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Sample records for material characterization reinforced

  1. Chemical Processing and Characterization of Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposite Silica Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Steven Shannon

    Ultrasound techniques, acoustic and electroacoustic spectroscopy, are used to investigate and characterize concentrated fluid phase nanocomposites. In particular, the data obtained from ultrasound methods are used as tools to improve the understanding of the fundamental process chemistry of concentrated, multicomponent, nanomaterial dispersions. Silicon nitride nanofibers embedded in silica are particularly interesting for lightweight nanocomposites, because silicon nitride is isostructural to carbon nitride, a super hard material. However, the major challenge with processing these composites is retarding particle-particle aggregation, to maintain highly dispersed systems. Therefore, a systematic approach was developed to evaluate the affect of process parameters on particle-particle aggregation, and improving the chemical kinetics for gelation. From the acoustic analysis of the nanofibers, this thesis was able to deduce that changes in aspect ratio affects the ultrasound propagation. In particular, higher aspect ratio fibers attenuate the ultrasound wave greater than lower aspect fibers of the same material. Furthermore, our results confirm that changes in attenuation depend on the hydrodynamical interactions between particles, the aspect ratio, and the morphology of the dispersant. The results indicate that the attenuation is greater for fumed silica due to its elastic nature and its size, when compared to silica Ludox. Namely, the larger the size, the greater the attenuation. This attenuation is mostly the result of scattering loss in the higher frequency range. In addition, the silica nanofibers exhibit greater attenuation than their nanoparticle counterparts because of their aspect ratio influences their interaction with the ultrasound wave. In addition, this study observed how 3M NH 4 Cl's acoustic properties changes during the gelation process, and during that change, the frequency dependency deviates from the expected squared of the frequency, until the

  2. Study of erosion characterization of carbon fiber reinforced composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Uttam Kumar; Chowdhury, Mohammad Asaduzzaman; Kowser, Md. Arefin; Mia, Md. Shahin

    2017-06-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials are widely used at different engineering and industrial applications there are good physical, mechanical, chemical properties and light weight. Erosion behavior of materials depends on various factors such as impact angle, particle velocity, particle size, particle shape, particle type, particle flux, temperature of the tested materials. Among these factors impact angle and particle velocity have been recognized as two parameters that noticeably influence the erosion rates of all tested materials. Irregular shaped sand (SiO2) particles of various sizes (200-300 µm, 400-500 µm, and 500-600 µm) were selected erosive element. Tested conditions such as impingement angles between 15 degree to 90 degree, impact velocities between 30-50 m/sec, and stand-off distances 15-25 mm at surrounding room temperature were maintained. The highest level of erosion of the tested composite is obtained at 60° impact angle, which signifies the semi-ductile behavior of this material. Erosion showed increasing trend with impact velocity and decreasing nature in relation to stand-off distance. Surface damage was analyzed using SEM to examine the nature of the erosive wear mechanism.

  3. Comprehensive Property Characterization of Nanotube Buckypaper-Reinforced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    J.B.Nagy, "TEM and laser-Polarized 129Xe NMR characterization of oxidatively purified carbon nanotubes," J.Am. Chem. Soc., Vol.122, pp. 10 5 9 1-10597...interfacial bonding by simulating a single tube pullout. The functionalization of oxidization and molecular wraps of the SWNTs for enhancing dispersion and...154 viii 7. Functionalization of SWNTs for Enhancing Dispersion and Interfacial Bonding. 156 7.1. Oxidation of SW NTs

  4. Fibre-reinforced materials.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-11-01

    This paper considers the role of fibres in the reinforcement of composite materials, and the significance of the form the fibre takes and the material from which it is made. The current dental applications of fibre reinforcement, including dental cements and splints, fibres made into structures for use in composites, denture bases and the contemporary use of fibres in fixed partial dentures, are reviewed. Their role in biomedical implants is surveyed and their future forecast.

  5. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  6. Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Oh, Jin Oh; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Woo

    2011-11-01

    Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites was performed through a series of the tensile test, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) test, and the strand test. The modified tensile specimens and the DMA specimens were used to evaluate the tensile and thermal analysis properties of resin systems. The strand specimens were used to evaluate the tensile properties and load transfer efficiencies of the specimens. Four types of resin systems were considered. One was a conventional resin system currently used for filament wound structures and other three were high temperature resin systems. According to the tensile and DMA test results, the tensile modulus decreases slightly and the tensile strength decreases rapidly until the temperature reaches glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus and tensile strength are almost negligible above glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus obtained from the tensile test is consistent with that from the DMA test at different temperatures. From the strand test results, considering, the load transfer efficiency is found to be around 87 to 90 % of the tensile strength of T800H-12K carbon fibers for all resin systems except the specimen with the Type 2. Finally we found that the Type 4 is the best candidate for high temperature resin system applicable to filament wound structures in the view of the glass transition temperature as well as the tensile properties.

  7. Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Oh, Jin Oh; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-04-01

    Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites was performed through a series of the tensile test, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) test, and the strand test. The modified tensile specimens and the DMA specimens were used to evaluate the tensile and thermal analysis properties of resin systems. The strand specimens were used to evaluate the tensile properties and load transfer efficiencies of the specimens. Four types of resin systems were considered. One was a conventional resin system currently used for filament wound structures and other three were high temperature resin systems. According to the tensile and DMA test results, the tensile modulus decreases slightly and the tensile strength decreases rapidly until the temperature reaches glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus and tensile strength are almost negligible above glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus obtained from the tensile test is consistent with that from the DMA test at different temperatures. From the strand test results, considering, the load transfer efficiency is found to be around 87 to 90 % of the tensile strength of T800H-12K carbon fibers for all resin systems except the specimen with the Type 2. Finally we found that the Type 4 is the best candidate for high temperature resin system applicable to filament wound structures in the view of the glass transition temperature as well as the tensile properties.

  8. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  9. Theory of fiber reinforced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.

    1972-01-01

    A unified and rational treatment of the theory of fiber reinforced composite materials is presented. Fundamental geometric and elasticity considerations are throughly covered, and detailed derivations of the effective elastic moduli for these materials are presented. Biaxially reinforced materials which take the form of laminates are then discussed. Based on the fundamentals presented in the first portion of this volume, the theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials is extended to include viscoelastic and thermoelastic properties. Thermal and electrical conduction, electrostatics and magnetostatics behavior of these materials are discussed. Finally, a brief statement of the very difficult subject of physical strength is included.

  10. The development, fabrication, and material characterization of polypropylene composites reinforced with carbon nanofiber and hydroxyapatite nanorod hybrid fillers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Cheng Zhu; Wong, Hoi Man; Yeung, Kelvin Wai Kwok; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the design, fabrication, microstructural and property characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of polypropylene (PP) reinforced with carbon nanofiber (CNF) and hydroxyapatite nanorod (HANR) fillers. The purpose is to develop advanced PP/CNF–HANR hybrids with good mechanical behavior, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility for use as craniofacial implants in orthopedics. Several material-examination techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, and impact measurement are used to characterize the microstructural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the hybrids. Furthermore, osteoblastic cell cultivation and colorimetric assay are also employed for assessing their viability on the composites. The CNF and HANR filler hybridization yields an improvement in Young’s modulus, impact strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility of PP. The PP/2% CNF–20% HANR hybrid composite is found to exhibit the highest elastic modulus, tensile strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. PMID:24648729

  11. The development, fabrication, and material characterization of polypropylene composites reinforced with carbon nanofiber and hydroxyapatite nanorod hybrid fillers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng Zhu; Wong, Hoi Man; Yeung, Kelvin Wai Kwok; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the design, fabrication, microstructural and property characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of polypropylene (PP) reinforced with carbon nanofiber (CNF) and hydroxyapatite nanorod (HANR) fillers. The purpose is to develop advanced PP/CNF-HANR hybrids with good mechanical behavior, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility for use as craniofacial implants in orthopedics. Several material-examination techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, and impact measurement are used to characterize the microstructural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the hybrids. Furthermore, osteoblastic cell cultivation and colorimetric assay are also employed for assessing their viability on the composites. The CNF and HANR filler hybridization yields an improvement in Young's modulus, impact strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility of PP. The PP/2% CNF-20% HANR hybrid composite is found to exhibit the highest elastic modulus, tensile strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility.

  12. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  13. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  14. FIBER-REINFORCED METALLIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOSITE MATERIALS), (*FIBER METALLURGY, TITANIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , REINFORCING MATERIALS, TUNGSTEN, WIRE, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, POWDER METALLURGY.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals as a reinforcing material for electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) fibers: formation, properties and nanomechanical characterization

    Treesearch

    Hong Dong; Kenneth E. Strawhecker; James A. Snyder; Joshua A. Orlicki; Richard S. Reiner; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    Uniform fibers composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) reinforced with progressively increasing contents of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), up to 41 wt% CNCs, have been successfully produced by electrospinning. The morphological, thermal and nanomechanical properties of the composite sub-micron fibers were investigated. The CNCs derived from wood pulp by sulfuric...

  16. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. Materials characterization of silicon carbide reinforced titanium (Ti/SCS-6) metal matrix composites: Part I. Tensile and fatigue behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, P. K.; Diaz, E. S.; Chiang, K. T.; Loh, D. H.

    1995-12-01

    Flexural fatigue behavior was investigated on titanium (Ti-15V-3Cr) metal matrix composites reinforced with cross-ply, continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. The titanium composites had an eightply (0, 90, +45, -45 deg) symmetric layup. Fatigue life was found to be sensitive to fiber layup sequence. Increasing the test temperature from 24 °C to 427 °C decreased fatigue life. Interface debonding and matrix and fiber fracture were characteristic of tensile behavior regardless of test temperature. In the tensile fracture process, interface debonding between SiC and the graphite coating and between the graphite coating and the carbon core could occur. A greater amount of coating degradation at 427 °C than at 24 °C reduced the Ti/SiC interface bonding integrity, which resulted in lower tensile properties at 427 °C. During tensile testing, a crack could initiate from the debonded Ti/SiC interface and extend to the debonded interface of the neighboring fiber. The crack tended to propagate through the matrix and the interface. Dimpled fracture was the prime mode of matrix fracture. During fatigue testing, four stages of flexural deflection behavior were observed. The deflection at stage I increased slightly with fatigue cycling, while that at stage II increased significantly with cycling. Interestingly, the deflection at stage III increased negligibly with fatigue cycling. Stage IV was associated with final failure, and the deflection increased abruptly. Interface debonding, matrix cracking, and fiber bridging were identified as the prime modes of fatigue mechanisms. To a lesser extent, fiber fracture was observed during fatigue. However, fiber fracture was believed to occur near the final stage of fatigue failure. In fatigued specimens, facet-type fracture appearance was characteristic of matrix fracture morphology. Theoretical modeling of the fatigue behavior of Ti/SCS-6 composites is presented in Part II of this series of articles.

  18. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  19. Reinforcing masonry walls with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jai, John Chia-Han

    1999-10-01

    In this investigation, a procedure is developed for determining the effectiveness of composite materials in retrofitting masonry buildings to reduce seismic damage. The reinforcement considered is a thin layer of fiber-reinforced composite applied to the wall in a wallpaper-like fashion. Models were developed which predicts the behavior of masonry walls reinforced in such a fashion and subjected to static, in-plane normal and shear loads. Solid walls, as well as walls with openings (such as windows and doors), were considered. The models estimate the load-deflection characteristic of the wall, the load set at which the wall fails, and the deflection of the wall at the instant of failure. The models were verified by tests performed with walls constructed of clay bricks and mortar, and with walls made of wood bricks. In these tests, the load versus deflection, the failure load, and the failure deflection were measured. Reasonable agreements were found between the values calculated by the models and the data. Parametric studies were also performed. The results of these studies indicate that composite reinforcement applied in a wallpaper-like fashion may increase substantially the load carrying capacities of masonry walls.

  20. Method of preparing fiber reinforced ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Alternate layers of mats of specially coated SiC fibers and silicon monotapes are hot pressed in two stages to form a fiber reinforced ceramic material. In the first stage a die is heated to about 600 C in a vacuum furnace and maintained at this temperature for about one-half hour to remove fugitive binder. In the second stage the die temperature is raised to about 1000 C and the layers are pressed at between 35 and 138 MPa. The resulting preform is placed in a reactor tube where a nitriding gas is flowed past the preform at 1100 to 1400 C to nitride the same.

  1. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mirdamadi, M.; Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The complex damage mechanisms that occur in fiber reinforced advanced metallic materials are discussed. As examples, results for several layups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites are presented. Fatigue tests were conducted and analyzed for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test conditions included isothermal, non-isothermal, and simulated mission profile thermomechanical fatigue. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 degree fibers is the controlling factor for fatigue life for a given test condition. An effective strain approach is presented for predicting crack initiation at notches. Fiber bridging models were applied to crack growth behavior.

  2. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  3. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  4. Carbon nanofibre reinforcement of soft materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Dale W.; Zhao, Jian; Dowty, Heather; Alexander, Max; Orler, E. Bruce

    2009-08-26

    In elastomeric matrices carbon nanofibres are found to be twenty times more effective than carbon black as a reinforcing filler. In hard matrices, by contrast, reinforcement is minimal. Tensile and dynamic mechanical tests were performed to elucidate the mechanism of reinforcement in order to explain the superior performance in soft matrices. Small-angle neutron scattering and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering were used to quantify filler morphology, which turns out to be the key factor that limits reinforcement potential. The presence of fractal cluster formed by agglomeration of the nanofibres reduces the effective aspect ratio of the nanotubes. Clustering, however, introduces a new reinforcement mechanism based on elastic deformation of the fibre clusters. This mechanism is operative in soft matrices but not in hard matrices, thus explaining the enhanced performance in soft matrices.

  5. Peptide Nanotube Reinforced Polymers: A System for Tunable, Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    mechanical reinforcement of polymeric materials used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. Our results show that the high aspect ratio... polymers like poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA), a common polymer used in resorbable load bearing 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Peptide nanotube reinforced polymers : A system for tunable, composite materials The

  6. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  7. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  8. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    PubMed

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  9. Characterization of Nanophase Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2000-01-01

    Engineering of nanophase materials and devices is of vital interest in electronics, semiconductors and optics, catalysis, ceramics and magnetism. Research associated with nanoparticles has widely spread and diffused into every field of scientific research, forming a trend of nanocrystal engineered materials. The unique properties of nanophase materials are entirely determined by their atomic scale structures, particularly the structures of interfaces and surfaces. Development of nanotechnology involves several steps, of which characterization of nanoparticles is indespensable to understand the behavior and properties of nanoparticles, aiming at implementing nanotechnolgy, controlling their behavior and designing new nanomaterials systems with super performance. The book will focus on structural and property characterization of nanocrystals and their assemblies, with an emphasis on basic physical approach, detailed techniques, data interpretation and applications. Intended readers of this comprehensive reference work are advanced graduate students and researchers in the field, who are specialized in materials chemistry, materials physics and materials science.

  10. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  11. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  12. Tensile Characterization of FRP Rods for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelli, F.; Nanni, A.

    2003-07-01

    The application of FRP rods as an internal or external reinforcement in new or damaged concrete structures is based on the development of design equations that take into account the mechanical properties of FRP material systems.The measurement of mechanical characteristics of FRP requires a special anchoring and protocol, since it is well known that these characteristics depend on the direction and content of fibers. In this study, an effective tensile test method is described for the mechanical characterization of FRP rods. Twelve types of glass and carbon FRP specimens with different sizes and surface characteristics were tested to validate the procedure proposed. In all, 79 tensile tests were performed, and the results obtained are discussed in this paper. Recommendations are given for specimen preparation and test setup in order to facilitate the further investigation and standardization of the FRP rods used in civil engineering.

  13. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  14. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  15. Fracture behavior of laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum material

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, T.M. |; Lewandowski, J.J.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Hunt, W.H. Jr

    1994-05-01

    Laminated metallic composites are being developed for applications which require high specific stiffness and fracture resistance. Recent work with laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) materials has demonstrated the potential for marked improvements in stable crack growth resistance via extrinsic toughening. The purpose of this work is to compare the fracture mechanisms and fracture resistance of laminated DRA materials to unlaminated DRA materials. In particular, the production of extensive stable crack growth and the associated improvement in damage tolerance in DRA laminates is documented.

  16. Applied materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, W.; Williams, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: The Use of LEED for the Characterization of Surface Damage from Pulsed-Laser Irradiation; Refractory Metals Growth on MBE GaAs; Surface Composition of Carburized Tungsten Trioxide and its Catalytic Activity; Interface Study of Mo/GaAs; Auger Electron Analysis of Oxides Grown on a Dilute Zirconium/Nickel Alloy; and Materials Characterization with Intense Positron Beams.

  17. Characterization of dielectric materials

    DOEpatents

    King, Danny J.; Babinec, Susan; Hagans, Patrick L.; Maxey, Lonnie C.; Payzant, Edward A.; Daniel, Claus; Sabau, Adrian S.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Howe, Jane Y.; Wood, III, David L.; Nembhard, Nicole S.

    2017-06-27

    A system and a method for characterizing a dielectric material are provided. The system and method generally include applying an excitation signal to electrodes on opposing sides of the dielectric material to evaluate a property of the dielectric material. The method can further include measuring the capacitive impedance across the dielectric material, and determining a variation in the capacitive impedance with respect to either or both of a time domain and a frequency domain. The measured property can include pore size and surface imperfections. The method can still further include modifying a processing parameter as the dielectric material is formed in response to the detected variations in the capacitive impedance, which can correspond to a non-uniformity in the dielectric material.

  18. Translucency of glass-fibre-reinforced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Tanaka, H; Kawamura, Y; Wakabayashi, K

    2004-08-01

    summary The purpose of this study was to examine the translucency of glass-fibre-reinforced composite framework materials. Vectris and FibreKor, as well as an experimental material, were the glass-fibre-reinforced framework materials used. Targis, Sculpture and Estenia were the types of particulate filler composites veneered onto frameworks. Specimens were fabricated from each material, 0.5 and 1.0 mm thick. In addition, laminate specimens, 1.5 mm thick, were fabricated. The translucency of each specimen was evaluated by determining its contrast ratio. The laminate specimens were examined for colour differences. The experimental framework material was more translucent than the enamel composite when it was not coloured, and was nearly as translucent as the dentine composite when coloured. The commercial tooth-coloured framework materials were nearly as translucent as the dentine composite. It was found that it was possible to reproduce the same colour as the veneering dentine composite, when the framework thickness was 0.5 mm, except in the case of FibreKor. Within the limitations of this study, tooth-coloured, glass-fibre-reinforced framework materials are nearly as translucent as the veneering dentine composite, but these materials affect the colour of the prosthesis if the thickness of the framework material is increased beyond a certain point. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Flammability Characteristics of Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Thick Vertical Sheet of Kevlar/Phenolio-PVB ( Owens - Corning $pall Liner), MTL A4) 3 12 Chemical Heat Release Rate During Fire Propagation for a 40 0.61 m...Long, 0.10 m Wide and 3 mm Thick Vertical Sheet of S-2/Phenolic ( Owens - Corning ), MTL #5) 13 Chemical Heac Release Rate During Fire Propagation for 41...Materials T eohnology Laboratory (AKTL) by Owens - Corning Corporation; 3. NTL #3: S-2 fiberglabs/polyestel’, flame retardant, prepreg, formulated for

  20. Friction Stir Processing of Particle Reinforced Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yong X.; Solomon, Daniel; Reinbolt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a review of friction stir processing (FSP) technology and its application for microstructure modification of particle reinforced composite materials. The main focus of FSP was on aluminum based alloys and composites. Recently, many researchers have investigated this technology for treating other alloys and materials including stainless steels, magnesium, titanium, and copper. It is shown that FSP technology is very effective in microstructure modification of reinforced metal matrix composite materials. FSP has also been used in the processing and structure modification of polymeric composite materials. Compared with other manufacturing processes, friction stir processing has the advantage of reducing distortion and defects in materials. The layout of this paper is as follows. The friction stir processing technology will be presented first. Then, the application of this technology in manufacturing and structure modification of particle reinforced composite materials will be introduced. Future application of friction stir processing in energy field, for example, for vanadium alloy and composites will be discussed. Finally, the challenges for improving friction stir processing technology will be mentioned.

  1. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  2. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  3. Low energy impact detection on carbon fiber reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, X.E.

    1995-03-01

    Impact damages, even of small magnitude, affect the mechanical properties of a composite material by reducing its structural integrity. Low energy impacts are not always visible to the naked eye, and they need to be accurately localized for safety and quality reasons. The results of low energy impact detection (0.5--6.0 J) on carbon fiber reinforced materials, carried out with four different NDT techniques--visual, infrared, X-rays, and eddy current--are presented in this paper. Probability of detection (POD) curves are plotted to compare the potential of each technique in regards to carbon fiber reinforced materials. Inspection results have shown that eddy currents are well suited to detect and quantify low energy impacts in carbon fiber composites.

  4. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  5. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  6. Guided waves characterization of bamboo fibers reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, L. De; Marzani, A.; Perelli, A.; Testoni, N.; Speciale, N.

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, an inverse procedure based on ultrasonic guided wave propagation is proposed for the bamboo fibers reinforced composites characterization. The procedure consists of an optimization problem in which the discrepancy between the experimental dispersion curves and those predicted through a numerical formulation is minimized.

  7. Automobile materials competition: energy implications of fiber-reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings-Saxton, J.

    1981-10-01

    The embodied energy, structural weight, and transportation energy (fuel requirement) characteristics of steel, fiber-reinforced plastics, and aluminum were assessed to determine the overall energy savings of materials substitution in automobiles. In body panels, a 1.0-lb steel component with an associated 0.5 lb in secondary weight is structurally equivalent to a 0.6-lb fiber-reinforced plastic component with 0.3 lb in associated secondary weight or a 0.5-lb aluminum component with 0.25 lb of secondary weight. (Secondary weight refers to the combined weight of the vehicle's support structure, engine, braking system, and drive train, all of which can be reduced in response to a decrease in total vehicle weight.) The life cycle transportation energy requirements of structurally equivalent body panels (including their associated secondary weights) are 174.4 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 104.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. The embodied energy requirements are 37.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 22.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. These results can be combined to yield total energy requirements of 211.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 126.7 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 174.3 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. Fiber-reinforced plastics offer the greatest improvements over steel in both embodied and total energy requirements. Aluminum achieves the greatest savings in transportation energy.

  8. Structure A, dock reinforcing & bill of material. Drawing no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, dock reinforcing & bill of material. Drawing no. H2-306, revised as-built dated August 13, 1953. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  9. Balloon material characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbeck, J. S.; Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are reviewed to study the state of stress and strain in a typical balloon fabricated from thin polyethylene film. Relaxation tests are conducted over a temperature range of -60 C to 140 C for a constant strain of 1%, and loads measured with the load cell are converted to values of the relaxation modulus. A log-log plot is made of the modulus as a function of time, and the maximum stress is found to occur at times of the order of one-half second. The film behaves as a nonlinear viscoelastic material, and by examining various theoretical relationships of stress and strain with temperature and time histories, a material testing program is developed which yields the necessary data to characterize the film.

  10. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  11. A study of fiber materials for use in temperature resistant fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachowsky, M. J.; Anderson, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    This study has been directed at characterizing the micro-properties of candidate ceramics and glasses for use in making fibers used in fiber reinforced material composites. Particular emphasis has been given into developing techniques to guide the optimization of fiber properties. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) have been used to help collate the method of synthesis, crystal structure and surface morphology with physical performance parameters. As a result, progress has been made in characterizing such materials. This increased understanding makes the previous research worthy of further study.

  12. Material and Flexural Properties of Fiber-reinforced Rubber Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminger, Nicholas P.

    The purpose of this research is to determine the material properties of rubber concrete with the addition of fibers, and to determine optimal mixture dosages of rubber and fiber in concrete for structural applications. Fiber-reinforced concrete and rubberized concrete have been researched separately extensively, but this research intends to combine both rubber and fiber in a concrete matrix in order to create a composite material, fiber-reinforced rubber concrete (FRRC). Sustainability has long been important in engineering design, but much of the previous research performed on sustainable concrete does not result in a material that can be used for practical purposes. While still achieving a material that can be used for structural applications, economical considerations were given when choosing the proportions and types of constituents in the concrete mix. Concrete mixtures were designed, placed, and tested in accordance with common procedures and standards, with an emphasis on practicality. Properties that were investigated include compressive strength, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility. The basis for determining the optimal concrete mixture is one that is economical, practical, and exhibits ductile properties with a significant strength. Results show that increasing percentages of rubber tend to decrease workability, unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, and modulus of elasticity while the toughness is increased. The addition of steel needle fibers to rubber concrete increases unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility of the composite material.

  13. Reinforced Pericardium as a Hybrid Material for Cardiovascular Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bracaglia, Laura G.; Yu, Li; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pericardium-based cardiovascular devices are currently bound by a 10-year maximum lifetime due to detrimental calcification and degradation. The goal of this work is to develop a novel synthetic material to create a lasting replacement for malfunctioning or diseased tissue in the cardiovascular system. This study couples poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and a natural biomaterial together in an unprecedented hybrid composite and evaluates the composite versus the standard glutaraldehyde-treated tissue. The polymer reinforcement is hypothesized to provide initial physical protection from proteolytic enzymes and degradation, but leave the original collagen and elastin matrix unaltered. The calcification rate and durability of the hybrid material are evaluated in vitro and in an in vivo subdermal animal model. Results demonstrate that PPF is an effective support and leads to significantly less calcium deposition, important metrics when evaluating cardiovascular material. By avoiding chemical crosslinking of the tissue and associated side effects, PPF-reinforced pericardium as a biohybrid material offers a promising potential direction for further development in cardiovascular material alternatives. Eliminating the basis for the majority of cardiovascular prosthetic failures could revolutionize expectations for extent of cardiovascular repair. PMID:25236439

  14. Reinforced pericardium as a hybrid material for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Yu, Li; Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P

    2014-11-01

    Pericardium-based cardiovascular devices are currently bound by a 10-year maximum lifetime due to detrimental calcification and degradation. The goal of this work is to develop a novel synthetic material to create a lasting replacement for malfunctioning or diseased tissue in the cardiovascular system. This study couples poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and a natural biomaterial together in an unprecedented hybrid composite and evaluates the composite versus the standard glutaraldehyde-treated tissue. The polymer reinforcement is hypothesized to provide initial physical protection from proteolytic enzymes and degradation, but leave the original collagen and elastin matrix unaltered. The calcification rate and durability of the hybrid material are evaluated in vitro and in an in vivo subdermal animal model. Results demonstrate that PPF is an effective support and leads to significantly less calcium deposition, important metrics when evaluating cardiovascular material. By avoiding chemical crosslinking of the tissue and associated side effects, PPF-reinforced pericardium as a biohybrid material offers a promising potential direction for further development in cardiovascular material alternatives. Eliminating the basis for the majority of cardiovascular prosthetic failures could revolutionize expectations for extent of cardiovascular repair.

  15. Mechanical response of composite materials with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Dickinson, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to identify the key geometrical parameters and quantify their influence on the mechanical response of through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforced composite materials. Composite laminates with TTT reinforcement fibers were fabricated using different TTT reinforcement materials and reinforcement methods and laminates were also fabricated of similar construction but without TTT reinforcement fibers. Coupon specimens were machined from these laminates and were destructively tested. TTT reinforcement yarns enhance damage tolerance and improve interlaminar strength. Thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns have equal or superior mechanical properties to thin-layer composites without TTT reinforcement yarns. A significant potential exists for fabrication cost reduction by using thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns. Removal of the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement improves compression strength. Stitching provides somewhat higher mechanical properties than integral weaving.

  16. As-Fabricated Reinforced Carbon/Carbon Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Webster, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) is a critical material for the space shuttle orbiter. It is used on the wing leading edge and the nose cap, where maximum temperatures are reached on reentry. The existing leading-edge system is a single-plate RCC composite construction with a wall thickness of approximately 1/4 in., making it a prime reliant protection scheme for vehicle operation.

  17. Microscopic mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity in polymer nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Eun

    Modification of polymers by adding various nano-particles is an important method to obtain effective enhancement of materials properties. Within this class of materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are among the most studied materials for polymer reinforcement due to their extraordinary mechanical properties, superior thermal and electronic properties, and high aspect ratio. However, to unlock the potential of CNTs for applications, CNTs must be well dispersed in a polymer matrix and the microscopic mechanism of polymer reinforcement by CNTs must be understood. In this study, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composites with polypropylene (PP)-SWNT and polystyrene (PS)-SWNT were prepared and analyzed. Microscopic study of the mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity by SWNT included Raman spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and dielectric measurement. For PP-SWNT composites, tensile tests show a three times increase in the Young's modulus with addition of only 1 wt% SWNT, and much diminished increase of modulus with further increase in SWNT concentration. For PS-SWNT composites, well-dispersed SWNT/PS composite has been produced, using initial annealing of SWNT and optimum sonication conditions. The studies on the tangential mode in the Raman spectra and TEM indicated well-dispersed SWNTs in a PS matrix. We show that conductivity appears in composites already at very low concentrations, hinting at the formation of a 'percolative' network even below 0.5% of SWNT. The Raman studies for both composites show good transfer of the applied stress from the polymer matrices to SWNTs. However, no significant improvement of mechanical property is observed for PS-SWNT composites. The reason for only a slight increase of mechanical property remains unknown.

  18. Constitutive model for fiber-reinforced materials with deformable matrices.

    PubMed

    Planas, J; Guinea, G V; Elices, M

    2007-10-01

    A great number of biological structures are composed of fibers (elastin, collagen, etc.) dispersed on an aqueous matrix in such a complex way that a detailed mechanical analysis based on microconstituents is, for practical purposes, out of reach. Consequently, the preferred approach to the mechanical behavior of these materials is based on setting up of constitutive equations that homogenize the behavior while capturing their main microstructural features. This work presents a simple macroscopic model for fiber-reinforced materials with deformable matrices, especially suited to many biological structural tissues. The constitutive equation is derived by imposing equivalence between the virtual works of both the fiber-reinforced and the equivalent continuum media, showing that it is independent of the control volume used for such equivalence. The model is particularized to incompressible materials, and an extension to orthotropic biological fibers is shown. Numerical simulations of uniaxial tests on silk fibers demonstrate the model's ability to capture the progressive alignment of the microconstituents under large deformations.

  19. The properties of metal-reinforced glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H

    1993-01-01

    The physical properties and bond strengths of two glass ionomer materials reinforced with silver and amalgam alloy powders were compared with those of a conventional material from the same manufacture as well as two commercially available products. The diametral tensile strength, hardness and bonding strength are improved with the addition of either commercial available silver particles or fabricated high-copper amalgam alloy powders to the glass. Simple mixture of the metal or alloy powders with the glass ionomer cement seems to be feasible to improve the properties of the regular cement. However, further studies in formulating an optimal composition of metal or alloy, setting characteristics and long-term clinical evaluation are necessary before proposing uses for this new material.

  20. Stiffening by fiber reinforcement in soft materials: a hyperelastic theory at large strains and its application.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Izzo, Ivano; Micera, Silvestro; Tendick, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work defines an incompressible, hyperelastic theory of anisotropic soft materials at finite strains, which is tested by application to the experimental response of fiber-reinforced rubber materials. The experimental characterization is performed using a uniaxial testing device with optical measures of the deformation, using two different reinforcing materials on a ground rubber matrix. In order to avoid non-physical responses of the underlying structural components of the material, the kinematics of the deformation are described using a novel deformation tensor, which ensures physical consistency at large strains. A constitutive relation for incompressible fiber-reinforced materials is presented, while issues of stability and ellipticity for the hyperelastic solution are considered to impose necessary restrictions on the constitutive parameters. The theoretical predictions of the proposed model are compared with the anisotropic experimental responses, showing high fitting accuracy in determining the mechanical parameters of the model. The constitutive theory is suitable to account for the anisotropic response at large compressive strains, opening perspectives for many applications in tissue engineering and biomechanics.

  1. Preparation and characterization of wheat straw fibers for reinforcing application in injection molded thermoplastic composites.

    PubMed

    Panthapulakkal, S; Zereshkian, A; Sain, M

    2006-01-01

    The potential of wheat straw fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes as reinforcing additives for thermoplastics was investigated. Fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes were characterized with respect to their chemical composition, morphology, and physical, mechanical and thermal properties. Composites of polypropylene filled with 30% wheat straw fibers were prepared and their mechanical properties were also evaluated. The fibers prepared by chemical process exhibited better mechanical, physical and thermal properties. Wheat straw fiber reinforced polypropylene composites exhibited significantly enhanced properties compared to virgin polypropylene. However, the strength properties of the composites were less for chemically prepared fiber filled composites. This was due to the poor dispersion of the fibers under the processing conditions used. These results indicate that wheat straw fibers can be used as potential reinforcing materials for making thermoplastic composites.

  2. Development and mechanical characterization of carbon-fiber-reinforced cement composites and mechanical properties and structural applications of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bayasi, M.Z.

    1989-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive experimental study on carbon fiber reinforced cement composites incorporating the Ashland's industrial grade carbon fiber reinforced cement composites incorporating the Ashland's inductrial grade carbon fibers (Carboflex), the optimum mix variables and processing techniques were decided. The types and proportions of different mix constituents, the fiber lengths and volume fractions, and the mixing and curing procedures which produce desirable fresh mix properties and superior hardened material performance were decided. A comprehensive experimental data set on the performance characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced cement was also generated. The research was performed in three phases: (1) Establishment of the mixing procedure and mix proportions for achieving desirable fresh mix characteristics; (2) Assessment of the trends in the effects of different mix variables on the strength of air cured specimens and further optimization of the mix proportions for achieving superior strength characteristics in addition to the desirable fresh mix workability; and (3) Optimization of the curing condition and full mechanical characterization for carbon fiber reinforced cement composites with some optimum values of fiber length and volume fraction. A comprehensive investigation was performed on the material properties and structural applications of steel fiber reinforced concrete. In studies on the application of steel fiber reinforced concrete a load bearing structural elements, the effects of steel fibers on improving the strength and ductility of concrete footings under bearing pressure, and enhancing bond between deformed bars and concrete were investigated.

  3. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  4. Physicochemical characterization of three fiber-reinforced epoxide-based composites for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Bonon, Anderson J; Weck, Marcus; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) biomedical materials are in contact with living tissues arising biocompatibility questions regarding their chemical composition. The hazards of materials such as Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalate and other monomers and composites present in FRC have been rationalized due to its potential toxicity since its detection in food, blood, and saliva. This study characterized the physicochemical properties and degradation profiles of three different epoxide-based materials intended for restorative dental applications. Characterization was accomplished by several methods including FTIR, Raman, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) Analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and degradation experiments. Physicochemical characterization revealed that although materials presented similar chemical composition, variations between them were more largely accounted by the different phase distribution than chemical composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Maxillofacial Materials Reinforced with Various Concentrations of Polyhedral Silsesquioxanes

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Sharif A.; Wee, Alvin G.; Rumsey, Deborah J.; Schricker, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates two mechanical properties, tensile strength and tear strength, of maxillofacial materials reinforced with functional polyhedral silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles at 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0% (mass/mass) loading. Adding POSS was found to significantly affect the overall tensile strength and extensibility of the maxillofacial material. Significant differences were found in mean peak load (p = .050) and extension before failure (p = .050), respectively, between concentrations of 0% and 5%. For tear resistance, a significant difference was observed in mean load (p = .002) between concentrations of 1% and 5%. Significant differences were also observed in extension before failure between concentrations of 0% and 1% (p = .002) and between 0% and 2% (p = .002). Increased resistance to tensile or shearing stresses could lead to greater clinical longevity. The following results suggest that functional nanoparticles can be used to improve properties without compromising clinical handling. PMID:20981354

  6. Characterization of carbon nanofibre-reinforced polypropylene foams.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M; Velasco, J I; Realinho, V; Arencón, D

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, carbon-nanofibre-reinforced polypropylene foams were prepared and characterized regarding their foaming behaviour, cellular structure and both thermo-mechanical as well as electrical properties. Polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing 5, 10 and 20 wt% of carbon nanofibres (CNF) and a chemical blowing agent were prepared by melt-mixing inside a twin-screw extruder and subsequently water-cooled and pelletized. The extruded nanocomposites were later foamed using a one-step compression-moulding process. The thermo-mechanical properties of the CNF-reinforced PP foams were studied, analyzing the influence of the carbon nanofibres on the cellular structure and subsequent thermo-mechanical behaviour of the foams. Carbon nanofibres not only seemed to act as nucleating agents, reducing the average cell size of the foams and increasing their cell density for similar expansion ratios, but also helped produce mechanically-improved foams, even reaching for the 20 wt% CNF-reinforced ones a specific modulus around 1.2 GPa x cm3/g for densities as low as 300 kg/m3. An increasingly higher electrical conductivity was assessed for both the solids as well as the foams with increasing the amount of carbon nanofibres.

  7. Linear orthotropic viscoelasticity model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic material based on Prony series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Vitor Takashi; de Carvalho Pereira, José Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Material properties description and understanding are essential aspects when computational solid mechanics is applied to product development. In order to promote injected fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials for structural applications, it is very relevant to develop material characterization procedures, considering mechanical properties variation in terms of fiber orientation and loading time. Therefore, a methodology considering sample manufacturing, mechanical tests and data treatment is described in this study. The mathematical representation of the material properties was solved by a linear viscoelastic constitutive model described by Prony series, which was properly adapted to orthotropic materials. Due to the large number of proposed constitutive model coefficients, a parameter identification method was employed to define mathematical functions. This procedure promoted good correlation among experimental tests, and analytical and numerical creep models. Such results encourage the use of numerical simulations for the development of structural components with the proposed linear viscoelastic orthotropic constitutive model. A case study was presented to illustrate an industrial application of proposed methodology.

  8. Linear orthotropic viscoelasticity model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic material based on Prony series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Vitor Takashi; de Carvalho Pereira, José Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Material properties description and understanding are essential aspects when computational solid mechanics is applied to product development. In order to promote injected fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials for structural applications, it is very relevant to develop material characterization procedures, considering mechanical properties variation in terms of fiber orientation and loading time. Therefore, a methodology considering sample manufacturing, mechanical tests and data treatment is described in this study. The mathematical representation of the material properties was solved by a linear viscoelastic constitutive model described by Prony series, which was properly adapted to orthotropic materials. Due to the large number of proposed constitutive model coefficients, a parameter identification method was employed to define mathematical functions. This procedure promoted good correlation among experimental tests, and analytical and numerical creep models. Such results encourage the use of numerical simulations for the development of structural components with the proposed linear viscoelastic orthotropic constitutive model. A case study was presented to illustrate an industrial application of proposed methodology.

  9. Mechanical response of a fibre reinforced earthen material under static and impact loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymerich, Francesco; Fenu, Luigi; Francesconi, Luca; Meloni, Paola

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the improvements provided by the insertion of hemp fibres with different weight fractions and lengths in an earthen material. The structural response of the materials was investigated by means of static and impact bending tests carried out on notched samples. The main focus of the analyses was in the characterization of the structural properties of the materials in terms of fracture resistance, post-cracking performance and energy absorption capability. The results of the study show that hemp fibres improve significantly the mechanical and fracture properties of the earthen material under both static and dynamic bending. It was also found that the structural properties of unreinforced and reinforced earthen materials are highly sensitive to the stress-rate, with higher strength and fracture resistance under impact loading than under static loading.

  10. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  11. CNT Reinforced Hybrid Microgels as Scaffold Materials for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of CNTs successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at. percent Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1373 and 1573 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, beryllides, and silicides. Thermodynamic data for NiAl alloys have been reviewed and activity of Ni and Al in the beta phase have been derived at 1373 and 1573 K. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and the matrix have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been defined.

  16. Laser Materials Search and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0030 Laser materials search and characterization Maxim E. Doroshenko INSTITUTION OF RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES...To) 1 October 2010 – 31 March 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laser materials search and characterization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ISTC Proj 4076p 5b...EOARD, Single crystals, ceramics, crystalline fibers, rare-earth ions, bismuth ions, laser materials, fluorescence decay, photonic crystal structure

  17. Magnetic Characterization of Organic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0005 Magnetic Characterization of Organic Materials Dongho Kim YONSEI UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY FOUNDATION Final Report 12...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10 Sep 2015 to 09 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Magnetic Characterization of Organic Materials 5a.  CONTRACT...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED: PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Organic materials show interesting phenomena called magnetic field effects (MFEs

  18. Biodegradable self-reinforced composite materials; manufacturing structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Törmälä, P

    1992-01-01

    Biodegradable (or absorbable), self-reinforced polymeric composites fulfill the demands of secure orthopaedic fixation materials because of their high strength, appropriate stiffness and strength retention which can be tailored according to the healing rate of damaged tissues. Ultra-high strength, self-reinforced, macroscopical biodegradable polymeric composites can be manufactured by creating the polymeric microstructure, where oriented reinforcing elements and matrix material, which have the same chemical element composition, are bound together. Biodegradable, self-reinforced composites have attractive application possibilities in surgery. The materials can be processed into the form of rods, screws, tacks, cerclages, clamps, plates, spirals, etc., which have versatile applications in traumatology and in orthopaedic surgery.

  19. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials Systems to Enhance Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    and low temperature evaluation of FRP performance. Field demonstrations included evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer tendons for post...glass fiber reinforced polymer cables as tie back tension members, and a test fixture was designed and fabricated to evaluate post stressing tendon

  20. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  1. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al4C3) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al4C3. Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al4C3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials.

  2. Analysis of woven fabrics for reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Ramnath, V.; Rosen, B. Walter

    1987-01-01

    The use of woven fabrics as reinforcements for composites is considered. Methods of analysis of properties are reviewed and extended, with particular attention paid to three-dimensional constructions having through-the-thickness reinforcements. Methodology developed is used parametrically to evaluate the performance potential of a wide variety of reinforcement constructions including hybrids. Comparisons are made of predicted and measured properties of representative composites having biaxial and triaxial woven, and laminated tape lay-up reinforcements. Overall results are incorporated in advanced weave designs.

  3. Railgun Application for High Energy Impact Testing of Nano-Reinforced Kevlar-Based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Vricella, A.; Pastore, R.; Morles, R. B.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    An advanced electromagnetic accelerator, called railgun, has been assembled and tuned in order to perform high energy impact test on layered structures. Different types of layered composite materials have been manufactured and characterized in terms of energy absorbing capability upon impact of metallic bullets fired at high velocity. The composite materials under testing are manufactured by integrating several layers of Kevlar fabric and carbon fiber ply within a polymeric matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at 1% of weight percentage. The experimental results show that the railgun-device is a good candidate to perform impact testing of materials in the space debris energy range, and that carbon nanotubes may enhance, when suitably coupled to the composite's matrix, the excellent antiballistic properties of the Kevlar fabrics.

  4. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at pct Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1173 and 1273 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, and silicides. Although several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified, the coefficients of thermal expansion for none of these materials match closely with that of FeAl alloys and this might pose serious problems in the design of composite systems based on FeAl alloys.

  6. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites Containing Metal Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuentz, Lily; Salem, Anton; Singh, M.; Halbig, M. C.; Salem, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of polymeric systems using 3D printing has become quite popular recently due to rapid growth and availability of low cost and open source 3D printers. Two widely used 3D printing filaments are based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) systems. PLA is much more environmentally friendly in comparison to ABS since it is made from renewable resources such as corn, sugarcane, and other starches as precursors. Recently, polylactic acid-based metal powder containing composite filaments have emerged which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. The composite filaments have higher density than pure PLA, and the majority of the materials volume is made up of polylactic acid. In order to utilize functionalities of composite filaments, printing behavior and properties of 3-D printed composites need to be characterized and compared with the pure PLA materials. In this study, pure PLA and composite specimens with different metallic reinforcements (Copper, Bronze, Tungsten, Iron, etc) were 3D printed at various layer heights and resulting microstructures and properties were characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) behavior of filaments with different reinforcements were studied. The microscopy results show an increase in porosity between 3-D printed regular PLA and the metal composite PLA samples, which could produce weaker mechanical properties in the metal composite materials. Tensile strength and fracture toughness behavior of specimens as a function of print layer height will be presented.

  7. Effect of tool material on machinability of TiCp reinforced Al-1100 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harishchandra; Kadadevaramath, R. S.; Anil, K. C.

    2016-09-01

    In present days MMC's are widely used in most of the industries, like automobiles, aerospace, minerals and marine industries, because of its high specific strength to weight ratio. There are many types of reinforcements are available, selection of reinforcement is depends on availability, cost and desired reinforcement properties. In our study Al-1100 is selected as a primary material and Titanium carbide particle (TiCp) of 44 pm size as reinforcement and synthesized by manual stir casting method, by varying the reinforcement percentage. K2DF6 salt was used as wetting agent in order to improve the wetting behaviour of the reinforcement and same was observed in optical micrographs. Further, prepared composite materials are subjected to machinability studies by using lathe tool dynamometer in order to evaluate the cutting force, surface roughness with respect to reinforcement percentage and tool material. From the results, it is observed that the hardness and surface roughness of a specimen increases with the increasing of reinforcement percentage and Hardness of the tool material respectively.

  8. UV radiation effect towards mechanical properties of Natural Fibre Reinforced Composite material: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahzan, Shahruddin; Fitri, Muhamad; Zaleha, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of natural fibres as reinforcement material have become common in human applications. Many of them are used in composite materials especially in the polymer matrix composites. The use of natural fibres as reinforcement also provide alternative solution of usage instead of being a waste materials. In some applications, these natural reinforced polymer composites were used as the outer layer, making them exposed to ultra violet exposure, hence prone to UV radiation. This paper reviews the effect of UV radiation towards the mechanical properties of natural fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite material. The effect of chemical treatment towards the natural fibre is also investigated. One of the important features that was critically explored was the degradation of the composite materials. The influence of UV radiation on the degradation rate involve several parameters such as wavelength, intensity and exposure time. This review highlights the influence of these parameters in order to provide better solution for polymer matrix composite’s development.

  9. FTIR characterization of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to the characterization of advanced materials. FTIR sampling techniques including internal and external reflectance and photoacoustic spectroscopy are discussed. Representative examples from the literature of the analysis of resins, fibers, prepregs and composites are reviewed. A discussion of several promising specialized FTIR techniques is also presented.

  10. FTIR characterization of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to the characterization of advanced materials. FTIR sampling techniques including internal and external reflectance and photoacoustic spectroscopy are discussed. Representative examples from the literature of the analysis of resins, fibers, prepregs and composites are reviewed. A discussion of several promising specialized FTIR techniques is also presented.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of biodegradable starch/PVA composite films reinforced with cellulosic fibre.

    PubMed

    Priya, Bhanu; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Pathania, Deepak; Singha, Amar Singh

    2014-08-30

    Cellulosic fibres reinforced composite blend films of starch/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were prepared by using citric acid as plasticizer and glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The mechanical properties of cellulosic fibres reinforced composite blend were compared with starch/PVA crossed linked blend films. The increase in the tensile strength, elongation percentage, degree of swelling and biodegradability of blend films was evaluated as compared to starch/PVA crosslinked blend films. The value of different evaluated parameters such as citric acid, glutaraldehyde and reinforced fibre to starch/PVA (5:5) was found to be 25 wt.%, 0.100 wt.% and 20 wt.%, respectively. The blend films were characterized using Fourier transform-infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA/DTG). Scanning electron microscopy illustrated a good adhesion between starch/PVA blend and fibres. The blend films were also explored for antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results confirmed that the blended films may be used as exceptional material for food packaging.

  12. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  13. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  14. Development of Ceramic Fibers for Reinforcement in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, L. E.; Lent, W. E.; Teague, W. T.

    1961-01-01

    the. testing apparatus for single fiber tensile strength increased the precision. of tests conducted on nine fibers. The highest mean tensile strength, a value of 295,000 pounds per square inch, was obtained with R-141 fibers. Treatment of R-74 fibers with anhydrous Linde A-1100 silane finish improved its mean fiber tensile strength by 25 percent. The lapse of time after fiber formation had no measurable effect on tensile strength. A static heating test conducted with various high melting fibers indicated that Fiberfrax and R-108 underwent no significant changes in bulk volume or resiliency on exposure to 2750 degrees Fahrenheit (1510 degrees Centigrade) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For fiber-resin composition fabrication, ten fiber materials were selected on the bases of high fiber yield, fusion temperature, and type of composition. Fiberfrax, a commercial ceramic fiber, was included for comparison. A new, more effective method of removing pellets from blown fibers was developed. The de-pelletized fibers were treated with a silane finish and felted into ten-inch diameter felts prior to resin impregnation. Composites containing 30 percent by weight of CTL 91-LD phenolic resin were molded under high pressure from the impregnated felts and post-cured to achieve optimum properties. Flexural strength, flexural modules of elasticity, and punch shear strength tests were conducted on the composite specimens. The highest average flexural strength obtained was 19,958 pounds per square inch with the R-74-fiber-resin composite. This compares very favorably with the military specification of 13,000 pounds per square inch flexural strength for randomly oriented fiber reinforced composites. The highest punch shear strength (11,509 pounds per square inch) was obtained with the R-89 fiber-resin composite. The effects of anhydrous fiber finishes on composite strength were not clearly indicated. Plasma arc tests at a heat flux of 550 British Thermal Units per square foot per second on

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  16. Use of reinforced inorganic cement materials for spark wire and drift chamber wire frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The results of a survey, materials test, and analysis study directed toward the development of an inorganic glass-fiber reinforced cement material for use in the construction of space qualified spark wire frames and drift chamber frames are presented. The purpose for this research was to evaluate the feasibility of using glass fiber reinforced cement (GFRC) for large dimensioned structural frames for supporting a number of precisely located spark wires in multiple planes. A survey of the current state of the art in fiber reinforced cement materials was made; material sample mixes were made and tested to determine their laboratory performances. Tests conducted on sample materials showed that compressive and flexural strengths of this material could approach values which would enable fabrication of structural spark wire frames.

  17. Characterization of carbon-fiber reinforced polyetherimide thermoplastic composites using mechanical and ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALHaidri, Mohannad

    Continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (CFRT) have the potential for being a mass-produced material for high-performance applications. The primary challenge of using CFRT is achieving fiber wet-out due to the high viscosity of thermoplastics. This results in higher temperatures and pressures required for processing the composites. Co-mingling thermoplastic fibers with a reinforcing fiber, potentially, can enable better wetting by reducing the distance the matrix needs to flow. This could result in shorter cycle times and better consolidation at lower temperatures and pressures. In this study, a polyetherimide (PEI) fiber was comingled with carbon fibers (CF). The resultant fibers were woven into fabrics and processed through a compression-molding technique to form laminates. Control specimens were also fabricated using films of PEI layered between plies of woven carbon-fiber materials. The manufactured CFRT panels were evaluated using ultrasonic C-scans (scans in two spatial dimensions) and then characterized for mechanical properties. The specimens produced using the co-mingled fibers had the cycle time reduced significantly compared to the film CFRT, although the results from the mechanical property evaluations were mixed. The behaviors in the co-mingled laminates can be attributed to the resin- and void-content distribution and the fiber-bundle orientations in the cured composite.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Shape Memory Epoxy (CNFR-SME) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyang

    Shape memory polymers have a wide range of applications due to their ability to mechanically change shapes upon external stimulus, while their achievable composite counterparts prove even more versatile. An overview of literature on shape memory materials, fillers and composites was provided to pave a foundation for the materials used in the current study and their inherent benefits. This study details carbon nanofiber and composite fabrication and contrasts their material properties. In the first section, the morphology and surface chemistry of electrospun-poly(acrylonitrile)-based carbon nanofiber webs were tailored through various fabrication methods and impregnated with a shape memory epoxy. The morphologies, chemical compositions, thermal stabilities and electrical resistivities of the carbon nanofibers and composites were then characterized. In the second section, an overview of thermal, mechanical and shape memory characterization techniques for shape memory polymers and their composites was provided. Thermal and mechanical properties in addition to the kinetic and dynamic shape memory performances of neat epoxy and carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites were characterized. The various carbon nanofiber web modifications proved to have notable influence on their respective composite performances. The results from these two sections lead to an enhanced understanding of these carbon nanofiber reinforced shape memory epoxy composites and provided insight for future studies to tune these composites at will.

  19. Strength and toughness of structural fibres for composite material reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Herráez, M; Fernández, A; Lopes, C S; González, C

    2016-07-13

    The characterization of the strength and fracture toughness of three common structural fibres, E-glass, AS4 carbon and Kevlar KM2, is presented in this work. The notched specimens were prepared by means of selective carving of individual fibres by means of the focused ion beam. A straight-fronted edge notch was introduced in a plane perpendicular to the fibre axis, with the relative notch depth being a0/D≈0.1 and the notch radius at the tip approximately 50 nm. The selection of the appropriate beam current during milling operations was performed to avoid to as much as possible any microstructural changes owing to ion impingement. Both notched and un-notched fibres were submitted to uniaxial tensile tests up to failure. The strength of the un-notched fibres was characterized in terms of the Weibull statistics, whereas the residual strength of the notched fibres was used to determine their apparent toughness. To this end, the stress intensity factor of a fronted edge crack was computed by means of the finite-element method for different crack lengths. The experimental results agreed with those reported in the literature for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres obtained by using similar techniques. After mechanical testing, the fracture surface of the fibres was analysed to ascertain the failure mechanisms. It was found that AS4 carbon and E-glass fibres presented the lower toughness with fracture surfaces perpendicular to the fibre axis, emanating from the notch tip. The fractured region of Kevlar KM2 fibres extended along the fibre and showed large permanent deformation, which explains their higher degree of toughness when compared with carbon and glass fibres. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  1. The strength of two reinforced glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Mazarakis, E; van der Vyver, P J; Janse van Rensburg, S D; de Wet, F A

    1994-08-01

    Preformed stainless steel crowns survive longer than multi-surface amalgams on deciduous molars. With the use of reinforced glass ionomers the bulk of the lost tooth structure can be replaced and the stainless steel crown cemented simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to compare two glass ionomer cements with regard to their shear bond strength (SBS) to the dentine of extracted primary molars and to their diametral tensile strength (DTS). The results showed that Vitremer was significantly (p < 0.01) stronger (DTS:x = 19.21; SBS:x = 7.63) than Ketac-Silver (DTS:x = 8.94; SBS:x = 2.92).

  2. FNAS materials processing and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Research on melt-sintered high temperature superconducting materials is presented. The vibrating sample magnetometer has become a useful characterization tool for the study of high temperature superconductors. Important information regarding the superconducting properties of a sample can be obtained without actually making contact with the sample itself. A step toward microgravity processing of high temperature superconductors was taken. In the future, the samples need to be optimized prior to this processing of the sample before the specific effects of the microgravity environment can be isolated. A series of melt-sintered samples show that bulk processing of high temperature superconductors is getting better.

  3. Reinforcement of immature roots with a new resin filling material.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Charles H; Schwartz, Scott A; Beeson, Thomas J

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reinforcement and strengthening ability of Resilon, gutta-percha, and a self-curing composite resin (Bisfil 2B) in endodontically treated roots of immature teeth. Sixty single rooted teeth were divided into five groups of 12 teeth each. Teeth in all groups except the negative controls were prepared with a #5 Peeso (1.5 mm) through the apex (simulating immature roots) and root ends were filled with a 4 mm barrier of MTA. After smear layer removal, canals in the three experimental groups were backfilled with gutta-percha, Resilon, or Bisfil 2B. The remaining canal space in the positive control group was left unfilled. Negative controls received no treatment. A horizontal fracture was created in the root of each specimen using an Instron and the mean peak loads to fracture were recorded. ANOVA revealed no significant difference between any of the treatment groups. Based on the results of this study, canal wall reinforcement of teeth with a canal diameter of 1.5 mm or less may not be necessary.

  4. Plastic Fibre Reinforced Soil Blocks as a Sustainable Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, C. K. Subramania; Nambiar, E. K. Kunhanandan; Abraham, Benny Mathews

    2012-10-01

    Solid waste management, especially the huge quantity of waste plastics, is one of the major environmental concerns nowadays. Their employability in block making in the form of fibres, as one of the methods of waste management, can be investigated through a fundamental research. This paper highlights the salient observations from a systematic investigation on the effect of embedded fibre from plastic waste on the performance of stabilised mud blocks. Stabilisation of the soil was done by adding cement, lime and their combination. Plastic fibre in chopped form from carry bags and mineral water bottles were added (0.1% & 0.2% by weight of soil) as reinforcement. The blocks were tested for density, and compressive strength, and observed failure patterns were analysed. Blocks with 0.1% of plastic fibres showed an increase in strength of about 3 to 10%. From the observations of failure pattern it can be concluded that benefits of fibre reinforcement includes both improved ductility in comparison with raw blocks and inhibition of crack propogation after its initial formation.

  5. Mechanical characterization of commercially made carbon-fiber-reinforced polymethylmethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Pal, S

    1986-01-01

    Acrylic bone cement is significantly weaker and of lower modulus of elasticity than compact bone. It is also weaker in tension than in compression. This limits its use in orthopedics to areas where tensile stresses were minimum. Many authors have shown that addition of small percentages of fiber reinforcement by hand mixing improved the mechanical properties significantly but with variable results. In this investigation we have examined the mechanical properties of machine-mixed, commercially available carbon-fiber-reinforced bone cement. Appropriate samples of normal low-viscosity cement and carbon-fiber-reinforced cement were prepared and tested mechanically. Carbon fiber increased the tensile strength and modulus by 30% and 35.8% respectively. The compression strength and modulus, however, increased by only 10.7%. Similarly, bending and shear strengths improved by 29.5% and 18.5%, respectively. Diametral compression strength, which is an indirect measure of tensile strength, however, showed only 6.2% improvement. The maximum temperature rise during polymerization was also reduced significantly by the fiber reinforcement.

  6. An historical mullite fiber-reinforced ceramic composite: Characterization of the wootz' crucible refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.L. ); Merk, N.; Thomas, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Since at least the sixteenth century, the wootz'' ultra-high carbon white cast-iron ingot was produced in India by melting or carburising iron in a crucible. This ingot was forced into sword blades of so-called Damascus steel. The charged crucible was fired in a long (24-hour) single cycle at high temperature (1150-1250{degree}C) in a strongly reducing atmosphere. Raw materials for the refractory vessel are clay and coked'' rice husks. At high temperatures, two phases reinforce the glassy matrix: cristobalite relics of rice husks and a network of mullite crystals. This paper characterizes the microstructure and chemistry of the mullite network in the glassy matrix by means of a combination of techniques: optical microscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM and EDS, and HREM. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  8. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  9. Surface characterization of LDEF materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, J. P.; Grammer, Holly Little

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), a passive experimental satellite, was placed into low-Earth orbit by the Shuttle Challenger in Apr. 1984. The LDEF spent an unprecedented 69 months in space. The flight and recovery of the LDEF provided a wealth of information on the longterm space environmental effects of a variety of materials exposed to the low-Earth orbit environment. Surface characterization of LDEF materials included polymers, composites, thermal control paints, and aluminum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis were used to document changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry of these materials. Detailed XPS analysis of the polymer systems, such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and fluorinated ethylene propylene thermal blankets on the backside of the LDEF revealed significant changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry as a result of exposure to the low-Earth orbit environment. Polymer systems such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and polysulfone showed a common trend of decreasing carbon content and increasing oxygen content with respect to the control sample. Carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis of the composite samples, in conjunction with SEM photomicrographs, revealed significant ablation of the polymer matrix resin to expose the carbon fibers of the composite during exposure to the space environment. Surface characterization of anodized aluminum tray clamps, which were located at regular intervals over the entire LDEF frame, provided the first results to evaluate the extent of contamination with respect to position on the LDEF. The XPS results clearly showed that the amount and state of both silicon and fluorine contamination were directly dependent upon the position of the tray clamp on the LDEF.

  10. Investigation of Methods for Selectively Reinforcing Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Alexa, Joel A.; Messick, Peter L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that selective reinforcement offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of metallic structures for aerospace applications. Applying high-strength, high-stiffness fibers to the high-stress regions of aluminum-based structures can increase the structural load-carrying capability and inhibit fatigue crack initiation and growth. This paper discusses an investigation into potential methods for applying reinforcing fibers onto the surface of aluminum and aluminum-lithium plate. Commercially-available alumina-fiber reinforced aluminum alloy tapes were used as the reinforcing material. Vacuum hot pressing was used to bond the reinforcing tape to aluminum alloy 2219 and aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 base plates. Static and cyclic three-point bend testing and metallurgical analysis were used to evaluate the enhancement of mechanical performance and the integrity of the bond between the tape and the base plate. The tests demonstrated an increase in specific bending stiffness. In addition, no issues with debonding of the reinforcing tape from the base plate during bend testing were observed. The increase in specific stiffness indicates that selectively-reinforced structures could be designed with the same performance capabilities as a conventional unreinforced structure but with lower mass.

  11. Analysis of glass-reinforced epoxy material for radio frequency resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaman, M R; Islam, M T; Misran, N; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than -20 dB for C band and -34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior.

  12. Analysis of Glass-Reinforced Epoxy Material for Radio Frequency Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than −20 dB for C band and −34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior. PMID:24977230

  13. A mechanism responsible for reducing compression strength of through-the-thickness reinforced composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify one of the mechanisms that contributes to the reduced compression strength of composite materials with through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcements. In this study a series of thick (0/90) laminates with stitched and integrally woven TTT reinforcements were fabricated and statically tested. In both the stitching and weaving process a surface loop of TTT reinforcement yarn is created between successive TTT penetrations. It was shown that the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement 'kinked' the in-plane fibers in such a manner that they were made ineffective in carrying compressive load. The improvement in strength by removal of the surface loop and 'kinked' in-plane fibers was between 7 and 35 percent.

  14. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  15. Nonlinear microscopy for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Reed Alan

    Making use of femtosecond laser sources, nonlinear microscopy provides access to previously unstudied aspects of materials. By probing third order nonlinear optical signals determined by the nonlinear susceptibility chi (3), which is present in all materials, we gain insight not available by conventional linear or electron microscopy. Third-harmonic (TH) microscopy is applied to supplement laser-induced damage studies of dielectric oxide thin film optical coatings. We present high contrast (S/N> 100 : 1) TH imaging of ≈17 nm nanoindentations, individual 10 nm gold nanoparticles, nascent scandia and hafnia films, and laser induced material modification both above and below damage threshold conditions in hafnia thin-films. These results imply that TH imaging is potentially sensitive to laser-induced strain as well as to nanoscale defects or contamination in oxide films. Compared to other sensitive imaging techniques such as Nomarski and dark field, TH imaging exhibits dramatically increased sensitivity to typical material modifications undergone during the formation of optical damage as evidenced by a dynamic range ≈106 : 1. Four-wave mixing (FWM) microscopy is employed to investigate delay dependent FWM signals and their implied characteristic resonant response times in multiple solvents. Mathematical modeling of resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and stimulated parametric emission (SPE) processes supplement the FWM studies and suggest a resonant CARS process that accounts for ≈95% of the total visible FWM signal which probes a characteristic material response time ≈100 fs. This signal enhancement likely indicates the net effects of probing several Raman active C-H stretch bands near 2950 cm-1. This FWM technique may be applied to characterize the dominant resonant response of the sample under study. Furthermore this technique presents the newfound capability to provide estimates of characteristic

  16. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  17. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  18. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  20. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  1. Tungsten fiber reinforced FeCrAlY - A first generation composite turbine blade material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Winsa, E. A.; Westfall, L. J.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    General and composite turbine blade material requirements are examined to identify a specific tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy (TFRS) having, in addition to strength, the desired combination of other material properties needed in turbine blades. Experimental data indicated that a thoriated tungsten fiber reinforced FeCrAlY matrix composite should have the stress-rupture, creep, tensile, fatigue, and impact strengths required for turbine blades operating from 1250 to 1370 K. Fabrication and design concepts are developed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating a hollow TFRS turbine blade at reasonable cost.

  2. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  3. Micromechanical model of crack growth in fiber reinforced brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.; Xu, Kang

    1990-01-01

    A model based on the micromechanical mechanism of crack growth resistance in fiber reinforced ceramics is presented. The formulation of the model is based on a small scale geometry of a macrocrack with a bridging zone, the process zone, which governs the resistance mechanism. The effect of high toughness of the fibers in retardation of the crack advance, and the significance of the fiber pullout mechanism on the crack growth resistance, are reflected in this model. The model allows one to address issues such as influence of fiber spacing, fiber flexibility, and fiber matrix friction. Two approaches were used. One represents the fracture initiation and concentrated on the development of the first microcracks between fibers. An exact closed form solution was obtained for this case. The second case deals with the development of an array of microcracks between fibers forming the bridging zone. An implicit exact solution is formed for this case. In both cases, a discrete fiber distribution is incorporated into the solution.

  4. Stretchable polyurethane sponge reinforced magnetorheological material with enhanced mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Lin; Xuan, Shouhu; Liao, Guojiang; Yin, Tiantian; Gong, Xinglong

    2015-03-01

    A stretchable magnetorheological material (SMRM) consisting of micro-meter carbonyl iron (CI) particles, low cross-linking polyurethane (PU) polymer and porous PU sponge has been developed. Due to the presence of the PU sponge, the high-performance MR material can be reversibly stretched or bent, just as MR elastomers. When the CI content increases to 80 wt%, the magnetic induced modulus of the MR material can reach as high as 7.34 MPa and the corresponding relative MR effect increases to 820%. A possible strengthening mechanism of the SMRM was proposed. The attractive mechanical properties make the SMRM a promising candidate for future high-performance devices.

  5. Graphite and boron-reinforced composite materials data summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Data summary is collection of information on typical processing techniques. Mechanical properties, and physical properties of advanced composite materials which are being considered for structural applications on advanced space vehicles.

  6. Production and characterization of cellulose reinforced starch (CRT) films.

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, K; Chandra Mohan, C; Azhagu Saravana Babu, P; Archana, G; Sabina, K; Sivarajan, M; Sukumar, M

    2016-02-01

    Starch from Tamarind seed is considered to be a nonedible and inexpensive component, with many industrial applications. Extraction and characterization of tamarind seed starch was carried out for the synthesis of biopolymer. Tamarind seeds were collected, cleaned and further roasted, decorticated, and pulverized to get starch powder. Total starch content present in each tamarind seed is estimated to be around 65-70%. About 84.68% purified starch can be recovered from the tamarind seed. Defatted Tamarind seed starch has an amylose content of 27.55 wt.% and 72.45 wt.% of amylopectin. Morphological (SEM) and X-ray diffraction were used to evaluate crystallinity. Likewise, TGA and DSC of starch have also been analyzed. Thermal properties of starch obtained from tamarind seeds showed good thermal stability when compared to other starch sources such as Mesquite seed and Mango kernel. This study proved that the tamarind seed starch can be used as a potential biopolymer material. Thermo-stable biofilms were produced through initial optimization studies. Predictive response surface quadratic models were constructed for prediction and optimization of biofilm mechanical properties. Correlation coefficient values were calculated to me more than 0.90 for mechanical responses which implies the fitness of constructed model with experimental data.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of gold nanoparticle reinforced Chitosan nanocomposites for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimitt G.

    Chitosan is a naturally derived polymer, which represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Polymeric materials can be regarded as promising candidates for next generation devices due to their low energy payback time. These devices can be fabricated by high-throughput processing methodologies, such as spin coating, inkjet printing, gravure and flexographic printing onto flexible substrates. However, the extensive applications of polymeric films are still limited because of disadvantages such as poor electromechanical properties, high brittleness with a low strain at break, and sensitivity to water. For certain critical applications the need for modification of physical, mechanical and electrical properties of the polymer is essential. When blends of polymer films with other materials are used, as is commonly the case, device performance directly depends on the nanoscale morphology and phase separation of the blend components. To prepare nanocomposite thin films with the desired functional properties, both the film composition and microstructure have to be thoroughly characterized and controlled. Chitosan reinforced bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through a solution casting method. Gold nanoparticles (˜ 32 nm diameter) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in the prepared Chitosan solution. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed by SEM images. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using TEM, SAED, SEM, EDX, XRD, UV-Vis, particle size analysis, zeta potential and FT-IR for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized at room temperature, human body temperatures and higher

  8. Processing and characterization of redmud reinforced polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugavel, R.; Jayamani, M.; Nagarajan, R.; Irullappasamy, S.; Cardona, F.; Sultan, M. T. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the redmud reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated by compression molding setup. The effects of the redmud content on the mechanical, melting and crystalline behavior of the composites was investigated. The melting and crystalline behavior of the composites were investigated using Digital Scanning Calorimeter. The test results show that hardness of the composites increases with increasing redmud content while incorporation of redmud content decreases tensile and impact strength of the composites. It is determined that the addition of redmud on the polypropylene does not affect the crystalline behavior of the composites.

  9. Effects of EB irradiation on stress-strain curves for carbon fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, K.; Mizutani, A.; Uchida, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2004-02-01

    In order to evaluate influence of electron beam (EB) irradiation on elasticity and stress- strain curve of composite materials reinforced by carbon fiber (CF), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced graphite (C/C) were treated by EB irradiation of 0.3 MGy. Since the EB strengthening was mainly dominated by the ductility enhancements of carbon fiber and matrix of epoxy resin, EB irradiation enlarged fracture stress and enhanced fracture strain of CFRP. Furthermore, EB irradiation slightly enhanced bending elasticity of CFRP and largely enhanced the initial spring constant related to elasticity of C/C coil. Although the elasticity enhancement of carbon fibers did not largely contribute that of CFRP, that of treated graphite matrix in C/C mainly caused the C/C coil elasticity enhancement by EB irradiation. Such a new treatment is a dream-worthy technology for structural materials to be applied in the fields of future engineering.

  10. Analytical solution of magnetothermoelastic interaction in a fiber-reinforced anisotropic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiny, Aatef D.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper is concerned with the investigation of the analytical solution of a fiber-reinforced anisotropic material under generalized magnetothermoelastic theory using the eigenvalue approach. Based on the Lord-Shulman theory, the formulation is applied to generalized magnetothermoelasticity with one relaxation time. Based on eigenvalue approach, exponential Fourier transform and Laplace techniques, the analytical solutions has been obtained. The inverses of Fourier transforms are obtained analytically. Numerical computations for a fiber-reinforced-like material have been performed and the results are presented graphically. The results of the temperature, displacement components and stress components have been verified numerically and are represented graphically. Comparisons are made with the results predicted by the presence and absence of reinforcement.

  11. Development of high-toughness low-viscosity nano-molecular resins for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Matt; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Woody; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony; Villacorta, Ricardo; Solamon, Ray

    2011-04-01

    As the nation's asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, the need for corrective measures to restore safety and rideability increases. The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life and no innovative technologies are available to improve the safety of US drivers, reduce the cost of road maintenance. We have identified a polymeric material, dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin, which can be cured by Grubb's catalyst and other commercially available catalysts to become an ultratough material with all the desired properties for pothole repair. We have characterized DCPD infiltration characteristics using non-destructive CT scan, and the mechanical properties using indirect tensile test under hot, cold or wet conditions. The preliminary results show that DCPD is a promising material for applications in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  12. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz; Radan, Pegah

    2015-05-01

    Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base.

  13. Friction stir processing of an aluminum-magnesium alloy with pre-placing elemental titanium powder: In-situ formation of an Al{sub 3}Ti-reinforced nanocomposite and materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Khodabakhshi, F.; Simchi, A.; Kokabi, A.H.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-10-15

    A fine-grained Al–Mg/Al{sub 3}Ti nanocomposite was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP) of an aluminum-magnesium (AA5052) alloy with pre-placed titanium powder in the stirred zone. Microstructural evolutions and formation of intermetallic phases were analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques across the thickness section of the processed sheets. The microstructure of the nanocomposite consisted of a fine-grained aluminum matrix (1.5 µm), un-reacted titanium particles (<40 µm) and reinforcement particles of Al{sub 3}Ti (<100 nm) and Mg{sub 2}Si (<100 nm). Detailed microstructural analysis indicated solid-state interfacial reactions between the aluminum matrix and micro-sized titanium particles to form Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic phase. The hard inclusions were then fractured and re-distributed in the metal matrix by the severe thermo-mechanical conditions imposed by FSP. Evaluation of mechanical properties by hardness measurement and uniaxial tensile test determined significant enhancement in the mechanical strength (by 2.5 order of magnetite) with a high ductility (~22%). Based on a dislocation-based model analysis, it was suggested that the strength enhancement was governed by grain refinement and the presence of hard inclusions (4 vol%) in the metal matrix. Fractographic studies also showed a ductile-brittle fracture mode for the nanocomposite compared with fully ductile rupture of the annealed alloy as well as the FSPed specimen without pre-placing titanium particles. - Highlights: • FSP was employed to fabricate in situ nanocomposite. • The AA5052 Al alloy with pre-placed micro-sized Ti particles were utilized. • The structural analysis was revealed that the in situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti nanophase. • The SZ grain structure was refined by PSN and ZHP mechanisms during DRX. • Hardness and tensile strength were improved up to ~2.5 times with a good ductility.

  14. Materials characterization on efforts for ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytula, Thomas P.; Schad, Kristin C.; Swann, Myles H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental efforts to develop a new procedure to measure char depth in carbon phenolic nozzle material are described. Using a Shor Type D Durometer, hardness profiles were mapped across post fired sample blocks and specimens from a fired rocket nozzle. Linear regression was used to estimate the char depth. Results are compared to those obtained from computed tomography in a comparative experiment. There was no significant difference in the depth estimates obtained by the two methods.

  15. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  16. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  17. Nanomechanical characterization and molecular mechanism study of nanoparticle reinforced and cross-linked chitosan biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Rath, Amrita; Mathesan, Santhosh; Ghosh, Pijush

    2015-03-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a biomaterial that offers many sophisticated and innovative applications in the biomedical field owing to its excellent characteristics of biodegradability, biocompatibility and non-toxicity. However, very low mechanical properties of chitosan polymer impose restriction on its further development. Cross-linking and nanoparticle reinforcement are the two possible methods to improve the mechanical properties of chitosan films. In this research, these two methods are adopted individually by using tripolyphosphate as cross-linker and nano-hydroxyapatite as particle reinforcement. The nanomechanical characterizations under static loading conditions are performed on these modified chitosan films. It is observed that nanoparticle reinforcement provided necessary mechanical properties such as ductility and modulus. The mechanisms involved in improvement of mechanical properties due to particle reinforcement are studied by molecular dynamics (MD). Further, improvement in mechanical properties due to combination of particle reinforcement and cross-linking agent with chitosan is investigated. The stress relaxation behavior for all these types of films is characterized under dynamic loading conditions using dynamic mechanical analysis (nanoDMA) experiment. A viscoelastic solid like response is observed for all types of film with modulus relaxing by 3-6% of its initial value. A suitable generalized Maxwell model is fitted with the obtained viscoelastic response of these films. The response to nano-scratch behavior is also studied for particle reinforced composite films.

  18. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  19. Materials Characterization and Microelectronic Implementation of Metal-insulator Transition Materials and Phase Change Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION MATERIALS...MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION MATERIALS AND PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS THESIS...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-016 MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND MICROELECTRONIC IMPLEMENTATION OF METAL -INSULATOR TRANSITION

  20. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  1. Reinforcements: The key to high performance composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    Better high temperature fibers are the key to high performance, light weight composite materials. However, current U.S. and Japanese fibers still have inadequate high temperature strength, creep resistance, oxidation resistance, modulus, stability, and thermal expansion match with some of the high temperature matrices being considered for future aerospace applications. In response to this clear deficiency, both countries have research and development activities underway. Once successful fibers are identified, their production will need to be taken from laboratory scale to pilot plant scale. In such efforts it can be anticipated that the Japanese decisions will be based on longer term criteria than those applied in the U.S. Since the initial markets will be small, short term financial criteria may adversely minimize the number and strength of U.S. aerospace materials suppliers to well into the 21st century. This situation can only be compounded by the Japanese interests in learning to make commercial products with existing materials so that when the required advanced fibers eventually do arrive, their manufacturing skills will be developed.

  2. Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsien-Yang; Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion with the stress concentrations on fiber-reinforced composites materials under tensile stresses. The Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion was developed from the initial yielding of materials based on macromechanics. To investigate this criterion, the influence of the materials anisotropic properties and far field loading on the composite materials with central hole and normal crack were studied. Special emphasis was placed on defining the crack tip stress fields and their applications. The study of Yeh-Stratton criterion for damage zone stress fields on fiber-reinforced composites under tensile loading was compared with several fracture criteria; Tsai-Wu Theory, Hoffman Theory, Fischer Theory, and Cowin Theory. Theoretical predictions from these criteria are examined using experimental results.

  3. Flammability Characteristics of Glass Reinforced Epoxy Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    adopted for the realistic flamability evaluation and screening of FRC materials for Army applications. UNCLASSIFIED S9CU*ITY CLASSIICATION Of THIS PAGIE...m2/g) is calculated by multiplying the optical density (m-1 ) by the total volumetric flow cate (m3/s) and dividing by the generation rate of...the ignition zone (50 kW/m2 of external heat flux with a pilot flame). FPI values were calculated as follows: I) chemical heat release rate (in kW

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Rauser, Richard W.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 C and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used because they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with X-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  6. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta; Cresko, Joseph

    2016-09-22

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-art manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.

  7. Strength and toughness of structural fibres for composite material reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Herráez, M.; Fernández, A.; Lopes, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the strength and fracture toughness of three common structural fibres, E-glass, AS4 carbon and Kevlar KM2, is presented in this work. The notched specimens were prepared by means of selective carving of individual fibres by means of the focused ion beam. A straight-fronted edge notch was introduced in a plane perpendicular to the fibre axis, with the relative notch depth being a0/D≈0.1 and the notch radius at the tip approximately 50 nm. The selection of the appropriate beam current during milling operations was performed to avoid to as much as possible any microstructural changes owing to ion impingement. Both notched and un-notched fibres were submitted to uniaxial tensile tests up to failure. The strength of the un-notched fibres was characterized in terms of the Weibull statistics, whereas the residual strength of the notched fibres was used to determine their apparent toughness. To this end, the stress intensity factor of a fronted edge crack was computed by means of the finite-element method for different crack lengths. The experimental results agreed with those reported in the literature for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres obtained by using similar techniques. After mechanical testing, the fracture surface of the fibres was analysed to ascertain the failure mechanisms. It was found that AS4 carbon and E-glass fibres presented the lower toughness with fracture surfaces perpendicular to the fibre axis, emanating from the notch tip. The fractured region of Kevlar KM2 fibres extended along the fibre and showed large permanent deformation, which explains their higher degree of toughness when compared with carbon and glass fibres. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242306

  8. Direct-write 3D printing of composite materials with magnetically aligned discontinuous reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Caunter, Andrew; Dendulk, Amy; Goodrich, Scott; Pembroke, Ryan; Shores, Dan; Erb, Randall M.

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing of fiber reinforced composites represents an enabling technology that may bring toughness and specific strength to complex parts. Recently, direct-write 3D printing has been offered as a promising route to manufacturing fiber reinforced composites that show high specific strength. These approaches primarily rely on the use of shear-alignment during the extrusion process to align fibers along the printing direction. Shear alignment prevents fibers from being oriented along principle stress directions of the final designed part. This paper describes a new direct-write style 3D printing system that incorporates magnetic fields to actively control the orientation of reinforcing fibers during the printing of fiber reinforced composites. Such a manufacturing system is fraught with complications from the high shear dominated alignment experienced by the fibers during extrusion to the slow magnetic alignment dynamics of fibers in viscous media. Here we characterize these issues and suggest effective operating windows in which magnetic alignment is a viable approach to orienting reinforcing particles during direct-write 3D printing.

  9. The effect of CNTs reinforcement on thermal and electrical properties of cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of the nano-reinforcement on the thermal properties of cement mortar. Nano-modified cement mortar with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) leading to the development of innovative materials possessing multi-functionality and smartness. Such multifunctional properties include enhanced mechanical behavior, electrical and thermal conductivity, and piezo-electric characteristics. The assessment of the thermal behavior was evaluated using IR Thermography. Two different thermographic techniques are used to monitor the influence of the nano-reinforcement. To eliminate any extrinsic effects (e.g. humidity) the specimens were dried in an oven before testing. The electrical resistivity was measured with a contact test method using a custom made apparatus and applying a known D.C. voltage. This study indicate that the CNTs nano-reinforcement enhance the thermal and electrical properties and demonstrate them useful as sensors in a wide variety of applications.

  10. Compressive strength of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed - delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  11. A novel nanosilica-reinforced waterborne UV-curable material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong; Wu, Wenjian; Mu, Yuping

    2009-07-01

    A novel multifunctional UV-curable waterborne polyurethane-acrylate(WPUA) was synthesized with isophorone diisocyanate(IPDI), polycaprolactone diols(PCL), dimethylol propionic acid(DMPA) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA). The chain structure of the WPUA was identified by 1H NMR spectrum. After that, the nanosilica modified with KH570 was dispersed in WPUA, and the effects were studied with dispersion and cast films. It was found that the viscosity of the hybrid emulsion was increased, and the water resistance, abrasion resistance and mechanical properties were improved with the addition and increasing amount of silica, to provide the WPUA/SiO2 hybrid materials with excellent performance and more expansive prospects.

  12. Environmental Durability of Materials and Bonded Joints Involving Fiber Reinforced Polymers and Concerte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavari, Mahdi Mansouri; rad, A. Yazdi; Gavari, Mohsen Mansouri

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the research work undertaken to evaluate the performance of materials and bonded joints involving Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) and concrete. Experimental variables ncluded polymer composite materials, test methods and environmental test conditions. Tensile and flexural tests were carried out to determine short term and long term environmental durability of composite materials. Single lap shear, a modified wedge cleavage and pull-off adhesion tests were used to study the performance of bonded joints. It is shown the tensile strength of composite materials can be affected after exposure to hot/humid conditions. The performance of stressed single lap joints was also affected by hot/humid conditions.

  13. Development of Mathematical and Computational Models to Design Selectively Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baobao

    Different positions of a material used for structures experience different stresses, sometimes at both extremes, when undergoing processing, manufacturing, and serving. Taking the three-point bending as an example, the plate experiences higher stress in the middle span area and lower stress in both sides of the plate. In order to ensure the performance and reduce the cost of the composite, placement of different composite material with different mechanical properties, i.e. selective reinforcement, is proposed. Very few study has been conducted on selective reinforcement. Therefore, basic understanding on the relationship between the selective reinforcing variables and the overall properties of composite material is still unclear and there is still no clear methodology to design composite materials under different types of loads. This study started from the analysis of composite laminate under three point bending test. From the mechanical analysis and simulation result of homogeneously reinforced composite materials, it is found that the stress is not evenly distributed on the plate based on through-thickness direction and longitudinal direction. Based on these results, a map for the stress distribution under three point bending was developed. Next, the composite plate was selectively designed using two types of configurations. Mathematical and finite element analysis (FEA) models were built based on these designs. Experimental data from tests of hybrid composite materials was used to verify the mathematical and FEA models. Analysis of the mathematical model indicates that the increase in stiffness of the material at the top and bottom surfaces and middle-span area is the most effective way to improve the flexural modulus in three point bending test. At the end of this study, a complete methodology to perform the selective design was developed.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  15. Preparation and characterization of bionanocomposite films reinforced with nano kaolin.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Shima; Alias, Abd Karim; Ariffin, Fazilah; Mahmud, Shahrom; Najafi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Effects of nano-kaolin incorporation into semolina films on the physical, mechanical, thermal, barrier and antimicrobial properties of the resulting bio-nanocomposite films were investigated. The properties included crystal structure (by X-ray diffraction), mechanical resistance, color, Fourier transform infrared spectra, decomposition temperature, water-vapor permeability (WVP), oxygen permeability (OP), and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Kaolin was incorporated into biofilms at various amounts (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 %, w/w total solid). All films were plasticized with 50 % (w/w total solid) combination of sorbitol/glycerol at 3:1 ratio. The incorporation of nanokaolin into semolina films decreased OP and WVP. The moisture content and water solubility of the films were found to decrease by nanokaolin reinforcement, and mechanical properties of films were improved by increasing nanokaolin concentration. Tensile strength and Young's modulus increased from 3.41 to 5.44 MPa and from 63.12 to 136.18, respectively, and elongation-at-break decreased. The films did not exhibit UV absorption. In conclusion, nanokaolin incorporation enhanced the barrier and mechanical properties of semolina films, indicating the potential application of these bio-nanocomposites in food-product packaging.

  16. Damage evaluation for concrete structures using fiber-reinforced composites as self-diagnosis materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Kenji; Shiba, Keiji; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugita, Minoru; Okuhara, Yoshiki

    2004-07-01

    Health monitoring techniques that utilize structural materials with the ability to diagnose their own condition, so-called self-diagnosis materials, have been under development. The authors have developed two types of electrically conductive fiber reinforced composite to diagnose cracks in concrete structures: a high sensitivity detection sensor and maximum strain memory sensor. Three points bending tests on pre-notched reinforced concrete beam under the cyclic loading is presented using these two self-diagnosis materials, with attention towards the relationship between crack width of the concrete beam and electric resistance. Moreover, effects of volume fraction of carbon particle on memorizing maximum strain are investigated. It has been proved that both self-diagnosis materials are highly effective to detect the cracks in the concrete. And present strain can be obtained by the proposed fiber reinforced plastic composites. Although volume fraction of carbon particle has significant influence on the characteristics of memorizing maximum strain, maximum strain of the concrete structures can be memorized using the appropriate self-diagnosis materials.

  17. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  18. The Preparation and Characterization of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Aaron

    1980-01-01

    Presents several examples illustrating different aspects of materials problems, including problems associated with solid-solid reactions, sintering and crystal growth, characterization of materials, preparation and characterization of stoichiometric ferrites and chromites, copper-sulfur systems, growth of single crystals by chemical vapor…

  19. The Preparation and Characterization of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Aaron

    1980-01-01

    Presents several examples illustrating different aspects of materials problems, including problems associated with solid-solid reactions, sintering and crystal growth, characterization of materials, preparation and characterization of stoichiometric ferrites and chromites, copper-sulfur systems, growth of single crystals by chemical vapor…

  20. Failure Characterization of a Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composite with Circular Holes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    cyanoacrylate glue , one at the side of the hole (on the axis normal to the load direction) and one centered 0.9 cm from the center of the hole, midway between the...such as FormicaT), concrete reinforced with steel rods, and steel-belted tires. Even in nature, wood is a composite material, with cellulose fibers bound

  1. Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Silicon Carbide (SiC) Reinforced Al-based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujba, Kachalla Abdullahi

    Composites are engineered materials developed from constituent materials; matrix and reinforcements, to attain synergistic behavior at the micro and macroscopic level which are different from the individual materials. The high specific strength, low weight, excellent chemical resistance and fatigue endurance makes these composites superior than other materials despite anisotropic behaviors. Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have excellent physical and mechanical properties and alumium (Al) alloy composites have gained considerable interest and are used in multiple industries including: aerospace, structural and automotive. The aim of this research work is to develop an advanced Al-based nanocomposites reinforced with Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silicon carbide particulates (SiCp) nanophases using mechanical alloying and advanced consolidation procedure (Non-conventional) i.e. Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) using two types of aluminum alloys (Al-7Si-0.3mg and Al-12Si-0.3Mg). Different concentrations of SiCp and CNTs were added and ball milled for different milling periods under controlled atmosphere to study the effect of milling time and the distribution of the second phases. Characterization techniques were used to investigate the morphology of the as received monolithic and milled powder using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Mapping, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Particle Size Analyses (PSA). The results revealed that the addition of high concentrations of SiCp and CNTs in both alloys aided in refining the structure of the resulting powder further as the reinforcement particles acted like a grinding agent. Good distribution of reinforcing particles was observed from SEM and no compositional fluctuations were observed from the EDS. Some degree of agglomerations was observed despite the ethyl alcohol sonication effect of the CNTs before ball milling. From the XRD; continuous reduction in crystallite size and

  2. Prediction of oxidation performance of reinforced carbon-carbon material for Space Shuttle leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method was developed for predicting oxidation performance, in an earth atmospheric entry environment, of reinforced carbon-carbon material, coated for oxidation resistance. A model was developed which describes oxidation control mechanisms, and the equations defining these mechanisms were derived. These relations were used to correlate oxidation test data, and to infer pertinent rate constants. Predictions were made of material oxidation performance in a representative entry environment, and the predictions were compared with ground test data. Results indicate that the method can be successfully used for predicting material oxidation performance.

  3. Material Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Marrow Stromal Cells on Fiber-Reinforced Laminated Hydrogel Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weijie; Ma, Junyu; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2009-01-01

    The fibrils in the bone matrix are glued together by ECM proteins to form laminated structures (osteons) to provide elasticity and a supportive substrate for osteogenesis. The objective of this work was to investigate material properties and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells seeded on osteon-mimetic fiber-reinforced hydrogel/apatite composites. Layers of electrospun poly(L-lactide) (L-PLA) fiber mesh coated with a poly(lactide-co-ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel precursor solution were stacked and pressed together, and crosslinked to produce a laminated fiber-reinforced composite. Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals were added to the precursor solution to produce an osteoconductive matrix for BMS cells. Acrylamide-terminated RGD peptide (Ac-GRGD) was conjugated to the PLEOF/HA hydrogel phase to promote focal point adhesion of BMS cells. Laminates were characterized with respect to Young’s modulus, degradation kinetics, and osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells. The moduli of the laminates under dry and wet conditions were significantly higher than those of the fiber mesh and PLEOF/HA hydrogel, and within the range of values reported for wet human cancellous bone. At days 14 and 21, ALPase activity of the laminates was significantly higher than those of the fiber mesh and hydrogel. Lamination significantly increased the extent of mineralization of BMS cells and laminates with HA and conjugated with RGD (Lam-RGD-HA) had 2.7-, 3.5-, and 2.8-fold higher calcium content (compared to laminates without HA or RGD) after 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The Lam-RGD-HA group had significantly higher expression of osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC) compared to the hydrogel or laminates without HA or RGD, consistent with the higher ALPase activity and calcium content of Lam-RGD-HA. Laminated osteon-mimetic structures have the potential to provide mechanical strength to the regenerating region as well as supporting the differentiation

  4. Tribological properties of metal-matrix composite materials reinforced by superelastic hard carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, I. N.; Drozdova, E. I.; Chernogorova, O. P.; Blinov, V. M.; Ekimov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-matrix composite materials (CMs) are synthesized from a mixture of a metal powder (Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al-based alloy) and fullerenes (10 wt %). The thermobaric synthesis conditions (700-1000°C, 5-8 GPa) ensure the collapse of fullerene molecules and their transformation into superelastic carbon phase particles with an indentation hardness H IT = 10-37 GPa, an elastic modulus E IT = 60-260 GPa, and an elastic recovery of >80% upon indentation. After reinforcing by superelastic hard carbon, the friction coefficient of CM decreases by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the friction coefficient of the matrix metal, and the abrasive wear resistance increases by a factor of 4-200. Superelastic hard carbon particles are a unique reinforcing material for an increase in the wear resistance and a simultaneous decrease in the friction coefficient of CM.

  5. Anisotropic characterization of magnetorheological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, E.; Modler, N.; Gude, M.

    2017-06-01

    For the development of energy efficient lightweight parts novel function integrating materials are needed. Concerning this field of application magnetorheological (MR) fluids, MR elastomers and MR composites are promising materials allowing the adjustment of mechanical properties by an external magnetic field. A key issue for operating such structures in praxis is the magneto-mechanical description. Most rheological properties are gathered at laboratory conditions for high magnetic flux densities and a single field direction, which does not correspond to real praxis conditions. Although anisotropic formation of superstructures can be observed in MR suspensions (Fig. 1) or experimenters intentionally polymerize MR elastomers with anisotropic superstructures these MR materials are usually described in an external magnetic field as uniform, isotropic materials. This is due to missing possibilities for experimentally measuring field angle dependent properties and ways of distinguishing between material properties and frictional effects. Just a few scientific works experimentally investigated the influence of different field angles (Ambacher et al., 1992; Grants et al., 1990; Kuzhir et al., 2003) [1-3] or the influence of surface roughness on the shear behaviour of magnetic fluids (Tang and Conrad, 1996) [4]. The aim of this work is the introduction of a novel field angle cell allowing the determination of anisotropic mechanical properties for various MR materials depending on the applied magnetic field angle.

  6. Processing and characterization of continuous fiber-reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaio-Wen.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the processing and mechanical behavior, particularly damage evolution and failure mechanisms, of continuous fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic composites was conducted. The processing effort utilized a slurry infiltration/hot pressing technique to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced borosilicate glass and Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced borosilicate glass composites. A slurry infiltration prepregging setup was designed and successfully operated. Processing parameters including slurry composition, binder burnout cycle and hot pressing schedule were systematically studied and optimized. Mechanical behavior studies were conducted on Nicalon SiC/Calcium Aluminosilicate (CAS) composites. The nature and the strength of the fiber/matrix interface was first characterized using a variety of fiber indentation test methods and transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  8. Damage detection and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites using ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ajith

    Due to the prevalence of fiber-reinforced composites in industrial applications, the need for damage-detection and characterization has increased. Ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) is a powerful and non-invasive method of detecting flaws and defects in composite materials. Air-coupled and immersion UT techniques are used to quantify the effect of matrix microcracking and delamination within the composite laminate. Detection of matrix microcracks in the laminate is of primary concern since microcracking is one of the initial damage modes resulting in local stiffness reduction. The techniques considered include pulse-echo in immersion, angle-beam through-transmission Lamb wave time-of-flight shift and velocity measurements, and angle-beam backscatter measurements from single microcracks within the composite laminate. The time-of-flight measurements are shown to be a reasonable method for quantifying stiffness reduction in the laminate, however special attention must be provided to the Lamb modes considered and their sensitivity to the independent stiffness components. The angle-beam backscatter technique may be used to detect individual microcracks but poses a limitation on the frequency and depth of inspection. Ultimately, the quantification of microcracking will provide an early descriptor of failure in the laminate.

  9. Feasibility study of prestressed natural fiber-reinforced polylactic acid (pla) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinchcliffe, Sean A.

    The feasibility of manufacturing prestressed natural-fiber reinforced biopolymer composites is demonstrated in this work. The objective of this study was to illustrate that the specific mechanical properties of biopolymers can be enhanced by leveraging a combination of additive manufacturing (3D printing) and post-tensioning of continuous natural fiber reinforcement. Tensile and flexural PLA specimens were 3D-printed with and without post-tensioning ducts. The mechanical properties of reinforcing fibers jute and flax were characterized prior to post-tensioning. The effect of matrix cross-sectional geometry and post-tensioning on the specific mechanical properties of PLA were investigated using mechanical testing. Numerical and analytical models were developed to predict the experimental results, which confirm that 3D-printed matrices improve the specific mechanical properties of PLA composites and are further improved via initial fiber prestressing. The results suggest that both additive manufacturing and fiber prestressing represent viable new methods for improving the mechanical performance of natural fiber-reinforced polymeric composites.

  10. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  11. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  12. SRB TPS closeout materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karu, Z. S.

    1979-01-01

    The recession characteristics of the materials used to closeout the Thermal Protection System (TPS) on the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) were assessed. Two candidate closeout materials namely, K5NA and MTA2 is the Marshall Trowelable Ablator. Test panels of each of these two materials were subjected to aerodynamic heat and shear in the NASA Hot Gas Facility. Pretest and Post-test measurements were taken and the rate of recession (R) thus determined was correlated with the heating rate. A least squares curve fit of the data together with another least squares 95% confidence level fit, was performed. The characteristics of the two materials when compared showed that both materials performed equally well at the higher heating rates (10 q 30 Btu/sq ft/sec) but MTA2 was slightly better, not receding as fast, at the lower q values. The comparison of the R versus q curves for K5NA and MTA2 with that of primary TPS P-50 cork on the SRB Aft Skirt was good.

  13. DCPD resin catalyzed with Grubbs catalysts for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Yao; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Jiann-Wen; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony

    2012-04-01

    The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life. In order to reinstate and maintain our pavement infrastructure integrity and durability, we have identified dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin for this purpose due to its unique properties - low cost, low viscosity at beginning and ultra-toughness after curing, chemical compatibility with tar, tunable curing profile due to catalyst design. DCPD resin can penetrate into high porous pavement area to reinforce them and block water or moisture seeping channels. It also can strongly bond the pothole patches with original pavement, and hold them together for a whole. With the catalyst design, DCPD could apply for all the weather, cold or hot, wet or dry. In this paper, we will investigate the DCPD reinforcement for cold mix and hot mix for pothole repair, as well as the bonding strength improvement between repair materials and original pavement, and show that DCPD is promising materials for application in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  14. Impact resistance of sustainable construction material using light weight oil palm shells reinforced geogrid concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muda, Z. C.; Malik, G.; Usman, F.; Beddu, S.; Alam, M. A.; Mustapha, K. N.; Birima, A. H.; Zarroq, O. S.; Sidek, L. M.; Rashid, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigate the performance of lightweight oil palm shells (OPS) concrete slab with geogrid reinforcement of 300mm × 300mm size with 20mm, 30mm and 40 mm thick casted with different geogrid orientation and boundary conditions subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.2 kg drop at 1 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance the slab thickness, boundary conditions and geogrid reinforcement orientation. Test results indicate that the used of the geogrid reinforcement increased the impact resistance under service (first) limit crack up to 5.9 times and at ultimate limit crack up to 20.1 times against the control sample (without geogrid). A good linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against the slab thickness. The orientation of the geogrid has minor significant to the crack resistance of the OPS concrete slab. OPS geogrid reinforced slab has a good crack resistance properties that can be utilized as a sustainable impact resistance construction materials.

  15. Nondestructive characterization of the elastic constants of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1993-01-01

    Composite structural components may be subjected to a variety of defects resulting in a sharp reduction in their load carrying capacity or even catastrophic failure. Thus, it is extremely important to have the means to monitor the degradation suffered by critical components of a structure for safe operation during its service life. A nondestructive method based on ultrasonics has recently been developed for the quantitative evaluation of composite structural components during service. The experimental part of the technique uses a two-transducer, pitch-catch type arrangement to generate a variety of elastic waves within the specimen immersed in water. The recorded reflection data are then analyzed by means of a theoretical model to back out the relevant properties. In this paper the method is applied to determine the stiffness constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy materials. The measurements are shown to be efficient and sufficiently accurate so that it can be used for early detection of material degradation in composite structural elements during service.

  16. Nondestructive Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, composite materials are applied to fracture-critical structures of aircraft and spacecraft...Ultrasonics offer the most capable inspection technology and recently developed techniques appear to improve this technology significantly... Recent progress in ultrasonic NDE of composites will be reviewed.

  17. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  18. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  19. Noncontacting NDE for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, K.L.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes research performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from May 1983 to September 1995, funded by the Interior Department`s Bureau of Mines, on ultrasonic methods (particularly noncontacting methods) for nondestructive evaluation and process control. The abilities of ultrasonic techniques to measure microstructural features in metals, ceramics, and composite materials were demonstrated. A major emphasis in this project was the development of noncontacting ultrasonic techniques, based on laser generation and detection of elastic waves, for process monitoring and control in high-temperature, harsh environments without close coupling to the material being processed. Laser ultrasonic measurements were utilized for in situ process monitoring during ceramic sintering, high temperature annealing, and molten metal solidification.

  20. Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    involved the dynamic testing of the specimens in order to experimentally determine the first three bending modes of the specimen to compare with...homogeneous material and the FGM were tested dynamically for comparison with the analytical models. Once the natural frequencies for the first three ...modulus, “in two- phase composites where one phase is discontinuous in a continuous matrix of the other phase [23].” The Halpin-Tsai equation (3) allows

  1. Mechanical and thermal properties of composite material system reinforced with micro glass balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Kikuchi, T.; Ishiwatari, H.

    2010-06-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of polymer composites reinforced with micro glass balloons are investigated in temperature conditions. The matrix resin of the composite is epoxy resin and its dispersion is micro glassy spherical shells of Sirasu Balloon. The composite system developed is a kind of micro porous materials with lightweight. From the experimental data of bending and tension tests, mechanical behaviours of the composites were clarified, and the effects of material properties and configurations on the mechanical properties of composites were discussed from the viewpoint of micromechanical study. A homogenization theory with multi-scale analytical method has been applied in order to evaluate the composite material system in temperature conditions. Numerical calculations were performed by using a model of micro porous materials and setting properties of each material at the temperature. Analytical results for the mechanical behaviour made a good agreement with experimental result of the composites in temperature conditions.

  2. Apparatus for consolidating a pre-impregnated, filament-reinforced polymeric prepreg material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method were developed for providing a uniform, consolidated, unidirectional, continuous, fiber-reinforced polymeric material. The apparatus comprises a supply means, a forming means, a shaping means, and a take-up means. The forming means further comprises a pre-melting chamber and a stationary bar assembly. The shaping means is a loaded cooled nip-roller apparatus. Forming takes place by heating a polymeric prepreg material to a temperature where the polymer becomes viscous and applying pressure gradients at separate locations along the prepreg material. Upon exiting the forming means, the polymeric prepreg material is malleable, consolidated, and flattened. Shaping takes place by passing the malleable, consolidated, flattened prepreg material through a shaped, matched groove in a loaded, cooled nip-roller apparatus to provide the final solid product.

  3. Application of fiber-reinforced bismaleimide materials to aircraft nacelle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peros, Vasilios; Ruth, John; Trawinski, David

    1992-01-01

    Existing aircraft engine nacelle structures employ advanced composite materials to reduce weight and thereby increase overall performance. Use of advanced composite materials on existing aircraft nacelle structures includes fiber-reinforced epoxy structures and has typically been limited to regions furthest away from the hot engine core. Portions of the nacelle structure that are closer to the engine require materials with a higher temperature capability. In these portions, existing nacelle structures employ aluminum sandwich construction and skin/stringer construction. The aluminum structure is composed of many detail parts and assemblies and is usually protected by some form of ablative, insulator, or metallic thermal shield. A one-piece composite inner cowl for a new-generation engine nacelle structure has been designed using fiber-reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) materials and honeycomb core in a sandwich construction. The new composite design has many advantages over the existing aluminum structure. Multiple details were integrated into the one-piece composite design, thereby significantly reducing the number of detail parts and fasteners. The use of lightweight materials and the reduction of the number of joints result in a significant weight reduction over the aluminum design; manufacturing labor and the overall number of tools required have also been reduced. Several significant technical issues were addressed in the development of a BMI composite design. Technical evaluation of the available BMI systems led to the selection of a toughened BMI material which was resistant to microcracking under thermal cyclic loading and enhanced the damage tolerance of the structure. Technical evaluation of the degradation of BMI materials in contact with aluminum and other metals validated methods for isolation of the various materials. Graphite-reinforced BMI in contact with aluminum and some steels was found to degrade in salt spray testing. Isolation techniques such as

  4. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Silica Fibre Reinforced Epoxides and a Theory of Fracture of Fibre Reinforced Viscoelastic Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the rate at which elastic energy, released by fiber breakage, can be absorbed, is calculated. Analogies of fiber reinforcement theory and chain fracture theories in polymers are discussed. (Author Modified Abstract)

  6. Characterizing the temperature dependence of electronic packaging-material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chia-Yu; Ume, Charles

    1995-06-01

    A computer-controlled, temperature-dependent material characterization system has been developed for thermal deformation analysis in electronic packaging applications, especially for printed wiring assembly warpage study. For fiberglass-reinforced epoxy (FR-4 type) material, the Young's moduli decrease to as low as 20-30% of the room-temperature values, while the shear moduli decrease to as low as 60-70% of the room-temperature values. The electrical resistance strain gage technique was used in this research. The test results produced overestimated values in property measurements, and this was shown in a case study. A noncontact strau]n measurement technique (laser extensometer) is now being used to measure these properties. Discrepancies of finite-element warpage predictions using different property values increase as the temperature increases from the stress-free temperature.

  7. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  8. Physical Characterization of Electronic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    rQ\\ ~NN/ Cr J + - F 4-. 4-’ o 0 ~’) tc~ N C-. ~ ’-4 II ~4j -4 r.. .4 C~.. -A I I - ’K) ~ / I + r~fl -. -> C,) + 𔃼 U) I 4 .- I~ 4- )-\\ j 4-, + - -~ I...IS ACSIW CTLOG HUMMER •. 4. TITLCli(Isasu 10 i~ie .Type O a~ir ? PERIO aln/go PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRONIC j / Final ’echnical.e...Laboratory of the Deputy for Electronic Technology of the Rome Air Development Center. (over) DO ’,A. 4,, 1473 O I NoV ,s osoLAz UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY

  9. Flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with advanced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shahawy, M.A.; Beitelman, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study to investigate the flexural behavior of structurally damaged reinforced and prestressed concrete members retrofitted with bonded carbon fiber materials. The effect of CFRP laminates, bonded to the soffit of precracked reinforced concrete rectangular and tee beams, is investigated in terms of flexural strength, deflections, cracking behavior and failure modes. The results indicate that strengthening of significantly cracked structural members by bonding Carbon laminates is structurally efficient and that the retrofitted members are restored to stiffness and strength values nearly equal to or greater than those of the original. The results indicate that the retrofitted members maintained adequate structural integrity and composite action at all stages of testing up to failure.

  10. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, Suleyman B.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quaiscrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked compositehibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus (stiffness).

  11. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked composite exhibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young`s modulus (stiffness). 3 figs.

  12. Fiber-reinforced materials: finite elements for the treatment of the inextensibility constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Scalet, Giulia; Wriggers, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The present paper proposes a numerical framework for the analysis of problems involving fiber-reinforced anisotropic materials. Specifically, isotropic linear elastic solids, reinforced by a single family of inextensible fibers, are considered. The kinematic constraint equation of inextensibility in the fiber direction leads to the presence of an undetermined fiber stress in the constitutive equations. To avoid locking-phenomena in the numerical solution due to the presence of the constraint, mixed finite elements based on the Lagrange multiplier, perturbed Lagrangian, and penalty method are proposed. Several boundary-value problems under plane strain conditions are solved and numerical results are compared to analytical solutions, whenever the derivation is possible. The performed simulations allow to assess the performance of the proposed finite elements and to discuss several features of the developed formulations concerning the effective approximation for the displacement and fiber stress fields, mesh convergence, and sensitivity to penalty parameters.

  13. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  14. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  15. Structure-processing-property relationships for polymer interphases in fiber reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.

    1995-12-31

    When polymer matrix composite materials are fabricated, polymers are processed to surround each reinforcing element while they are fluid and then they solidify in intimate contact with the reinforcement surface. For thermoset matrices, chemisorption of constituents, segregation of components. and processing constraints all can influence the resulting structure of the polymer in its solidified state. For thermoplastic matrices, segregation by molecular weight, morphological changes resulting from crystallization or additive segregation can also control the final matrix structure. In addition the surface of the fibers is coated with chemical agents that can also interact with the polymer. Examples will be given to illustrate the effect of the structure of this polymer interphase on adhesion. It will be shown that in some cases if the resulting polymer structure is known, adhesion and composite properties can be predicted.

  16. Theoretical analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with NiAl and FeAl matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Several potential reinforcement materials were assessed for their chemical, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and mechanical compatibility with the intermetallic matrices based on NiAl and FeAl. Among the ceramic reinforcement materials, Al2O3, TiC, and TiB2, appear to be the optimum choices for NiAl and FeAl matrices. However, the problem of CTE mismatch with the matrix needs to be solved for these three reinforcement materials. Beryllium-rich intermetallic compounds can be considered as potential reinforcement materials provided suitable reaction barrier coatings can be developed for these. Based on preliminary thermodynamic calculations, Sc2O3 and TiC appear to be suitable as reaction barrier coatings for the beryllides. Several reaction barrier coatings are also suggested for the currently available SiC fibers.

  17. Devices for SRF material characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Goudket, Philippe; Xiao, B.; Junginger, T.

    2016-10-07

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain Rs, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily man ufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure Rs consists of a cylindrical cavity excitedmore » in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known Rs. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub - nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.« less

  18. Devices for SRF material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Goudket, Philippe; Xiao, B.; Junginger, T.

    2016-10-07

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain Rs, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily man ufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure Rs consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known Rs. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub - nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  19. Devices for SRF material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudket, P.; Junginger, T.; Xiao, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    The surface resistance R s of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain R s, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily manufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure R s consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known R s. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub-nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  20. Devices for SRF material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Goudket, Philippe; Xiao, B.; Junginger, T.

    2016-10-07

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain Rs, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily man ufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure Rs consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known Rs. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub - nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber reinforced Post to Core Material

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, JN; Saha, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Aim: To compare the effect of different chemical solvents on glass fiber reinforced posts and to study the effect of these solvents on the shear bond strength of glass fiber reinforced post to core material. Materials and methods: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three chemical solvents, i.e. silane coupling agent, 6% H2O2 and 37% phosphoric acid on the shear bond strength of glass fiber post to a composite resin restorative material. The changes in post surface characteristics after different treatments were also observed, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and shear bond strength was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). Results: Surface treatment with hydrogen peroxide had greatest impact on the post surface followed by 37% phosphoric acid and silane. On evaluation of the shear bond strength, 6% H2O2 exhibited the maximum shear bond strength followed in descending order by 37% phosphoric acid and silane respectively. Conclusion: The surface treatment of glass fiber post enhances the adhesion between the post and composite resin which is used as core material. Failure of a fiber post and composite resin core often occurs at the junction between the two materials. This failure process requires better characterization. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Saha S. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Reinforced Post to Core Material. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):192-196. PMID:25709300

  2. Flexural properties and shock-absorbing capabilities of new face guard materials reinforced with fiberglass cloth.

    PubMed

    Abe, Keisuke; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Churei, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Ueno, Toshiaki

    2013-02-01

     Experimental materials incorporating fiberglass cloth were used to develop a thin and lightweight face guard (FG). This study aims to evaluate the effect of fiberglass reinforcement on the flexural and shock absorption properties compared with conventional thermoplastic materials.  Four commercial 3.2-mm and 1.6-mm medical splint materials (Aquaplast, Polyform, Co-polymer, and Erkodur) and two experimental materials were examined for use in FGs. The experimental materials were prepared by embedding two or four sheets of a plain woven fiberglass cloth on both surfaces of 1.5-mm Aquaplast. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were determined using a three-point bending test. The shock absorption properties were evaluated for a 5200-N impact load using the first peak intensity with a load cell system and the maximum stress with a film sensor system.  The flexural strength (74.6 MPa) and flexural modulus (6.3 GPa) of the experimental material with four sheets were significantly greater than those of the 3.2-mm commercial specimens, except for the flexural strength of one product. The first peak intensity (515 N) and maximum stress (2.2 MPa) of the experimental material with four sheets were significantly lower than those of the commercial 3.2-mm specimens, except for one product for each property. These results suggest that the thickness and weight of the FG can be reduced using the experimental fiber-reinforced material. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Characterization of MWCNT/Nanoclay Binary Nanoparticles Modified Composites and Fatigue Performance Evaluation of Nanoclay Modified Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-21

    alternatives to conventional metallic materials in aviation, naval and automotive industries due to their low density, higher specific strength and...renowned for their fatigue performance. Wind mill blades, automotive parts and aircraft components are frequently subjected under fatigue load...reinforced with nanoparticles. Zhou et al. incorporated various weight percentage of carbon nanofibers to epoxy and found that 2 wt. % reinforcement

  4. Antifriction and Construction Materials Based on Modified Phenol-Formaldehyde Resins Reinforced with Mineral and Synthetic Fibrous Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistr, M. V.; Boiko, V. S.; Lipko, E. O.; Gerasimenko, K. O.; Gomza, Yu. P.; Vesnin, R. L.; Chernyayev, A. V.; Ananchenko, B. A.; Kovalenko, V. L.

    2014-05-01

    Novel polymer composite materials (PCM) based on resole phenol-formaldehyde resins modified with polyamide and reinforced with a combination of organic and inorganic fibrous fillers have been developed. PCM are characterized by a Charpy impact strength of up to 250 kJ/m2, an ultimate strength in static bending of up to 468 MPa, an ultimate strength in compression of up to 178 MPa, a Martens thermal stability of up to 300 °C, a friction coefficient of up to 0.12, and mass wear of up to 0.76 mg/(cm2 · km). They can be used for the fabrication of products intended for antifriction and constructional purposes.

  5. Characterization of the Material Microstructure for Reactive Material Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Fraunhofer Institut Kuazeitdynamik Ernst - Mach -I nstitut Characterization of the Material Microstructure for Reactive Material Design 2 nI Quarterly...Investigator, Head of Department - Numerical Simulation Prof. Dr. K. Thoma Director of Ernst - Mach -Institut Fraunhofer EMI 2 Report 1-13/08 Table of...2008 Freiburg, Germany Hraunhofe r-Institut fur KuzzLeldynamik , rnst- mach -Intatr Dire(tor Prof Dr. Klaus fhomna EMI Freiburg, Eckerstr 4, 79104

  6. Aspects regarding wearing behaviour in case of aluminium composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a study regarding wear comportment of sintered composite materials obtained by mixture of aluminium with short carbon fibers. The necessity to satisfying more and more the specific functions during design of high performance structures leads to perform multi-materials such as reinforced composite parts. The wear tests were made on three different orientations of fibers on a standard machine of tribology, pin disk type. Counter-disk was made of cast iron with a superficial hardness of 92 HB. The wear rate and friction coefficient decreased exponentially with time of friction and reached a stationary value. This behaviour was attributed to the development of a lubricating film on the friction surface. To conduct this work was performed measurements on samples from the Al matrix composites and carbon fiber 43%, wear mechanism was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. In addition to fiber orientation, the tribological behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with fiber is influenced by the interfacial reaction of fiber-matrix. The characteristics and the dimensions of the interface depend on the cycle of temperature and time at which the material has been subjected during the manufacturing process and thereafter.

  7. Microencapsulation of phase change materials with carbon nanotubes reinforced shell for enhancement of thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiwei; Xia, Yongpeng; Zhang, Huanzhi; Xu, Fen; Zou, Yongjin; Xiang, Cuili; Chu, Hailiang; Qiu, Shujun; Sun, Lixian

    2017-03-01

    Novel microencapsulated phase change materials (micro-PCMs) were synthesized via in-situ polymerization with modified carbon nanotubes(CNTs) reinforced melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and CNTs reinforced n-octadecane as PCMs core. DSC results confirm that the micro-PCMs possess good phase change behavior and excellent thermal cycling stability. Melting enthalpy of the micro-PCMs can achieve 133.1 J/g and has slight changes after 20 times of thermal cyclings. And the incorporation of CNTs supplies the micro-PCMs with fast thermal response rate which increases the crystallization temperature of the micro-PCMs. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of the micro-PCMs has been significantly enhanced by introducing CNTs into their shell and core materials. And the thermal conductivity of micro-PCMs with 1.67 wt.% CNTs can increase by 25%. These results exhibit that the obtained micro-PCMs have a good prospect in thermal energy storage applications.

  8. Complementary methods for nondestructive testing of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Sturm, R.; Vizureanu, P.; Savin, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents complementary methods used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers as two electromagnetic methods using sensor with orthogonal coils and sensor with metamaterials lens as well as ultrasound phased array method and Fiber Bragg gratings embedded instead of a carbon fiber for better health monitoring. The samples were impacted with low energy in order to study delamination influence. The electromagnetic behavior of composite was simulated by finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) software, showing a very good concordance with electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation tests.

  9. On the suitability of fiberglass reinforced polyester as building material for mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Berghahn, R; Brandsch, J; Piringer, O; Pluta, H J; Winkler, T

    1999-07-01

    Gel- and topcoat surface layers on fiberglass [glass-reinforced plastic (GRP)] made of unsaturated resin based on isophthalic acid polyester and neopentyl glycol (ISO-NPG) were tested for leaching, ecotoxicity of water eluates, and abrasion by river sediments at a current speed of 0.5 m * s-1. Leaching from topcoat tempered at low temperature was significant, whereas it was negligible from highly tempered gelcoat. Water eluates from both gel-and topcoat were nontoxic in routinely employed biotests (bacteria, algae, daphnids). No abrasion by river sediments was detectable. Based on these results, GRP with gelcoat made of ISO-NPG is considered a suitable building material for mesocosms.

  10. Field applications of a carbon fiber sheet material for strengthening reinforced concrete structure

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Kliger, H.S.; Yoshizawa, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-31

    Forca Tow Sheet is now being introduced into the USA as a viable alternative to conventional concrete strengthen techniques. This carbon fiber shoot material is externally bonded to reinforced concrete and masonry structures and serves to strengthen existing conditions. Based on the growing use of Tow Sheet in the Japanese market die US infrastructure market is beginning to apply this technology on a number of diverse repair projects. This paper describes actual field applications on industrial and public structures in the US and Japan. Also included are the results of one yen of monitoring of die Japanese structure.

  11. Assessment of Fracture Toughness of a Discretely-Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepashkin, A. A.; Ozherelkov, D. Yu.; Sazonov, Yu. B.; Komissarov, A. A.; Mozolev, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The stress-strain state at the tip of a crack in a discretely reinforced quasi-isotropic carbon-carbon composite material (CCCM) is studied. The stress intensity factor J 1 c and the J-integral are evaluated in accordance with domestic methods and international standards. The distribution of the fields of displacements and strains on the surface of the specimens is determined by the method of numerical correlation of digital images using a VIC-D system. The applicability of different criteria to evaluation of the fracture toughness of CCCM of type TERMAR is determined.

  12. The importance of material structure in the laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced plastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G. . Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Tagliaferri, V. . Istituto di Ingegneria Meccanica); Covelli, L. )

    1995-01-01

    A previously proposed micromechanical formula, aiming to predict the vaporization energy Q[sub v] of composite materials as a function of fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio, was assessed. The experimental data, obtained on glass fiber reinforced plastic panels with different fiber contents cut by a medium power CO[sub 2] cw laser, were treated according to a procedure previously suggested, in order to evaluate Q[sub v]. An excellent agreement was found between experimental and theoretical Q[sub v] values. Theory was then used to predict the response to laser cutting of a composite material with a fiber content varying along the thickness. The theoretical predictions indicated that, in this case, the interpretation of the experimental results may be misleading, bringing to errors in the evaluation of the material thermal properties, or in the prediction of the kerf depth. Some experimental data were obtained, confirming the theoretical findings.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber reinforced Post to Core Material.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, Jn; Saha, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effect of different chemical solvents on glass fiber reinforced posts and to study the effect of these solvents on the shear bond strength of glass fiber reinforced post to core material. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three chemical solvents, i.e. silane coupling agent, 6% H2O2 and 37% phosphoric acid on the shear bond strength of glass fiber post to a composite resin restorative material. The changes in post surface characteristics after different treatments were also observed, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and shear bond strength was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). Surface treatment with hydrogen peroxide had greatest impact on the post surface followed by 37% phosphoric acid and silane. On evaluation of the shear bond strength, 6% H2O2 exhibited the maximum shear bond strength followed in descending order by 37% phosphoric acid and silane respectively. The surface treatment of glass fiber post enhances the adhesion between the post and composite resin which is used as core material. Failure of a fiber post and composite resin core often occurs at the junction between the two materials. This failure process requires better characterization. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Saha S. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Reinforced Post to Core Material. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):192-196.

  14. Fibers and fibrous materials for the reinforcement of composites with extremal characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Perepelkin, K.E.

    1992-11-01

    The development of engineering and science, including medicine, is closely related to the creation of new forms of materials, among which fibers and fibrous materials for the reinforcement of composites with extremal characteristics occupy an important position: super strong, superhigh-modulus, heat-stable and heat-resisting, incombustible, fire-resistant, chemically and biologically stable, and other materials. The production of these materials is based on new forms of organic polymers and fibers: polyolefin, aramide, arimide, oxazole, benzimidazole, carbon, and such forms of inorganic polymers as carbide, oxide, nitride, etc. These forms of fibers and fibrous materials, and composites based on them are being produced in many countries throughout the world. In this study, the authors examine the physical bases of the production of fibers and fibrous materials with extremal characteristics, their structure, and properties. The structural conditionality of the mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, as well as the effect of the surrounding medium - temperature, active media - are analyzed. The results of calculation of the theoretical and maximum allowable values of the properties are given. The most promising forms of fibers and fibrous materials, and their application are described. 66 refs., 10 tabs.

  15. Thermal Protection Materials: Development, Characterization and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Silvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (TPS) are used to protect space vehicles from the heat experienced during entry into an atmosphere. The application for these materials is very specialized as are the materials. They must have specific properties to withstand conditions during specific entries. There is no one-size-fits-all TPS as the conditions experienced by a material are very dependent upon the atmosphere, the entry speed, the size and shape of the vehicle, and the location on the vehicle. However, all TPS must be reliable and efficient to ensure mission safety, that is to protect the vehicle while ensuring that payload is maximized. Types of TPS will be reviewed in relation to types of missions and applications. Both reusable and ablative materials will be discussed. Approaches to characterizing and evaluating these materials will be presented. The role of heritage versus new materials will be described.

  16. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  17. Micro/Nanomechanical characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy composite.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Wang, Xinnan; Tangpong, X W

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of 1 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were characterized using a self-designed micro/nano three point bending tester that was on an atomic force microscope (AFM) to in situ observe MWCNTs movement on the sample surface under loading. The migration of an individual MWCNT at the surface of the nanocomposite was tracked to address the nanomechanical reinforcing mechanism of the nanocomposites. Through morphology analysis of the nanocomposite via scanning electron microscopy, AFM, and digital image correlation technique, it was found that the MWCNTs agglomerate and the bundles were the main factors for limiting the bending strength of the composites. The agglomeration/bundle effect was included in the Halpin-Tsai model to account for the elastic modulus of the nanocomposites.

  18. Dynamic fatigue and strength characterization of three ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica C; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Stoner, Brian R; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2007-06-01

    Fracture strength and fatigue parameters of three ceramic materials submitted to dynamic fatigue were evaluated. A machinable leucite-reinforced dental ceramic, aluminum oxide, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were tested. The inert strength of the materials was determined in air (25 degrees C) at stressing rates of 70, 250, 400 MPa/s for Porcelain, Alumina and YSZ respectively. The data was analyzed using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic of fracture (sigma0) parameters were determined for each material. Specimens were also tested in 3-point bending at different stressing rates in distilled/deionized water at 37 degrees C (dynamic fatigue) in order to calculate the fatigue parameters n and ln B. The strength for each material was characterized using Strength-Probability-Time (SPT) diagrams for 1 day, 1 year and 10 years. YSZ showed a high-fracture strength sigma0 (1,459 MPa) at a failure probability of 63.2% and high resistance to subcritical crack growth. YSZ and alumina showed better resistance to slow crack growth than porcelain, indicating less susceptibility to strength degradation by stress corrosion. Lifetime predictions after 10 years indicate a reduction of 50%, 36% and 29% in strength for porcelain, alumina and YSZ respectively. YSZ seems to be a very promising material for long-term dental and biomedical applications.

  19. NDE for Material Characterization in Aeronautic and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Kautz, Harold E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Martin, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes selected nondestructive evaluation (NDE) approaches that were developed or tailored at the NASA Glenn Research Center for characterizing advanced material systems. The emphasis is on high-temperature aerospace propulsion applications. The material systems include monolithic ceramics, superalloys, and high temperature composites. In the aeronautic area, the highlights are cooled ceramic plate structures for turbine applications, F-TiAl blade materials for low-pressure turbines, thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) for residual stress measurements in titanium based and nickel based engine materials, and acousto ultrasonics (AU) for creep damage assessment in nickel-based alloys. In the space area, examples consist of cooled carbon-carbon composites for gas generator combustors and flywheel rotors composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites for energy storage on the international space station (ISS). The role of NDE in solving manufacturing problems, the effect of defects on structural behavior, and the use of NDE-based finite element modeling are discussed. NDE technology needs for improved microelectronic and mechanical systems as well as health monitoring of micro-materials and components are briefly discussed.

  20. LDEF polymeric materials: A summary of Langley characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Whitley, Karen S.; Kalil, Carol R.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Shen, James Y.; Chang, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) enabled the exposure of a wide variety of materials to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment. This paper provides a summary of research conducted at the Langley Research Center into the response of selected LDEF polymers to this environment. Materials examined include graphite fiber reinforced epoxy, polysulfone, and additional polyimide matrix composites, films of FEP Teflon, Kapton, several experimental high performance polyimides, and films of more traditional polymers such as poly(vinyl toluene) and polystyrene. Exposure duration was either 10 months or 5.8 years. Flight and control specimens were characterized by a number of analytical techniques including ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electron and scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and, in some instances, selected solution property measurements. Characterized effects were found to be primarily surface phenomena. These effects included atomic oxygen-induced erosion of unprotected surfaces and ultraviolet-induced discoloration and changes in selected molecular level parameters. No gross changes in molecular structure or glass transition temperature were noted. The intent of this characterization is to increase our fundamental knowledge of space environmental effects as an aid in developing new and improved polymers for space application. A secondary objective is to develop benchmarks to enhance our methodology for the ground-based simulation of environmental effects so that polymer performance in space can be more reliably predicted.

  1. Recovery of microfields in fiber-reinforced composite materials: Principles and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Andrew J.

    A detailed investigation of the limitations and errors induced by modeling a composite layer composed of straight carbon fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix as an homogenous layer with Cauchy effective moduli is performed. Specifically, the material system studied has IM7 carbon fibers arranged in a square array and bonded together with 8552 epoxy resin (IM7/8552). The finite element method is used to study the effect of free surfaces on the local elastic fields in 0°, 45° and 90° laminae, in which as many as 256 individual fibers are modeled. Through these analyses, it is shown that a micro-boundary layer, analogous to the macro-boundary layer observed in composite laminates, is developed at the microlevel. Additionally, [0/90]s and [90/0]s laminates are studied to investigate the joint action of the macro- and micro-boundary layers. Unless otherwise noted, fiber volume fractions of Vƒ=0.20 and Vƒ=0.65 are selected and the domains are subjected to uniform axial extension. Although this study is done for a highly idealized geometry (i.e. with a single material system and under a simple loading condition) the principles of periodicity, symmetry and antisymmetry used to efficiently perform a direct numerical simulation with a large number of fiber inclusions is general, and can be applied to more complicated geometries and boundary conditions. The purpose of the current work is to be the first step in a building block approach to understanding the interaction of multiple scales in fiber-reinforced composites through direct numerical simulations. The main part of the current manuscript focuses on the characterization of a micro-boundary layer that develops in fiber reinforced composite layers. This phenomena results from the changing constraints on the constituent phases as a result of discontinuities, such as free surfaces or ply interfaces. The effect is most pronounced in laminae that have a fiber termination intersecting a free surface, and appears to be

  2. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  3. Characterization of Polyester Matrix Reinforced with Banana Fibers Thermal Properties by Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, Foluke S.; Netto, Pedro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Artur R. P. Junior Sergio N.

    Synthetic fibers are being replaced gradually by natural materials such as lignocellulosic fibers. Compared to synthetic fibers, natural fibers have shown advantages in technical aspects such as environmental and economic. So there is a growing international interest in the use of those fibers. The banana fiber presents significant properties to be studied, but until now few thermal properties on banana fiber as reinforcement of polyester matrix were performed. The present work had as its objective to investigate, by photoacoustic spectroscopy and photothermal techniques the thermal properties of diffusivity, specific heat capacity and conductivity for polyester composites reinforced with banana fibers. In the polyester matrix will be added up to 30% in volume of continuous and aligned banana fibers. These values show that the incorporation of banana fibers in the polyester matrix changes its thermal properties.

  4. Fracture resistance of simulated immature tooth roots reinforced with MTA or restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Karapinar-Kazandag, Meric; Basrani, Bettina; Tom-Kun Yamagishi, Valerie; Azarpazhooh, Amir; Friedman, Shimon

    2016-04-01

    Immature endodontically treated teeth may require reinforcing to reduce the risk of root fracture. This study assessed the fracture resistance of simulated immature tooth roots reinforced with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or two composite resin (CR) materials. One hundred extracted roots of mature human maxillary incisors were decoronated and sectioned 9 mm further apically from the decoronation line and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). In Group 1 (negative control), roots received no treatment. In groups 2-5, canals were enlarged to 2.1 mm diameter to simulate immature roots, dressed with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2 ) and incubated for 7 days. After removal of Ca(OH)2 , canals in Group 2 (positive control) were left unfilled. Canals in groups 3, 4 and 5 were filled with MTA, BisFil 2B flowable CR or BisFil II posterior CR, respectively. After further incubation for 30 days, specimens were embedded in acrylic cylinders and horizontally loaded in a universal testing machine at cross head speed of 5 mm min(-1) until fracture occurred. Load (N) at and pattern of fracture were recorded. Load at fracture was significantly lower (t-test, P = 0.003) in Group 2 (630 ± 199.12) than in Group 1 (896.98 ± 311.79). It did not differ significantly among groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 (anova, P > 0.07). Pattern of fracture did not differ among the groups either. Within the limitations of this study, root canal filling with MTA and two CR materials affected reinforcement of simulated immature roots to levels comparable with intact roots. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout. PMID:28788137

  6. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-07-24

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  7. Characterization of the Microstructures of Various Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    has been reviewed and is approved for publication. CHARLES R. UNDERWOOD Manager, Characterization Facility Structural Metals Branch Metals & Ceramics...Division FOR THE COMMANDER GAIL E. EICHELMAN Chief, Structural Metals Branch Metals & Ceramics Division "If your address has changed, if you wish to...number) Research on characterization of microstructures of alloys and non- metallic materials is summarized. The emphasis was on improvements in the

  8. Nondestructive spectroscopic characterization of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Walker, Lauren; Sanders, Rachel; Farley, Carlton; Mills, Jonathan; Sharma, Anup

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the application of Raman spectroscopy technique for characterization and identification of the distinct Raman signatures of construction materials. The results reported include the spectroscopic characterization of building materials using compact Raman system with 785 nm wavelength laser. The construction materials studied include polyblend sanded grout, fire barrier sealant, acrylic latex caulk plus and white silicone. It is found that, both fire barrier sealant and acrylic latex caulk plus has a prominent Raman band at 1082 cm-1, and three minor Raman signatures located at 275, 706 and 1436 cm-1. On the other hand, sand grout has three major Raman bands at 1265, 1368 and 1455 cm-1, and four minor peaks at 1573, 1683, 1762, and 1868 cm-1. White silicone, which is a widely used sealant material in construction industry, has two major Raman bands at 482 and 703 cm-1, and minor Raman characteristic bands at 783 and 1409 cm-1.

  9. Reinforcement of conventional glass-ionomer restorative material with short glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Ibrahim M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the strengthening effect of glass fibers when added to conventional glass-ionomer restorative material. Glass fibers were incorporated into glass-ionomer powder in 3 wt% and 5 wt%. The fibers used had 1 mm length and 10 microm thickness. These criteria of fiber length, diameter, and concentration represent a new approach for reinforcing conventional glass-ionomer [Medifill, conventional restorative glass-ionomer]. The mechanical properties tested were diametral tensile strength, hardness, flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness after 24-h and 7-days of storage in deionized water. Glass short fibers were mixed thoroughly into the glass-ionomer powder before mixing with the cement liquid. Samples of specific dimensions were prepared for each time interval and fiber loading according to the manufacturer's instructions and international standards. Hardness was measured using a micro-hardness tester at 100 gram applied load for 15 s. The other mechanical properties were measured using a Lloyd universal testing machine. The results showed increased diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness by the addition of glass fibers. There was an appreciable increase of the tested mechanical properties of glass-ionomer restorative material as a result of increasing fiber loading and water storage for 1 week. It was concluded that conventional glass-ionomer can be reinforced by the addition of short glass fibers.

  10. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  11. Modeling of the Indentation of Fiber Reinforced Materials Using Spherical Indenters

    SciTech Connect

    Gountsidou, V.; Polatoglou, H. M.

    2010-01-21

    Following the enormous development of the technology there is a great need for complex engineering materials to be studied in multilayered films at the nano-level. Careful modeling of the structure of engineering materials, using finite element analysis may reveal specific behavior of the component materials and the filling materials, such as mortars, which are the important boundaries of all the engineering materials. The instruments used for experiments are expensive and their utilization is hindered by many unexpected factors. With the help of computer programs it is possible to achieve virtual nanoindentation, a widely known non-destructive method. It is easy to model structures in whatever shape or dimensions we wish, with one or more layers and with linear or nonlinear materials in order to obtain stress, strain, displacement curves, study microhardness, etc. The purpose of this paper is to model the nanoindentation process for fiber-reinforced concrete and to study the mechanical properties as a function of the distance of a particular fibre.

  12. Optimization of the hot pressing parameters to fabricate the fiber reinforced material (FRM)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kunio; Onzawa, Tadao

    1995-11-01

    When hot pressing is used to fabricate the fiber reinforced materials (FRM), the deformation and the adhesion of the matrix foil must be completed and the thickness of the reaction layer at the matrix/fiber interface must be smaller than the critical value derived from the Ochiai`s theory. A simulation model was proposed to predict the deformation of matrix foils, where plastic and creep deformations were taken into account. These calculations provide a consistent and unified interpretation of experimental data for Ti-matrix FRM, while the creep constants of Ti are known. A method is proposed to estimate the creep constants from some experimental trial for the matrix materials whose creep constants are unknown. By using this method, to types of Ti{sub 3}Al matrix FRM were formed to demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm. The tensile strength of the FRM was examined.

  13. A method for determining structural properties of RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, R. M.; Fowler, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A method was developed for evaluation and prediction of effects of oxidation of the graphitic substrate on structural properties of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) thermal protection material. Test specimens of RCC material were exposed to successive periods of convective heating in a plasma-jet facility to simulate the chemical reactions of Shuttle atmospheric entry. After each period of testing, the test specimen mass loss and performance in a nondestructive flexure test were determined. A computational model of the RCC specimen was developed for the NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) program and validated by comparison of calculated and experimental results of flexure tests. The elastic moduli and ultimate loads in tension and compression were then computed for various levels of substrate oxidation.

  14. The Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber -Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsieng-Yang

    1996-01-01

    The Yeh-Stratton criterion developed from a yielding criterion is modified to a generalized failure criterion and applied to fiber-reinforced composites with a central crack or a circular cutout under tensile loadings. The purpose of a material failure criterion is to establish a theoretical margin of safety and to be validated by experiments. It is necessary to obtain the crack tip stress field before a failure criterion of composite materials is applied. However, the crack tip stress field is complicated since there are numerous factors that influence the crack tip stress distribution. The understanding of the factors that contribute to crack tip stress field is of critical importance in analyzing composite laminates.

  15. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed, to be cured, and be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000degC. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200degC, -SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Testing for this included thermal and mechanical testing per ASTM standard tests.

  16. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  17. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  18. Influence of oxide reinforcement materials on high-temperatue oxidation resistance of Ni sub 3 A1 matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of Ni{sub 3}Al-based metal matrix composites was studied in high-temperature air under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions as a function of the composition and form of oxide reinforcement material. The incorporation of oxide fibers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--ZrO{sub 2} or particles into the Ni{sub 3}Al matrix led to oxidation rates significantly greater than that for the monolithic aluminide. The increase in susceptibility was primarily due to internal oxidation along the fiber- (or particle-) matrix interfaces and depended on the type of reinforcement material and its deposition in the matrix. The results suggest that the choice of reinforcement material and the method of materials processing will be important considerations in the design of oxidation-resistant Ni{sub 3}Al composites. 10 refs, 4 figs.

  19. Development and characterization of orthotropic-birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Koller, G. M.; Niiro, T.

    1984-01-01

    Materials were selected and fabrication procedures developed for orthotropic birefringent materials. An epoxy resin (Maraset 658/558 system) was selected as the matrix material. Fibers obtained from style 3733 glass cloth and type 1062 glass roving were used as reinforcement. Two different fabrication procedures were used. In the first one, layers of unidirectional fibers removed from the glass cloth were stacked, impregnated with resin, bagged and cured in the autoclave at an elevated temperature. In the second procedure, the glass roving was drywound over metal frames, impregnated with resin and cured at room temperature under pressure and vacuum in an autoclave. Unidirectional, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates of two thicknesses and with embedded flaws were fabricated. The matrix and the unidirectional glass/epoxy material were fully characterized. The density, fiber volume ratio, mechanical, and optical properties were determined. The fiber volume ratio was over 0.50. Birefringent properties were in good agreement with predictions based on a stress proportioning concept and also, with one exception, with properties predicted by a finite element analysis. Previously announced in STAR as N81-26183

  20. Development of an Iron-Based Hardfacing Material Reinforced with Fe-(TiW)C Composite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, E. O.; Alcantara, N. G.; Tecco, D. G.; Kumar, R. V.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the correlation of microstructure with wear resistance in a hardfacing material reinforced with Fe-(TiW)C composite powder particles. This material was designed for cladding components subjected to highly abrasive conditions and was deposited on a low-carbon steel substrate by open arc welding. The theoretical and experimental work undertaken includes solidification study, microstructural characterization, and abrasive wear testing. Microstructural analysis of the hardfaced top layer of the alloy showed the presence of TiWC carbide particles and TiNbC carbides randomly distributed in a eutectic mixture matrix γ/M7C3 containing primary austenite dendrites. Microstructural examinations also showed that hard and fine spherulitic carbides, in which a Ti-rich MC carbide core was encircled by MC carbide enriched with Nb and W, were homogeneously distributed in the matrix. The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping of spherulitic carbides showed that the any added Nb replaced a significant part of W in the Fe-(TiW)C powder, and W preferentially partitioned into other carbides and matrix during solidification. Abrasion test results showed that the preceding carbides improve the wear resistance of the hardfacing material in comparison with conventional Fe-Cr-C and Fe-Cr-C-Nb alloys, especially under high stress conditions.

  1. Self-reinforced composites of hydroxyapatite-coated PLLA fibers: fabrication and mechanical characterization.

    PubMed

    Charles, Lyndon F; Kramer, Erica R; Shaw, Montgomery T; Olson, James R; Wei, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Self-reinforced composites (SRCs) are materials where both the matrix and fiber-reinforcing phase are made up of the same polymer. Improved bonding can be achieved with self-reinforced composites compared to traditional dual-polymer, fiber-reinforced composites owing to the identical chemistry of the components in SRCs. Bonding between the fiber and matrix phase is an important factor in applications where mechanical stability is required, such as in the field of bone repair. In this study, we prepared bioabsorbable poly(L-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite (PLLA/HA) self-reinforced composites via a three-step process that includes surface etching of the fiber, the deposition of the HA coating onto the PLLA fibers through immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF), and hot compaction molding. Although coated with a layer of HA, self-reinforced composites were successfully generated by hot compaction. The effects of compaction time (15 and 30 min), compaction temperature (140, 150, 155, 160, 165, and 170 °C), and HA wt% (0, 5, 10, and 15 wt%) on flexural mechanical properties were studied. Mechanical test results indicated that in unfilled (no HA) PLLA SRCs, compaction time and temperature increased the flexural modulus of the composites tested. Based on the results obtained for unfilled composites, a single compaction time and temperature condition of 15 min and 170 °C were selected to study the effect of HA loading on the composite mechanical properties. HA was successfully loaded onto the fibers at 0, 5, 10, and 15 wt% before hot compaction and was found to significantly increase flexural modulus (P=0.0001). Modulus values ranged from 8.3 GPa±0.5 (0 wt% HA) to 9.7 GPa±0.6 (15 wt% HA). Microscopy results suggest that the HA in these composites forms a nodular-like structure along the fibers, which allows polymer-polymer contact yet prevents longitudinal shear. The procedure used successfully generated composites with flexural moduli near the lower range of bone that may

  2. Characterization of anisotropic elastic constants of silicon-carbide particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites; Part 1: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, H. ); Hsu, D.K. . Center for Nondestructive Evaluation); Shannon, R.E. . Materials Reliability Dept.); Liaw, P.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of silicon-carbide particulate (SiC[sub p]) reinforced Al metal matrix composites were characterized using ultrasonic techniques and microstructural analysis. The composite materials, fabricated by a powder metallurgy extrusion process, included 2124, 6061, and 7091 Al alloys reinforced by 10 to 30 pct of [alpha]-SiC[sub p] by volume. Results were presented for the assumed orthotropic elastic constants obtained from ultrasonic velocities and for the microstructural data on particulate shape, aspect ratio, and orientation distribution. All of the composite samples exhibited a systematic anisotropy: the stiffness in the extrusion direction was the highest, and the stiffness in the out-of-plane direction was the lowest. Microstructural analysis suggested that the observed anisotropy could be attributed to the preferred orientation of SiC[sub p]. The ultrasonic velocity was found to be sensitive to internal defects such as porosity and intermetallic compounds. It has been observed that ultrasonics may be a useful, nondestructive technique for detecting small directional differences in the overall elastic constants of the composites since a good correlation has been noted between the velocity and microstructure and the mechanical test. By incorporating the observed microstructural characteristics, a theoretical model for predicting the anisotropic stiffnesses of the composites has been developed and is presented in a companion article (Part 2).

  3. Characterization of anisotropie elastic constants of silicon-carbide participate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites: Part I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Hsu, David K.; Shannon, Robert E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    1994-04-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of silicon-carbide particulate (SiC p ) reinforced Al metal matrix composites were characterized using ultrasonic techniques and microstructural analysis. The composite materials, fabricated by a powder metallurgy extrusion process, included 2124, 6061, and 7091 Al alloys reinforced by 10 to 30 pct of α-SiC p by volume. Results were presented for the assumed orthotropic elastic constants obtained from ultrasonic velocities and for the microstructural data on particulate shape, aspect ratio, and orientation distribution. All of the composite samples exhibited a systematic anisotropy: the stiffness in the extrusion direction was the highest, and the stiffness in the out-of-plane direction was the lowest. Microstructural analysis suggested that the observed anisotropy could be attributed to the preferred orientation of SiC p . The ultrasonic velocity was found to be sensitive to internal defects such as porosity and intermetallic compounds. It has been observed that ultrasonics may be a useful, nondestructive technique for detecting small directional differences in the overall elastic constants of the composites since a good correlation has been noted between the velocity and microstructure and the mechanical test. By incorporating the observed microstructural characteristics, a theoretical model for predicting the anisotropic stiffnesses of the composites has been developed and is presented in a companion article (Part II).

  4. Preliminary Validation of Composite Material Constitutive Characterization

    Treesearch

    John G. Michopoulos; Athanasios lliopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Adrian C. Orifici; Rodney S. Thomson

    2012-01-01

    This paper is describing the preliminary results of an effort to validate a methodology developed for composite material constitutive characterization. This methodology involves using massive amounts of data produced from multiaxially tested coupons via a 6-DoF robotic system called NRL66.3 developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The testing is followed by...

  5. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  6. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  7. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  8. Carbon nanotube materials characterization and devices design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng

    The objective of this research is to characterize the electrical and mechanical properties of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) materials, and explore possible device applications for these materials. In order to achieve this goal, different forms of Carbon Nanotube materials---including Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Carbon Nanotube Ribbon, Carbon Nanotube Thread, and sub-micrometer Carbon Nanotube Thread---were tested under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) using a Micromanipulator (MM). Video and sound recording of the testing in the microscope provided new understanding how thread is formed and how nanotube materials fail. As-produced and thermally treated nanotubes were also tested. The main electrical parameters measured were electrical resistivity and maximum current density. The main mechanical property measured was strength. Together, these parameters are helping to determine the strongest and most conductive forms of CNT material. Putting nanotube materials into application is the ultimate goal of this continuing research. Several aggressive application ideas were investigated in a preliminary way in this work. In biomedical applications, a bundle of CNTs was formed for use as an electrode for accurate biosensing. A simple robot was designed using CNT electrical fiber. The robot was powered by two solenoids and could act as an in-body sensor and actuator to perform some impossible tasks from the viewpoint of current medical technology. In aerospace engineering, CNT materials could replace copper wire to reduce the weight of aircraft. Based on the excellent mechanical properties of CNT materials, a challenging idea is to use CNT material to build elevators to move payloads to outer space without using rockets. This dissertation makes contributions in the characterization of nanotube materials and in the design of miniature electromagnetic devices.

  9. Reinforced structural plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowitz, H. R.; Kendrick, W. P.; Jones, J. F.; Thorpe, R. S.; Burns, E. A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Reinforced polyimide structures are described. Reinforcing materials are impregnated with a suspension of polyimide prepolymer and bonded together by heat and pressure to form a cured, hard-reinforced, polyimide structure.

  10. Terahertz Ray System Calibration and Material Characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Blackshire, James L.; Thompson, R. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Recently, terahertz ray imaging has emerged as one of the most promising new NDE techniques, and new systems are being developed for applications. In this work, we conducted system calibration on a new time-domain spectroscopy system, and then utilized this system to characterize glass-fiber composite plates and polyimide resin disks. Extensive experimental measurements in thru-transmission mode were made to map out the T-ray beam pattern in free space as well as to scan these two test materials. Material properties such as index of fraction and absorption coefficient are of the primary interest. Both results were shown in good agreement with known data. Using these characterized material properties, we also demonstrated accurate modeling of the T-ray signal propagating through the polyimide resin disk.

  11. Mechanical characterization of SiC whisker-reinforced MoSi/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, D.H.; Gibbs, W.S.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of an intermetallic matrix with two different reinforcements were studied. The matrix material was MoSi/sub 2/, with either Los Alamos VLS SiC whiskers or Huber VS SiC whiskers. The purpose of the reinforcement was to provide toughening at ambient temperature and strengthening at elevated temperatures. The VLS whiskers greatly improved the yield strength of the matrix at 1200/degree/C, and also increased the room temperature fracture toughness of the matrix. The VS whiskers were added because they are much smaller in length and diameter, and therefore decreased the mean free path between whiskers, at the same volume fraction. The VS whiskers improved the toughness of the matrix at ambient temperature, and increased the yield strength of MoSi/sub 2/ at 1400/degree/C by 470%. The high strength of this new composite places this material in the realm of attractive engineering materials for high-temperature applications. 11 refs., 6 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Study on reinforcement of soil for suppressing fugitive dust by bio-cementitious material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qiwei; Qian, Chunxiang

    2017-06-01

    Microbial-induced reinforcement of soil, as a new green and environmental-friendly method, is being paid extensive attention to in that it has low cost, simple operation and rapid effects. In this research, reinforcement of soil for suppressing fugitive dust by bio-cementitious material was investigated. Soil cemented by bio-cementitious material had superior mechanical properties, such as hardness, compressive strength, microstructure, wind-erosion resistance, rainfall-erosion resistance and freeze-thaw resistance. The average hardness of sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil is 18.9 º, 25.2 º and 26.1 º, while average compressive strength of samples is 0.43 MPa, 0.54 MPa and 0.69 MPa, respectively; meanwhile, the average calcite content of samples is 6.85 %, 6.09 %, and 5.96 %, respectively. Compared with the original sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil, the porosity decreases by 38.5 %, 33.7 % and 29.2 %. When wind speed is 12 m/s, the mass loss of sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil cemented by bio-cementitious material are all less than 30 g/(m2·h). After three cycles of rainfall erosion of 2.5 mm/h, the mass loss are less than 25 g/(m2·h) and the compressive strength residual ratio are more than 98.0 %. Under 25 cycles of freeze-thaw, the mass loss ratio are less than 3.0 %.

  13. Using Plasma-Activated High Performance Fibers with Nanocrystalline Structure in Producing New Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, V.; Korneeva, N.

    2008-08-01

    A wet-pull-out method for investigation of interaction between the high performance polyethylene (HPPE) fiber and polymer matrix is discussed. The paper concerns a cold plasma technique for improving the bond of the HPPE fibers to the matrices and the fibers impregnation with the matrix. Controlled parameters are pull-out force and the height of the matrix capillary lifting along the fiber both in air and in vacuum, in combination with plasma activation of the fibers. The method allows one to estimate the wetting and impregnation of multi-filament fiber with the matrix and simultaneously measure the joint strength. Coupled action of plasma treatment and vacuum impregnation of the fibers improves the joint strength by a factor of 3. Plasma activated HPPE fibers impregnated in air show the value of shear strength τ of 4 Kg/mm2. To understand the effect of treatment initial and plasma-activated fibers were used to fabricate composite materials (CM). The properties and failure modes were compared to those of CM reinforced with untreated fibers. The failure mode of CM reinforced with plasma-activated fibers points to a high strength of the bond between the fibers and the matrix.

  14. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  15. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  16. Effect of reinforcement volume fraction on the mechanical properties of the Al-SiC nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, AKM Asif; Amierah, Norul

    2017-08-01

    Particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) has emerged as one of the potential materials for structural application due to their superior mechanical properties. However, these MMCs have poor damage tolerance due to their low fracture toughness. The volume fraction of reinforcement plays a significant role to improve the overall strength of the MMCs. In this research, Al matrix composites reinforced with three different volume fraction of the SiC nanoparticles were fabricated by a powder metallurgy process and the effects of volume fraction on the mechanical properties of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was investigated. The samples were prepared with 200 kN compaction load and 600°C sintering temperature. Subsequently, their mechanical testing was carried out. The density and hardness of the samples were investigated. Moreover, the microstructure of the nanocomposites was examined by optical microscope. The results showed that the high volume fraction reinforced nanocomposite exhibited better microstructural feature and high hardness as compared to the low volume fraction reinforced nanocomposite. Therefore, the high volume fraction reinforced nanocomposite can be a potential material to use in the brake disc of the automobile.

  17. Thermal Damage Characterization of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; DeHaven, M R; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

    2009-08-14

    We conducted thermal damage experiments at 180?C on PBXN-9 and characterized its material properties. Volume expansion at high temperatures was very significant which led to a reduction in material density. 2.6% of weight loss was observed, which was higher than other HMX-based formulations. Porosity of PBXN-9 increased to 16% after thermal exposure. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability and density were proved to be possible at higher temperatures.

  18. Friction and wear characteristics of polymer-matrix friction materials reinforced by brass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Jia; Xiaomei, Ling

    2004-10-01

    This study is an investigation of friction materials reinforced by brass fibers, and the influence of the organic adhesion agent, cast-iron debris, brass fiber, and graphite powder on the friction-wear characteristics. Friction and wear testing was performed on a block-on-ring tribometer (MM200). The friction pair consisted of the friction materials and gray cast iron (HT200). The worn surface layers formed by sliding dry friction were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray energy-dispersive analysis (EDX), and differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TAG). The experimental results showed that the friction coefficient and the wear loss of the friction materials increased with the increase of cast-iron debris, but decreased with the increase of graphite powder content. The friction coefficient and wear loss also increased slightly when the mass fraction of brass fibers was over 19%. When the mass fraction of organic adhesion agent was about 10 11%, the friction materials had excellent friction-wear performance. Surface heating from friction pyrolyzes the organic ingredient in the worn surface layer of the friction materials, with the pyrolysis depth being about 0.5 mm. The surface layers were rich in iron but poor in copper, and they were formed on the worn surface of the friction material. When the mass fraction of brass fibers was about 16 20%, the friction materials possessed better wear resistance and a copper transfer film formed on the friction surface of counterpart. Fatigue cracks were also found in the worn surface of the gray cast-iron counterpart, with fatigue wear being the prevailing wear mechanism.

  19. Development and Characterization of Reference Materials for Genetic Testing: Focus on Public Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, Lisa V.; Datta, Vivekananda; Williams, Mickey; Zook, Justin M.; Salit, Marc L.

    2016-01-01

    Characterized reference materials (RMs) are needed for clinical laboratory test development and validation, quality control procedures, and proficiency testing to assure their quality. In this article, we review the development and characterization of RMs for clinical molecular genetic tests. We describe various types of RMs and how to access and utilize them, especially focusing on the Genetic Testing Reference Materials Coordination Program (Get-RM) and the Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) Consortium. This review also reinforces the need for collaborative efforts in the clinical genetic testing community to develop additional RMs. PMID:27578503

  20. Development and Characterization of Reference Materials for Genetic Testing: Focus on Public Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Lisa V; Datta, Vivekananda; Williams, Mickey; Zook, Justin M; Salit, Marc L; Han, Jin Yeong

    2016-11-01

    Characterized reference materials (RMs) are needed for clinical laboratory test development and validation, quality control procedures, and proficiency testing to assure their quality. In this article, we review the development and characterization of RMs for clinical molecular genetic tests. We describe various types of RMs and how to access and utilize them, especially focusing on the Genetic Testing Reference Materials Coordination Program (Get-RM) and the Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) Consortium. This review also reinforces the need for collaborative efforts in the clinical genetic testing community to develop additional RMs.

  1. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate tank materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to undertand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here. The composition of the Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) RCT material is largely a low base solution of 0.2M NaNO2 and 0.1M NaNO3 with a small amount of formate present. Insoluble solids comprise only 0.05 wt.% of the slurry. The solids appear to be largely sludge-like solids based on elemental composition and SEM-EDS analysis. The sample contains an elevated concentration of I-129 (38x) and substantial 59% fraction of Tc-99, as compared to the incoming SB8 Tank 40 feed material. The Hg concentration is 5x, when compared to Fe, of that expected based on sludge carryover. The total U and Pu concentrations are reduced significantly, 0.536 wt.% TS and 2.42E-03 wt.% TS, respectively, with the fissile components, U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, an order of magnitude lower in concentration than those in the SB8 Tank 40 DWPF feed material. This report will be revised to include the foaming study requested in the TTR and outlined in the TTQAP when that work is concluded.

  2. Study of stinging nettle (urtica dioica l.) Fibers reinforced green composite materials : a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus Suryawan, I. G. P.; Suardana, N. P. G.; Suprapta Winaya, I. N.; Budiarsa Suyasa, I. W.; Tirta Nindhia, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L., latin) is a wild plant that grows in Indonesia, Asia, and Europe. Nettle in Bali, Indonesia is called as Lateng, Jelatang. Nettle plant has a very strong fiber and high fixed carbon. Nettle plants are covered with fine hairs, especially in the leaves and stems. When it is touched, it will release chemicals, sting and trigger inflammation that causes redness, itching, bumps and irritation to the skin. Nettle plants grow in the wild, regarded as a weed in the agricultural industry, easy to grow and snatch food from the parent plant. The main objective of this paper is to review of the potential nettle fibers and then explain about the potential of local nettle plant in Indonesia. Nettle is a plant group at the end of bast. Its plant fibers taken from the bark, as reinforcement in composite materials. Nettle fibers have three main advantages such as strong, lightweight and low environmental impact.

  3. Surface emissivity of a reinforced carbon composite material with an oxidation-inhibiting coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Total effective emissivity and spectral emissivity over the wavelength range of 0.65 to 6.3 microns were determined for temperatures from 1300 t0 2250 deg K. A multi channel radiometer was used in the arcjet and laboratory tests. The black-body-hole method was used to independently check radiometer results. The results show the silicon-carbide coated reinforced carbon composite material is a nongray radiator. The total effective emissivity and the spectral emissivity at 0.65 micron both decreased with increasing temperature, respectively, from approximately 0.8 to 0.6, and from 0.4 to 0.25, over the temperature range. The emissivity values were the same when the sample was viewed normal to the surface or at a 45 deg angle. Recommended emissivity values are presented.

  4. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  5. Characterization and modeling of compliant active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, S. P.; Ramesh, K. T.; Douglas, A. S.

    2003-09-01

    Active materials respond mechanically to changes in environmental conditions. One example of a compliant active material is a polymer gel. Active polymer gels expand and contract in response to certain environmental stimuli, such as the application of an electric field or a change in the pH level of the surroundings. This ability to achieve large, reversible deformations with no external mechanical loading has generated much interest in the use of these gels as actuators and "artificial muscles". While much work has been done to study the behavior and properties of these gels, little information is available regarding the full constitutive description of the mechanical and actuation properties. This work focuses on developing a means of characterizing the mechanical properties of compliant active materials. A thermodynamically consistent finite-elastic constitutive model was developed to describe the mechanical and actuation behaviors of these kinds of materials. The mechanical properties of compliant active materials are characterized by a free-energy function, and the model utilizes an evolving internal variable to describe the actuation state. A biaxial testing system has been developed which can measure stresses and deformations of polymer gel films in a variety of liquid environments. This testing system is used to determine the form and parameters of the free-energy function for a specific active polymer gel, poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylic acid) gel.

  6. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  7. Advanced in situ multi-scale characterization of hardness of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Onishi, Keiko; Kawai, Masamichi; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    In situ multi-scale characterization of hardness of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is demonstrated by a traditional hardness tester, instrumented indentation tester and atomic-force-microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation. In particular, due to the large residual indentation and nonuniform distribution of the microscale carbon fibers, the Vickers hardness could not be calculated by the traditional hardness tester. In addition, the clear residual microindentation could not be formed on the CFRP by instrumented indentation tester because of the large tip half angle of the Berkovich indenter. Therefore, an efficient technique for characterizing the true nanoscale hardness of CFRP was proposed and evaluated. The local hardness of the carbon fibers or plastic matrix on the nanoscale did not vary with nanoindentation location. The Vickers hardnesses of the carbon fiber and plastic matrix determined by AFM-based nanoindentation were 340 ± 30 and 40 ± 2 kgf/mm2, respectively.

  8. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  9. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  10. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  11. Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For a period covering October 1, 1995 through August 12, 1996, the research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on "Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures. " The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the applicability of electrochemical techniques for characterization of complex device structures based on InP and GaAs, Ge, InGaAs, InSb, InAs and InSb, including: (1) accurate EC-V net majority carrier concentration depth profiling, and (2) surface and bulk structural and electrical type defect densities. Our motivation for this R&D effort was as follows: "Advanced space solar cells and ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells are fabricated using a large variety of III-V materials based on InP and GaAs for solar cells and low bandgap materials such as Ge, InGaAs, InAs and InSb for TPV applications. At the present time for complex device structures using these materials, however, there is no simple way to assess the quality of these structures prior to device fabrication. Therefore, process optimization is a very time consuming and a costly endeavor". Completion of this R&D effort would have had unquestionable benefits for space solar cell and TPV cells, since electrochemical characterization of the above cell structures, if properly designed can provide many useful structural and electrical material information virtually at any depth inside various layers and at the interfaces. This, could have been applied for step-by-step process optimization, which could have been used for fabrication of new generation high efficiency, low cost space PV and TPV cells.

  12. The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been successfully used in orthopedic implants. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the properties, technical data, and safety of CFR-PEEK biomaterial and to evaluate its potential for new innovation in the design of articulating medical devices. A comprehensive search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify articles relevant to the outcomes of CFR-PEEK orthopedic implants. The search was also expanded by reviewing the reference sections of selected papers and references and benchmark reports provided by content experts. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. There is limited literature available assessing the performance of CFR-PEEK, specifically as an implant material for arthroplasty systems. Nevertheless, available studies strongly support CFR-PEEK as a promising and suitable material for orthopedic implants because of its biocompatibility, material characteristics, and mechanical durability. Future studies should continue to investigate CFR-PEEK’s potential benefits. PMID:25780341

  13. Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert B; Sholom, Sergey

    2017-08-01

    Modern techniques for detection of covert nuclear material requires some combination of real time measurement and/or sampling of the material. More common is real time measurement of the ionizing emission caused by radioactive decay or through the materials measured in response to external interrogation radiation. One can expose the suspect material with various radiation types, including high energy photons such as x rays or with larger particles such as neutrons and muons, to obtain images or measure nuclear reactions induced in the material. Stand-off detection using imaging modalities similar to those in the medical field can be accomplished, or simple collimated detectors can be used to localize radioactive materials. In all such cases, the common feature is that some or all of the nuclear materials have to be present for the measurement, which makes sense; as one might ask, "How you can measure something that is not there?" The current work and results show how to do exactly that: characterize nuclear materials after they have been removed from an area leaving no chemical trace. This new approach is demonstrated to be fully capable of providing both previous source spatial distribution and emission energy grouping. The technique uses magnetic resonance for organic insulators and/or luminescence techniques on ubiquitous refractory materials similar in theory to the way the nuclear industry carries out worker personnel dosimetry. Spatial information is obtained by acquiring gridded samples for dosimetric measurements, while energy information comes through dose depth profile results that are functions of the incident radiation energies.

  14. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  15. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningli

    2011-12-01

    Wave propagation in porous media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a porous media filled with oil or gas. In porous noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of porous materials. The dissertation deals with two types of porous media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in porous media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in porous materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered porous acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used involves the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of porous solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples

  16. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  17. Characterization of aerosols and fibers emitted from composite materials combustion.

    PubMed

    Chivas-Joly, C; Gaie-Levrel, F; Motzkus, C; Ducourtieux, S; Delvallée, A; De Lagos, F; Nevé, S Le; Gutierrez, J; Lopez-Cuesta, J-M

    2016-01-15

    This work investigates the aerosols emitted during combustion of aircraft and naval structural composite materials (epoxy resin/carbon fibers and vinyl ester/glass fibers and carbon nanotubes). Combustion tests were performed at lab-scale using a modified cone calorimeter. The aerosols emitted have been characterized using various metrological devices devoted to the analysis of aerosols. The influence of the nature of polymer matrices, the incorporation of fibers and carbon nanotubes as well as glass reinforcements on the number concentration and the size distribution of airborne particles produced, was studied in the 5 nm-10 μm range. Incorporation of carbon fibers into epoxy resin significantly reduced the total particle number concentration. In addition, the interlaced orientation of carbon fibers limited the particles production compared to the composites with unidirectional one. The carbon nanotubes loading in vinyl ester resin composites influenced the total particles production during the flaming combustion with changes during kinetics emission. Predominant populations of airborne particles generated during combustion of all tested composites were characterized by a PN50 following by PN(100-500).

  18. Characterization of Infrastructure Materials using Nonlinear Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghe

    In order to improve the safety, reliability, cost, and performance of civil and mechanical structures/components, it is necessary to develop techniques that are capable of characterizing and quantifying the amount of distributed damage in engineering materials before any detectable discontinuities (cracks, delaminations, voids, etc.) appear. In this dissertation, novel nonlinear ultrasonic NDE methods are developed and applied to characterize cumulative damage such as fatigue damage in metallic materials and degradation of cement-based materials due to chemical reactions. First, nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves are used to measure the near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened aluminum alloy (AA 7075) samples. Results show that the nonlinear Rayleigh wave is very sensitive to near-surface residual stresses, and has the potential to quantitatively detect them. Second, a novel two-wave mixing method is theoretically developed and numerically verified. This method is then successfully applied to detect the fatigue damage in aluminum alloy (AA 6061) samples subjected to monotonic compression. In addition to its high sensitivity to fatigue damage, this collinear wave mixing method allows the measurement over a specific region of interest in the specimen, and this capability makes it possible to obtain spatial distribution of fatigue damage through the thickness direction of the sample by simply timing the transducers. Third, the nonlinear wave mixing method is used to characterize the degradation of cement-based materials caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). It is found that the nonlinear ultrasonic method is sensitive to detect ASR damage at very early stage, and has the potential to identify the different damage stages. Finally, a micromechanics-based chemo-mechanical model is developed which relates the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to ASR damage. This model provides a way to quantitatively predict the changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter due to ASR

  19. Characterization of a new natural fiber from Arundo donax L. as potential reinforcement of polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Fiore, V; Scalici, T; Valenza, A

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of using of Arundo donax L. fibers as reinforcement in polymer composites. The fibers are extracted from the outer part of the stem of the plant, which widely grows in Mediterranean area and is diffused all around the world. To use these lignocellulosic fibers as reinforcement in polymer composites, it is necessary to investigate their microstructure, chemical composition and mechanical properties. Therefore, the morphology of A. donax L. fibers was investigated through electron microscopy, the thermal behavior through thermogravimetric analysis and the real density through a helium pycnometer. The chemical composition of the natural fibers in terms of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and ash contents was determinated by using standard test methods. The mechanical characterization was carried out through single fiber tensile tests and a reliability analysis of the experimental data was performed. Furthermore, a mathematical model was applied to investigate the relation between the transverse dimension of the fibers and the mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cassava starch films containing acetylated starch nanoparticles as reinforcement: Physical and mechanical characterization.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Ana Paula; Mali, Suzana; Romero, Natália; de Carvalho, Gizilene Maria

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the use of acetylated starch nanoparticles (NPAac) as reinforcement in thermoplastic starch films. NPAac with an average size of approximately 500 nm were obtained by nanoprecipitation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that NPAac are more thermally stable and essentially amorphous when compared with acetylated starch. Thermoplastic starch films with different proportions of NPAac (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 10.0%, w/w) were obtained and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water vapor permeability (WVP), adsorption isotherms, TGA and mechanical tests. The inclusion of reinforcement caused changes in film properties: WVP was lowered by 41% for film with 1.5% (w/w) of NPAac and moisture adsorption by 33% for film with 10% (w/w) of NPAac; and the Young's modulus and thermal stability were increased by 162% and 15%, respectively, for film with 0.5% (w/w) of NPAac compared to the starch film without the addition of NPAac. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strain characterization of embedded aerospace smart materials using shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Müller, Bernhard; Sinke, Jos; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-04-01

    The development of smart materials for embedding in aerospace composites provides enhanced functionality for future aircraft structures. Critical flight conditions like icing of the leading edges can affect the aircraft functionality and controllability. Hence, anti-icing and de-icing capabilities are used. In case of leading edges made of fibre metal laminates heater elements can be embedded between composite layers. However this local heating causes strains and stresses in the structure due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the different laminated materials. In order to characterize the structural behaviour during thermal loading full-field strain and shape measurement can be used. In this research, a shearography instrument with three spatially-distributed shearing cameras is used to measure surface displacement gradients which give a quantitative estimation of the in- and out-of-plane surface strain components. For the experimental part, two GLARE (Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy) specimens with six different embedded copper heater elements were manufactured: two copper mesh shapes (straight and S-shape), three connection techniques (soldered, spot welded and overlapped) and one straight heater element with delaminations. The surface strain behaviour of the specimens due to thermal loading was measured and analysed. The comparison of the connection techniques of heater element parts showed that the overlapped connection has the smallest effect on the surface strain distribution. Furthermore, the possibility of defect detection and defect depth characterisation close to the heater elements was also investigated.

  2. Mechanical characterization of glass fiber (woven roving/chopped strand mat E-glass fiber) reinforced polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijaya; Srinivas, Kolla

    2017-07-01

    Polymer reinforced composites have been replacing most of the engineering material and their applications become more and more day by day. Polymer composites have been analyzing from past thirty five years for their betterment for adapting more applications. This paper aims at the mechanical properties of polyester reinforced with glass fiber composites. The glass fiber is reinforced with polyester in two forms viz Woven Rovings (WRG) and Chopped Strand Mat (CSMG) E-glass fibers. The composites are fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the composites are cut as per ASTM Standard sizes for corresponding tests like flexural, compression and impact tests, so that flexural strength, compression strength, impact strength and inter laminar shear stress(ILSS) of polymer matrix composites are analyzed. From the tests and further calculations, the polyester composites reinforced with Chopped Strand Mat glass fiber have shown better performance against flexural load, compression load and impact load than that of Woven Roving glass fiber.

  3. Fatique testing of OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) cold water pipe glass-reinforced plastic materials. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sirian, C.R.; Conn, A.F.

    1983-09-01

    Specimens of a GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastic) composite laminate - a candidate material for use in an OTEC cold water pipe (CWP) - were subjected to cyclic bending while immersed in a synthetic sea water solution. The loss of stiffness, i.e., decrease in bending modulus, for this GFRP was determined as a function of cycles of loading.

  4. Modeling and Characterization of Recompressed Damaged Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Belak, J; Campbell, G

    2002-12-16

    Ductile metals subjected to shock loading can develop internal damage through nucleation growth and coalescence of voids. The extent of damage can range from a well-defined spall plane induced by light shocks to more widespread damage caused by strong shocks. Because damage materials are often part of a dynamic system, significant additional deformation can occur in extensively damaged materials. To represent material behavior in simulation codes for stockpile stewardship calculations, both the damage and the recompression processes must be modeled accurately. Currently, no experimentally based models of recompression behavior are available for use in numerical simulations. The goals of this project are to (1) perform recompression experiments on samples containing controlled and well-characterized damage, (2) develop a model capturing the recompression behavior and residual strength based on the experimental data and micro-mechanical models, and (3) implement the model in an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) code (ALE3D). The recompression model, together with failure models based on underlying physical mechanisms, will provide a more accurate representation of material behavior-information that is needed for simulations of explosively loaded materials such as those required by the Stockpile Stewardship Program.

  5. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetard, L.; Passian, A.; Farahi, R. H.; Thundat, T.; Davison, B. H.

    2015-10-01

    The non-destructive, simultaneous chemical and physical characterization of materials at the nanoscale is an essential and highly sought-after capability. However, a combination of limitations imposed by Abbe diffraction, diffuse scattering, unknown subsurface, electromagnetic fluctuations and Brownian noise, for example, have made achieving this goal challenging. Here, we report a hybrid approach for nanoscale material characterization based on generalized nanomechanical force microscopy in conjunction with infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. As an application, we tackle the outstanding problem of spatially and spectrally resolving plant cell walls. Nanoscale characterization of plant cell walls and the effect of complex phenotype treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy. We present results that reveal both the morphological and compositional substructures of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with the lower-resolution chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. These results should prove relevant in other fields such as cancer research, nanotoxicity, and energy storage and production, where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites, nanoparticle uptake by cells and nanoscale quality control are in demand.

  6. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  7. Micromechanical and macroscopic models of ductile fracture in particle reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Jie; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    This paper is aimed at developing two modules contributing to the overall framework of multi-scale modelling of ductile fracture of particle reinforced metallic materials. The first module is for detailed micromechanical analysis of particle fragmentation and matrix cracking of heterogeneous microstructures. The Voronoi cell FEM for particle fragmentation is extended in this paper to incorporate ductile failure through matrix cracking in the form of void growth and coalescence using a non-local Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. In the resulting enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (VCFEM) or E-VCFEM, the assumed stress-based hybrid VCFEM formulation is overlaid with narrow bands of displacement based elements to accommodate strain softening in the constitutive behaviour. The second module develops an anisotropic plasticity-damage model in the form of the GTN model for macroscopic analysis in the multi-scale material model. Parameters in this model are calibrated from results of homogenization of microstructural variables obtained by E-VCFEM analysis of microstructural representative volume element. Numerical examples conducted yield satisfactory results.

  8. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  9. In vitro fracture resistance of molar teeth restored with a short fibre-reinforced composite material.

    PubMed

    Fráter, Márk; Forster, András; Keresztúri, Márk; Braunitzer, Gábor; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficiency of a short fibre-reinforced composite (SFRC) material compared to conventional composites when restoring class II. MOD cavities in molar teeth with different layering techniques. One hundred and thirty mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (n=26). Except for the control group (intact teeth), in all other groups MOD cavities were prepared. The cavities were restored by either conventional composite with horizontal and oblique layering or by SFRC with horizontal and oblique layering. The specimens were submitted to static fracture toughness test. Fracture thresholds and fracture patterns were evaluated. In general, no statistically significant difference was found in fracture toughness between the study groups, except for horizontally layered conventional composite restorations, which turned out to be significantly weaker than controls. However, SFRC yielded noticeably higher fracture thresholds and only obliquely applied SFRC restorations exhibited favourable fracture patterns above chance level. The application of SFRC did not lead to a statistically significant improvement of the fracture toughness of molar teeth with MOD cavities. Still, SFRC applied in oblique increments measurably reduces the chance of unrestorable fractures of molar teeth with class II MOD cavities. The restoration of severely weakened molar teeth with the use of SFRC combined with composite might have advantages over conventional composites alone. It was observed from the statistical data, that the application of SFRC with an oblique layering technique yielded not significantly but better fracture thresholds and more favourable fracture patterns than any other studied material/technique combination. Thus further investigations need to be carried out, to investigate the possible positive mechanical effects of SFRC. The application of the horizontal layering technique with conventional composite materials is inferior

  10. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic method for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of engineering material is described. The method utilizes the nonlinearity parameter measurement which describes the anharmonic behavior of the solid through measurements of amplitudes of the fundamental and of the generated second harmonic ultrasonic waves. The nonlinearity parameter is also directly related to the acoustoelastic constant of the solid which can be determined by measuring the linear dependence of ultrasonic velocity on stress. A major advantage of measurements of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes it more applicable for in-service nondestructive characterization. The relationships between the nonlinearity parameter of second-harmonic generation and the percentage of solid solution phase in engineering materials such as heat treatable aluminum alloys was established. The acoustoelastic constants are measured on these alloys for comparison and confirmation. A linear relationship between the nonlinearity parameter and the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in the alloys is indicated.

  11. C-QWIPs for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwong-Kit; Chen, ChenJune; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the utilities of corrugated quantum well infrared photodetectors (C-QWIPs) in detector material characterization. By measuring the detector responsivity as a function of corrugation period, several important detector parameters, such as the absorption coefficient (alpha) of parallel propagating light and the energy resolved photoconductive gain g, can be directly deduced. For the QWIP material presented, (alpha) at the peak was found to be 0.21 micrometer-1 under the usual operating condition. This value of (alpha) corresponds to an absorption length of 4.9 micrometer. Instead of being a constant, the value of g also varies significantly across the excitation spectrum, and the peak value is larger than the noise gain at large bias. Our results show that the present characterization technique is capable of providing accurate and detailed information on the intrinsic properties of QWIP materials under actual operating conditions. It is extremely useful in detector optimization. In addition, we also show that the performance of C-QWIPs can be further improved by etching an additional vertical trench at the center of each corrugation.

  12. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  13. Characterization of SiC f/SiC and CNT/SiC composite materials produced by liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. K.; Lee, S. P.; Cho, K. S.; Byun, J. H.; Bae, D. S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper dealt with the microstructure and mechanical properties of SiC based composites reinforced with different reinforcing materials. The composites were fabricated using reinforcing materials of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Tyranno Lox-M SiC chopped fibers. The volume fraction of carbon nanotubes was also varied in this composite system. An Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3 powder mixture was used as a sintering additive in the consolidation of the SiC matrix. The characterization of the composites was investigated by means of SEM and three point bending tests. These composites showed a dense morphology of the matrix region, by the creation of a secondary phase. The composites reinforced with SiC chopped fibers possessed a flexural strength of about 400 MPa at room temperature. The flexural strength of the carbon nanotubes composites had a tendency to decrease with increased volume fraction of the reinforcing material.

  14. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot, and

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used to enhance numerous applications such as electronics, sensors and composite strength. This presentation will show the synthesizing process of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperatures and hydrocarbon concentrations but weakly on pressures. The size, growth modes and orientations of carbon nanotube will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential applications including sensor, heat pipe, field emission, radiation shielding, and reinforcements for composites by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S.; Watson, M.

    2003-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used for numerous applications to enhance the performance of electronics, sensors and composites. This presentation will demonstrate the synthesizing process of carbon nanotube by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes could be synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperature and hydrocarbon concentration but weakly on pressure. The sizes, orientations, and growth modes of carbon nanotubes will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential aerospace applications such as reinforced and functional composites, temperature sensing, and thermal control by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used to enhance numerous applications such as electronics, sensors and composite strength. This presentation will show the synthesizing process of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperatures and hydrocarbon concentrations but weakly on pressures. The size, growth modes and orientations of carbon nanotube will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential applications including sensor, heat pipe, field emission, radiation shielding, and reinforcements for composites by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  18. Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

  19. Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for characterizing optical materials, using steps and equipment for generating a coherent laser light, filtering the light to remove high order spatial components, collecting the filtered light and forming a parallel light beam, splitting the parallel beam into a first direction and a second direction wherein the parallel beam travelling in the second direction travels toward the material sample so that the parallel beam passes through the sample, applying various physical quantities to the sample, reflecting the beam travelling in the first direction to produce a first reflected beam, reflecting the beam that passes through the sample to produce a second reflected beam that travels back through the sample, combining the second reflected beam after it travels back though the sample with the first reflected beam, sensing the light beam produced by combining the first and second reflected beams, and processing the sensed beam to determine sample characteristics and properties.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of a novel carbon fiber-reinforced calcium phosphate silicate bone cement with potential osteo-inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Xiao, Yu; Gong, Tianxing; Zhou, Shuxin; Troczynski, Tom; Yang, Quanzu; Bao, Chongyun; Xu, Xiaoming

    2015-12-23

    The repair of bone defects is still a pressing challenge in clinics. Injectable bone cement is regarded as a promising material to solve this problem because of its special self-setting property. Unfortunately, its poor mechanical conformability, unfavorable osteo-genesis ability and insufficient osteo-inductivity seriously limit its clinical application. In this study, novel experimental calcium phosphate silicate bone cement reinforced by carbon fibers (CCPSC) was fabricated and characterized. First, a compressive strength test and cell culture study were carried out. Then, the material was implanted into the femoral epiphysis of beagle dogs to further assess its osteo-conductivity using a micro-computed tomography scan and histological analysis. In addition, we implanted CCPSC into the beagles' intramuscular pouches to perform an elementary investigation of its osteo-inductivity. The results showed that incorporation of carbon fibers significantly improved its mechanical properties. Meanwhile, CCPSC had better biocompatibility to activate cell adhesion as well as proliferation than poly-methyl methacrylate bone cement based on the cell culture study. Moreover, pronounced biodegradability and improved osteo-conductivity of CCPSC could be observed through the in vivo animal study. Finally, a small amount of osteoid was found at the heterotopic site one month after implantation which indicated potential osteo-inductivity of CCPSC. In conclusion, the novel CCPSC shows promise as a bioactive bone substitute in certain load-bearing circumstances.

  1. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose from Acacia mangium and its reinforcement potential.

    PubMed

    Jasmani, Latifah; Adnan, Sharmiza

    2017-04-01

    Acacia mangium, a fast growing tree is widely planted in Malaysia. Converting Acacia wood into nanocellulose could create new value added products for forest-based industry. Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was prepared from Acacia mangium wood pulp via 64wt% sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Prior to acid hydrolysis, Acacia mangium was subjected to pulping followed by bleaching in order to remove non-cellulosic fragments. Acid hydrolysis was carried out on bleached pulp to produce the needle-like NCC with 79% crystallinity and aspect ratio of 26. The resulting NCC was mixed with PVA as a reinforcement material. Incorporation of 2% NCC improved the tensile of the NCC-PVA film by 30%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of short-fibre reinforced thermoplastics for fracture fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Hastings, R S; Mason, J J; Moet, A

    1990-10-01

    This study focuses on determining the effects of clinically relevant procedures on the flexural and fracture toughness properties of three short-fibre thermoplastic composites for potential application as fracture fixation devices. The procedures included sterilization, heat contouring and saline soaking. The three materials tested were polysulphone, polybutylene terephthalate and polyetheretherketone, all reinforced with 30% short carbon fibres. The polysulphone composite showed significant degradation in mechanical properties due to saline soaking. The polybutylene terephthalate exhibited significant degradation of mechanical properties following both contouring and saline soaking. The polyetheretherketone composite, however, exhibited no degradation in mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that flexion and fracture toughness testing were effective for determining the response of the composites to different applied conditions and demonstrated the stability of polyetheretherketone subjected to these treatments. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the most effective fibre-matrix bonding to be in the polyetheretherketone.

  3. Photothermal speckle modulation for noncontact materials characterization.

    PubMed

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Sullenberger, Ryan M; Crompton, David R; Jeys, Thomas H; Saar, Brian G; Herzog, William D

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a noncontact, photothermal materials characterization method based on visible-light speckle imaging. This technique is applied to remotely measure the infrared absorption spectra of materials and to discriminate materials based on their thermal conductivities. A wavelength-tunable (7.5-8.7 μm), intensity-modulated, quantum cascade pump laser and a continuous-wave 532 nm probe laser illuminate a sample surface such that the two laser spots overlap. Surface absorption of the intensity-modulated pump laser induces a time-varying thermoelastic surface deformation, resulting in a time-varying 532 nm scattering speckle field from the surface. The speckle modulation amplitude, derived from a series of visible camera images, is found to correlate with the amplitude of the surface motion. By tuning the pump laser's wavelength over a molecular absorption feature, the amplitude spectrum of the speckle modulation is found to correlate to the IR absorption spectrum. As an example, we demonstrate this technique for spectroscopic identification of thin polymeric films. Furthermore, by adjusting the rate of modulation of the pump beam and measuring the associated modulation transfer to the visible speckle pattern, information about the thermal time constants of surface and sub-surface features can be revealed. Using this approach, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish between different materials (including metals, semiconductors, and insulators) based on differences in their thermal conductivities.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and application of electrode materials

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lin

    1995-07-07

    It has been known that significant advances in electrochemistry really depend on improvements in the sensitivity, selectivity, convenience, and/or economy of working electrodes, especially through the development of new working electrode materials. The advancement of solid state chemistry and materials science makes it possible to provide the materials which may be required as satisfactory electrode materials. The combination of solid state techniques with electrochemistry expands the applications of solid state materials and leads to the improvement of electrocatalysis. The study of Ru-Ti4O7 and Pt-Ti4O7 microelectrode arrays as introduced in paper 1 and paper 4, respectively, focuses on their synthesis and characterization. The synthesis is described by high temperature techniques for Ru or Pt microelectrode arrays within a conductive Ti4O7ceramic matrix. The characterization is based on the data obtained by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, voltammetry and amperometry. These microelectrode arrays show significant enhancement in current densities in comparison to solid Ru and Pt electrodes. Electrocatalysis at pyrochlore oxide Bi2Ru2O7.3 and Bi2Ir2O7 electrodes are described in paper 2 and paper 3, respectively. Details are reported for the synthesis and characterization of composite Bi2Ru2O7.3 electrodes. Voltammetric data are examined for evidence that oxidation can occur with transfer of oxygen to the oxidation products in the potential region corresponding to anodic discharge of H2O with simultaneous evolution of O2. Paper 3 includes electrocatalytic activities of composite Bi2Ir2O7 disk electrodes for the oxidation of I- and the reduction of IO3-.

  5. Morphological characterization of carbon-nanofiber-reinforced epoxy nanocomposites using ultra-small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, R.S.; Anderson, D.P.; Brown, J.M.; Arlen, M.J.; Colleary, A.J.; Lafdi, K.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the properties of nanocomposites reinforced with vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs) can be found throughout the literature. Electrical, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties are just a few of the characteristics that have been well discussed. Although these properties depend on morphology, morphological characterization is rare. Due to its 2-dimensional nature, microscopy is of limited value when analyzing network morphologies. This work will show how the characterization of the three-dimensional geometry and network formation of VGCFs can be determined using ultra-small angle scattering techniques. Ultra-small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (USAXS and USANS) were used to characterize the morphology of carbon nanofibers suspended in epoxy. Using a simplified tube model, we estimate the dimensions of suspended fibers. The assumption of tubular fibers accounts for the increased surface area observed with USAXS that is not accounted for using a solid rod model. Furthermore, USANS was used to search for a structural signature associated with the electrical percolation threshold. USANS extends to longer dimensional scales than USAXS, which measures a smaller range of momentum transfer. To determine the electrical percolation threshold, AC impedance spectroscopy was employed to verify that an electrically conductive, percolated network forms at VGCNF loadings of 0.8% < CNF wt% < 1.2%. These values correlate with the USANS data, where a morphological transition is seen at {approx}1.2% loading.

  6. Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction...Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction Ralph P. I. Adler and Daniel J. Snoha...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and

  7. Characterization of damping in microfibrous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobramaney, Pregassen; Flowers, George T.; Dean, Robert N.

    2012-04-01

    MEMS gyroscopes are used in many applications including harsh environments such as high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise. If the latter is at the natural frequency of the gyroscope, the proof mass will be overexcited giving rise to a corrupted gyroscope output. To mitigate the effect of the high-power, high-frequency acoustic noise, it is proposed to use nickel microfibrous sheets as an acoustic damper. For this purpose, the characterization of vibration damping in Nickel microfibrous sheets was examined in the present research effort. The sheets were made from nickel fibers with cellulose as a binding agent using a wet-lay papermaking technique. Sintering was done at 1000 °C to remove all the cellulose giving rise to a porous material. Square sheets of 20 cm were made from three diameters of nickel fibers namely 4, 8, and 12 microns. The sheets were cut into smaller pieces to fit the requirements of a fixture specially designed for this study. The fixture was attached to a LDS V408 shaker with a mass resting on a stack of the microfibrous sheets to simulate transmitted vibration by base motion with the sheet stack acting as a damper. A series of experiments was conducted using these 3 fiber diameters, different number of layers of microfibrous sheets and varying the vibration amplitude. From the collected vibration data, the stiffness and damping ratio of the microfibrous material was characterized.

  8. Material Modeling and Ballistic-Resistance Analysis of Armor-Grade Composites Reinforced with High-Performance Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Glomski, P. S.; He, T.; Arakere, G.; Bell, W. C.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    A new ballistic material model for 0°/90° cross-plied oriented ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene fiber-based armor-grade composite laminates has been constructed using open-literature data for the fiber and polymeric-matrix material properties and the general experimental/field-test observations regarding the deformation and failure modes in these types of materials. The present model is an extension of our recently developed unit cell-based ballistic material model for the same class of composites (M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, T. He,W.C. Bell, B. A. Cheeseman, C.-F. Yen, and B. Scott, A Ballistic Material Model for Cross-Plied Unidirectional Ultra-High Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Fiber-reinforced Armor-Grade Composites, Mater. Sci. Eng, A 2008, 498(1-2), p 231-241) which was found to be physically sound, but computationally not very efficient. The present model is constructed in such a way that it can be readily integrated into commercial finite element programs like ANSYS/Autodyn (ANSYS/Autodyn version 11.0, User Documentation, Century Dynamics Inc., a subsidiary of ANSYS Inc., 2007), as a User Material Subroutine. To validate the model, a series of transient nonlinear dynamics computational analyses of the transverse impact of armor-grade composite laminates with two types of bullets/projectiles is carried out and the computational results compared with their experimental counterparts. Relatively good agreement is found between the experiment and the computational analysis relative to: (a) the success of the armor panels of different areal densities in defeating the bullets at different initial bullet velocities; (b) postmortem spatial distribution of the damage modes and the extents within the panels; (c) the temporal evolution of the armor-panel back-face bulge; and (d) The existence of three distinct armor-penetration stages (i.e., an initial filament shearing/cutting dominated stage, an intermediate stage characterized by pronounced filament

  9. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  10. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  11. Development and characterization of fatigue resistant Aramid reinforced aluminium laminates (ARALL) for fatigue Critical aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, M. H.; Umar, S.; Nauman, S.

    2014-06-01

    The structural weight of an aircraft has always been a controlling parameter that governs its fuel efficiency and transport capacity. In pursuit of achieving light-weight aircraft structures, high design stress levels have to be adopted and materials with high specific strength such as Aluminum etc. are to be deployed. However, an extensive spectrum of fatigue load exists at the aircraft wings and other aerodynamic components that may cause initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks and concludes in a catastrophic rupture. Fatigue is therefore the limiting design parameter in such cases and materials with high fatigue resistance are then required. A major improvement in the fatigue behavior was observed by laminating Kevlar fibers with Aluminum using epoxy. ARALL (Aramid Reinforced ALuminum Laminates) is a fatigue resistant hybrid composite that consists of layers of thin high strength aluminum alloy sheets surface bonded with aramid fibers. The intact aramid fibers tie up the fatigue cracks, thus reducing the stress intensity factor at the crack tip as a result of which the fatigue properties of can be enhanced with orders of magnitude as compared to monolithic high strength Aluminum alloy sheets. Significant amount of weight savings can be achieved in fatigue critical components in comparison with the traditional materials used in aircraft.

  12. Application of acoustic emission on the characterization of fracture in textile reinforced cement laminates.

    PubMed

    Blom, J; Wastiels, J; Aggelis, D G

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of textile reinforced cementitious (TRC) composites under flexural loading. The main objective is to link specific AE parameters to the fracture mechanisms that are successively dominating the failure of this laminated material. At relatively low load, fracture is initiated by matrix cracking while, at the moment of peak load and thereafter, the fiber pull-out stage is reached. Stress modeling of the material under bending reveals that initiation of shear phenomena can also be activated depending on the shape (curvature) of the plate specimens. Preliminary results show that AE waveform parameters like frequency and energy are changing during loading, following the shift of fracturing mechanisms. Additionally, the AE behavior of specimens with different curvature is very indicative of the stress mode confirming the results of modeling. Moreover, AE source location shows the extent of the fracture process zone and its development in relation to the load. It is seen that AE monitoring yields valuable real time information on the fracture of the material and at the same time supplies valuable feedback to the stress modeling.

  13. Processing and characterization of polyols plasticized-starch reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Barral, L; Bouza, R; Montero, B

    2016-09-20

    Biocomposites suitable for short-life applications such as food packaging were prepared by melt processing and investigated. Biocomposites studied are wheat starch plasticized with two different molecular weight polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and reinforced with various amounts of microcrystalline cellulose. The effect of the plasticizer type and the filler amount on the processing properties, the crystallization behavior and morphology developed for the materials, and the influence on thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties and water absorption behavior were investigated. Addition of microcrystalline cellulose led to composites with good filler-matrix adhesion where the stiffness and resistance to humidity absorption were improved. The use of sorbitol as a plasticizer of starch also improved the stiffness and water uptake behavior of the material as well as its thermal stability. Biodegradable starch-based materials with a wide variety of properties can be tailored by varying the polyol plasticizer type and/or by adding microcrystalline cellulose filler. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Acoustic Emission on the Characterization of Fracture in Textile Reinforced Cement Laminates

    PubMed Central

    Blom, J.; Wastiels, J.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of textile reinforced cementitious (TRC) composites under flexural loading. The main objective is to link specific AE parameters to the fracture mechanisms that are successively dominating the failure of this laminated material. At relatively low load, fracture is initiated by matrix cracking while, at the moment of peak load and thereafter, the fiber pull-out stage is reached. Stress modeling of the material under bending reveals that initiation of shear phenomena can also be activated depending on the shape (curvature) of the plate specimens. Preliminary results show that AE waveform parameters like frequency and energy are changing during loading, following the shift of fracturing mechanisms. Additionally, the AE behavior of specimens with different curvature is very indicative of the stress mode confirming the results of modeling. Moreover, AE source location shows the extent of the fracture process zone and its development in relation to the load. It is seen that AE monitoring yields valuable real time information on the fracture of the material and at the same time supplies valuable feedback to the stress modeling. PMID:24605050

  15. Carbon fiber reinforced mortar as an electrical contact material for cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1995-05-01

    For a joint between old plain mortar and new mortar (which serves as an electrical contact material for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced old mortar), short carbon fiber addition to the new mortar was found to decrease both the contact resistivity and the new mortar`s volume resistivity. Whether the new mortar contained fibers or not, the contact resistance was higher than the new mortar`s volume resistance perpendicular to the contact and was lower than the new mortar`s volume resistance parallel to the contact. In the presence of latex, the volume resistivity was 3.1 {times} 10{sup 5}, 1.4 {times} 10{sup 3} and 1.2 {times} 10{sup 2} {Omega}{center_dot}cm and the contact resistivity was 5.9 {times} 10{sup 6}, 2.7 {times} 10{sup 5} and 2.6 {times} 10{sup 4} {Omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} at fiber contents of 0, 0.53 and 1.1 vol.% respectively. Latex addition alone to the new mortar increased slightly both contact resistivity and new mortar`s volume resistivity. All resistivities increased very slightly with curing age.

  16. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  17. Electrical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, M.; Pascal, Fabien

    Semiconductor materials and devices continue to occupy a preeminent technological position due to their importance when building integrated electronic systems used in a wide range of applications from computers, cell-phones, personal digital assistants, digital cameras and electronic entertainment systems, to electronic instrumentation for medical diagnositics and environmental monitoring. Key ingredients of this technological dominance have been the rapid advances made in the quality and processing of materials - semiconductors, conductors and dielectrics - which have given metal oxide semiconductor device technology its important characteristics of negligible standby power dissipation, good input-output isolation, surface potential control and reliable operation. However, when assessing material quality and device reliability, it is important to have fast, nondestructive, accurate and easy-to-use electrical characterization techniques available, so that important parameters such as carrier doping density, type and mobility of carriers, interface quality, oxide trap density, semiconductor bulk defect density, contact and other parasitic resistances and oxide electrical integrity can be determined. This chapter describes some of the more widely employed and popular techniques that are used to determine these important parameters. The techniques presented in this chapter range in both complexity and test structure requirements from simple current-voltage measurements to more sophisticated low-frequency noise, charge pumping and deep-level transient spectroscopy techniques.

  18. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  19. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  20. Characterization and modeling of performance of Polymer Composites Reinforced with Highly Non-Linear Cellulosic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozite, L.; Joffe, R.; Varna, J.; Nyström, B.

    2012-02-01

    The behaviour of highly non-linear cellulosic fibers and their composite is characterized. Micro-mechanisms occurring in these materials are identified. Mechanical properties of regenerated cellulose fibers and composites are obtained using simple tensile test. Material visco-plastic and visco-elastic properties are analyzed using creep tests. Two bio-based resins are used in this study - Tribest and EpoBioX. The glass and flax fiber composites are used as reference materials to compare with Cordenka fiber laminates.

  1. Advanced materials characterization based on full field deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, A. Paige

    Accurate stress-strain constitutive properties are essential for understanding the complex deformation and failure mechanisms for materials with highly anisotropic mechanical properties. Among such materials, glass-fiber- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer--matrix composites play a critical role in advanced structural designs. The large number of different methods and specimen types currently required to generate three-dimensional allowables for structural design slows down the material characterization. Also, some of the material constitutive properties are never measured due to the prohibitive cost of the specimens needed. This work shows that simple short-beam shear (SBS) specimens are well-suited for measurement of multiple constitutive properties for composite materials and that can enable a major shift toward accurate material characterization. The material characterization is based on the digital image correlation (DIC) full-field deformation measurement. The full-field-deformation measurement enables additional flexibility for assessment of stress--strain relations, compared to the conventional strain gages. Complex strain distributions, including strong gradients, can be captured. Such flexibility enables simpler test-specimen design and reduces the number of different specimen types required for assessment of stress--strain constitutive behavior. Two key elements show advantage of using DIC in the SBS tests. First, tensile, compressive, and shear stress--strain relations are measured in a single experiment. Second, a counter-intuitive feasibility of closed-form stress and modulus models, normally applicable to long beams, is demonstrated for short-beam specimens. The modulus and stress--strain data are presented for glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy material systems. The applicability of the developed method to static, fatigue, and impact load rates is also demonstrated. In a practical method to determine stress-strain constitutive relations, the stress

  2. Materials characterization using frequency domain photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi Oladeinde

    A frequency domain photoacoustic microscopy system is developed for the characterization of micro- and nanoscale materials. An amplified, intensity modulated continuous wave (CW) laser source is used to generate narrow-bandwidth acoustic waves through the thermoelastic effect. The displacement resulting from acoustic wave interaction with material boundaries is measured using a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer. The signal from the interferometer is coupled to a RF lock-in amplifier or vector network analyzer, allowing for the bandwidth of the detection system to be matched to that of the acoustic signals. Measurements are made over an extremely narrow bandwidth by modulating the excitation laser source on the sample surface over a long time interval and selecting a corresponding integration time for the detection system. An analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this system indicates that it offers substantial improvements over existing systems that incorporate pulsed laser sources to generate broad bandwidth acoustic waves. Using a bandwidth of 1.0 Hz, for instance, experimental results show a minimum detectable displacement of 3.1 fm. Extracting quantitative material parameters from the complex acoustic spectrum can be difficult when multiple acoustic modes are excited, or in the presence of reflections from sample boundaries. Two techniques are used to process the measured signals. In the first technique, the modulation frequency of the excitation laser is scanned over the bandwidth of interest, and a transient sample response is constructed from the frequency domain data. Acoustic arrivals that are separated in the time domain are time gated for further analysis. In the second approach, the modulation frequency of the excitation laser is fixed, but the source to receiver distance is varied. The spatial frequencies of the acoustic modes are found by analyzing the spatial variation of the phase, allowing for the velocity of each mode generated at

  3. Metal Standards for Waveguide Characterization of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Kory, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    Rectangular-waveguide inserts that are made of non-ferromagnetic metals and are sized and shaped to function as notch filters have been conceived as reference standards for use in the rectangular- waveguide method of characterizing materials with respect to such constitutive electromagnetic properties as permittivity and permeability. Such standards are needed for determining the accuracy of measurements used in the method, as described below. In this method, a specimen of a material to be characterized is cut to a prescribed size and shape and inserted in a rectangular- waveguide test fixture, wherein the specimen is irradiated with a known source signal and detectors are used to measure the signals reflected by, and transmitted through, the specimen. Scattering parameters [also known as "S" parameters (S11, S12, S21, and S22)] are computed from ratios between the transmitted and reflected signals and the source signal. Then the permeability and permittivity of the specimen material are derived from the scattering parameters. Theoretically, the technique for calculating the permeability and permittivity from the scattering parameters is exact, but the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of the measurements from which the scattering parameters are obtained. To determine whether the measurements are accurate, it is necessary to perform comparable measurements on reference standards, which are essentially specimens that have known scattering parameters. To be most useful, reference standards should provide the full range of scattering-parameter values that can be obtained from material specimens. Specifically, measurements of the backscattering parameter (S11) from no reflection to total reflection and of the forward-transmission parameter (S21) from no transmission to total transmission are needed. A reference standard that functions as a notch (band-stop) filter can satisfy this need because as the signal frequency is varied across the frequency range

  4. Advanced STEM Characterization of Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sanchita

    area of model metallic multi-layers materials. Traditional TEM techniques such as two-beam imaging, weak beam imaging, and through-focal series have been applied to characterize the dislocation network and He bubble distribution. STEM Z-contrast imaging has also been applied to characterize the dislocation network and He bubble distribution. The TGB is found to consist of grid (square, rectangular) of screw dislocations with a line direction along <110> and with Burgers vector1/2a<110>. The He bubble distribution is found to be random across the thickness. The results showed that, because of STEM's characteristic dependence on atomic number, STEM imaging reduces the post-processing of images and provides 3D information about distribution of the radiation damage which is unobtainable by TEM. In summary, this dissertation makes important contributions to the knowledge of FT catalyst by providing direct, reliable representation of 3D structure of a FT catalyst after reduction and irradiated metallic-bilayer knowledge base by presenting new results which will help in designing new materials and fabrication techniques.

  5. Study on experimental characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer panel using digital image correlation: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashfuddoja, Mohammad; Prasath, R. G. R.; Ramji, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the experimental characterization of polymer-matrix and polymer based carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate by employing a whole field non-contact digital image correlation (DIC) technique is presented. The properties are evaluated based on full field data obtained from DIC measurements by performing a series of tests as per ASTM standards. The evaluated properties are compared with the results obtained from conventional testing and analytical models and they are found to closely match. Further, sensitivity of DIC parameters on material properties is investigated and their optimum value is identified. It is found that the subset size has more influence on material properties as compared to step size and their predicted optimum value for the case of both matrix and composite material is found consistent with each other. The aspect ratio of region of interest (ROI) chosen for correlation should be the same as that of camera resolution aspect ratio for better correlation. Also, an open cutout panel made of the same composite laminate is taken into consideration to demonstrate the sensitivity of DIC parameters on predicting complex strain field surrounding the hole. It is observed that the strain field surrounding the hole is much more sensitive to step size rather than subset size. Lower step size produced highly pixilated strain field, showing sensitivity of local strain at the expense of computational time in addition with random scattered noisy pattern whereas higher step size mitigates the noisy pattern at the expense of losing the details present in data and even alters the natural trend of strain field leading to erroneous maximum strain locations. The subset size variation mainly presents a smoothing effect, eliminating noise from strain field while maintaining the details in the data without altering their natural trend. However, the increase in subset size significantly reduces the strain data at hole edge due to discontinuity in

  6. Fatigue damage characterization of braided and woven fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesano, John

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMC) for manufacturing primary load-bearing structural components has significantly increased in many industrial applications. Specifically in the aerospace industry, PMCs are also being considered for elevated temperature applications. Current aerospace-grade composite components subjected to fatigue loading are over-designed due to insufficient understanding of the material failure processes, and due to the lack of available generic fatigue prediction models. A comprehensive literature survey reveals that there are few fatigue studies conducted on woven and braided fabric reinforced PMC materials, and even fewer at elevated temperatures. It is therefore the objective of this study to characterize and subsequently model the elevated temperature fatigue behaviour of a triaxial braided PMC, and to investigate the elevated temperature fatigue properties of two additional woven PMCs. An extensive experimental program is conducted using a unique test protocol on the braided and woven composites, which consists of static and fatigue testing at various test temperatures. The development of mechanically-induced damage is monitored using a combination of non-destructive techniques which included infrared thermography, fiber optic sensors and edge replication. The observed microscopic damage development is quantified and correlated to the exhibited macroscopic material behaviour at all test temperatures. The fiber-dominated PMC materials considered in this study did not exhibit notable time- or temperature-dependent static properties. However, fatigue tests reveal that the local damage development is in fact notably influenced by temperature. The elevated temperature environment increases the toughness of the thermosetting polymers, which results in consistently slower fatigue crack propagation rates for the respective composite materials. This has a direct impact on the stiffness degradation rate and the fatigue lives for the braided

  7. Industrial Materials Characterization Using Neutron Activation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    S. Yusuf; W. Rigot; M. Buchmann; T. Quinn

    2000-06-04

    For more than 30 yr now, we have applied neutron activation analysis (NAA) in material characterization by stressing the fundamentals, namely, understanding the nuclear reactions, characterizing the irradiation facility, and establishing a stable counting system. When these three aspects are treated properly, then Eq. (1), A{sub 0} = {lambda}Ce{sup {lambda}t{sub 1}}/(1-e{sup -{lambda}{Delta}})(1-e{sup {lambda}{tau}})={epsilon}{gamma}({theta}mN{sub A}/M){integral}{sub E=0}{sup E={infinity}}{Phi}(E){sigma}(E)dE, is applicable with negligible errors. The quantities in Eq. (1) are all known except for the quantities under the integral and the counting efficiency. It is the treatment of the integral in Eq. (1) that raises a question and is the topic in numerous theses. The object of this paper is to show how the shape-independent approach can be used to cut down time and cost of analysis without compromising accuracy.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Binder Less Mg/Mg Alloy Infiltrated SiCp Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu Kumar, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    SiCp-reinforced commercial pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy MMCs’ were prepared through infiltration route without the use of any special atmospheres. The preform was prepared using a mixture of reinforcement particles and the matrix metal particles. The composites were prepared with various volume percentage of the reinforcement and their properties with the variation of SiCp were analyzed. The interfacial properties of the composites were analyzed using microstructure, microhardness, and wear studies. Calculation of thermal conditions during infiltration was done to study the effect of adding matrix metal particles on the infiltration behavior and its effect on the uniformity distribution of the reinforcements.

  9. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R. H.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel of considerable potential in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy [1,2]. However, while rich in carbohydrates [3], the plant cell walls exhibit a natural resistance to complex phenotype treatments such as enzymatic microbial deconstruction, heat and acid treatments that can remove the lignin polymers from cellulose before hydrolysis [5]. Noninvasive physical and chemical characterization of the cell walls and the effect of such treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary to understand and overcome such resistance [6]. Although lacking chemical recognition in their traditional forms, the various emerging modalities of nano-mechanical [7] and opto-nano-mechanicalmore » [8] force microscopies [9,10] provide a superb window into the needed nanoscale material characterization [6]. Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful, non- destructive and ultra-sensitive technique that can provide the needed molecular fingerprinting but the photothermal channel is delocalized and thus lacks spatial resolution. Utilizing the emerging dynamic concepts of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) [11] and virtual resonance [12], we introduce a hybrid photonic and nanomechanical force microscopy (hp-MSAFM) with molecular recognition and characterize the extraction, holopulping and acid treatment of biomass. We present spatially and spectrally resolved cell wall images that reveal both the morphological and the compositional alterations of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. The presented findings should prove highly relevant in fields such as cancer research [13], nanotoxicity [14], energy storage and production [15], where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites [16], nanoparticle uptake by cells [14], and nanoscale quality control [17] are in demand.« less

  10. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R. H.; Thundat, Thomas; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-08-10

    Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel of considerable potential in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy [1,2]. However, while rich in carbohydrates [3], the plant cell walls exhibit a natural resistance to complex phenotype treatments such as enzymatic microbial deconstruction, heat and acid treatments that can remove the lignin polymers from cellulose before hydrolysis [5]. Noninvasive physical and chemical characterization of the cell walls and the effect of such treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary to understand and overcome such resistance [6]. Although lacking chemical recognition in their traditional forms, the various emerging modalities of nano-mechanical [7] and opto-nano-mechanical [8] force microscopies [9,10] provide a superb window into the needed nanoscale material characterization [6]. Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful, non- destructive and ultra-sensitive technique that can provide the needed molecular fingerprinting but the photothermal channel is delocalized and thus lacks spatial resolution. Utilizing the emerging dynamic concepts of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) [11] and virtual resonance [12], we introduce a hybrid photonic and nanomechanical force microscopy (hp-MSAFM) with molecular recognition and characterize the extraction, holopulping and acid treatment of biomass. We present spatially and spectrally resolved cell wall images that reveal both the morphological and the compositional alterations of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. The presented findings should prove highly relevant in fields such as cancer research [13], nanotoxicity [14], energy storage and production [15], where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites [16], nanoparticle uptake by cells [14], and nanoscale quality control [17] are in demand.

  11. Nondestructive characterization of UHMWPE armor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.; Jensen, Terrence; Eisenmann, David

    2012-05-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material increasingly used for fabricating helmet and body armor. In this work, plate specimens consolidated from thin fiber sheets in series 3124 and 3130 were examined with ultrasound, X-ray and terahertz radiation. Ultrasonic through-transmission scans using both air-coupled and immersion modes revealed that the 3130 series material generally had much lower attenuation than the 3124 series, and that certain 3124 plates had extremely high attenuation. Due to the relatively low inspection frequencies used, pulse-echo immersion ultrasonic testing could not detect distinct flaw echoes from the interior. To characterize the nature of the defective condition that was responsible for the high ultrasonic attenuation, terahertz radiation in the time-domain spectroscopy mode were used to image the flaws. Terahertz scan images obtained on the high attenuation samples clearly showed a distribution of a large number of defects, possibly small planar delaminations, throughout the volume of the interior. Their precise nature and morphology are to be verified by optical microscopy of the sectioned surface.

  12. Terahertz material characterization for nonreciprocal integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mičica, Martin; Postava, Kamil; Vanwolleghem, Mathias; Horák, Tomáś; Lampin, Jean François; Pištora, Jaromír.

    2015-05-01

    Interest in nonreciprocal terahertz (THz) integrated optics makes necessity to look for new materials active in this region and precisely characterize their optical properties. In this paper we present important aspects of the methods for determination of optical functions in far infrared (FIR) and THz spectral range. The techniques are applied to polyethylene cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas) and hexaferrites (BaFe12O19, SrFe12O19). Topas is promising material in integrated optics for THz radiation, thanks to its low absorption in this region. On the other hand, hexaferrites with its magneto-optic properties can be used for nonreciprocal integrated optic parts and radiation control. Samples were studied by THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in spectral range 2 - 100 cm-1 by transmission and reflection. Advantage of presented THz time domain spectroscopy is measurement of the electric field wavefunction, which allows to obtain both the amplitude and phase spectra. In results we provide measured data, processing, and final computed optical properties of Topas and hexaferrites which reveal interesting optical behaviour in THz spectral range.

  13. Nondestructive characterization of UHMWPE armor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.; Jensen, Terrence; Eisenmann, David

    2012-05-17

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material increasingly used for fabricating helmet and body armor. In this work, plate specimens consolidated from thin fiber sheets in series 3124 and 3130 were examined with ultrasound, X-ray and terahertz radiation. Ultrasonic through-transmission scans using both air-coupled and immersion modes revealed that the 3130 series material generally had much lower attenuation than the 3124 series, and that certain 3124 plates had extremely high attenuation. Due to the relatively low inspection frequencies used, pulse-echo immersion ultrasonic testing could not detect distinct flaw echoes from the interior. To characterize the nature of the defective condition that was responsible for the high ultrasonic attenuation, terahertz radiation in the time-domain spectroscopy mode were used to image the flaws. Terahertz scan images obtained on the high attenuation samples clearly showed a distribution of a large number of defects, possibly small planar delaminations, throughout the volume of the interior. Their precise nature and morphology are to be verified by optical microscopy of the sectioned surface.

  14. Surface Analytical Characterization of Biosensor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccone, Giacomo; Gilliland, D.; Kulisch, Wilhelm

    The development of materials for applications in biosensors and other fields of modern biotechnology critically depends on the characterization of the surfaces of these materials. In this contribution, two major techniques for this purpose are introduced, namely X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). First, the principles, advantages but also shortcomings of both techniques are described. But it is also shown that the application of both techniques to the same surface can lead to synergetic effects overcoming the shortcomings of each technique by the strengths of the other. Examples will be presented from our recent work on biomaterials such as Ta2O5, TiO2, and TiC/a-C, which are promising candidates for applications in biosensors and other field of biotechnology. Finally it will be shown that in any case care has to be taken in the interpretation of XPS and ToF-SIMS results as there are several sources of artefacts caused by the measurements themselves.

  15. Preparation and characterization of agar-based nanocomposite films reinforced with bimetallic (Ag-Cu) alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir Ali; Ahmed, Jasim; Jacob, Harsha

    2017-01-02

    Agar-based active nanocomposite films were prepared by incorporating silver-copper (Ag-Cu) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) (0.5-4wt%) into glycerol plasticized agar solution. Thermo-mechanical, morphological, structural, and optical properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized by texture analyzer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface color measurement. Tensile strength and the melting temperature of the film increased linearly with NPs loading concentration. Color, transparency and UV barrier properties of agar films were influenced by the reinforcement of Ag-Cu NPs. XRD analysis confirmed the crystalline structure of the Agar/Ag-Cu nanocomposite films, whereas the smoothness and the homogeneity of film surface strongly reduced as observed through the SEM. The nanocomposite films exhibited a profound antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Salmonella enterica sv typhimurium) bacteria. Overall, the agar nanocomposite films could be used as packaging material for food preservation by controlling foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

  16. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  17. Conservative Approach for Restoring Posterior Missing Tooth with Fiber Reinforcement Materials: Four Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Ertas, Ertan; Ozsevik, Semih; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Adhesively luted, fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial dentures can be a clinical alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth in selective situations. This type of restoration allows for satisfactory esthetics and reduced tooth preparation compared to a conventional, fixed-partial denture. This clinical report describes the use of a fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial denture as a conservative alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth. PMID:21912503

  18. Review of Physics Related Research and Development Activities in Nondestructive Characterization of Solid Rocket Motor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Lee H.

    1998-10-01

    The perception that solid rocket motors (srm) are of relatively simple mechanical construction with a long history in private, military, and NASA applications may lead some to believe that little is left to be done in terms of basic and applied research and development in support of this technology. The fact is that srm?s are very complicated primarily because of the complexity of the materials from which they are built. The reliability and performance of srm?s are determined by the ballistic and mechanical properties of each individual material component, and by the manufacturing processes that conjoin these materials. In order to insure reliability and good performance, there are on-going materials research and development activities in the srm community. Included are activities involving the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used for materials and processes characterization. Typical applications include: detection and characterization of defects in fiber reinforced composite materials, detection of weak bonds and debonds, verification of surface cleanliness prior to bonding, characterization of aging materials and bondlines, measurement of elastic properties in filled polymeric materials, monitoring of cure in polymeric materials, and measurement of film or coating thicknesses. NDE methods and physics principles upon which they are based will be described. Challenges and future research and development directions will be identified.

  19. [Recent advances and perspective in the study of the nano-reinforcing materials for molecular imprinting of proteins].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-hui; Chai, Miao-ling; Hou, Jia-peng; Pan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technique (MIT) involves the synthesis of polymer in the presence of a template to produce complementary binding sites in terms of its size, shape and functional group orientation. Such kind of polymer possesses specific recognition ability towards its template molecule. Despite the rapid development of MIT over the years, the majority of the template molecules that have been studied are small molecules, while molecular imprinting of proteins remains a significant yet challenging task due to their large size, structural flexibility and complex conformation. This review, we summarized the research findings over the past years, and discussed the nano-reinforcing materials used to prepare molecular imprinting of proteins and the perspective of these nano-reinforcing materials.

  20. Study on the laser irradiation effects on coating reinforced glass fiber/resin composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minsun; Jiang, Houman; Zhang, Tianyu; Zhang, Xiangyu

    2016-10-01

    Two kinds of anti-laser coating made of reflective / ablative resin, called reinforcement schemes of A and B, are applied to the glass fiber reinforced resin matrix composite plate. The anti-laser performance of these samples to the laser operated at the wavelength of 976nm is tested, under the case of a 0.3 Mach tangential airflow pass over the surface of the sample. The experimental results show that the laser damage threshold of the coating reinforced samples have increased more than 50% compared to the original sample, the reinforcement scheme B is better than A. The laser power density damage threshold of the coating reinforced samples to the near infrared laser is higher than 100W/cm2, under the irradiation time is 60 seconds. For the resin reinforced fiber samples, the removal process of the ablation residues has important effects on the perforation time of samples, when there is a strong airflow pass over the surface. The larger laser spot corresponding to the removal of the ablation residues is easier.

  1. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  2. Topological characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, A. H.; Dasan, Y. K.; Khan, Ihsan Ullah; Ahmad, Faiz; Ayoub, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the morphological and barrier properties of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites. Nanocrystalline cellulose was isolated from waste oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber using Sulphuric acid hydrolysis. Chemical modifications of nanocrystalline cellulose was performed to allow good compatibilization between fiber and the polymer matrices and also to improve dispersion of fillers. Bionanocomposite materials were produced from these nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) using solvent casting and evaporation techniques. The properties of extracted nanocrystalline cellulose were examined using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer, TEM and AFM. Besides that, the properties of bionanocomposites were examined through FESEM and oxygen permeability properties analysis. Better barrier and morphological properties were obtained for nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced bionanocomposites than for neat polymer blend.

  3. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  4. Modeling the Creep of Rib-Reinforced Composite Media Made from Nonlinear Hereditary Phase Materials 2. Verification of the Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskii, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    An indirect verification of a structural model describing the creep of a composite medium reinforced by honeycombs and made of nonlinear hereditary phase materials obeying the Rabotnov theory of creep is presented. It is shown that the structural model proposed is trustworthy and can be used in practical calculations. For different kinds of loading, creep curves for a honeycomb core made of a D16T aluminum alloy are calculated.

  5. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    Angstadt, Y.-P. Sun, and K.L. Koudela, Micro-Mechanics Based Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl...intralamina and interlamina damage mechanisms (e.g., fiber breakage within the yarns , fiber/matrix de-bonding, diffuse delamination/interlam- ina separation...a closer look is given to the architecture of the woven fabric. Specifically, details of yarn weaving and crimping, yarn cross-section change, and

  6. Evaluation of the Biocompatibility of New Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials for Craniofacial Bone Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Mădălina-Anca; Rotaru, Horaţiu; Bâldea, Ioana; Boşca, Adina B; Berce, Cristian P; Prejmerean, Cristina; Prodan, Doina; Câmpian, Radu S

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to assess the biocompatibility of new advanced fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) to be used for custom-made cranial implants. Four new formulations of FRC were obtained using polymeric matrices (combinations of monomers bisphenol A glycidylmethacrylate [bis-GMA], urethane dimethacrylate [UDMA], triethylene glycol dimethacrylate [TEGDMA], hydroxyethyl methacrylate [HEMA]) and E-glass fibers (300 g/mp). Every FRC contains 65% E-glass and 35% polymeric matrix. Composition of polymeric matrices are: bis-GMA (21%), TEGDMA (14%) for FRC1; bis-GMA (21%), HEMA (14%) for FRC2; bis-GMA (3.5%), UDMA (21%), TEGDMA (10.5%) for FRC3, and bis-GMA (3.5%), UDMA (21%), HEMA (10.5%) for FRC4. Cytotoxicity test was performed on both human dental pulp stem cells and dermal fibroblasts. Viability was assessed by tetrazolium dye colorimetric assay. Subcutaneous implantation test was carried out on 40 male Wistar rats, randomly divided into 4 groups, according to the FRC tested. Each group received subcutaneous dorsal implants. After 30 days, intensity of the inflammatory reaction, tissue repair status, and presence of the capsule were the main criteria assessed. Both cell populations showed no signs of cytotoxicity following the FRC exposures. In terms of cytotoxicity, the best results were obtained by FRC3 followed by FRC2, FRC4, and FRC1. FRC3 showed also the mildest inflammatory reaction and this correlated both with the noncytotoxic behavior and the presence of a well-organized capsule. The composite biomaterials developed may constitute an optimized alternative of the similar materials used for the reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects. According to authors' studies, the authors conclude that FRC3 is the best formulation regarding the biological behavior.

  7. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 1: Measurement of elastic constants and microstructural characterization.

    PubMed

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; de Ligny, Dominique; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Petschelt, Anselm; Peterlik, Herwig; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the mechanical behavior of dental restorative materials requires an insight into the materials elastic constants and microstructure. Here we aim to use complementary methodologies to thoroughly characterize chairside CAD/CAM materials and discuss the benefits and limitations of different analytical strategies. Eight commercial CAM/CAM materials, ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Elastic constants were evaluated using three methods: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), Resonant Beam Technique (RBT) and Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (PE). The microstructures were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Young's modulus (E), Shear modulus (G), Bulk modulus (B) and Poisson's ratio (ν) were obtained for each material. E and ν reached values ranging from 10.9 (Lava Ultimate) to 201.4 (e.max ZirCAD) and 0.173 (Empress CAD) to 0.47 (Lava Ultimate), respectively. RUS showed to be the most complex and reliable method, while the PE method the easiest to perform but most unreliable. All dynamic methods have shown limitations in measuring the elastic constants of materials showing high damping behavior (hybrid materials). SEM images, Raman spectra and XRD patterns were made available for each material, showing to be complementary tools in the characterization of their crystal phases. Here different methodologies are compared for the measurement of elastic constants and microstructural characterization of CAD/CAM restorative materials. The elastic properties and crystal phases of eight materials are herein fully characterized. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials

  8. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  9. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  10. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  11. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-08-06

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension.

  12. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  13. Processing and characterization of epoxy composites reinforced with short human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Nanda, Bishnu; Satapathy, Alok

    2017-02-01

    Human hair is a biological fiber with well characterized microstructure. It has many unique properties like high tensile strength, thermal insulation, unique chemical composition, elastic recovery, scaly surface etc. But due to its slow decomposition, it creates many environmental problems. Although a number of utilization avenues are already in place, hair is still considered as a biological waste. In view of this, the present work makes an attempt to explore the possibility of fabricating a class of polymer composites reinforced with short human hair fibers. Epoxy composites with different proportions of hair fiber (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt.%) are prepared by simple hand lay-up technique. Mechanical properties such as tensile, flexural and compressive strengths were evaluated by conducting tests as per ASTM standards. It was found out that with the increase in fiber content, the tensile and flexural strength of the composite were increasing significantly while the compressive strength improved marginally. Scanning electron microscopy was done on these samples to observe the microstructural features.

  14. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  15. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred. PMID:28773285

  16. Stereocomplex poly (methyl methacrylate) fibers and self-reinforced composites, and, Structural color of butterflies and beetles - characterization, replication and mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crne, Matija

    This thesis is divided into two parts. Part A describes our efforts in producing stereocomplex PMMA fibers for the purpose of reinforcing PMMA materials. These kinds of composites are known as "self-reinforced" composites. We were successful in producing stereocomplex PMMA fibers with three different methods---wet spinning, gel spinning and electrospinning. Gel spinning and electrospinning produced the most crystalline fibers. Stereocomplex PMMA fibers were further shown to be resistant to high temperature and also to hot monomer solvent during bulk polymerization. Part B describes our efforts in characterizing, replicating and mimicking structural color features of butterflies and beetles. We have developed a simple method of characterizing the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of microscopic objects such as butterfly wing scales. We used this method to characterize structural color features resulting from the replication of butterfly Morpho rhetenor, mimicry of butterfly Papilio palinurus and also the native structural color features of Chrysina gloriosa, which were shown to be cholesteric focal conic defects lined on the surface.

  17. Pullout problem and fracture mechanism of quasi-brittle material reinforced with discontinous aligned fibers subjected to uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-Jang

    The objective of this research is to characterize the postpeak pseudo strain-hardening behavior of the discontinuous aligned fiber composites subjected to uniaxial tension. In order to fully understand the fiber axial force-debonding relationship, fiber pullout problem was first investigated. Unlike most models this theory assumes a triangularly distributed interface shear stress. Besides, R-curve approach was adopted to evaluate the maximum pullout load. In quasi-brittle materials when the value of energy release rate G increases with the applied load, the value of crack resistance R also increases. As a result, the equality of G and R can only serve as the necessary condition for crack propagation. In order to further distinguish stable and unstable crack propagation, a second condition must be included. Namely, the first derivatives of G and R must also equal to each other for the onset of unstable crack propagation. The applied load corresponding to this status is assumed to be the maximum pullout load the fiber can sustain. The corresponding debond length is referred to critical debond length ldc. It was found that ldc increases with embedment length le. This model reproduced the experimental results pretty well. The same concept of R-curve was adopted to investigate the fracture mechanism of the uniaxial tension problem. While determining strain energy of the fiber reinforced composite, equivalent inclusion method and Mori-Tanaka theory was utilized. Again, whenever the above two conditions are satisfied simultaneously, unstable crack propagation initiates. However, are the fibers being pulled out or is there another unstable crack propagation? The comparison of the force sustained by all the fibers in the entire cross section with its allowable value sets the criterion. Besides, unlike most models, this model takes account of the impact of fiber distribution. Thus a model distinguishing single cracking from multiple cracking fracture mechanism has been

  18. Fabrication and characterization of regenerated silk scaffolds reinforced with natural silk fibers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Sahba; Hoyer, Birgit; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Lode, Anja; Nosoudi, Nasim; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Gelinsky, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite material developed for bone tissue engineering. Three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by embedding of natural degummed silk fibers in a matrix of regenerated fibroin, followed by freeze-drying. Different ratios of fibers to fibroin were investigated with respect to their influence on mechanical and biological properties. For all scaffold types, an interconnected porous structure suitable for cell penetration was proven by scanning electron microscopy. Compressive tests, carried out in static and cyclic mode under dry as well as wet conditions, revealed a strong impact of fiber reinforcement on compressive modulus and compressive stress. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that the fiber/fibroin composite scaffolds support cell attachment, proliferation, as well as differentiation along the osteoblastic lineage. Considering the excellent mechanical and biological properties, novel fiber/fibroin scaffolds appear to be an interesting structure for prospect studies in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Limit analysis assessment of experimental behavior of arches reinforced with GFRP materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilio, Ismael; Fedele, Roberto; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Milani, Gabriele

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a comparison between results furnished by a 3D FE upper bound limit analysis and experimental results for some reinforced masonry arches tested at the University of Minho (Portugal) is provided. While the delamination from arches support can be modelled only in an approximate way within limit analysis, the aim of the paper is to accurately reproduce the change in the failure mechanism observed in experimentation, due to the introduction of strengthening elements. Both experimental and numerical results showa clear change in the failure mechanism and in the corresponding ultimate peak load. A set of simulations is also performed on reinforced arches previously damaged, to investigate the role played by the reinforcement within a proper repairing procedure. Good correlation with experimental work and numerical simulations is achieved.

  20. Development and characterization of reinforced poly(L-lactide) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Eon; Todo, Mitsugu

    2011-05-01

    Novel reinforced poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds such as solid shell, porous shell, one beam and two beam reinforced scaffolds were developed to improve the mechanical properties of a standard PLLA scaffold. Experimental results clearly indicated that the compressive mechanical properties such as the strength and the modulus are effectively improved by introducing the reinforcement structures. A linear elastic model consisting of three phases, that is, the reinforcement, the porous matrix and the boundary layer was also introduced in order to predict the compressive moduli of the reinforced scaffolds. The comparative study clearly showed that the simple theoretical model can reasonably predict the moduli of the scaffolds with three phase structures. The failure mechanism of the solid shell and the porous shell reinforced scaffolds under compression were found to be buckling of the solid shell and localized buckling of the struts constructing the pores in the porous shell, respectively. For the beam reinforced scaffolds, on the contrary, the primary failure mechanism was understood to be micro-cracking within the beams and the subsequent formation of the main-crack due to the coalescence of the micro-racks. The biological study was exhibited that osteoblast-like cells, MC3T3-E1, were well adhered and proliferated on the surfaces of the scaffolds after 12 days culturing.

  1. Fabrication, nanomechanical characterization, and cytocompatibility of gold-reinforced chitosan bio-nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimitt G; Kumar, Ajeet; Jayawardana, Veroni N; Woodworth, Craig D; Yuya, Philip A

    2014-11-01

    Chitosan, a naturally derived polymer represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Gold nanoparticles (~32 nm) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in Chitosan matrix. Bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through solution casting process. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed with SEM. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, EDX, SAED, UV-vis, XRD, DLS, and Zeta potential for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale properties of materials under the influence of temperature were characterized through nanoindentation techniques. From quasi-static nanoindentation, it was observed that hardness and reduced modulus of the nanocomposites were increased significantly in direct proportion to the gold nanoparticle concentration. Gold nanoparticle concentration also showed positive impact on storage modulus and thermal stability of the material. The obtained films were confirmed to be biocompatible by their ability to support growth of human cells in vitro. In summary, the results show enhanced mechanical properties with increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, and provide better understanding of the structure-property relationships of such biocompatible materials for potential biomedical applications.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation Approaches Developed for Material Characterization in Aeronautics and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Kautz, Harold E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Martin, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) approaches were developed or tailored for characterizing advanced material systems. The emphasis was on high-temperature aerospace propulsion applications. The material systems included monolithic ceramics, superalloys, and high-temperature composites. In the aeronautics area, the major applications were cooled ceramic plate structures for turbine applications, gamma-TiAl blade materials for low-pressure turbines, thermoelastic stress analysis for residual stress measurements in titanium-based and nickel-based engine materials, and acousto-ultrasonics for creep damage assessment in nickel-based alloys. In the space area, applications consisted of cooled carbon-carbon composites for gas generator combustors and flywheel rotors composed of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites for energy storage on the International Space Station.

  3. Hybrid hierarchical bio-based materials: Development and characterization through experimentation and computational simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Mahmoodul

    Environmentally friendly bio-based composites with improved properties can be obtained by harnessing the synergy offered by hybrid constituents such as multiscale (nano- and micro-scale) reinforcement in bio-based resins composed of blends of synthetic and natural resins. Bio-based composites have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental appeal and their potential to compete with synthetic composites. The advantage of multiscale reinforcement is that it offers synergy at various length scales, and when combined with bio-based resins provide stiffness-toughness balance, improved thermal and barrier properties, and increased environmental appeal to the resulting composites. Moreover, these hybrid materials are tailorable in performance and in environmental impact. While the use of different concepts of multiscale reinforcement has been studied for synthetic composites, the study of mukiphase/multiscale reinforcements for developing new types of sustainable materials is limited. The research summarized in this dissertation focused on development of multiscale reinforced bio-based composites and the effort to understand and exploit the synergy of its constituents through experimental characterization and computational simulations. Bio-based composites consisting of petroleum-based resin (unsaturated polyester), natural or bio-resin (epoxidized soybean and linseed oils), natural fibers (industrial hemp), and nanosilicate (nanoclay) inclusions were developed. The work followed the "materials by Mahmoodul Haq design" philosophy by incorporating an integrated experimental and computational approach to strategically explore the design possibilities and limits. Experiments demonstrated that the drawbacks of bio-resin addition, which lowers stiffness, strength and increases permeability, can be counter-balanced through nanoclay reinforcement. Bio-resin addition yields benefits in impact strength and ductility. Conversely, nanoclay enhances stiffness

  4. Fiber reinforced concrete solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A. J.; Newgard, P. J.

    1985-05-07

    A solar collector is disclosed comprising a glass member having a solar selective coating thereon, and a molded, glass-reinforced concrete member bonded to the glass member and shaped to provide a series of passageways between the glass member and the fiber-reinforced concrete member capable of carrying heat exchanging fluid therethrough. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may be formed by spraying a thin layer of concrete and chopped fibers such as chopped glass fibers onto a mold to provide an inexpensive and lightweight, thin-walled member. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may have a lightweight cellular concrete backing thereon for insulation purposes. The collector is further characterized by the use of materials which have substantially matching thermal coefficients of expansion over the temperature range normally encountered in the use of solar collectors.

  5. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  6. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  7. Fundamental Characterization Studies of Advanced Photocatalytic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phivilay, Somphonh Peter

    Solar powered photocatalytic water splitting has been proposed as a method for the production of sustainable, non-carbon hydrogen fuel. Although much technological progress has been achieved in recent years in the discovery of advanced photocatalytic materials, the progress in the fundamental scientific understanding of such novel, complex mixed oxide and oxynitride photocatalysts has significantly lagged. One of the major reasons for this slow scientific progress is the limited number of reported surface characterization studies of the complex bulk mixed oxide and oxynitride photocatalyst systems. Although photocatalytic splitting of water by bulk mixed oxide and oxynitride materials involves both bulk (generation of excited electrons and holes) and surface phenomena (reaction of H2O with excited electrons and holes at the surface), the photocatalysis community has almost completely ignored the surface characteristics of such complex bulk photocatalysts and correlates the photocatalytic properties with bulk properties. Some of the most promising photocatalyst systems (NaTaO3, GaN, (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) and TaON) were investigated to establish fundamental bulk/surface structure photoactivity relationships. The bulk molecular and electronic structures of the photocatalysts were determined with Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) and transient PL spectroscopy were provided insight into how recombination of photogenerated electrons is related to the photocatalysis activity. The chemical states and atomic compositions of the surface region of the photocatalysts were determined with high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (˜1-3 nm) and high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (˜0.3 nm). The new insights obtained from surface characterization clarified the role of La and Ni promoters species for the NaTaO3 photocatalyst system. The La2O3 additive was found to be a structural promoter that stabilizes small NaTaO3 nanoparticles (NPs

  8. Mechanical properties characterization of composite sandwich materials intended for space antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1986-01-01

    The composite materials proposed for use in the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Program contains a new, high modulus graphite fiber as the reinforcement. A study was conducted to measure certain mechanical properties of the new fiber-reinforced material as well as of a composite-faced aluminum honeycomb sandwich structure. Properties were measured at -157, 22, and 121 C. Complete characterization of this material was not intended. Longitudinal tensile, picture-frame shear, short-beam shear, and flexural tests were performed on specimens of the composite face-sheet materials. Unidirectional, cross-plied, and quasi-isotropic fiber composite ply layup designs were fabricated and tested. These designs had been studied by using NASA's Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) computer program. Flexural tests were conducted on (+/- 60/0 deg) sub s composite-faced sandwich structure material. Resistance strain gages were used to measure strains in the tensile, picture-frame, and sandwich flexural tests. The sandwich flexural strength was limited by the core strength at -157 and 22 C. The adhesive bond strength was the limiting factor at 121 C. Adhesive mechanical properties are reflected in sandwich structure flexural properties when the span-to-depth ratio is great enough to allow a significant shear effect on the load-deflection behavior of the sandwich beam. Most measured properties agreed satisfactorily with the properties predicted by ICAN.

  9. Mechanical properties characterization of composite sandwich materials intended for space antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    The composite materials proposed for use in the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program contains a new, high modulus graphite fiber as the reinforcement. A study was conducted to measure certain mechanical properties of the new fiber-reinforced material as well as of a composite-faced aluminum honeycomb sandwich structure. Properties were measured at -157, 22, and 121 C. Complete characterization of this material was not intended. Longitudinal tensile, picture-frame shear, short-beam shear, and flexural tests were performed on specimens of the composite face-sheet materials. Unidirectional, cross-plied, and quasi-isotropic fiber composite ply layup designs were fabricated and tested. These designs had been studied by using NASA's Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) computer program. Flexural tests were conducted on (+/- 60/0 deg) sub s composite-faced sandwich structure material. Resistance strain gages were used to measure strains in the tensile, picture-frame, and sandwich flexural tests. The sandwich flexural strength was limited by the core strength at 157 and 22 c. The adhesive bond strength was the limiting factor at 121 C. Adhesive mechanical properties are reflected in sandwich structure flexural properties when the span-to-depth ratio is great enough to allow a significant shear effect on the load-deflection behavior of the sandwich beam. Most measured properties agreed satisfactorily with the properties predicted by ICAN.

  10. Characterization of porous glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant structures: porosity and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo V J; Peltola, Matti; Aro, Hannu T; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the microstructure and mechanical properties of porous fiber-reinforced composites (FRC). Implants made of the FRC structures are intended for cranial applications. The FRC specimens were prepared by impregnating E-glass fiber sheet with non-resorbable bifunctional bis-phenyl glycidyl dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin matrix. Four groups of porous FRC specimens were prepared with a different amount of resin matrix. Control group contained specimens of fibers, which were bound together with sizing only. Microstructure of the specimens was analyzed using a micro computed tomography (micro-CT) based method. Mechanical properties of the specimens were measured with a tensile test. The amount of resin matrix in the specimens had an effect on the microstructure. Total porosity was 59.5 % (median) in the group with the lowest resin content and 11.2 % (median) in the group with the highest resin content. In control group, total porosity was 94.2 % (median). Correlations with resin content were obtained for all micro-CT based parameters except TbPf. The tensile strength of the composites was 21.3 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content and 43.4 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content. The tensile strength in control group was 18.9 MPa (median). There were strong correlations between the tensile strength of the specimens and most of the micro-CT based parameters. This experiment suggests that porous FRC structures may have the potential for use in implants for cranial bone reconstructions, provided further relevant in vitro and in vivo tests are performed.

  11. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiskumar, R.; Murugan, N.; Dinaharan, I.; Vijay, S.J.

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  12. Influence of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-04-01

    Unresolved controversy exists concerning the optimum restorative material to reinforce the thin-walled roots of endodontically treated teeth to improve their fracture resistance under occlusal load. This study evaluated the effectiveness of irrigant, dowel type, and root-reinforcing material on the fracture resistance of thin-walled endodontically treated teeth. The root canals of 140 maxillary central incisors were enlarged and equally divided into seven groups according to the canal irrigant: no irrigant (control), 5% hydrogen peroxide, 5% sodium hypochlorite, a combination of 5% hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite, 15% ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid (EDTA), 10% lactic acid, or 20% lactic acid. Within each group, root canals were lined with composite resin (PermaFlo) or glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). A light-transmitting plastic dowel (Luminex) was used to create space for a quartz fiber-reinforced dowel (Aestheti Post) or a titanium alloy dowel (ParaPost XH) and to cure the restorative materials. Following dowel cementation and restoration of the roots with composite core, the teeth were submitted to fracture resistance testing, and data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test (α= 0.05). Fracture resistance values were significantly different among irrigants, restorative materials, and their interaction (p < 0.001); however, the dowel type was not significantly different (p= 0.51). Thin-walled roots that had the smear layer removed with lactic acid and that were then lined with composite resin had a higher fracture resistance. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Preparation and characterization of electron-beam treated HDPE composites reinforced with rice husk ash and Brazilian clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. V.; Teixeira, J. G.; Gomes, M. G.; Oliveira, R. R.; Díaz, F. R. V.; Moura, E. A. B.

    2014-08-01

    This work evaluates the morphology, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. HDPE reinforced with rice husk ashes (80:20 wt%), HDPE reinforced with clay (97:3 wt%) and HDPE reinforced with both rice husk ashes and clay(77:20:3 wt%) were obtained. The Brazilian bentonite chocolate clay was used in this study. This Brazilian smectitic clay is commonly used to produce nanocomposites. The composites were produced by melting extrusion process and then irradiation was carried out in a 1.5 MeV electron-beam accelerator (room temperature, presence of air). Comparisons using the irradiated and non-irradiated neat polymer, and the irradiated and non-irradiated composites were made. The materials obtained were submitted to tensile, flexural and impact tests. Additionally HDT, SEM and XRD analyses were carried out along with the sol-gel analysis which aimed to assess the cross-linking degree of the irradiated materials. Results showed great improvement in most HDPE properties and a high cross-linking degree of 85% as a result of electron-beam irradiation of the material.

  14. Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0552 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by...presented at: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials; 2015 Jul 19–24; Copenhagen, Denmark. Approved for public release...US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by Thomas A Plaisted Weapons and Materials

  15. Fabrication, nanomechanical characterization, and cytocompatibility of gold-reinforced chitosan bio-nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nimitt G.; Kumar, Ajeet; Jayawardana, Veroni N.; Woodworth, Craig D.; Yuya, Philip A.

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally derived polymer represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Gold nanoparticles (~32 nm) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in Chitosan matrix. Bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through solution casting process. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed with SEM. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, EDX, SAED, UV–vis, XRD, DLS, and Zeta potential for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale properties of materials under the influence of temperature were characterized through nanoindentation techniques. From quasi-static nanoindentation, it was observed that hardness and reduced modulus of the nanocomposites were increased significantly in direct proportion to the gold nanoparticle concentration. Gold nanoparticle concentration also showed positive impact on storagemodulus and thermal stability of the material. The obtained films were confirmed to be biocompatible by their ability to support growth of human cells in vitro. In summary, the results show enhanced mechanical properties with increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, and provide better understanding of the structure–property relationships of such biocompatiblematerials for potential biomedical applications. PMID:25280713

  16. Characterization and modeling of three-dimensional self-healing shape memory alloy-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pingping; Cui, Zhiwei; Kesler, Michael S.; Newman, John A.; Manuel, Michele V.; Wright, M. Clara; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, three-dimensional metal-matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are modeled and simulated, by adopting an SMA constitutive model accounting for elastic deformation, phase transformation and plastic behavior. A modeling method to create composites with pre-strained SMA wires is also proposed to improve the self-healing ability. Experimental validation is provided with a composite under three-point bending. This modeling method is applied in a series of finite element simulations to investigate the self-healing effects in pre-cracked composites, especially the role of the SMA reinforcement, the softening property of the matrix, and the effect of pre-strain in the SMA. The results demonstrate that SMA reinforcements provide stronger shape recovery ability than other, non-transforming materials. The softening property of the metallic matrix and the pre-strain in SMA are also beneficial to help crack closure and healing. This modeling approach can serve as an efficient tool to design SMA-reinforced MMCs with optimal self-healing properties that have potential applications in components needing a high level of reliability.

  17. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of graphene oxide-reinforced poly (acrylic acid)/gelatin composite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, Shahab; Gheysour, Mahsa; Karimi, Alireza; Salarian, Reza

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels have found many practical uses in drug release, wound dressing, and tissue engineering. However, their applications are restricted due to their weak mechanical properties. The role of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS) as reinforcement agent in poly (acrylic acid) (PAA)/Gelatin (Gel) composite hydrogels is investigated. Composite hydrogels are synthesized by thermal initiated redox polymerization method. Samples are then prepared with 20 and 40 wt. % of PAA, an increasing amount of GONS (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 wt. %), and a constant amount of Gel. Subsequently, cylindrical hydrogel samples are subjected to a series of compression tests in order to measure their elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The results exhibit that the addition of GONS increases the Young's modulus and maximum stress of hydrogels significantly as compared with control (0.0 wt. % GONS). The highest Young's modulus is observed for hydrogel with GO (0.2 wt. %)/PAA (20 wt. %), whereas the highest maximum stress is detected for GO (0.2 wt. %)/PAA (40 wt. %) specimen. The addition of higher amounts of GONS leads to a decrease in the maximum stress of the hydrogel GO (0.3 wt. %)/PAA (40 wt. %). No significant differences are detected for the maximum strain among the hydrogel samples, as the amount of GONS increased. These results suggest that the application of GONS could be used to improve mechanical properties of hydrogel materials. This study may provide an alternative for the fabrication of low-cost graphene/polymer composites with enhanced mechanical properties beneficial for tissue engineering applications.

  18. Characterization of Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Yarns: In-situ Strain Sensing and Composite Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Christian David

    together during twisting. For CNT yarns, this level is referred to as packs since the title "bundle" has already been widely used as the grouping of individual CNTs. The utilization of conventional textile mechanics is supported by the congruent stress strain curves of cotton/wool yarns and CNT yarns. With this new perspective, sources of strength losses can be identified and, in most cases, quantified. Deterministic and statistical textile models are used to enumerate three top-level parameters which affect the yarn's strength. This approach offers guidance for future work to be done in the field of CNT yarns, including the growth of raw CNT forests, the spinning procedures involved, and any post-processing steps that may arise that can mitigate these losses that are extremely degrading to the CNT yarn mechanical strength. The strength of the yarn is a direct reflection of the quality of the yarn's structure. These morphological properties across the nano, meso, and macro scales have an effect on other physical properties such as electromechanical sensitivity. Improving the strength will also improve the yarn's ability to serve as a strain gage. Coupled with its appealing size, these yarns will be an effective in-situ embedded strain sensor. In conclusion, high quality CNT yarns with minimized strength losses show promise for structural health monitoring of advanced materials and structures since they can be both strongly reinforcing and electromechanically sensitive.

  19. The microflow behavior and interphase characterization of fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Maureen Elizabeth

    There is typically a trade off that takes place when designing a composite part for ballistic purposes. Structural strength requirements typically call for less than 1% voids with strong adhesion between the fiber and matrix whereas for ballistic applications, such as spall plates for body armor where energy absorbing properties are paramount, the composites are usually resin lean and have weaker fiber matrix interphases. The energy absorbing properties of a composite can be tailored through the sizings applied to the fiber or through control of the resin infiltration of the composite part. The goal of this research was two pronged. The first was to develop a transverse microflow model that could be used to predict the microflow within a tow assuming it is completely surrounded by resin. The models developed consider the capillary pressure on the flow front, which is typically ignored by literature models, as the main driving force for transverse flow into the fiber bundles. This capillary pressure is a function of the surface properties of the resin and fiber and by tailoring these properties one can control the microflow of the resin. The dynamic model, which takes into account the fiber radius, fiber volume fraction, fiber count, resin contact angle with the fiber and the resin surface tension, was used to study the effects of tow count, fiber volume fraction and contact angle on the infiltration time. The second goal of this research was the development of an interphase characterization methodology that can be used to evaluate the interphase properties, using the Dynamic Interphase Loading Apparatus (DILA), once the fiber preforms are infiltrated. The DILA is a unique piece of equipment that allows one to pushout a fiber from a thin composite slice while recording the resulting force and displacement. The interphase characterization process includes indenter selection, sample and test configuration design, test parameters, post test validation and data

  20. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Particulate Reinforced Diboride Composites for High Temperature Leading Edge Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald T.; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Bull, Jeff; Laub, Bernie; Reuther, James; Kinney, David; Kontinos, Dean; Beckman, Sarah; Stuffle, Kevin; Cull, A. D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Previous work on refractory diboride composites has shown that these systems have the potential for use in high temperature leading edge applications for reusable reentry vehicles. Experiments in reentry environments have shown that these materials have multiple use temperatures greater than 1900 C. The work to be discussed focuses on three compositions: HfB2/SiC, ZrB2/SiC, and ZrB2/C/SiC. These composites have been hot pressed and their mechanical properties measured at room and elevated temperatures. Extensive microstructural characterization has been conducted on polished cross sections and the fracture surfaces have been examined to determine their failure origins.

  1. Experimental data on the properties of natural fiber particle reinforced polymer composite material.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, D; Presin Kumar, A John

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the development of polymer bio-composites. The powdered coconut shell, walnut shells and Rice husk are used as reinforcements with bio epoxy resin to form hybrid composite specimens. The fiber compositions in each specimen are 1:1 while the resin and hardener composition 10:1 respectively. The fabricated composites were tested as per ASTM standards to evaluate mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, shear strength and impact strength are evaluated in both with moisture and without moisture. The result of test shows that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under mechanical loads. However it is found that the incorporation of walnut shell and coconut shell fibre can improve the properties.

  2. Resistance to Penetration and Compression of Fibre-Reinforced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    relationships at very high strains. J . Phys. E.: Scient . Instrum . 7, 167-169. Zhu. G., Goldsmith, W. and Dharan, C. K. H. (1992). Penetration of...of Ftb.-mInxoroed 5 FUNDING NUMBERS composift mdsorld 8 AUTHOR R L WOODWARD, G T EGGLESTONE, B J BAXTER AND K CHALLIS 7 FORMING ORG NAMESIADDRESSES...RESISTANCE TO PENETRATION AND COMPRESSION OF FIBRE-REINFORCED COMPOSITE MATERIALSt R. L. WOODWARD, G. T. EGGLESTONE, B. J . BAXTER and K. CHALLIS DSTO

  3. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  4. Resin characterization in cured graphite fiber reinforced composites using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Stein, B. A.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using diffuse reflectance in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information on cured graphite fiber reinforced polymeric matrix resin composites was investigated. Several graphite/epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide composites exposed to thermal or radiation environments were examined. An experimental polyimide-sulfone adhesive tape was also studied during processing. In each case, significant changes in resin molecular structure was observed due to environmental exposure. These changes in molecular structure were correlated with previously observed changes in material properties providing new insights into material behavior.

  5. Bioactivity, cytocompatibility and thermal properties of experimental Bioglass-reinforced composites as potential root-canal filling materials.

    PubMed

    Alhashimi, Raghad Abdulrazzaq; Mannocci, Francesco; Sauro, Salvatore

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the bioactivity and the cytocompatibility of experimental Bioglass-reinforced polyethylene-based root-canal filling materials. The thermal properties of the experimental materials were also evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry, while their radiopacity was assessed using a grey-scale value (GSV) aluminium step wedge and a phosphor plate digital system. Bioglass 45S5 (BAG), polyethylene and Strontium oxide (SrO) were used to create tailored composite fibres. The filler distribution within the composites was assessed using SEM, while their bioactivity was evaluated through infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) after storage in simulated body fluid (SBF). The radiopacity of the composite fibres and their thermal properties were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The cytocompatibility of the experimental composites used in this study was assessed using human osteoblasts and statistically analysed using the Pairwise t-test (p<0.05). Bioglass and SrO fillers were well distributed within the resin matrix and increased both the thermal properties and the radiopacity of the polyethylene matrix. The FTIR showed a clear formation of calcium-phosphates, while, MTT and AlamrBlue tests demonstrated no deleterious effects on the metabolic activity of the osteoblast-like cells. BAG-reinforced polyethylene composites may be suitable as obturation materials for endodontic treatment. Since their low melting temperature, such innovative composites may be easily removed in case of root canal retreatment. Moreover, their biocompatibility and bioactivity may benefit proliferation of human osteoblast cells at the periapical area of the root.

  6. Microstructure and Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Particle Reinforced Epoxy-Based Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    carbon nanotubes ) or thermally insulating (clay) fillers to make materials with controlled conductive and fire retardant properties. Other polymer... carbon nanotubes or organic fiber fillers, research has also been conducted on polymers reinforced with metal and metal oxide particles, although to a... carbon nanotube composites where the drop 176 T a b le 4 .1 1 : G la ss tr an si ti on te m p er at u re s d et er m in ed fr om D S C m ea su re

  7. Modeling the Creep of Rib-Reinforced Composite Media Made of Nonlinear Hereditary Phase Materials. 1. Structural Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskii, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of an algorithm of time steps, a method to simulate the creep is developed for rib-reinforced composite media made of nonlinear hereditary phase materials whose behavior is described by the Rabotnov theory. The technique proposed allows one, at discrete moments of time, to consider such a composition as nonlinear elastic with the initial stress state. The use of an iterative process of the type of the method of variable elasticity parameters allowed us to linearize the governing relationships and to reduce the problem of calculation of creep of the composite media at discrete points in time to a series of linear elastic problems of the mechanics of composites.

  8. Laser-Generated Lamb Waves Propagation in Multilayered Plates Composed of Viscoelastic Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Yuan, Shou-qi; Guan, Yi-jun; Ge, Yong

    2016-07-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Lamb waves in multilayered fiber-reinforced composite plates with different fiber orientations and number of layers have been investigated quantitatively. Considering the viscoelasticity of the composite materials, we have set up finite element models for simulating the laser-generated Lamb waves in two types of the multilayered composite plates. In the first type, different fiber orientations are adopted. In the second one, different number of layers are considered. The results illustrate the occurrence of attenuation and dispersion, which is induced by the viscoelasticity and multilayer structure, respectively.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Characterization of Standardized Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P.; Sibille, L.; Meeker, G.; Wilson, S.

    2006-01-01

    Lunar exploration requires scientific and engineering studies using standardized testing procedures that ultimately support flight certification of technologies and hardware. This motivates the development of traceable, standardized lunar regolith simulant (SLRS) materials. For details, refer to the 2005 Workshop on Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials.

  11. Characterization of Thermal Behavior of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Curaua Fibers by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelos, Mariana A.; Ribeiro, Carolina Gomes D.; Ferreira, Jordana; Vieira, Janaina da S.; Margem, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Epoxy composites reinforced with natural lignocellulosic fibers have, in recent times, been gaining attention in engineering areas as lighter and cheaper alternatives for traditional composites such as the "fiberglass". The curaua fiber is the one strongest today being considered as reinforcement of composites for automobile interior parts. In fact, several studies are currently being dedicated to curaua fiber composites since physical and mechanical properties are required for practical uses. In this work, the thermal behavior of epoxy composites reinforced with up to 30 % in volume of curaua fibers was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, DSC. The results showed endothermic and exothermic events associated with water release and possible molecular chain amorphous transformation. Comparison with similar composites permitted to propose mechanism that explains this DSC thermal behavior.

  12. Material Characterization for Composite Materials in Load Bearing Wave Guides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    in their thermal expansions. Fiber composites offer high internal damping, which leads to better "vibrational energy absorption within the material... internal stresses. Composites are normally coated or painted to prevent moisture absorption. Composites first started seeing use in military... internal protons and electrons. The additional energy from EM waves excites the electrons allowing them to potentially jump into higher energy bands or

  13. Characterizing the reinforcement mechanisms in multiwall nanotube/polycarbonate composites across different length and time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Renee Kelly

    The enthusiasm and interest in the potential properties of nanotube (NT)/polymer composites are based on several factors, including the potential for unsurpassed enhancements in mechanical properties together with electrical, thermal and optical properties. Using multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) grown to a long aspect ratio, the study found that fragmentation tests can be completed in a similar manner to traditional fiber composites. It was found that the fragmentation length does not depend on the angle of the nanotube to the loading direction hence the ISS does not change with the orientation angle of the nanotube in the composite. A critical aspect ratio of 100 and 300 for untreated nanotubes (ARNT) and treated nanotubes (EPNT), respectively was also measured. For nanotubes that are well dispersed in the polycarbonate, it was observed at a critical angle of 60° that there was a change in failure mechanism from pullout to fracture of the nanotubes due to bending shear. Because the tensile strength of a MWNT is unknown a cumulative distribution was used to characterize the relative interfacial shear strength as a function of nanotube chemical modification. The second goal of this thesis is to use Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) with controlled aspect ratios of multiwall nanotubes (MWNT) to isolate and quantify the effects of the interfacial region on modulus enhancements in nanotube-reinforced composites. One major finding of this study was that the shortest aspect ratio showed a significantly broadened relaxation spectrum than the longer aspect ratio nanotubes, despite the longer aspect ratio nanotubes being more percolated at the given weight percent. There is also a direct correlation between the free space parameter of the short aspect ratio nantoubes network and broadening of the relaxation spectrum, concluded to be a result of increased interaction of the interfacial polymer. The study found agreement with the premise that at a constant filler weight

  14. Dielectric Characterization of a Nonlinear Optical Material

    PubMed Central

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Krohns, S.; Gemander, F.; Schmahl, W. W.; Loidl, A.

    2014-01-01

    Batisite was reported to be a nonlinear optical material showing second harmonic generation. Using dielectric spectroscopy and polarization measurements, we provide a thorough investigation of the dielectric and charge-transport properties of this material. Batisite shows the typical characteristics of a linear lossy dielectric. No evidence for ferro- or antiferroelectric polarization is found. As the second-harmonic generation observed in batisite points to a non-centrosymmetric structure, this material is piezoelectric, but most likely not ferroelectric. In addition, we found evidence for hopping charge transport of localized charge carriers and a relaxational process at low temperatures. PMID:25109553

  15. Performance and Characterization of Geopolymer Concrete Reinforced with Short Steel Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Faris, M. A.; Tahir, M. F. M.; Kadir, A. A.; Sandu, A. V.; Mat Isa, N. A. A.; Corbu, O.

    2017-06-01

    In the recent years, geopolymer concrete are reporting as the greener construction technology compared to conventional concrete that made up of ordinary Portland cement. Geopolymer concrete is an innovative construction material that utilized fly ash as one of waste material in coal combustion industry as a replacement for ordinary Portland cement in concrete. The uses of fly ash could reduce the carbon dioxide emission to the atmosphere, redundant of fly ash waste and costs compared to ordinary Portland cement concrete. However, the plain geopolymer concrete suffers from numerous drawbacks such as brittleness and low durability. Thus, in this study the addition of steel fiber is introduced in plain geopolymer concrete to improve its mechanical properties especially in compressive and flexural strength. Characterization of raw materials also determined by using chemical composition analysis. Short type of steel fiber is added to the mix in weight percent of 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt% with fixed molarity of sodium hydroxide of 12M and solid to liquid ratio as 2.0. The addition of steel fiber showed the excellent improvement in the mechanical properties of geopolymer concrete that are determined by various methods available in the literature and compared with each other.

  16. Fatigue and Fracture Characterization of GlasGridRTM Reinforced Asphalt Concrete Pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavizadeh, Seyed Amirshayan

    The purpose of this research is to develop an experimental and analytical framework for describing, modeling, and predicting the reflective cracking patterns and crack growth rates in GlasGridRTM-reinforced asphalt pavements. In order to fulfill this objective, the effects of different interfacial conditions (mixture and tack coat type, and grid opening size) on reflective cracking-related failure mechanisms and the fatigue and fracture characteristics of fiberglass grid-reinforced asphalt concrete beams were studied by means of four- and threepoint bending notched beam fatigue tests (NBFTs) and cyclic and monotonic interface shear tests. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was utilized for obtaining the displacement and strain contours of specimen surfaces during each test. The DIC analysis results were used to develop crack tip detection methods that were in turn used to determine interfacial crack lengths in the shear tests, and vertical and horizontal (interfacial) crack lengths in the notched beam fatigue tests. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) principles were applied to the crack length data to describe the crack growth. In the case of the NBFTs, a finite element (FE) code was developed and used for modeling each beam at different stages of testing and back-calculating the stress intensity factors (SIFs) for the vertical and horizontal cracks. The local effect of reinforcement on the stiffness of the system at a vertical crack-interface intersection or the resistance of the grid system to the deflection differential at the joint/crack (hereinafter called joint stiffness) for GlasGrid-reinforced asphalt concrete beams was determined by implementing a joint stiffness parameter into the finite element code. The strain level dependency of the fatigue and fracture characteristics of the GlasGrid-reinforced beams was studied by performing four-point bending notched beam fatigue tests at strain levels of 600, 750, and 900 microstrain. These beam

  17. Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0101 TITLE: Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0101 5c. PROGRAM...mobile refrigeration. These technological advances are critically dependent on the development of new and currently non-existing materials . This

  18. National Transonic Facility Fan Blade prepreg material characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, P. J.; Richards, W. H.; Ahl, E. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The test program for the basic prepreg materials used in process development work and planned fabrication of the national transonic facility fan blade is presented. The basic prepreg materials and the design laminate are characterized at 89 K, room temperature, and 366 K. Characterization tests, test equipment, and test data are discussed. Material tests results in the warp direction are given for tensile, compressive, fatigue (tension-tension), interlaminar shear and thermal expansion.

  19. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  20. Design and Development of a Composite Dome for Experimental Characterization of Material Permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Hector; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic dome, including a description of the dome fabrication, method for sealing penetrations in the dome, and a summary of the planned test series. This dome will be used for the experimental permeability characterization and leakage validation of composite vessels pressurized using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen at the Cryostat Test Facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The preliminary design of the dome was completed using membrane shell analysis. Due to the configuration of the test setup, the dome will experience some flexural stresses and stress concentrations in addition to membrane stresses. Also, a potential buckling condition exists for the dome due to external pressure during the leak testing of the cryostat facility lines. Thus, a finite element analysis was conducted to assess the overall strength and stability of the dome for each required test condition. Based on these results, additional plies of composite reinforcement material were applied to local regions on the dome to alleviate stress concentrations and limit deflections. The dome design includes a circular opening in the center for the installation of a polar boss, which introduces a geometric discontinuity that causes high stresses in the region near the hole. To attenuate these high stresses, a reinforcement system was designed using analytical and finite element analyses. The development of a low leakage polar boss system is also investigated.

  1. Continuous fiber reinforced composite materials as alternatives for metal alloys used for dental appliances.

    PubMed

    Karmaker, A C; DiBenedetto, A T; Goldberg, A J

    1997-01-01

    Two types of uniaxially oriented long S2-glass fiber reinforced composites were prepared for use in various dental appliances. Matrix polymers were polycarbonate (PC) and bisphenol A bis (2-hydroxy-propyl) methacrylate (Bis-GMA) based copolymers. Flexural tests were conducted on the composites using a procedure which simulates clinical usages. To evaluate the adhesion between the composites and the adhesive, the single-lap shear test was conducted. Mechanical properties of the small cross-sectional composite strips were superior to those used previously in clinical studies.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Squeezed Cast Aluminum Matrix Composites Containing Boride Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaya-Luengas, L.; Estremera-Pérez, E.; Muñoz, L.; Suárez, O. M.

    2010-12-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 2 and 4 wt.% copper reinforced with aluminum dodecaborides were successfully fabricated by squeeze casting employing pressures up to 62 MPa. The distribution of reinforcements throughout the composites was quantified, whereas the effect of pressure on the composites density and hardness was determined. In addition, the reinforcement chemical stability was examined using high-temperature x-ray diffraction which permitted to confirm the formation of AlB2 phase a result of AlB12 decomposition. The pressure effect on the squeezed composites was investigated by optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, superficial Rockwell hardness testing, and differential thermal analysis. At the highest applied pressures, the castings density increased when the shrinkage porosity was practically eliminated. The composite superficial hardness improved by increasing the applied squeeze. The indirect squeeze cast technique caused Al2Cu phase segregation to upper regions of the specimens, while conversely, the AlB12 reinforcements segregated preferentially at lower regions of the casting.

  3. Non-contact characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Li, X.; Withers, P. J.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors is presented in this paper. Both air-cored circular sensors and highly directional ferrite-cored sensors are designed for bulk conductivity measurements and directionality characterization. An analytical model describing the interaction of the circular sensors with the hybrid planar structure is developed. Finite element (FE) models that take into account the anisotropicity of CFRP have also been proposed. Both models are in good agreement with experimental results. The features of the sensor output signals are analysed and explained. It is proved that an anisotropic model (tensor expression for conductivity) is appropriate for the CFRP materials under investigation. A formula to link the bulk conductivity with the conductivity tensor is proposed and verified. Lift-off effects are also discussed. It is believed that this is amongst the first published reports of using eddy-current techniques for characterizing the hybrid aluminium/CFRP material.

  4. Photonic bandgap materials: Design, fabrication, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramania, Ganapathi S.

    The last few decades have seen a tremendous explosion in the area of new synthetic materials. As we begin to better understand the nature of the atomic and molecular bonds it has been possible to systematically search for materials with specific properties thanks to the availability of powerful supercomputers. Due to significant advances in materials synthesis a rich variety of artificial materials whose mechanical, chemical, electronic and optical properties can be suitably tailored can now be produced. Some of the materials (plastics, synthetic fibers, ceramics, alloys etc.) can replace or substitute traditional materials; some others have managed to create new applications themselves (semiconductors, superconductors, optical fibers etc.). Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in a new material called "photonic bandgap structures" which can manipulate light in an extraordinary way opening up new possibilities in the area of optics and optoelectronics, eventually paving the way for optical computing. Proof of principle structures that demonstrates the expected property has been successfully fabricated for low frequency electromagnetic waves. However, making photonic bandgap structures that can operate at visible frequency is quite challenging. This is because photonic bandgap material are essentially periodic dielectric structures where the periodicity is on the order of the wavelength of light. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a technique for the fabrication inverse FCC photonic crystals that can operate at the visible and near infrared frequencies. The technique essentially focuses on employing self organizing systems such as monodisperse colloidal systems of polystyrene microspheres as a basis for forming periodic structure at submicron dimensions. The main aspects are first to show that the experimental procedure for fabrication developed in this dissertation actually has the desired structural property. Demonstration of structural

  5. Characterization of Semiconductor Materials Using AOTF Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, G. P.; Cheng, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    A non-invasive characterization of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using white light interference measured by an AOTF polarimetric hyperspectral imaging instrument will be presented an an illustration of the technology potential. Experiments provided high resolution thickness maps of both silicon and oxide layers with accuracy and observed optically active imperfections and distributions in the structure.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanodiamond Reinforced Chitosan for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Yang, Qiaoqin; Wang, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional tissue scaffold material nanodiamond (ND)/chitosan (CS) composites with different diamond concentrations from 1 wt % to 5 wt % were synthesized through a solution casting method. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nanoindentation. Compared with pristine CS, the addition of ND resulted in a significant improvement of mechanical properties, including a 239%, 276%, 321%, 333%, and 343% increase in Young’s modulus and a 68%, 96%, 114%, 118%, and 127% increase in hardness when the ND amount was 1 wt %, 2 wt %, 3 wt %, 4 wt %, and 5 wt %, respectively. The strong interaction between ND surface groups and the chitosan matrix plays an important role in improving mechanical properties. PMID:27649252

  7. Discovery and characterization of lunar materials: An incomplete process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.

    1991-01-01

    Our knowledge of lunar materials is based on (1) sample collections (by the Apollo and Lunar missions, supplemented by Antarctic lunar meteorites); and (2) remote sensing (Earth-based or by spacecraft). The characterization of lunar materials is limited by the small number of sampled sites and the incomplete remote-sensing database (geochemical data collected from orbit cover 20 percent of the lunar surface). There is much about lunar surface materials that remains to be discovered. Listed are some features suspected form present knowledge: (1) Polar Materials; (2) Farside Materials; (3) Crater-Floor Materials; (4) Crater-Wall and Central Peak Materials; (5) Volcanic Shield and Dome Materials; (6) Transient-Event Materials; and (7) Meteoritic and Cometary Materials; This short list of likely discoveries isn't exhaustive. We know much about a few spots on the Moon, but little about the full range of lunar materials.

  8. Production and Characterization of Novel Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Marvin

    2016-06-07

    This project has three major objectives: exploring the potential nanostructured materials in photovoltaic applications; providing photovoltaic research experiences to NCCU students, who are largely members of underrepresented minority groups; and enhancing the photovoltaic research infrastructure at NCCU to increase faculty and student competitiveness. Significant progress was achieved in each of these areas during the project period, as summarized in this report.

  9. Processing and Characterization of Lightweight Syntactic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    into lightweight (aluminum, magnesium) metal matrices via various metal processing methods. The performance of the resulting foam materials under quasi...selected based on compatibility with their intended matrices . Furthermore, although this report primarily focuses on ceramic-based spheres discussed, it

  10. Method for material characterization in a non-anechoic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pometcu, L.; Sharaiha, A.; Benzerga, R.; Tamas, R. D.; Pouliguen, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a characterization method for extracting the reflection coefficient of materials and the real part of their permittivity. The characterization is performed in a real environment, as opposed to the classical measurement methods that require an anechoic chamber. In order to reduce the effects of the multipath propagation, a free space bistatic measurement was performed at different distances material-antennas in far field. By using a Teflon sample and a commercial absorbing material sample, measurements have been performed in order to validate the characterization technique.

  11. High-temperature material characterization for multispectral window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, James; Arida, Marvin-Ray; Ku, Zahyun; Jang, Woo-Yong; Urbas, Augustine M.

    2017-05-01

    A microwave cylindrical cavity combined with a laser has been investigated to characterize the temperature dependence of widow materials in the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). This paper discusses the requirements of high temperature RF material characterizations for transparent ceramic materials, such as ALON, that can potentially be used for multispectral windows. The RF cylindrical resonator was designed and the numerical model was studied to characterize the dielectric constant of materials. The dielectric constant can be extracted from the resonant frequency shift based on the cavity perturbation method (CPM), which is sensitive to the sample size and shape. Laser heating was applied to the material under test (MUT), which could easily be heated above 1000°C by the laser irradiation, in order to conduct CPM at high temperature. The temperature distribution in a material was also analyzed to investigate the impact of the thermal properties and the sample shape.

  12. Low earth simulation and materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Woollam, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen plasma ashers and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) sources are currently being used for low Earth orbit (LEO) simulation. The suitability of each of these simulation techniques is considered. Thin film coatings are characterized by optical techniques, including variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, optical spectrophotometry, and laser light scatterometry. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to characterize the surface morphology of thin aluminum films as a function of substrate temperature during deposition. Results on diamondlike carbon (DLC) films show that DLC degrades with simulated atomic oxygen (AO) exposure at a rate comparable to Kapton polyimide. Since DLC is not as susceptible as Kapton to environmental factors such as moisture absorption, it could potentially provide more accurate measurements of AO fluence on short space flights.

  13. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    This study presents a comprehensive investigation of performance and behavior of steel-fiber reinforced concrete pipes (SFRCP). The main goal of this study is to develop the material constitutive model for steel fiber reinforced concrete used in dry-cast application. To accomplish this goal a range of pipe sizes varying from 15 in. (400 mm) to 48 in. (1200 mm) in diameter and fiber content of 0.17%, 0.25%, 0.33%, 0.5%, 0.67% and 83% by volume were produced. The pipes were tested in three-edge bearing condition to obtain the load-deformation response and overall performance of the pipe. The pipes were also subjected to hydrostatic joint and joint shear tests to evaluate the performance of the fiber-pipe joints for water tightness and under differential displacements, respectively. In addition, testing on hardened concrete was performed to obtain the basic mechanical material properties. High variation in the test results for material testing was identified as a part of experimental investigation. A three-dimensional non-linear finite element model of the pipe under the three edge bearing condition was developed to identify the constitutive material relations of fiber-concrete composite. A constitutive model of concrete implementing the concrete plasticity and continuum fracture mechanics was considered for defining the complex non-linear behavior of fiber-concrete. Three main concrete damage algorithms were examined: concrete brittle cracking, concrete damaged plasticity with adaptive meshing technique and concrete damaged plasticity with visco-plastic regularization. The latter was identified as the most robust and efficient to model the post-cracking behavior of fiber reinforced concrete and was used in the subsequent studies. The tension stiffening material constitutive law for composite concrete was determined by converging the FEM solution of load-deformation response with the results of experimental testing. This was achieved by iteratively modifying the non

  14. Spectral Characterization of Bright Materials on Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaccioni, Fabrizio; DeSanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Li, Jian-Yang; Longobardo, A.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Schroeder, S. E.; Tosi, F.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The surface of Vesta, as observed by the camera and imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn spacecraft, displays large surface diversity in terms of its geology and mineralogy with noticeably dark and bright areas on the surface often associated with various geological features and showing remarkably different forms. Here we report our initial attempt to spectrally characterize the areas that are distinctively brighter than their surroundings.

  15. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy using a synthetic bioabsorbable staple line reinforcement material: Post-operative complications and 6 year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mahdi; Cheruvu, Manikandar S; Moorthy, Krishna; Ahmed, Ahmed R

    2016-09-01

    Gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a serious complication. Currently, the literature lacks long-term outcomes in LSG and leak rates after reinforcement of the staple line. The aims are two-fold: to present leak rates from using staple line reinforcement and six year outcomes of LSG in relation to resolution of obesity-related comorbidities and long-term weight loss. This is a single-institution, retrospectively reviewed study of 204 patient case files. Data from all patients undergoing LSG between December 2007 and May 2013 was collected. The total complication rate was 6.9% (14/204), with no recorded staple line leaks. The mean postoperative Body Mass Index (BMI) at 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, 5 years, and 6 years was 39.3 ± 8, 38.7 ± 8, 40.4 ± 9, 40.5 ± 10, 43.0 ± 10, and 42.4 ± 7, respectively. The mean % excess weight loss at 1 year, 3 years, and 6 years was 48.4 ± 19, 51.7 ± 28, and 41.0 ± 21, respectively. There were no significant differences between follow-ups at year 1 and 3 (p > 0.05), and between year 3 and 6 (p > 0.05) for the mean % excess weight loss. The resolution rates for all patients were 74%, 61%, 79%, and 90% for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus type 2 and obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. The synthetic bioabsorbable reinforcement material shows no staple line leaks making it safe to use. LSG as a procedure had a high resolution of obesity-related comorbidities as well as sustainable long-term weight loss.

  16. Noncontact Acousto-Ultrasonics for Material Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1998-01-01

    A NdYAG 1064 nm, laser pulse was employed to produce ultrasonic waves in specimens of SiC/SiC and SiC/Ti 6-4 composites which are high temperature materials of interest for aerospace applications. Air coupled transducers were used to detect and collect the signals used for acousto-ultrasonic analysis. Conditions for detecting ultrasonic decay signals were examined. The results were compared to those determined on the same specimens with contact coupling. Some non-contact measurements were made employing conventional air focused detectors. Others were performed with a more novel micromachined capacitance transducer. Concerns of the laser-in technology include potential destructiveness of the laser pulse. Repeated laser pulsing at the same location does lead to deterioration of the ultrasonic signal in some materials, but seems to recover with time. Also, unlike contact AU, the frequency regime employed is a function of laser-material interaction rather than the choice of transducers. Concerns of the air coupled-out technology include the effect of air attenuation. This imposes a practical upper limit to frequency of detection. In the case of the experimental specimens studied ultrasonic decay signals could be imaged satisfactorily.

  17. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis.

  18. Determining the material parameters for the reconstruction of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymers from data measured by flash thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jan P.; Götschel, Sebastian; Maierhofer, Christiane; Weiser, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Flash thermography is a fast and reliable non-destructive testing method for the investigation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials. In this paper numerical simulations of transient thermography data are presented, calculated for a quasi-isotropic flat bottom hole sample. They are compared to experimental data. These simulations are one important step towards the quantitative reconstruction of a flaw by assessing thermographic data. The applied numerical model is based on the finite-element method, extended by a semi-analytical treatment of the boundary of the sample, which is heated by the flash light. A crucial part for a reliable numerical model is the prior determination of the material parameters of the specimen as well as of the experimental parameters of the set-up. The material parameters in plane and in depth diffusivity are measured using laser line excitation. In addition, the absorption and heat transfer process of the first layers is investigated using an IR microscopic lens. The performance of the two distinct components of CFRP during heating - epoxy resin and carbon fibers - is examined. Finally, the material parameters are optimized by variation and comparison of the simulation results to the experimental data. The optimized parameters are compared to the measured ones and further methods to ensure precise material parameter measurements are discussed.

  19. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-09-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  20. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-02-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  1. Charge Transport Characterization of Novel Electronic Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Henry Orlando, 5th.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented includes analysis of electronic transport data and related measurements for the following types of materials: molecular metals and conducting polymers based upon phthalocyanine (Pc) building blocks, new composites of conducting polymers with inorganic polymeric and layered materials, and both bulk and thin film samples of the high -T_{rm c} ceramic superconductors. To successfully study such a wide spectrum of materials, the charge transport instrumentation has evolved into multiple computer-controlled experimental arrangements which process data for temperature dependent ac and dc conductivity, thermoelectric power, critical current density, and other measurements, over the temperature range of 1.5 K to 400 K. The phthalocyanine-based molecular metals and conducting polymers exhibit some of the highest reported conductivities for environmentally stable organic conductors, and possess a unique structure which is inherently resistant to large structural transformations upon donor/acceptor doping. These properties are demonstrated primarily by results for Ni(Pc)(ClO_4) _{rm y} and { (Si(Pc)O) X_{rm y}}_{rm n}. The rigidly-enforced structure of the latter system of materials allows for controllable tuning of the band-filling and hence, the charge transport properties of an organic conductor, from insulating to metal-like behavior, without any major structural alterations of the polymeric backbone. Other types of polymeric samples for which results are presented consist of composite fibers formed from the rigid rod polymers, Kevlar and PBT, "alloyed" with the (Pc)-based conducting polymers, and new microlaminates formed by intercalating various conducting polymers into the van der Waals gap of inorganic, layered host materials. Significant success has been achieved in the fabrication of superconducting films of Y-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Sr(Pb)-Ca-Cu -O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O by organometallic chemical vapor deposition. Results are also presented for films prepared

  2. The zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic: lights and shadows of a new material.

    PubMed

    Traini, Tonino; Sinjari, Bruna; Pascetta, Romeo; Serafini, Nicola; Perfetti, Giorgio; Trisi, Paolo; Caputi, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the mechanical properties, composition and surface preparation for adhesive bonding of the recently introduced zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) glass-ceramic. One single block of ZLS was used to prepare the specimens (n=14). The fracture toughness (Ft) and the Vickers hardness (HV) were measured on specimens partially crystallized (PCs) (n=4) and fully crystallized (FCs) at 840°C for 8 min (n=4). The surface treatment was done using hydrofluoric-acid gel (HF) at different concentrations and times of action on FCs specimens (n=4). SEM-EDX was used to test elemental composition and crystalline phases (n=2). The new ZLS glass-ceramic showed significantly higher values of HV and Ft for FCs, PCs showed a brittle behavior. The surface etching should be made using HF at 4.9% for 20 s.

  3. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Forming Process in long fibre reinforced hyperelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erchiqui, F.; Bendada, A.; Gakwaya, A.; Kandil, N.

    2004-06-01

    In this work, we are interested in modeling and numerical simulation using the dynamic finite element method for the hyperelastic behaviour of a thin, transverse isotropic and incompressible thermoplastic membrane. The hyperelastic (Mooney -Rivlin) is considered. The thermoforming of the long fibre reinforced sheet is done under the action of a perfect gas. The load in pressure used in modelling is deduced from the law of perfect gases pressure. The lagrangian formulation together with the assumption of the membrane theory is used. The numerical analyze is performed by comparing the obtained results with measured experimental data for the polymeric ABS membrane inflation without long fibre. Moreover, the influence of the orientation of fibre on the thickness and on the stress distribution in the thermoforming sheet are analyzed.

  4. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  5. Carbon fiber/copper mesh reinforced carbon composite for sliding contact material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chaoyong; Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Jian; Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Pei; Sun, Miao

    2017-02-01

    A novel carbon fiber/copper mesh knitted fabric reinforced carbon (Cf/Cu/C) composite was fabricated by a CVI-I/C technique. The mechanical, electrical, arc discharge and tribological properties of the Cf/Cu/C composite were compared with those of a traditional C/Cu composite fabricated by powder metallurgy. The results show that the copper mesh distributes uniformly in the Cf/Cu/C composite, and it exhibits higher mechanical property and more excellent electrical resistivity than those of the C/Cu composite. Meanwhile, the arc resistance property of Cf/Cu/C composite is also better than the C/Cu composite under the same testing conditions. The wear rate is about 80% of the C/Cu composite.

  6. ["Elastic osteosynthesis" with autocompression plates of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic material].

    PubMed

    Stange, J; Mittelmeier, H

    1989-06-01

    The problem of atrophic bone that occurs in osteosynthesis employing rigid plates is first depicted. Attempts at fabricating "simirigid" plates, which, however, have so far failed to gain any practical importance are then discussed. The reason for this seems to be that made of duroplastics cannot be molded during the operation and the thermoplastics do not have sufficient strength. The production of semirigid plates made of thermoplastic Polyethersulfon (PES), reinforced with 20% short carbon fibres, results in plates which are made moldable by heating in a small oven, white retaining sufficient static strength, although only limited fatigue strength. Biomechanical examinations revealed that with appropriate dimensioning of the plates, "elastic osteosynthesis" results in less loss of mechanical function of the stabilized bones, so that less atrophy of the bone may be expected. During more pronounced exercise loading, a reversible "springiness" of the fracture results, which might stimulate callus formation and improved stability.

  7. Evaluation of Effective Material Parameters of CNT-reinforced Composites via 3D BEM

    SciTech Connect

    De Araujo, Francisco Celio

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely employed to build advanced composites. In this work, a Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied to 3D representative volume elements (RVEs) to estimate mechanical properties of CNT-based composites. To model the thin-walled nanotubes, special integration procedures for calculating nearly-strongly-singular integrals have been developed. The generic BE substructuring algorithm allows modeling complex CNT-reinforced polymers, containing any number of nanotubes of any shape (straight or curved). The subregion-by-subregion strategy, based on Krylov solvers, makes the independent generation, assembly, and storage of the many parts of the complete BE model possible. Thus, significant memory and CPU-time reductions are achieved in avoiding working with an explicit global system of equations. Further CPU-time reduction is obtained by employing a matrix-copy option for repeated subregions. Several applications will illustrate the ability of this algorithm to analyze CNT-based composites.

  8. New nanocomposite materials reinforced with cellulose whiskers in atactic polypropylene: effect of surface and dispersion characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, N; Bonini, C; Bortolussi, F; Boisson, C; Heux, L; Cavaillé, J Y

    2005-01-01

    New nanocomposite films were prepared with atactic polypropylene as the matrix and either of three types of cellulose whiskers, with various surface and dispersion characteristics, as the reinforcing phase: aggregated without surface modification, aggregated and grafted with maleated polypropylene or individualized and finely dispersed with a surfactant. Films obtained by solvent casting from toluene were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile testing. In the linear region, the mechanical properties above the glass-rubber transition were found to be drastically enhanced for the nanocomposites as compared to the neat polypropylene matrix. These effects were ascribed to the formation of a rigid network with filler/filler interactions. In addition, interactions between the filler and the matrix as well as the dispersion quality were found to play a major role on the mechanical properties of the composites when investigation of the films was performed in the nonlinear region.

  9. A study on biocomposite from local balinese areca catechu l. husk fibers as reinforced material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kencanawati, C. I. P. K.; Suardana, N. P. G.; Sugita, I. K. G.; Suyasa, I. W. B.

    2017-05-01

    Untapped areca catechu l. husk fibers optimally can cause pollution to the environment. Therefore it is necessary to learn the characteristics of local balinese areca catechu l. husk fibers, such as physical, chemical, morphological, and mechanical. AHF testing the tensile strength with a single pull fiber test in accordance with ASTM D 3379 in the amount of 146-152 MPa. While the observation of the physical properties, of local balinese areca catechu l. husk fibers have a diameter and length variations of each 250-540 μm and 9.24 to 55.20 mm, with an aspect ratio of between 31.43 to 102.22, density ranges between 0:48 - 0.74 kg / cm3, absorption lower water (90-150%) when compared to AHF grows in other areas. From this study it appears that local Bali AHF can be used as reinforcement in composite replacement for synthetic fibers.

  10. Fatigue Micromechanism Characterization in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Carbon fiber reinforced polymers ( CFRPs ) are well established as an important weight-reducing structural technology...particularly within the aerospace sector due to their high specific stiffness and strength. CFRPs are widely identified as being very fatigue resistant, but...M.N. Mavrogordato, A.E. Scott, I. Sinclair, S.M. Spearing, “Synchrotron computed tomography of fatigue micromechanisms in CFRP ”, Proceeding of 19th

  11. Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Hydroxyapatite Composites Consolidated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Yeon; Han, Young-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Jang, Byung-Koog; Kim, Sukyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pure HA and 1, 3, 5, and 10 vol% multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWNT-) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) were consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The relative density of pure HA increased with increasing sintering temperature, but that of the MWNT/HA composite reached almost full density at 900°C, and then decreased with further increases in sintering temperature. The relative density of the MWNT/HA composites increased with increasing MWNT content due to the excellent thermal conductivity of MWNTs. The grain size of MWNT/HA composites decreased with increasing MWNT content and increased with increasing sintering temperature. Pull-out toughening of the MWNTs of the MWNT/HA composites was observed in the fractured surface, which can be used to predict the improvement of the mechanical properties. On the other hand, the existence of undispersed or agglomerate MWNTs in the MWNT/HA composites accompanied large pores. The formation of large pores increased with increasing sintering temperature and MWNT content. The addition of MWNT in HA increased the hardness and fracture toughness by approximately 3~4 times, despite the presence of large pores produced by un-dispersed MWNTs. This provides strong evidence as to why the MWNTs are good candidates as reinforcements for strengthening the ceramic matrix. The MWNT/HA composites did not decompose during SPS sintering. The MWNT-reinforced HA composites were non-toxic and showed a good cell affinity and morphology in vitro for 1 day. PMID:24724100

  12. Characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites consolidated by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Yeon; Han, Young-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Jang, Byung-Koog; Kim, Sukyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pure HA and 1, 3, 5, and 10 vol% multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWNT-) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) were consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The relative density of pure HA increased with increasing sintering temperature, but that of the MWNT/HA composite reached almost full density at 900°C, and then decreased with further increases in sintering temperature. The relative density of the MWNT/HA composites increased with increasing MWNT content due to the excellent thermal conductivity of MWNTs. The grain size of MWNT/HA composites decreased with increasing MWNT content and increased with increasing sintering temperature. Pull-out toughening of the MWNTs of the MWNT/HA composites was observed in the fractured surface, which can be used to predict the improvement of the mechanical properties. On the other hand, the existence of undispersed or agglomerate MWNTs in the MWNT/HA composites accompanied large pores. The formation of large pores increased with increasing sintering temperature and MWNT content. The addition of MWNT in HA increased the hardness and fracture toughness by approximately 3~4 times, despite the presence of large pores produced by un-dispersed MWNTs. This provides strong evidence as to why the MWNTs are good candidates as reinforcements for strengthening the ceramic matrix. The MWNT/HA composites did not decompose during SPS sintering. The MWNT-reinforced HA composites were non-toxic and showed a good cell affinity and morphology in vitro for 1 day.

  13. Characterization and comparison of pore landscapes in crystalline porous materials.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marielle; Martin, Richard L; Rycroft, Chris H; Jones, Andrew; Iglesia, Enrique; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    Crystalline porous materials have many applications, including catalysis and separations. Identifying suitable materials for a given application can be achieved by screening material databases. Such a screening requires automated high-throughput analysis tools that characterize and represent pore landscapes with descriptors, which can be compared using similarity measures in order to select, group and classify materials. Here, we discuss algorithms for the calculation of two types of pore landscape descriptors: pore size distributions and stochastic rays. These descriptors provide histogram representations that encode the geometrical properties of pore landscapes. Their calculation involves the Voronoi decomposition as a technique to map and characterize accessible void space inside porous materials. Moreover, we demonstrate pore landscape comparisons for materials from the International Zeolite Association (IZA) database of zeolite frameworks, and illustrate how the choice of pore descriptor and similarity measure affects the perspective of material similarity exhibiting a particular emphasis and sensitivity to certain aspects of structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of commercial sheet polarizer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Dennis H.; Jones, Douglas G.

    2006-05-01

    Sheet polarizers were invented by Land in the 1920s. The fabrication of the type of sheet polarizers we use today, i.e. H-sheet polarizers, was described in the basic H-sheet patent issued in 1948. Single polarizer transmittance, and parallel pair and crossed pair transmittance are typically quoted for these polarizers. In this paper we describe spectropolarimetric measurement results for a variety of commercial sheet polarizer and sheet retarder materials. The measurements cover the nominal spectral region for the polarization elements but also describe performance well beyond the advertised range. Mueller matrices for the elements were measured, and diattenuation and retardance for both polarizers and retarders are presented.

  15. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  16. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  17. Characterizing solar mirror materials using portable reflectometers

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1982-09-01

    Currently available portable instrumentation for hemispherical and specular reflectance measurements of solar mirror materials is discussed. Particular attention is given to the wavelength dependence of the measurement spectrum, which in most cases does not approximate a solar spectral distribution, and to other limitations of each instrument. Because a portable instrument is not available that can determine the solar averaged specular reflectance from a single measurement, two procedures are recommended for obtaining a reasonable estimate for this quantity using the existing portable equipment. Finally, future developments in this area are briefly discussed.

  18. Improvement and optimization of internal damping in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Final report, June 1983-November 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.F.; Suarez, S.A.

    1986-03-03

    The objective of this research were to study the effects of such parameters as fiber aspect ratio, fiber orientation and fiber/matrix properties on damping in fiber-reinforced polymer composites. These objectives were to be met by using both experimental and analytical approaches. The development of improved techniques for fabrication and testing of specimens and the development of relatively simple design equations for prediction of damping were desirable goals that were also met. Two new computer-aided testing techniques based on the impulse frequency-response approach were developed. Specimens of graphite/epoxy, boron/epoxy and Kevlar aramid/epoxy were fabricated by using an autoclave-style press cure which was developed specifically for this program. Although a number of parameters were studied, the emphasis was on the influence of fiber length, fiber orientation, and fiber material on damping of polymer composites. Experimental results show that, as predicted, very low fiber aspect ratios are required to produce significant improvements in damping. Of the three fiber types tested, the Kevlar aramid fiber composite was found to have much better damping than graphite or boron fiber composites. Measurements and predictions also indicate that the control of fiber orientation in a continuous fiber reinforced laminate may be a better approach to the improvement of damping than the control of fiber aspect ratio.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Superhard Materials of Crystalline Carbon Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    J 2 2 FEB 19% F49620-95-1-0384 PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERHARD MATERIALS OF CRYSTALLINE CARBON NITRIDE Final Technical Report...and Letters 3, 1597-1602 (1996). F49620-95-1-0384 4. Y. W. Chung, "Synthesis and properties of crystalline carbon nitride composite superhard ...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final Technical Report 1 Aus 97 to 31 Jul 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preparation and Characterization of Superhard Materials

  20. Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1992-12-01

    Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

  1. Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1992-01-01

    Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

  2. New Techniques in Characterization of Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2008-01-01

    Two new techniques have been developed to characterize Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) based ferroelectric single crystals: (i) electro-thermal imaging, and (ii) single crystal x-ray diffraction in the transmission mode. (i) Electro-thermal imaging is a remote sensing technique that can detect the polarization direction and poling state of a whole crystal slice. This imaging technique utilizes an IR camera to determine the field induced temperature change and does not require any special or destructive sample preparation. In the resulting images it is possible to distinguish regions of 180 deg domains. This powerful technique can be used remotely during poling to determine the poling state of the crystal to avoid over-poling that can result in inferior properties and/or cracking of the crystals. Electro-thermal imaging produced the first direct observations of polarization rotation. Under bipolar field, the domains near the corners were the first to switch direction. As the field increased above the coercive field, domains at the center part of the crystals switched direction. (ii) X-ray diffraction in the transmission mode has long been used in structure determination of organic crystals and proteins; however, it is not used much to characterize inorganic systems. 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 single crystals were examined by this XRD technique for the first time, and a never-before-seen super-lattice was revealed with a doubling of the unit cell in all three directions, giving a cell volume eight times that of a traditional perovskite unit cell. The significance of the super-lattice peaks increased with poling, indicating a structural contribution to ordering. Lack of such observations by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope examinations suggests the presence of a bulk effect.

  3. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  4. Statistical methods for material characterization and qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Kercher, Andrew K

    2005-01-01

    This document describes a suite of statistical methods that can be used to infer lot parameters from the data obtained from inspection/testing of random samples taken from that lot. Some of these methods will be needed to perform the statistical acceptance tests required by the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program. Special focus has been placed on proper interpretation of acceptance criteria and unambiguous methods of reporting the statistical results. In addition, modified statistical methods are described that can provide valuable measures of quality for different lots of material. This document has been written for use as a reference and a guide for performing these statistical calculations. Examples of each method are provided. Uncertainty analysis (e.g., measurement uncertainty due to instrumental bias) is not included in this document, but should be considered when reporting statistical results.

  5. Statistical Methods for Material Characterization and Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, A.K.

    2005-04-01

    This document describes a suite of statistical methods that can be used to infer lot parameters from the data obtained from inspection/testing of random samples taken from that lot. Some of these methods will be needed to perform the statistical acceptance tests required by the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program. Special focus has been placed on proper interpretation of acceptance criteria and unambiguous methods of reporting the statistical results. In addition, modified statistical methods are described that can provide valuable measures of quality for different lots of material. This document has been written for use as a reference and a guide for performing these statistical calculations. Examples of each method are provided. Uncertainty analysis (e.g., measurement uncertainty due to instrumental bias) is not included in this document, but should be considered when reporting statistical results.

  6. Computational efficiency of numerical approximations of tangent moduli for finite element implementation of a fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haofei; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated computational efficiency of finite element (FE) simulations when a numerical approximation method was used to obtain the tangent moduli. A fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model for nearly incompressible soft tissues was implemented for 3D solid elements using both the approximation method and the closed-form analytical method, and validated by comparing the components of the tangent modulus tensor (also referred to as the material Jacobian) between the two methods. The computational efficiency of the approximation method was evaluated with different perturbation parameters and approximation schemes, and quantified by the number of iteration steps and CPU time required to complete these simulations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the overall accuracy of the approximation method is improved by adopting the central difference approximation scheme compared to the forward Euler approximation scheme. For small-scale simulations with about 10,000 DOFs, the approximation schemes could reduce the CPU time substantially compared to the closed-form solution, due to the fact that fewer calculation steps are needed at each integration point. However, for a large-scale simulation with about 300,000 DOFs, the advantages of the approximation schemes diminish because the factorization of the stiffness matrix will dominate the solution time. Overall, as it is material model independent, the approximation method simplifies the FE implementation of a complex constitutive model with comparable accuracy and computational efficiency to the closed-form solution, which makes it attractive in FE simulations with complex material models.

  7. Application of radiation-crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene to fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    Plain-woven carbon fiber-filled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composites were fabricated by radiation-crosslinking under selective conditions. High mechanical and frictional properties are found in the composite materials compared with crosslinked PTFE without fiber. The composite materials with optional shapes, which are laminated after electron beam (EB) crosslinking treatment of each mono-layer could also be fabricated.

  8. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  9. Characterization of mechanical properties of materials using ultrasound broadband spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Megha; Prasad, Abhinav; Bellare, Jayesh R; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the characterization of homogenous materials (metals, alloys, glass and polymers) by a simple broadband ultrasonic interrogation method. The novelty lies in the use of ultrasound in a continuous way with very low input power (0 dBm or less) and analysis of the transmitted acoustic wave spectrum for material property characterization like speed of sound, density and dimensions of a material. Measurements were conducted on various thicknesses of samples immersed in liquid where continuous-wave, frequency swept ultrasonic energy was incident normal to the sample surface. The electro-acoustic transmission response is analyzed in the frequency domain with respect to a specifically constructed multi-layered analytical model. From the acoustic signature of the sample materials, material properties such as speed of sound and acoustic impedance can be calculated with experimentally derived values found to be in general agreement with the literature and with pulse-echo technique establishing the basis for a non-contact and non-destructive technique for material characterization. Further, by looking at the frequency spacing of the peaks of water when the sample is immersed, the thickness of the sample can be calculated independently from the acoustic response. This technique can prove to be an effective non-contact, non-destructive and fast material characterization technique for a wide variety of materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The NIST metrology program on electromagnetic characterization of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, C.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Electromagnetic Properties of Materials (EPM) Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is described, including an outline of the current goals of the project and details of measurement techniques being used at NIST for characterizing dielectric and magnetic materials of importance in wireless communications in the RF spectrum of interest.

  11. Statistical characterization of carbon phenolic prepreg materials, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, Don A.; Stites, John, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to characterize several lots of materials used for carbon/carbon and carbon/phenol product manufacture. Volume one is organized into testing categories based on raw material of product form. Each category contains a discussion of the sampling plan, comments and observations on each test method utilized, and a summary of the results obtained each category.

  12. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  13. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  15. Modeling and characterization of recompressed damaged materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Cazamias, J U; Kalantar, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Springer, H K

    2004-02-11

    Experiments have been performed to explore conditions under which spall damage is recompressed with the ultimate goal of developing a predictive model. Spall is introduced through traditional gas gun techniques or with laser ablation. Recompression techniques producing a uniaxial stress state, such as a Hopkinson bar, do not create sufficient confinement to close the porosity. Higher stress triaxialities achieved through a gas gun or laser recompression can close the spall. Characterization of the recompressed samples by optical metallography and electron microscopy reveal a narrow, highly deformed process zone. At the higher pressures achieved in the gas gun, little evidence of spall remains other than differentially etched features in the optical micrographs. With the very high strain rates achieved with laser techniques there is jetting from voids and other signs of turbulent metal flow. Simulations of spall and recompression on micromechanical models containing a single void suggest that it might be possible to represent the recompression using models similar to those employed for void growth. Calculations using multiple, randomly distributed voids are needed to determine if such models will yield the proper behavior for more realistic microstructures.

  16. Photothermal characterization of encapsulant materials for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.; Gupta, A.; Distefano, S.

    1982-01-01

    A photothermal test matrix and a low cost testing apparatus for encapsulant materials of photovoltaic modules were defined. Photothermal studies were conducted to screen and rank existing as well as future encapsulant candidate materials and/or material formulations in terms of their long term physiochemical stability under accelerated photothermal aging conditions. Photothermal characterization of six candidate pottant materials and six candidate outer cover materials were carried out. Principal products of photothermal degradation are identified. Certain critical properties are also monitored as a function of photothermal aging.

  17. Nondestructive electromagnetic characterization of uniaxial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil G.

    In this dissertation, a method for the simultaneous non-destructive extraction of the permittivity and permeability of a dielectric magnetic uniaxial anisotropic media is developed and several key contributions are demonstrated. The method utilizes a single fixture in which the MUT is clamped between two rectangular waveguides with 6" x 6" PEC flanges. The transmission and reflection coefficients are measured, then compared with theoretically calculated coefficients to find a least squares solution to the minimization problem. One of the key contributions of this work is the development of the total parallel plate spectral-domain Green's function by two independent methods. The Green's function is thereby shown to be correct in form and in physical meaning. A second significant contribution of this work to the scientific community is the evaluation of one of the inverse Fourier transform integrals in the complex plane. This significantly enhances the efficiency of the extraction code. A third significant contribution is the measurement of a number of uniaxial anisotropic materials, many of which were envisioned, designed and constructed in-house using 3D printing technology. The results are shown to be good in the transverse dimension, but mildly unstable in the longitudinal dimension. A secondary contribution of this work that warrants mention is the inclusion of a flexible, complete, working code for the extraction process. Although such codes have been written before, they have not been published in the literature for broader use.

  18. Optimum structural design of robotic manipulators with fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Lamancusa, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    High-speed robotic arms with advanced structural characteristics can be fabricated from optimally tailored fiber reinforced composites. An integrated design methodology is presented for the optimal structural synthesis of composite robotic manipulators. Optimum configurations of ply angles and ply thicknesses are predicted for maximum structural end-effector stiffness and maximum end-effector load carrying capacity, without altering the geometric dimensions of the links. Multiple posture finite element-based static performance criteria are implemented. A new finite element has been developed for the modeling of tubular composite links. Unique features are the inclusion of shear effects and coupling between stretching and flexure. Numerical solutions are obtained via an efficient optimization algorithm. Applications to an existing SCARA-class manipulator illustrate the effectiveness of the method and demonstrate the dramatic influence of the multi-postural design criteria on the optimal design. For a filament wound structure using a high strength carbon fiber in a thermoplastic matrix, the resultant optimum ply configurations have increased the specific stiffness and specific load capacity by factors of 1.5 and 16, respectively, in comparison to identically sized aluminum links.

  19. Processing and characterization of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites using micro-braiding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ogihara, Shinji

    In the present study, we investigate fatigue properties of green composites. A hemp fiber yarn reinforced poly(lactic acid) composite was selected as a green composite. Unidirectional (UD) and textile (Textile) composites were fabricated using micro-braiding technique. Fatigue tests results indicated that fatigue damages in UD composites was splitting which occurred just before the final fracture, while matrix crack and debonding between matrix and fiber yarn occurred and accumulated stably in Textile composites. These results were consistent with modulus reduction and acoustic emission measurement during fatigue tests.

  20. Characterization of Micron-Scale Nanotublar Super Dielectric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    MICRON-SCALE NANOTUBULAR SUPER DIELECTRIC MATERIALS by Jonathan Wayne Gandy September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Jonathan Phillips Co-Advisor...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHARACTERIZATION OF MICRON-SCALE NANOTUBULAR SUPER DIELECTRIC MATERIALS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...study focused on dielectric materials based on a novel hypothesis: that porous electrically insulating solids in which the pores are filled with liquids

  1. Hall coefficient measurement for nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Although Hall detectors are widely used for magnetic flux density measurements in numerous electromagnetic NDE applications, measurement of the Hall coefficient of metals and their alloys for NDE purposes has not been successfully attempted before. While other intrinsic electric properties, such as electric conductivity and, to a lesser degree, thermoelectric power, are widely used for NDE, Hall coefficient measurements have never been really considered mainly because the measurements are rather difficult to carry out, especially in high-conductivity materials. In contrast to electric conductivity, the Hall coefficient is influenced mainly by the concentration density of the free charge carriers, i.e., electrons in metals, and not so much by their mobility, therefore it could be a valuable addition to our NDE arsenal. We modified the alternating current potential drop (ACPD) method with square-electrode configuration by adding an external bias magnetic field modulation to measure the Hall coefficient. The presence of such a bias field violates the Reciprocity Theorem unless the sign of the magnetic field is switched between the two measurements, which can be exploited to measure the Hall coefficient in the presence of other variations that would otherwise hide it. This new experimental method was tested on paramagnetic alloys and yielded a ±4% reproducibility that probably could be further improved by additional development efforts. As a first step towards illustrating some of the potential applications of this new technique, we have done reversible applied stress measurements in Al 1100 plates and found the sensitivity of the technique to elastic strain surprisingly high.

  2. Metrology and Characterization Challenges for Emerging Research Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C. Michael; Herr, Dan; Obeng, Yaw

    2011-11-10

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) Emerging Research Materials (ERM) and Emerging Research Devices (ERD) Technology Workgroups have identified materials and devices that could enable continued increases in the density and performance of future integrated circuit (IC) technologies and the challenges that must be overcome; however, this will require significant advances in metrology and characterization to enable progress. New memory devices and beyond CMOS logic devices operate with new state variables (e.g., spin, redox state, etc.) and metrology and characterization techniques are needed to verify their switching mechanisms and scalability, and enable improvement of operation of these devices. Similarly, new materials and processes are needed to enable these new devices. Additionally, characterization is needed to verify that the materials and their interfaces have been fabricated with required quality and performance.

  3. Preparation, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of chitin nanofibrils reinforced carrageenan nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hee-Yun

    2015-03-06

    Present study illustrates the preparation of chitin nanofibrils (CNF) reinforced carrageenan nanocomposite films by the solution-casting technique. CNF was prepared by acid hydrolysis of chitin, followed by high speed homogenization and sonication. FTIR result demonstrated that the chemical structure of chitin had not changed after acid hydrolysis. However, the crystalinity of CNF was found to be higher than chitin. The crystallite size of chitin and CNF was 4.73 and 6.27 nm, respectively. The char content at 600 °C of chitin (19.2%) was lower than the CNF (25%). The carrageenan/CNF composite films were smooth and flexible and the CNF was dispersed uniformly in the carrageenan polymer matrix. The tensile strength and modulus of carrageenan film were increased significantly (p<0.05) after CNF reinforcement with up to 5 wt%, however, elongation at break, water vapor permeability, and transparency decreased slightly. Carrageenan/CNF nanocomposite films showed strong antibacterial activity against a Gram-positive food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Suzhu; Juay, Yang Kang; Young, Ming Shyan

    2008-04-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites have been successfully fabricated with melt blending. Two melt blending approaches of batch mixing and continuous extrusion have been used and the properties of the derived nanocomposites have been compared. The interaction of PMMA and CNTs, which is crucial to greatly improve the polymer properties, has been physically enhanced by adding a third party of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) compatibilizer. It is found that the electrical threshold for both PMMA/CNT and PMMA/PVDF/CNT nanocomposites lies between 0.5 to 1 wt% of CNTs. The thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites increase with CNTs and they are further increased by the addition of PVDF For 5 wt% CNT reinforced PMMA/PVDF/CNT nanocomposite, the onset of decomposition temperature is about 17 degrees C higher and elastic modulus is about 19.5% higher than those of neat PMMA. Rheological study also shows that the CNTs incorporated in the PMMA/PVDF/CNT nanocomposites act as physical cross-linkers.

  5. Novel methods and self-reinforced composite materials for assessment and prevention of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Eric S.

    Novel methods for assessing the electrochemical and micromechanical performance of modular tapers were evaluated, and self-reinforced composite materials were developed for their potential to prevent the onset of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular taper devices. A study of the seating and taper locking mechanics of modular taper samples was conducted, and the effect on taper engagement strength of seating load, loading rate, taper moisture, and taper design/material combination was studied. The load-displacement behavior was captured during seating, and the subsequent pull off load was correlated to seating displacement, seating energy, and seating load. The primary factor affecting taper engagement strength was seating load, and loading rate and design/material factors did not have a significant impact on the quality of the taper engagement. Next, the effect of variation of 7 different design, material, and surgical factors on the fretting corrosion and micromechanical behavior during incremental cyclic fretting corrosion testing was examined using a design of experiments matrix. Seating load and head offset length were the most influential factors affecting fretting corrosion, with low seating loads and high head offsets giving rise to increased currents during sequentially incremented cyclic loads. Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) fibers were produced, and the effects of varying draw down ratio, molecular weight, and post-spinning treatment on the structural and mechanical properties of the fibers were studied. Highly drawn fibers showed the highest increase in molecular orientation and mechanical properties. PEEK fibers were then utilized in the design and fabrication of self-reinforced composite PEEK (SRC-PEEK) thin film composites, and self-reinforced composite ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (SRC-PE) produced from Spectra fiber was also introduced. Pin on disk studies were employed to understand the potential of both of these SRC materials to

  6. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  7. Fiber-reinforced composite substructure: load-bearing capacity of an onlay restoration and flexural properties of the material.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan K; Lassila, Lippo V J; Tezvergil, Arzu; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of composite resin onlay restorations made of particulate filler composite (PFC) with two different types of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructures. In addition, flexural properties of the material combination and the effect of polymerization devices were tested. Specimens were prepared to simulate an onlay restoration, which consisted of 2 to 3 mm of FRC layer as a substructure (short random and continuous bidirectional fiber orientation) and a 1 mm surface layer of PFC. Control specimens were prepared from plain PFC. In Group A the specimens were incrementally polymerized only with a hand-light curing unit for 40 s, while in Group B the specimens were post-cured in a light-curing oven for 15 min before they were statically loaded with a steel ball. Bar-shaped test specimens were prepared to measure the flexural properties of material combination using a three-point bending test (ISO 10477). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed all specimens with a FRC substructure have higher values of static load-bearing capacity and flexural properties than those obtained with plain PFC (p<0.001). The load-bearing capacity of all the specimens decreased after post-curing and water storage. Restorations made from a material combination of FRC and PFC showed better mechanical properties than those obtained with plain PFC.

  8. Strain Sensing Based on Multiscale Composite Materials Reinforced with Graphene Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Moriche, Rocío; Prolongo, Silvia G; Sánchez, María; Jiménez-Suárez, Alberto; Campo, Mónica; Ureña, Alejandro

    2016-11-07

    The electrical response of NH2-functionalized graphene nanoplatelets composite materials under strain was studied. Two different manufacturing methods are proposed to create the electrical network in this work: (a) the incorporation of the nanoplatelets into the epoxy matrix and (b) the coating of the glass fabric with a sizing filled with the same nanoplatelets. Both types of multiscale composite materials, with an in-plane electrical conductivity of ~10(-3) S/m, showed an exponential growth of the electrical resistance as the strain increases due to distancing between adjacent functionalized graphene nanoplatelets and contact loss between overlying ones. The sensitivity of the materials analyzed during this research, using the described procedures, has been shown to be higher than commercially available strain gauges. The proposed procedures for self-sensing of the structural composite material would facilitate the structural health monitoring of components in difficult to access emplacements such as offshore wind power farms. Although the sensitivity of the multiscale composite materials was considerably higher than the sensitivity of metallic foils used as strain gauges, the value reached with NH2 functionalized graphene nanoplatelets coated fabrics was nearly an order of magnitude superior. This result elucidated their potential to be used as smart fabrics to monitor human movements such as bending of fingers or knees. By using the proposed method, the smart fabric could immediately detect the bending and recover instantly. This fact permits precise monitoring of the time of bending as well as the degree of bending.

  9. Modelling of fracture phenomenon in case of composite materials reinforced with short carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliman, R.

    2015-11-01

    The research work presented in this paper describes the composite materials in terms of formation and propagation of cracks using an algorithm that imposes disproportional loads to composite samples. The required parameters that describe the composites fracture demand inputs as: load intensity, geometry features and relative loading direction. In order to obtain reliable results, it should be a good correlation between the model which describes the facture propagation, the composition of the material and the structural homogeneity. The presented study is using a Functionally Graded Material with local homogeneity in fracture area, and a numerical model based on integration of interactions (Mori - Tanaka method). The parameters that describes the fracture behaviour, includes a factor of stress intensity which is important for establish the fracture direction. The model used in simulations is considering a composite sample with rectangular shape and 6 mm thickness. The sample is loaded with predefined stress σct (MPa) above and under the fracture line. σct represents the critical stress able to lead to fracture propagation. The main objective of this research work it was to generate a numerical model which describes the fracture behaviour of a composite material. The obtained model and its accuracy to describe the fracture behaviour of a composite material is presented in the final part of this paper.

  10. Thermophysical characterization of composite materials under transient heating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roetling, J.; Hanson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Thermophysical property measurements were made under transient heating conditions on several materials being considered for use in SCOUT rocket motors. The materials included were ATJ graphite, MX 2600 silica phenolic, FM 5272 cellulose phenolic, and two carbon-carbon composites: CARBITEX 700 and RPP-4. The ATJ was included as a reference or base line material to check performance of the transient tests as it was not expected to be sensitive to heating rate. Measurements included in the program were thermal conductivity, strength, compressive stress-strain (carbon-carbon only), thermal expansion and the effective thermal expansion under partially restrained conditions. Development of this latter measurement was a major part of the program. It consisted of partially restraining the expansion of a specimen as it was heated, measuring the load and strain which occurred (together with a simultaneous modulus determination by superimposing a small cyclic load) and using these quantities to calculate what the effective thermal expansion would have to be to produce the observed stress and deformation. For materials which are sensitive to heating rate, such as reinforced phenolics, it was believed that this would provide a more realistic determination of the thermal expansion as it more nearly simulates the conditions experienced in end use.

  11. Effect of Sericin on Mechanical Behavior of Composite Material Reinforced by Silk Woven Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Teruo; Ino, Haruhiro; Hanada, Koji; Katori, Sigetaka

    Recent, attention has been given to shift from glass fibers and carbon fibers to natural fibers for FRP composites for the goal of protecting the environment. This paper concerned with the application of silk fabric for composite materials. Polypropylene (PP) was used for the matrix material and the silk fabric composites were molded using a compression molding method. Especially, the effect of sericin on mechanical behaviors of composite materials was discussed. Good adhesion between silk and PP was obtained by removing the sericin existing around the fibroin. The tensile modulus of composite decreased with decreasing the sericin because of the flexibility of silk fibers without sericin. In particular, the higher Izod impact value was obtained for the composites containing the silk fibers without sericin.

  12. Biodegradable packaging materials conception based on starch and polylactic acid (PLA) reinforced with cellulose.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, Fatma; Bessadok, Atef; Dammak, Mohamed; Jaziri, Mohamed; Ammar, Emna

    2016-10-01

    The plastic materials used for packaging are increasing leading to a considerable amount of undegradable solid wastes. This work deals with the reduction of conventional plastics waste and the natural resources preservation by using cellulosic polymers from renewable resources (alfa and luffa). Plasticized starch films syntheses were achieved at a laboratory scale. These natural films showed some very attractive mechanical properties at relatively low plasticizers levels (12 to 17 % by weight). Furthermore, mixtures including polylactic acid polymer (PLA) and cellulose fibers extracted from alfa and luffa were investigated by melt extrusion technique. When used at a rate of 10 %, these fibers improved the mixture mechanical properties. Both developed materials were biodegradable, but the plasticized starch exhibited a faster biodegradation kinetic compared to the PLA/cellulose fibers. These new materials would contribute to a sustainable development and a waste reduction.

  13. Definition and Modeling of Critical Flaws in Graphite Fiber Reinforced Resin Matrix Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-28

    Chatterjee, Z. Hashin, and R.B. Pipes ct:• Materials Sciences Corporation B2ue Bell Office Campus Merion-Towle House Blue Bell, PA 19422 August 1979 Final...Materials Sciences Corporation Blue Bell Office Campus Merion-lowle House Blue Bell, PA 19422 d~ ~~ ocuou M or P b c r Jera Im I IC TV Ii~~ `-A \\~ W 5t...Campus erion-Towle House -al •e _B ll • 194’ It. CONTTROLLINc.OFFICE NAME ANO ADDRESS 12. REIPORT DATE Naval Air Development Center b7 Warminster, PA 19422

  14. Rectangular waveguide material characterization: anisotropic property extraction and measurement validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowgey, Benjamin Reid

    Rectangular waveguide methods are appealing for measuring isotropic and anisotropic materials because of high signal strength due to field confinement, and the ability to control the polarization of the applied electric field. As a stepping stone to developing methods for characterizing materials with fully-populated anisotropic tensor characteristics, techniques are presented in this dissertation to characterize isotropic, biaxially anisotropic, and gyromagnetic materials. Two characterization techniques are investigated for each material, and thus six different techniques are described. Additionally, a waveguide standard is introduced which may be used to validate the measurement of the permittivity and permeability of materials at microwave frequencies. The first characterization method examined is the Nicolson-Ross-Weir (NRW) technique for the extraction of isotropic parameters of a sample completely filling the cross-section of a rectangular waveguide. A second technique is proposed for the characterization of an isotropic conductor-backed sample filling the cross-section of a waveguide. If the sample is conductor-backed, and occupies the entire cross-section, a transmission measurement is not available, and thus a method must be found for providing two sufficiently different reflection measurements.The technique proposed here is to place a waveguide iris in front of the sample, exposing the sample to a spectrum of evanescent modes. By measuring the reflection coefficient with and without an iris, the necessary two data may be obtained to determine the material parameters. A mode-matching approach is used to determine the theoretical response of a sample placed behind the waveguide iris. This response is used in a root-searching algorithm to determine permittivity and permeability by comparing to measurements of the reflection coefficient. For the characterization of biaxially anisotropic materials, the first method considers an extension of the NRW technique

  15. Processing, Characterization and Fretting Wear of Zinc Oxide and Silver Nanoparticles Reinforced Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Biopolymer Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Fahad; Kumar, Anil; Patel, Anup Kumar; Sharma, Rajeev K.; Balani, Kantesh

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the most widely used biopolymer for articulating surfaces, such as an acetabular cup liner interfacing with a metal/ceramic femoral head. However, the formation of wear debris leads to the aseptic loosening of implants. Thus, in order to improve the life span via enhancing the fretting wear resistance, UHMWPE is reinforced with ZnO/Ag nanoparticles. It is envisaged that the ZnO/Ag addition will also exhibit antibacterial properties. In the current study, the synergetic effect of the reinforcement of ZnO/Ag nanoparticles (0-3 wt.% combinations) on the fretting wear behavior of a UHMWPE matrix is assessed. The phase characterization of compression- molded UHMWPE-Ag-ZnO biopolymer nanocomposites has elicited the retention of starting phases. All samples were processed at >98% density using compression molding. Silver and ZnO reinforcement showed enhanced hardness ~20.4% for U3A and 42.0% for U3Z. Fretting wear performance was evaluated at varying loads (5-15 N), keeping in mind the weight at different joints, with constant frequency (5 Hz) as well as amplitude of oscillation (100 µm). Laser surface profilometry showed change of wear volume from 8.6 × 10-5 mm3 for neat polymer to 5.8 × 10-5 mm3 with 1 wt.% Ag + 1 wt.% ZnO reinforcement (at 15 N load). Consequently, the mechanics of resistance offered by Ag and ZnO is delineated in the UHMWPE matrix. Further, S. aureus viability reduction is ~28.7% in cases with 1 wt.% Ag addition, ~42.5% with 1 wt.% ZnO addition, but synergistically increase to ~58.6% and 47.1% when each of Ag and ZnO is added with 1 wt.% and 3 wt.%, respectively (when compared to that of the UHMWPE control sample). Increased wear resistance and superior bioactivity and enhanced anti-bacterial properties of 1 wt.% Ag + 1 wt.% ZnO and 3 wt.% Ag + 3 wt.% ZnO shows the potential use of ZnO-Ag-UHMWPE biopolymer composites as an articulating surface.

  16. Characterization of materials for waste-canister compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, H.E.; Mack, J.E.

    1981-10-01

    Sample materials of 7 waste forms and 15 potential canister materials were procured for compatibility tests. These materials were characterized before being placed in test, and the results are the main topic of this report. A test capsule was designed for the tests in which disks of a single waste form were contacted with duplicate samples of canister materials. The capsules are undergoing short-term tests at 800/sup 0/C and long-term tests at 100 and 300/sup 0/C.

  17. Optical characterization of window materials for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M.

    2013-09-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  18. Optical Characterization of Window Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  19. Characterization of Nylon 6 Nano Fiber/E-Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod Kumar, T.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Santhanam, V.; Udayakumar, N.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper thermoplastic polymer Nylon-6 is generated in the form of Nanofibers by using an electro spinning method, and concentration of a solution is 4% as a constant then, by varying the process parameters such as flow rate (0.8 ml/hr, 1ml/hr and 1.2 ml/hr) of the solution. The results indicated Nanofibers with 4% concentration and 1 ml/hr produced optimum fibers due to continuous fiber formation. Composites Plates are fabricated by using a Hand lay-up method with different volume fraction (0.5, 1, 2 % v/v) of Nanofibers ratio. Then, the optimum Nanofibers volume ratio (2 % v/v) is reinforced with E-glass fibers and epoxy resin as a matrix. In order to find Nanofibers effect, Mechanical properties like (Tensile, Flexural and Impact) is performed and evaluated.

  20. Development of Al- and Cu-based nanocomposites reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets: Fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, Abdollah; Pavese, Matteo; Badini, Claudio; Fino, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and copper matrix nanocomposites reinforced by graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were successfully fabricated by a wet mixing method followed by conventional powder metallurgy. The uniform dispersion of GNPs within the metal matrices showed that the wet mixing method has a great potential to be used as a mixing technique. However, by increasing the GNPs content, GNPs agglomeration was more visible. DSC and XRD of Al/GNPs nanocomposites showed that no new phase formed below the melting point of Al. Microstructural observations in both nanocomposites reveal the evident grain refinement effect as a consequence of GNPs addition. The interfacial bonding evaluation shows a poor interfacial bonding between GNPs and Al, while the interfacial bonding between Cu and GNPs is strong enough to improve the properties of the Cu/GNPs nanocomposites. In both composites, the coefficient of thermal expansion decreases as a function of GNPs while, their hardness is improved by increasing the GNPs content as well as their elastic modulus.

  1. Characterization of SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using NASA's reaction forming process. Silicon-2 at a percent of niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bi-modal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon and silicon. Fiber push-out tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approx. 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approx. 60 MPa. A typical four point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pull out.

  2. Characterization of SiC Fiber (SCS-6) Reinforced-Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) reinforced-reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using a reaction-forming process. Silicon-2 at.% niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bimodal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon, and silicon. Fiber pushout tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approximately 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approximately 60 MPa. A typical four-point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pullout.

  3. Carbon black reinforced polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based composite particles: preparation, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian; Yan, Chunjie; Zhou, Sen; Zhang, Yonghan; Yang, Bipeng

    2017-10-01

    Carbon black (CB) is an excellent filler to reinforce polymers because of its unique thermal and mechanical properties. Thus, a type of modified carbon black (MCB) was developed, which led to reduced filler aggregation in methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomers and resulted in homogeneous dispersion in the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) substrate. The PMMA-MCB composite particles that were prepared in this work possessed remarkable and stable properties. Therefore, they can be used as an ultra-lightweight proppant (ULWP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that CB was successfully modified and the MCB was well dispersed in the PMMA matrix. Results of crushing rate and differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that MCB could significantly enhance the thermal and mechanical performance of the ULWP. Heat treatment of the ULWP under a nitrogen atmosphere could also clearly enhance its performance in various aspects. The process of modifying CB, the approach of synthesizing PMMA-MCB composite particles, and their mechanism were systematically investigated in this work.

  4. Retention of Lecture Items Reinforced with Humorous and Non-Humorous Exemplary Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.; Freshley, Dwight L.

    College students in nine intact beginning speech classes served as subjects for a study testing the effects of humor on student recall of lecture information. The 156 subjects were exposed to one of three versions of an audiotaped lecture. One version amplified eight points in the subject matter with humorous material; and a third version (the…

  5. Characterization of bond in steel-fiber-reinforced cementitious composites under tensile loads

    SciTech Connect

    Namur, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated was bonding in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composites, like fiber-reinforced mortar. The study was basically analytical, consisting primarily of two analytical models that predict the bond shear stress distribution at the interface between the fibers and the matrix, as well as the normal tensile distributions in the fibers and the matrix. The two models were, however, based on separate assumptions. While the first model assumed a known bond shear stress versus slip relationship at the interface between the fibers and the surrounding matrix, the second model was based on a mechanism of force transfer between the fibers and the matrix, hence circumventing the rather complex task of determining the relationship between the bond stress and the slip for the given type of fiber and matrix. Some applications to this second model, such as the bond modulus, the debonding stress, the length of the debonded zone were also investigated. A theoretical study of the pull-out process of steel fibers in cementitious matrices is included. The problem consisted of relating an idealized bond shear stress versus slip relationship to a pull-out curve. The derivation as based on the assumption that this relationship is linearly elastic-perfectly frictional, and then extended to the case of a fiction decaying linearly with the slip. The problem was subdivided into two components: a primal problem, whereby the pull-out curve is predicted from an assumed bond shear stress-slip relationship, and the dual problem, in which an experimentally obtained pull-out curve was used to predict the interfacial constitutive model, namely the bond-slip curve. Model application was illustrated by three examples of pull-out tests. The pull-out curves obtained in the laboratory, which featured the pull-out force versus the end slip of the pull-out fiber, were used to predict bond shear stress-slip relationships.

  6. Cellulose reinforced nylon-6 nanofibrous membrane: Fabrication strategies, physicochemical characterizations, wicking properties and biomimetic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Tiwari, Arjun Prasad; Maharjan, Bikendra; Won, Ko Sung; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-08-20

    The aim of the present study is to develop a facile, efficient approach to reinforce nylon 6 (N6) nanofibers with cellulose chains as well as to study the effect that cellulose regeneration has on the physicochemical properties of the composite fibers. Here, a cellulose acetate (CA) solution (17wt%) was prepared in formic acid and was blended with N6 solution (20%, prepared in formic acid and acetic acid) in various proportions, and the blended solutions were then electrospun to produce hybrid N6/CA nanofibers. Cellulose was regenerated in-situ in the fiber via alkaline saponification of the CA content of the hybrid fiber, leading to cellulose-reinforced N6 (N6/CL) nanofibers. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the fiber diameter and hence pore size gradually decreases as the mass composition of CA increases in the electrospinning solution. Cellulose regeneration showed noticeable change in the polymorphic behavior of N6, as observed in the XRD and IR spectra. The strong interaction of the hydroxyl group of cellulose with amide group of N6, mainly via hydrogen bonding, has a pronounced effect on the polymorphic behavior of N6. The γ-phase was dominant in pristine N6 and N6/CA fibers while α- phase was dominant in the N6/CL fibers. The surface wettability, wicking properties, and the tensile stress were greatly improved for N6/CL fibers compared to the corresponding N6/CA hybrid fibers. Results of DSC/TGA revealed that N6/CL fibers were more thermally stable than pristine N6 and N6/CA nanofibers. Furthermore, regeneration of cellulose chain improved the ability to nucleate bioactive calcium phosphate crystals in a simulated body fluid solution.

  7. Dynamic characterization and modeling of potting materials for electronics assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Lee, Gilbert F.; Santiago, Jaime R.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling, which in turn needs both static and dynamic characterization of individual electronic components and encapsulation material to generate reliable material parameters for a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, difficulty arises in capturing one of the critical features characteristic of the loading environment in a high velocity impact: multiple loading events coupled with multi-axial stress states. Hence, potting materials need to be characterized well to understand its damping capacity at different frequencies and strain rates. An encapsulation scheme to protect electronic boards consists of multiple layers of filled as well as unfilled polymeric materials like Sylgard 184 and Trigger bond Epoxy # 20-3001. A combination of experiments conducted for characterization of materials used Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), and dynamic material analyzer (DMA). For material which behaves in an ideal manner, a master curve can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. To verify the applicability of WLF model, a new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor with experimental incremental shift factor. Deviations can be readily observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine if model parameters reflect the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests can readily indicate deviations from experimental high strain rate data. Experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements are presented.

  8. Experimental Research Into the Effect Of External Actions and Polluting Environments on the Serviceablity of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Vildeman, V. E.; Babin, A. D.; Grinev, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    The results of mechanical tests of fiberglass and CFRP specimens in transverse bending and interlaminar shear (the short-beam method) and of sandwich panels in tension and compression are presented. The effect of external polluting environments on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials and structures is estimated. Stress-strain diagrams are constructed.

  9. Ethanol production waste as rubber composite filler: examining the pyrolysis of dried distillers grains and other dry milling byproducts as potential rubber reinforcement materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current push for corn-based ethanol is creating a large surplus of affordable by-products that can potentially serve as filler material for rubber composites. Biomaterial fillers can help replace carbon black and reduce dependence on petroleum. This research examines the reinforcement behavior...

  10. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  11. Characterization of Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Stanaland, Tesia; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two if the sunfacing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team, at MSFC, is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to radiation environments simulating orbital environments. This paper describes the results of three candidate materials after exposure to a simulated Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). This is the first known characterization of solar sail material exposed to space simulated radiation environments. The technique of radiation dose versus material depth profiling was used to determine the orbital equivalent exposure doses. The solar sail exposure procedures and results of the material characterization will be discussed.

  12. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  13. Characterization of nanocellulose reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol) & polyacrylamide composite films.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arup; Chakrabarty, Debabrata

    2015-12-10

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide was reinforced with various doses of nanocellulose. The different composite films thus prepared were characterized with respect to their mechanical, thermal, morphological and barrier properties. The composite film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose showed the highest tensile strength. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide; and its various composites with nanocellulose were almost identical in their thermal stability. Each of the composites however exhibited much superior stability with respect to the linear poly(vinyl alcohol) and crosslinked polyacrylamide. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies exhibited phase separated morphology where agglomerates of nanocellulose were found to be dispersed in the matrix of the semi-IPN. The moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR) was the lowest for the film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose.

  14. Synthesis of irregular graphene oxide tubes using green chemistry and their potential use as reinforcement materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Aroca, Ángel; Deb, Sanjukta

    2017-01-01

    Micrometer length tubes of graphene oxide (GO) with irregular form were synthesised following facile and green metal complexation reactions. These materials were obtained by crosslinking of GO with calcium, zinc or strontium chlorides at three different temperatures (24, 34 and 55°C) using distilled water as solvent for the compounds and following a remarkably simple and low-cost synthetic method, which employs no hazardous substances and is conducted without consumption of thermal or sonic energy. These irregular continuous GO networks showed a very particular interconnected structure by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Disperse X-Ray Spectroscopy for elemental analysis and High-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope Dark Field Imaging, and were analysed by Raman Spectroscopy. To demonstrate the potential use of these 3D GO networks as reinforcement materials for biomedical applications, two composites of calcium alginate with irregular tubes of GO and with single GO nanosheets were prepared with the same amount of GO and divalent atoms and analysed. Thus, the dynamic-mechanical modulus of the composites synthesised with the 3D crosslinked GO networks showed a very significant mechanical improvement due to marked microstructural changes confirmed by confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Variational-based higher-order energy-momentum schemes with incompatible modes for fiber-reinforced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Michael; Dietzsch, Julian

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a new class of time-stepping schemes for structural dynamics is presented, which originally emanate from Gauss-Runge-Kutta schemes as traditional representatives of higher-order symplectic-momentum schemes. The presented time stepping schemes belong to the family of higher-order energy-momentum schemes, which represent Gauss-Runge-Kutta schemes with a physically motivated time approximation of the considered mechanical system. As higher-order energy-momentum schemes so far are not derived by using a straight-forward design method, a variational-based design of energy-momentum schemes is shown. Here, a differential variational principle of continuum mechanics, Jourdain's principle, is discretized, and energy-momentum schemes emanate as discrete Euler-Lagrange equations. This procedure is strong related, but is not identical, to the derivation of variational integrators (VI), which emanate from discretising a Lagrange function or Hamilton's principle, respectively. Furthermore, this design procedure is well suited to connect energy-momentum schemes with numerical modifications based on mixed variational principles, as the enhanced assumed strain elements for improving the spatial discretisation in direction of a locking-free discrete formulation. Therefore, a Q1/E9 energy-momentum scheme of higher order for the continuum formulation of fiber-reinforced materials is presented. This material formulation is important for simulating dynamics of light-weight structures.

  16. Numerical estimation of fire resistance and a flexible design of fire protection for structures made of reinforced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaledin, Vl. O.; Mitkevich, A. B.; Strakhov, V. L.

    2012-07-01

    The basic principles of a progressive methodology for calculating the fire resistance of reinforced structures, meant for application to high-rise, multifunctional, and unique buildings, are presented. The methodology is universal with respect to materials, types of building structures with fire protection, and different force and heat loads acting on them under the conditions of fire. It permits one to take into account all particularities of the thermomechanical behavior of structures in the case of joint action of thermal and force loads. The solution procedure is based on using high-level mathematical models and universal methods of numerical analysis, i.e., the finite-element method (FEM) and the finite-difference method (FDM). To simplify and reduce the labor content of computational algorithms, a mathematical model of special beam finite element has been developed, which in a natural way takes into account the complex structure of buildings, spatial nonuniformity of temperature fields, and the nonlinear behavior of materials. This procedure allowed us to determine the limits of applicability of the known approximate approach, which is based on the use of the concept of "critical temperature," to the estimation of fire resistance and to the design of fire protection of concrete structures. The procedure has been used in designing a number of unique structures built in Moscow.

  17. Control of shape recovery force in SMA fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Keitaro; Shimamoto, Akira

    2005-05-01

    The method of generating the most practicable shape recovery force in smart composite materials which embedded shape-memory alloy (SMA) fiber under the resin matrix is electric heating. However, because the calorie for the heating of the resin matrix increases in the low temperature environment, it is necessary to control the electric heating corresponding to an ambient temperature to obtaining a steady shape recovery force. In this paper, the main factor which influences the shape recovery force is reviewed first. And, it reports the shape recovery force control system by the electric heating which makes the contribution of composite materials which combine SMA that the phase transformation temperature is different to the stability improvement to the operation environment, and the SMA fiber a strain sensor to be possible.

  18. Improvement and Optimization of Internal Damping of Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-17

    q applied to this composite must be q1= a AC = Of Af + or Am 3.5 Therefore, Oc = ECc c = of Vf + Om Vm 3.6 where Vf and Vm are the fiber volume...2 -3.110 - 1 P + ! c; s3.1_-a 2Em L 2 EL a 2 U 1 a 2 3.12 c 2 EL where EL is the longitudinal Young’s modulus of the homo - geneous material

  19. Characterization of the correlation between the interfaces and failure behaviors for particle reinforced Mg–Li composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Q.; Wu, G.Q. Huang, Z.; Tao, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The interfacial microstructure of SiC{sub p} or YAl{sub 2p} reinforced Mg–14Li–3Al matrix composites was comparatively characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. A nanoindentation combined with scanning electron microscopy technique was used to characterize the interfacial mechanical properties between the reinforcements and matrix. The interfacial strength and failure behaviors for the composites were analyzed from the load–penetration curves and corresponding images. In situ tensile tests were used to observe the fracture and deformation processes with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The results show that both the chemical and mechanical compatibilities between the YAl{sub 2} particles and LA143 matrix are better than those between the SiC particles and LA143 matrix. The interfacial breakage load for the SiC/LA143 composite is lower than that for the YAl{sub 2}/LA143 composite because of the worse chemical and mechanical compatibilities between the ceramic particles and metal matrix. Interfacial breakage is the main failure mechanism for the SiC/LA143 composite, while the particle breakage and matrix crack are the main failure mechanism for the YAl{sub 2}/LA143 composite. These may be related to the stronger interfacial bonding between the intermetallic particles and metal matrix. - Highlights: • The compatibility for YAl{sub 2} particle with LA143 matrix is better than SiC particle. • The strength of the YAl{sub 2}/LA143 interface is higher than the SiC/LA143 interface. • The main failure behavior for the SiC/LA143 composite is interfacial breakage. • The main failure behavior for YAl{sub 2}/LA143 composite is particle and matrix breakage. • The interfacial strength plays an important role on the composite failure behavior.

  20. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42