent aims of our study were to evaluate the role played by MCs in tissue fibrosis and to give a possible explanation regarding the mechanisms that were responsible of biological response observed, through the analyses of some proteins, such as metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), its inhibitor (TIMP-2) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Our data confirmed the involvement of TGF-β, released by MCs, in the disruption of the equilibrium between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 that were implicated in the enhancement of fibrosis. In summary, this study demonstrate that this type of materials induced an inflammatory response at the site of implant and help to clarify what type of mechanism and which proteins are involved in this biological response. Nevertheless, more extensive investigations are in progress to better evaluate the inflammatory process. PMID:17125597

  2. Prevention of mast cell degranulation by disodium cromoglycate attenuates the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Banasová, Alena; Maxová, Hana; Hampl, Václav; Vízek, Martin; Povýsilová, Viera; Novotná, Jana; Vajnerová, Olga; Hnilicková, Olga; Herget, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces lung vascular remodeling, which results in pulmonary hypertension. Vascular remodeling is associated with collagenolysis and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). One of the possible sources of MMPs in hypoxic lung are mast cells. The role of lung mast cell collagenolytic activity in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension was tested by the inhibitor of mast cell degranulation disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Rats were treated with DSCG in an early or later phase of isobaric hypoxia. Control groups were exposed to hypoxia only or to normoxia. Lung hemodynamics, muscularization and collagen metabolism in the walls of peripheral pulmonary vessels in the lungs were measured. DSCG applied at an early phase of exposure to hypoxia reduced the development of pulmonary hypertension, inhibited muscularization in peripheral pulmonary arteries and decreased the amount of collagen cleavage fragments in prealveolar vessels. Mast cell degranulation plays a role in the initiation of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Antibiotics Suppress Activation of Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells and Reduce Dietary Lipid Absorption in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirokazu; Zhang, Linda S; Martinez, Kristina; Chang, Eugene B; Yang, Qing; Wang, Fei; Howles, Philip N; Hokari, Ryota; Miura, Soichiro; Tso, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The gut microbiota affects intestinal permeability and mucosal mast cells (MMCs) responses. Activation of MMCs has been associated with absorption of dietary fat. We investigated whether the gut microbiota contributes to the fat-induced activation of MMCs in rats, and how antibiotics might affect this process. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptomycin and penicillin for 4 days (n = 6-8) to reduce the abundance of their gut flora, or normal drinking water (controls, n = 6-8). They underwent lymph fistula surgery and after an overnight recovery were given an intraduodenal bolus of intralipid. We collected intestinal tissues and lymph fluid and assessed activation of MMCs, intestinal permeability, and fat transport parameters. Compared with controls, intestinal lymph from rats given antibiotics had reduced levels of mucosal mast cell protease II (produced by MMCs) and decreased activity of diamine oxidase (produced by enterocytes) (P < .05). Rats given antibiotics had reduced intestinal permeability in response to dietary lipid compared with controls (P < .01). Unexpectedly, antibiotics also reduced lymphatic transport of triacylglycerol and phospholipid (P < .01), concomitant with decreased levels of mucosal apolipoproteins B, A-I, and A-IV (P < .01). No differences were found in intestinal motility or luminal pancreatic lipase activity between rats given antibiotics and controls. These effects were not seen with an acute dose of antibiotics or 4 weeks after the antibiotic regimen ended. The intestinal microbiota appears to activate MMCs after the ingestion of fat in rats; this contributes to fat-induced intestinal permeability. We found that the gut microbiome promotes absorption of lipid, probably by intestinal production of apolipoproteins and secretion of chylomicrons. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention of mast cell degranulation by disodium cromoglycate delayed the regression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Maxová, Hana; Vasilková, Marianna; Novotná, Jana; Vajnerová, Olga; Bansová, Alena; Vízek, Martin; Herget, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling induced by chronic hypoxia regresses after return to normoxia. This regression is associated with an increased amount of collagenase in pulmonary mast cells and increased collagenolytic and elastolytic activity in the lung tissue. The role of lung mast cells during recovery from chronic hypoxia was tested by the inhibition of their degranulation by disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Male Wistar rats (n = 46) were exposed to isobaric hypoxia (3 weeks, F(i)O(2) 0.1). Thirteen of them were tested immediately at the end of exposure, 17 were treated with DSCG during the first 4 days of recovery and tested on the 5th or 14th day of recovery, 16 untreated animals were measured at the same time intervals. These groups were compared with 12 animals kept in normoxia. The rats were anesthetized (Thiopental) and their pulmonary arterial blood pressure (PAP), cardiac output and heart weight were tested, as well as the collagen composition of the walls of the peripheral pulmonary arteries. DSCG applied during the first 4 days of recovery from chronic hypoxia blocked the decrease in PAP during the early phase of recovery and had no influence on PAP at a later phase. DSCG administration prevents collagen splitting in peripheral pulmonary vessels at the early phase of recovery. PAP and right ventricle hypertrophy were normalized after 14 days of return to normoxia. Mast cell degranulation plays a role in the regression of pulmonary hypertension during the early phase of recovery from chronic hypoxia. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Biochemical and functional characterization of glycosaminoglycans released from degranulating rat peritoneal mast cells: Insights into the physiological role of endogenous heparin.

    PubMed

    Lever, Rebecca; Smailbegovic, Amir; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Gray, Elaine; Hogwood, John; Francis, Stephen M; Richardson, Neville V; Page, Clive P; Mulloy, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The properties of commercially prepared heparin as an anticoagulant and antithrombotic agent in medicine are better understood than is the physiological role of heparin in its native form, where it is uniquely found in the secretory granules of mast cells. In the present study we have isolated and characterised the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) released from degranulating rat peritoneal mast cells. Analysis of the GAGs by NMR spectroscopy showed the presence of both heparin and the galactosaminoglycan dermatan sulphate; heparinase digestion profiles and measurements of anticoagulant activity were consistent with this finding. The rat peritoneal mast cell GAGs significantly inhibited accumulation of leukocytes in the rat peritoneal cavity in response to IL-1β (p < 0.05, n = 6/group), and inhibited adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes in the inflamed rat cremasteric microcirculation in response to LPS (p < 0.001, n = 4/group). FTIR spectra of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were altered by treatment of the cells with heparin degrading enzymes, and restored by the addition of exogenous heparin. In conclusion, we have shown that rat peritoneal mast cells contain a mixture of GAGs that possess anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Isolation of rat lung mast cells for purposes of one-week cultivation using novel Percoll variant Percoll PLUS.

    PubMed

    Kubrycht, J; Maxová, H; Nyč, O; Vajner, L; Novotná, J; Hezinová, A; Trnková, A; Vrablová, K; Vytášek, R; Valoušková, V

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged cultivation of separated rat lung mast cells (LMC) in vitro is necessary to better investigate a possible role of LMC in different stages of tissue remodeling induced by hypoxia. Rat lung mast cells (LMC) were separated using a protocol including an improved proteolytic extraction and two subsequent density gradient separations on Ficoll-Paque PLUS and a new generation of Percoll, i.e. Percoll PLUS. Instead of usual isotonic stock Percoll solution, an alternative "asymptotically isotonic" stock solution was more successful in our density separation of LMC on Percoll PLUS. Separated cells were cultivated for six days in media including stem cell factor, interleukins IL-3 and IL-6, and one of two alternative mixtures of antibiotics. These cultivations were performed without any contamination and with only rare changes in cell size and morphology. Model co-cultivation of two allogenic fractions of LMC often caused considerable rapid changes in cell morphology and size. In contrast to these observations no or rare morphological changes were found after cultivation under hypoxic conditions. In conclusions, we modified separation on Percoll PLUS to be widely used, altered LMC separation with respect to purposes of long-lasting cultivation and observed some model morphological changes of LMC.

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of outwardly rectifying Cl- currents in rat peritoneal mast cells: a comparison of different stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Tim; Ziegler, Albrecht; Heber, Dieter; Seebeck, Jörg

    2003-10-08

    Diethylstilbestrol and other stilbene derivatives can provide some inhibition of the outwardly rectifying Cl- current (I(Cl-,OR)) in rat peritoneal mast cells. In order to elucidate structure-activity relationships of diethylstilbestrol, 12 stilbenes as well as 17beta-estradiol and hexestrol were tested in rat peritoneal mast cells using the nystatin-perforated patch approach of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Since trans-stilbene showed no effect, the substituents of diethylstilbestrol must be of importance. The introduction of only one hydroxy group in trans-stilbene produced potent inhibition of the I(Cl-,OR) (IC50: 3.3 microM). But in contrast, resveratrol with hydroxy groups at positions 4, 3', and 5' as well as methoxy substituted stilbene derivatives and 17beta-estradiol were ineffective. On the other hand, hexestrol potently inhibited I(Cl-,OR) indicating that the aromatic ring systems can also be connected by an ethyl bridge. In summary, a hydroxy group at position 4 (or 4') is a prerequisite for diethylstilbestrol-mediated inhibition of I(Cl-,OR).

  8. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  9. Effects of strong electrolytes on the iron alum--Alcian Blue--Safranin staining of mast cell granules of the rat.

    PubMed

    Miyata, K; Takaya, K

    1980-09-01

    Rat mast cells fixed in Carnoy's fluid were stained with iron alum-Alcian Blue--Safranin solution after pre-treatment with strong electrolyte solutions including acids, neutral salts and alkalis. Although both red and blue mast cells were observed without pre-treatment, most mast cells were stained blue and a few red when they were stained after the pre-treatment. Mast cell granules contain salt complexes formed between basic proteins and acidic polysaccharides through ionic linkages between protein basic groups and polysaccharide sulphate and carboxylic acid groups. It is suggested that when sections are treated with strong electrolyte solutions, complexes are broken by disruption of ionic linkages and sulphate and carboxylic acid groups of polysaccharides masked by basic proteins become available for binding Alcian Blue. This was confirmed by model experiments performed with smears of a heparin-lysozyme complex. When mast cells were fixed in aldehyde-containing fixatives, no effects of strong electrolyte solutions on the staining properties of mast cell granules were revealed.

  10. Mast-cell-releasing tryptase triggers acute lung injury induced by small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by activating PAR-2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaoliang; Liu, Dezhao; Huang, Pinjie; Gao, Wanling; Chen, Xinzhi; Hei, Ziqing

    2012-06-01

    Mast cell has been demonstrated to be involved in the small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury, however, the precise role of tryptase released from mast cell on acute lung injury(ALI) induced by IIR remains to be elucidated, our study aimed to observe the roles of tryptase on ALI triggered by IIR and its underlying mechanism. Adult SD rats were randomized into sham-operated group, sole IIR group in which rats were subjected to 75 min superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 4 h reperfusion, or IIR being respectively treated with cromolyn sodium, protamine, and compound 48/80. The above agents were, respectively, administrated intravenously 5 min before reperfusion. At the end of experiment, lung tissue was obtained for assays for protein expressions of tryptase and mast cell protease 7 (MCP7) and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). Pulmonary mast cell number and levels of IL-8 were quantified. Lung histologic injury scores and lung water content were measured. IIR resulted in lung injury evidenced as significant increases in lung histological scores and lung water contents, accompanied with concomitant increases of expressions of tryptase and MCP7, and elevations in PAR-2 expressions and IL-8 levels in lungs. Stabilizing mast cell with cromolyn sodium and inhibiting tryptase with protamine significantly reduced IIR-mediated ALI and the above biochemical changes while activating mast cell with compound 48/80 further aggravated IIR-mediated ALI and the increases of above parameters. Tryptase released from mast cells mediates ALI induced by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by activating PAR-2 to produce IL-8.

  11. Prostaglandin D2 generation by rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with Datura stramonium agglutinin and its inhibition by haptenic sugar and wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko; Uchida, Masaatsu K

    2002-09-01

    The production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) by rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomer-specific Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) for 10 min in the presence of 0.3 mM Ca2+ was examined. Previously, our group reported that the incubation of rat mast cells with DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) under similar conditions resulted in a calcium influx and histamine release via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway of the mast cells, and the histamine release was inhibited by haptenic sugar chitooligosaccharides or GlcNAc-specific lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (K. Matsuda et al., Jpn J Pharmacol 66, 195 - 204 (1994)). DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) dose-dependently stimulated the mast cells to generate PGD2. Chitooligosaccharides (1% w/v) and WGA (100 microg/ml) inhibited the production of PGD2 induced by 100 microg/ml of DSA, suggesting that the effect of DSA is sugar-specific. A prostaglandin G/H synthase inhibitor NS-398 (N-[cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulfonamide) (10 microM) inhibited the formation of PGD2 induced by DSA (20 microg/ml). These results suggest that the binding of DSA to the corresponding sugar residues on the mast cell surface mediates the signaling of the prostaglandin G/H synthase pathway.

  12. Effect of 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet (PUVA) radiation on mast cells. II. In vitro PUVA inhibits degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by compound 48/80

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, K.; Danno, K.; Tachibana, T.; Horio, T.

    1986-07-01

    Rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with a histamine liberator, compound 48/80, showed a significantly reduced capacity for releasing histamine following in vitro treatment with 0.1 micrograms/ml of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 1-5 J/cm2 of long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) irradiation (PUVA). No remarkable inhibition in histamine release was observed in the cells treated with 8-MOP only. Irradiation with 5 J/cm2 of UVA alone exerted an inhibitory effect on histamine release, to a lesser extent than PUVA. PUVA irradiation did not bring any decrease in cell viability or any spontaneous release of histamine from irradiated cells as shown by phase-contrast microscopy and by histamine assay, respectively. These results suggest that PUVA treatment may cause a noncytotoxic disturbance at mast cell membranes or on surface receptors, leading to a decreased capacity for secreting chemical mediators.

  13. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  14. Characteristics of histamine release from rat mast cells in relation to the valency of the stimulating ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Healicon, R M; Foreman, J C

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the valency of a ligand and the subsequent characteristics of histamine release was investigated in rat peritoneal mast cells. The cells were passively sensitized to the DNP hapten and a series of DNP-human serum albumin conjugates of known valency were used to induce histamine release. The rate of release of histamine induced by these conjugates was independent of the DNP/HSA ratio when the ratio was between 71.3 and 7.2. Marked slowing of the release occurred as the ratio was reduced below 7.2. The rate of desensitization of the cells slowed as a continuous function as the DNP/HSA ratio was reduced. 45Calcium uptake measurements showed that the changes in histamine release were paralleled by changes in the membrane permeability to calcium. The rate of release of histamine from mast cells and the rate of desensitization of the cells are discussed in terms of the size of IgE receptor complexes on the cell membrane. PMID:2420710

  15. In vivo effect of the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (Permixon) on mast cell accumulation and glandular epithelium trophism in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Kyroudi, Aspasia; Zervas, Anastasios; Papadoukakis, Stefanos; Giannopoulos, Aris; Kittas, Christos; Karayannacos, Panagiotis

    2002-04-01

    The Serenoa repens lipido-sterolic extract (SRLSE, Permixon, Pierre Fabre Medicament, Castres, France) is used to treat benign prostate hyperplasia. We studied the in vivo effect of SRLSE on mast cell accumulation and the histological characteristics of the rat ventral prostate. Adult Wistar rats received either tocopherol or SRLSE (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively) every second day for 90 days. Histological features were studied in hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections while mean mast cell numbers were determined in Giemsa-stained sections. The central region of the ventral prostate in treated animals showed significant changes with acinar epithelium becoming flat or low cuboidal. In the same region, mean mast cell number per optical field in the control, low-dose and high-dose groups were, respectively, 4.7+/-0.7, 3.4+/-1.0 and 2.4+/-0.6, showing a dose-dependent, statistically significant decrease. Administering SRLSE significantly reduces mast cell accumulation and provokes epithelium atrophy within the central area of the rat ventral prostate. These phenomena may participate in the clinical activity of the drug.

  16. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ranadive, N.S.; Shirwadkar, S.; Persad, S.; Menon, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of /sup 51/Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker /sup 51/Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells.

  17. Release of the mucosal mast cell granule chymase, rat mast cell protease-II, during anaphylaxis is associated with the rapid development of paracellular permeability to macromolecules in rat jejunum

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The soluble granule chymase, rat mast cell protease-II (RMCP-II), is abundantly expressed in intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC) but its function is not known. One hypothesis is that RMCP-II degrades the epithelial basement membrane and promotes the loss of enterocytes typically associated with type I hypersensitivity reactions in the rat. To test this hypothesis more directly, ex vivo perfusion of the cranial mesenteric artery and jejunal lumen was used to monitor the anaphylactic release of RMCP-II and its effects on mucosal permeability and epithelial integrity. Within 2 min of intravascular challenge with soluble adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis worm antigen there was a 1,000-fold (P < 0.02) increase in the concentration of RMCP-II in the vascular perfusate from the jejunum of Nippostrongylus-sensitized rats but not the controls. Similarly, translocation of RMCP-II into the gut lumen increased 10-fold (P < 0.02) after 2 min only in worm antigen- challenged immune rats. Using an identical protocol, but incorporating Evans blue-labeled human serum albumin (EB-HSA) in the vascular perfusate, the timing of the release of RMCP-II into the two compartments was very similar to the first experiment and furthermore the translocation of EB-HSA increased 18-fold (P < 0.05) after 4 min in sensitized rats challenged with worm antigen. To examine the effects of RMCP-II more directly 1 mg of the highly purified chymase was introduced into the cranial mesenteric artery in ex vivo perfused normal rats. A significant (P < 0.05) 70-fold increase in concentration of RMCP-II in jejunal perfusate occurred after 6 min. In a repeat dose- response experiment, infusion of 0.375, 0.75, or 1.5 mg of RMCP-II, together with EB-HSA, established that the cumulative amounts of RMCP- II and EB-HSA translocated from the vasculature to the gut lumen in each perfusion (during the 10-min period of RMCP-II infusion) were significantly correlated. Analysis of intestinal perfusates by SDS-PAGE and

  18. Agarwood Inhibits Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells and Reduces Scratching Behavior in Mice: Effect of Agarwood on Histamine Release and Scratching Behavior.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Eiji; Shimizu, Yasuharu; Masui, Ryo; Tsubonoya, Tomoe; Hayakawa, Tomomi; Sudoh, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the effects of agarwood on histamine release from mast cells in rats and on the scratching behaviors in mice. Histamine release from rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or concanavalin A (Con A) and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice were examined to investigate the effects of agarwood. The hyaluronidase activity and the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in mast cells were examined to investigate the mechanisms for the inhibition of histamine release. The correlation between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the content of its typical ingredients, a 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives, was analyzed using thin-layer chromatography. Agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on mast-cell histamine release induced by compound 48/80 or Con A without any effect on hyaluronidase activity; this effect involves an increase in the cAMP levels in mast cells. Oral administration of agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. The inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release were quite different, depending on the area where the agarwood was produced, its quality, and its market price. No correlation was found between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the typical ingredients of agarwood, which are 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives. These results show that agarwood inhibits histamine release from mast cells partially through an increase in the cAMP levels in cells. We suggest that some active ingredients of agarwood must be effective on oral intake and that agarwood can be used to treat patients with a number of conditions, including urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and bronchial asthma, in which an increase in histamine release occurs. Differences in the pharmacological effects of this crude drug among markets may provide important information for the quality control of this herbal medicine.

  19. Prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat skin flap model: the role of mast cells, cromolyn sodium, and histamine receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, P G; Lee, J J; Mastorakos, D; Hu, Q Y; Pinto, J T; Santamaria, E

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of mast cells and their principal product, histamine, in ischemia/reperfusion injury. Cromolyn sodium, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine were administered to ischemic flaps just before reperfusion and evaluated for flap survival, mast cell count, neutrophil count, and myeloperoxidase levels. Epigastric island skin flaps were elevated in 49 rats; they were rendered ischemic by clamping the artery for 10 hours. Thirty minutes before reperfusion, the rats were treated with intraperitoneal saline (n = 11), cimetidine (n = 11), diphenhydramine (n = 11), or cromolyn sodium (n = 10). Flap survival was evaluated at 7 days. Neutrophil counts, mast cell counts, and myeloperoxidase levels were evaluated 12 hours after reperfusion. Flap necrosis in the sham group of animals (n = 6) was 0.0 percent, as expected, whereas the control group (saline-treated animals) had 47.3+/-33.4 percent necrosis. Animals treated with diphenhydramine and cimetidine demonstrated a significant decrease in flap necrosis to 17.7+/-8.8 percent and 19.4+/-14.7 percent, respectively. This protective effect was not seen with cromolyn sodium (44.3+/-35.6 percent). Both neutrophil and mast cell counts were significantly decreased in flaps from antihistamine-treated and sham animals versus both saline- and cromolyn sodium-treated groups. The administration of diphenhydramine and cimetidine before reperfusion can significantly reduce the extent of flap necrosis and the neutrophil and mast cell counts caused by ischemia/reperfusion. This protective effect is not seen with cromolyn sodium. The protective effect of antihistamines on flap necrosis might be related to the decrease in neutrophils and, possibly, mast cells within the flap.

  20. Evidence for lipoxygenase activity in induction of histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by chelated iron.

    PubMed

    Magro, A M; Brai, M

    1983-05-01

    The ferric iron-desferrioxamine B chelate effectively induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The release was maximum at exogenous ferric iron concentrations of 10-100 microM, and the chelate was non-toxic, as determined by trypan blue uptake. In many aspects the chelate-induced histamine release paralleled IgE-mediated release. The kinetics, temperature, and Ca2+ dependence resembled antigen-induced release. Phosphatidylserine potentiated the release in Wistar rats but not in fawn-hooded rats, a strain which does not respond to phosphatidylserine potentiation. The chelate-induced histamine release was blocked by the metabolic inhibitors dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, 2-deoxyglucose, and antimycin A. Lipoxygenase inhibitors also effectively blocked release, indicating an involvement of fatty acid metabolism via the lipoxygenase pathway. Free radical scavengers and antioxidants antagonistic to lipid peroxidation also inhibited the chelate-induced histamine release. Overall the data raise the possibility that endogenous cellular iron may be involved in the generation of free radicals and lipid peroxidation and that these may be early events in IgE-mediated release of histamine.

  1. Evidence for lipoxygenase activity in induction of histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by chelated iron.

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A M; Brai, M

    1983-01-01

    The ferric iron-desferrioxamine B chelate effectively induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The release was maximum at exogenous ferric iron concentrations of 10-100 microM, and the chelate was non-toxic, as determined by trypan blue uptake. In many aspects the chelate-induced histamine release paralleled IgE-mediated release. The kinetics, temperature, and Ca2+ dependence resembled antigen-induced release. Phosphatidylserine potentiated the release in Wistar rats but not in fawn-hooded rats, a strain which does not respond to phosphatidylserine potentiation. The chelate-induced histamine release was blocked by the metabolic inhibitors dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, 2-deoxyglucose, and antimycin A. Lipoxygenase inhibitors also effectively blocked release, indicating an involvement of fatty acid metabolism via the lipoxygenase pathway. Free radical scavengers and antioxidants antagonistic to lipid peroxidation also inhibited the chelate-induced histamine release. Overall the data raise the possibility that endogenous cellular iron may be involved in the generation of free radicals and lipid peroxidation and that these may be early events in IgE-mediated release of histamine. PMID:6188682

  2. Structure-activity relationship of a series of 17 parabens and related compounds for histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells and skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Uramaru, Naoto; Inoue, Toshio; Watanabe, Yoko; Shigematsu, Hidenari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Parabens, which are a homologous series of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, have been used as preservatives in cosmetics, medicines and foods because of their antimicrobial activity. However, parabens in cosmetics have been suspected to cause allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, we examined paraben-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and skin reaction in guinea pigs using a series of 17 parabens with different alcohol side chains, ranging from methylparaben to dodecylparaben. Octylparaben showed the greatest histamine release-inducing activity from mast cells, and the activity was decreased in shorter- and longer-side-chain parabens. Octyl benzoate, octyl o-hydroxybenzoate and phenyloctane caused no significant degranulation of mast cells, whereas octyl m-hydroxybenzoate, octyl p-hydroxybenzoate and octyl phenol induced concentration-related degranulation. Metabolites of these parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) did not show histamine release-inducing activity. In the guinea pig skin reaction test, heptylparaben induced a typical strong skin reaction, while butylparaben induced a typical weak skin reaction, and methylparaben and dodecylparaben were inactive. Metabolites of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) were also inactive. These results indicate that interaction of parabens with rat mast cells requires a minimum length and adequate lipophilicity of the alkyl side chain. Since metabolites of parabens were inactive, parabens appear to be direct-acting allergens.

  3. Chronic low-level administration of diquat increases the nociceptive response to gastric distension in rats: role of mast cells and tachykinin receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Anton, P M; Theodorou, V; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    2001-05-01

    Dietary factors can modulate visceral sensitivity and are suggested to interact with neuroimmune pathways. To determine whether daily low-level exposure to a food contaminant (diquat) alters sensitivity to gastric distension (GD) and the role of mast cells and tachykinin receptors activation, two series of experiments were conducted in eight groups of eight male Wistar rats (200-250 g) receiving daily doses of either diquat (0.1 mg/kg per day orally) or water for 21 days. In the first series, rats were sacrificed at the end of treatments and the gastric mucosal mast cell (MMC) number was histologically quantified. In the second series, after 21 days of treatment the cardiovascular depressor (CVD) response and corresponding gastric volumes were recorded under GD (from 10 to 40 mmHg). Doxantrazole (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)), a mast cell stabilizer, and SR 140333 (1 mg/kg i.p.) and MEN 11420 (0.1 mg/kg intravenously), respectively NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonists, were administered before GD. Before and after GD, blood samples were taken to measure blood histamine and the gastric MMC number was determined after sacrifice. Diquat treatment increased the MMC number. In diquat-treated rats, GD increased the CVD response and blood histamine level and induced MMC degranulation. Doxantrazole did not modify the hypersensitivity to GD but prevented mast cell degranulation. Both NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonists blocked the enhanced CVD response induced by diquat and prevented mast cell degranulation. None of the drugs had any effect in control animals. Prolonged exposure to a food contaminant at doses possibly found in food increases gastric sensitivity to distension, activates tachykinin receptors and results in MMC degranulation after GD.

  4. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  5. [Effects of acupoint-nerve block on mast cell activity, manual acupuncture- and electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in adjuvant arthritis rats].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong; Zhan, Rui; Yu, Xiao-jia; Zhang, Di; Li, Wei-min; Ding, Guang-hong

    2009-02-01

    To observe the effects of acupoint-nerve block on manual-acupuncture (MA) and electroacupuncture (EA) analgesia and mast cells degranulation in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats in order to analyze the underlying peripheral mechanism of MA and EA analgesia. A total of 80 SD rats were randomized into control, AA model (M), normal + lidocaine (NL), EA, EA-ST36 + Lidoc (L + EA), Dubi (ST 35) + Lidoc + EA-ST36 (DL + ZEA), Xiajuxu (ST 39) + Lidoc + EA-ST36 (XL+ ZEA), MA, Lidoc+ MA-ST36 (L + MA), and ST35 + Lidoc + MA-ST36 (DL + ZMA) groups, with 8 cases in each. AA model was established by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.05 ml) in the rat's right hind-paw under anesthesia. Lidoc hydrochloride (2%, 0.05 ml) was injected into ST36 or ST35 separately for blocking the local nerve. Paw withdrawal latency (pain threshold, PT) and mast cell degranulation ratios (DGR) were detected. EA (2/100 Hz, 0.5 mA, 1 mA, 1.5 mA) or MA was applied to ST36. Compared with model group, PT values of EA and MA groups increased significantly (P<0.05, P<0.01) and mast cell DGR of EA and MA groups were significantly higher (P<0.01). Both PT and DGR of NL group were basically not affected by ST36-Lidoc-injection in comparison with model group (P>0.05). PT values of L + EA and DL+ ZEA groups were significantly lower than those of control and EA groups (P<0.01), and comparable to those of model and NL groups (P>0.05). PT of XL + ZEA group was significantly higher than those of model and NL groups (P<0.01), and comparable to that of EA group (P>0.05). Similar situations were found in MA-related groups. Mast cell DGR of ST36 area in L + EA, DL + ZEA and XL + ZEA groups were comparable to that of EA group (P>0.05), and such was the case in MA-related groups. After nerve block of the local and proximal acupoints rather than the distal acupoint innervated by the same nerve, the analgesic effect of both MA and EA of ST36 is obviously attenuated; but no marked influences on MA- and EA-induced mast

  6. Dectin-1-mediated signaling leads to characteristic gene expressions and cytokine secretion via spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Honjoh, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamauchi, Shota; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2014-11-07

    Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucan and plays important roles for the antifungal immunity through the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in dendritic cells or macrophages. Recently, expression of Dectin-1 was also identified in human and mouse mast cells, although its physiological roles were largely unknown. In this report, rat mast cell line RBL-2H3 was analyzed to investigate the molecular mechanism of Dectin-1-mediated activation and responses of mast cells. Treatment of cells with Dectin-1-specific agonist curdlan induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and the interaction of Dectin-1 with the Src homology 2 domain of Syk. These responses depended on tyrosine phosphorylation of the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Dectin-1, whereas they were independent of the γ-subunit of high-affinity IgE receptor. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses showed that Dectin-1-mediated signaling stimulated gene expression of transcription factor Nfkbiz and inflammatory cytokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The response was abrogated by pretreatment with Syk inhibitor R406. These results suggest that Syk is critical for Dectin-1-mediated activation of mast cells, although the signaling differs from that triggered by FcϵRI activation. In addition, these gene expressions induced by curdlan stimulation were specifically observed in mast cells, suggesting that Dectin-1-mediated signaling of mast cells offers new insight into the antifungal immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Dectin-1-mediated Signaling Leads to Characteristic Gene Expressions and Cytokine Secretion via Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) in Rat Mast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Honjoh, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamauchi, Shota; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucan and plays important roles for the antifungal immunity through the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in dendritic cells or macrophages. Recently, expression of Dectin-1 was also identified in human and mouse mast cells, although its physiological roles were largely unknown. In this report, rat mast cell line RBL-2H3 was analyzed to investigate the molecular mechanism of Dectin-1-mediated activation and responses of mast cells. Treatment of cells with Dectin-1-specific agonist curdlan induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and the interaction of Dectin-1 with the Src homology 2 domain of Syk. These responses depended on tyrosine phosphorylation of the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Dectin-1, whereas they were independent of the γ-subunit of high-affinity IgE receptor. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses showed that Dectin-1-mediated signaling stimulated gene expression of transcription factor Nfkbiz and inflammatory cytokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The response was abrogated by pretreatment with Syk inhibitor R406. These results suggest that Syk is critical for Dectin-1-mediated activation of mast cells, although the signaling differs from that triggered by FcϵRI activation. In addition, these gene expressions induced by curdlan stimulation were specifically observed in mast cells, suggesting that Dectin-1-mediated signaling of mast cells offers new insight into the antifungal immunity. PMID:25246527

  8. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment.

  9. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide reduces viscerovisceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis: role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, Teresa; Affaitati, Giannapia; De Filippis, Daniele; Lopopolo, Mariangela; Grassia, Gianluca; Lapenna, Domenico; Negro, Luana; Costantini, Raffaele; Vaia, Massimo; Cipollone, Francesco; Ialenti, Armando; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide were evaluated on pain behaviours and markers of mast cell (MC) activity in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis (ENDO+STONE)-induced viscerovisceral hyperalgesia (VVH). Female Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent surgical induction of endometriosis were randomly assigned to receive active (ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide 10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), orally) or placebo treatment for 25 days. At day 21, they underwent ureteral stone formation and were video-recorded till day 25 to evaluate ureteral and uterine pain behaviours. At autopsy (day 25), ureteral condition and number and diameter of endometrial cysts were evaluated. The following were then measured: number and percentage of degranulating MCs, number of vessels, chymase, nerve growth factor (NGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Flk-1 (VEGF receptor) in cysts, and NGF in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide-treated vs placebo-treated rats showed significantly lower number, duration and complexity of ureteral crises, shorter duration of uterine pain, and smaller cyst diameter (0.0001 < P < 0.004); a significantly higher percentage of expelled stones (P < 0.0001); significantly lower MC number (P < 0.01), vessel number (P < 0.01), chymase (P < 0.05), NGF (P < 0.05), VEGF (P < 0.01), and Flk-1 (P < 0.01) expression in cysts and NGF expression in DRG (P < 0.01). In all animals, the global duration of ureteral crises correlated linearly and directly with cyst diameter, MC number and chymase in cysts, and NGF in cysts and DRG (0.02 < P < 0.0002). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide significantly reduces VVH from ENDO+STONE, probably by modulating MC expression/activity in cysts, thus reducing central sensitization due to noxious signals from endometriotic lesions. The results suggest potential utility of the compound for VVH in clinics.

  10. Number Density of Mast Cells in the Primo Nodes of Rats.

    PubMed

    Gil, HyunJi; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, LiJung; Kim, SungChul; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play a major role in allergic reactions. Surprisingly, the acupuncture points have a higher density of MCs compared with nonacupoints in the skin, which is consistent with the augmentation of the immune function by acupuncture treatment. We hypothesized that the primo vascular system (PVS), which was proposed as the anatomical structure of the acupuncture points and meridians, should have a high density of MCs. In order to test that hypothesis, we investigated the primo nodes isolated from the surfaces of internal organs, such as the liver, the small and the large intestines, and the bladder. The harvested primo nodes were stained with toluidine blue, and the MCs were easily recognized by their red-purple stains and their characteristic granules. The results showed a high density of MCs in the primo nodes and confirmed the hypothesis. The MCs were uniformly distributed in the nodes. The relative concentration of the MCs with respect to other cells was ∼15%. We divided the sizes of the primo nodes into three classes: large, medium, and small. The number density and the relative concentration of MCs did not show a size-dependence. The current work suggests that the PVS may participate in the immune response to allergic inflammation, which closely involves MCs.

  11. The Effects of a Chactoid Scorpion Venom and Its Purified Toxins on Rat Blood Pressure and Mast Cells Histamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Keren; Cohen, Gadi; Momic, Tatjana; Lazarovici, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the venom of the Chactoid family of scorpions on blood pressure was scantly investigated and was addressed in the present study using the venom of the Israeli scorpion, Scorpio maurus palmatus. Blood pressure in rats was monitored via cannulated femoral artery, while venom and toxins were introduced into femoral vein. Venom injection elicited a biphasic effect, expressed first by a fast and transient hypotensive response, which lasted up to 10 min, followed by a hypertensive response, which lasted up to one hour. It was found that these effects resulted from different venom components. Phospholipase A2 produced the hypotensive effect, while a non-enzymatic neurotoxic polypeptide fraction produced the hypertensive effect. Surprisingly, the main neurotoxic polypeptide to mice had no effect on blood pressure. In vitro experiments indicated that the hypertensive factors caused histamine release from the peritoneal mast cells, but this effect is assumed to be not relevant to their in vivo effect. In spite of the cytotoxic activity of phospholipase A2, it did not release histamine. These findings suggest that the effects of venom and isolated fractions on blood pressure parameters are mediated by different mechanisms, which deserve further pharmacological investigation. PMID:23899970

  12. The effects of a chactoid scorpion venom and its purified toxins on rat blood pressure and mast cells histamine release.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Keren; Cohen, Gadi; Momic, Tatjana; Lazarovici, Philip

    2013-07-29

    The effect of the venom of the Chactoid family of scorpions on blood pressure was scantly investigated and was addressed in the present study using the venom of the Israeli scorpion, Scorpio maurus palmatus. Blood pressure in rats was monitored via cannulated femoral artery, while venom and toxins were introduced into femoral vein. Venom injection elicited a biphasic effect, expressed first by a fast and transient hypotensive response, which lasted up to 10 min, followed by a hypertensive response, which lasted up to one hour. It was found that these effects resulted from different venom components. Phospholipase A₂ produced the hypotensive effect, while a non-enzymatic neurotoxic polypeptide fraction produced the hypertensive effect. Surprisingly, the main neurotoxic polypeptide to mice had no effect on blood pressure. In vitro experiments indicated that the hypertensive factors caused histamine release from the peritoneal mast cells, but this effect is assumed to be not relevant to their in vivo effect. In spite of the cytotoxic activity of phospholipase A₂, it did not release histamine. These findings suggest that the effects of venom and isolated fractions on blood pressure parameters are mediated by different mechanisms, which deserve further pharmacological investigation.

  13. Effect of royal jelly on experimental colitis induced by acetic acid and alteration of mast cell distribution in the colon of rats

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, T.; Bayiroglu, F.; Yoruk, M.; Kaya, M.S.; Uslu, S.; Comba, B.; Mis, L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Twenty adult female Wistar albino rats were divided into four treatment groups of 5 animals each, including a control group (Group I); Group II was treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight); Group III had acetic acid-induced colitis; and Group IV had acetic acid-induced colitis treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight) for 4 weeks. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4% acetic acid; the control group received physiological saline (10 mL kg−1). Colon samples were obtained under deep anaesthesia from animals in all groups. Tissues were fixed in 10% formalin neutral buffer solution for 24 h and embedded in paraffin. Six-micrometre-thick sections were stained with Mallory’s triple stain and toluidine blue in 1% aqueous solution at pH 1.0 for 5 min (for Mast Cells). RJ was shown to protect the colonic mucosa against the injurious effect of acetic acid. Colitis (colonic damage) was confirmed histomorphometrically as significant increases in the number of mast cells (MC) and colonic erosions in rats with acetic acid-induced colitis. The RJ treatment significantly decreased the number of MC and reduced the area of colonic erosion in the colon of RJ-treated rats compared with rats with untreated colitis. The results suggest that oral treatment with RJ could be used to treat colitis. PMID:21263740

  14. Radiation-Released Histamine in the Rhesus Monkey as Modified by Mast Cell Depletion and Antihistamine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    radiation of two untreated monkeys, four monkeys given chlorpheniramine 30 minutes before irradiation and four monkeys treated with 48/80 for four...antagonist, chlorpheniramine ’ (3 mg/kg), 30 minutes before irradiation. Experiment 3. Seven monkeys were given aminoguanidine and 30 minutes later the...4000-rad dose of ionizing radiation in animals receiving no treatment. When the animals were pretreated with chlorpheniramine , the histamine

  15. A blockade of complement activation prevents rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mucosal mast cell degranulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, T; Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Saotome, T; Bamba, T

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to define the putative role of complement activation in association with mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation in the pathogenesis of rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We prepared complement activity-depleted rats by the administration of the anti-complement agent K-76COOH and the serine-protease inhibitor FUT-175. Autoperfused segments of the jejunum were exposed to 60 min of ischaemia, followed by reperfusion for various time periods, and the epithelial permeability was assessed by the 51Cr-EDTA clearance rate. The number of MMC was immunohistochemically assessed. In control rats, the maximal increase in mucosal permeability was achieved by 30–45 min of reperfusion. This increase was significantly attenuated by the administration of either K-76COONa alone or in combination with FUT-175. In contrast, the administration of carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI), which prevents the inactivation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins such as C5a, significantly enhanced the increase in I/R-induced mucosal permeability. These findings were confirmed morphologically by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the I/R-induced mucosal injury was accompanied by a marked decrease in the number of MMC, and administration of K-76COOH significantly inhibited this change. These results indicate that complement activation and the generation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins are key events in I/R-induced mucosal injury. It is likely that intestinal I/R-induced mucosal injury may be partially mediated by MMC activation associated with the complement activation. PMID:9528887

  16. Irradiation-induced effects on mast cells, neuropeptides, and atrial natriuretic peptide in the rat heart and lung: bases for further studies.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, K S; Cavén, A G; Hansson, M C; Larsson, F H; Kjörell, U K; Henriksson, R G; Franzén, L I

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of irradiation over the thorax of the rat on the mast cells, the neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers, and the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the heart and lung. The total doses were 20 to 36 Gy delivered as single doses or fractionated irradiation. Immunohistochemical and radioimmunoassay methods were used. The number of mast cells was much reduced in both the lung and heart in response to irradiation. A trend for lowering the atrial natriuretic peptide levels in plasma was noted both 1 day and 9 days after irradiation. In contrast to the situation in other organs (salivary and laryngeal glands, the intestine), no changes occurred in the immunohistochemical expression of neuropeptides. With these observations and those made in previous studies about the effects of radiotherapy on other organs, the functional significance and basis for further research in the fields are discussed.

  17. The significance of chloride in the inhibitory action of disodium cromoglycate on immunologically-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Law, J K Y; Yeung, C K; Wan, S P; Ingebrandt, S; Lau, H Y A; Rudd, J A; Chan, M

    2011-09-01

    The microelectrode array (MEA) was used to investigate the pharmacological relevance of chloride (Cl-) ions in antigen-dependent mast cell activation and the inhibitory effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell activation. The movements of ions across the cellular membrane and the potential relationship between Cl- channels and DSCG during immunological activation were investigated using the MEA. The results were then subsequently compared with the amount of histamine released from anti-IgE activated peritoneal mast cells. The inclusion of charybdotoxin (ChTX) in Cl--free buffer showed that the measured field potentials during antigen-stimulated peritoneal mast cell were a combination of Cl- influx and K+ efflux. The delayed onset time of Cl- influx indicated the presence of a delayed outwardly-rectifying Cl- current in the antigen-stimulated peritoneal mast cells. The use of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid demonstrated that the activated mast cell membrane potential can be stabilised, thereby reducing the amount of histamine released from the anti-IgE activated mast cells. The correlation between the results of the histamine release assay and the electrophysiological measurements demonstrated the importance of Cl- to anti-IgE dependent mast cell activation. The inhibitory effect of DSCG on anti-IgE activated cells, however, did not correlate with the presumed influx of Cl-. The MEA data suggest that Cl- influx is crucial to IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation. While the MEA cannot yield information about single channel properties, it is convenient to use and can provide information on the global changes in electrophysiological responses of non-excitable cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. TRPC5/Orai1/STIM1-dependent Store-operated Entry of Ca2+ Is Linked to Degranulation in a Rat Mast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hong-Tao; Peng, Ze; Hiragun, Takaaki; Iwaki, Shoko; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.

    2009-01-01

    Degranulation of mast cells in response to antigen (Ag) or the calcium mobilizing agent, thapsigargin, is dependent on emptying of intracellular stores of Ca2+ and the ensuing influx of external Ca2+, also referred to as store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, it is unlikely that the calcium release-activated calcium current (CRAC) is the sole mechanism for the entry of Ca2+ because Sr2+ and other divalent cations also permeate and support degranulation in stimulated mast cells. Here we show that influx of Ca2+ and Sr2+ as well as degranulation are dependent on the presence of the transient receptor potential channel canonical 5 (TRPC5), in addition to STIM1 and Orai1, as demonstrated by knock down of each of these proteins by inhibitory RNAs in a rat mast cell (RBL-2H3) line. Overexpression of STIM1 and Orai1, which are known to be essential components of CRAC, allows entry of Ca2+ but not Sr2+ whereas overexpression of STIM1 and TRPC5 allows entry of both Ca2+ and Sr2+. These and other observations suggest that Sr2+-permeable TRPC5 associates with STIM1 and Orai1 in a stoichiometric manner to enhance entry of Ca2+ to generate a signal for degranulation. PMID:18250430

  20. Effects of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on Ca2+ concentration and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukugasako, Sanae; Ito, Shinichi; Ikemoto, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) action in allergic reactions were investigated by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). In the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, methyl paraben (0.1–10 mM) increased [Ca2+]i, in a concentration-dependent manner. Under both the conditions, methyl paraben alone did not evoke histamine release. In RPMCs pretreated with a protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) 3 and 10 nM), methyl paraben (0.3–3 mM) induced histamine release. However, a high concentration (10 mM) of the agent did not increase the histamine release. U73122 (0.1 and 0.5 μM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), significantly inhibited the methyl paraben-induced histamine release in PMA-pretreated RPMCs. U73343 (0.5 μM), an inactive analogue of U73122, did not inhibit the histamine release caused by methyl paraben. In Ca2+-free solution, PLC inhibitors (U73122 0.1 and 0.5 μM, D609 1–10 μM) inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas U73343 (0.5 μM) did not. Xestospongin C (2–20 μM) and 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (30 and 100 μM), blockers of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in Ca2+-free solution. In conclusion, methyl paraben causes an increase in [Ca2+]i, which may be due to release of Ca2+ from storage sites by IP3 via activation of PLC in RPMCs. In addition, methyl paraben possibly has some inhibitory effects on histamine release via unknown mechanisms. PMID:12770943

  1. The outwardly rectifying chloride channel in rat peritoneal mast cells is regulated by serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Jörg; Tritschler, Stefan; Roloff, Tim; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Ziegler, Albrecht

    2002-02-01

    A slowly activating, outwardly rectifying Cl- channel (ORCC) has been described in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). This channel is activated by intracellular application of cAMP, an effect that might be mediated by a PKA-type serine/threonine protein kinase. To test this hypothesis, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments (nystatin-perforated patch) were performed and 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate, Sp-enantiomer (Sp-8Br-cAMPS), a cell membrane-permeable activator of PKA, and three inhibitors of different serine/threonine protein phosphatases (okadaic acid, cantharidin, calyculin A), were tested. In RPMCs application of repetitive series of step hyper- and depolarizations (holding potential 0 mV, test potentials -80 to +80 mV, step size +20 mV) induced a slowly increasing, [half-maximal activation time ( t0.5) 11.0+/-1.1 min, Imax (at +80 mV) 18.7+/-3.1 pA pF-1], DIDS-sensitive, outwardly rectifying Cl- current I(Cl,OR). The activation of this current could be accelerated by Sp-8Br-cAMPS, okadaic acid or cantharidin in the extracellular solution. Co-application of Sp-8Br-cAMPS and okadaic acid increased Imax supra-additively. Calyculin A and higher concentrations of cantharidin inhibited the Cl- current via unknown mechanisms. Our findings suggest that I(Cl,OR) in RPMCs is activated by a PKA-type protein kinase, a process which is antagonized functionally by okadaic acid- and cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases.

  2. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  3. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  4. B cell depletion reduces the development of atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Herbin, Olivier; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Binder, Christoph J.; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Laurans, Ludivine; Taleb, Soraya; Van Vré, Emily; Esposito, Bruno; Vilar, José; Sirvent, Jérôme; Van Snick, Jacques; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    B cell depletion significantly reduces the burden of several immune-mediated diseases. However, B cell activation has been until now associated with a protection against atherosclerosis, suggesting that B cell–depleting therapies would enhance cardiovascular risk. We unexpectedly show that mature B cell depletion using a CD20-specific monoclonal antibody induces a significant reduction of atherosclerosis in various mouse models of the disease. This treatment preserves the production of natural and potentially protective anti–oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) IgM autoantibodies over IgG type anti-oxLDL antibodies, and markedly reduces pathogenic T cell activation. B cell depletion diminished T cell–derived IFN-γ secretion and enhanced production of IL-17; neutralization of the latter abrogated CD20 antibody–mediated atheroprotection. These results challenge the current paradigm that B cell activation plays an overall protective role in atherogenesis and identify new antiatherogenic strategies based on B cell modulation. PMID:20603314

  5. Induction of inflammatory mediators from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells by haemolysin-positive and -negative E. coli strains with different adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, J; Vosbeck, K; König, W

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the role of various E. coli strains that expressed different adhesins and/or generated haemolysin with regard to the induction of inflammatory mediators, e.g. histamine release from rat mast cells as well as the chemiluminescence response and the release of lipoxygenase transformation products from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Our data show that the degree of haemagglutination did not parallel the induction of the chemiluminescence response. Haemolysin-negative bacteria with different adhesins induced more 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as compared to haemolysin-positive bacteria, which generated more leukotriene B4 as compared to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Among the leukotrienes, more leukotriene B4 as compared to leukotriene C4 was released from peripheral leucocytes. Studies with rat mast cells showed that histamine release was dependent on the haemolysin activity expressed by washed bacteria or present within the bacterial culture supernatant. Histamine release was markedly diminished when haemolysin activity decayed. Several haemolysin-negative bacteria with defined adhesins also released histamine, suggesting that, in addition to haemolysin, other factors contribute to mediator release. Thus, various properties of bacteria (e.g. adhesins, haemolysin) may participate to varying degrees in the induction of inflammatory mediators, e.g. oxygen radicals, lipoxygenase transformation products, leucotrienes and histamine. PMID:2433215

  6. Rotational dynamics of type I Fc epsilon receptors on individually-selected rat mast cells studied by polarized fluorescence depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, N A; Pecht, I; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1992-01-01

    We report the first application of polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD), a technique which combines the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with the long lifetimes of triplet probes, to the measurement of membrane protein rotational diffusion on individually selected, intact mammalian cells. We have examined the rotation of type I Fc epsilon receptors (Fc epsilon RI) on rat mucosal mast cells of the RBL-2H3 line in their resting monomeric and differently oligomerized states using as probes IgE and three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; H10, J17, and F4) specific for the Fc epsilon RI. PFD experiments using eosin (EITC)-IgE show that individual Fc epsilon RI on cells have a rotational correlation time (RCT) at 4 degrees C of 79 +/- 4 microseconds. Similarly, Fc epsilon RI-bound EITC-Fab fragments of the J17 Fc epsilon RI-specific mAb exhibit an RCT of 76 +/- 6 microseconds. These values agree with previous measurements of Fc epsilon RI-bound IgE rotation by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy methods. Receptor-bound EITC-conjugated divalent J17 antibody exhibits an increased RCT of 140 +/- 6 microseconds. This is consistent with the ability of this mAb to form substantial amounts of Fc epsilon RI dimers on these cell surfaces. The ratio of limiting to initial anisotropy in these experiments remains constant at about 0.5 from 5 degrees C through 25 degrees C for IgE, Fab, and intact mAb receptor ligands. Extensive cross-linking by second antibody of cell-bound IgE, of intact Fc epsilon RI-specific mAbs or of their Fab fragments, however, produced large fixed anisotropies demonstrating, under these conditions, receptor immobilization in large aggregates. PFD using the mAbs H10 and F4 as receptor probes yielded values for triplet lifetimes, RCT values, and anisotropy parameters essentially indistinguishable from those obtained with the mAb J17 clone. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed. PMID:1547323

  7. Characterization of the choroidal mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, W A

    1987-01-01

    The experimental studies performed on nonpigmented rat choroids and the review of the important literature covered in this thesis seem to justify the following statements: 1. Mast cells are present in the choroid in significant numbers. 2. Mast cell numbers vary considerably from one individual to another and from one location in the choroid to another. 3. The major concentration of mast cells in the uvea is in the posterior choroid. 4. The mast cells of the choroid have a preferential location along arterial vessels. 5. Choroidal mast cell population density apparently decreases with senescence. 6. Mast cell products are present in sufficient quantity to exert substantial effects on physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory responses in the choroid. 7. Choroidal mast cell products are released with appropriate stimulation and share some properties with the connective-tissue mast cell. 8. Choroidal mast cell demonstrate enough differences to suggest that a local differentiation may be present and may represent a locally controlled modulating effect for choroidal physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory reactions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:3328921

  8. B-cell-depleting Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sanz, Iñaki; Bosch, Xavier; Stone, John H.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a new class of agents (B-cell-depleting therapies) has opened a new era in the therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus, with belimumab being the first drug licensed for use in systemic lupus erythematosus in more than 50 years. Four agents deserve specific mention: rituximab, ocrelizumab, epratuzumab, and belimumab. Controlled trials have shown negative results for rituximab, promising results for epratuzumab, and positive results for belimumab. Despite these negative results, rituximab is the most-used agent in patients who do not respond or are intolerant to standard therapy and those with life-threatening presentations. B-cell-depleting agents should not be used in patients with mild disease and should be tailored according to individual patient characteristics, including ethnicity, organ involvement, and the immunological profile. Forthcoming studies of B-cell-directed strategies, particularly data from investigations of off-label rituximab use and postmarketing studies of belimumab, will provide new insights into the utility of these treatments in the routine management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22444096

  9. Pretreatment with Evans blue, a stimulator of BK(Ca) channels, inhibits compound 48/80-induced shock, systemic inflammation, and mast cell degranulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yaw-Syan; Kuo, Su-Yu; Lin, Hsuan-Yea; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Shi-Ying; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Kun-Zer; Huang, Hung-Tu

    2015-09-01

    The present study demonstrated that intravenous injection of a high dose of compound 48/80 to the rat induced 50% drop, within a few min, in the mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure as well as systemic inflammatory plasma leakage that might lead to circulatory and respiratory failure. We also investigated whether pretreatment with Evans blue, a stimulator of BK(Ca) channels, could exert inhibitory effect against compound C48/80-induced allergic circulatory shock and systemic inflammation. Different groups of Sprague-Dawley rats received an intravenous injection of a dose of Evans blue (0, 5, 10, or 50 mg/kg) just 20 s prior to injection of compound 48/80 (200 μg/kg, over 2 min). The present study found that pretreatment with Evans blue in a dose of 10 or 50 mg/kg exerted acute inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced sudden drop in mean arterial and pulse pressures. We also showed that pretreatment with Evans blue in a dose of 5, 10, or 50 mg/kg significantly inhibited compound 48/80-induced extensive plasma extravasation, mast cell degranulation, and edema formation in various organs including the airways, esophagus, and skin. Pretreatment with Evans blue 50 mg/kg 1 h earlier exhibited longer-term inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced arterial hypotension and systemic inflammation. We concluded that Evans blue pretreatment prevented rats from compound 48/80-triggered allergic shock and systemic inflammation, possibly mainly through inhibition of mast cell degranulation. Evans blue might be potentially useful in elucidating the mechanism and acting as a therapeutic agent of allergic shock and systemic inflammation.

  10. Inflammatory oedema induced by phospholipases A2 isolated from Crotalus durissus sp. in the rat dorsal skin: a role for mast cells and sensory C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Câmara, Paula R S; Esquisatto, Laura C M; Camargo, Enilton A; Ribela, Maria Teresa C P; Toyama, Marcos H; Marangoni, Sergio; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2003-06-01

    The ability of the phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) from Crotalus durissus cascavella, Crotalus durissus collilineatus and Crotalus durissus terrificus venoms and crotapotin to increase the vascular permeability in the rat skin as well as the contribution of both mast cells and sensory C-fibers have been investigated in this study. Vascular permeability was measured as the plasma extravascular accumulation at skin sites of intravenously injected 125I-human serum albumin. Intradermal injection of crotalic PLA(2)s (0.05-0.5 microg/site) in the rat skin resulted in dose-dependent increase in plasma extravascular whereas crotapotin (1 microg/site) failed to affect this response. Co-injection of crotapotin (1 microg/site) did not modify the increased vascular permeability induced by the PLA(2)s (0.05-0.5 microg/site). Previous treatment (30 min) of the animals with cyproheptadine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced PLA(2) (0.5 microg/site)-induced oedema. In rats treated neonatally with capsaicin to deplete neuropeptides, the plasma extravasation induced by all PLA(2)s (0.5 microg/site) was also significantly reduced. Similarly, the tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonist SR140333 (1nmol/site) significantly reduced the PLA(2)-induced oedema. In addition, the combination of SR140333 with cyproheptadine further reduced the increased plasma extravasation by PLA(2) from C. d. cascavella venom, but not by PLA(2) from C. d. terrificus and C. d. collilineatus venoms. Our results suggest that increase in skin vascular permeability by crotalic PLA(2)s is mediated by activation of sensory C-fibers culminating in the release of substance P, as well as by activation of mast cells which in turn release amines such as histamine and serotonin.

  11. Activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells following histamine release: a possible role in cell recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Ferjan, I.; Johansen, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. The activity of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells was measured at various time intervals after induction of cellular histamine release by compound 48/80 or by the antigen-antibody reaction. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive potassium uptake of the cells using 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium (K+(86Rb+)-uptake). 2. Stimulation of the cells with compound 48/80 induced a time and concentration dependent increase of the Na+/K(+)-pump activity. The pump activity was maximal 2 min after stimulation of the cells. Then, the activity gradually decreased and reached a level not significantly different from the controls after 2 h of incubation. 3. When the cells were stimulated by the antigen-antibody reaction, there was also a rapid (within 5 min) stimulation of the Na+/K(+)-pump. In contrast to the stimulation with compound 48/80, the pump activity returned to the control level after 60 min of incubation with antigen. 4. The ouabain-resistant potassium uptake of the cells was increased after stimulation of the cells, regardless of the secretagogue used. This probably reflects the increased surface area of the cells present after the histamine release. 5. On the basis of the present results, we suggest a role for the Na+/K(+)-pump in the recovery process of the mast cell following histamine release. PMID:7679025

  12. Cytoskeletal studies on Lowicryl K4M embedded and Affi-Gel 731 attached rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E H; Jahn, H

    1984-01-01

    The subplasmalemmal network in mast cells consists of irregularly arranged 6-7 nm filaments (actin) connected by thinner filaments. In places oblique filaments with crossbridges or short, perpendicular filaments (11-12 nm) connect cell and granule membrane. Filaments attaching subplasmalemmal network to cell membrane divide like a Y and attach cell membrane end-on with a conical, hook-like bending. Each granule is surrounded by a regular network of filaments.

  13. M cell-depletion blocks oral prion disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D S; Kobayashi, A; Ohno, H; Yagita, H; Williams, I R; Mabbott, N A

    2012-01-01

    Many prion diseases are orally acquired. Our data show that after oral exposure, early prion replication upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in Peyer's patches is obligatory for the efficient spread of disease to the brain (termed neuroinvasion). For prions to replicate on FDC within Peyer's patches after ingestion of a contaminated meal, they must first cross the gut epithelium. However, the mechanism through which prions are conveyed into Peyer's patches is uncertain. Within the follicle-associated epithelium overlying Peyer's patches are microfold cells (M cells), unique epithelial cells specialized for the transcytosis of particles. We show that following M cell-depletion, early prion accumulation upon FDC in Peyer's patches is blocked. Furthermore, in the absence of M cells at the time of oral exposure, neuroinvasion and disease development are likewise blocked. These data suggest M cells are important sites of prion uptake from the gut lumen into Peyer's patches. PMID:22294048

  14. Effects of mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients on inflammatory mediator release from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, P; König, B; König, W

    1992-01-01

    Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing chronic bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may interfere with host defence mechanisms. We investigated 13 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from sputa of CF patients with regard to the induction or modulation of inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils (PMN) and rat mast cells. The effects of mucoid as compared to non-mucoid bacteria were studied using a mucoid strain and its non-mucoid revertant. The release of leukotrienes (LT) and histamine in response to the majority of the CF strains was insignificant. However, preincubation of PMN with P. aeruginosa caused a dose-dependent decrease (50-95%) of LTB4 and LTC4 generation and LTB4 metabolism induced by the Ca(2+)-ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan (ZX) (P less than 0.001). The mucoid strains caused a three- to 10-fold higher impairment of LTB4 release (P less than 0.05) and a concomitant down-regulation of LTB4 receptors on neutrophils. Inhibitory effects were also obtained for mucoid and non-mucoid bacteria when the phorbol-ester or the Ca(2+)-ionophore induced luminol enhanced chemiluminescence response (P less than 0.001) or the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (P less than 0.01) was studied. The bacteria-cell contact with non-mucoid strains was associated with an increased Ca2+ influx into PMN, whereas mucoid bacteria had no effect. In addition, a protein kinase C-dependent decrease of the C3bi receptor was suppressed by the mucoid--and less effectively--by the non-mucoid strain. The results suggest that the impairment of the phagocytic and inflammatory system may contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of mucoid P. aeruginosa infection in CF. PMID:1321094

  15. Laser photobiomodulation (830 and 660 nm) in mast cells, VEGF, FGF, and CD34 of the musculocutaneous flap in rats submitted to nicotine.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira; Leite, Gabriella de Paula Marcondes Ferreira; Marcolino, Alexandre Marcio; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; de Araújo, João Eduardo; Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of laser photobiomodulation (PBM) on the viability of the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap in rats subjected to the action of nicotine. We evaluated 60 albino Wistar rats, divided into six groups of ten animals. Group 1 (saline) underwent the surgical technique to obtain a TRAM flap; group 2 (laser 830 nm) underwent the surgical technique and was irradiated with a laser 830 nm; group 3 (laser 660 nm) underwent the surgical technique and was irradiated with a laser 660 nm; group 4 was treated with nicotine subcutaneously (2 mg/kg/2×/day/4 weeks) and underwent surgery; group 5 (nicotine + laser 830 nm) was exposed to nicotine, underwent the surgical technique, and was irradiated with a laser 830 nm; group 6 (nicotine + laser 660 nm) was exposed to nicotine, underwent the surgical technique, and was irradiated with a laser 660 nm. The application of PBM occurred immediately after surgery and on the two following days. The percentage of necrosis was assessed using the AxioVision® software. The number of mast cells (toluidine blue staining) was evaluated, and immunohistochemistry was performed to detect vascular endothelial growth factor expression (anti-VEGF-A), fibroblasts (anti-basic FGF), and neoformed vessels (anti-CD34). PBM with a wavelength of 830 nm increased the viability of the TRAM flap, with a smaller area of necrosis, increased number of mast cells, and higher expression of VEGF and CD34. PBM increases the viability of musculocutaneous flaps treated with to nicotine.

  16. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  17. Early Phase Mast Cell Activation Determines the Chronic Outcome of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Danelli, Luca; Madjene, Lydia Celia; Madera-Salcedo, Iris; Gautier, Gregory; Pacreau, Emeline; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2017-03-15

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is an important cause of acute kidney injury that can lead to end-stage renal failure. Although the ensuing inflammatory response can restore homeostasis, a consecutive maladaptive repair and persistent inflammation represent important risk factors for postischemic chronic kidney disease development. In this study, we investigated the role of mast cells in both the early and late phases of the inflammatory response in experimental models of acute and chronic renal IRI using our recently developed mouse model that allows conditional ablation of mast cells. Depletion of mast cells prior to IRI resulted in improved renal function due to diminished local inflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels and neutrophil recruitment to the kidneys after the acute injury phase (48 h post-IRI). Furthermore, although not completely protected, mast cell-depleted mice displayed less organ atrophy and fibrosis than did wild-type mice during the chronic phases (2 and 6 wk post-IRI) of disease development. Conversely, mast cell ablation after the acute phase of IRI had no impact on organ atrophy, tubular necrosis, or fibrosis. Thus, our results suggest a deleterious role of mast cells during the acute inflammatory phase of IRI promoting subsequent fibrosis development, but not during the chronic phase of the disease.

  18. Gender-related effects of sex steroids on histamine release and FcεRI expression in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Cruz, Samira; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Yepez-Mulia, Lilián; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are versatile effector and regulatory cells in various physiologic, immunologic, and pathologic processes. In addition to the well-characterized IgE/FcεRI-mediated degranulation, a variety of biological substances can induce MCs activation and release of their granule content. Sex steroids, mainly estradiol and progesterone, have been demonstrated to elicit MCs activation. Most published studies have been conducted on MCs lines or freshly isolated peritoneal and bone marrow-derived MC without addressing gender impact on MC response. Our goal was to investigate if the effect of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on MCs may differ depending on whether female or male rats are used as MCs donors. Our results demonstrated that effect of sex steroids on MCs histamine release is dose- and gender-dependent and can be direct, synergistic, or inhibitory depending on whether hormones are used alone or to pretreat MCs followed by substance P-stimulation or upon IgE-mediated stimulation. In contrast, sex steroids did not have effect on the MC expression of the IgE high affinity receptor, FcεRI, no matter female or male rats were used. In conclusion, MCs degranulation is modulated by sex hormones in a gender-selective fashion, with MC from females being more susceptible than MC from males to the effects of sex steroids.

  19. Gender-Related Effects of Sex Steroids on Histamine Release and FcεRI Expression in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Cruz, Samira; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Yepez-Mulia, Lilián; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are versatile effector and regulatory cells in various physiologic, immunologic, and pathologic processes. In addition to the well-characterized IgE/FcεRI-mediated degranulation, a variety of biological substances can induce MCs activation and release of their granule content. Sex steroids, mainly estradiol and progesterone, have been demonstrated to elicit MCs activation. Most published studies have been conducted on MCs lines or freshly isolated peritoneal and bone marrow-derived MC without addressing gender impact on MC response. Our goal was to investigate if the effect of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on MCs may differ depending on whether female or male rats are used as MCs donors. Our results demonstrated that effect of sex steroids on MCs histamine release is dose- and gender-dependent and can be direct, synergistic, or inhibitory depending on whether hormones are used alone or to pretreat MCs followed by substance P-stimulation or upon IgE-mediated stimulation. In contrast, sex steroids did not have effect on the MC expression of the IgE high affinity receptor, FcεRI, no matter female or male rats were used. In conclusion, MCs degranulation is modulated by sex hormones in a gender-selective fashion, with MC from females being more susceptible than MC from males to the effects of sex steroids. PMID:25973435

  20. Degradation of human anaphylatoxin C3a by rat peritoneal mast cells: a role for the secretory granule enzyme chymase and heparin proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasoni, J.E. Jr.; Conrad, D.H.; Hugli, T.E.; Schwartz, L.B.; Ruddy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Purified human C3a was iodinated (/sup 125/I-C3a) and used to study the interaction of labeled peptide with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC). Cellular binding of /sup 125/I-C3a occurred within 30 sec, followed by a rapid dissociation from the cell. Once /sup 125/I-C3a was exposed to RMC, it lost the ability to rebind to a second batch of RMC. Analysis of the supernatants by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation and electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels (SDS PAGE) revealed a decrease in the fraction of /sup 125/I precipitable by TCA and the appearance of /sup 125/-C3a cleavage fragments. Pretreatment of RMC with enzyme inhibitors specific for chymotrypsin, but not trypsin, abrogated the degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a. Treatment of RMC bearing /sup 125/I-C3a with bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS/sup 3/) covalently cross-linked the /sup 125/I-C3a to chymase, the predominant enzyme found in the secretory granules. Indirect immunofluorescence of RMC by using the IgG fraction of goat anti-rat chymase showed that chymase is present on the surface of unstimulated cells. Neither purified chymase nor heparin proteoglycan alone had any appreciable effect on /sup 125/I-C3a, but together they resulted in prompt degradation of the /sup 125/I-C3a.

  1. Mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Disorders associated with mast cell activation range from relatively common IgE-mediated disease and chronic urticaria to rarer conditions such as mastocytosis or monoclonal mast cell activation disorder. Mast cell activation disorders can be mechanistically classified into primary (associated with abnormal production of mast cells that carry pathologic markers of clonality), secondary (normal mast cells activated in reaction to a microenvironmental trigger), and idiopathic (no etiology is found). Clinical presentations, diagnostic criteria as well as general principles of a stepwise therapy approach are discussed.

  2. Effect of gefarnate on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated with compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, in comparison with that of teprenone.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Kobayashi, Takashi; Imai, Yoichiro; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Nakazawa, Saburo

    2005-08-01

    We have reported that teprenone (geranylgeranylacetone), an anti-ulcer drug, prevents acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated once with compound 48/80 (C48/80), a mast cell degranulator, possibly by suppressing mucus depletion, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the gastric mucosa. Herein, we examined the preventive effect of gefarnate (geranyl farnesylacetate), an anti-ulcer drug, on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated once with C48/80 (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.) in comparison with that of teprenone, because the chemical structure and anti-ulcer action of gefarnate are similar to those of teprenone. Gefarnate (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) administered orally at 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment, at which time gastric mucosal lesions appeared, reduced progressive gastric mucosal lesions at 3 h dose-dependently. At 3 h after C48/80 treatment, the gastric mucosa had decreased adherent mucus and hexosamine contents and increased myeloperoxdiase (an index of neutrophil infiltration) and xanthine oxidase activities and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (an index of lipid peroxidation) content. Post-administered gefarnate attenuated all these changes dose-dependently. These preventive effects of gefarnate were similar to those of teprenone at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Post-administered gefarnate did not affect the increases in serum serotonin and histamine concentrations and the decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow at 3 h after C48/80 treatment like teprenone. These results indicate that orally administered gefarnate prevents acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in C48/80-treated rats possibly by suppressing mucus depletion, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the gastric mucosa like teprenone.

  3. 46. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST FROM UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH. ERECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST FROM UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH. ERECTION AND RETRACTION CYLINDERS BETWEEN MAST AND TRENCH WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Histamine release by exocytosis from rat mast cells on reduction of extracellular sodium: a secretory response inhibited by calcium, strontium, barium or magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, D E; Douglas, W W

    1976-01-01

    1. Histamine release from peritoneal mast cells of the rat was stimulated when the cells were exposed for 10 min to sodium-deficient media where all NaCl had been replaced by KC1, RbC1, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, or Tris, provided calcium was less than about 0-5 mM. 2. Light and electron microscopy showed the response to be exocytosis. 3. The chelating agents, EDTA and EGTA, abolished the response to sodium lack and their inhibitory effects were reversed by re-incubating cells with calcium but not magnesium. 4. The response was inhibited by dinitrophenol combined with glucose-deprivation. 5. The response was inversely related to the concentrations of sodium and calcium below 137-5 and 0-5 mM respectively. 6. The related alkaline earth metals, barium, strontium, and magnesium, resembled calcium in inhibiting the response to sodium lack. 7. No secretory response was seen when the cells were exposed for 10 min to calcium-free medium in which lithium replaced sodium. Exposure to this medium for 60 min, however, elicited secretion. 8. It is concluded that when extracellular calcium is low, a reduction in extracellular sodium induces a conventional exocytotic secretory response dependent on energy and cellular calcium. It is suggested that sodium lack may mobilize calcium from a cellular site possibly the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. Images A B C D E F G H PMID:59804

  5. Pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and bronchial reactivity in formaldehyde-exposed rats are modulated by mast cells and differentially by neuropeptides and nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lino dos Santos Franco, Adriana; Damazo, Amilcar Sabino; Beraldo de Souza, Hyula Regines; Domingos, Helory Vanni; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Costa, Soraia Katia Pereira; Tavares de Lima, Wothan . E-mail: wtdelima@icb.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    We have used a pharmacological approach to study the mechanisms underlying the rat lung injury and the airway reactivity changes induced by inhalation of formaldehyde (FA) (1% formalin solution, 90 min once a day, 4 days). The reactivity of isolated tracheae and intrapulmonary bronchi were assessed in dose-response curves to methacholine (MCh). Local and systemic inflammatory phenomena were evaluated in terms of leukocyte countings in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, blood, bone marrow lavage and spleen. Whereas the tracheal reactivity to MCh did not change, a significant bronchial hyporesponsiveness (BHR) was found after FA inhalation as compared with naive rats. Also, FA exposure significantly increased the total cell numbers in BAL, in peripheral blood and in the spleen, but did not modify the counts in bone marrow. Capsaicin hindered the increase of leukocyte number recovered in BAL fluid after FA exposure. Both compound 48/80 and indomethacin were able to prevent the lung neutrophil influx after FA, but indomethacin had no effect on that of mononuclear cells. Following FA inhalation, the treatment with sodium cromoglycate (SCG), but not with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME, significantly reduced the total cell number in BAL. Compound 48/80, L-NAME and SCG significantly prevented BHR to MCh after FA inhalation, whereas capsaicin was inactive in this regard. On the other hand, indomethacin exacerbated BHR. These data suggest that after FA inhalation, the resulting lung leukocyte influx and BHR may involve nitric oxide, airway sensory fibers and mast cell-derived mediators. The effect of NO seemed to be largely restricted to the bronchial tonus, whereas neuropeptides appeared to be linked to the inflammatory response, therefore indicating that the mechanisms responsible for the changes of airway responsiveness caused by FA may be separate from those underlying its inflammatory lung effects.

  6. Mast cells in laser and surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Browne, R M; Frame, J W; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    Precooling of tissues was investigated as a possible means of reducing thermal damage during CO2 laser surgery of the oral mucosa. The changes in mast cells in scalpel, and in non-cooled and precooled (tissue temperature lowered to approximately 10 degrees C) CO2 laser wounds were studied. Standard wounds five mm in length were created with the CO2 laser or scalpel on the dorsum of the tongues of 32 Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia with fentanyl/fluanisone and midazolam. Animals were killed with excess anesthetic immediately or six hours after surgery, their tongues were removed, trimmed, fixed in neutral formalin and processed to paraffin wax. Acid (pH 1.4) toluidine blue stained sections were used to count normal and degranulated mast cells in five fields (0.1 mm2) located at defined positions immediately adjacent to the wound site. At both 0 and 6 hours normal mast cell numbers were significantly different between treatment groups (P<0.045; ANOVA) with mean numbers highest in scalpel wounds and lowest in uncooled laser wounds. Similarly, at 0 time, there were significant differences in degranulated mast cells between treatment groups (P=0.004; ANOVA) but highest numbers were detected in uncooled laser wounds and lowest in scalpel wounds. There were no significant differences in degranulated mast cell counts at six hours although there was a similar distribution in numbers between groups. Total numbers of mast cells (normal + degranulated) did not differ between treatment groups. These results demonstrated that i) laser wounds are associated with greater levels of mast cell degranulation than scalpel wounds and ii) precooling of tissues prior to laser treatment decreases the level of mast cell degranulation. It is concluded that tissue damage in CO2 laser surgery may be reduced by precooling of tissue.

  7. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  8. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    The prominent role for mast cells in the inflammatory response has been increasingly well documented in recent years. Mast cells not only contribute to maintain homeostasis via degranulation and to generate IgE-mediated allergic reactions, but also sit at a major crossroads for both innate and adaptive immune responses. The part played by mast cells in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis identifies mast cells as a valuable treatment target in these diseases. Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors targeting the c-Kit mast cell receptor have been found effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and multiple sclerosis. When used in combination with other available drugs, tyrosine-kinase inhibitors may improve the therapeutic management of these diseases.

  9. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation.

  10. Combined exposure of peripubertal male rats to the endocrine-disrupting compound atrazine and power-frequency electromagnetic fields causes degranulation of cutaneous mast cells: a new toxic environmental hazard?

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, Vesna; Matavulj, Milica; Johansson, Olle

    2010-08-01

    The effects of single and combined treatments of the endocrine-disrupting compound atrazine and the power-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) were investigated on cutaneous mast cells in juvenile/peripubertal male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) 4 h/day exposure to EMFs (50 Hz), (2) 20 mg/kg of body weight (bw) of atrazine, (3) 200 mg/kg bw of atrazine, (4) EMFs with 20 mg/kg bw of atrazine, (5) EMFs with 200 mg/kg bw of atrazine, and (6) control. Both the atrazine and the combined treatments, but not the single EMF exposure, increased the number of degranulated mast cells. Statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the control and both of the combined treatments (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Additionally, low and high doses of atrazine combined with the EMFs were found significantly different when compared to the EMF group alone (both at p<0.001). Considering the biological importance of mast cells in cutaneous immune reactions, future studies should reveal whether combined exposures to chemical and physical environmental agents pose a serious health risk.

  11. The exocytotic signaling pathway induced by nerve growth factor in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine in rat peritoneal mast cells involves a type D phospholipase.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Westenberger, K; Elgeti, T; Ziegler, A; Schütze, S

    2001-12-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been previously shown to induce exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine (lysoPS) by interacting with high-affinity NGF receptors of the TrkA-type. In RPMCs, type D phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipases (PLDs) have been postulated to be involved in some exocytotic signaling pathways induced by different agonists. The aim of the present study was to assess a putative functional role of PLD for NGF/lysoPS-induced exocytosis in RPMCs. In 1-[14C]palmitoyl-2-lyso-3-phosphatidylcholine-labelled RPMCs, NGF/lysoPS stimulated the formation of diacylglycerol (DAG) and, in the presence of ethanol (1% [v/v]), phosphatidylethanol (PEtOH). These data indicate PLD-activation by NGF/lysoPS in RPMCs. Preincubation of RPMCs for 2 min with ethanol, an inhibitor of PLD-derived DAG-formation, dose-dependently (IC(50): 0.6% [v/v]) and agonist-selectively inhibited the NGF/lysoPS induced release of [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) in [3H]5-HT-loaded RPMCs, confirming the functional importance of PLD-action. Exocytosis and PEtOH-production was potently inhibited by the broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine and activated by the protein kinase C(PKC)-activator PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) suggesting a role for PKC as mediator for NGF/lysoPS-induced activation of PLD.

  12. Mast importance, production, and management

    Treesearch

    Harmon P., Jr. Weeks

    1989-01-01

    Mast is a broad term that refers to the various nuts and fruits produced by woody plants. It is usually subdivided into hard mast (nuts) and soft mast (fleshy fruits). Forest tree and shrub mast is an important seasonal food for many forest wildlife species.

  13. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Michael; Hültner, Lothar; Müller, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized as potent producers of a large panel of biologically highly active mediators such as biogenic amines, arachidonic acid metabolites, cytokines and chemokines, but most of their biological functions have been elusive and speculative. By taking advantage of mast cell-deficient mice, the role of mast cells in a variety of experimental settings can now be studied in detail and such approaches have dramatically altered and enlarged our knowledge about mast cell biology and function. Herein we will focus on the role of mast cells in inflammatory reactions of diverse origin, such as delayed type hypersensitivity, atopy, immune complex-mediated inflammation and innate immune responses. From the current standpoint, there is no doubt that the most outstanding and beneficial feature of mast cells is their recently discovered ability to induce a life-saving inflammatory response rapidly upon encountering microbes and microbial constituents. Nevertheless, the picture is also emerging that mast cells are deeply involved in the induction and maintenance of a variety of severe allergic and autoimmune diseases. However, a deeper understanding of their activation and immune-modulatory capacity might open a new window for the development of curative strategies.

  14. IL-7 receptor blockade following T cell depletion promotes long-term allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Hoa-Le; Boeffard, Françoise; Longis, Julie; Danger, Richard; Martinet, Bernard; Haspot, Fabienne; Vanhove, Bernard; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    T cell depletion is commonly used in organ transplantation for immunosuppression; however, a restoration of T cell homeostasis following depletion leads to increased memory T cells, which may promote transplant rejection. The cytokine IL-7 is important for controlling lymphopoiesis under both normal and lymphopenic conditions. Here, we investigated whether blocking IL-7 signaling with a mAb that targets IL-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) alone or following T cell depletion confers an advantage for allograft survival in murine transplant models. We found that IL-7R blockade alone induced indefinite pancreatic islet allograft survival if anti–IL-7R treatment was started 3 weeks before graft. IL-7R blockade following anti-CD4– and anti-CD8–mediated T cell depletion markedly prolonged skin allograft survival. Furthermore, IL-7 inhibition in combination with T cell depletion synergized with either CTLA-4Ig administration or suboptimal doses of tacrolimus to induce long-term skin graft acceptance in this stringent transplant model. Together, these therapies inhibited T cell reconstitution, decreased memory T cell numbers, increased the relative frequency of Tregs, and abrogated both cellular and humoral alloimmune responses. Our data suggest that IL-7R blockade following T cell depletion has potential as a robust, immunosuppressive therapy in transplantation. PMID:24569454

  15. Cumulative Doses of T-Cell Depleting Antibody and Cancer Risk after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jenny H C; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R; Lim, Wai H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell depleting antibody is associated with an increased risk of cancer after kidney transplantation, but a dose-dependent relationship has not been established. This study aimed to determine the association between cumulative doses of T-cell depleting antibody and the risk of cancer after kidney transplantation. Using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry between 1997-2012, we assessed the risk of incident cancer and cumulative doses of T-cell depleting antibody using adjusted Cox regression models. Of the 503 kidney transplant recipients with 2835 person-years of follow-up, 276 (55%), 209 (41%) and 18 (4%) patients received T-cell depleting antibody for induction, rejection or induction and rejection respectively. The overall cancer incidence rate was 1,118 cancers per 100,000 patient-years, with 975, 1093 and 1377 cancers per 100,000 patient-years among those who had received 1-5 doses, 6-10 doses and >10 doses, respectively. There was no association between cumulative doses of T cell depleting antibody and risk of incident cancer (1-5: referent, 6-10: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95%CI 0.48-2.95, >10: HR 1.42, 95%CI 0.50-4.02, p = 0.801). This lack of association is contradictory to our hypothesis and is likely attributed to the low event rates resulting in insufficient power to detect significant differences.

  16. Optimising B-cell depletion in autoimmune disease: is obinutuzumab the answer?

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venkat; Dahal, Lekh N; Cragg, Mark S; Leandro, Maria

    2016-08-01

    In Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), B-cell depletion therapy using rituximab results in variable clinical responses between individuals, which likely relates to variable B-cell depletion in the presence of immune defects. Outcomes in clinical trials with other type I anti-CD20 mAbs, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab, are comparable to rituximab. A mechanistically different type II mAb, obinutuzumab (OBZ), with greater capacity for B-cell depletion, has recently entered clinical trials in SLE. Here we consider whether type II anti-CD20 mAbs will provide mechanistic advantages to overcome the disease-related immune defects in autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  17. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  18. Acute rejection, T-cell-depleting antibodies, and cancer after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai H; Turner, Robin M; Chapman, Jeremy R; Ma, Maggie K M; Webster, Angela C; Craig, Jonathan C; Wong, Germaine

    2014-04-27

    Systemic inflammatory response has been shown to play a vital role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Acute rejection is a systemic inflammatory state and may share a common casual pathway for cancer development after transplantation. The increased burden of immunosuppression used in the treatment of acute rejection, particularly the use of T-cell-depleting antibody may further heighten the risk of cancer development. We aimed to determine the association between acute rejection, T-cell-depleting antibody use and cancer risk after kidney transplantation. Using the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA), we assessed the risk of incident cancer among those who had experienced rejection stratified by the use of T-cell-depleting antibody using adjusted Cox proportional hazard and competing risk models. A total of 7153 kidney transplant recipients between 1997 and 2009 were included. A total of 467 (6.5%) recipients developed cancers. Recipients who experienced acute rejection and treated with T-cell-depleting antibody were at a 1.4-fold increased risk of cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% CI 1.02-1.99, P=0.039) compared with those who did not experience acute rejection. There was an excess risk of genitourinary tract cancers among recipients who had experienced rejection requiring T-cell-depleting antibody compared with recipients who did not experience acute rejection (HR 2.20, 95% CI 1.33-3.66, P=0.007). Acute rejection requiring T-cell-depleting antibody is a significant risk factor for cancer development in kidney transplant recipients independent of competing events such as age and cardiovascular deaths.

  19. Growth of Mycobacterium marinum in the footpads of T-cell-depleted mice.

    PubMed

    Collins, F M; Montalbine, V; Morrison, N E

    1975-05-01

    Mycobacterium marinum strains 1218 and 1219 were inoculated into the hind footpads of T-cell-depleted specific pathogen-free C57B1/6 mice, and the growth and survival of the organisms at the site of injection, the draining popliteal lymph node, and the spleen and lung were quantitated for up to 70 days. T-cell depletion largely ablated the normal cell-mediated antituberculous response to the M. marinum population. The mice were able to control the further growth of the inoculum within the footpad only after it had reached 5 to 10 times that present in the normal controls. The high temperature-adapted strain (37 C; strain no. 1218) induced an increasing infection in the liver, spleen, and lungs of the THXB mice, and the infection eventually spread to the opposite footpad and to the tail skin. Strain 1219 gave rise to considerable systemic involvement in the THXB host despite its inability to survive at 37 C, but the size of the splenic and lung populations was considerably lower than in the 1218-infected animals. Both M. marinum infections persisted in the tissues of the T-cell-depleted mice with no indication of a cell-mediated immune response. Footpad swelling in the M. marinum-infected mice was not greatly reduced by T-cell depletion, and, if anything, tended to persist at high levels long after the swelling of the control feet had gone into a decline. On the other hand, incorporation of tritiated thymidine by cells within the infected footpads, the draining lymph node, and the spleen was considerably reduced in the T-cell-depleted host compared with control values. Late in the infection, there was a significant increase in the amount of label taken up by the cells in the footpads of the T-cell-depleted host.

  20. High-dose chlorogenic acid induces inflammation reactions and oxidative stress injury in rats without implication of mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Yuan; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Wang, Chuan-She; Wang, Ming-Xia; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Fu; Fan, Jing-Yu; Li, Peng-Tao; Han, Jing-Yan

    2013-05-02

    Chlorogenic acid (CA) exits widely in those Chinese herbal injections that have antibacterial and antiphlogistic effects and belongs to the ethnopharmacological family of medicines. Chinese herbal injections containing high levels of CA have been reported to increase the adverse drug reactions, but the mechanism for which is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the CA derived adverse drug reactions. The present study was to explore the potential role of CA in initiating inflammatory reaction and the underlying mechanism. Male Wistar rats were treated with different dosages of CA for different time period. The variables examined included microcirculation by intravital microscopy, histology of ileum tissue, expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and CD18 on leukocytes by flow cytometry, myeloperoxidase activity and maleic dialdehyde content in ileum tissue by spectrophotometry, activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in serum by ELISA, and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits by PCR and Western blot. High-dose CA increased the number of adherent leukocytes, generation of peroxides in the venular walls and induced albumin leakage from mesentery venules. High-dose CA induced changes also included an increase in maleic dialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase activities, and a decline in activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. High-dose, but not Low-dose CA induced inflammation reaction, and in this process an imbalance between oxidant and antioxidant mechanism may be involved, providing more information for better understanding the rationale behind the adverse effects of CA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mucosal mast cells and developmental changes in gastric absorption.

    PubMed

    Catto-Smith, A G; Ripper, J L

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether gastric mucosal mast cells undergo degranulation during normal postnatal development and to correlate this with gastric electrical parameters, paracellular permeability, and macromolecular absorption. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied between 10 and 30 days after birth. Gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation occurred and was maximal on days 15 and 17, measured by histology and gastric and serum levels of rat mast cell protease II. Short-circuit current, transepithelial conductance, and permeability of voltage-clamped glandular stomach were elevated in younger animals, falling with age except for a transient but significant increase in conductance and permeability at 17 days, closely correlated with maximal mast cell degranulation. Macromolecular uptake was significantly increased in animals aged 10-15 days. Concanavalin A and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation increased conductance and permeability in vitro in younger animals. We conclude that 1) gastric mucosal mast cells degranulate during development, 2) the neonatal stomach has increased permeability and uptake of macromolecules, and 3) gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation during development may affect mucosal permeability.

  2. Acute Liver Failure Due to Echovirus 9 Associated With Persistent B-Cell Depletion From Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Bajema, Kristina L; Simonson, Paul D; Greninger, Alex L; Çoruh, Basak; Pottinger, Paul S; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Liou, Iris W; Jalikis, Florencia G; Fligner, Corinne L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We describe a case of fatal acute liver failure due to echovirus 9 in the setting of persistent B-cell depletion and hypogammaglobulinemia 3 years after rituximab therapy. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing further specified the etiologic agent. Early recognition may provide an opportunity for interventions including intravenous immunoglobulin and liver transplantation. PMID:28948184

  3. 45. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH FROM BASE OF MAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH FROM BASE OF MAST, FROM SOUTH. ACTUATORS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS VISIBLE CONNECTING DOORS AND WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Mast cells and mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells have been recognized for well over 100 years. With time, human mast cells have been documented to originate from CD34+ cells, and have been implicated in host responses in both innate and acquired immunity. In clinical immunology, they are recognized for their central role in IgE-mediated degranulation and allergic inflammation by virtue of their expression of the high-affinity receptor for IgE and release of potent proinflammatory mediators. In hematology, the clinical disease of mastocytosis is characterized by a pathologic increase of mast cells in tissues, often associated with mutations in KIT, the receptor for stem cell factor. More recently, and with increased understanding of how human mast cells are activated through receptors including the high-affinity receptor for IgE and KIT, specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been identified with the potential to interrupt signaling pathways and thus limit the proliferation of mast cells as well as their activation through immunoglobulin receptors. PMID:18684881

  5. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  6. Changes in levels of plasminogen activator activity in normal and germ-cell-depleted testes during development.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, M; Smith, F E; Fritz, I B

    1982-05-01

    Levels of plasminogen activator activity were determined in testes obtained from normal and irradiated rats in various ages. During normal development, plasminogen activator activity per g testis increased rapidly between 40 and 60 days of age, but a comparable rise did not occur in germ-cell depleted testes of irradiated rats. Levels of enzyme in various populations of testicular cells were highest in Sertoli (varying between 1800 and 6300 units/mg protein in cell maintained under different culture conditions), and lowest in peritubular myoid cells (about 1 unit/mg protein), with intermediate levels in germinal cells (ranging between 147 and 560 units/Mg protein in residual bodies, spermatocytes and spermatids). No protease inhibitor could be detected in germ-cell extracts. The addition to the medium in which Sertoli cells were in culture of particles which can be phagocytosed (autoclaved E. coli) resulted in an increased formation of plasminogen activator activity by Sertoli cells. A synergistic enhancement of enzyme production resulted following the addition of submaximal quantities of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and autoclaved bacteria to sertoli cells in culture. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the presence of advanced germinal cells during gonadal development may stimulate the synthesis of plasminogen activator by Sertoli cells, mediated in part by the phagocytosis of residual bodies by sertoli cells which occurs prior to spermiation.

  7. Distinguishing Mast Cell Progenitors from Mature Mast Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Ding, Zhoujie; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells originate from the bone marrow and develop into c-kit(+) FcɛRI(+) cells. Both mast cell progenitors (MCp) and mature mast cells express these cell surface markers, and ways validated to distinguish between the two maturation forms with flow cytometry have been lacking. Here, we show that primary peritoneal MCp from naïve mice expressed high levels of integrin β7 and had a low side scatter (SSC) light profile; whereas mature mast cells expressed lower levels of integrin β7 and had a high SSC light profile. The maturation statuses of the cells were confirmed using three main strategies: (1) MCp, but not mature mast cells, were shown to be depleted by sublethal whole-body γ-irradiation. (2) The MCp were small and immature in terms of granule formation, whereas the mature mast cells were larger and had fully developed metachromatic granules. (3) The MCp had fewer transcripts of mast cell-specific proteases and the enzyme responsible for sulfation of heparin than mature mast cells. Moreover, isolated peritoneal MCp gave rise to mast cells when cultured in vitro. To summarize, we have defined MCp and mature mast cells in naïve mice by flow cytometry. Using this strategy, mast cell maturation can be studied in vivo.

  8. Human mast cell transcriptome project.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nakajima, T; Matsumoto, K

    2001-05-01

    After draft reading of the human genome sequence, systemic analysis of the transcriptome (the whole transcripts present in a cell) is progressing especially in commonly available cell types. Until recently, human mast cells were not commonly available. We have succeeded to generate a substantial number of human mast cells from umbilical cord blood and from adult peripheral blood progenitors. Then, we have examined messenger RNA selectively transcribed in these mast cells using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Many unexpected but important transcripts were selectively expressed in human mast cells. We discuss the results obtained from transcriptome screening by introducing our data regarding mast-cell-specific genes.

  9. Tetraspanins in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Kempf, Wolfgang; Wölbing, Florian; Biedermann, Tilo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are key mediators of the immune system, most prominently known for their role in eliciting harmful allergic reactions. Mast cell mediator release (e.g. by degranulation) is triggered by FcεRI recognition of antigen – IgE complexes. Until today no therapeutic targeting of this and other mast cell activation pathways is established. Among possible new candidates there are tetraspanins that have been described on MC already several years ago. Tetraspanins are transmembrane proteins acting as scaffolds, mediating local clustering of their interaction partners, and thus amplify their activities. More recently, tetraspanins were also found to exert intrinsic receptor functions. Tetraspanins have been found to be crucial components of fundamental biological processes like cell motility and adhesion. In immune cells, they not only boost the effectiveness of antigen presentation by clustering MHC molecules, they are also key players in all kinds of degranulation events and immune receptor clustering. This review focuses on the contribution of tetraspanins clustered with FcεRI or residing in granule membranes to classical MC functions but also undertakes an outlook on the possible contribution of tetraspanins to newly described mast cell functions and discusses possible targets for drug development. PMID:22783251

  10. Mast cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Folkerts, Gert; Redegeld, Frank

    2011-08-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The inflamed airways of COPD patients contain several inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. The relative contribution of mast cells to airway injury and remodeling is not well documented. In this review, an overview is given on the possible role of mast cells and their mediators in the pathogenesis of COPD. Activation of mast cells and mast cell signaling in response to exposure to cigarette smoke is further discussed.

  11. Both cladribine and alemtuzumab may effect MS via B-cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Herrod, Samuel S; Alvarez-Gonzalez, Cesar; Zalewski, Lukasz; Albor, Christo; Schmierer, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    To understand the efficacy of cladribine (CLAD) treatment in MS through analysis of lymphocyte subsets collected, but not reported, in the pivotal phase III trials of cladribine and alemtuzumab induction therapies. The regulatory submissions of the CLAD Tablets Treating Multiple Sclerosis Orally (CLARITY) (NCT00213135) cladribine and Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis, study one (CARE-MS I) (NCT00530348) alemtuzumab trials were obtained from the European Medicine Agency through Freedom of Information requests. Data were extracted and statistically analyzed. Either dose of cladribine (3.5 mg/kg; 5.25 mg/kg) tested in CLARITY reduced the annualized relapse rate to 0.16-0.18 over 96 weeks, and both doses were similarly effective in reducing the risk of MRI lesions and disability. Surprisingly, however, T-cell depletion was rather modest. Cladribine 3.5 mg/kg depleted CD4(+) cells by 40%-45% and CD8(+) cells by 15%-30%, whereas alemtuzumab suppressed CD4(+) cells by 70%-95% and CD8(+) cells by 47%-55%. However, either dose of cladribine induced 70%-90% CD19(+) B-cell depletion, similar to alemtuzumab (90%). CD19(+) cells slowly repopulated to 15%-25% of baseline before cladribine redosing. However, alemtuzumab induced hyperrepopulation of CD19(+) B cells 6-12 months after infusion, which probably forms the substrate for B-cell autoimmunities associated with alemtuzumab. Cladribine induced only modest depletion of T cells, which may not be consistent with a marked influence on MS, based on previous CD4(+) T-cell depletion studies. The therapeutic drug-response relationship with cladribine is more consistent with lasting B-cell depletion and, coupled with the success seen with monoclonal CD20(+) depletion, suggests that B-cell suppression could be the major direct mechanism of action.

  12. Mast cell activation is involved in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chan Juan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Chang Qing; Zhang, Kuo; Zhou, Shu Pei; Duan, Li Ping

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of mast cell in stress-induced barrier dysfunction in the esophagus and its possible pathway involved using mast cell-deficient (Ws/Ws) rats. Ws/Ws rats and normal (+/+) rats were submitted to chronic restraint stress (CRS) 2 h/day for 7 days. Tissues were obtained from distal esophagus. Mast cells were counted under Alcian blue-safranin O stain. Activation of mast cells was assessed using transmission electron microscope. Esophageal epithelial barrier dysfunction was evaluated by measuring intercellular spaces (ICS) and by quantifying tight junction (TJ) proteins. The localization and expression of mast cell-derived tryptase and proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) were assessed. A higher number of mast cells and higher proportion of activated mast cells were observed in CRS +/+ rats compared with non-stress controls. Increased ICS and decreased expression of some TJ proteins were observed in the CRS +/+ rats but not in the CRS Ws/Ws rats. Tryptase and its receptor PAR-2 were found elevated concomitantly by nearly 100% in CRS +/+ rats, but not in CRS Ws/Ws rats. Mast cells play an important role in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in esophagus. The mechanism may involve the activation of PAR-2 by mast cell-derived tryptase, causing proinflammatory responses and the subsequent disruption of the epithelial TJ proteins and a disturbed cytoskeleton function, resulting in dilated intercellular spaces. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in patients with SCID after T cell-depleted BM and PBSC transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horn, B; Viele, M; Mentzer, W; Mogck, N; DeSantes, K; Cowan, M

    1999-11-01

    We report a high incidence (19.5%) of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 41 patients with SCID who underwent a T cell-depleted haploidentical transplant. Other than infections, AIHA was the most common post-transplant complication in this patient cohort. Clinical characteristics and treatment of eight patients who developed AIHA at a median of 8 months after the first T cell-depleted transplant are presented. All patients had warm-reacting autoantibodies, and two of eight had concurrent cold and warm autoantibodies. Clinical course was most severe in two patients who had cold and warm autoantibodies. Five patients received specific therapy for AIHA. Successful taper off immunosuppressive therapy for AIHA coincided with T cell reconstitution. Delayed reconstitution of T cell immunity, due to T cell depletion, immunosuppressive conditioning and CsA, as well as paucity of regulatory T cells, are the likely explanations for the occurrence of AIHA in our patient cohort. Screening of the population at risk may prevent morbidity and mortality from AIHA.

  14. B cell depleting therapy regulates splenic and circulating T follicular helper cells in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Audia, Sylvain; Rossato, Marzia; Trad, Malika; Samson, Maxime; Santegoets, Kim; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Bekker, Cornelis; Facy, Olivier; Cheynel, Nicolas; Ortega-Deballon, Pablo; Boulin, Mathieu; Berthier, Sabine; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Martin, Laurent; Ciudad, Marion; Janikashvili, Nona; Saas, Philippe; Radstake, Timothy; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    B cells are involved in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) pathophysiology by producing antiplatelet auto-antibodies. However more than a half of ITP patients do not respond to B cell depletion induced by rituximab (RTX). The persistence of splenic T follicular helper cells (TFH) that we demonstrated to be expanded during ITP and to support B cell differentiation and antiplatelet antibody-production may participate to RTX inefficiency. Whereas it is well established that the survival of TFH depends on B cells in animal models, nothing is known in humans yet. To determine the effect of B cell depletion on human TFH, we quantified B cells and TFH in the spleen and in the blood from ITP patients treated or not with RTX. We showed that B cell depletion led to a dramatic decrease in splenic TFH and in CXCL13 and IL-21, two cytokines predominantly produced by TFH. The absolute count of circulating TFH and serum CXCL13 also decreased after RTX treatment, whatever the therapeutic response. Therefore, we showed that the maintenance of TFH required B cells and that TFH are not involved in the inefficiency of RTX in ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secretory activity of mast cell during stress: effect of prolyl-glycyl-proline and Semax.

    PubMed

    Umarova, B A; Kopylova, G N; Smirnova, E A; Guseva, A A; Zhuikova, S E

    2003-10-01

    Stress increased secretory activity of mast cells in the mesentery and subcutaneous fat of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of Semax and prolyl-glycyl-proline in doses of 0.05 and 1 mg/kg, respectively, 1 h before stress abolished this effect. The test preparations did not modulate secretory activity of mast cells in unstressed animals. Semax and prolyl-glycyl-proline in vitro prevented activation of mast cells with synacten and acetylcholine. The stabilizing effect of peptides on mast cells probably determines their antiulcer activity.

  16. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Duraiswamy, B.; Satishkumar, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity of Pothos scandens extracts Materials and Methods: Pothos scandens L. (family- Araceae) aerial part was successively extracted with ethanol and aqueous to prepare extract of the plant. The extracts of P. scandens were evaluated for stabilization of mast cell in rat allergic models. The extract of P. scandens ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) was studied for peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity in rat mesenteric preparation induced by C 48/80. Result: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, fixed oil, proteins, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous extracts of P. scandens L. showed dose dependent increase in the number of intact cells when compare with C48/80 at the concentration of 10 and 100 μg/ml. It virtues further work towards the isolation of phytoconstituents from this plant. Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent. PMID:23542883

  17. Effects of B Cell Depletion on Early Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Jiayao; Wong, Eileen A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M. Teresa; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Ruden, Rachel; Cirrincione, Lauren R.; Chan, John; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies in mice have shown that components of B cell and humoral immunity can modulate the immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the roles of these components in human and nonhuman primate infections are unknown. The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of M. tuberculosis infection closely mirrors the infection outcomes and pathology in human tuberculosis (TB). The present study used rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to deplete B cells in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques to examine the contribution of B cells and humoral immunity to the control of TB in nonhuman primates during the acute phase of infection. While there was no difference in the overall pathology, disease profession, and clinical outcome between the rituximab-treated and untreated macaques in acute infection, analyzing individual granulomas revealed that B cell depletion resulted in altered local T cell and cytokine responses, increased bacterial burden, and lower levels of inflammation. There were elevated frequencies of T cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, and IL-17 and decreased IL-6 and IL-10 levels within granulomas from B cell-depleted animals. The effects of B cell depletion varied among granulomas in an individual animal, as well as among animals, underscoring the previously reported heterogeneity of local immunologic characteristics of tuberculous granulomas in nonhuman primates. Taken together, our data clearly showed that B cells can modulate the local granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques during acute infection. The impact of these alterations on disease progression and outcome in the chronic phase remains to be determined. PMID:26883591

  18. Partial Regulatory T Cell Depletion Prior to Schistosomiasis Vaccination Does Not Enhance the Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Xu, Zhipeng; Hoellwarth, Jason; Chen, Xiaojun; He, Lei; Zhang, Rongbo; Liu, Feng; Wang, Jun; Su, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not only influence self-antigen specific immune responses, but also dampen the protective effect induced by a number of vaccines. The impact of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on vaccines against schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that is a major public health concern, however, has not been examined. In this study, a DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST) was constructed and its potential effects were evaluated by depleting CD25+ cells prior to pVAX1-Sj26GST immunization. This work shows that removal of CD25+ cells prior to immunization with the pVAX1-Sj26GST schistosomiasis DNA vaccine significantly increases the proliferation of splenocytes and IgG levels. However, CD25+ cell-depleted mice immunized with pVAX1-Sj26GST show no improved protection against S. japonicum. Furthermore, depletion of CD25+ cells causes an increase in both pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IFN-γ, GM-CSF and IL-4) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (e.g. IL-10), with CD4+CD25- T cells being one of the major sources of both IFN-γ and IL-10. These findings indicate that partial CD25+ cell depletion fails to enhance the effectiveness of the schistosome vaccine, possibly due to IL-10 production by CD4+CD25- T cells, or other cell types, after CD25+ cell depletion during vaccination. PMID:22802961

  19. B Cell Depletion Therapy Normalizes Circulating Follicular Th Cells in Primary Sjögren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Gwenny M; Kroese, Frans G M; Meiners, Petra M; Corneth, Odilia B; Huitema, Minke G; Haacke, Erlin A; van der Vegt, Bert; Arends, Suzanne; Vissink, Arjan; Bootsma, Hendrika; Abdulahad, Wayel H

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of B cell depletion therapy on effector CD4+ T cell homeostasis and its relation to objective measures of disease activity in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). Twenty-four patients with pSS treated with rituximab (RTX) and 24 healthy controls (HC) were included. Frequencies of circulating effector CD4+ T cell subsets were examined by flow cytometry at baseline and 16, 24, 36, and 48 weeks after the first RTX infusion. Th1, Th2, follicular Th (TFH), and Th17 cells were discerned based on surface marker expression patterns. Additionally, intracellular cytokine staining was performed for interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-21, and IL-17 and serum levels of these cytokines were analyzed. In patients with pSS, frequencies of circulating TFH cells and Th17 cells were increased at baseline compared with HC, whereas frequencies of Th1 and Th2 cells were unchanged. B cell depletion therapy resulted in a pronounced decrease in circulating TFH cells, whereas Th17 cells were only slightly lowered. Frequencies of IL-21-producing and IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells and serum levels of IL-21 and IL-17 were also reduced. Importantly, the decrease in circulating TFH cells was associated with lower systemic disease activity over time, as measured by the European League Against Rheumatism Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index scores and serum IgG levels. B cell depletion therapy in patients with pSS results in normalization of the elevated levels of circulating TFH cells. This reduction is associated with improved objective clinical disease activity measures. Our observations illustrate the pivotal role of the crosstalk between B cells and TFH cells in the pathogenesis of pSS.

  20. B-Cell Depletion Reduces the Maturation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Murine Models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Austin, Cecilia; Moore, Thomas; Lightle, Rhonda; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Gunel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Marchuk, Douglas A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are relatively common vascular malformations, characterized by increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, vascular hyper-permeability and the presence of blood degradation products including non-heme iron. Previous studies revealed robust inflammatory cell infiltration, selective synthesis of IgG, in situ antigen driven B-cell clonal expansion, and deposition of immune complexes and complement proteins within CCM lesions. We aimed to evaluate the impact of suppressing the immune response on the formation and maturation of CCM lesions, as well as lesional iron deposition and ROCK activity. Two murine models of heterozygous Ccm3 (Pdcd10), which spontaneously develop CCM lesions with severe and milder phenotypes, were either untreated or received anti-mouse BR3 to deplete B cells. Brains from anti-mouse BR3-treated mice exhibited significantly fewer mature CCM lesions and smaller lesions compared to untreated mice. B cell depletion halted the progression of lesions into mature stage 2 lesions but did not prevent their genesis. Non-heme iron deposition and ROCK activity was decreased in lesions of B cell depleted mice. This represents the first report of the therapeutic benefit of B-cell depletion in the development and progression of CCMs, and provides a proof of principle that B cells play a critical role in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. These findings add biologics to the list of potential therapeutic agents for CCM disease. Future studies would characterize the putative antigenic trigger and further define the mechanism of immune response in the lesions.

  1. Influence of ethanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea Linn. on mast cells and erythrocytes membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Dikshit, V J; Damre, A S; Kulkarni, K R; Saraf, M N

    2000-08-01

    The ethanolic extract of T. purpurea Linn. was studied for its in vitro effect on rat mast cell degranulation and erythrocyte membrane integrity in vitro. The extract in concentration of 25-200 microg/ml showed a dose-dependant inhibition of rat mast cell degranulation induded by compound 48/80 and egg albumin. T. purpurea extract was found to inhibit haemolysis of erythrocytes induced by hypotonic solution but accelerated haemolysis induced by heat at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extract of T. purpurea may inhibit degranulation of mast cells by a mechanism other than membrane stabilization.

  2. Mast cells in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; van der Velden, Daniël; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-05

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease with a complex disease pathogenesis leading to inflammation and destruction of synovial tissue in the joint. Several molecules lead to activation of immune pathways, including autoantibodies, Toll-Like Receptor ligands and cytokines. These pathways can cooperate to create the pro-inflammatory environment that results in tissue destruction. Each of these pathways can activate mast cells, inducing the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and in combination can markedly enhance mast cell responses. Mast cell-derived cytokines, chemokines, and proteases have the potential to induce recruitment of other leukocytes able to evoke tissue remodeling or destruction. Likewise, mast cells can secrete a plethora of factors that can contribute to tissue remodeling and fibroblast activation. Although the functional role of mast cells in arthritis pathogenesis in mice is not yet elucidated, the increased numbers of mast cells and mast cell-specific mediators in synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients suggest that mast cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis may contribute to its pathogenesis.

  3. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  4. 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and its derivatives act as secretagogues on rodent mast cells.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yohei; Yoshimura, Marie; Sakamaki, Kazuma; Inoue, Asuka; Kakinoki, Aya; Hokari, Satoshi; Sakanaka, Mariko; Aoki, Junken; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that activated mast cells are involved in contact hypersensitivity, although the precise mechanisms of their activation are still not completely understood. We investigated the potential of common experimental allergens to induce mast cell activation using murine bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and rat peritoneal mast cells. Among these allergens, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinirobenzene (DNFB) were found to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells. DNFB-induced degranulation is accompanied by cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and is significantly inhibited by pertussis toxin, U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor), and BAPTA (a Ca(2+) chelator), raising the possibility that DNFB acts on the G protein-coupled receptors and activates Gi , which induces activation of phospholipase C, as well as known mast cell secretagogues, such as compound 48/80. DNFB could induce mast cell degranulation in the absence of serum proteins and IgE. Structure-activity relationship analyses revealed an inverse correlation between the degree of degranulation and the electron density of the C1 carbon of the DNFB derivatives. These findings raise a possibility that DNFB functions as a potent contact allergen through induction of cutaneous mast cell degranulation.

  5. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; van Wyk, F.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  6. Autoantibody-producing plasmablasts after B cell depletion identified in muscle-specific kinase myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Kumar, Aditya; Nowak, Richard J; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2017-09-07

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Pathogenic autoantibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) can be found in patients with MG who do not have detectable antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). MuSK MG includes immunological and clinical features that are generally distinct from AChR MG, particularly regarding responsiveness to therapy. B cell depletion has been shown to affect a decline in serum autoantibodies and to induce sustained clinical improvement in the majority of MuSK MG patients. However, the duration of this benefit may be limited, as we observed disease relapse in MuSK MG patients who had achieved rituximab-induced remission. We investigated the mechanisms of such relapses by exploring autoantibody production in the reemerging B cell compartment. Autoantibody-expressing CD27+ B cells were observed within the reconstituted repertoire during relapse but not during remission or in controls. Using two complementary approaches, which included production of 108 unique human monoclonal recombinant immunoglobulins, we demonstrated that antibody-secreting CD27hiCD38hi B cells (plasmablasts) contribute to the production of MuSK autoantibodies during relapse. The autoantibodies displayed hallmarks of antigen-driven affinity maturation. These collective findings introduce potential mechanisms for understanding both MuSK autoantibody production and disease relapse following B cell depletion.

  7. Mast cells in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are constitutively found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The three major physiological functions of GI mast cells comprise of - as far as we know - regulation of GI functions, namely epithelial and endothelial functions, crosstalk with the enteric nervous system, and contribution to the host defense against bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. A number of chronic GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies, are thought to be associated with mast cell hyperplasia and humoral activity. Clinical conditions characterized by a decrease in mast cell functionality are not known so far. In the present review, we summarize current evidence which show that human mast cells play a central role at the GI barrier, both in health and disease.

  8. Mast cells in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Ando, Tomoaki; Kimura, Miho; Wilson, Bridget S.; Kawakami, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Mast cells play as the major effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity through activation via the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, although many other functions have recently been discovered for this cell type. Given the broad array of proinflammatory mediators secreted from FcεRI-activated mast cells, as well as sensitization to allergens, IgE elevation, and increased mast cells in a majority of atopic dermatitis patients, mast cells are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Numerous animal models have been used to study this epidemic disease. Here we review the recent progress to synthesize our current understanding of this disease and potential mechanisms for a mast cell's role in the disease. PMID:19828304

  9. Mast Cell Hyperplasia and Eosinophilia Induced by Ascaris Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G. T.; Binet, J.-L.

    1971-01-01

    Daily i.p. injections of dilute Ascaris body fluid into rats induced peritoneal eosinophilia and the formation of pin-point follicles in the omentum. The follicles comprised plasma cells, macrophages and fibroblasts together with large numbers of eosinophils and mast cells. Electron microscopy of eosinophils in the follicles revealed loss of cytoplasmic granules and numerous vesicular and tubular structures in the cytoplasm. The mast cells showed clear areas round the granules, suggesting dissolution of granule components. ImagesFigs. 4-6Figs. 7-8Figs. 13-14Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-3Figs. 11-12 PMID:5135540

  10. B-Cell Depletion Promotes Aortic Infiltration of Immunosuppressive Cells and Is Protective of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Schaheen, Basil; Downs, Emily A; Serbulea, Vlad; Almenara, Camila C P; Spinosa, Michael; Su, Gang; Zhao, Yunge; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Butts, Cherié; McNamara, Coleen A; Leitinger, Norbert; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Meher, Akshaya K; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-11-01

    B-cell depletion therapy is widely used for treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. B cells are abundant in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA); however, it is unknown whether B-cell depletion therapy affects AAA growth. Using experimental models of murine AAA, we aim to examine the effect of B-cell depletion on AAA formation. Wild-type or apolipoprotein E-knockout mice were treated with mouse monoclonal anti-CD20 or control antibodies and subjected to an elastase perfusion or angiotensin II infusion model to induce AAA, respectively. Anti-CD20 antibody treatment significantly depleted B1 and B2 cells, and strikingly suppressed AAA growth in both models. B-cell depletion resulted in lower circulating IgM levels, but did not affect the levels of IgG or cytokine/chemokine levels. Although the total number of leukocyte remained unchanged in elastase-perfused aortas after anti-CD20 antibody treatment, the number of B-cell subtypes was significantly lower. Interestingly, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the immunomodulatory enzyme indole 2,3-dioxygenase were detected in the aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In accordance with an increase in indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells, the number of regulatory T cells was higher, whereas the expression of proinflammatory genes was lower in aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In a coculture model, the presence of B cells significantly lowered the number of indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells without affecting total plasmacytoid dendritic cell number. The present results demonstrate that B-cell depletion protects mice from experimental AAA formation and promotes emergence of an immunosuppressive environment in aorta. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Tityus serrulatus venom increases vascular permeability in selected airway tissues in a mast cell-independent way.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Juliana P; Freitas, Thalma A; Conceição, Isaltino M; Kwasniewski, Fábio H

    2013-03-01

    Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv)-induced pulmonary edema can occur in severe envenomation and the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of pharmacological modulation of the mast cell activation and the histamine antagonism on airways edema (investigated by Evans blue dye extravasation) and measured 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in rats envenomed by Tsv. Additionally, the in vitro effect of Tsv on mast cells was studied using histological method and 5-HT release from mesenteric and peritoneal mast cells. We found that i.v. injection of Tsv increase vascular permeability in trachea, upper and lower bronchi and in lung parenchyma. This was not affected by ketotifen, a mast cell "stabilizer," or by pretreatment with pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist). Moreover, 5-HT was not found in BALF of envenomed rats. In vitro experiments showed that Tsv did not induce mast cell degranulation nor release of 5-HT by mesenteric or peritoneal mast cells, in sharp contrast to preparations challenged by a mast cell activator, compound 48/80. In conclusion, our results show that Tsv causes strong edema in rat airways which is independent of mast cell activation and show that mast cells are not directly activated by Tsv. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Mast cells in neoangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nienartowicz, Andrzej; Sobaniec-Łotowska, Maria E; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Lemancewicz, Dorota

    2006-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) always accompany connective tissue and are located in the proximity of lymphatic and blood vessels and nerve fibers. They are round or oval mononuclear cells with a diameter of 4-20 microm containing in their cytoplasm specific exocrine granules (storing neutral proteases) enclosed by a single membrane, whose presence is regarded as an index of the MC's static state. In view of their wide distribution in the organism, they play various roles in, for example, type I hypersensitivity reactions, chronic inflammatory processes, tissue reconstruction and wound healing, and pathological pulmonary fibrosis. They also play a role in angiogenesis, both in normal conditions during tissue regeneration and in pathological neoplastic states. The microcirculation provides building and nutritional substances to cancer cells and enables cancer spread via the blood. On the other hand, a tumor with good vascularization is more prone to penetration by cytostatics, which is why angiogenesis is a very important process in the course of neoplastic disease. Many authors indicate a close association between mast cells and angiogenesis. Some substances contained in the cytoplasm of these cells are potent stimulators of angiogenesis (tryptase, heparin), while others may inhibit it (protamine, platelet factor 4), and this conditions cancer growth and the development of the metastatic process. It is not known, however, what interactions occur between stimulants and inhibitors and what the proportional involvement of particular mediators in the formation of new vessels is.

  13. Serum levels of cytokines and secondary messages after T-cell-depleted and non-T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation: influence of conditioning and hematopoietic reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Schwaighofer, H; Kernan, N A; O'Reilly, R J; Brankova, J; Nachbaur, D; Herold, M; Eibl, B; Niederwieser, D

    1996-10-15

    Cytokines are increasingly recognized as important mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Measurements of cytokine serum levels in patients with GVHD, and successful prevention and treatment of the disease with the use of cytokine antagonists to either the cytokine or its receptor, are only two of several factors demonstrating the involvement of cytokines in GVHD. To further investigate the role of cytokines in the pathomechanism of acute GVHD, we investigated endogenous serum levels of various cytokines and dependent molecules in sera of 14 patients after T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and compared the results with those of 12 patients undergoing non-TCD BMT. The effect of various conditioning regimens and of hematopoietic reconstitution on cytokine serum levels was analyzed in detail in these cohorts of patients by measuring interferon (IFN)-gamma, IFN-alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin. The analyses showed that an increase in IFN-gamma and neopterin serum levels was a specific feature of cyclophosphamide administration and was not observed after other cytostatic drugs or total body irradiation, and that an increase in IFN-gamma, neopterin, beta2-microglobulin, and IFN-alpha release depends on the presence of T cells in the graft. We conclude that significant cytokine serum alterations were noted after TCD BMT as compared with after non-TCD BMT. These alterations, besides depletion of cytotoxic effector cells, might be involved in preventing GVHD after TCD BMT. In addition, more attention should be devoted to the cytokine release-inducing capacity of the conditioning regimen, because such a release might influence the occurrence of transplant-related complications after BMT.

  14. The mast cell - B-cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang Michael

    2017-02-24

    Over the past years, a critical role for the immune system and in particular, for mast cells, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B-cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague Dawley rats and B-cell deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, sugen-hypoxia and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B-cells, as a) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast cell stabilizers, and b) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B-cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B-cells in PH was demonstrated, in that either blocking B-cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell - B-cell axis driven by IL-6 as critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy.

  15. Long-term maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion in patients with ANCA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, William F; Cortazar, Frank B; Wenger, Julia; Murphy, Andrew P; Rhee, Eugene P; Laliberte, Karen A; Niles, John L

    2014-04-01

    Remission in the majority of ANCA vasculitis patients is not sustained after a single course of rituximab, and risk of relapse warrants development of a successful strategy to ensure durable remission. A retrospective analysis of ANCA vasculitis patients who underwent maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion for up to 7 years was performed. Maintenance therapy with rituximab was initiated after achieving remission or converting from other prior maintenance therapy. Continuous B-cell depletion was achieved in all patients by scheduled rituximab administration every 4 months. Disease activity, serologic parameters, adverse events, and survival were examined. In the study, 172 patients (mean age=60 years, 55% women, 57% myeloperoxidase-ANCA) treated from April of 2006 to March of 2013 underwent continuous B-cell depletion with rituximab. Median remission maintenance follow-up time was 2.1 years. Complete remission (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score [BVAS] = 0) was achieved in all patients. Major relapse (BVAS ≥ 3) occurred in 5% of patients and was associated with weaning of other immunosuppression drugs. Remission was reinduced in all patients. Survival mirrored survival of a general age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched United States population. This analysis provides evidence for long-term disease control using continuous B-cell depletion. This treatment strategy in ANCA vasculitis patients also seems to result in survival rates comparable with rates in a matched reference population. These findings suggest that prospective remission maintenance treatment trials using continuous B-cell depletion are warranted.

  16. Palmitoylethanolamide regulates development of intestinal radiation injury in a mast cell dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junru; Zheng, Junying; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Wang, Wen; Garg, Sarita; Prather, Paul L.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells and neuroimmune interactions regulate the severity of intestinal radiation mucositis, a dose-limiting toxicity during radiation therapy of abdominal malignancies. Aims Because endocannabinoids regulate intestinal inflammation, we investigated the effect of the cannabimimetic, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in a mast competent (+/+) and mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rat model. Methods Rats underwent localized, fractionated intestinal irradiation and received daily injections with vehicle or PEA from 1 day before until 2 weeks after radiation. Intestinal injury was assessed non-invasively by luminol bioluminescence, and, at 2 weeks, by histology, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis, gene expression analysis, and pathway analysis. Results Compared to +/+ rats, Ws/Ws rats sustained more intestinal structural injury (p=0.01), mucosal damage (p=0.02), neutrophil infiltration (p=0.0003), and collagen deposition (p=0.004). PEA reduced structural radiation injury (p=0.02), intestinal wall thickness (p=0.03), collagen deposition (p=0.03), and intestinal inflammation (p=0.02) in Ws/Ws rats, but not in +/+ rats. PEA inhibited mast cell-derived cellular immune response and anti-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-10 signaling, and activated the prothrombin pathway in +/+ rats. In contrast, while PEA suppressed non-mast cell derived immune responses, it increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 and IL-6 signaling and decreased activation of the prothrombin pathway in Ws/Ws rats. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the absence of mast cells exacerbate radiation enteropathy by mechanisms that likely involve the coagulation system, anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling, and the innate immune system; and that these mechanisms are regulated by PEA in a mast cell-dependent manner. The endocannabinoid system should be explored as target for mitigating intestinal radiation injury. PMID:24848354

  17. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  18. Mast Wake Reduction by Shaping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-03

    piercing masts, hydrofoil boats 4 and oilrig platforms. Incorporating the technology will also 5 reduce the wave heights generated by such marine...on the 4 leading and trailing edges of the mast. For example: a I 5 caliber ogive with no straight mid-sections results in a 6 thickness to chord ratio...trailing edges of the mast. More specifically a 1 3 caliber ogive with no straight mid-sections results in a 4 thickness to chord ratio of 0.5 and has

  19. Ex vivo T-cell depletion in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Saad, A; Lamb, L S

    2017-03-20

    The most common cause of post-transplant mortality in patients with hematological malignancy is relapse, followed by GvHD, infections, organ toxicity and second malignancy. Immune-mediated complications such as GvHD continue to be challenging, yet amenable to control through manipulation of the T-cell compartment of the donor graft with subsequent immunomodulation after transplant. However, risk of both relapse and infection increase concomitantly with T-cell depletion (TCD) strategies that impair immune recovery. In this review, we discuss the clinical outcome of current and emerging strategies of TCD in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant that have developed during the modern transplantation era, focusing specifically on ex vivo strategies that target selected T-cell subsets.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.22.

  20. Ets Factors Regulate Neural Stem Cell Depletion and Gliogenesis in Ras Pathway Glioma.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Joshua J; Levy, Rachelle; Antonuk, C Danielle; Molina, Jessica; Dutra-Clarke, Marina; Park, Hannah; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Kim, Gi Bum; Hu, Xin; Bannykh, Serguei I; Verhaak, Roel G W; Danielpour, Moise

    2015-07-14

    As the list of putative driver mutations in glioma grows, we are just beginning to elucidate the effects of dysregulated developmental signaling pathways on the transformation of neural cells. We have employed a postnatal, mosaic, autochthonous glioma model that captures the first hours and days of gliomagenesis in more resolution than conventional genetically engineered mouse models of cancer. We provide evidence that disruption of the Nf1-Ras pathway in the ventricular zone at multiple signaling nodes uniformly results in rapid neural stem cell depletion, progenitor hyperproliferation, and gliogenic lineage restriction. Abolishing Ets subfamily activity, which is upregulated downstream of Ras, rescues these phenotypes and blocks glioma initiation. Thus, the Nf1-Ras-Ets axis might be one of the select molecular pathways that are perturbed for initiation and maintenance in glioma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogen-specific T cell depletion and reactivation of opportunistic pathogens in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Geldmacher, Christof; Koup, Richard A

    2012-05-01

    During HIV infection, it is unclear why different opportunistic pathogens cause disease at different CD4 T cell count thresholds. Early work has shown that CD4 T cell depletion is influenced both by cellular activation status and expression of viral entry receptors. More recently, functional characteristics of the CD4 T cells, such as cytokine and chemokine production, have also been shown to influence cellular susceptibility to HIV. Here, we examine how functional differences in pathogen-specific CD4 T cells could lead to their differential loss during HIV infection. This may have implications for when different opportunistic infections occur, and a better understanding of the mechanisms for functional imprinting of antigen-specific T cells may lead to improvements in design of vaccines against HIV and opportunistic pathogens.

  2. Satellite cell depletion does not inhibit adult skeletal muscle regrowth following unloading-induced atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Janna R.; Mula, Jyothi; Kirby, Tyler J.; Fry, Christopher S.; Lee, Jonah D.; Ubele, Margo F.; Campbell, Kenneth S.; McCarthy, John J.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2012-01-01

    Resident muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells, are thought to be the main mediators of skeletal muscle plasticity. Satellite cells are activated, replicate, and fuse into existing muscle fibers in response to both muscle injury and mechanical load. It is generally well-accepted that satellite cells participate in postnatal growth, hypertrophy, and muscle regeneration following injury; however, their role in muscle regrowth following an atrophic stimulus remains equivocal. The current study employed a genetic mouse model (Pax7-DTA) that allowed for the effective depletion of >90% of satellite cells in adult muscle upon the administration of tamoxifen. Vehicle and tamoxifen-treated young adult female mice were either hindlimb suspended for 14 days to induce muscle atrophy or hindlimb suspended for 14 days followed by 14 days of reloading to allow regrowth, or they remained ambulatory for the duration of the experimental protocol. Additionally, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was added to the drinking water to track cell proliferation. Soleus muscle atrophy, as measured by whole muscle wet weight, fiber cross-sectional area, and single-fiber width, occurred in response to suspension and did not differ between satellite cell-depleted and control muscles. Furthermore, the depletion of satellite cells did not attenuate muscle mass or force recovery during the 14-day reloading period, suggesting that satellite cells are not required for muscle regrowth. Myonuclear number was not altered during either the suspension or the reloading period in soleus muscle fibers from vehicle-treated or satellite cell-depleted animals. Thus, myonuclear domain size was reduced following suspension due to decreased cytoplasmic volume and was completely restored following reloading, independent of the presence of satellite cells. These results provide convincing evidence that satellite cells are not required for muscle regrowth following atrophy and that, instead, the myonuclear

  3. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J.; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury. PMID:26203800

  4. Differences in Aspergillus-specific immune recovery between T-cell-replete and T-cell-depleted hematopoietic transplants.

    PubMed

    Perruccio, Katia; Topini, Fabiana; Tosti, Antonella; Gazzola, Maria Vittoria; Messina, Chiara; Martelli, Massimo F; Caniglia, Maurizio; Velardi, Andrea; Cesaro, Simone

    2015-12-01

    After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, invasive aspergillosis remains one of the most lethal infections. Susceptibility may be due to prophylaxis and treatment of graft-vs.-host disease in T-cell-replete transplants, and delayed immune rebuilding due to T-cell depletion in haploidentical transplantation. We monitored CD4(+) T-cell recovery and anti-Aspergillus immune competence in pediatric recipients of T-cell-replete matched transplants and of prevalently adult recipients of T-cell-depleted matched or haploidentical transplants for hematological malignancies. Although CD4(+) T-cell counts were higher in T-cell-replete transplant recipients at all post-transplant time points, Aspergillus-specific T cells were first detected 15-18 months after T-cell-replete matched, 7-9 months after T-cell-depleted matched, and 9-12 months after haploidentical transplantation, respectively. Incidence of invasive aspergillosis was 22% with 10% mortality after T-cell-replete transplants, 0% after T-cell-depleted matched, and 7% with 4% mortality after haploidentical transplants. Although T-cell counts were significantly higher after T-cell-replete transplants, post-transplant immune suppression/GvHD appeared to impair their function. Specific Aspergillus immune competence recovered faster after T-cell-depleted transplants, whether matched or haploidentical. T-cell-replete transplants were associated with a higher incidence of invasive aspergillosis and Aspergillus-related deaths. These results showed that T-cell depletion without post-transplant immunosuppression is associated to a faster immune recovery than T-cell-replete transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A mast-seeding desert shrub regulates population dynamics and behavior of its heteromyid dispersers.

    PubMed

    Auger, Janene; Meyer, Susan E; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2016-04-01

    Granivorous rodent populations in deserts are primarily regulated through precipitation-driven resource pulses rather than pulses associated with mast-seeding, a pattern more common in mesic habitats. We studied heteromyid responses to mast-seeding in the desert shrub blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), a regionally dominant species in the Mojave-Great Basin Desert transition zone. In a 5-year study at Arches National Park, Utah, USA, we quantified spatiotemporal variation in seed resources in mast and intermast years in blackbrush-dominated and mixed desert vegetation and measured responses of Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat) and Perognathus flavescens (plains pocket mouse). In blackbrush-dominated vegetation, blackbrush seeds comprised >79% of seed production in a mast year, but 0% in the first postmast year. Kangaroo rat abundance in blackbrush-dominated vegetation was highest in the mast year, declined sharply at the end of the first postmast summer, and then remained at low levels for 3 years. Pocket mouse abundance was not as strongly associated with blackbrush seed production. In mixed desert vegetation, kangaroo rat abundance was higher and more uniform through time. Kangaroo rats excluded the smaller pocket mice from resource-rich patches including a pipeline disturbance and also moved their home range centers closer to this disturbance in a year of low blackbrush seed production. Home range size for kangaroo rats was unrelated to seed resource density in the mast year, but resource-poor home ranges were larger (P < 0.001) in the first postmast year, when resources were limiting. Blackbrush seeds are higher in protein and fat but lower in carbohydrates than the more highly preferred seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) and have similar energy value per unit of handling time. Kangaroo rats cached seeds of these two species in similar spatial configurations, implying that they were equally valued as stored food resources. Blackbrush mast

  6. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  7. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  8. Mast cell release of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Simpson, K.M.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of rat serosal mast cells (MC) to release superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) upon activation by immunologic and nonimmunologic stimuli was investigated. Purified MC (90-95%) were either sensitized with monoclonal IgE reactive against dinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) and challenged with DNP-BSA, or naive MC were treated with compound 48/80 or ionophore A23187. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was measured by O/sub 2//sup -/ dismutase (SOD)-sensitive reduction of cytochrome C and MC activation was assessed by the release of histamine or (/sup 14/C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT). The results reveal that activation of MC by 48/80 or immunologic challenge does not release O/sub 2//sup -/, although these stimuli induce substantial release of histamine and 5HT (40-70%). In contrast, A23187 released O/sub 2//sup -/ (3-6 nMols/10/sup 6/ MC) and histamine (40-80%). In mixed cell preparations containing MC and macrophages (M0), activation of MC with 48/80 resulted in inhibition of M0 O/sub 2//sup -/ release. The MC-mediated inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ production was not due to histamine or 5HT, but was due to MC-granule SOD. MC contain abundant quantities of SOD and, therefore, release O/sub 2//sup -/ only when its production exceeds the intracellular SOD threshold following activation with selective stimuli. In addition, the apparent differences in the mode and site of action of various stimuli on MC may contribute to the discriminative release of O/sub 2//sup -/.

  9. Systemic Effects of Ingested Lactobacillus Rhamnosus: Inhibition of Mast Cell Membrane Potassium (IKCa) Current and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Paul; Wang, Binxiang; Khambati, Ibrahim; Kunze, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of the intestine to certain strains lactobacillus can have systemic immune effects that include the attenuation of allergic responses. Despite the central role of mast cells in allergic disease little is known about the effect of lactobacilli on the function of these cells. To address this we assessed changes in rat mast cell activation following oral treatment with a strain of Lactobacillus known to attenuate allergic responses in animal models. Sprague Dawley rats were fed with L.rhamnosus JB-1 (1×109) or vehicle control for 9 days. Mediator release from peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) was determined in response to a range of stimuli. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to assess mast cell responses in vivo. The Ca2+ activated K+ channel (KCa3.1) current, identified as critical to mast cell degranulation, was monitored by whole cell patch-clamp. L.rhamnosus JB-1 treatment lead to significant inhibition of mast cell mediator release in response to a range of stimuli including IgE mediated activation. Furthermore, the PCA response was significantly reduced in treated rats. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RPMC from treated animals were much less responsive to the KCa3.1 opener, DCEBIO. These studies demonstrate that Ingestion of L.rhamnosus JB-1 leads to mast cell stabilization in rats and identify KCa3.1 as an immunomodulatory target for certain lactobacilli. Thus the systemic effects of certain candidate probiotics may include mast cell stabilization and such actions could contribute to the beneficial effect of these organisms in allergic and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:22815978

  10. Targeting mast cells in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Frossard, Nelly

    2014-06-01

    Although mast cells have long been known to play a critical role in anaphylaxis and other allergic diseases, they also participate in some innate immune responses and may even have some protective functions. Data from the study of mast cell-deficient mice have facilitated our understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms driving mast cell functions during both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review presents an overview of the biology of mast cells and their potential involvement in various inflammatory diseases. We then discuss some of the current pharmacological approaches used to target mast cells and their products in several diseases associated with mast cell activation.

  11. Treg-cell depletion promotes chemokine production and accumulation of CXCR3(+) conventional T cells in intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Akeus, Paulina; Langenes, Veronica; Kristensen, Jonas; von Mentzer, Astrid; Sparwasser, Tim; Raghavan, Sukanya; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent tumor types worldwide and tumor-infiltrating T cells are crucial for anti-tumor immunity. We previously demonstrated that Treg cells from CRC patients inhibit transendothelial migration of conventional T cells. However, it remains unclear if local Treg cells affect lymphocyte migration into colonic tumors. By breeding APC(Min/+) mice with depletion of regulatory T cells mice, expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor under the control of the FoxP3 promoter, we were able to selectively deplete Treg cells in tumor-bearing mice, and investigate the impact of these cells on the infiltration of conventional T cells into intestinal tumors. Short-term Treg-cell depletion led to a substantial increase in the frequencies of T cells in the tumors, attributed by both increased infiltration and proliferation of T cells in the Treg-cell-depleted tumors. We also demonstrate a selective increase of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in Treg-cell-depleted tumors, which were accompanied by accumulation of CXCR3(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ mRNA expression. In conclusion, Treg-cell depletion increases the accumulation of conventional T cells in intestinal tumors, and targeting Treg cells could be a possible anti-tumor immunotherapy, which not only affects T-cell effector functions, but also their recruitment to tumors.

  12. Autoantibody levels in myositis patients correlate with clinical response during B cell depletion with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Oddis, Chester V; Goudeau, Danielle; Koontz, Diane; Qi, Zengbiao; Reed, Ann M; Ascherman, Dana P; Levesque, Marc C

    2016-06-01

    To determine the longitudinal trends in serum levels of four myositis-associated autoantibodies: anti-Jo-1, -transcription intermediary factor 1 γ (TIF1-γ), -signal recognition particle (SRP) and -Mi-2, after B cell depletion with rituximab, and to determine the longitudinal association of these autoantibody levels with disease activity as measured by myositis core-set measures (CSMs). Treatment-resistant adult and pediatric myositis subjects (n = 200) received rituximab in the 44-week Rituximab in Myositis Trial. CSMs [muscle enzymes, manual muscle testing (MMT), physician and patient global disease activity, HAQ, and extramuscular disease activity] were evaluated monthly and anti-Jo-1 (n = 28), -TIF1-γ (n = 23), -SRP (n = 25) and -Mi-2 (n = 26) serum levels were measured using validated quantitative ELISAs. Temporal trends and the longitudinal relationship between myositis-associated autoantibodies levels and CSM were estimated using linear mixed models. Following rituximab, anti-Jo-1 levels decreased over time (P < 0.001) and strongly correlated with all CSMs (P < 0.008). Anti-TIF1-γ levels also decreased over time (P < 0.001) and were only associated with HAQ, MMT and physician and patient global disease activity. Anti-SRP levels did not change significantly over time, but were significantly associated with serum muscle enzymes. Anti-Mi-2 levels significantly decreased over time and were associated with muscle enzymes, MMT and the physician global score. Anti-Jo-1, anti-TIF1-γ and anti-Mi-2 levels in myositis subjects decreased after B cell depletion and were correlated with changes in disease activity, whereas anti-SRP levels were only associated with longitudinal muscle enzyme levels. The strong association of anti-Jo-1 levels with clinical outcomes suggests that anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies may be a good biomarker for disease activity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights

  13. Effect of LED phototherapy (λ630 +/- 20nm) on mast cells during wound healing in hypothyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraguassú, Gardênia M.; De Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; da Guarda, Milena G.; Rodriguez, Tânia T.; Ramalho, Maria José P.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria P.

    2014-02-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with the disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. LED phototherapy has been studied using several healing models, but their effects on mast cells proliferation associated to hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect LED (λ630+/-20nm) phototherapy on mast cells proliferation during tissue repair in hypothyroid rats. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 24 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each: EC-Control Euthyroid; ED-Euthyroid+LED; HC-Control Hypothyroid and HD-Hypothyroid+LED. The irradiation started immediately after surgery and was repeated every other day for 7 days, when animals death occurred. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. The specimens removed were processed to wax and stained with toluidine blue for mast cell identification. The mast cell proliferation was significantly higher in HC group than in EC group (Mann Whitney, p<0.05), but when ED group was compared to HD group, no significant difference was found. Our results showed that there was increase of mast cells in the presence of hypothyroidism, prolonging the inflammatory phase of repair, and the LED light has a biomodulative effect on mast cell population, even when hipothyroidism was present.

  14. Long-Term Maintenance Therapy Using Rituximab-Induced Continuous B-Cell Depletion in Patients with ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendergraft, William F.; Cortazar, Frank B.; Wenger, Julia; Murphy, Andrew P.; Rhee, Eugene P.; Laliberte, Karen A.; Niles, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Remission in the majority of ANCA vasculitis patients is not sustained after a single course of rituximab, and risk of relapse warrants development of a successful strategy to ensure durable remission. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective analysis of ANCA vasculitis patients who underwent maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion for up to 7 years was performed. Maintenance therapy with rituximab was initiated after achieving remission or converting from other prior maintenance therapy. Continuous B-cell depletion was achieved in all patients by scheduled rituximab administration every 4 months. Disease activity, serologic parameters, adverse events, and survival were examined. Results In the study, 172 patients (mean age=60 years, 55% women, 57% myeloperoxidase–ANCA) treated from April of 2006 to March of 2013 underwent continuous B-cell depletion with rituximab. Median remission maintenance follow-up time was 2.1 years. Complete remission (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score [BVAS]=0) was achieved in all patients. Major relapse (BVAS≥3) occurred in 5% of patients and was associated with weaning of other immunosuppression drugs. Remission was reinduced in all patients. Survival mirrored survival of a general age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched United States population. Conclusion This analysis provides evidence for long-term disease control using continuous B-cell depletion. This treatment strategy in ANCA vasculitis patients also seems to result in survival rates comparable with rates in a matched reference population. These findings suggest that prospective remission maintenance treatment trials using continuous B-cell depletion are warranted. PMID:24626432

  15. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rachel K; Hutchinson, Lee M; Burpee, Benjamin T; Tupper, Emily J; Pelletier, Jonathan H; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R; Malay, Ethan T; Evans, Brieana L; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoantigen-Specific B-Cell Depletion Overcomes Failed Immune Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rachel A.; Kendall, Peggy L.; Thomas, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  17. B cell depletion in treating primary biliary cirrhosis: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-08-14

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a progressive autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology that affects almost exclusively women. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is currently the only approved drug by Food and Drug Administration for patients with PBC. Although the precise pathogenesis of PBC remains unclear, it has been postulated that many cell populations, including B cells, are involved in the ongoing inflammatory process, which implicates, not surprisingly, a potential therapeutic target of depleting B cell to treat this disorder. Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been approved for the treatment of lymphoma and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Whether it is effective in the treatment of PBC has not been evaluated. Recently, Tsuda et al([1]) demonstrated that B cell depletion with rituximab significantly reduced the number of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-producing B cells, AMA titers, the plasma levels of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM and IgG) as well as serum alkaline phosphatase, and it was well tolerated by all the treated patients with no serious adverse events. This observation provides a novel treatment option for the patients with PBC who have incomplete response to UDCA.

  18. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  19. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  20. Mast cells in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jean S; Jawdat, Dunia M

    2004-07-01

    Mast cells have been most extensively studied in their traditional role as an early effector cell of allergic disease. However, in the majority of individuals, it might be the role of this cell as a sentinel in host defense that is most important. Mast cells have been repeatedly demonstrated to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, and evidence for their involvement in early responses to viral and fungal pathogens is growing. Mast cells are activated during innate immune responses by multiple mechanisms, including well-established responses to complement components. In addition, novel mechanisms have emerged as a result of the explosion of knowledge in our understanding of pattern-recognition receptors. The mast cell shares many features with other innate immune effector cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages. However, a unique role for mast cells is defined not only by their extensive mediator profile but also by their ability to interact with the vasculature, to expedite selective cell recruitment, and to set the stage for an appropriate acquired response. Copyright 2004 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

  1. Nonclinical evaluation of the potential for mast cell activation by an erythropoietin analog

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, James L.

    2015-09-15

    The erythropoietin analog peginesatide was withdrawn from marketing due to unexpected severe anaphylactic reactions associated with administration of the multi-use formulation. The adverse events occurred rapidly following the first ever administration of the drug with most affected patients becoming symptomatic in less than 30 min. This is most consistent with an anaphylactoid reaction due to direct activation of mast cells. Laboratory evaluation was undertaken using rat peritoneal mast cells as the model system. Initial studies showed that high concentrations of the formulated drug as well as formulated vehicle alone could cause mast cell degranulation as measured by histamine release. The purified active drug was not able to cause histamine release whereas the vehicle filtrate and lab created drug vehicle were equally potent at causing histamine release. Individual formulations of vehicle leaving one component out showed that histamine release was due to phenol. Dose response studies with phenol showed a very sharp dose response curve that was similar in three buffer systems. Cellular analysis by flow cytometry showed that the histamine release was not due to cell death, and that changes in light scatter parameters consistent with degranulation were rapidly observed. Limited testing with primary human mast cells showed a similar dose response of histamine release with exposure to phenol. To provide in vivo confirmation, rats were injected with vehicle formulated with various concentrations of phenol via a jugular vein cannula. Significant release of histamine was detected in blood samples taken 2 min after dosing at the highest concentrations tested. - Highlights: • Peginesatide caused severe anaphylactoid reactions in 0.2% of patients. • Both formulated drug and vehicle cause degranulation of rat mast cells. • Phenol was identified as the vehicle component causing degranulation. • Human mast cells show similar dose response to phenol as rat mast cells

  2. Mast cell ontogeny: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells were first identified by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, when he was still a medical student. Many fundamental aspects of mast cell ontogeny have been elucidated since Ehrlich's first identification. Demonstration of mast cell derivation from bone marrow precursors could be established in 1977 when Kitamura's group first showed reconstitution of mast cells in mast cell-deficient mice by the adaptive transfer of wild type bone marrow and indicated that these cells were of hematopoietic origin. It is now definitively established that development of mast cells in bone marrow occurs along the myeloid pathway. However, several aspects need further clarification. In particular, identification and chemical characterization of growth factors expressing mast cell differentiating properties and the relationship between mast cell and basophils developmental pathways.

  3. Curiosity on Tilt Table with Mast Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-25

    The Mast Camera Mastcam on NASA Mars rover Curiosity has two rectangular eyes near the top of the rover remote sensing mast. This image shows Curiosity on a tilt table NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

  4. CD4+ T cell depletion in an untreated HIV type 1-infected human leukocyte antigen-B*5801-positive patient with an undetectable viral load.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Adriana; Bailey, Justin R; Xu, Jie; Philp, Frances H; Quinn, Thomas C; Williams, Thomas M; Ray, Stuart C; Thomas, David L; Blankson, Joel N

    2008-04-15

    We report a case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for 20 years who has experienced CD4(+) T cell depletion in spite of maintaining undetectable viral loads. Our data suggest that immune activation can cause CD4(+) T cell depletion even when HIV-1 replication appears to be controlled by host factors.

  5. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  6. Protective effect of teprenone against acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Kobayashi, Takashi; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Nakazawa, Saburo

    2003-11-01

    The protective effect of teprenone, an anti-ulcer drug, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (0.75 mg/kg). Teprenone (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) was orally administered 0.5 h before compound 48/80 treatment. Administered teprenone prevented gastric mucosal lesion development found at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment dose-dependently, although no dose of teprenone affected the decreased gastric mucosal blood flow and increased serum serotonin and histamine concentrations found at 3 h after the treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxdiase (an index of neutrophil infiltration) and xanthine oxidase and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (an index of lipid peroxidation) and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus) and adherent mucus occurred in gastric mucosal tissues at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment. Administered teprenone dose-dependently attenuated all these changes found at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered teprenone protects against compound 48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion and its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  7. A mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, prevents the accumulation of hyaluronan in lung tissue injured by ionizing irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, K.; Bjermer, L.; Hellstroem, S.H.; Henriksson, R.; Haellgren, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Irradiation with a single dose of 30 Grey on the basal regions of the lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats induced a peribronchial and alveolar inflammation. Infiltration of mast cells in the edematous alveolar interstitial tissue and also in the peribronchial tissue were characteristic features of the lesion. The appearance of mast cells was already seen 4 wk after irradiation and by weeks 6 to 8 there was a heavy infiltration. The staining properties suggested that they were connective tissue-type mast cells. The infiltration of mast cells was paralleled by an accumulation of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) in the alveolar interstitial tissue 6 and 8 wk after irradiation. The recovery of hyaluronan (HA) during bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of the lungs also increased at this time. Treatment with a mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, induced a distinct reduction of granulated mast cells in the alveolar tissue. Regular treatment with compound 48/80 from the time of irradiation considerably reduced the HA recovery during BAL and the HA accumulation in the interstitial tissue but did not affect the interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. By contrast, an accumulation of HA in the alveolar interstitial space was induced when compound 48/80 was given not until mast cell infiltration of the lung had started. The effects of compound 48/80 indicate that the connective tissue response after lung irradiation is dependent on whether or not mast cell degranulation is induced before or after the mast cell infiltration of the alveolar tissue.

  8. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  9. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  11. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  13. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  14. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  15. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  18. 46 CFR 111.05-9 - Masts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Masts. 111.05-9 Section 111.05-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Ground, Ground Detection, and Grounded Systems § 111.05-9 Masts. Each nonmetallic mast and...

  19. Cresyl Violet Stains Mast Cells Selectively: Its Application to Counterstaining in Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Tarumi, Wataru; Hamada, Naomi; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Itoh, Masanori T

    2017-04-01

    The thiazine dye toluidine blue (TB) is well known to stain mast cells and hyaline cartilage metachromatically, and thus is mostly often used for their identification. However, TB is not suitable for counterstaining in immunohistochemistry, because of its high-background staining in the cytoplasm of other cell species and in extracellular structures. To expand the knowledge about dyestuffs staining mast cells in consideration with their usage in immunohistochemistry, we determined the stainability of several thiazines and oxazines, which are structurally related compounds to TB, using sections of mast cell-containing tissues. We found that all azine dyes used metachromatically stained mast cells and cartilage. Among these dyes, an oxazines cresyl violet (CV) stained mast cells with lower background, suggesting that those are useful for detecting mast cells and for counterstaining in immunohistochemistry. To ascertain its utility, CV was used in immunostaining of bHSDs in sections from adult rat ovary. Immunopositive signals reflected by DAB development in brown were clearly detected even after CV staining. We conclude that, similar to thiazines, oxazines stain mast cells metachromatically, and that of these, CV is more useful as a counterstain in immunohistochemistry than TB.

  20. Mast cell infiltrates in vulvodynia represent secondary and idiopathic mast cell hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Eberz, Barbara; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Mast cell infiltrates in tissues of vulvodynia are common, but they have not been characterized for criteria of neoplastic mast cell disease or correlated with patient's concomitant diseases associated with increased mast cells. Formalin-fixed specimens of 35 patients with vulvodynia were evaluated immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3,4,8,20,117c and human mast cell tryptase, and for WHO-criteria of neoplastic mastocytosis (>25% spindled mast cell, CD25 expression, point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V), and chronically elevated serum tryptase levels). Only 20/35 specimens showed a T-lymphocyte dominant inflammatory infiltrate on HE-stained sections, but all showed mast cells. 4/35 biopsies showed <10 mast cells/mm(2) , 15/35 specimens 40-60 mast cells/mm(2) and 16/35 specimens >60 mast cells/mm(2) (average 80/mm(2) ). Control tissue contained typically <10 mast cells/mm(2) . Spindling, CD25-expression, c-kit gene mutations, or increased serum tryptase levels were not detected. 26/35 (74%) patients had concomitant autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, atopy, various allergies, preceding infections. Independent of the subtype of vulvodynia, the majority of mast cell rich biopsies with >40 mast cells/mm(2) were classified as a secondary mast cell disorder reflecting an activated immune system in 75% of vulvodynia patients. Patients with increased mast cells may benefit from medical therapy targeting mast cells.

  1. Germinal Center B Cell Depletion Diminishes CD4+ Follicular T Helper Cells in Autoimmune Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Isharat; Stern, Jessica; McCaughtry, Tom M.; Gallagher, Sandra; Sun, Hong; Gao, Changshou; Tedder, Thomas; Carlesso, Gianluca; Carter, Laura; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous support from follicular CD4+ T helper (Tfh) cells drives germinal center (GC) responses, which last for several weeks to produce high affinity memory B cells and plasma cells. In autoimmune Sle1 and NZB/W F1 mice, elevated numbers of Tfh cells persist, promoting the expansion of self-reactive B cells. Expansion of circulating Tfh like cells have also been described in several autoimmune diseases. Although, the signals required for Tfh differentiation have now been well described, the mechanisms that sustain the maintenance of fully differentiated Tfh are less understood. Recent data demonstrate a role for GC B cells for Tfh maintenance after protein immunization. Methods and Finding Given the pathogenic role Tfh play in autoimmune disease, we explored whether B cells are required for maintenance of autoreactive Tfh. Our data suggest that the number of mature autoreactive Tfh cells is controlled by GC B cells. Depletion of B cells in Sle1 autoimmune mice leads to a dramatic reduction in Tfh cells. In NZB/W F1 autoimmune mice, similar to the SRBC immunization model, GC B cells support the maintenance of mature Tfh, which is dependent mainly on ICOS. The CD28-associated pathway is dispensable for Tfh maintenance in SRBC immunized mice, but is required in the spontaneous NZB/W F1 model. Conclusion These data suggest that mature Tfh cells require signals from GC B cells to sustain their optimal numbers and function in both autoimmune and immunization models. Thus, immunotherapies targeting B cells in autoimmune disease may affect pathogenic Tfh cells. PMID:25101629

  2. Lineage-specific chimaerism quantification after T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buño, I; Anta, B; Moreno-López, E; Balsalobre, P; Balas, A; García-Sánchez, F; Serrano, D; Carrión, R; Gómez-Pineda, A; Díez-Martín, J L

    2003-04-01

    Patients that receive a T-cell depleted (TCD) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) show higher risk of graft failure/rejection and of disease relapse than those that receive unmanipulated grafts. The purpose of the present investigation was to analyze the usefulness of chimaerism quantification in bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB), and leukocyte lineages such as T lymphocytes (CD3+,both CD4+ and CD8+), B lymphocytes (CD19+) and myeloid cells (CD15+), for the early detection of graft failure/rejection episodes and disease relapse after TCD-PBSCT. Two of the ten (2/10) patients included in the study showed stable complete chimaerism (CC). The other 8/10 patients showed decreasing mixed chimaerism (MC) and 7 of them had either graft failure (n = 1)/rejection (n = 3) or disease relapse (n = 3). In two patients relapsed from chronic myeloid leukemia, MC was observed in BM and PB, with higher percentages of autologous cells in BM, as well as in leukocyte lineages, with higher percentages of recipient cells in the myeloid lineage than in lymphocytes. Combined analysis of chimaerism and minimal residual disease allowed early diagnosis of relapse and successful rescue therapy with donor leukocyte infusions (DLI), before the onset of hematological relapse. Chimaerism analysis allowed early diagnosis of incipient graft rejection in 3 patients. These patients showed MC both in BM and PB, with greater percentages of recipient cells in PB. Analysis of leukocyte lineages showed higher percentages of autologous cells in T lymphocytes (mainly CD8+) than in B or myeloid cells. Two of these patients were successfully treated with DLI and recovered normal PB counts and BM cellularity, as well as CC. The graft versus recipient hemopoiesis effect harbored by the donor immunocompetent cells infused seems useful forthe treatment of graft rejection, provided that an early diagnosis is made.

  3. Inducible satellite cell depletion attenuates skeletal muscle regrowth following a scald-burn injury.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Celeste C; McKenna, Colleen F; Cambias, Lauren A; Brightwell, Camille R; Prasai, Anesh; Wang, Ye; El Ayadi, Amina; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E; Fry, Christopher S

    2017-08-22

    Severe burns result in profound skeletal muscle atrophy; persistent muscle atrophy and weakness are major complications that hamper recovery from burn injury. Many factors contribute to the erosion of muscle mass following burn trauma, and we have previously shown concurrent activation and apoptosis of muscle satellite cells following a burn injury in pediatric patients. To determine the necessity of satellite cells during muscle recovery following a burn injury, we utilized a genetically modified mouse model (Pax7(CreER) -DTA) that allows for the conditional depletion of satellite cells in skeletal muscle. Additionally, mice were provided 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to determine satellite cell proliferation, activation and fusion. Juvenile satellite cell-wild type (SC-WT) and satellite cell-depleted (SC-Dep) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to sham or burn injury consisting of a dorsal scald burn injury covering 30% of total body surface area. Both hind-limb and dorsal muscles were studied at 7, 14 and 21 days post-burn. SC-Dep mice had >93% depletion of satellite cells compared to SC-WT (P < 0.05). Burn injury induced robust atrophy in muscles located both proximal and distal to the injury site (∼30% decrease in fibre cross-sectional area [CSA], P < 0.05). Additionally, burn injury induced skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell proliferation, and fusion. Depletion of satellite cells impaired post-burn recovery of both muscle fibre CSA and volume (P < 0.05). These findings support an integral role for satellite cells in the etiology of lean tissue recovery following a severe burn injury. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural killer cell depletion confounds the antitumor mechanism of endogenous IL-12 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Miller, George; Bleier, Joshua I; Antonescu, Cristina; Pillarisetty, Venu G; Shah, Alaap B; Lahrs, Svenja; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2004-06-20

    IL-12 gene transfer to hepatocytes using a recombinant adenovirus vector (AdIL-12) has been shown to protect against primary and metastatic liver tumors in mice. However, the mechanism of protection has been elusive and studies using depleting monoclonal antibodies or transgenic mice have purported it to be independent of T and NK cells. We postulated that depletion of NK cells may distort the experimental model and misrepresent the antitumor mechanism by altering the magnitude and duration of transgene expression. We show in mice treated with AdIL-12 that NK depletion increased serum IL-12 levels by more than 250-fold and prolonged transgene expression by nearly 2 weeks compared to nondepleted mice. To determine the contribution of NK cells to tumor protection after AdIL-12 treatment, we analyzed NK cells from treated animals. Isolated NK cells were markedly activated in terms of their lytic activity and IFN-gamma secretion. Adoptive transfer of NK cells from mice that had been treated with AdIL-12 to naive mice was sufficient to confer protection against colorectal hepatic metastases. This protection was mediated in part by NK-cell production of IFN-gamma. Our findings indicate that NK-cell depletion distorts the model of systemic AdIL-12 administration by markedly altering transgene expression, which then may potentiate other antitumor mechanisms, and that endogenous IL-12 overexpression activates NK cells, rendering them sufficient to protect against liver metastases. These data have critical implications for investigating the immunologic mechanisms of experimental models that utilize gene transfer. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Efficacy of B cell Depletion Therapy on Joint Flare is Associated with Increased Lymphatic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Ju, Yawen; Bouta, Echoe M.; Xing, Lianping; Wood, Ronald W.; Kuzin, Igor; Bottaro, Andrea; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Arthritic flare in tumor necrosis factor transgenic (TNF-Tg) mice is associated with efferent lymph node (LN) “collapse,” triggered by B cell translocation into lymphatic spaces and decreased lymphatic drainage. We examined whether BCDT efficacy is associated with restoration of lymphatic drainage due to removal of obstructing nodal B cells. Methods We developed contrast-enhancement (CE) MRI imaging, near-infrared indocyanine green (NIR-ICG) imaging, and intravital immunofluorescent imaging to longitudinally assess synovitis, lymphatic flow, and cell migration in lymphatic vessels in TNF-Tg mice. We tested to see if BCDT efficacy is associated with restoration of lymphatic draining and cell egress from arthritic joints. Results Unlike active lymphatics to normal and pre-arthritic knees, afferent lymphatic vessels to collapsed LNs in inflamed knees do not pulse. Intravital immunofluorescent imaging demonstrated that CD11b+ monocytes/macrophages in lymphatic vessels afferent to expanding LN travel at high velocity (186 ± 37 micrometer/sec), while these cells are stationary in lymphatic vessels afferent to collapsed PLN. BCDT of flaring TNF-Tg mice significantly decreased knee synovial volume by 50% from the baseline level, and significantly increased lymphatic clearance versus placebo (p<0.05). This increased lymphatic drainage restored macrophages egress from inflamed joints without recovery of the lymphatic pulse. Conclusion These results support a novel mechanism in which BCDT of flaring joints lessens inflammation by increasing lymphatic drainage and subsequent migration of cells and cytokines from the synovial space. PMID:23002006

  6. Effect of sugammadex on rocuronium induced changes in pancreatic mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Yıldıray; Tumkaya, Levent; Bostan, Habib; Tomak, Yakup; Altuner, Durdu; Yilmaz, Adnan; Erdivanli, Başar; Bedir, Recep; Yalcin, Alper; Turan, Alparslan

    2015-08-01

    Mast cells play a vital role in hypersensitivity reactions. Rocuronium is known to cause mast cell mobilization, hypersensitivity, and pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sugammadex on pancreatic changes due to rocuronium. A total of 42 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into six equal groups to receive either rocuronium 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v., R group), rocuronium 1 mg/kg + sugammadex 16 mg/kg i.v. (RS16 group), rocuronium 1 mg/kg + sugammadex 96 mg/kg i.v. (RS96 group), sugammadex 16 mg/kg (S16), sugammadex 96 mg/kg i.v. (S96 group), or 0.9% sodium chloride (control group). Sugammadex was administered 5s later following rocuronium. In R group, mast count was higher, and the distribution rate of granules and nuclear changes were different compared with other groups. Distribution rate of granules in groups S16 and S96 were similar to the control group and lower compared with other groups. The amount of mast cells and granule density in groups RS16 and RS96 was lower compared with R group. The amount of mast cells in groups RS16 and RS96 was significantly lower compared with other treatment groups. These results suggest that sugammadex may have an inhibitory effect on mobilization and morphological changes in pancreatic mast cells induced by administration of rocuronium and sugammadex in rats.

  7. Mast cell activation syndromes presenting as anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2015-05-01

    Anaphylaxis results from severe systemic mast cell activation. In addition to IgE-mediated and physical triggers, it may occur with a clonal mast cell disease and in an idiopathic fashion without clear provoking factors. Disorders of mast cell activation are classified into primary (clonal), secondary, and idiopathic. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by objective documentation of elevated mast cell mediators during attacks and a favorable response to antimediator therapy. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with recurrent anaphylaxis without a clear cause. This article discusses the diagnosis of MCAS.

  8. An update on mast cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Hannah; Grattan, Clive

    2016-12-01

    Disorders of mast cell activation can be classified as primary (mastocytosis), secondary (reactive) or idiopathic. This article discusses how to recognise and approach the diagnosis of patients suspected to have symptoms of abnormal mast cell activation. Given the highly varied and often complex symptomatology of such patients, we advocate applying a logical step-wise approach to investigating these patients to ensure the correct diagnosis is made. Treatments of mast cell activation disorders are discussed, dividing them into those that ameliorate the effects of mast cell mediators and those that act to stabilise the mast cell.

  9. SuperCam_MastUnit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuze, M. D.; Bernardi, P. B.; Caïs, Ph. C.; Perez, R. P.; Rees, J. M. R.; Pares, L. P.; Dubois, B. D.; Parot, Y. P.; Quertier, B. Q.; Maurice, S. M.; Maccabe, K. M.; Wiens, R. W.; Rull, F. R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper will describe and give a development status of SuperCam's mast unit. SuperCam will be carried on the Mars 2020 rover, and consists in an enhanced version of the ChemCam LIBS which is still performing at the surface of Mars, on Curiosity.

  10. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  11. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Prolonged B cell depletion with rituximab is effective in treating refractory pulmonary granulomatous inflammation in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA).

    PubMed

    Henderson, Scott R; Copley, Susan J; Pusey, Charles D; Ind, Philip W; Salama, Alan D

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary nodule formation is a frequent feature of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Traditional induction therapy includes methotrexate or cyclophosphamide, however, pulmonary nodules generally respond slower than vasculitic components of disease. Efficacy of rituximab (RTX) solely for the treatment of pulmonary nodules has not been assessed. In this observational cohort study, we report patient outcomes with RTX in GPA patients with pulmonary nodules who failed to achieve remission following conventional immunosuppression. Patients (n = 5) with persistent pulmonary nodules were identified from our clinic database and retrospectively evaluated. Systemic manifestations, inflammatory markers, disease activity, concurrent immunosuppression, and absolute B cell numbers were recorded pre-RTX and at 6 monthly intervals following treatment. Chest radiographs at each time point were scored by an experienced radiologist, blinded to clinical details. Five patients with GPA and PR3-ANCA were evaluated (2 male, 3 female), mean age 34 (22-52) years. Pulmonary nodules (median 4, range 2-6), with or without cavitation were present in all patients. RTX induced initial B cell depletion (<5 cells/μL) in all patients but re-population was observed in 3 patients. Repeated RTX treatment in these 3 and persistent B cell depletion in the whole cohort was associated with further significant radiological improvement. Radiographic scoring at each time interval showed reduction in both number of nodules (P =  <0.0001) and largest nodule diameter (P =  <0.0001) in all patients for at least 18 months following B cell depletion. In summary, RTX therapy induces resolution of pulmonary granulomatous inflammation in GPA following prolonged B cell depletion.

  13. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  14. Mast Cells in Allergic Diseases and Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Diana L.; Wasserman, Stephen I.

    1982-01-01

    Mast cells with their stores of vasoactive and chemotactic mediators are central to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The cross-linking of receptorbound IgE molecules on the surface of mast cells initiates a complex chain of events, including calcium ion influx, phospholipid methylation and turnover and cyclic nucleotide metabolism, ultimately resulting in the release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity. These mast cell mediators are important in smooth muscle reactivity, in the recruitment of eosinophilic and neutrophilic leukocytes and in the generation of secondary chemical mediators. Histologic evidence of mast cell degranulation, biochemical evidence of mast cell mediators in blood and tissues and clinical evidence of signs and symptoms reproducible by these mediators have strongly supported the crucial role of mast cells in asthma, urticaria, anaphylaxis, rhinitis and mastocytosis. Because of their unique location at host environment interfaces, mast cells may both participate in allergic diseases and promote homeostasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6293204

  15. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  16. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  17. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis by sodium salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H M; Shin, H Y; Choo, Y K; Park, J K

    1999-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal) is a commonly used agent with a wide pharmacological spectrum. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of NaSal on anaphylaxis. NaSal (10−1 and 1 mm) significantly inhibited systemic anaphylaxis induced by compound 48/80 in rats. NaSal also significantly inhibited local anaphylaxis activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin E (IgE). NaSal (10−1 and 1 mm) significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Northern-blot analysis demonstrated that a significantly reduced level of the mRNA of l-histidine decarboxylase was expressed in mast cells treated with NaSal, compared with that without NaSal. NaSal (10−2 and 10−1 mm) had a significant inhibitory effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumour necrosis factor-α secretion from RPMC. The level of cyclic AMP in RPMC, when NaSal (1 mm) was added, transiently and significantly increased about sixfold compared with that of basal cells. These results suggest a possible use of NaSal in managing mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis. PMID:10233741

  18. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    clinical ramifications of roseolovirus infection in humans have been hypothesized, but studies showing definitive causative relationships between infection and disease susceptibility are lacking. Here we show that MRV infects the thymus and causes T-cell depletion, suggesting that other roseoloviruses may have similar properties.

  19. Electromagnetic pollution from phone masts. Effects on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    A review on the impact of radiofrequency radiation from wireless telecommunications on wildlife is presented. Electromagnetic radiation is a form of environmental pollution which may hurt wildlife. Phone masts located in their living areas are irradiating continuously some species that could suffer long-term effects, like reduction of their natural defenses, deterioration of their health, problems in reproduction and reduction of their useful territory through habitat deterioration. Electromagnetic radiation can exert an aversive behavioral response in rats, bats and birds such as sparrows. Therefore microwave and radiofrequency pollution constitutes a potential cause for the decline of animal populations and deterioration of health of plants living near phone masts. To measure these effects urgent specific studies are necessary.

  20. Phaeton Mast Dynamics: On-Orbit Characterization of Deployable Masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    The PMD instrument is a set of three custom-designed triaxial accelerometer systems designed specifically to detect and characterize the modal dynamics of deployable masts in orbit. The instrument was designed and built as a payload for the NuSTAR spacecraft, but it is now sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory's DSX project. It can detect acceleration levels from 1 micro gram to 0.12g over a frequency range of 0.1Hz to 30Hz, the results of which can support future modeling and designing of deployable mast structures for space. This paper details the hardware architecture and design, calibration test and results, and current status of the PMD instrument.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  2. Phaeton Mast Dynamics: On-Orbit Characterization of Deployable Masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the Phaeton Mast Dynamics (PMD) instrument architecture and design, including design constraints, design solutions, and instrument results. Since the design and build phases were completed with PMD as a NuSTAR payload, the presentation discusses NuSTAR's constraints and initial accommodations. The instrument results presented here are independent of the host mission, but the effects of a host mission's data handling design on PMD capabilities is discussed in 2011 IEEEAC Paper 1305.

  3. Changes in mast cells and in permeability of mesenteric microvessels under the effect of immobilization and electrostimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorizontova, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a reduction in the amount of mast cells in the mesentery and an increase in their degranulation was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability of rat mesentery. It is supposed that immobilization and electrostimulation causing degranulation of mast cells prompted histamine and serotonin release from them, thus increasing the permeability of the venular portion of the microvascular bed. Prophylactic use of esculamin preparation with P-vitaminic activity decreased mast cell degranulation, which apparently prolonged the release of histamine and serotonin from them and normalized vascular permeability.

  4. Asymmetric divertor biasing in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Cohen, R.; Counsell, G. C.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments are being carried out on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) where the divertor tiles are electrically biased in a toroidally alternating way. The aim is to induce convective cells in the divertor plasma, broaden the SOL and reduce the divertor heat load. This paper describes the underlying theory and experimental results. Criteria are presented for achieving strong broadening and exciting shear-flow turbulence in the SOL, and properties of the expected turbulence are derived. It is also shown that magnetic shear near the X-point is likely to confine the potential perturbations to the divertor region, leaving the part of the SOL that is in direct contact with the core plasma intact. Preliminary comparison of the theory with MAST data is encouraging: the distortion of the heat deposition pattern, its broadening, and the incremental heat load are qualitatively in agreement; quantitative comparisons are underway.

  5. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-02-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases, such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular, by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release not only of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine, and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells.

  6. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells. PMID:25104798

  7. The role of mast cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wezel, A; Quax, P H A; Kuiper, J; Bot, I

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is the major underlying cause of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed towards inhibiting growth of atherosclerotic lesions as well as towards prevention of lesion destabilization. Interestingly, the presence of mast cells has been demonstrated in both murine and human plaques, and multiple interventional murine studies have pointed out a direct role for mast cells in early and late stages of atherosclerosis. Moreover, it has recently been described that activated lesional mast cells correlate with major cardiovascular events in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on the effect of different mast cell derived mediators in atherogenesis and in late stage plaque destabilization. Also, possible ligands for mast cell activation in the context of atherosclerosis are discussed. Finally, we will elaborate on the predictive value of mast cells, together with therapeutic implications, in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Nitric oxide synthesis inhibition induces leukocyte adhesion via superoxide and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kubes, P; Kanwar, S; Niu, X F; Gaboury, J P

    1993-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that inhibition of nitric oxide production with various nitric oxide synthesis inhibitors (L-NAME, L-NMMA) initiate leukocyte adhesion to postcapillary venules. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism (or mechanisms) that promote the L-NAME-induced leukocyte response. Intravital microscopy was used to examine 25-40 microns venules in the rat mesentery. Nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited with L-NAME and leukocyte adhesion was observed over the first 60 min. The fourfold increase in leukocyte adhesion was independent of alterations in venular red blood cell velocity. The adhesion was superoxide-mediated inasmuch as superoxide dismutase (SOD) abolished the rise in leukocyte adhesion associated with nitric oxide synthesis inhibition. Ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer, also abolished the rise in leukocyte adhesion induced by L-NAME. Histology revealed that mast cell degranulation occurred only in animals treated with L-NAME but not in animals pretreated with SOD or ketotifen. This observation suggests that mast cells become activated in the absence of nitric oxide production and superoxide contributes to the mast cell activation. The L-NAME-induced leukocyte adhesion could be reproduced by infusing hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (a superoxide generating system) or compound 48/80 (an activator of mast cells) and both responses were attenuated by ketotifen. These data suggest that inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis results in a superoxide and mast cell-dependent leukocyte adhesion.

  9. A comparative study of mast cells and eosinophil leukocytes in the mammalian testis.

    PubMed

    Anton, F; Morales, C; Aguilar, R; Bellido, C; Aguilar, E; Gaytán, F

    1998-05-01

    The existence of a physiological integration between the immune and endocrine systems has long been recognized. In spite of the abundant literature data on the presence of cells of the immune system in the testis, mast cells and eosinophil leukocytes have received little attention. We have studied the presence, distribution and numbers of mast cells and eosinophils in the testes of 12 mammalian species. Mast cells were frequently found in equine (stallion, ass and mule) and human testis, whereas eosinophils were nearly absent. On the contrary, eosinophils were abundant in the hare testis, while mast cells were lacking. Both cells types were present in high numbers in swine (wild and domestic boar) testis. Otherwise, mast cells and eosinophils were absent from the testicular parenchyma of several species (rat, dog, cat, bull and deer), although they were present, in most cases, around blood vessels in the tunica albuginea. The presence of high numbers of mast cells and/or eosinophil leukocytes in the testicular parenchyma of some species suggest a role for these cells in local regulatory pathways.

  10. Mast material test program (MAMATEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1988-01-01

    The Mast Material Test Program (MAMATEP) at NASA Lewis is discussed. Objectives include verifying the need for, and evaluating the performance of, various protection techniques for the Solar Array Assembly mast of the Space Station Photovoltaic Power Module. Mast material samples were evaluated in terms of mass and bending modulus, measured before and after environmental exposure. Test environments included atomic oxygen exposure (RF plasma asher), thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. Protective coatings included CV-1144 silicon, a Ni/Au/InSn eutectic, and an open weave, Al braid. Results indicate that unprotected samples degrade in an atomic oxygen environment at a steady rate. Open weave, Al braid offers little protection for the fiberglass-epoxy sample in an asher environment. Ni/Au/InSn eutectic offers excellent protection in an asher environment prior to thermal cycling and mechanical flexing. Long duration asher results from unprotected samples indicate that, even though the fiberglass-epoxy degrades, a protection technique may not be necessary to ensure structural integrity. However, a protection technique may be desirable to limit or contain the amount of debris generated by the degradation of the fiberglass-epoxy.

  11. Malicious Activity Simulation Tool (MAST) and Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    research will enable a more secure implementation of MAST. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Malware , network security, training, Security Control...operational information systems that they manage day-to-day. MAST is a software suite that allows for simulated malware activity on operational...discussed in [1]. Particular emphasis is on the unique risk MAST represents as a malware simulation platform designed to run on production and

  12. Solar Array Mast Imagery Discussion for ISIW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgo, Gary

    2017-01-01

    SAW Mast inspection background: In 2012, NASA's Flight Safety Office requested the Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) office determine the probability of damage to the Solar Array Wing (SAW) mast based on the exposure over the life time of the ISS program. As part of the risk mitigation of the potential MMOD strikes. ISS Program office along with the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) began developing methods for imaging the structural components of the Mast.

  13. Phenotypic changes of bone marrow-derived mast cells after intraperitoneal transfer into W/Wv mice that are genetically deficient in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The ability of mouse IL-3-dependent, bone marrow culture-derived mast cells (BMMC) to generate serosal mast cells (SMC) in vivo after adoptive transfer to mast cell-deficient mice has been defined by chemical and immunochemical criteria. BMMC differentiated and grown from WBB6F1-+/+ mouse progenitor cells in medium containing PWM/splenocyte-conditioned medium synthesized a approximately 350,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycan bearing approximately 55,000 Mr glycosaminoglycans, as defined by gel filtration of each. Approximately 85% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to the cell-associated BMMC proteoglycans were chondroitin sulfates based upon their susceptibility to chondroitinase ABC digestion; HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC- generated unsaturated disaccharides revealed these glycosaminoglycans to be chondroitin sulfate E. As determined by heparinase and nitrous acid degradations, approximately 10% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to BMMC proteoglycans were heparin. In contrast, mast cells recovered from the peritoneal cavity of congenitally mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice 15 wk after intraperitoneal injection of BMMC synthesized approximately 650,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 105,000 Mr. Thus, after adoptive transfer, the SMC of the previously mast cell-deficient mice were like those recovered from the normal WBB6F1-+/+ mice that were shown to synthesize approximately 600,000 Mr proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 115,000 Mr. As assessed by indirect immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry using the B1.1 rat mAb (an antibody that recognizes an epitope located on the neutral glycosphingolipid globopentaosylceramide), approximately 5% of BMMC bound the antibody detectably, whereas approximately 72% of the SMC that were harvested from mast cell-deficient mice 15 wk after adoptive transfer of BMMC were B1.1-positive

  14. Involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced in mice by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom.

    PubMed

    Távora, Bianca C L F; Kimura, Louise F; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Chiariello, Thiago M; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2016-10-01

    Bites caused by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede are mainly characterized by burning pain, paresthesia and edema. On this regard, the aim of this work was to study the involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced by Scolopendra viridicornis (Sv) centipede venom. The edema was analyzed on mice paws. The mice were pretreated with cromolyn (mast cell degranulation inhibitor) and antagonists of histamine receptors, such as promethazine (H1R), cimetidine (H2R) and thioperamide (H3/H4R). The analyses were carried out at different times after the injection of Sv venom (15 μg) or PBS in the footpad of mice. Our results showed a significant inhibition of the edema induced by Sv venom injection in mice previously treated: cromolyn (38-91%), promethazine (50-59%) and thioperamide (around 30%). The treatment with cimetidine did not alter the edema induced by Sv venom. Histopathological analysis showed that Sv venom injection (15 μg) induced edema, leukocyte recruitment and mast cells degranulation, when compared with the PBS-injected mice. Direct effects of the Sv venom on mast cells were studied in PT-18 line (mouse mast cell) and RBL-2H3 cells (rat mast cells). The data showed that higher doses (3.8 and 7.5 μg) of Sv venom were cytotoxic for both cell lineages and induced morphological changes. However, lower doses of the venom induced degranulation of both mast cell lines, as well as the secretion of MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-1β. The production of PGD2 was only observed in the RBL-2H3 line incubated with Sv venom. Taking our results together, we demonstrated that upon Sv venom exposure, mast cells and histamine are crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory reaction.

  15. Blood pressure modulation following activation of mast cells by cationic cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Maamoun; Schwalb, Herzl; Shefler, Irit; Levdansky, Lilia; Mekori, Yoseph A; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2011-12-01

    Short cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are widely used in vitro to transduce agents into cells. But their systemic effect has not been yet studied in detail. We studied the systemic effect of the cell penetrating peptides, penetratin, transportan and pro-rich, on rat hemodynamic functions. Intra-arterial monitoring of blood pressure showed that injection of the positively charged penetratin and transportan in a wide range of concentrations (2.5-320 μg/kg) caused highly significant transient decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pretreatment with histamine receptors blockers or with cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizing agent, significantly attenuated this effect. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of these both peptides with mast cells line, LAD2, caused a massive mast cell degranulation. In vitro studies showed that these CPP in a wide range of concentrations were not cytotoxic without any effect on the survival of LAD2 mast cell line. In contrast, the less positively charged and proline-rich CPP, pro-rich, had no systemic effects with no effect on mast cell degranulation. Our results indicate that intravenously administrated positively charged CPP may have deleterious consequences due to their induced BP drop, mediated by mast cell activation. Therefore, the major effect of mast cell activation on BP should be considered in developing possible future drug therapies based on the injection of membrane-permeable and positively charged CPP. Nevertheless, lower levels of such CPP may be considered as a treatment of systemic high BP through moderate systemic mast cell activation.

  16. Mast cells in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    DeBruin, Erin J; Gold, Matthew; Lo, Bernard C; Snyder, Kimberly; Cait, Alissa; Lasic, Nikola; Lopez, Martin; McNagny, Kelly M; Hughes, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are primarily known for their role in defense against pathogens, particularly bacteria; neutralization of venom toxins; and for triggering allergic responses and anaphylaxis. In addition to these direct effector functions, activated mast cells rapidly recruit other innate and adaptive immune cells and can participate in "tuning" the immune response. In this review we touch briefly on these important functions and then focus on some of the less-appreciated roles of mast cells in human disease including cancer, autoimmune inflammation, organ transplant, and fibrosis. Although it is difficult to formally assign causal roles to mast cells in human disease, we offer a general review of data that correlate the presence and activation of mast cells with exacerbated inflammation and disease progression. Conversely, in some restricted contexts, mast cells may offer protective roles. For example, the presence of mast cells in some malignant or cardiovascular diseases is associated with favorable prognosis. In these cases, specific localization of mast cells within the tissue and whether they express chymase or tryptase (or both) are diagnostically important considerations. Finally, we review experimental animal models that imply a causal role for mast cells in disease and discuss important caveats and controversies of these findings.

  17. Mast Cell-Airway Smooth Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Davinder; Doe, Camille; Woodman, Lucy; Heidi Wan, Wing-Yan; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Hollins, Fay

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mast cell localization to airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle in asthma is important in the development of disordered airway physiology. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed by airway structural cells. Whether it has a role in the crosstalk between these cells is uncertain. We sought to define TSLP expression in bronchial tissue across the spectrum of asthma severity and to investigate the TSLP and TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression and function by primary ASM and mast cells alone and in coculture. Methods: TSLP expression was assessed in bronchial tissue from 18 subjects with mild to moderate asthma, 12 with severe disease, and nine healthy control subjects. TSLP and TSLPR expression in primary mast cells and ASM was assessed by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its function was assessed by calcium imaging. The role of TSLP in mast cell and ASM proliferation, survival, differentiation, synthetic function, and contraction was examined. Results: TSLP expression was increased in the ASM bundle in mild-moderate disease. TSLP and TSLPR were expressed by mast cells and ASM and were functional. Mast cell activation by TSLP increased the production of a broad range of chemokines and cytokines, but did not affect mast cell or ASM proliferation, survival, or contraction. Conclusions: TSLP expression by the bronchial epithelium and ASM was upregulated in asthma. TSLP promoted mast cell synthetic function, but did not contribute to other functional consequences of mast cell-ASM crosstalk. PMID:22052771

  18. The role of Notch signaling in muscle progenitor cell depletion and the rapid onset of histopathology in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaodong; Tang, Ying; Lu, Aiping; Takayama, Koji; Usas, Arvydas; Wang, Bing; Weiss, Kurt; Huard, Johnny

    2015-05-15

    Although it has been speculated that stem cell depletion plays a role in the rapid progression of the muscle histopathology associated with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for stem cell depletion remain poorly understood. The rapid depletion of muscle stem cells has not been observed in the dystrophin-deficient model of DMD (mdx mouse), which may explain the relatively mild dystrophic phenotype observed in this animal model. In contrast, we have observed a rapid occurrence of stem cell depletion in the dystrophin/utrophin double knockout (dKO) mouse model, which exhibits histopathological features that more closely recapitulate the phenotype observed in DMD patients compared with the mdx mouse. Notch signaling has been found to be a key regulator of stem cell self-renewal and myogenesis in normal skeletal muscle; however, little is known about the role that Notch plays in the development of the dystrophic histopathology associated with DMD. Our results revealed an over-activation of Notch in the skeletal muscles of dKO mice, which correlated with sustained inflammation, impaired muscle regeneration and the rapid depletion and senescence of the muscle progenitor cells (MPCs, i.e. Pax7+ cells). Consequently, the repression of Notch in the skeletal muscle of dKO mice delayed/reduced the depletion and senescence of MPCs, and restored the myogenesis capacity while reducing inflammation and fibrosis. We suggest that the down-regulation of Notch could represent a viable approach to reduce the dystrophic histopathologies associated with DMD.

  19. The role of Notch signaling in muscle progenitor cell depletion and the rapid onset of histopathology in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Tang, Ying; Lu, Aiping; Takayama, Koji; Usas, Arvydas; Wang, Bing; Weiss, Kurt; Huard, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Although it has been speculated that stem cell depletion plays a role in the rapid progression of the muscle histopathology associated with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for stem cell depletion remain poorly understood. The rapid depletion of muscle stem cells has not been observed in the dystrophin-deficient model of DMD (mdx mouse), which may explain the relatively mild dystrophic phenotype observed in this animal model. In contrast, we have observed a rapid occurrence of stem cell depletion in the dystrophin/utrophin double knockout (dKO) mouse model, which exhibits histopathological features that more closely recapitulate the phenotype observed in DMD patients compared with the mdx mouse. Notch signaling has been found to be a key regulator of stem cell self-renewal and myogenesis in normal skeletal muscle; however, little is known about the role that Notch plays in the development of the dystrophic histopathology associated with DMD. Our results revealed an over-activation of Notch in the skeletal muscles of dKO mice, which correlated with sustained inflammation, impaired muscle regeneration and the rapid depletion and senescence of the muscle progenitor cells (MPCs, i.e. Pax7+ cells). Consequently, the repression of Notch in the skeletal muscle of dKO mice delayed/reduced the depletion and senescence of MPCs, and restored the myogenesis capacity while reducing inflammation and fibrosis. We suggest that the down-regulation of Notch could represent a viable approach to reduce the dystrophic histopathologies associated with DMD. PMID:25678553

  20. Mast cell degranulation – a mechanism for the anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1?

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, SK; Kane, KA; Wainwright, CL

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the previously reported anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is mediated by degranulation of cardiac mast cells prior to myocardial ischaemia. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either ET-1 (1.6 nmol·kg−1) in the presence or absence of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG; 20 mg·kg−1·h−1) prior to coronary artery occlusion (CAO). In separate experiments rats were given compound 48/80 (50 µg·kg−1) to compare the effects of ET-1 with those of a known mast cell degranulator. Ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias were detected through continuous monitoring of a lead I electrocardiogram. After 30 min of CAO, the hearts were removed and mast cell degranulation determined by histological analysis. A parallel series of sham groups were performed to determine the direct effects of ET-1 and compound 48/80 on mast cell degranulation in the absence of ischaemia. Key results: ET-1 and compound 48/80 both exerted profound anti-arrhythmic effects, significantly reducing the total number of ventricular ectopic beats (P < 0.001) and the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (P < 0.05). These anti-arrhythmic effects were abolished by concomitant DSCG infusion prior to CAO. In sham animals ET-1 and compound 48/80 both induced mast cell degranulation (P < 0.001), an effect which was abolished by DSCG, confirming their ability to induce degranulation of mast cells. Conclusions and implications: These results demonstrate for the first time that when given prior to ischaemia ET-1 mediates its anti-arrhythmic effects, at least in part, via cardiac mast cell degranulation. PMID:19422371

  1. Mast cell degranulation--a mechanism for the anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1?

    PubMed

    Walsh, S K; Kane, K A; Wainwright, C L

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the previously reported anti-arrhythmic effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is mediated by degranulation of cardiac mast cells prior to myocardial ischaemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either ET-1 (1.6 nmolxkg(-1)) in the presence or absence of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG; 20 mgxkg(-1)xh(-1)) prior to coronary artery occlusion (CAO). In separate experiments rats were given compound 48/80 (50 microgxkg(-1)) to compare the effects of ET-1 with those of a known mast cell degranulator. Ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias were detected through continuous monitoring of a lead I electrocardiogram. After 30 min of CAO, the hearts were removed and mast cell degranulation determined by histological analysis. A parallel series of sham groups were performed to determine the direct effects of ET-1 and compound 48/80 on mast cell degranulation in the absence of ischaemia. ET-1 and compound 48/80 both exerted profound anti-arrhythmic effects, significantly reducing the total number of ventricular ectopic beats (P < 0.001) and the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (P < 0.05). These anti-arrhythmic effects were abolished by concomitant DSCG infusion prior to CAO. In sham animals ET-1 and compound 48/80 both induced mast cell degranulation (P < 0.001), an effect which was abolished by DSCG, confirming their ability to induce degranulation of mast cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that when given prior to ischaemia ET-1 mediates its anti-arrhythmic effects, at least in part, via cardiac mast cell degranulation.

  2. Anaphylatoxin C3a induced mediator release from mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herrscher, R.; Hugli, T.E.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the biochemical and functional consequences of the binding of highly purified human C3a to isolated rat serosal mast cells. C3a caused a dose-dependent (1-30 ..mu..M), noncytotoxic release of up to 64% (+/- 7 SEM) of the mast cell histamine content. C3a (10..mu..M) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake 8.2- fold (+/- 2.2 SEM) above unstimulated control values within 10 minutes. Arachidonyl-diacylglycerol and arachidonyl-monoacylglycerol levels increased significantly within 2 minutes after C3a (10 ..mu..M) stimulation. Turnover of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine were increased within 15 minutes. In contrast to antigen, C3a stimulation (10 ..mu..M) was not enhanced by exogenous phosphatidylserine, and was not inhibited by ethanol (100 ..mu..mM). C3a suppressed arachidonic acid (AA) release to 38% (+/- 9 SEM) below baseline, and did not cause PGD/sub 2/ formation. C3a and the desarginine form of C3a caused identical responses in all experiments. These studies indicate that C3a stimulation activates mast cell preformed mediator release in a manner very similar to antigen-IgE stimulation, but C3a suppresses free AA levels and does not stimulate PGD/sub 2/ synthesis.

  3. Selective Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Agonists Regulate Mast Cell Activation in an Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gaewon; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Bu Man; Lee, Sin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jong; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Many inflammatory mediators, including various cytokines (e.g. interleukins and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]), inflammatory proteases, and histamine are released following mast cell activation. However, the endogenous modulators for mast cell activation and the underlying mechanism have yet to be elucidated. Endogenous cannabinoids such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide or AEA), were found in peripheral tissues and have been proposed to possess autacoid activity, implying that cannabinoids may downregulate mast cell activation and local inflammation. Objective In order to investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) agonists on mast cell activation, AEA-derived compounds were newly synthesized and evaluated for their effect on mast cell activation. Methods The effects of selected compounds on FcεRI-induced histamine and β-hexosaminidase release were evaluated in a rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3). To further investigate the inhibitory effects of CB1R agonist in vivo, an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model was exploited. Results We found that CB1R inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators without causing cytotoxicity in RBL-2H3 cells and that CB1R agonists markedly and dose-dependently suppressed mast cell proliferation indicating that CB1R plays an important role in modulating antigen-dependent immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mast cell activation. We also found that topical application of CB1R agonists suppressed the recruitment of mast cells into the skin and reduced the level of blood histamine. Conclusion Our results indicate that CB1R agonists down-regulate mast cell activation and may be used for relieving inflammatory symptoms mediated by mast cell activation, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis. PMID:26848215

  4. Mast cell activation by fibrinogen-related homologous c-terminal peptides (haptides) modulates systemic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Maamoun; Schwalb, Herzl; Nesher, Maoz; Gilon, Dan; Shefler, Irit; Mekori, Yoseph A; Shapira, Oz M; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-11-01

    Haptides are a family of short peptides homologous to C-termini sequences of fibrinogen chains β and γ (haptides Cβ and preCγ, respectively) which were previously shown to penetrate and bind cells. This work investigates the systemic effect of the haptides with possible clinical implications. Intra-arterial monitoring in rats recorded the haptides' effects on systemic blood pressure. In parallel, their effect was also tested in vitro on isolated rat peritoneal mast cells and on human mast cells. Intra-arterial monitoring in rats showed that intravenous administration of low haptides concentrations (35-560 μg/kg rat) caused a shocklike behavior with transient decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by up to 55% (P < .05) in a dose-dependent manner and a minor increase in their heart rate. Randomly scrambled sequences of the haptides had no such effect, suggesting a specific interaction with receptors. Intravenous administration of blockers to histamine receptors H1 and H2 before haptides administration attenuated this effect. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of human LAD2 mast cell line or isolated rat peritoneal mast cells with the haptides caused degranulation of the mast cells. We found that the haptides Cβ and preCγ activated mast cells causing histamine release, resulting in a steep decrease in blood pressure, comparable to anaphylactic shock. In treating vascular occlusive diseases, massive fibrinolysis is induced, and haptide-containing sequences are released. We suggest that treatment with histamine receptor blockers or with mast cell stabilizing agents in such pathological conditions may overcome this effect. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Further characterization of protein kinase C in mouse mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ishizaka, T.

    1986-03-01

    Bridging of cell-bound IgE antibody molecules on colony stimulating factor dependent mouse mast cell line (PT-18) cells by multivalent antigen induces the mobilization and uptake of Ca/sup 2 +/ monitored by Quin-2 and the production of diacylglycerol. Exposure of the sensitized cells to antigen also induces a substantial increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the plasma membrane (340 units to 1375 units: 1 unit = 1 pmol of /sup 32/P incorporated into Histone H-1/min/10/sup 7/ cells), within 30 seconds. There is also an increase in /sup 3/H phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (/sup 3/H-PDB) binding which parallels the increase in PKC activity both in kinetics and antigen dose dependency. Determination of K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ for PKC revealed no difference between the cytosolic and membranous forms of PKC. Partial purification of PKC from the membrane of sensitized mast cells which had been labeled with /sup 32/P and stimulated with DNP-HSA revealed a protein of 80-84,000 molecular weight, which migrated on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis just above an authentic standard of PKC purified from rat brain. Treatment of the PKC from mouse mast cell membrane with alkaline phosphatase resulted in a reduction of phosphorylating activity and bindability of /sup 3/H-PDB. In conclusion, the authors speculate that activation of mouse mast cells by cross-linking IgE results in the phosphorylation of a silent-pool of PKC converting it from an inactive state to an activated form.

  6. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  7. The mechanism of anti-CD20–mediated B cell depletion revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Montalvao, Fabricio; Garcia, Zacarias; Celli, Susanna; Breart, Béatrice; Deguine, Jacques; Van Rooijen, Nico; Bousso, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD20 Ab therapy has proven successful for treating B cell malignancies and a number of autoimmune diseases. However, how anti-CD20 Abs operate in vivo to mediate B cell depletion is not fully understood. In particular, the anatomical location, the type of effector cells, and the mechanism underlying anti-CD20 therapy remain uncertain. Here, we found that the liver is a major site for B cell depletion and that recirculation accounts for the decrease in B cell numbers observed in secondary lymphoid organs. Using intravital imaging, we established that, upon anti-CD20 treatment, Kupffer cells (KCs) mediate the abrupt arrest and subsequent engulfment of B cells circulating in the liver sinusoids. KCs were also effective in depleting malignant B cells in a model of spontaneous lymphoma. Our results identify Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis by KCs as a primary mechanism of anti-CD20 therapy and provide an experimental framework for optimizing the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. PMID:24177426

  8. Effects of Toxin A from Clostridium difficile on Mast Cell Activation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Gloria M.; Torres-López, Javier; Lin, Tong-Jun; Chavez, Bibiana; Hernández, Manuel; Muñoz, Onofre; Befus, A. Dean; Enciso, J. Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Toxins A and B from Clostridium difficile are the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. They cause fluid accumulation, necrosis, and a strong inflammatory response when inoculated in intestinal loops. Since mast cells are a rich source of inflammatory mediators, abundant in the gut, and known to be involved in C. difficile-induced enteritis, we studied the in vitro effect of toxin A on isolated mast cells. Normal rats sensitized by infection with Nippostrongilus brasiliensis were used to isolate peritoneal mast cells (PMC). PMC from naive rats were stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187 as a model of antigen-independent activation, and PMC from sensitized rats were stimulated with N. brasiliensis antigens to study immunoglobulin E-dependent mast cell activation. After 4 h, toxin A did not induce release of nitric oxide or histamine in naive PMC. However, 10 ng of toxin per ml caused a significant release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast, 1 μg of toxin per ml inhibited antigen or A23187-induced histamine release by PMC. Toxin A at 1 μg/ml for 4 h caused disruption of actin which aggregated in the cytoplasm and around the nucleus. After 24 h, chromatin condensation, cytoplasmic blebbing, and apoptotic-like vesicles were observed; DNA fragmentation was documented also. These results suggest that mast cells may participate in the initial inflammatory response to C. difficile infection by releasing TNF-α upon interaction with toxin A. However, longer exposure to toxin A affects the release of inflammatory mediators, perhaps because of the alteration of the cytoskeleton and induction of apoptosis. The impaired functions and survival of mast cells by C. difficile toxin A could hamper the capacity of these cells to counteract the infection, thus prolonging the pathogenic effects of C. difficile toxins. PMID:9596744

  9. Variable-Tilt Helicopter Rotor Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.

    1995-01-01

    Variable-tilt helicopter rotor mast proposed to improve helicopter performance and reduce vibration, especially at upper end of forward-speed range of helicopters. Achieved by use of universal coupling in main rotor mast or by tilting entire engine-and-transmission platform. Performance, energy efficiency, and safety enhanced.

  10. Analyzing Vibrations in a Long Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Report describes mathematical prediction and measurement of vibrations in light weight extensible mast of lattice structure. With mast suspended from 10 vertical wires, vibrations excited in horizontal plane by motor-driven mechanism or by hand. Vibrations recorded photographically and with accelerometers.

  11. Gypsy moth effects on mast production

    Treesearch

    Kurt W. Gottschalk

    1990-01-01

    Gypsy moth outbreaks can have drastic effects on many forest resources and uses. Because the gypsy moth prefers oak foliage, oak stands are the most susceptible to defoliation and resultant damage. The value of oak mast for many wildlife species is high. The high carbohydrate content of acorns provides the energy necessary for winter survival. Loss of mast crops due to...

  12. Are mast cells important in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Caraffa, Alessandro; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with microvascular and macrovascular syndromes mediated by mast cells. Mast cells are activated through cross-linking of their surface high affinity receptors for IgE (FcRI) or other antigens, leading to degranulation and release of stored inflammatory mediators, and cytokines/chemokines without degranulation. Mast cells are implicated in innate and acquired immunity, inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Histamine and tryptase genes in mast cells are overexpressed in pancreatic tissue of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Histamine is a classic inflammatory mediator generated by activated receptors of mast cells from the histamine-forming enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which can be activated by two inflammatory chemokines, RANTES and MPC1, when injected intramuscularly or intradermally in mice. This activation is inhibited in genetically mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice, which show higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. This study contributes to understanding the mechanism by which mast cells profoundly affect diabetes, and their manipulation could represent a new therapeutic strategy. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of mast cells in inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes.

  13. Mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Gabriella Chieffi; Pinelli, Claudia; Santillo, Alessandra; Minucci, Sergio; Rastogi, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known as multifunctional entities that may confer a benefit on immune system. This review presents the known facts on mast-cell system and breakthroughs in mast-cell biology in fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. As compared to mammals, there are relatively few data available on mast cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates. Nevertheless, like in mammals, mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates contain a wide range of bioactive compounds including histamine, heparin, neuropeptides, and neutral proteases. In bony fishes, these cells secrete antimicrobial peptides as well. Mast cells have a widespread distribution in the brain, endocrine glands, intestine, liver, kidney, skin, tongue, and lungs, the highest concentration occurring in different tissues in the different taxa. Currently, researchers are grappling with the nature of scientific support to substantiate the functional importance of mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates. Ultimately, the origin and evolution of vertebrate mast cell is of great interest to comparative immunologists seeking an underlying trend in the phylogenetic development of immunity.

  14. [Mast cells and basophils and their disorders].

    PubMed

    Bösiger, J; Fehr, J

    2006-01-01

    This short review gives a brief overview on recent findings about the roles of basophils and mast cells in acquired and innate immunity. We try to give some insight into the methods used to study physiologic functions of mast cells and basophils. We mention variations of circulating basophil numbers as an epiphenomenon of some internal diseases and present an update on mastocytosis.

  15. Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

  16. Radioprotective effect of kupffer cell depletion on hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Hu, Wei-Xu

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced liver injury remains a clinical problem and data suggest that sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) are an important target. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before exposure would protect SECs from radiation-induced injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected 24 h before irradiation with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) (10 mg/kg body weight). Three groups of animals were treated: 1. control group (saline and sham irradiation); 2. GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group and 3. 30 Gy radiation only group. Specimens were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after completion of each treatment. Liver tissue was assessed for inflammatory cytokine expression and radiation-induced SEC injury based on serum hyaluronic acid (HA) level, apoptosis and ultrastructural and histological analyses. The results showed that radiation exposure caused apoptosis of SECs, but not hepatocytes. Inflammatory cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression, was significantly attenuated in the GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group, compared with the 30 Gy radiation-only group (P < 0.05). The GdCl3 + radiation-treated rats exhibited significantly lower levels of HA and SEC apoptosis than the radiation-treated only rats at early time points, and radiation-induced liver injury was also attenuated. In conclusion, we hypothesize that selective Kupffer cell inhibition by gadolinium chloride was shown to reduce apoptosis in SECs caused by irradiation of the live and protected the liver against radiation-induced injury.

  17. Frontline Science: Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 1 is a critical modulator of mast cell degranulation and stress-induced pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Gibson, Amelia J; D'Costa, Susan; Overman, Elizabeth L; Sommerville, Laura J; Poopal, Ashwini C; Mackey, Emily; Li, Yihang; Moeser, Adam J

    2017-07-06

    Life stress is a major risk factor in the onset and exacerbation of mast cell-associated diseases, including allergy/anaphylaxis, asthma, and irritable bowel syndrome. Although it is known that mast cells are highly activated upon stressful events, the mechanisms by which stress modulates mast cell function and disease pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 1 (CRF1) in mast cell degranulation and associated disease pathophysiology. In a mast cell-dependent model of IgE-mediated passive systemic anaphylaxis (PSA), prophylactic administration of the CRF1-antagonist antalarmin attenuated mast cell degranulation and hypothermia. Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice engrafted with CRF1(-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) exhibited attenuated PSA-induced serum histamine, hypothermia, and clinical scores compared with wild-type BMMC-engrafted Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice engrafted with CRF1(-/-) BMMCs also exhibited suppressed in vivo mast cell degranulation and intestinal permeability in response to acute restraint stress. Genetic and pharmacologic experiments with murine BMMCs, rat RBL-2H3, and human LAD2 mast cells demonstrated that although CRF1 activation did not directly induce MC degranulation, CRF1 signaling potentiated the degranulation responses triggered by diverse mast cell stimuli and was associated with enhanced release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Taken together, our results revealed a prominent role for CRF1 signaling in mast cells as a positive modulator of stimuli-induced degranulation and in vivo pathophysiologic responses to immunologic and psychologic stress. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Mast Cells: Pivotal Players in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; van Berkel, Theo J.C; Biessen, Erik A.L

    2008-01-01

    The clinical outcome of cardiovascular diseases as myocardial infarction and stroke are generally caused by rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. However, the actual cause of a plaque to rupture is not yet established. Interestingly, pathology studies have shown an increased presence of the mast cell, an important inflammatory effector cell in allergy and host defense, in (peri)vascular tissue during plaque progression, which may point towards a causal role for mast cells. Very recent data in mouse models show that mast cells and derived mediators indeed can profoundly impact plaque progression, plaque stability and acute cardiovascular syndromes such as vascular aneurysm or myocardial infarction. In this review, we discuss recent evidence on the role of mast cells in the progression of cardiovascular disorders and give insight in the therapeutic potential of modulation of mast cell function in these processes to improve the resilience of a plaque to rupture. PMID:19936193

  19. Mast cell biology: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Austin, Sarah J; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the field of mast cell biology has expanded well beyond the boundaries of atopic disorders and anaphy laxis, on which it has been historically focused. The biochemical and signaling events responsible for the development and regulation of mast cells has been increasingly studied, aided in large part by novel breakthroughs in laboratory techniques used to study these cells. The result of these studies has been a more comprehensive definition of mast cells that includes added insights to their overall biology as well as the various disease states that can now be traced to defects in mast cells. This introductory chapter outlines and highlights the various topics of mast cell biology that will be discussed in further detail in subsequent chapters.

  20. Ion channels regulating mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ashmole, I; Bradding, P

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma and related allergic conditions. Mast cell activation leads to the degranulation of preformed mediators such as histamine and the secretion of newly synthesised proinflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes and cytokines. Excess release of these mediators contributes to allergic disease states. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ is essential for mast cell mediator release. From the Ca2+ channels that mediate this influx, to the K+ , Cl- and transient receptor potential channels that set the cell membrane potential and regulate Ca2+ influx, ion channels play a critical role in mast cell biology. In this review we provide an overview of our current knowledge of ion channel expression and function in mast cells with an emphasis on how channels interact to regulate Ca2+ signalling.

  1. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F. ); Fox, C.C.; Lichtenstein, L.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. The authors demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate ({sup 35}S)sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an {approx}2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate E proteoglycans and the ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the ({sup 35}S)sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells.

  2. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R L; Fox, C C; Lichtenstein, L M; Austen, K F

    1988-01-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of 35S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although [35S]heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. We here demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate [35S] sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an approximately equal to 2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin [35S]sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin [35S]sulfate E proteoglycans and the [35S]heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the [35S]sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of 35S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells. PMID:3353378

  3. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  4. The human mast cell: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Guha; Ajitawi, Omar; Chi, David S

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are fascinating, multifunctional, tissue-dwelling cells that have been traditionally associated with the allergic response. However, recent studies suggest these cells may be capable of regulating inflammation, host defense, and innate immunity. The purpose of this review is to present salient aspects of mast cell biology in the context of mast cell function in physiology and disease. After their development from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells that are primed with stem cell factor, mast cells continue their maturation and differentiation in peripheral tissue, developing into two well-described subsets of cells, MC(T) and MC(TC) cells. These cells can be distinguished on the basis of their tissue location, dependence on T lymphocytes, and their granule contents. Mast cells can undergo activation by antigens/allergens, superoxides, complement proteins, neuropeptides, and lipoproteins. After activation, mast cells express histamine, leukotrienes, and prostanoids, as well as proteases, and many cytokines and chemokines. These mediators may be pivotal to the genesis of an inflammatory response. By virtue of their location and mediator expression, mast cells may play an active role in many diseases, such as allergy, parasitic diseases, atherosclerosis, malignancy, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and arthritis. Recent data also suggest that mast cells play a vital role in host defense against pathogens by elaboration of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Mast cells also express the Toll-like receptor, which may further accentuate their role in the immune-inflammatory response. This chapter summarizes the many well-known and novel functional aspects of human mast cell biology and emphasizes their unique role in the inflammatory response.

  5. Mast cell tryptase and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, H.

    1997-01-01

    Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have indicated the potential importance of tryptase, the major protein component in mast cells, in inflammatory diseases (especially asthma). Being released at inflammatory sites after the activation of mast cells, tryptase is capable of causing bronchohyperresponsiveness and infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, etc. in animal airways. The mechanisms by which tryptase causes bronchoconstriction involve probably the potentiation of other chemical mediators such as histamine, production of bradykinin via the hydrolysis of kininogen, and cleavage of the bronchodilating peptides VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) and PHM (peptide histidine-methionine). Tryptase has also been found to be a potent mitogen in vitro for airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, implying its role in the hyperplasia of the asthmatic airways. The experimental data providing evidence for the above roles of tryptase are summarized in the present review, as well as the effects of tryptase inhibition in animal asthma models. The potential strategies for the development of anti-asthmatic agents based on the inhibition of tryptase are discussed. PMID:18472864

  6. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  7. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  8. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis inhibition: evidence for heterogeneity in IgE mast cell interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L; Farris, P N; Bazin, H

    1981-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that IgE molecules are heterogeneous with respect to ability to compete with IgE myeloma for sensitization of histamine release from chopped human lung and ability to passively sensitize human basophils for antigen-induced histamine release. These observations prompted further investigation of the possibility that there exists a functional heterogeneity in the IgE molecules with respect to mast-cell binding properties. Using eight different purified rat IgE myeloma proteins, we found that they differ in their ability to inhibit the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction of mouse reaginic antisera. This suggests that IgE molecules differ in their ability to bind to mast cell receptors. Since maximal inhibition of different mouse reaginic antisera and mouse IgE hybridomas is achieved with different IgE myelomas, there may exist a functional heterogeneity in mast-cell binding receptors as well. PMID:7319556

  9. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  10. The Mast Cell-IgE Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and IgE are so inextricably linked to the pathology of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis, that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts. Surely, we do not have mast cells and IgE so that we can eat a peanut and die! It is thought that mast cells and IgE and basophils (circulating granulocytes, whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells) can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive T helper cell type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks, and certain other parasites. Accordingly, it was suggested that allergies are misdirected type 2 immune responses in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a broad variety of apparently harmless antigens. However, components of animal venoms also can sensitize individuals to develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, on subsequent venom exposure. Here, I describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate host resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during responses to an initial exposure to such venoms and that acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI, and mast cells can contribute toward acquired resistance in mice to the lethal effects of honeybee or Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against noxious substances. PMID:26776074

  11. Mast cell secretome: Soluble and vesicular components.

    PubMed

    Vukman, Krisztina V; Försönits, András; Oszvald, Ádám; Tóth, Eszter Á; Buzás, Edit I

    2017-02-09

    Mast cells are multifunctional master cells implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Their role has been best characterized in allergy and anaphylaxis; however, emerging evidences support their contribution to a wide variety of human diseases. Mast cells, being capable of both degranulation and subsequent recovery, have recently attracted substantial attention as also being rich sources of secreted extracellular vesicles (including exosomes and microvesicles). Along with secreted de novo synthesized soluble molecules and secreted preformed granules, the membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles represent a previously unexplored part of the mast cell secretome. In this review article we summarize available data regarding the different soluble molecules and membrane-enclosed structures secreted by mast cells. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the release mechanisms including degranulation, piecemeal degranulation, transgranulation, and secretion of different types of extracellular vesicles. Finally, we aim to give a summary of the known biological functions associated with the different mast cell-derived secretion products. The increasingly recognized complexity of mast cell secretome may provide important novel clues to processes by which mast cells contribute to the development of different pathologies and are capable of orchestrating immune responses both in health and disease.

  12. Suppressor Cell-Depleting Immunotherapy With Denileukin Diftitox is an Effective Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashank; Cheung, Laurene; Pokkali, Supriya; Winglee, Kathryn; Guo, Haidan; Murphy, John R; Bishai, William R

    2017-06-15

    Host-directed therapies that augment host immune effector mechanisms may serve as important adjunctive therapies for tuberculosis treatment. We evaluated the activity of denileukin diftitox in an acute mouse model of tuberculosis (TB) infection and analyzed the cellular composition and bacterial burden in lungs and spleens. These in vivo studies show that denileukin diftitox potentiates standard TB treatment in the mouse model, an effect which may be due to depletion of T-regulatory and myeloid-derived suppressor cells during TB infection. Our results indicate that denileukin diftitox and other suppressor cell-depleting therapies may be useful adjunctive, host-directed therapies for TB. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a megadose T-cell-depleted graft: harnessing natural and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Velardi, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    For patients with high-risk acute leukemia who do not have a matched donor or who urgently need a transplant, transplantation from a full human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype mismatched family donor should be considered a viable option. Clinical trials have shown that a strategy for haploidentical transplantation based on the infusion of high numbers of T-cell-depleted hematopoietic progenitor cells and no post-transplant immunosuppression controls bi-directional T-cell alloreactivity, ie, graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in patients with leukemia. Overall, event-free survival compares favorably with reports of transplants using sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling. This transplant modality has highlighted the crucial role of donor-versus-recipient natural killer cell (NK) alloreactivity in the control of leukemia relapse. Current studies are focusing on rebuilding post-transplant immunity to improve clinical outcomes.

  14. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping theme senteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation of

  15. Mast cells modulate the inflammatory process in endotoxin-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião da Silva, Pierre; Girol, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of mast cells and annexin-A1 (Anxa1) in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Methods EIU was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the paws of rats, which were then sacrificed after 24 and 48 h. To assess EIU in the absence of mast cells, groups of animals were pretreated with compound 48/80 (c48/80) and sacrificed after 24 h after no treatment or EIU induction. The eyes were used for histological studies and the aqueous humor (AqH) pool was used for the analysis of transmigrated cells and Anxa1 levels. In inflammatory cells, Anxa1 expression was monitored by immunohistochemistry. Results After 24 h, rats with EIU exhibited degranulated mast cells, associated with elevated numbers of infiltrating leukocytes and the high expression of Anxa1 in the AqH and the neutrophils. After 48 h of EIU, the mast cells were intact, indicating granule re-synthesis, and there was a reduction of neutrophil transmigration and an increase in the number of mononuclear phagocytic cells in ocular tissues. Anxa1 expression was decreased in neutrophils but increased in mononuclear phagocytic cells. In the animals pretreated with c48/80 and subjected to EIU, mast cells responded to this secretagogue by degranulating and few transmigrated neutrophils were observed. Conclustions We report that mast cells are a potential source of pharmacological mediators that are strongly linked to the pathophysiology of EIU, and the endogenous protein Anxa1 is a mediator in the homeostasis of the inflammatory process with anti-migratory effects on leukocytes, which supports further studies of this protein as an innovative therapy for uveitis. PMID:21633711

  16. Effect of Omegaven on mast cell concentration in diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Saeid; Ansarihadipour, Hadi; Nakhaei, Mahmoodreza; Darabi, Mohammadreza; Bayat, Parvindokht; Sakhaei, Mohammadhassan; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadhoseiny, Atefe

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic wound healing is a complicated process. In all over the world 15% of 200 million diabetic people suffer from diabetic foot problems. Mast cells are known to participate in three phases of wound healing: the inflammatory reaction, angiogenesis and extracellular-matrix reabsorption. The inflammatory reaction is mediated by released histamine and arachidonic acid metabolites. Omega-3 fatty acids alter proinflammatory cytokine production during wound healing which affects the presence of inflammatory cells in wound area as well, but how this events specifically influences the presence of mast cells in wound healing is not clearly understood. This study is conducted to determine the effect of Omegaven, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) on pattern of presence of mast cells in diabetic wound area. Diabetic male wistar rats were euthanized at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 15 days after the excision was made. To estimate the number of mast cells histological sections were provided from wound area and stained with toluidine blue. In this relation wound area (8400 microscopic field, 45.69 mm(2)) were examined by stereological methods by light microscope. We found that comparing experimental and control group, omega-3 fatty acids significantly decreased wound area in day 7 and also the number of grade three mast cells in day 3 and 5. We also found that wound strength has significantly increased in experimental group at day 15. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sanjay P; Sheth, N R; Suhagia, B N

    2015-01-01

    The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action.

  18. Gibberellic acid, a plant growth regulator, increases mast cell recruitment and alters Substance P levels.

    PubMed

    Erin, Nuray; Afacan, Berna; Ersoy, Yasemin; Ercan, Feriha; Balci, Mustafa Kemal

    2008-12-05

    Gibberellic acid (GA3), a plant growth regulator, is used commonly in agriculture. Its potential hazardous effects on human health, however, were relatively unexplored. Several studies demonstrated that in animals chronic GA3 consumption increased tumor formation and oxidative stress. Mast cells and Substance P (SP) play an important role in inflammation. Because chronic inflammation triggers serious conditions, including tumor formation, we examined changes in mast cell recruitment and activation as well as SP levels in skin and urinary bladder. Wistar Albino rats were treated with either a single GA3 dose or multiple GA3 doses for 30 days. Sub-chronic exposure to GA3 markedly increased mast cell recruitment and activation in both tissues. Treatment with 2mg/kg GA3 dose for 30 days decreased SP levels in skin and bladder. SP levels returned to control values in bladder and further increased in skin following 30-day treatment with the 20mg/kg GA3 dose. There was marked urothelial loss and inflammatory cell infiltration in bladder of 30-day GA3 treated groups. In skin, single GA3 doses also decreased SP levels and enhanced mast cell activation and recruitment. Since both SP and mast cell activation elicit inflammatory responses, these results demonstrate that exposure to plant growth regulators may increase inflammatory skin and bladder disease and that use of GA3 should be clearly monitored.

  19. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, N. R.; Suhagia, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Objective: Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. Materials and Methods: The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). Results and Conclusion: The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action. PMID:25883521

  20. B-cell depletion in SLE: clinical and trial experience with rituximab and ocrelizumab and implications for study design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B cells are believed to be central to the disease process in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), making them a target for new therapeutic intervention. In recent years there have been many publications regarding the experience in SLE of B-cell depletion utilising rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that temporarily depletes B cells, reporting promising results in uncontrolled open studies and in routine clinical use. However, the two large randomised controlled trials in extra-renal lupus (EXPLORER study) and lupus nephritis (LUNAR study) failed to achieve their primary endpoints. Based on the clinical experience with rituximab this failure was somewhat unexpected and raised a number of questions and concerns, not only into the true level of benefit of B-cell depletion in a broad population but also how to test the true level of effectiveness of an investigational agent as we seek to improve the design of therapeutic trials in SLE. A better understanding of what went wrong in these trials is essential to elucidate the underlying reasons for the disparate observations noted in open studies and controlled trials. In this review, we focus on various factors that may affect the ability to accurately and confidently establish the level of treatment effect of the investigational agent, in this case rituximab, in the two studies and explore hurdles faced in the randomised controlled trials investigating the efficacy of ocrelizumab, the humanised anti-CD20 mAb, in SLE. Further, based on the lessons learned from the clinical trials, we make suggestions that could be implemented in future clinical trial design to overcome the hurdles faced. PMID:23566295

  1. B-cell depletion in SLE: clinical and trial experience with rituximab and ocrelizumab and implications for study design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venkat; Jayne, David; Close, David; Isenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    B cells are believed to be central to the disease process in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), making them a target for new therapeutic intervention. In recent years there have been many publications regarding the experience in SLE of B-cell depletion utilising rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that temporarily depletes B cells,reporting promising results in uncontrolled open studies and in routine clinical use. However, the two large randomised controlled trials in extra-renal lupus (EXPLORER study) and lupus nephritis (LUNAR study) failed to achieve their primary endpoints. Based on the clinical experience with rituximab this failure was somewhat unexpected and raised a number of questions and concerns, not only into the true level of benefit of B-cell depletion in a broad population but also how to test the true level of effectiveness of an investigational agent as we seek to improve the design of therapeutic trials in SLE. A better understanding of what went wrong in these trials is essential to elucidate the underlying reasons for the disparate observations noted in open studies and controlled trials. In this review, we focus on various factors that may affect the ability to accurately and confidently establish the level of treatment effect of the investigational agent, in this case rituximab, in the tw studies and explore hurdles faced in the randomised controlled trials investigating the efficacy of ocrelizumab, the humanised anti-CD20 mAb, in SLE. Further, based on the lessons learned from the clinical trials, we make suggestions that could be implemented in future clinical trial design to overcome the hurdles faced.

  2. HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Zecca, Marco; Strocchio, Luisa; Pagliara, Daria; Comoli, Patrizia; Bertaina, Alice; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Perotti, Cesare; Corbella, Franco; Brescia, Letizia; Locatelli, Franco

    2014-04-01

    We report the outcome of 12 consecutive pediatric patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) who had neither an HLA-identical sibling nor an HLA-matched unrelated donor and who were given T cell-depleted, CD34(+) positively selected cells from a haploidentical related donor after a reduced-intensity, fludarabine-based conditioning regimen. Engraftment was achieved in 9 of 12 patients (75%), and the cumulative incidence of graft rejection was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5% to 59%). Cumulative incidences of grades II to IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 17% (95% CI, 5% to 59%) and 35% (95% CI, 14% to 89%), respectively. The conditioning regimen was well tolerated, with no fatal regimen-related toxicity and 3 cases of grade III regimen-related toxicity. The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 17% (95% CI, 5% to 59%). The 5-year overall survival, event-free survival, and disease-free survival were 83% (95% CI, 62% to 100%), 67% (95% CI, 40% to 93%), and 83% (95% CI, 62% to 100%), respectively. These data demonstrate that a fludarabine-based conditioning regimen, followed by infusion of high doses of T cell-depleted stem cells, is able to ensure engraftment with good overall survival and disease-free survival, confirming the feasibility of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in FA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest series of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a haploidentical related donor in FA patients reported to date. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. DOORS FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH RAISED FOR MAINTENANCE POSITION OF 10 DEGREES. LAUNCHER IS RIGHT OF MAST; RAILS PARALLEL TO MAST. CONTROL PANELS LEFT TO RIGHT: ELECTRICAL PANEL, COMMUNICATIONS PANEL, AND MAST CONTROL PANEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Mast cell differentiation depends on T cells and granule synthesis on fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S; Mansour, A; Gallily, R; Smolarski, M; Rofolovitch, M; Ginsburg, H

    1983-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation was generated in the following three experimental situations: (i) infection of mice with Schistosoma Mansoni or with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and growth of the lymph node cells in the presence of the corresponding helminth antigen; (ii) immunization with horse serum and growth of blood and lymph node cells in the presence of the horse serum; (iii) exposure of T-cell-depleted suspensions of lymph node cells from unimmunized mice to T-cell factor (TCF) released into medium of the young cultures of (i) and (ii). This differentiation was also obtained when lymph node cells from athymic nude mice were exposed to TCF. The cell suspensions were plated on X-irradiated fibroblast monolayers prepared from embryonic mouse skin. Screening of the suspensions before plating on the fibroblasts in culture revealed no young forms of mast cells, and none were present in culture of nude mice lymph node cells maintained without TCF. Primordial appearance of metachromatic granules generally in the golgi zone was first seen in many 'large lymphoid cells' as early as 18 hr after plating. This was followed by increase in the cytoplasm volume, increase in granule number and mitosis, ending at 10-18 days with homogeneous populations of mature mast cells. When the mesenteric lymph node cells from mice infected with the helminths were grown in the absence of fibroblasts but in the presence of the antigen, homogeneous populations of cells with extended cytoplasm, filled with unstained vacuoles developed during days 7-13. These cells did not contain histamine (or at most 0.2 microgram per 10(6) vacuolated cells). When these cells were plated on fibroblast monolayers clear granule formation in all the vacuoles was seen 2 days later. It increased progressively in size and staining intensity, until the vacuoles transformed into typical mast cell granules. By the fourth day the vacuolated cells attained the typical mast cell morphology and the histamine content greatly

  5. Benign mast cell hyperplasia and atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile lichen planus in adult men.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Introduction. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic cytokine-mediated disease of possible auto-immune etiology. 25% of men have anogenital manifestations. Erosive penile LP causes a scarring phimosis of the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Mast cells as potent immune modulators have been implicated in a number of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, but have not been investigated in LP. Material and Methods. Formalin-fixed tissues of 117 circumcision specimens of adult men affected by LP were evaluated for the extent of mast cell and lymphocyte infiltrates, characterized immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3, 4, 8, 20, 21, 25, 30, 117c and human mast cell tryptase. Specimens with dense mast cell infiltrates were analyzed for point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V). Results. Unaffected skin and modified mucosa of foreskins contained ⟨5 mast cells/mm². The inflammatory infiltrate of LP-lesions displayed ⟨15 mast cells/mm² in 33/117 foreskins, 16-40 mast cells/mm² in 22/117 and ⟩40 mast cells/mm² (average 70, range 40-100) in 62/117 foreskins. Lesional mast cells of 29/117 (24%) foreskins showed aberrant CD25-expression and/or spindled morphology, with 11/29 men having erosive LP, 13/29 a lymphocytic vasculitis and 1/28 a systemic mastocytosis. Neither CD30-expression nor c-kit mutations were identified. Atypical mast cell infiltrates in LP correlated with high disease activity, erosive LP and presence of lymphocytic vasculitis Conclusions. Increased mast cells in penile LP, mostly representing a benign hyperplasia/activation syndrome, suggests them as targets for innovative therapy options for symptomatic LP-patients not responding to corticosteroid therapy. Presently, the biological implications of atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile LP are unknown.

  6. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane lowers the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) onto a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  7. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane is attached to the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  8. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A technician monitors the progress as a crane lifts the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for transfer to a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  9. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) away from the flatbed of the transport truck at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  10. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane lifts the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) up for placement on a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  11. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane is prepared to help lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  12. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) up from the flatbed of the transport truck at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  13. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A heavy-lift transport truck arrives at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the first of two Tail Service Mast Umbilicals (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  14. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) into the vertical position at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  15. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technician monitors the progress as a crane lowers the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) onto a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  16. Fuel retention studies on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast Team Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel retention has been studied on MAST using gas-balance analysis. With 8-15 min of inter-shot helium glow-discharge cleaning (4He-GDC), the wall retention fraction stays very high (>90%) during the flat-top of the plasma current, indicating this component is dominant during the discharge. Recovery of wall conditioning with 4He-GDC suggests the retention process is dominated by direct implantation of particles in shallow surface layers. The effect of 4He-GDC duration on the particle balance has also been investigated. It is shown that when there was no preceding 4He-GDC, the wall pumping capacity was reduced, causing higher plasma density and tank pressure for the next shot.

  17. How mast cells make decisions

    PubMed Central

    Karhausen, Jörn; Abraham, Soman N.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in various tissues and are responsible for initiating many of the early inflammatory responses to extrinsic challenges. Recent studies have demonstrated that MCs can tailor their responses, depending on the stimulus encountered and the tissue in which they are stimulated. In this issue of the JCI, Gaudenzio and colleagues examine the mechanistic differences between MC responses observed after engagement of Fcε receptor I and those seen after MC stimulation via the recently identified G protein–coupled receptor MRGPRX2. By showing that discrete cellular activation patterns affect the phenotype of the MC response in vivo and in vitro, the authors provide important information about how MCs differentially process various stimuli into distinct degranulation programs. PMID:27643441

  18. Overview of MAST results and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Brian

    2005-10-01

    The MAST experimental programme is focused both on physics studies for ITER and on addressing key issues for the long term potential of the spherical tokamak such as non-solenoidal start-up, current drive and plasma exhaust. ITER physics studies cover confinement scaling, transport physics including the generation and sustainment of transport barriers, pedestal physics, scrape-off layer transport, error fields and performance limiting instabilities such as ELMs, neo-classical tearing modes etc. These studies are carried out in close collaboration with international partners including joint experiments with other devices. Substantial upgrades to MAST have been implemented during the last two years including a new divertor, centre column and error field correction coils as well as many diagnostic enhancements. An upgrade to the neutral beam heating system is well-advanced. An overview of the latest MAST results in the areas described above, exploiting the new MAST capabilities, will be presented together with future plans.

  19. Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Defence R&D Canada National Défense Defence nationale Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T.S. Koko , D.P. Brennan, X. Luo, M.E...Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T. S. Koko , D. P. Brennan, X. Luo, M. E. Norwood, L. Jiang, and U. O. Akpan... Koko The scientific or technical validity of this Contract Report is entirely the responsibility of the contractor and the contents do not necessarily

  20. Mast cell activation syndromes: definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Valent, P

    2013-04-01

    Mast cell activation (MCA) occurs in a number of different clinical conditions, including IgE-dependent allergies, other inflammatory reactions, and mastocytosis. MCA-related symptoms may be mild, moderate, severe, or even life-threatening. The severity of MCA depends on a number of different factors, including genetic predisposition, the number and releasability of mast cells involved in the reaction, the type of allergen, presence of specific IgE, and presence of certain comorbidities. In severe reactions, MCA can be documented by a substantial increase in the serum tryptase level above baseline. When symptoms are recurrent, are accompanied by an increase in mast cell-derived mediators in biological fluids, and are responsive to treatment with mast cell-stabilizing or mediator-targeting drugs, the diagnosis of mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is appropriate. Based on the underlying condition, these patients can further be classified into i) primary MCAS where KIT-mutated, clonal mast cells are detected, ii) secondary MCAS where an underlying inflammatory disease, often in the form of an IgE-dependent allergy, but no KIT-mutated mast cells, is found, and iii) idiopathic MCAS, where neither an allergy or other underlying disease, nor KIT-mutated mast cells are detectable. It is important to note that in many patients with MCAS, several different factors act together to lead to severe or even life-threatening anaphylaxis. Detailed knowledge about the pathogenesis and complexity of MCAS, and thus establishing the exact final diagnosis, may greatly help in the management and therapy of these patients.

  1. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-A-derived peptide attenuate chemotaxis of mast cells induced by human β-defensin 3.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Motoko; Murata, Masaki; Saito, Atsushi; Takamiya, Rina; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Kuronuma, Koji; Chiba, Hirofumi; Hashimoto, Jiro; Sawada, Norimasa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Kuroki, Yoshio; Ariki, Shigeru

    2017-03-25

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is known to be involved in mast cell activation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of hBD3-induced mast cell activation have been poorly understood. We previously reported that SP-A and SP-A-derived peptide 01 (SAP01) regulate the function of hBD3. In this study, we focused on the effects of SP-A and SAP01 on the activation of mast cells induced by hBD3. SAP01 directly bound to hBD3. Mast cell-mediated vascular permeability and edema in hBD3 administered rat ears were decreased when injected with SP-A or SAP01. Compatible with the results in rat ear model, both SP-A and SAP01 inhibited hBD3-induced chemotaxis of mast cells in vitro. Direct interaction between SP-A or SAP01 and hBD3 seemed to be responsible for the inhibitory effects on chemotaxis. Furthermore, SAP01 attenuated hBD3-induced accumulation of mast cells and eosinophils in tracheas of the OVA-sensitized inflammatory model. SP-A might contribute to the regulation of inflammatory responses mediated by mast cells during infection.

  2. Expanding spectrum of mast cell activation disorders: monoclonal and idiopathic mast cell activation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Mezzano, Veronica; Castells, Mariana

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, 2 new syndromes of mast cell activation have been described in patients with episodes of mast cell mediator release that range from flushing and abdominal cramping to anaphylaxis: monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome (MMAS) and idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). This review will discuss these 2 new syndromes in the larger context of mast cell activation disorders as well as the diagnostic and treatment approaches for these conditions. PubMed was searched using the following terms: mast cell activation disorder, mast cell activation syndrome, and clonal mast cell. Only English-language articles published up until February 27, 2013, were considered. MMAS has been diagnosed in patients with systemic reactions to hymenoptera stings and elevated baseline serum tryptase as well as in patients with unexplained episodes of anaphylaxis. A bone marrow biopsy establishes the diagnosis by revealing the presence of monoclonal mast cells that carry the D816V KIT mutation and/or express CD25 while the diagnostic requirements for systemic mastocytosis are not met. MCAS affects predominantly women in whom no mast cell abnormality or external triggers account for their episodes of mast cell activation. MCAS is a diagnosis of exclusion, and primary and secondary mast cell activation disorders as well as idiopathic anaphylaxis have to be ruled out before making the diagnosis. Patients with MCAS and MMAS are treated in a stepwise fashion with drugs that block the effects of mediators released by mast cells on activation. One third of MCAS patients experience complete resolution of symptoms with treatment, while one third have a major response and one third a minor response to treatment. A combination of drugs is usually necessary to achieve symptom control. No drug trial has been performed in patients with MMAS and MCAS. MMAS and MCAS are 2 newly described, rare syndromes of mast cell activation. Further studies will be necessary to better understand

  3. Impact of mast cells on the skin.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Varvara, G; Murmura, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Pantalone, A; Neri, G; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Theoharides, T C; Conti, P

    2013-01-01

    When through the skin a foreign antigen enters it provokes an immune response and inflammatory reaction. Mast cells are located around small vessels that are involved in vasaldilation. They mature under the influence of local tissue to various cytokines. Human skin mast cells play an essential role in diverse physiological and pathological processes and mediate immediate hypersensitive reaction and allergic diseases. Injection of anti-IgE in the skin or other agents that directly activate mast cells may cause the decrease in vascular tone, leakage of plasma and may lead to a fall in blood pressure with fatal anaphylactic shock. Skin mast cells are also implicated as effector cells in response to multiple parasites such as Leishmania which is primarily characterized by its tissue cutaneous tropism. Activated macrophages by IFNgamma, cytotoxic T cells, activated mast cells and several cytokines are involved in the elimination of the parasites and immunoprotection. IL-33 is one of the latest cytokines involved in IgE-induced anaphylaxis and in the pathogenesis of allergic skin disorders. IL-33 has been shown in epidermis of patients with psoriasis and its skin expression causes atopic dermatitis and it is crucial for the development of this disease. Here we review the impact of mast cells on the skin.

  4. Interaction of phosphatidylserine with mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T W; Lagunoff, D

    1978-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) potentiates histamine secretion from mast cells exposed to concanavalin A and Ca2+. In order to identify the form of PtdSer that is responsible for its effect on mast cell secretion, PtdSer containing a tritium-labeled serine moiety (3H-PtdSer) was synthesized from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 3H-PtdSer and the binding isotherm for 3H-PtdSer interaction with mast cells were determined. The midpoints of the binding isotherm and the dose-response curve for potentiation of secretion coincide and are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the CMC. The shape of the binding curve is explicable either in terms of simple binding of preformed PtdSer micelles or of cooperative binding of monomeric PtdSer in which the number of molecules cooperatively associating with a mast cell binding site is equal to the number of monomers in a PtdSer micelle. In either case, at equilibrium, PtdSer micelles are bound to the mast cells. The number of PtdSer molecules bound to a single mast cell at equilibrium was estimated to be 3.7 X 10(9). PMID:84384

  5. Mast cells as targets of pimecrolimus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jiao, Zongjiu

    2011-11-01

    Mast cells, the multi-functional secretory cells, are the pivotal effector cells in immune response, and contribute to the pathogenesis of many diverse diseases, like asthma and mastocytosis, by releasing numerous proinflammatory mediators. Pimecrolimus (SDZ ASM 981) is a derivative of the macrolactam ascomycin and is a member of the calcineurin inhibitor class of immunosuppressors. It inhibits the calcineurin-dependent activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in turn. Pimecrolimus has high and selective anti-inflammatory activity within the skin, and with much lower potential to affect local and systemic immune responses. Therefore it has been widely used for treatment of various inflammatory skin diseases. It has a cellselective mode of action, and mast cells are its specific target cells. Pimecrolimus inhibits the release of both preformed and de novo synthesized mediators from activated mast cells and inhibits accumulation of mast cells by inducing apoptosis. Several experimental and clinical reports have demonstrated the successful application of pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, to treat mastocytosis, a spectrum of disorders characterized by mast cell hyperplasia, especially cutaneous mastocytosis. These new findings suggest that pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors may be a novel and effective therapeutic approach for mast cell-associated diseases such as asthma and mastocytosis.

  6. Role of CC chemokines and their receptors in multiple aspects of mast cell biology: comparative protein profiling of FcepsilonRI- and/or CCR1-engaged mast cells using protein chip technology.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masako; Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Dawson, Maria; Richardson, Ricardo Micheler; Alban, Andrew; Leed, Benjamin; Miyazaki, Dai; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Apart from the FcepsilonRI-mediated mechanism, mast cells are activated by chemokines. Evidence has accumulated indicating that there is cross-talk between the FcepsilonRI-mediated signalling pathway and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)-mediated signalling pathways in mast cells. We have found that costimulation with IgE/antigen and CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) enhances degranulation but inhibits chemotaxis of rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL)-2H3 cells expressing human CCR1 (RBL-CCR1 cells). We hypothesize that this signalling cross-talk in mast cells may play important roles in the orchestration and focusing of the allergic response. In this study, we have sought information about global protein networks either enhanced or inhibited following cross-talk between the FcepsilonRI-mediated and CCR-mediated signalling pathways in mast cells. We believe this information may be useful for providing an understanding of mast cell function and in the establishment of new anti-inflammatory drugs for allergic diseases. Proteomics is a promising tool for studying protein profiles within biological samples and facilitates an understanding of the complex responses of an organism to a stimulus. Here, we show comparative data of protein profiles derived from FcepsilonRI-engaged and/or CCR1-engaged RBL-CCR1 cells using protein chip array technology, a proteomic technology. We also discuss our view of the role of CC chemokines and CCRs in regulating multiple aspects of mast cell biology.

  7. Mast cells in allergy: innate instructors of adaptive responses.

    PubMed

    Stelekati, Erietta; Orinska, Zane; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The function of mast cells as effector cells in allergy has been extensively studied. However, increasing insight into mast cell physiology has revealed new mast cell functions and has introduced mast cells as key players in the regulation of innate as well as adaptive immunity. For example, mast cells have recently been found to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which enable them to participate in the innate immune response against pathogens. Furthermore, mast cells have been reported to interact with B cells, dendritic cells and T cells and thereby modulate the direction of an adaptive immune response. Finally, recent documentation that mast cells express functional MHC class II and costimulatory molecules and release immunologically active exosomes, has raised the possibility that mast cells also engage in (as yet) poorly understood antigen presentation functions. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that mast cells serve as central mediators between innate and adaptive immunity, rather as pure effector cells, during allergic innate responses.

  8. Further studies on the effect of nitrogen dioxide on mast cells: The effect of the metabolite, nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Ozawa, Masashi ); Bissonnette, E.; Befus, A.D. )

    1993-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide exposure and the development of allergic diseases, the effects of nitrite as a chemical product of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on mast cell functions were investigated. We have studied nitride-induced histamine release from two functionally distinct mast cell populations, namely peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. High concentrations of nitrite alone (10, 20, and 50 mM) induced histamine release from IMMC, but not from PMC. Moreover, histamine release from PMC and IMMC stimulated with sensitizing antigen was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with 50 mM nitrite or nitrate. No differences in histamine release from nitrite-treated and control PMC were seen below 1 mM. To investigate the effect of nitrite on tumor cell cytotoxic activity, PMC were incubated with various concentrations of nitrite. Pretreatment with 5 and 50 mM nitrite markedly depressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha]-dependent natural cytotoxicity of PMC for the tumor target WEHI-164. Thus, high concentrations of nitrite enhanced mast cell histamine release, but depressed TNF-[alpha]-dependent cytotoxicity. However, low concentrations of nitrite (<1 mM) that would normally be produced by short-term atmospheric exposure to nitrogen dioxide may have no significant effects on mast cell functions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Donor age matters in T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients: Faster immune reconstitution using younger donors.

    PubMed

    González-Vicent, Marta; Molina, Blanca; Deltoro, Natalia; Sevilla, Julián; Vicario, José Luis; Castillo, Ana; Ramirez, Manuel; Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-03-04

    T-cell depleted (TCD) haploidentical transplantation is increasingly used in paediatric patients with haematological malignancies and donor selection is a challenge. We conclude that a simple criterion such as donor age should be also considered in depleted haploidentical setting because faster immune reconstitution is achieved using younger donors decreasing non-relapse related mortality.

  10. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody augments antitumor immune responses and immunotherapy in nonhematopoetic murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Fridlender, Zvi G; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Kapoor, Veena; Blouin, Aaron; Kaiser, Larry R; Albelda, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    The role played by B cells in cancer biology is complex and somewhat controversial. Previous studies using genetically engineered mice suggest that B cells may be immunosuppressive and inhibit tumor rejection. However, the effects of B-cell depletion employing an antibody in mice bearing solid tumors has not been tested owing to difficulties in making an effective antimouse CD20 antibody (similar to rituximab). Injection of a newly developed antimouse CD20 antibody was effective in depleting circulating B cells from blood and lymph nodes, although depletion was less complete in the spleen. B-cell depletion slowed the growth of new solid tumors (not expressing CD20) and retarded the growth of established tumors but did not induce tumor regression. However, when the antibody was combined with an active immunotherapy approach using an adenovirus vaccine expressing the human papilloma virus-E7 gene (Ad.E7) in mice bearing TC1 tumors (murine lung cancer cells expressing human papilloma virus-E7), we noted enhanced antitumor effects and increased numbers of tetramer+/CD8+ T cells within the spleens and activated CD8+ T cells within tumors. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody was thus effective in retarding tumor growth in multiple solid tumor models and augmenting immunotherapy in a tumor vaccine model. These studies raise the possibility that B-cell depletion may be a useful adjunct in human immunotherapy trials.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced B-cell depletion in hepatoblastoma patients undergoing ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Mali, Vidyadhar Padmakar; Rahayatri, Tri Hening; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Uchida, Hajime; Shigeta, Takanobu; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kasahara, Mureo

    2016-05-01

    LT from ABO-I donors requires preconditioning regimens to prevent postoperative catastrophic AMR. NAC for HBL is known to cause myelosuppression leading to a reduction in the number and function of lymphocytes. We investigated this chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression in HBL patients listed for LT from ABO-I donors with reference to the kinetics of B, T cells, and anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers. Between 2005 and 2015, of the 319 patients who underwent LDLT at our institute, 12 were indicated for unresectable HBL. Three patients with unresectable HBL who underwent LDLT from ABO-I donors are included in this study. Immunosuppression consisted of a standard regime of tacrolimus and low-dose steroids as in ABO compatible/identical LDLT. No additional preoperative therapies for B-cell depletion were used. Absolute lymphocyte counts, lymphocyte subsets (including CD20+ B cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD8+ T cells), and anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers were measured before LDLT and postoperatively. The median age at diagnosis was 19 months (range, 3-31 months). The median follow-up was seven months (range, 6-15 months). The median interval from the last NAC to LDLT was 33 days (range, 25-52 days). The median interval from LDLT to adjuvant chemotherapy was 28 days (range, 22-36 days). The counts of CD20+ B cells before LDLT were depleted to median 5 cells/mm(3) (range, 0-6 cells/mm(3)). There was a transient rebound in the CD20+ B cell counts on day seven (maximum of 82 cells/mm(3)) followed by a decline starting at 14 days after LDLT that was sustained for the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers were lowered to between 1:1 and 1:16 before LDLT and remained low for the duration of follow-up in this study. All of the three patients remained in good health without either acute cellular or AMR after LDLT. The B-cell depletion that occurs after cisplatin-based chemotherapy for HBL may help accomplish safe ABO-I LDLT

  12. Cornuside inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic response by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liangchang; Jin, Guangyu; Jiang, Jingzhi; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Yan; Lin, Zhenhua; Li, Guangzhao; Choi, Yunho; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-04-29

    Aims: The present study is to investigate the effect of cornuside on mast cell-mediated allergic response, as well as its possible mechanisms of action. Methods: To test the anti-allergic effects of cornuside in vivo, local extravasation was induced by local injection of anti-dinitrophenyl immunoglobulin E (IgE) followed by intravenous antigenic challenge in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model rats. Mast cell viability was determined using MTT assay. Histamine content from rat peritoneal mast cells was measured by the radioenzymatic method. To investigate the mechanisms by which cornuside affects the reduction of histamine release, the levels of calcium uptake were measured. To examine whether cornuside affects the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, Western blotting and ELISA were carried out. Results: Oral administration of cornuside inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats. Presence of cornuside attenuated IgE-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on histamine release was mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. In addition, cornuside decreased phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on pro-inflammatory cytokines was dependent on nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that cornuside inhibits mast cell-derived inflammatory allergic reactions by blocking histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic effects of cornuside suggest a possible therapeutic application of this agent in inflammatory allergic diseases.

  13. Ancient origin of mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G. William; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Lam, Bing K.; Satoh, Nori; Stevens, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The sentinel roles of mammalian mast cells (MCs) in varied infections raised the question of their evolutionary origin. We discovered that the test cells in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis morphologically and histochemically resembled cutaneous human MCs. Like the latter, C. intestinalis test cells stored histamine and varied heparin•serine protease complexes in their granules. Moreover, they exocytosed these preformed mediators when exposed to compound 48/80. In support of the histamine data, a C. intestinalis-derived cDNA was isolated that resembled that which encodes histidine decarboxylase in human MCs. Like heparin-expressing mammalian MCs, activated test cells produced prostaglandin D2 and contained cDNAs that encode a protein that resembles the synthase needed for its biosynthesis in human MCs. The accumulated morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and molecular biology data suggest that the test cells in C. intestinalis are the counterparts of mammalian MCs that reside in varied connective tissues. The accumulated data point to an ancient origin of MCs that predates the emergence of the chordates >500 million years ago, well before the development of adaptive immunity. The remarkable conservation of MCs throughout evolution is consistent with their importance in innate immunity. PMID:25094046

  14. Silibinin attenuates mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-05-01

    Silibinin is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, roles of silibinin in the immediate-type allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have not fully been investigated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that silibinin attenuated mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions involved in allergic diseases. Oral administration of silibinin inhibited compound 48/80-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reaction in mice. Silibinin also attenuated anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis. Silibinin had no cytotoxicity on rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC). Silibinin dose-dependently reduced histamine release from RPMC activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in RPMC. Pretreatment of silibinin suppressed the antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in RPMC. Furthermore, silibinin increased the intracellular cAMP level. Increased cAMP, decreased calcium uptake and suppressed NF-kappaB activity might be involved in the inhibitory effect of silibinin on the secretory response. Our findings provide possibility that silibinin may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for allergic diseases.

  15. Prevention of immunodeficiency virus induced CD4+ T-cell depletion by prior infection with a non-pathogenic virus

    SciTech Connect

    TerWee, Julie A.; Carlson, Jennifer K.; Sprague, Wendy S.; Sondgeroth, Kerry S.; Shropshire, Sarah B.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-20

    Immune dysregulation initiated by a profound loss of CD4+ T-cells is fundamental to HIV-induced pathogenesis. Infection of domestic cats with a non-pathogenic lentivirus prevalent in the puma (puma lentivirus, PLV or FIV{sub PCO}) prevented peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell depletion caused by subsequent virulent FIV infection. Maintenance of this critical population was not associated with a significant decrease in FIV viremia, lending support to the hypothesis that direct viral cytopathic effect is not the primary cause of immunodeficiency. Although this approach was analogous to immunization with a modified live vaccine, correlates of immunity such as a serum-neutralizing antibody or virus-specific T-cell proliferative response were not found in protected animals. Differences in cytokine transcription profile, most notably in interferon gamma, were observed between the protected and unprotected groups. These data provide support for the importance of non-adaptive enhancement of the immune response in the prevention of CD4+ T-cell loss.

  16. Survival after T cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation is improved using the mother as donor.

    PubMed

    Stern, Martin; Ruggeri, Loredana; Mancusi, Antonella; Bernardo, Maria Ester; de Angelis, Claudia; Bucher, Christoph; Locatelli, Franco; Aversa, Franco; Velardi, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    We hypothesized that transplacental leukocyte trafficking during pregnancy, which induces long-term, stable, reciprocal microchimerism in mother and child, might influence outcome of patients with acute leukemia given parental donor haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We analyzed the outcome of 118 patients who received transplants for acute leukemia in 2 centers. Patients received highly T cell-depleted haploidentical grafts after myelo-ablative conditioning. Five-year event-free survival was better in patients who received transplants from the mother than from the father (50.6% +/- 7.6% vs 11.1% +/- 4.2%; P < .001). Better survival was the result of both reduced incidence of relapse and transplantation-related mortality. The protective effect was seen in both female and male recipients, in both lymphoid and myeloid diseases; it was more evident in patients receiving transplants in remission than in chemotherapy-resistant relapse. Incidences of rejection and acute graft-versus-host disease were not significantly influenced. Multivariate analysis confirmed donor sex in parental donor transplantation as an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, father vs mother = 2.36; P = .003). In contrast, in a control cohort of patients who received transplants from haploidentical siblings, donor sex had no influence on outcome. Although obtained in a retrospective analysis, these data suggest that the mother of the patient should be preferred as donor for haploidentical HSCT.

  17. B cell depletion therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus: long‐term follow‐up and predictors of response

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kristine P; Cambridge, Geraldine; Leandro, Maria J; Edwards, Jonathan C W; Ehrenstein, Michael; Isenberg, David A

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To describe the long‐term clinical outcome and safety profile of B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It was also determined whether baseline parameters can predict the likelihood of disease flare. Methods 32 patients with refractory SLE were treated with BCDT using a combination protocol (rituximab and cyclo‐phosphamide). Patients were assessed with the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) activity index, and baseline serology was measured. Flare was defined as a new BILAG ‘A' or two new subsequent ‘B's in any organ system. Results Of the 32 patients, 12 have remained well after one cycle of BCDT (median follow‐up 39 months). BCDT was followed by a decrease of median global BILAG scores from 13 to 5 at 6 months (p = 0.006). Baseline anti‐extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) was the only identified independent predictor of flare post‐BCDT (p = 0.034, odds ratio = 8, 95% CI 1.2 to 55) from multivariable analysis. Patients with low baseline serum C3 had a shorter time to flare post‐BCDT (p = 0.008). Four serious adverse events were observed. Conclusion Autoantibody profiling may help identify patients who will have a more sustained response. Although the long‐term safety profile of BCDT is favourable, ongoing vigilance is recommended. PMID:17412738

  18. Early activation of mucosal mast cells during the primary immune response in a rodent model of neonatal asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Shudou, Masachika; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2011-02-01

    During an allergic inflammatory response in the airway, if a failure of the epithelial cell barrier occurs before the systemic immune response is triggered by allergens, more allergens can invade. Using a rat model of asthma, we previously found that mucosal mast cells, which localise to the epithelial layer of the airways, are activated to promote a pro-asthmatic immune response. In this study, we developed a neonatal rat model of allergic airway hypersensitivity that mimics some features of childhood asthma. Airway hypersensitivity was measured using unrestrained whole-body plethysmography after analysis of the serum IgE titre. Inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were examined. Two mast cell-specific proteases were detected using PCR. In addition, we analysed the phenotype and the number of mast cells in the airways by immunohistochemistry, and we found that the number of mucosal mast cells and the expression level of the proteases increased 2 weeks after sensitisation. Changes in the IgE titre, airway hypersensitivity and the activation of other inflammatory cells were delayed, appearing during the 4 weeks after sensitisation. Our results indicate that the activation of mucosal mast cells contributes to the pro-asthmatic immune response. This activation may be a biomarker allowing early intervention that could help prevent allergic airway inflammation.

  19. A Microplate Assay to Assess Chemical Effects on RBL-2H3 Mast Cell Degranulation: Effects of Triclosan without Use of an Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Juyoung; Gosse, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic disease and immune defense against parasites. Once activated (e.g. by an allergen), they degranulate, a process that results in the exocytosis of allergic mediators. Modulation of mast cell degranulation by drugs and toxicants may have positive or adverse effects on human health. Mast cell function has been dissected in detail with the use of rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), a widely accepted model of human mucosal mast cells3-5. Mast cell granule component and the allergic mediator β-hexosaminidase, which is released linearly in tandem with histamine from mast cells6, can easily and reliably be measured through reaction with a fluorogenic substrate, yielding measurable fluorescence intensity in a microplate assay that is amenable to high-throughput studies1. Originally published by Naal et al.1, we have adapted this degranulation assay for the screening of drugs and toxicants and demonstrate its use here. Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that is present in many consumer products and has been found to be a therapeutic aid in human allergic skin disease7-11, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here we demonstrate an assay for the effect of triclosan on mast cell degranulation. We recently showed that triclosan strongly affects mast cell function2. In an effort to avoid use of an organic solvent, triclosan is dissolved directly into aqueous buffer with heat and stirring, and resultant concentration is confirmed using UV-Vis spectrophotometry (using ε280 = 4,200 L/M/cm)12. This protocol has the potential to be used with a variety of chemicals to determine their effects on mast cell degranulation, and more broadly, their allergic potential. PMID:24300285

  20. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  1. Mast cell-orchestrated immunity to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; St John, Ashley L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mast cells were discovered more than a century ago, their functions beyond their role in allergic responses remained elusive until recently. However, there is a growing appreciation that an important physiological function of these cells is the recognition of pathogens and modulation of appropriate immune responses. Because of their ability to instantly release several pro-inflammatory mediators from intracellular stores and their location at the host–environment interface, mast cells have been shown to be crucial for optimal immune responses during infection. Mast cells seem to exert these effects by altering the inflammatory environment after detection of a pathogen and by mobilizing various immune cells to the site of infection and to draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, the character and timing of these responses can vary depending on the type of pathogen stimulus, location of pathogen recognition and sensitization state of the responding mast cells. Recent studies using mast cell activators as effective vaccine adjuvants show the potential of harnessing these cells to confer protective immunity against microbial pathogens. PMID:20498670

  2. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  3. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  4. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  5. Extendable mast used in one shot soil penetrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotz, G. M.; Howard, G. A.

    1966-01-01

    Penetrometer to test soil characteristics has a piercing head with soil instrumentation equipment attached to an expandable mast actuated by compressed air. The penetrometer gives continuous measurements as the mast pushes the piercing head through the soil.

  6. Arm and Mast of NASA Mars Rover Curiosity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-06

    The arm and the remote sensing mast of the Mars rover Curiosity each carry science instruments and other tools for NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission. This image shows the arm on the left and the mast just right of center.

  7. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  8. Expression of Mast Cell Proteases Correlates with Mast Cell Maturation and Angiogenesis during Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Toso, Vanina Danuza; Campos, Maria Rita de Cássia; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells are surrounded by infiltrating inflammatory cells, such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and mast cells. A body of evidence indicates that mast cells are associated with various types of tumors. Although role of mast cells can be directly related to their granule content, their function in angiogenesis and tumor progression remains obscure. This study aims to understand the role of mast cells in these processes. Tumors were chemically induced in BALB/c mice and tumor progression was divided into Phases I, II and III. Phase I tumors exhibited a large number of mast cells, which increased in phase II and remained unchanged in phase III. The expression of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-4, mMCP-5, mMCP-6, mMCP-7, and carboxypeptidase A were analyzed at the 3 stages. Our results show that with the exception of mMCP-4 expression of these mast cell chymase (mMCP-5), tryptases (mMCP-6 and 7), and carboxypeptidase A (mMC-CPA) increased during tumor progression. Chymase and tryptase activity increased at all stages of tumor progression whereas the number of mast cells remained constant from phase II to III. The number of new blood vessels increased significantly in phase I, while in phases II and III an enlargement of existing blood vessels occurred. In vitro, mMCP-6 and 7 are able to induce vessel formation. The present study suggests that mast cells are involved in induction of angiogenesis in the early stages of tumor development and in modulating blood vessel growth in the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22815822

  9. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  10. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  11. Mast cell activation syndrome: Proposed diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2010-12-01

    The term mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is finding increasing use as a diagnosis for subjects who present with signs and symptoms involving the dermis, gastrointestinal track, and cardiovascular system frequently accompanied by neurologic complaints. Such patients often have undergone multiple extensive medical evaluations by different physicians in varied disciplines without a definitive medical diagnosis until the diagnosis of MCAS is applied. However, MCAS as a distinct clinical entity has not been generally accepted, nor do there exist definitive criteria for diagnosis. Based on current understanding of this disease "syndrome" and on what we do know about mast cell activation and resulting pathology, we will explore and propose criteria for its diagnosis. The proposed criteria will be discussed in the context of other disorders involving mast cells or with similar presentations and as a basis for further scientific study and validation.

  12. Inhibitory effects of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions by cell cultured Siberian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Koo, H N; Myung, N I; Shin, M K; Kim, J W; Kim, D K; Kim, K S; Kim, H M; Lee, Y M

    2001-02-01

    The crude drug "Siberian Ginseng (SG)" has long been used in empirical Oriental medicine for the nonspecific enhancement of resistance in humans and animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of cell cultured SG by oral administration in mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. SG dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic allergy with doses of 10(-2) to 1 g/kg 1 h before oral administration. Of special note, SG inhibited systemic allergy with the dose of 1 g/kg by 25%. SG (1 g/kg) also inhibited passive cutaneous allergic reaction by 51%. SG dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. When SG (0.01 mg/ml) was added, the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in antidinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody-stimulated mast cells was inhibited 39.5% and 23.3%, respectively. In addition, SG inhibited anti-DNP IgE antibody-stimulated TNF-alpha protein expression in mast cells. Our studies provide evidence that SG may be beneficial in the treatment of various types of allergic diseases.

  13. Insights into mast cell functions in asthma using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ying; Gregory, Joshua A; Nilsson, Gunnar P; Adner, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    Therapeutics targeting specific mechanisms of asthma have shown promising results in mouse models of asthma. However, these successes have not transferred well to the clinic or to the treatment of asthma sufferers. We suggest a reason for this incongruity is that mast cell-dependent responses, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of both atopic and non-atopic asthma, are not a key component in most of the current asthma mouse models. Two reasons for this are that wild type mice have, in contrast to humans, a negligible number of mast cells localized in the smaller airways and in the parenchyma, and that only specific protocols show mast cell-dependent reactions. The development of mast cell-deficient mice and the reconstitution of mast cells within these mice have opened up the possibility to generate mouse models of asthma with a marked role of mast cells. In addition, mast cell-deficient mice engrafted with mast cells have a distribution of mast cells more similar to humans. In this article we review and highlight the mast cell-dependent and -independent responses with respect to airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in asthma models using mast cell-deficient and mast cell-engrafted mice.

  14. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST): A Statistical Validation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, John M.; Newman, Isadore; Brown, Russ

    2004-01-01

    This study extends the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST; M. L. Selzer, 1971) literature base by examining 4 issues related to the validity of the MAST scores. Specifically, the authors examine the validity of the MAST scores in light of the presence of impression management, participant demographic variables, and item endorsement…

  15. 43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. AIR CONDITIONING DUCTING IS VISIBLE ON INTERIOR OF MAST. RAIL IS VISIBLE LEFT OF THE MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. 53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST. AIR-CONDITIONING DUCTS VISIBLE ON RIGHT SIDE OF MAST. HYDRAULIC ACTUATOR ARMS FOR OPENING TRENCH DOORS VISIBLE ON LEFT SIDE OF PHOTO. 'DOOR STOP' PEDESTAL IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST): A Statistical Validation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, John M.; Newman, Isadore; Brown, Russ

    2004-01-01

    This study extends the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST; M. L. Selzer, 1971) literature base by examining 4 issues related to the validity of the MAST scores. Specifically, the authors examine the validity of the MAST scores in light of the presence of impression management, participant demographic variables, and item endorsement…

  18. Mast cell activation syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Frieri, Marianne; Patel, Reenal; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a condition with signs and symptoms involving the skin, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurologic systems. It can be classified into primary, secondary, and idiopathic. Earlier proposed criteria for the diagnosis of MCAS included episodic symptoms consistent with mast cell mediator release affecting two or more organ systems with urticaria, angioedema, flushing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, hypotensive syncope or near syncope, tachycardia, wheezing, conjunctival injection, pruritus, and nasal stuffiness. Other criteria included a decrease in the frequency, severity, or resolution of symptoms with anti-mediator therapy including H(1) and H(2)histamine receptor antagonists, anti-leukotrienes, or mast cell stabilizers. Laboratory data that support the diagnosis include an increase of a validated urinary or serum marker of mast cell activation (MCA), namely the documentation of an increase of the marker above the patient's baseline value during symptomatic periods on more than two occasions, or baseline serum tryptase levels that are persistently above 15 ng/ml, or documentation of an increase of the tryptase level above baseline value on one occasion. Less specific assays are 24-h urine histamine metabolites, PGD(2) (Prostaglandin D(2)) or its metabolite, 11-β-prostaglandin F(2) alpha. A recent global definition, criteria, and classification include typical clinical symptoms, a substantial transient increase in serum total tryptase level or an increase in other mast cell derived mediators, such as histamine or PGD2 or their urinary metabolites, and a response of clinical symptoms to agents that attenuate the production or activities of mast cell mediators.

  19. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus–infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit+IL-7Rα+ (CD117+CD127+) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼63%), IL-22 (∼36%), and TNF-α (∼72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4+ T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P < 0.001). Notably, ILC3 could be induced to undergo apoptosis by microbial products through the TLR2 (lipoteichoic acid) and/or TLR4 (LPS) pathway. These findings indicated that persistent microbial translocation may result in loss of ILC3 in lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues.—Xu, H., Wang, X., Lackner, A. A., Veazey, R. S. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus–infected macaques. PMID:26283536

  20. Immunotherapy of murine retrovirus-induced acquired immunodeficiency by CD4 T regulatory cell depletion and PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Green, William R

    2011-12-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus induces a complex disease featuring an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome termed murine AIDS (MAIDS) in susceptible strains of mice, such as C57BL/6 (B6). CD4 T helper effector cells are required for MAIDS induction and progression of viral pathogenesis. CD8 T cells are not needed for viral pathogenesis, but rather, are essential for protection from disease in resistant strains, such as BALB/c. We have discovered an immunodominant cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope encoded in a previously unrecognized LP-BM5 retroviral alternative (+1 nucleotide [nt]) gag translational open reading frame. CTLs specific for this cryptic gag epitope are the basis of protection from LP-BM5-induced immunodeficiency in BALB/c mice, and the inability of B6 mice to mount an anti-gag CTL response appears critical to the initiation and progression of LP-BM5-induced MAIDS. However, uninfected B6 mice primed by LP-BM5-induced tumors can generate CTL responses to an LP-BM5 retrovirus infection-associated epitope(s) that is especially prevalent on such MAIDS tumor cells, indicating the potential to mount a protective CD8 T-cell response. Here, we utilized this LP-BM5 retrovirus-induced disease system to test whether modulation of normal immune down-regulatory mechanisms can alter retroviral pathogenesis. Thus, following in vivo depletion of CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells and/or selective interruption of PD-1 negative signaling in the CD8 T-cell compartment, retroviral pathogenesis was significantly decreased, with the combined treatment of CD4 Treg cell depletion and PD-1 blockade working in a synergistic fashion to substantially reduce the induction of MAIDS.

  1. Long-term efficacy of B cell depletion therapy on lung and skin involvement in diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bosello, Silvia L; De Luca, Giacomo; Rucco, Manuela; Berardi, Giorgia; Falcione, Matteo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Pirronti, Tommaso; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-02-01

    To assess the long-term efficacy and safety of single and multiple courses of rituximab therapy in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with and without lung disease. A total of 20 SSc patients with a diffuse disease were treated with rituximab. At baseline and during follow-up the lung involvement was evaluated with pulmonary function tests (FVC and DLCO) and with lung high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). The skin score, activity, and severity indices improved significantly after 12 months and at final follow-up compared to baseline. After 12 months, there was a significant increase of FVC and TLC compared to baseline (p = 0.024 and p = 0.005, respectively), while the mean DLCO value remained stable. Considering the last available follow-up in six patients with restrictive lung disease at baseline, two patients (33.3%) experienced an increase of more than 10% of FVC, one patient had a decrease of FVC >10%, while in three patients FVC remained stable (50%). After the mean follow-up of 48.5 ± 20.4 months, among the patients with normal lung parameters at baseline, FVC remained stable in 12 (85.7%) and in one patient (14.3%) it increased by more than 10%. At the final follow-up, the alveolar and interstitial HRCT scores remained stable in more than 80% of patients, both in patients with and without restrictive lung disease at baseline. Anti-CD20 B cell depletion therapy is effective on skin involvement but seems also to preserve the pulmonary function, as supported by a stable or improved FVC and stable interstitial score, suggesting a possible role of rituximab as a modifying therapy overall in early diffuse SSc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Depletion Modulates Anxiety and Depression-Like Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Hyojung; Lee, Gihyun; Oh, Sei-Joong; Shin, Min-Kyu; Shim, Insop; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    Stress has been shown to suppress immune function and increase susceptibility to inflammatory disease and psychiatric disease. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are prominent in immune regulation. This study was conducted to determine if anti-CD25 antibody (Ab) mediated depletion of Treg cells in mice susceptibility to stress-induced development of depression-like behaviors, as well as immunological and neurochemical activity. To accomplish this, an elevated plus-maze test (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), and forced swim test (FST) were used to examine depression-like behaviors upon chronic immobilization stress. Immune imbalance status was observed based on analysis of serum cytokines using a mouse cytometric bead array in conjunction with flow cytometry and changes in the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in the brain were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The time spent in the open arms of the EPM decreased significantly and the immobility time in the FST increased significantly in the anti-CD25 Ab-treated group when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. In addition, interlukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-á (TNF-á), interlukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interlukin-4 (IL-4) and interlukin-17A (IL-17A) concentrations were significantly upregulated in the stressed anti-CD25 Ab-treated group when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. Furthermore, the non stressed anti-CD25 Ab-treated group displayed decreased 5-HT levels within the hippocampus when compared with the non stressed wild-type group. These results suggest that CD4+CD25+ Treg cell depletion modulated alterations in depressive behavior, cytokine and monoaminergic activity. Therefore, controlling CD4+CD25+ Treg cell function during stress may be a potent therapeutic strategy for the treatment of depression-like symptoms. PMID:22860054

  3. Inhibition of envelope-mediated CD4+-T-cell depletion by human immunodeficiency virus attachment inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Louis; Zhang, Sharon; McAuliffe, Brian; Connors, David; Zhou, Nannon; Wang, Tao; Agler, Michele; Kadow, John; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2009-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) binding induces proapoptotic signals in CD4(+) T cells without a requirement of infection. Defective virus particles, which represent the majority of HIV-1, usually contain a functional Env and therefore represent a potentially significant cause of such CD4(+)-T-cell loss. We reasoned that an HIV-1 inhibitor that prohibits Env-host cell interactions could block the destructive effects of defective particles. HIV-1 attachment inhibitors (AIs), which potently inhibit Env-CD4 binding and subsequent downstream effects of Env, display low-nanomolar antiapoptotic potency and prevent CD4(+)-T-cell depletion from mixed lymphocyte cultures, also with low-nanomolar potency. Specific Env amino acid changes that confer resistance to AI antientry activity eliminate AI antiapoptotic effects. We observed that CD4(+)-T-cell destruction is specific for CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains and that the fusion blocker enfuvirtide inhibits Env-mediated CD4(+)-T-cell killing but is substantially less potent than AIs. These observations, in conjunction with observed antiapoptotic activities of soluble CD4 and the CXCR4 blocker AMD3100, suggest that this AI activity functions through a mechanism common to AI antientry activity, e.g., prevention of Env conformation changes necessary for specific interactions with cellular factors that facilitate viral entry. Our study suggests that AIs, in addition to having potent antientry activity, could contribute to immune system homeostasis in individuals infected with HIV-1 that can engage CXCR4, thereby mitigating the increased risk of adverse clinical events observed in such individuals on current antiretroviral regimens.

  4. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  5. Activation‑induced upregulation of MMP9 in mast cells is a positive feedback mediator for mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Cai, Zhijian; Yang, Fei; Chen, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Activated mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR). As a member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, MMP9 has been previously demonstrated act in a pro‑inflammatory manner. Mast cells regulate the activity of MMP9, and mast cells themselves have been reported to produce MMP9. However, to the best of our knowledge, the involvement of MMP9 in mast cell activation remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated an upregulation of MMP9 protein and mRNA expression levels in mast cells activated by phorbol ester and ionomycin. Phosphorylated ERK and AKT protein levels also markedly increased in activated mast cells, and inhibition of the ERK and AKT signaling pathways prevented the increase of MMP9 in activated mast cells. MMP9 was demonstrated to be involved in mast cell activation, since inhibition of MMP9 activity or expression inhibited mast cell activation. Furthermore, IL‑4 treatment reduced MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells, and interference with IL‑4 signaling with an IL‑4 neutralizing antibody promoted MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells. These results revealed a novel MMP9‑mediated mechanism underlying mast cell activation, thus providing novel ideas for AR therapy.

  6. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  7. Addition of an Indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase Inhibitor to B cell Depletion Therapy Blocks Autoreactive B Cell Activation and Recurrence of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, Elizabeth; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Objective Define the role indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) plays in driving pathogenic B cells responses leading to arthritis and determine if inhibitors of the IDO pathway can be used in conjunction with B cell depletion therapy to prevent the re-emergence of autoantibodies and arthritis following reconstitution of the B cell repertoire. Methods Immunoglobulin transgenic mice were treated with the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-tryptophan (1MT) and followed for the extent of autoreactive B cell activation. Arthritic mice (K/BxN) were treated with B cell depletion therapy alone or in combination with 1MT. Mice were followed for the presence of autoantibody secreting cells, inflammatory cytokines, and joint inflammation. Results 1MT did not affect the initial activation or survival of autoreactive B cells, but did inhibit their ability to differentiate into autoantibody secreting cells. Treatment with anti-CD20 depleted the B cell repertoire and attenuated arthritis symptoms; however, arthritis symptoms rapidly returned as B cells repopulated the repertoire. Administration of 1MT prior to B cell repopulation prevented the production of autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and flare in arthritis symptoms. Conclusion IDO activity is essential for the differentiation of autoreactive B cells into antibody secreting cells, but is not necessary for their initial stages of activation. Addition of 1MT to B cell depletion therapy prevents the differentiation of autoantibody secreting cells and recurrence of autoimmune arthritis following reconstitution of the B cell repertoire. These data suggest that IDO inhibitors could be used in conjunction with B cell depletion as an effective co-therapeutic strategy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22294267

  8. [Relationship between regional mast cell activity and peripheral nerve discharges during manual acupuncture stimulation of "Zusanli" (ST 36)].

    PubMed

    Sa, Zhe-Yan; Huang, Meng; Zhang, Di; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2013-04-01

    To observe changes of discharges of the sciatic nerve branch and mast cell activities and collagen fibers in the acupoint area during manual acupuncture stimulation of "Zusanli"(ST 36), so as to reveal the relationship between peripheral nerve and mast cell activities. A total of 30 male SD rats were divided into normal, acupuncture control (an acupuncture neidle was inserted into ST 36 without manipulation), manual acupuncture (MA), disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, suppressing mast cell activity) plus acupuncture (MA + DSCG) and col lagenase (dissolving the collagen fibers) plus acupuncture (MA+ collagenase) groups (6 rats/group). After dissection of a branch of the sciatic nerve innervating ST 36 region in the left hind-limb under anesthesia, the ipsilateral ST 36 was stimulated by manipulating the acupuncture needle for 20 min. Discharges of the sciatic nerve branch were recorded by using a pair of metal electrodes and data acquisition system (Power Lab). Skin and muscle tissues of ST 36 area were sampled, sliced and stained with Toluidine Blue for detecting the number of degranulated mast cells. Compared with the control group, the mean power spectrum of d ischarges of the sciatic nerve and the mean rates of the degranulated mast cells in "Zusanli" (ST 36) area in the MA group were significantly increased (P<0.01). Whereas the mean power spectrum of discharges of the sciatic nerve and the mean degranulation rates of mast cells were considerably lower in the MA + DSCG group and MA+ collagenase group than in the MA group (P<0.01). No significant differences were found between the normal and control groups, and between the MA+NDSCG and MA+collagenase groups in the mean power density and degranulation rates of mast cells (P>0.05). Manual acupuncture stimulation of Zuai"ST 36 can significantly potentiate the discharge activity of the sciatic nerve and induce degranulation of mast cells at the same time, suggesting an involvement of mast cells in initiating acupuncture

  9. Roles of mucosal mast cells in intestinal cell-mediated immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, A.; Cummins, A.G.; Munro, G.H.; Gibson, S.; Miller, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    Mucosal mast cells in rats with GvHR have been studied by cell counts, tissue levels of the specific protease RMCPII, and, as an index of MMC activation, serum RMCPII. In semi-allogeneic GvHR without host irradiation, GvHR produced modest increases in these three indices. In contrast, irradiation profoundly depleted MMC even though enteropathy was more severe than in non-irradiated hosts. We suggest that enteropathy is not dependent on the presence of MMC. In rats given cyclosporin A, lesions of GvHR were mild and numbers of MMC were low.

  10. Mast Cell: A Multi-Functional Master Cell

    PubMed Central

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; Dileepan, Kottarappat N.; Wood, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells of the myeloid lineage and are present in connective tissues throughout the body. The activation and degranulation of mast cells significantly modulates many aspects of physiological and pathological conditions in various settings. With respect to normal physiological functions, mast cells are known to regulate vasodilation, vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, and venom detoxification. On the other hand, mast cells have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases, including allergy, asthma, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal disorders, many types of malignancies, and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of mast cells in many pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26779180

  11. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  12. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  13. Degranulation of mast cells and inhibition of the response to secretory agents by phototoxic compounds and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gendimenico, G.J.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1984-11-01

    The symptoms of cutaneous phototoxicity from coal tar compounds and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug benoxaprofen are characterized by wheal and flare formation which is mediated by histamine released from dermal mast cells. Rat serosal mast cells were used as an in vitro model system to study the direct effect of phototoxic compounds on mast cell degranulation. The coal tar compounds studied included acridine and pyrene. Combined exposure of cells to acridine and UVA (320 to 400 nm) radiation caused mast cells to degranulate, as assayed by the release of (/sup 3/H)serotonin. Maximum (/sup 3/H)serotonin release (70 to 80%) was obtained with 50 microM acridine and 300 kJ/m2 UVA. Pyrene (25 microM), when photoexcited with UVB (280 to 360 nm) radiation, caused about 80% release of (/sup 3/H)serotonin. No degranulation occurred with 20 microM benoxaprofen and UVB doses up to 7.2 kJ/m2. Trypan blue staining correlated well with degranulation caused by acridine plus UVA; however, with pyrene plus UVB there was greater (/sup 3/H)serotonin release than dye uptake. Excitation of photosensitizers with doses of UV radiation that did not cause trypan blue staining suppressed degranulation of mast cells in response to chemical stimulation. Acridine, pyrene, and benoxaprofen in the presence of UV radiation inhibited the mast cells from responding to compound 48/80 or the calcium ionophore, chlortetracycline. Two other phototoxic compounds, chlorpromazine and deoxytetracycline, also abolished degranulation by compound 48/80. These findings indicate that phototoxic compounds: (1) cause degranulation in the presence of high doses of UV radiation; and (2) suppress degranulation of mast cells in response to secretory stimuli at doses of UV radiation that do not cause release of mediator.

  14. Efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with suboptimal response to standard treatment: Results of a phase II, multicenter noncomparative study.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Ygal; Paintaud, Gilles; Azoulay, Elie; Poullin, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Desvignes, Céline; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Peltier, Julie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Pène, Frédéric; Presne, Claire; Saheb, Samir; Deligny, Christophe; Rousseau, Alexandra; Féger, Frédéric; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The standard four-rituximab infusions treatment in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) remains empirical. Peripheral B cell depletion is correlated with the decrease in serum concentrations of anti-ADAMTS13 and associated with clinical response. To assess the efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion, 24 TTP patients were enrolled in this prospective multicentre single arm phase II study and then compared to patients from a previous study. Patients with a suboptimal response to a plasma exchange-based regimen received two infusions of rituximab 375 mg m(-2) within 4 days, and a third dose at day +15 of the first infusion if peripheral B cells were still detectable. Primary endpoint was the assessment of the time required to platelet count recovery from the first plasma exchange. Three patients died after the first rituximab administration. In the remaining patients, the B cell-driven treatment hastened remission and ADAMTS13 activity recovery as a result of rapid anti-ADAMTS13 depletion in a similar manner to the standard four-rituximab infusions schedule. The 1-year relapse-free survival was also comparable between both groups. A rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion is feasible and provides comparable results than with the four-rituximab infusions schedule. This regimen could represent a new standard in TTP. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00907751). Am. J. Hematol. 91:1246-1251, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Inhibitory effect of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp on IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Nahoko; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Sada, Kiyonao; Hori-Tamura, Naoko

    2011-05-25

    The palm fruit açaí is known to have potential health benefits due to its antioxidant scavenging capacities. Pretreatment of IgE-sensitized mouse primary cultured mast cells with açaí pulp resulted in the dramatic suppression of antigen-induced degranulation in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, açaí suppressed IgE-mediated degranulation and transcription of the cytokine genes from a cultured mast cell line of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Açaí could selectively inhibit FcεRI signaling pathways. Furthermore, the FcεRI-mediated complementary signaling pathway was also suppressed by açaí. These results demonstrate that açaí is a potent inhibitor of IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

  16. iMAST Quarterly, Number 3, 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    imast.html NAVY PROGRAM MANAGER James G. Mattern (703) 602-9570 ext. 453 matternjg@navsea.navy.mil ©2000. The iMAST quarterly newsletter is published...and Technology Conference hosted by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base was held recently at the Dayton Convention

  17. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  19. Silver Nanoparticle-Directed Mast Cell Degranulation Is Mediated through Calcium and PI3K Signaling Independent of the High Affinity IgE Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleh, Nasser B.; Persaud, Indushekhar; Brown, Jared M.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterial (ENM)-mediated toxicity often involves triggering immune responses. Mast cells can regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses and are key effectors in allergic diseases and inflammation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials used in consumer products due to their antimicrobial properties. We have previously shown that AgNPs induce mast cell degranulation that was dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. Furthermore, we identified a role for scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) in AgNP-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, it is completely unknown how SR-B1 mediates mast cell degranulation and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. In the current study, we hypothesized that SR-B1 interaction with AgNPs directs mast cell degranulation through activation of signal transduction pathways that culminate in an increase in intracellular calcium signal leading to mast cell degranulation. For these studies, we utilized bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and RBL-2H3 cells (rat basophilic leukemia cell line). Our data support our hypothesis and show that AgNP-directed mast cell degranulation involves activation of PI3K, PLCγ and an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, we found that influx of extracellular calcium is required for the cells to degranulate in response to AgNP exposure and is mediated at least partially via the CRAC channels. Taken together, our results provide new insights into AgNP-induced mast cell activation that are key for designing novel ENMs that are devoid of immune system activation. PMID:27907088

  20. Silver Nanoparticle-Directed Mast Cell Degranulation Is Mediated through Calcium and PI3K Signaling Independent of the High Affinity IgE Receptor.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Nasser B; Persaud, Indushekhar; Brown, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterial (ENM)-mediated toxicity often involves triggering immune responses. Mast cells can regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses and are key effectors in allergic diseases and inflammation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials used in consumer products due to their antimicrobial properties. We have previously shown that AgNPs induce mast cell degranulation that was dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. Furthermore, we identified a role for scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) in AgNP-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, it is completely unknown how SR-B1 mediates mast cell degranulation and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. In the current study, we hypothesized that SR-B1 interaction with AgNPs directs mast cell degranulation through activation of signal transduction pathways that culminate in an increase in intracellular calcium signal leading to mast cell degranulation. For these studies, we utilized bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and RBL-2H3 cells (rat basophilic leukemia cell line). Our data support our hypothesis and show that AgNP-directed mast cell degranulation involves activation of PI3K, PLCγ and an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, we found that influx of extracellular calcium is required for the cells to degranulate in response to AgNP exposure and is mediated at least partially via the CRAC channels. Taken together, our results provide new insights into AgNP-induced mast cell activation that are key for designing novel ENMs that are devoid of immune system activation.

  1. Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design.

    PubMed

    Freidlin, Boris; Korn, Edward L; Gray, Robert

    2014-02-01

    New targeted anticancer therapies often benefit only a subset of patients with a given cancer. Definitive evaluation of these agents may require phase III randomized clinical trial designs that integrate evaluation of the new treatment and the predictive ability of the biomarker that putatively determines the sensitive subset. We propose a new integrated biomarker design, the Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design, that allows sequential testing of the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups and overall population while controlling the relevant type I error rates. After defining the testing and error framework for integrated biomarker designs, we review the commonly used approaches to integrated biomarker testing. We then present a general form of the MaST design and describe how it can be used to provide proper control of false-positive error rates for biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups. The operating characteristics of the MaST design are compared by analytical methods and simulations to the sequential subgroup-specific design that sequentially assesses the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups. Practical aspects of MaST design implementation are discussed. The MaST design is shown to have higher power relative to the sequential subgroup-specific design in situations where the treatment effect is homogeneous across biomarker subgroups, while preserving the power for settings where treatment benefit is limited to biomarker-positive subgroup. For example, in the time-to-event setting considered with 30% biomarker-positive prevalence, the MaST design provides up to a 30% increase in power in the biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups when the treatment benefits all patients equally, while sustaining less than a 2% loss of power against alternatives where the benefit is limited to the biomarker-positive subgroup. The proposed design is appropriate for settings where it is reasonable to assume that the treatment will not be

  2. Development, significance, and heterogeneity of mast cells with particular regard to the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase.

    PubMed

    Welle, M

    1997-03-01

    Mast cells are one of the major effector cells in the pathogenesis of the immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction in a number of non-allergic immune disorders as well as in normal physiological processes. In addition, it has been shown recently that mast cells also play a significant role in a life-saving host response to bacterial reactions. But as much as the immunopathological role of mast cells has been acknowledged, these cells have also aroused much controversy and confusion. By now it is clear that one explanation for the sometimes even contradictory opinions on mast cell function arise from mast cell heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can express itself as differences in histochemical, biochemical, and functional characteristics. In vitro systems provided a powerful tool for the investigation of the basic mechanisms for mast cell development and differentiation and helped to demonstrate that mast cell heterogeneity can be traced back to certain cytokine patterns that are present in different microenvironments. In this context it has also been shown that the growth factors required for human mast cell differentiation are somewhat different than those for rodents. In rodents, the atypical, T cell-dependent mucosal type mast cell can be distinguished from the T cell-independent connective tissue-type mast cell. In humans, the strict classification into mucosal and connective tissue-type mast cells is not possible and the content of mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase is the main criterion for mast cell subtypes in humans. The large quantities of tryptase and chymase that are synthesized by mast cells suggest and emphasize the significance of these proteinases in mast cell function and stimulated investigations about the biological properties of these mast cell-specific proteases. Comparing their biological activities it becomes clear that they share some activities. On the other hand, tryptase seems to participate in proinflammatory mast cell

  3. Inhibitory effects of atractylone on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Moon, Phil-Dong; Nam, Sun-Young; Ryu, Ka-Jung; Yoou, Myoung-Schook; Choi, Jung-Hye; Hwang, Sung-Yeoun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-10-25

    This study investigated a salutary effect of atractylone (Atr) which is an active constituent of Pyeongwee-San (KMP6) on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. Our previous report indicated that KMP6 regulated allergic reactions. Thus, this study sought to determine the potential of Atr in vitro models, compound 48/80-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-stimulated human mast cell line (HMC-1) cells, and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated RPMCs as well as in vivo models, IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis, and compound 48/80-induced ear swelling. The results showed that Atr inhibited compound 48/80-induced RPMCs degranulation, intracellular calcium level, tryptase release, and histamine release. Atr inhibited the up-regulation of p56(lck) tyrosine kinase activity by compound 48/80. And Atr reduced tryptase and histamine releases from PMA plus A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells. In addition, Atr decreased histidine decarboxylase activity and expression in the activated HMC-1 cells. Atr inhibited SCF-induced morphological alteration and filamentous actin formation in RPMCs. Atr improved IgE-induced PCA reaction by decreasing the levels of histamine, IgE, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, and IL-13 in the serum of PCA-induced mice. Furthermore, Atr mitigated compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and ear swelling. Taken together, these results of this study indicate that Atr regulates the degranulation of mast cell, proving its potential in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions.

  4. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  5. Mechanism of the modulation of murine peritoneal cell function and mast cell degranulation by low doses of malathion.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, K; Ellefson, D

    1992-01-01

    Malathion is a widely used organophosphate pesticide that modulates immune function at noncholinergic doses. Previous studies showed that this alteration in immune function was the result of enhanced macrophage function. In the present study, the effects of low doses of purified malathion (as low as 0.25 mg/kg malathion) administered orally to mice enhanced the respiratory burst of peritoneal cells. Microscopic examination of the peritoneal cells showed that mast cells were degranulated within 4 hr after malathion administration. The amount of beta-hexosaminidase, an enzyme released upon immunologic degranulation of mast cells, in the peritoneal lavage fluid of malathion-treated mice was also significantly elevated with 4 hours after malathion administration. Treatment of RBL-1, a rat basophilic cell line, cells with malathion, parathion or paroxon in vitro also led to the release of beta-hexosaminidase with paraoxon being the most potent. Further examination of the peritoneal cells of malathion-treated mice showed that the percentage of phagocytic peritoneal cells ingesting mast cell granules and the number of granules ingested per cell were elevated. These data suggest that malathion may enhance the respiratory burst of peritoneal cells through degranulation of peritoneal mast cells and the subsequent exposure to peritoneal cells to mast cell mediators.

  6. Chemically modified tetracycline (CMT)-3 inhibits histamine release and cytokine production in mast cells: possible involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sandler, C; Ekokoski, E; Lindstedt, K A; Vainio, P J; Finel, M; Sorsa, T; Kovanen, P T; Golub, L M; Eklund, K K

    2005-07-01

    To find novel inhibitors of mast cell function we have studied the effect of a potent, non-antimicrobial, chemically modified tetracycline, CMT-3 or COL-3, on key functions of mast cells. In the presence of 25 microM CMT-3, the 48/80-induced histamine release from rat serosal mast cells was inhibited significantly, to 43.0 +/- 7.3% of control. Similarly, the activation-induced secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-8 by HMC-1 cells were decreased in the presence of 25 microM CMT-3 to 13.5 +/- 4.1% and 9.7 +/- 1.1% of control, respectively. CMT-3 did not cause intracellular accumulation of TNF-alpha but instead it reduced the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA in HMC-1 cells. Moreover, CMT-3 was found to significantly inhibit the protein kinase C (PKC) activity with IC(50) value of 31 microM. CMT-3 inhibited effectively both human recombinant PKCalpha and PKCdelta isoforms. In comparison to doxycycline, CMT-3 was more effective as an inhibitor of both cytokine production and PKC activity. Considering the central role of PKC in mast cell activation, PKC inhibition could, at least partially, explain the observed inhibitory effects of CMT-3. The inhibition of the key proinflammatory functions of mast cells by CMT-3 suggests its potential clinical usefulness in the treatment of allergic and inflammatory disorders.

  7. The inhibition of mast cell damage and histamine release in anaphylaxis by pyridine and diphosphopyridine nucleotidase inhibitors. Comparison with compound 48/80

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Ivan; Da Silva, W. Dias; Fernandes, J. Ferreira

    1960-01-01

    In rats and guinea-pigs both mast cell damage and histamine release in anaphylaxis were inhibited by pyridine, nicotinamide, diethylnicotinamide, nicotinic acid, isonicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid hydrazide, which are known to be inhibitors of diphosphopyridine nucleotidases. On the other hand these compounds potentiated histamine release and mast cell damage by compound 48/80 in guinea-pigs although inhibiting the same phenomena in rats. The relationship of these findings with the mechanism of histamine liberation in anaphylaxis is discussed. PMID:13773170

  8. Impact of Multi-Targeted Antiretroviral Treatment on Gut T Cell Depletion and HIV Reservoir Seeding during Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Schuetz, Alexandra; Vandergeeten, Claire; Sereti, Irini; de Souza, Mark; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Dewar, Robin; Marovich, Mary; van Griensven, Frits; Sekaly, Rafick; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Chomchey, Nitiya; Paris, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Valcour, Victor; Maldarelli, Frank; Chomont, Nicolas; Michael, Nelson; Phanuphak, Praphan; Kim, Jerome H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited knowledge exists on early HIV events that may inform preventive and therapeutic strategies. This study aims to characterize the earliest immunologic and virologic HIV events following infection and investigates the usage of a novel therapeutic strategy. Methods and Findings We prospectively screened 24,430 subjects in Bangkok and identified 40 AHI individuals. Thirty Thais were enrolled (8 Fiebig I, 5 Fiebig II, 15 Fiebig III, 2 Fiebig IV) of whom 15 completed 24 weeks of megaHAART (tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz/raltegravir/maraviroc). Sigmoid biopsies were completed in 24/30 at baseline and 13/15 at week 24. At baseline, the median age was 29 years and 83% were MSM. Most were symptomatic (87%), and were infected with R5-tropic (77%) CRF01_AE (70%). Median CD4 was 406 cells/mm3. HIV RNA was 5.5 log10 copies/ml. Median total blood HIV DNA was higher in Fiebig III (550 copy/106 PBMC) vs. Fiebig I (8 copy/106 PBMC) (p = 0.01) while the median %CD4+CCR5+ gut T cells was lower in Fiebig III (19%) vs. Fiebig I (59%) (p = 0.0008). After 24 weeks of megaHAART, HIV RNA levels of <50 copies were achieved in 14/15 in blood and 13/13 in gut. Total blood HIV DNA at week 0 predicted reservoir size at week 24 (p<0.001). Total HIV DNA declined significantly and was undetectable in 3 of 15 in blood and 3 of 7 in gut. Frequency of CD4+CCR5+ gut T cells increased from 41% at baseline to 64% at week 24 (p>0.050); subjects with less than 40% at baseline had a significant increase in CD4+CCR5+ T cells from baseline to week 24 (14% vs. 71%, p = 0.02). Conclusions Gut T cell depletion and HIV reservoir seeding increases with progression of AHI. MegaHAART was associated with immune restoration and reduced reservoir size. Our findings could inform research on strategies to achieve HIV drug-free remission. PMID:22479485

  9. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR

  10. Studies on the pH gradient and histamine uptake of isolated mast cell granules

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1986-05-01

    A purified preparation of mast cell granules with intact perigranular membranes was obtained using a method involving probe sonication of rat serosal mast cells followed by differential centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation of the granules. Purification was assessed with histamine and mast cell granule protease assays. Granule integrity was demonstrated by light and electron microscopy and quantitated with a ruthenium red binding assay. The low yield of granules (20 ..mu..g protein/4 rats) necessitated the development of two microanalytical techniques to demonstrate the existence of a pH gradient across the membrane: 9-aminoacridine fluorescence studies in a cuvet with 50 ..mu..l capacity and /sup 14/C-methylamine distribution studies on microgram quantities of granule protein. Quantitation of results from isotope studies were confounded by the presence of oil used for separating granules from the aqueous phase. Nonetheless, an extrapolation procedure calibrated by external pH yielded an internal pH value of 5.46 +/- .03 (n = 4), consistent with values observed in granules obtained from other secretory cells. Collapse of the pH gradient by NH/sub 4//sup +/ or nigericin/KCl was demonstrated using either technique. Addition of histamine depressed intragranular pH, suggesting that histamine transport may utilize the ..delta..pH as a driving force.

  11. Activation of basophil and mast cell histamine release by eosinophil granule major basic protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Major basic protein (MBP) is a primary constituent of eosinophil granules. In this report, we demonstrate that MBP from human eosinophil granules initiates a nonlytic histamine release from human leukocytes. A direct effect of MBP on basophils was confirmed using purified human basophils. The kinetics of release were similar to those reported for poly-L-arginine, although MBP was less potent than poly-L-arginine of similar molecular weight. Reduction and alkylation of MBP diminished both the potency and efficacy of the molecule. Native MBP also stimulated histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells in a manner characteristic of other polycations. These results emphasize the bidirectional nature of the basophil/mast cell-eosinophil regulatory axis. PMID:6854212

  12. Mast cells as targets for immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Oldford, Sharon A; Marshall, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells have historically been studied mainly in the context of allergic disease. In recent years, we have come to understand the critical importance of mast cells in tissue remodeling events and their role as sentinel cells in the induction and development of effective immune responses to infection. Studies of the role of mast cells in tumor immunity are more limited. The pro-tumorigenic role of mast cells has been widely reported. However, mast cell infiltration predicts improved prognosis in some cancers, suggesting that their prognostic value may be dependent on other variables. Such factors may include the nature of local mast cell subsets and the various activation stimuli present within the tumor microenvironment. Experimental models have highlighted the importance of mast cells in orchestrating the anti-tumor events that follow immunotherapies that target innate immunity. Mast cells are long-lived tissue resident cells that are abundant around many solid tumors and are radiation resistant making them unique candidates for combined treatment modalities. This review will examine some of the key roles of mast cells in tumor immunity, with a focus on potential immunotherapeutic interventions that harness the sentinel role of mast cells.

  13. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  14. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Brooke L.; Whitelock, John M.; O’Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S.

    2015-01-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells. PMID:26586669

  15. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Ooi, Joshua D.; Alikhan, Maliha A.; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4+ effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  16. Brain mast cell relationship to neurovasculature during development.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mona; Ronda, Jocelyn; Weintraub, Michael; Jain, Kim; Silver, Rae; Silverman, Ann-Judith

    2007-09-26

    Mast cells, derived from the hematopoietic stem cell, are present in the brain from birth. During development, mast cells occur in two locations, namely the pia and the brain parenchyma. The current hypothesis regarding their origin states that brain mast cells (or their precursors) enter the pia and access the thalamus by traveling along the abluminal wall of penetrating blood vessels. The population in the pia reaches a maximum at postnatal (PN) day 11, and declines rapidly thereafter. Chromatin fragmentation suggests that this cell loss is due to apoptosis. In contrast, the thalamic population expands from PN8 to reach adult levels at PN30. Stereological analysis demonstrates that mast cells home to blood vessels. More than 96% of mast cells are inside the blood-brain barrier, with ~90% contacting the blood vessel wall or its extracellular matrix. Mast cells express alpha4 integrins -- a potential mechanism for adhesion to the vascular wall. Despite the steady increase in the volume of microvasculature, at all ages studied, mast cells are preferentially located on large diameter vessels (>16 microm; possibly arteries), and contact only those maturing blood vessels that are ensheathed by astroglial processes. Mast cells not only home to large vessels but also maintain a preferential position at branch points, sites of vessel growth. This observation presents the possibility that mast cells participate in and/or regulate vasculature growth or differentiation. The biochemical and molecular signals that induce mast cell homing in the CNS is an area of active investigation.

  17. Isolation, culture, and characterization of intestinal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sellge, Gernot; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are bone-marrow-derived tissue cells typically located at barrier sites of the body, such as skin, mucosal barriers, or blood barriers, that is, around blood vessels. This location suggests that mast cells might have a function as immunological "gate-keepers" or "watch dogs" and, indeed, some recent functional data support this idea. Mast cells derive from myeloid progenitors, but in contrast to other myeloid cells, they leave the bone marrow in an immature state; therefore, mast cells are not found in the blood under normal conditions. For full maturation, the tissue environment is necessary. Thus, mature mast cells can be only isolated from tissue such as skin or mucosal sites, which makes mast cell isolation rather complicated. Alternatively, mast cell progenitors can be isolated from the bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cord blood, which is easier but requires subsequent in vitro maturation of mast cells as far as possible using cytokines. This chapter describes a rather new technique of mast cell isolation from human intestinal mucosal tissue yielding approx 1-5 million pure and viable human mast cells suitable to perform functional and cell culture experiments.

  18. Resource limitation underlying multiple masting models makes mast seeding sensitive to future climate change.

    PubMed

    Monks, Adrian; Monks, Joanne M; Tanentzap, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanistic models can help resolve controversy over the responses of mast seeding plants to future environmental change. We evaluate drivers of mast seeding by: developing and validating a new mechanistic resource-based model of mast seeding using four 40-yr Chionochloa (snow tussock) datasets; and comparing the performance of competing empirically-based statistical models, that aim to approximate the mechanisms underlying mast seeding, in explaining simulated and observed data. Our mechanistic model explained 90-99% of the variation in Chionochloa flowering, with higher rates of stored resource mobilisation and lower probability of climatic induction of flowering occurring at lower fertility sites. Inter-annual variation in floral induction and the degree to which seeding is resource-limited explained shifts in the relative performance of different empirical models fitted to data simulated from the mechanistic model. Empirical models explicitly capturing the interaction between the floral induction cue and internal resource state underlying the resource-limited induction mechanism had > 8.7× the statistical support of alternatives when fitted to Chionochloa datasets. We find support for resource-limited floral induction with multiple empirical models consistent with this same mechanism. As both resource acquisition and flowering cues are climate sensitive, we expect climate change to impact upon patterns of mast seeding. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Of mast and mean: differential-temperature cue makes mast seeding insensitive to climate change.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Dave; Geldenhuis, Andre; James, Alex; Penelope Holland, E; Plank, Michael J; Brockie, Robert E; Cowan, Philip E; Harper, Grant A; Lee, William G; Maitland, Matt J; Mark, Alan F; Mills, James A; Wilson, Peter R; Byrom, Andrea E

    2013-01-01

    Mast-seeding plants often produce high seed crops the year after a warm spring or summer, but the warm-temperature model has inconsistent predictive ability. Here, we show for 26 long-term data sets from five plant families that the temperature difference between the two previous summers (ΔT) better predicts seed crops. This discovery explains how masting species tailor their flowering patterns to sites across altitudinal temperature gradients; predicts that masting will be unaffected by increasing mean temperatures under climate change; improves prediction of impacts on seed consumers; demonstrates that strongly masting species are hypersensitive to climate; explains the rarity of consecutive high-seed years without invoking resource constraints; and generates hypotheses about physiological mechanisms in plants and insect seed predators. For plants, ΔT has many attributes of an ideal cue. This temperature-difference model clarifies our understanding of mast seeding under environmental change, and could also be applied to other cues, such as rainfall.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Acorus calamus extracts on mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions using mast cell and mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Jae; Jiang, Jun; Kim, Myong-Ki; Shin, Yong-Kook; Kim, Dong-Woo; Moon, Won-Kook; Kwon, Sang-Chul; Koppula, Sushruta; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2012-05-07

    Acorus calamus Linn. (Araceae) is a traditional herbal plant used for centuries to treat various allergic symptoms including asthma and bronchitis. The present study was focused to provide a pharmacological basis for the traditional use of Acorus calamus in allergic symptoms using the mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions in in vitro and in vivo models. Cell viabilities were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) induced β-hexosaminidase and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in IgE-sensitized rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells were measured by enzymatic assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction mouse model was implemented for in vivo studies. Hot water (HW), butylene glycol (BG), hexane (HE) and steam distilled (SD) extracts of Acorus calamus showed different cytoxicity levels evaluated in RBL-2H3 cells. Sub-toxic doses of HW extract suppressed the β-hexosaminidase secretion and IL-4 production significantly and dose dependently in DNP-HSA induced IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells compared to other extracts of Acorus calamus. Further, in vivo studies also revealed that the HW extract significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mouse compared to the normal control group. HW extract of Acorus calamus most effectively inhibited degranulation and IL-4 secretion in DNP-HSA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and also reduced the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction in mouse, providing a therapeutic evidence for its traditional use in ameliorating allergic reactions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood.

    PubMed

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Kirshenbaum, Arnold; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2010-08-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling events regulating these responses. Proof of principle studies has also demonstrated utility of these systems for the identification of potential inhibitors of mast cell activation and growth. In this unit, techniques for the development and culture of human mast cells from their progenitors and the culture of human mast cell lines are described. The relative merits and drawbacks of each model are also described.

  2. Molecular basis of mast cell disease.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Brenet, Fabienne; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is an incurable and sometimes fatal haematological disorder grossly described as the accumulation of abnormal mast cells in the bone marrow and other organs causing tissue and organ damage. The clinical manifestations of this disease are extremely variable; disease phenotypes range from indolent to aggressive, and often present with associated non-mast cell haematological disorders (AHNMD), mainly myeloproliferative neoplasm and myelodysplastic syndromes. Recent efforts to genetically dissect the mechanisms that define aggressive and non-aggressive mastocytosis have generated a list of recurrent somatic mutations in mastocytosis patients that are associated with and may predict the evolution towards aggressive disease phenotypes. Here we review these mutations and discuss the molecular mechanisms associated with these mutations in an effort to better understand the biology of this disease and to predict its onset and evolution, with the ultimate goal of devising new and improved treatment strategies.

  3. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  4. Anaphylaxis: mechanisms of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe systemic allergic response that is rapid in onset and potentially lethal, and that typically is induced by an otherwise innocuous substance. In IgE-dependent and other examples of anaphylaxis, tissue mast cells and circulating basophilic granulocytes (basophils) are thought to represent major (if not the major) sources of the biologically active mediators that contribute to the pathology and, in unfortunate individuals, fatal outcome, of anaphylaxis. In this chapter, we will describe the mechanisms of mast cell (and basophil) activation in anaphylaxis, with a focus on IgE-dependent activation, which is thought to be responsible for most examples of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in humans. We will also discuss the use of mouse models to investigate the mechanisms that can contribute to anaphylaxis in that species in vivo, and the relevance of such mouse studies to human anaphylaxis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. EBW simulation for MAST and NSTX experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Pavlo, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Vahala, G.

    2005-09-26

    The interpretation of EBW emission from spherical tokamaks is nontrivial. We report on a 3D simulation model of this process that incorporates Gaussian beams for the antenna, a full wave solution of EBW-X and EBW-X-O conversions using adaptive finite elements, and EBW ray tracing to determine the radiative temperature. This model is then used to interpret the experimental results from MAST and NSTX. EBW for ELM free H-modes in MAST suggests that the magnetic equilibrium determined by the EFIT code does not adequately represent the B-field within the transport barrier. Using the EBW signal for the reconstruction of the radial profile of the magnetic field, we determine a new equilibrium and see that the EBW simulation now yields better agreement with experimental results. EBW simulations yield excellent results for the time development of the plasma temperature as measured by the EBW radiometer on NSTX.

  6. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  7. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions.

  8. Spectrum of mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Petra, Anastasia I; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Conti, Pio; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2014-06-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation disorders present with multiple symptoms including flushing, pruritus, hypotension, gastrointestinal complaints, irritability, headaches, concentration/memory loss and neuropsychiatric issues. These disorders are classified as: cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis with a c-kit mutation and clonal MC activation disorder, allergies, urticarias and inflammatory disorders and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), idiopathic urticaria and angioedema. MCs are activated by IgE, but also by cytokines, environmental, food, infectious, drug and stress triggers, leading to secretion of multiple mediators. The symptom profile and comorbidities associated with these disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are confusing. We propose the use of the term 'spectrum' and highlight the main symptoms, useful diagnostic tests and treatment approaches.

  9. Twenty-first century mast cell stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, D F; Walsh, J J

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell stabilizing drugs inhibit the release of allergic mediators from mast cells and are used clinically to prevent allergic reactions to common allergens. Despite the relative success of the most commonly prescribed mast cell stabilizer, disodium cromoglycate, in use for the preventative treatment of bronchial asthma, allergic conjunctivitis and vernal keratoconjunctivitis, there still remains an urgent need to design new substances that are less expensive and require less frequent dosing schedules. In this regard, recent developments towards the discovery of the next generation of mast cell stabilizing drugs has included studies on substances isolated from natural sources, biological, newly synthesized compounds and drugs licensed for other indications. The diversity of natural products evaluated range from simple phenols, alkaloids, terpenes to simple amino acids. While in some cases their precise mode of action remains unknown it has nevertheless sparked interest in the development of synthetic derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Within the purely synthetic class of inhibitors, particular attention has been devoted to the inhibition of important signalling molecules including spleen TK and JAK3. The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs as well as nilotinib, a TK inhibitor, are just some examples of clinically used drugs that have been evaluated for their anti-allergic properties. Here, we examine each approach under investigation, summarize the test data generated and offer suggestions for further preclinical evaluation before their therapeutic potential can be realized. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23441583

  10. iMAST Quarterly, 2007 Number 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    pitting surface damage due to corrosion and fatigue. Removal of the surface damage on these gears, however, using the ISF process, has shown that the...the flight control bridge where both corrosion and Figure . Micrograph of Copper powder deposited on Al- 6061 . The mixing of the materials at...the interface is clearly visible.[7] Figure 3. SH-60 Helicopter Transmission Gearbox Figure 4. Corrosion on Gearbox Al- 6061 Cu iMAST Quarterly 007 No

  11. Characterization of mast cell secretory granules and their cell biology.

    PubMed

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2014-10-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition.

  12. Controversial role of mast cells in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Varricchi, Gilda; Galdiero, Maria R; Marone, Giancarlo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Borriello, Francesco; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations during tumor initiation and progression. The stromal microenvironment can promote tumor development. Mast cells, widely distributed throughout all tissues, are a stromal component of many solid and haematologic tumors. Mast cells can be found in human and mouse models of skin cancers such as melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas, primary cutaneous lymphomas, haemangiomas and Merkel cell carcinoma. However, human and animal studies addressing potential functions of mast cells and their mediators in skin cancers have provided conflicting results. In several studies, mast cells play a pro-tumorigenic role, whereas in others, they play an anti-tumorigenic role. Other studies have failed to demonstrate a clear role for tumor-associated mast cells. Many unanswered questions need to be addressed before we understand whether tumor-associated mast cells are adversaries, allies or simply innocent bystanders in different types and subtypes of skin cancers.

  13. Formation of a Mast Cell Synapse: FcεRI Membrane Dynamics upon Binding Mobile or Immobilized Ligands on Surfaces1

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Spendier, Kathrin; Pfeiffer, Janet; Griffiths, Gary; Li, Haitao; Lidke, Keith A.; Oliver, Janet M.; Lidke, Diane S.; Thomas, James L.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    High affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI) on mast cells form a “synapse” when presented with mobile, bilayer incorporated antigen. Here, we show that receptor reorganization within the contacting mast cell membrane is markedly different upon binding of mobile and immobilized ligands. Rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3) primed with fluorescent anti-DNP IgE were engaged by surfaces presenting either bilayer-incorporated, monovalent DNP-lipid (mobile ligand) or chemically crosslinked, multivalent DNP (immobilized ligand). Total internal reflection fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy methods were used to visualize receptor reorganization at the contact site. The spatial relationships of FcεRI to other cellular components at the synapse, such as actin, cholesterol and LAT, were also analyzed. Stimulation of mast cells with immobilized polyvalent ligand resulted in typical levels of degranulation. Remarkably, degranulation also followed interaction of mast cells with bilayers presenting mobile, monovalent ligand. Receptors engaged with mobile ligand coalesce into large, cholesterol-rich clusters that occupy the central portion of the contacting membrane. These data indicate that FcεRI crosslinking is not an obligatory step in triggering mast cell signaling and suggest that dense populations of mobile receptors are capable of initiating low level degranulation upon ligand recognition. PMID:20042583

  14. Mast cells and histamine are triggering the NF-κB-mediated reactions of adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues to acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Dusio, Giuseppina F.; Gasheva, Olga Yu.; Skoog, Hunter; Tobin, Richard; Peddaboina, Chander; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Zawieja, David C.; Newell-Rogers, M. Karen; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish mechanistic links between the aging-associated changes in the functional status of mast cells and the altered responses of mesenteric tissue and mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) to acute inflammation. We used an in vivo model of acute peritoneal inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide treatment of adult (9-month) and aged (24-month) F-344 rats. We analyzed contractility of isolated MLVs, mast cell activation, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) without and with stabilization of mast cells by cromolyn or blockade of all types of histamine receptors and production of 27 major pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues and blood. We found that the reactivity of aged contracting lymphatic vessels to LPS-induced acute inflammation was abolished and that activated mast cells trigger NF-κB signaling in the mesentery through release of histamine. The aging-associated basal activation of mesenteric mast cells limits acute inflammatory NF-κB activation in aged mesentery. We conclude that proper functioning of the mast cell/histamine/NF-κB axis is necessary for reactions of the lymphatic vessels to acute inflammatory stimuli as well as for interaction and trafficking of immune cells near and within the collecting lymphatics. PMID:27875806

  15. Sclerosing mediastinitis and mast cell activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-03-15

    Sclerosing mediastinitis (ScM) is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder, idiopathic in roughly half the cases. Systemic symptoms not attributable to sclerosis often appear in idiopathic ScM. Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a potential cause of these symptoms and also can cause sclerosis. ScM has not previously been associated with MCAD. Presented here are the first two cases of ScM associated with MCAD, specifically mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). CASE 1: A 58-year-old chronically polymorbid woman developed ScM following matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Eight years later MCAS, likely underlying most of her chronic issues, was identified. CASE 2: A 30-year-old chronically polymorbid woman presented with superior vena cava syndrome and was diagnosed with ScM. On further evaluation, MCAS was identified. Treatment promptly effected symptomatic improvement; sclerosis has been stable. Non-compliance yielded symptomatic relapse; restored compliance re-achieved symptomatic remission. Different MCAS presentations reflect elaboration of different mediators, some of which can induce inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MCAS may have directly and/or indirectly driven ScM in these patients. MCAS should be considered in ScM presenting with comorbidities better explained by mast cell mediator release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2017-03-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized nonneoplastic mast cell disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation and allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, physical examination and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective patients with MCAS. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal mast cell disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset and diagnosis were 9 and 49 years, respectively (range: 0-88 and 16-92, respectively) and median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range: 1-85). Median numbers of comorbidities, symptoms, and family medical issues were 11, 20, and 4, respectively (range: 1-66, 2-84, and 0-33, respectively). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom and examination finding. Abnormalities in routine laboratories were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D2, histamine and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Our study highlights MCAS׳s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of human mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Furitsu, T; Saito, H; Dvorak, A M; Schwartz, L B; Irani, A M; Burdick, J F; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1989-01-01

    Nucleated cells of human umbilical cord blood were cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. After 7-8 weeks in culture, when the number of the other hematopoietic cells declined, metachromatic granule-containing mononuclear cells appeared in the cultures, and the number of the cells increased up to 12 weeks. After 11-14 weeks in culture, the metachromatic mononuclear cells comprised a substantial portion of the cultured cells. These cells contained 1.8-2 micrograms of histamine per 10(6) cells and bore receptors for IgE. All of the cells contained tryptase in their granules. Electron microscopic analysis showed that these cells were mature human mast cells, clearly different from the basophilic granulocytes or eosinophils that arise in a variety of circumstances in cord blood cell cultures. Most of the cultured mast cells expressed some granules with regular crystalline arrays and contained both tryptase and chymase, and thus resembled human skin mast cells. Images PMID:2532357

  18. Macroscopic stability of high β MAST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M.-D.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Meyer, H. F.; Michael, C. A.; Pinches, S. D.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; MAST Team

    2011-07-01

    The high-beta capability of the spherical tokamak, coupled with a suite of world-leading diagnostics on MAST, has facilitated significant improvements in the understanding of performance-limiting core instabilities in high performance plasmas. For instance, the newly installed motional Stark effect diagnostic, with radial resolution <25 mm, has enabled detailed study of saturated long-lived modes in hybrid scenarios. Similarly, the upgraded Thomson scattering system, with radial resolution <10 mm and the possibility of temporal resolution of 1 µs, has allowed detailed analysis of the density and temperature profiles during transient activity in the plasma, such as at a sawtooth crash. High resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy provided measurement of rotation braking induced by both applied magnetic fields and by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, allowing tests of neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory predictions. Finally, MAST is also equipped with internal and external coils that allow non-axisymmetric fields to be applied for active MHD spectroscopy of instabilities near the no-wall beta limit. MAST has been able to operate above the pressure at which the resonant field amplification is observed to strongly increase. In order to access such high pressures, the resistive wall mode must be damped, and so numerical modelling has focused on assessing the kinetic damping of the mode and its nonlinear interaction with other instabilities. The enhanced understanding of the physical mechanisms driving deleterious MHD activity given by these leading-edge capabilities has provided guidance to optimize operating scenarios for improved plasma performance.

  19. [Lipid networks in mast cell biology].

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-resident mast cells are derived from circulating committed progenitors, which are originated from pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. These progenitors migrate into extravascular tissues, where they undergo differentiation and maturation into tissue-specific mature phenotypes. When activated by IgE/antigen, stem cell factor, neuropeptides, or other stimuli, mature mast cells release three classes of biologically active products, including pre-formed mediators stored in secretory granules, newly transcribed cytokines and chemokines, and de novo synthesized lipid mediators. Therefore, these cells have been implicated as major effector cells in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. In recent years, it has become clear that lipid mediators including arachidonic acid metabolites (prostaglandins and leukotrienes) and lysophospholipid-derived products play crucial roles in mast cell-associated pathology. In this article, we will provide an overview of the roles of various lipid mediators in allergic diseases fueled by studies of their biosynthetic enzymes or receptors. In the latter part, we will make a particular focus on phospholipase A(2) enzymes, which are placed at the bottleneck (rate-limiting) step of the lipid mediator-biosynthetic pathways.

  20. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release.

  1. Composite biomarker panel for prediction of severity and diagnosis of acute GVHD with T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplants-single centre pilot study.

    PubMed

    Min, San San; Mehra, Varun; Clay, Jennifer; Cross, Gemma F; Douiri, Abdel; Dew, Tracy; Basu, Tanya N; Potter, Victoria; Ceesay, M Mansour; Pagliuca, Antonio; Sherwood, Roy A; Vincent, Royce P

    2017-10-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of a composite biomarker panel to help identify individuals at risk of developing aGVHD, and to help predict and differentiate between severity of aGVHD following T-cell-depleted allogeneic HSCT. We retrospectively analysed our cohort of biopsy confirmed patients with aGVHD, who underwent T-cell-depleted HSCT and matched them with negative controls without any evidence of aGVHD. Post-transplant serum samples on days 0 and 7 and at onset of aGVHD were analysed for elafin, regenerating islet-derived 3-α, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor-1, soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α and hepatocyte growth factor. Biomarker data were combined as composite panels A-F (table 2) using logistic regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to study sensitivity and specificity of the composite panels. Our composite biomarker panels significantly differentiated between aGVHD and no GVHD patients at time of onset (panel E) and reliably predicted severity of GVHD grades at days 0 and 7 post-transplant (panels B and D). The area under the curve for the composite panel at time of onset was 0.65 with specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values of 100%, 55.6%, 100% and 78.9%, respectively (p=0.03). This pilot data support the usefulness of these composite biomarker panels in the prediction of severity and diagnosis of aGVHD in patients undergoing T-cell-depleted reduced intensity allogeneic HSCT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. B-cell depletion inhibits arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, but does not adversely affect humoral responses in a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model.

    PubMed

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyri; Hancock, Gerald E; Kunz, Arthur; Hegen, Martin; Zhou, Xiaochuan X; Sheppard, Barbara J; Lamothe, Jennifer; Li, Evelyn; Ma, Hak-Ling; Hamann, Philip R; Damle, Nitin K; Collins, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We report the development of a mouse B cell-depleting immunoconjugate (anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody [mAb] conjugated to calicheamicin) and its in vivo use to characterize the kinetics of CD22+ B-cell depletion and reconstitution in murine primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. The effect of B-cell depletion was further studied in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model. Our results show that (1) the immunoconjugate has B-cell-specific in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity; (2) B-cell reconstitution starts in the bone marrow and spleen around day 30 after depletion and is completed in all tissues tested by day 50; (3) B-cell depletion inhibits the development of clinical and histologic arthritis in the CIA model; (4) depletion of type II collagen antibody levels is not necessary for clinical and histologic prevention of CIA; and (5) B-cell depletion does not adversely affect memory antibody responses after challenge nor clearance of infectious virus from lungs in the RSV vaccination model. These results demonstrate for the first time that only B-cell reduction but not type II collagen antibody levels correlate with the prevention of arthritis and represent key insights into the role of CD22-targeted B-cell depletion in mouse autoimmunity and vaccination models.

  3. Kupffer cell depletion by CI2MDP-liposomes alters hepatic cytokine expression and delays liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Meijer, C; Wiezer, M J; Diehl, A M; Schouten, H J; Schouten, H J; Meijer, S; van Rooijen, N; van Lambalgen, A A; Dijkstra, C D; van Leeuwen, P A

    2000-02-01

    Although Kupffer cells (KCs) are capable of producing important growth-stimulating cytokines, their role in liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy (PH) remains poorly understood. In the present study liver regeneration was studied after KC-depletion by intravenous administration of liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene-diphosphonate (C12MDP), a method known to physically eliminate KCs. Furthermore, splenectomy was performed one week prior to PH to exclude the effect of C12MDP-liposomes on macrophage populations in the spleen. KC-depletion was confirmed in cryostat liver sections stained with the monoclonal antibody ED2, a marker for resident tissue macrophages. Forty-eight hours after PH, the cumulative hepatocyte DNA synthesis, as determined in liver sections by the hepatocyte bromodeoxyuridine labeling index, was significantly decreased in KC-depleted rats when compared to control-rats. The weight of the remnant liver, expressed as a percentage of the initial liver weight, was significantly less at 96 h after PH in KC-depleted rats. KC-depletion abolished the hepatic interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA synthesis and decreased hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor-beta1(TGF-beta1) mRNA after PH, as was assessed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Moreover, at 4 h after PH the systemic release of IL-6 was significantly decreased in KC-depleted rats. We conclude that KCs are important for hepatocyte regeneration after PH. Delayed liver regeneration in KC-depleted rats can be explained, at least in part, by an imbalanced hepatic cytokine expression, thereby suppressing important growth-stimulating cytokines.

  4. Regeneration of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain repertoire after transient B-cell depletion with an anti-CD20 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rouzière, Anne-Sophie; Kneitz, Christian; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Dörner, Thomas; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    B-cell depletive therapies have beneficial effects in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear. In particular, it is not known how the regeneration of the B-cell repertoire takes place. Two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with rituximab, and the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes (Ig-VH) were analysed to follow the B-cell regeneration. Patient A was treated with two courses of rituximab, and B-cell regeneration was followed over 27 months by analysing more than 680 Ig-VH sequences. Peripheral B-cell depletion lasted 7 months and 10 months, respectively, and each time was accompanied by a clinical improvement. Patient B received one treatment course. B-cell depletion lasted 5 months and was accompanied by a good clinical response. B cells regenerated well in both patients, and the repopulated B-cell repertoire was characterised by a polyclonal and diverse use of Ig-VH genes, as expected in adult individuals. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration we observed the expansion and recirculation of a highly mutated B-cell population. These cells expressed very different Ig-VH genes. They were class-switched and could be detected for a short period only. Patient A was followed long term, whereby some characteristic changes in the VH2 family as well as in specific mini-genes like VH3–23, VH 4–34 or VH 1–69 were observed. In addition, rituximab therapy resulted in the loss of clonal B cells for the whole period. Our data show that therapeutic transient B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies results in the regeneration of a diverse and polyclonal heavy-chain repertoire. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration, highly mutated B cells recirculate for a short time period in both the patients analysed. The longitudinal observation of a single patient up to 27 months shows subtle intraindividual changes, which may indicate repertoire

  5. Mast Cells Can Enhance Resistance to Snake and Honeybee Venoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Martin; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lammel, Verena; Åbrink, Magnus; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-07-01

    Snake or honeybee envenomation can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, and it has been proposed that the activation of mast cells by snake or insect venoms can contribute to these effects. We show, in contrast, that mast cells can significantly reduce snake-venom-induced pathology in mice, at least in part by releasing carboxypeptidase A and possibly other proteases, which can degrade venom components. Mast cells also significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality induced by honeybee venom. These findings identify a new biological function for mast cells in enhancing resistance to the morbidity and mortality induced by animal venoms.

  6. Olopatadine: a drug for allergic conjunctivitis targeting the mast cell.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Andrea; Quintieri, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    Ocular allergic diseases are characterized by specific activation of conjunctival mast cells with subsequent release of preformed and newly formed mediators. Mast cells are thus the first therapeutic target of ocular anti-allergic treatments. In this review, a Medline literature search was conducted on conjunctival mast cells, their role in ocular allergy and mast cell stabilization by ocular anti-allergic compounds. Olopatadine hydrochloride, a mast cell stabilizer and histamine receptor antagonist, has been shown to inhibit mast cell activation in an in vitro model of human mast cell culture, reducing histamine and TNF-alpha release and upregulating proinflammatory mediators in conjunctival epithelial cells. In the in vivo conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) model in allergic subjects, combined with objective evaluations of tear mediators and cytology, olopatadine reduced histamine tear levels and all aspects of allergic inflammation, confirming the positive clinical effects observed in active allergic patients. Mast cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of ocular allergy. The CAC model is ideal for assessing the mast cell stabilizing effects of anti-allergic compounds. This review of clinical studies demonstrates the superiority of olopatadine compared with other topical allergic drugs.

  7. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  8. Potential role of mast cells in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Heber, Elisa M; Trivillin, Verónica A; Tomasi, Víctor H; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, María E

    2008-11-01

    During the process of activation, mast cells release products stored in their granules. Tryptase, a protease released from mast cell granules after activation, induces tumor cell proliferation through the activation of PAR-2 (protease activated receptor 2) on the plasma membrane of carcinoma cells. Chemical cancerization (DMBA) of the hamster cheek pouch is the most accepted model of oral cancer. However, there are no reports on the activation of mast cells during experimental carcinogenesis or on the correlation between mast cell activation and cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential effect of mast cells on the proliferation of epithelial cells at different times during the cancerization process. Paraffin serial sections of cancerized, tumor-bearing pouches were stained with Alcian Blue-Safranin to identify the different degrees of mast cell activation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify BrdU-positive cells to study tumor cell proliferation. Mast cells were counted and grouped into two categories: inactive mast cells AB-S+++ (red) and active mast cells AB+++S- (blue). Mast cell counts were performed in tumor stroma, base of the tumor (connective tissue immediately below the exophytic tumor), connective and muscle tissue underlying the cancerized epithelium (pouch wall) and adventitious tissue underlying the pouch wall. There was a significant increase in the number of mast cells at the base of tumors (p<0.001) compared to the number of mast cells in the wall of the pouch and in tumor stroma. In normal non-cancerized pouches, inactive mast cells were prevalent both in the wall (AB:S=1:2.15; p<0.001) and in the adventitious tissue (AB:S=1:1.6; p<0.004) of the hamster cheek pouch. At most of the experimental times examined, the ratio of active/inactive mast cells (AB/S) in the wall approximated unity and even reverted. The ratio of mast cells was AB:S 1:1.05 at the base of the tumor and 1:0.24 in tumor stroma (p<0

  9. Mast cells in human and experimental cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Bot, Ilze; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, like many other types of inflammatory cell, perform pleiotropic roles in cardiometabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, as well as complications associated with these diseases. Low numbers of mast cells are present in the heart, aorta, and adipose tissue of healthy humans, but patients with cardiometabolic diseases and animals with experimentally-induced cardiometabolic pathologies have high numbers of mast cells with increased activity in the affected tissues. Mediators released by the activated mast cells, such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, heparin, histamine, and proteases, not only function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases, but might also directly contribute to the pathogenesis of such diseases. Mast-cell mediators impede the functions of vascular cells, the integrity of the extracellular matrix, and the activity of other inflammatory cells, thereby contributing to the pathobiology of the conditions at multiple levels. In mouse models, mast-cell activation aggravates the progression of various cardiometabolic pathologies, whereas a genetic deficiency or pharmacological stabilization of mast cells, or depletion or inhibition of specific mast-cell mediators, tends to delay the progression of such conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of mast-cell activation or their targeted effector functions offers potential novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiometabolic disorders.

  10. Overview of physics results from MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, H.; Maingi, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Several improvements to the MAST plant and diagnostics have facilitated new studies advancing the physics basis for ITER and DEMO, as well as for future spherical tokamaks (STs). Using the increased heating capabilities P-NBI <= 3.8 MW H-mode at I-P = 1.2 MA was accessed showing that the energy confinement on MAST scales more weakly with I-P and more strongly with B-t than in the ITER IPB98(y, 2) scaling. Measurements of the fuel retention of shallow pellets extrapolate to an ITER particle throughput of 70% of its original designed total throughput capacity. The anomalous momentum diffusion, chi(phi), is linked to the ion diffusion, chi(i), with a Prandtl number close to P-phi approximate to chi(phi)/chi(i) approximate to 1, although chi(i) approaches neoclassical values. New high spatial resolution measurements of the edge radial electric field, E-r, show that the position of steepest gradients in electron pressure and E-r (i.e. shearing rate) are coincident, but their magnitudes are not linked. The T-e pedestal width on MAST scales with root beta(ped)(pol) rather than rho(pol). The edge localized mode (ELM) frequency for type-IV ELMs, new in MAST, was almost doubled using n = 2 resonant magnetic perturbations from a set of four external coils (n = 1, 2). A new internal 12 coil set (n <= 3) has been commissioned. The filaments in the inter-ELM and L-mode phase are different from ELM filaments, and the characteristics in L-mode agree well with turbulence calculations. A variety of fast particle driven instabilities were studied from 10 kHz saturated fishbone like activity up to 3.8 MHz compressional Alfven eigenmodes. Fast particle instabilities also affect the off-axis NBI current drive, leading to fast ion diffusion of the order of 0.5 m(2) s(-1) and a reduction in the driven current fraction from 40% to 30%. EBW current drive start-up is demonstrated for the first time in a ST generating plasma currents up to 55 kA. Many of these studies contributed to the

  11. Oncogenic Kit signals on endolysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum are essential for neoplastic mast cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Yuuki; Toyoshima, Shota; Wakamatsu, Ei; Suzuki, Shunichi; Ogawa, Shuhei; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Kit is a receptor-type tyrosine kinase found on the plasma membrane. It can transform mast cells through activating mutations. Here, we show that a mutant Kit from neoplastic mast cells from mice, Kit(D814Y), is permanently active and allows cells to proliferate autonomously. It does so by activating two signalling pathways from different intracellular compartments. Mutant Kit from the cell surface accumulates on endolysosomes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which requires Kit’s kinase activity. Kit(D814Y) is constitutively associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but the complex activates Akt only on the cytoplasmic surface of endolysosomes. It resists destruction because it is under-ubiquitinated. Kit(D814Y) also appears in the endoplasmic reticulum soon after biosynthesis, and there, can activate STAT5 aberrantly. These mechanisms of oncogenic signalling are also seen in rat and human mast cell leukemia cells. Thus, oncogenic Kit signalling occurs from different intracellular compartments, and the mutation acts by altering Kit trafficking as well as activation. PMID:25493654

  12. Feasibility of low dose interleukin-2 therapy following T cell-depleted non-myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA matched or mismatched family member donors

    PubMed Central

    Rizzieri, David A.; Crout, Christopher; Storms, Robert; Golob, Jared; Long, Gwynn D.; Gasparetto, Cristina; Sullivan, Keith M.; Horwitz, Mitchell; Chute, John; Lagoo, Anand S.; Morris, Ashley; Beaven, Anne; Yang, Yiping; Peterson, Bercedis; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.

    2013-01-01

    High relapse rates and infections remain primary causes of failure in non-myeloablative transplantation. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) may stimulate the immune system and improve outcomes. The primary objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of administering IL-2 following a T cell-depleted nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Methods Patients received T cell depleted nonmyeloablative transplant from a matched or mismatched related donor. Those with allogeneic engraftment, < grade 2 acute GVHD at time of study entry, and no severe end organ damage were eligible and received IL2 starting 6 weeks after the first day of stem cell infusion. Patients received 1 mu/m2 daily for 5 days each week for 4 weeks followed by a 2 week rest period for a 6 week cycle to continue for up to 1 year. Results Eight patients aged 28–69 were treated. Significant toxicities were limited to GVHD of the skin ≤ grade 2 in 3 patients and severe fatigue in 4 patients, limiting the duration of therapy. Two of the 8 patients died of relapsed disease and one from CMV. With a median overall duration of follow up of survivors of 48 months, five patients (63%) remain alive and in continuous complete remission. PMID:21166499

  13. No effect of HLA-C mismatch after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated donors and T-cell depletion in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Isabelle; Uhlin, Michael; Schaffer, Marie; Sundin, Mikael; Hauzenberger, Dan; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas

    2017-08-01

    HLA-C mismatch in unrelated donor's hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been associated with poor patient outcome. However, the impact of HLA-C mismatch in the context of HSCT combined with in vivo T-cell depletion remains unclear. We therefore performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of the clinical outcome on patients with hematological malignancies treated with allo-HSCT, who underwent T-cell depletion. The majority of the patients (n=276) received a HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1-matched graft that were either also HLA-C matched (n=260), or patients with the permissive HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatch (n=16), while the remaining patients (n=95) received a HLA-C-mismatched graft (excluding HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatches). We did not observe any significant differences between the HLA-C-matched patients (including the permissive HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatch) and the HLA-C-mismatched patients regarding cumulative proportion surviving, graft failure, relapse-free survival, relapse, or acute graft-versus-host disease. Our data suggest that in the context of high dose T lymphocyte-depleting agents, HLA-C matching is not essential for patients with hematological malignancies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Release of Elastase from Purified Human Lung Mast Cells and Basophils. Identification as a Hageman Factor Cleaving Enzyme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    heterogeneity and hyper- plasia in bleomycin -induced pulmonary fibrosis of rats. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 130:.797-902. 40. AGius, R. M., R. C. GoDFREY, and S. T...been shown to be elevated in human pulmonary disorders. Although the HF cleaving assay has been used to demonstrate the presence of functional elastase...FUJLMER, and R. G. CRYSTAL. 1979. Ultrastructure of pulmonary mast cells in patients with fibrotic lung disorders. Lab, Invest. 40-.717-34. 38

  15. Disodium Cromoglycate Reverses Colonic Visceral Hypersensitivity and Influences Colonic Ion Transport in a Stress-Sensitive Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Siobhan Yvonne; O’Mahony, Siobhain Mary; Grenham, Susan; Cryan, John Francis; Hyland, Niall Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The interface between psychiatry and stress-related gastrointestinal disorders (GI), such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established, with anxiety and depression the most frequently occurring comorbid conditions. Moreover, stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, which display anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, exhibit GI disturbances akin to those observed in stress-related GI disorders. Additionally, there is mounting preclinical and clinical evidence implicating mast cells as significant contributors to the development of abdominal visceral pain in IBS. In this study we examined the effects of the rat connective tissue mast cell (CTMC) stabiliser, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on visceral hypersensitivity and colonic ion transport, and examined both colonic and peritoneal mast cells from stress-sensitive WKY rats. DSCG significantly decreased abdominal pain behaviors induced by colorectal distension in WKY animals independent of a reduction in colonic rat mast cell mediator release. We further demonstrated that mast cell-stimulated colonic ion transport was sensitive to inhibition by the mast cell stabiliser DSCG, an effect only observed in stress-sensitive rats. Moreover, CTMC-like mast cells were significantly increased in the colonic submucosa of WKY animals, and we observed a significant increase in the proportion of intermediate, or immature, peritoneal mast cells relative to control animals. Collectively our data further support a role for mast cells in the pathogenesis of stress-related GI disorders. PMID:24367692

  16. Disodium cromoglycate reverses colonic visceral hypersensitivity and influences colonic ion transport in a stress-sensitive rat strain.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Siobhan Yvonne; O'Mahony, Siobhain Mary; Grenham, Susan; Cryan, John Francis; Hyland, Niall Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The interface between psychiatry and stress-related gastrointestinal disorders (GI), such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established, with anxiety and depression the most frequently occurring comorbid conditions. Moreover, stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, which display anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, exhibit GI disturbances akin to those observed in stress-related GI disorders. Additionally, there is mounting preclinical and clinical evidence implicating mast cells as significant contributors to the development of abdominal visceral pain in IBS. In this study we examined the effects of the rat connective tissue mast cell (CTMC) stabiliser, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on visceral hypersensitivity and colonic ion transport, and examined both colonic and peritoneal mast cells from stress-sensitive WKY rats. DSCG significantly decreased abdominal pain behaviors induced by colorectal distension in WKY animals independent of a reduction in colonic rat mast cell mediator release. We further demonstrated that mast cell-stimulated colonic ion transport was sensitive to inhibition by the mast cell stabiliser DSCG, an effect only observed in stress-sensitive rats. Moreover, CTMC-like mast cells were significantly increased in the colonic submucosa of WKY animals, and we observed a significant increase in the proportion of intermediate, or immature, peritoneal mast cells relative to control animals. Collectively our data further support a role for mast cells in the pathogenesis of stress-related GI disorders.

  17. Anti-allergic effects of Lycopus lucidus on mast cell-mediated allergy model

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Kim, InKyeom; Lee, Maan-Gee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lim, Jong-Pil; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2005-12-15

    The current study characterizes the mechanism by which the aqueous extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. (Labiatae) (LAE) decreases mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. The immediate-type allergic reaction is involved in many allergic diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. LAE has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, its specific mechanism of action is still unknown. LAE was anally administered to mice for high and fast absorption. LAE inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. LAE decreased the local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. LAE dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Furthermore, LAE decreased the secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of LAE on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. LAE attenuated PMA plus A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and specifically blocked activation of p38 MAPK, but not that of c-jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Our findings provide evidence that LAE inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38 MAPK, and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  18. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-10-06

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems.

  19. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10. D2----B10)

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it.

  20. Influence of 670 nm low-level laser therapy on mast cells and vascular response of cutaneous injuries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Manoela Carrera M C; de Pinho, Cristina Bacellar; Medrado, Alena Ribeiro Peixoto; Andrade, Zilton de Araújo; Reis, Sílvia Regina de Almeida

    2010-03-08

    Laser biomodulation has been getting considerable attention when it comes to its effects on the inflammatory process. Its action upon mast cells have been already studied, but none of the previous papers related the resulting effect to the inflammatory and vascular status of the wounds. Therefore, the acute inflammatory process as well as the mast cells behavior and the vascular response were analyzed under the influence of laser treatment on cutaneous wounds. Surgical procedures were performed on 60 rats divided into sham and laser groups. Low-level laser therapy was performed following surgical procedures (670 nm, 9 mW, 4 J/cm(2), 124 s). Histological specimens were analyzed for cell morphology and immunohistochemistry using anti-von Willebrand Factor and anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor antibody. Laser treatment resulted in an increased acute inflammatory response in irradiated tissues; surgical wounds treated with laser therapy had increased polymorphonuclear cells, mast cells and vasodilation and lower numbers of vessels than those in control rats. Laser treatment resulted in higher expression of VEGF in irradiated tissues 6-24h post-treatment (p=0.002). It is possible to observe an amplification of acute inflammatory process during the first hours after surgical procedure in rats submitted to laser therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mast Cells Contribute to Scar Formation During Fetal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Brian C.; Parent, Allison E.; Meleski, Melissa A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Schrementi, Megan E.; Wilgus, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    Scar formation is a potentially detrimental process of tissue restoration in adults, affecting organ form and function. During fetal development, cutaneous wounds heal without inflammation or scarring at early stages of development, but begin to heal with significant inflammation and scarring as the skin becomes more mature. One possible cell type that could regulate the change from scarless to fibrotic healing is the mast cell. We show here that dermal mast cells in scarless wounds generated at embryonic day 15 (E15) are fewer in number, less mature and do not degranulate in response to wounding as effectively as mast cells of fibrotic wounds made at embryonic day 18 (E18). Differences were also observed between cultured mast cells from E15 and E18 skin with regard to degranulation and preformed cytokine levels. Injection of mast cell lysates into E15 wounds disrupted scarless healing, suggesting that mast cells interfere with scarless repair. Finally, wounds produced at E18, which normally heal with a scar, healed with significantly smaller scars in mast cell-deficient KitW/W-v mice compared to Kit+/+ littermates. Together, these data suggest that mast cells enhance scar formation, and that these cells may mediate the transition from scarless to fibrotic healing during fetal development. PMID:21993557

  2. Effects of different silvicultural systems on initial soft mast production

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; David G. Peitz; Philip A. Tappe

    1999-01-01

    Recent policy changes by federal land management agencies such as the United States [Department of Agriculture] Forest Service have led to increased use of silvicultural systems other than clearcutting. Because soft mast is an integral part of wildlife habitat and the effects of these alternative silviculture systems on soft mast production are unknown, we evaluated...

  3. 123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ON LEFT; HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS IN CENTER OF ROOM, FACING WEST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. 125. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS ON LEFT SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS ON LEFT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases. PMID:28262689

  6. 33 CFR 401.82 - Reporting mast height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting mast height. 401.82... mast height. A vessel, any part of which extends more than 33.5 m above water level, shall not transit any part of the Seaway until precise information concerning the height of the vessel has been...

  7. The role of mast cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2012-01-01

    The histochemical characteristics of human basophils and tissue mast cells were described over a century ago by Paul Ehrlich. When mast cells are activated by an allergen that binds to serum IgE attached to their FcɛRI receptors, they release cytokines, eicosanoids and their secretory granules. Mast cells are now thought to exert critical proinflammatory functions, as well as potential immunoregulatory roles, in various immune disorders through the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, cytokines chemokines, and neutral proteases (chymase and tryptase). The aim of this review is to describe the role of mast cells in allergic inflammation. Mast cells interact directly with bacteria and appear to play a vital role in host defense against pathogens. Drugs, such as glucocorticoids, cyclosporine and cromolyn have been shown to have inhibitory effects on mast cell degranulation and mediator release. This review shows that mast cells play an active role in such diverse diseases as asthma, rhinitis, middle ear infection, and pulmonary fibrosis. In conclusion, mast cells may not only contribute to the chronic airway inflammatory response, remodeling and symptomatology, but they may also have a central role in the initiation of the allergic immune response, that is providing signals inducing IgE synthesis by B-lymphocytes and inducing Th2 lymphocyte differentiation.

  8. 127. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND GAUGES FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND GAUGES FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST ON UPPER RIGHT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases.

  10. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST). Overview and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST) is a geographical partnership of six of the nation's best two-year colleges located in the six states that have about one-third of the density of metals-related industries in the United States. The purpose of the MAST grant is to develop and implement a national training model to overcome…

  11. Space Shuttle Tail Service Mast Concept Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uda, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Design studies and analyses were performed to describe the loads and dynamics of the space shut