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Sample records for material properties test

  1. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  2. Cyclic Material Properties Test to Determine Hardening/Softening Characteristics of HY-80 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Hodge; J.M. Minicucci; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-30

    The Cyclic Material Properties Test was structured to obtain and provide experimental data for determining cyclic hardening/softening characteristics of HY-80 steel. The inelastic strain history data generated by this test program and the resulting cyclic stress-strain curve will be used to enhance material models in the finite element codes used to perform nonlinear elastic-plastic analysis.

  3. Research study for materials/properties test results database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Lubricants Data Base System was designed and developed for operation on the DEC PDP 11/24 computer. The procedures are written in Datatrieve. In transferring the Lubricants System to the VAX 8600 computer, the Datatrieve had to be 80 percent rewritten. At the end of the contract the Lubricants System is operational on both the PDP 11/24 and VAX 8600 computers. The LOX/GOX, Aluminum/Steel, Toxic, VCM, and Flammability Systems are operational only on the PDP 11/24 computer. The Toxic, VCM, and Flammability Systems do not contain any useable data, only test data. However, the LOX/GOX file does contain test data results supplied by MSFC.

  4. Mechanical property tests on structural materials for ITER magnet system at low temperatures in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets need strong non-superconducting components for structural reinforcement. For instance, the ITER magnet system (MS) consists of cable-in-conduit conductor, coil case, magnet support, and insulating materials. Investigation of mechanical properties at magnet operation temperature with specimens machined at the final manufacturing stages of the conductor jacket materials, magnet support material, and insulating materials, even the component of the full-size conductor jacket is necessary to establish sound databases for the products. In China, almost all mechanical property tests of structural materials for the ITER MS, including conductor jacket materials of TF coils, PF coils, CCs, case material of CCs, conductor jacket materials of Main Busbars (MB) and Corrector Busbars (CB), material of magnet supports, and insulating materials of CCs have been carried out at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (TIPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). In this paper, the mechanical property test facilities are briefly demonstrated and the mechanical tests on the structural materials for the ITER MS, highlighting test rigs as well as test methods, are presented.

  5. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated from a larger structure, etc). For such cases, other material testing methods need to be implemented. Indentation testing is one such method; this approach is often non-destructive and can be used to characterize regions that are not compatible with other testing methods. However, indentation testing typically leads to force-displacement data as opposed to the direct stress-strain data normally used for the mechanical characterization of materials; this data needs to be analyzed using a suitable approach to determine the associated material properties. As such, methods to establish material properties from force-displacement indentation data need to be identified. In this work, a finite element approach using parameter optimization is developed to determine the mechanical properties from the experimental indentation data. Polymers and tissues tend to have time-dependent mechanical behavior; this means that their mechanical response under load changes with time. This dissertation seeks to characterize the properties of these materials using indentation testing under the assumption that they are linear viscoelastic. An example of a material of interest is the polymer poly vinyl chloride (PVC) that is used as the insulation of some aircraft wiring. Changes in the mechanical properties of this material over years of service can indicate degradation and a potential hazard to continued use. To investigate the validity of using indentation testing to monitor polymer insulation degradation, PVC film and PVC-insulated aircraft wiring are

  6. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  7. Remarks on Some Mechanical Small-Scale Tests Applied to Properties of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardu, Marilena; Seccatore, Jacopo

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of test campaigns on small-scale strength properties (particularly, micro-hardness) performed on two homogeneous materials: calcite, a very common and widespread mineral that is characterized by its relatively low Mohs hardness and its high reactivity with even weak acids; and glass, an amorphous solid characterized by the absence of the long-range order which defines crystalline materials. After a synthetic description of the principles underlying two of the three classical comminution laws, known as Kick's law and Rittinger's law, experimental results are discussed. The results of the tests performed show that both scale effect and size effect contribute to the non-constancy of mechanical properties at small scale for crystalline materials. On the other hand, for amorphous materials, a theoretical law considering size effects gives considerably different results from empirical measurements. Considerations and an extended discussion address these findings.

  8. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  9. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  10. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  11. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat-Plate Solar Array project is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations included studies of aging and degradation of candidate encapsulation materials, continued identification of primers for durable bonding of module interfaces, continued evaluation of soil resistant treatments for the sunlit surface of the module and testing of corrosion protective coatings for use low cost mild steel substrates.

  12. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  13. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  15. Mechanical properties testing of candidate polymer matrix materials for use in high performance composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four candidate neat resin systems for use in graphite/epoxy composites are characterized. This includes tensile and shear stiffnesses and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests are conducted on specimens in the dry state and moisture-saturated, at temperatures of 23C, 82C and 121C. The neat resins tested are Hexcel HX-1504, Narmco 5245-C, American Cyanamid CYCOM 907, and Union Carbide ERX-4901A (MDA). Results are compared with those obtained for four other epoxy resins tested in a prior program, i.e., Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914, as well as with available Hercules 3501-6 data. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces is performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions. A finite element micromechanics analysis is used to predict unidirectional composite response under various test conditions, using the measured neat resin properties as input data.

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  17. Accelerator-based tests of radiation shielding properties of materials used in human space infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, C; Briccarello, M; Destefanis, R; Faraud, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Guarnieri, V; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Rusek, A; Scampoli, P; Durante, M

    2008-03-01

    Shielding is the only practical countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during space travel. It is well known that light, hydrogenated materials, such as water and polyethylene, provide the best shielding against space radiation. Kevlar and Nextel are two materials of great interest for spacecraft shielding because of their known ability to protect human space infrastructures from meteoroids and debris. We measured the response to simulated heavy-ion cosmic radiation of these shielding materials and compared it to polyethylene, Lucite (PMMA), and aluminum. As proxy to galactic nuclei we used 1 GeV n iron or titanium ions. Both physics and biology tests were performed. The results show that Kevlar, which is rich in carbon atoms (about 50% in number), is an excellent space radiation shielding material. Physics tests show that its effectiveness is close (80-90%) to that of polyethylene, and biology data suggest that it can reduce the chromosomal damage more efficiently than PMMA. Nextel is less efficient as a radiation shield, and the expected reduction on dose is roughly half that provided by the same mass of polyethylene. Both Kevlar and Nextel are more effective than aluminum in the attenuation of heavy-ion dose.

  18. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The historical development of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is presented, including the functional requirements, polymer selection, curing, stabilization, production and module processing. The construction and use of a new method for the accelerated aging of polymers is detailed. The method more closely resembles the conditions that may be encountered in actual module field exposure and additionally may permit service life to be predicted accurately. The use of hardboard as a low cost candidate substrate material is studied. The performance of surface antisoiling treatments useful for imparting a self cleaning property to modules is updated.

  20. Rhenium material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  1. Rhenium material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaglow, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  2. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  3. Materials property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.; Green, E.R.; Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.

    1990-04-19

    An in-depth review of the measurement techniques that could be used in materials characterization is presented. The measurement techniques to non-destructively determine the in-service or time-related aging of materials considered include ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, eddy current conductivity, neutron scattering and absorption, conventional and tomographic imaging for ultrasonic and radiation imaging, x-ray scattering, thermal impedance, and magnetic hysteresis. The three sections of the report include a review of failure mechanisms in steel and a discussion of nondestructive evaluation techniques and fracture mechanics, a description of a chart on Measurement Techniques versus Material Properties, and recommendations on the techniques and tests to be performed for the experimental investigations and analysis task of the project. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost-effective and long life solar modules. Of the $18 (1948 $) per square meter allocated for the encapsulation components approximately 50% of the cost ($9/sq m) may be taken by the load bearing component. Due to the proportionally high cost of this element, lower costing materials were investigated. Wood based products were found to be the lowest costing structural materials for module construction, however, they require protection from rainwater and humidity in order to acquire dimensional stability. The cost of a wood product based substrate must, therefore, include raw material costs plus the cost of additional processing to impart hygroscopic inertness. This protection is provided by a two step, or split process in which a flexible laminate containing the cell string is prepared, first in a vacuum process and then adhesively attached with a back cover film to the hardboard in a subsequent step.

  5. Testing of Replacement Bag Material

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Recently, the FB-Line bagout material was changed to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible.The results of the strength tests and the outgassing measurements and calculations demonstrate that the proposed replacement nylon bag materials (HRMP and orange anti-static material) are acceptable substitutes for LDPE and the original nylon with respect to mechanical properties.

  6. Thermo-Optical and Mechanical Property Testing of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollerman, WIlliam A.; Stanaland, T. L.; Womack, F.; Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Semmel, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra-lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate sails to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to electrons. This poster will discuss the preliminary results of this research.

  7. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in solar energy technology is reported in the following areas: aging and life prediction methodology and devices for solar cell encapsulation; the function of adhesion chemistry, primers, and a new diagnostic technique for estimations of bond durability; a study of fire retardant formulations for decreasing the potential flammability of solar modules; initial studies of the electrical insulating properties of encapsulation materials and measurement of the intrinsic dielectric strength; antisoiling compounds for the prevention of soil build-up on the outer surface of the module; and low temperature processing encapsulants that permit module fabrication at temperatures less than 100 C. Another area of study has been added to determine the degree to which formulation and processes affect the module quality and manufacturing yield.

  8. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  9. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  10. Test Method To Quantify The Wicking Properties Of Porous Insulation Materials Designed To Prevent Interstitial Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Andrea; Zirkelbach, Daniel; Künzel, Hartwig

    2010-05-01

    Applying an interior insulation often is the only option for a thermal retrofit, especially when heritage buildings are concerned. In doing so, the original construction becomes colder in winter and interstitial condensation may occur. The common way to avoid harmful condensation beneath the interior insulation of the external wall is the installation of a vapor barrier. Since such a barrier works both ways, it may adversely affect the drying potential of the wall during the warmer seasons. One way to avoid the problems described is the installation of an interior insulation system without a vapor barrier to the inside. Here, the effect of capillary transport in porous hydrophilic media is used to conduct condensing moisture away from the wall/insulation interface back to the surface in contact with the indoor air. Following an increasing demand, several water wicking insulation materials (e.g. Calcium-silicate, Autoclave Aerated Concrete based mineral foam, hydrophilic Glass fiber, Cellulose fiber) have appeared on the market. In the past, different methods have been developed to measure and describe the liquid transport properties of hydrophilic porous media. However, the evaluation of the moisture transport mechanisms and their efficiency in this special field of implementation is very complex because of the interacting vapor- and liquid moisture transfer processes. Therefore, there is no consensus yet on its determination and quantification.

  11. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  12. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  13. Materials Testing and Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

    1980-07-01

    The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

  14. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During this quarter the technical activities were directed toward the reformulation of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a compound in solar cell module fabrication. Successful formulations were devised that lowered the temperature required for cure and raised the gel content. A major volatile component was also eliminated (acrylate crosslinking agent) which should aid in the production of bubble free laminates. Adhesive strengths and primers for the bonding of ethylene/vinyl acetate to supersyrate and substrate materials was assessed with encouraging results. The incorporation of silane compounds gave high bond strengths. A survey of scrim materials was also conducted.

  15. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules were investigated. The following areas were explored: (1) soil resistant surface treatment; (2) corrosion protecting coatings from mild steel substrates; (3) primers for bonding module interfaces; and (4) RS/4 accelerated aging of candidate encapsulation compounds

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  18. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules are identified, and evaluated. Ethylene vinyl acetate lamination pottant studies are conducted with respect to the time/temperature cure requirements for successful use of this compound. The time needed to produce successful gel contents are redetermined at a variety of temperatures and are related to the peroxide half life temperature curve. Formulation of the butyl acrylate syrup casting pottant is complete. The formulation contains an ultraviolet stabilizer system and is cured with an initiator that presents no shipping or handling hazards. The catalyzed syrup is stable at room temperature and has a pot life of at least an eight hour period of time. The syrup cures to a transparent rubber in 18 minutes at a temperature of 60 C.

  19. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical activities were directed toward the assessment of encapsulation processes for use with ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer as the pottant. Potentially successful formulations were prepared by compounding the raw polymer with ultraviolet absorbers and crosslinking agents to give stabilized and curable compositions. The compounded resin was then converted to a more useful form with an extruder to give pottant in sheets that could be more easily used in lamination. After experimenting with various techniques, the vacuum-bag process was found to be an excellent encapsulation method. Miniature single-celled and multi-celled solar modules of both substrate and superstrate designs were prepared by this technique. The resulting modules were of good appearance, were bubble-free, and successfully passed the thermal cycle test.

  20. Material Properties Test to Determine Ultimate Strain and True Stress-True Strain Curves for High Yield Steels

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This testing was undertaken to develop material true stress-true strain curves for elastic-plastic material behavior for use in performing transient analysis. Based on the conclusions of this test, the true stress-true strain curves derived herein are valid for use in elastic-plastic finite element analysis for structures fabricated from these materials. In addition, for the materials tested herein, the ultimate strain values are greater than those values cited as the limits for the elastic-plastic strain acceptance criteria for transient analysis.

  1. Assessment of Technologies for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System and Recommendations for Technology Improvement - Part III: Material Property Characterization, Analysis, and Test Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Johnson, Theodore F.; Whitley, Karen S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this report is to contribute to the independent assessment of the Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Material. This report specifically addresses material modeling, characterization testing, data reduction methods, and data pedigree. A brief description of the External Tank foam materials, locations, and standard failure modes is provided to develop suitable background information. A review of mechanics based analysis methods from the open literature is used to provide an assessment of the state-of-the-art in material modeling of closed cell foams. Further, this report assesses the existing material property database and investigates sources of material property variability. The report presents identified deficiencies in testing methods and procedures, recommendations for additional testing as required, identification of near-term improvements that should be pursued, and long-term capabilities or enhancements that should be developed.

  2. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  3. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2011-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10 years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  4. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2010-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10 years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  5. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W,; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2012-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1 G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  6. Radioactive material package seal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Celotex Structural Properties Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.

    2001-01-26

    In the course of regulatory review of the 9975 packaging, the question of the effects environmental conditions on performance of the packaging was raised. The results of previous tests of the Celotex material, used for impact absorption and thermal insulation, indicated that the effect of temperature variation was small. Accordingly, performance under ambient conditions was judged to be representative of performance under temperature extremes. To extend the database to include other effects, and in response to the questions, a series of materials tests were performed on the Celotex brand cellulose fiberboard material.

  8. Measurement of the Viscoelastic Properties of Damping Materials: Adaptation of the Wave Propagation Method to Test Samples of Short Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEMERLE, P.

    2002-02-01

    Wave propagation methods allow the deduction of the viscoelastic damping properties of materials from the waveform pattern of a transitory wave: the wave profile is recorded at two travel distances in a thin bar made of the medium studied. In the case of linear viscoelasticity, the characteristics of the material are deduced directly from the transfer function of the two pulses measured. From a theoretical point of view, these methods are of great interest as they bridge a gap between vibratory methods and ultrasonic methods, allowing results to be obtained in a frequency range covering one and a half to two decades in the audiometric range (20 Hz-20 kHz). However, they have not been used much in industrial applications due to the difficulty and cost involved in producing samples in the form of bars. This study shows how this type of method can be adapted to measuring the viscoelastic properties of damping materials using reduced size and common shaped samples such as end-stop buffers.

  9. Material testing of silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Palusinski, Iwona A.

    2009-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is developing a space qualification method for silicon carbide optical systems that covers material verification through system development. One of the initial efforts has been to establish testing protocols for material properties. Three different tests have been performed to determine mechanical properties of SiC: modulus of rupture, equibiaxial flexural strength and fracture toughness. Testing materials and methods have been in accordance with the respective ASTM standards. Material from four vendors has been tested to date, as part of the MISSE flight program and other programs. Data analysis has focused on the types of issues that are important when building actual components- statistical modeling of test results, understanding batch-to-batch or other source material variations, and relating mechanical properties to microstructures. Mechanical properties are needed as inputs to design trade studies and development and analysis of proof tests, and to confirm or understand the results of non-destructive evaluations of the source materials. Measuring these properties using standardized tests on a statistically valid number of samples is intended to increase confidence for purchasers of SiC spacecraft components that materials and structures will perform as intended at the highest level of reliability.

  10. Materials properties data base computerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, R. G.; Donthnier, M. L.; Moran, M. C.; Mortman, I.; Pinter, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Material property data plays a key role in the design of jet engine components. Consistency, accuracy and efficient use of material property data is of prime importance to the engineering community. The system conception, development, implementation, and future plans for computer software that captures the Material Properties Handbook into a scientific data base are described. The engineering community is given access to raw data and property curves, display of multiple curves for material evaluation and selection, direct access by design analysis computer programs, display of the material specification, and a historical repository for the material evolution. The impact of this activity includes significant productivity gains and cost reductions; all users have access to the same information nd provides consistent, rapid response to the needs of the engineering community. Future plans include incorporating the materials properties data base into a network environment to access information from other data bases and download information to engineering work stations.

  11. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  12. Packaging Materials Properties Data

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.

    1991-10-30

    Several energy absorbing materials are used in nuclear weapons component shipping containers recently designed for the Y-12 Plant Program Management Packaging Group. As a part of the independent review procedure leading to Certificates of Compliance, the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Safety Review Panels requested compression versus deflection . data on these materials. This report is a compilation of that data.

  13. Packaging materials properties data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Several energy absorbing materials are used in nuclear weapons component shipping containers recently designed for the Y-12 Plant Program Management Packaging Group. As a part of the independent review procedure leading to Certificates of Compliance, the US Department of Energy Technical Safety Review Panels requested compression versus deflection data on these materials. This report is a compilation of that data.

  14. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting approved specifications to establish design values on...

  15. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting approved specifications to establish design values on...

  16. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting approved specifications to establish design values on...

  17. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting approved specifications to establish design values on...

  18. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  19. Compatibility testing of vacuum seal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. A.; Rodin, W. A.

    1993-05-01

    Small scale materials compatibility testing was conducted for three elastomers considered for use as vacuum seal materials: Adiprene MOCA-cured; Adiprene Cyanacured; and Sylgard silastic rubber. The tests were conducted using orthogonal array designed experiments for each of the elastomers placed in contact with three materials commonly used during weapon disassembly operations: Duxseal, Sylgard 186 grease, and 2-propyl alcohol. The test results indicated that only the 2-propyl alcohol had a significant effect on the elastomer hardness and physical properties. The alcohol had the largest effect on the two Adiprene materials, and the silastic rubber was the least affected.

  20. Methods and instruments for materials testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansma, Paul (Inventor); Drake, Barney (Inventor); Rehn, Douglas (Inventor); Adams, Jonathan (Inventor); Lulejian, Jason (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and instruments for characterizing a material, such as the properties of bone in a living human subject, using a test probe constructed for insertion into the material and a reference probe aligned with the test probe in a housing. The housing is hand held or placed so that the reference probe contacts the surface of the material under pressure applied either by hand or by the weight of the housing. The test probe is inserted into the material to indent the material while maintaining the reference probe substantially under the hand pressure or weight of the housing allowing evaluation of a property of the material related to indentation of the material by the probe. Force can be generated by a voice coil in a magnet structure to the end of which the test probe is connected and supported in the magnet structure by a flexure, opposing flexures, a linear translation stage, or a linear bearing. Optionally, a measurement unit containing the test probe and reference probe is connected to a base unit with a wireless connection, allowing in the field material testing.

  1. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  2. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  3. Material Properties of Titanium Diboride

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    The physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of polycrystalline TiB2 are examined with an emphasis on the significant dependence of the properties on the density and grain size of the material specimens. Using trend analysis, property relations, and interpolation methods, a coherent set of trend values for the properties of polycrystalline TiB2 is determined for a mass fraction of TiB2 ⩾ 98 %, a density of (4.5±0.1) g/cm3, and a mean grain size of (9±1) µm. PMID:27551633

  4. European tests on materials outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwaal, A.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to international coordination of spacecraft materials, a number of European firms and institutes performed outgassing tests on identical materials at 125 C in high vacuum. The outgassing data obtained with the different types of equipment is presented and both the results and the critical parameters are discussed.

  5. Property Status of Lunar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, V.

    Most of the lunar material in private hands is of meteoric origin, and its property sta- tus does not present many challenges. The intention of Applied Space Resources, Inc, to fly a commercial lunar sample return mission and to subsequently offer lunar ma- terial for sale, raises the issue of the legality of exploitation and private ownership of retrieved lunar material. Lunar samples have been returned in the past by means of the Apollo (US) and Luna (USSR) missions and, while most of the material re- mains government property and is used for scientific means, a small fraction has been transferred abroad and some has entered the private market. Apollo-collected moon- rocks have been offered, symbolically, to heads of States, and some foreign nations have subsequently transferred ownership to private individuals. The same, lunar ma- terial of Soviet provenience has entered the private market, this forming a valuable legal precedent for the lawfulness of sale of lunar material. Recently, plans were made public to award the Apollo astronauts with lunar rocks. While in the US there is a popular misconception that it is illegal to own lunar material, the truth lies elsewhere. As the Apollo samples are the property of the US government and a small fraction was stolen, lost, or misplaced, the US government intends to recover this material, unlawfully owned. In the same time, a significant number of individuals have been prosecuted for offering for sale fake lunar rocks. The present paper will analyse the different categories of lunar material according to its ownership status, and will as- sert that private property of lunar material is lawful, and lunar material that will be returned in the future will be able to enter the market without hindrances.

  6. Materials with controllable signature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, O.; Holmberg, B.; Karlsson, T.; Savage, S.

    1995-02-01

    We have in this report considered some types of material with potential for use in signature control of structures. The material types selected for inclusion in this study were electrically conductive polymers, fullerenes, nanostructured materials and Langmuir-Blodgett films. To control the signature of a structure in real time it must be possible to vary the material emissivity, structural transmission, and reflection or absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the relevant wavelength region. This may be achieved by changes in temperature, pressure, electrical or magnetic field or by the concentration of a chemical substance within the material. It is concluded that it is feasible to develop electrically conductive polymeric materials with controllable properties for practical signature control application within 5 to 10 years.

  7. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  8. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  9. Thermal properties of granulated materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, A. E.; Glaser, P. E.; Fountain, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the thermophysical properties of granular materials or silicates believed to simulate the lunar surface layer. Emphasis is placed on thermal conductivity data and the effects of material and environmental variables on the thermal conductivity. There are three basic mechanisms of heat transfer in particulate materials: conduction by the gas contained in the void spaces between the particles; conduction within the solid particles and across the interparticle contacts; and thermal radiation within the particles, across the void spaces between particle surfaces, and between void spaces themselves. Gas and solid conduction, thermal radiation, and the interaction between conduction and radiation are considered.

  10. Materials Properties Research at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presson, Joan B.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    MSFC is currently planning, organizing and directing test coupon fabrication and subsequent CTE testing for two mirror materials of specific interest to the AMSD and NGST programs, Beryllium 0-30H (Be 0-30H) and Ultra Low Expansion glass (ULE). The ULE test coupons are being fabricated at MSFC from AMSD core residuals provided by Kodak, The Be 0-30H test coupons are being fabricated at Brush Wellman using residuals from the SBMD. Both sets of test coupons will be sent to a test vendor selected through the NASA competitive proposal process with the test results being provided by written report to MSFC by the end of the fiscal year. The test results will become model input data for the AMSD analysts, both MSFC and contractor, providing an enhancement to the historical CTE data currently available.

  11. Material properties of ceramics for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Janet Bernice

    2000-12-01

    Ceramic tooth-replacement materials have been greatly improved since their introduction near the end of the eighteenth century, but still have problems concerning clinical performance and aesthetics. Material property testing has advanced as well as the ability to form new dental ceramics. The purpose of this study was to test some of the new materials according to recently developed standards, and to utilize the results to better understand, predict and determine how to improve dental material performance and machinability. Aspects of this study include unique applications of testing methodology and the development of a new edge chipping test. A new brittleness parameter, B, is introduced. Unlike previously suggested brittleness parameters, B has theoretical significance as a volume energy to surface energy ratio. The ascertained properties were used to evaluate the dental ceramics. Toughness-related parameters were important in the clinical results, and correlations with microstructural characteristics indicate potential improvements as well as limitations. A good fit to a model predicting toughness increases with grain size, for example, suggests processing-induced thermal mismatch stresses as a toughening mechanism in glass-ceramics. Stresses that are too high, however, can result in local microcracking and a decrease in toughness. Machinability is of particular importance in fabricating dental components, which have complicated shapes and tight tolerances. As there is no currently accepted quantitative definition of machinability, a subjective analysis involving professional machinists and a regression analysis was used. Material properties and a theoretical model for material removal rates, based on lateral crack formation, were compared with the subjective machinability rankings. Although there were differences among the machinists' criteria, hardness was found to be the single most effective property in predicting machinability. High temperature properties

  12. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  13. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700/cm) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K germanium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing, and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  14. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-03-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K germanium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  15. Satellite Material Contaminant Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Bertrand, William T.; Seiber, Bryan L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, Patrick M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. This paper presents infrared (4000 to 700 cm-1) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contants determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  16. Material properties for asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck Syal, M.; Bernier, J.; Chen, L.; Coppari, F.; Dearborn, D.; Herbold, E.; Howley, K.; Kraus, R.; Kumar, M.; Millot, M.; Owen, J. M.; Swift, D.; Wasem, J.; Mulford, R.; Root, S.; Cotto-Figueroa, D.; Asphaug, E.; Schultz, P.; Nuth, J.; Arnold, J.; Burkhard, C.; Dotson, J.; Lee, T.; Sears, D.; Miller, P.

    2015-06-01

    Impulsive strategies to prevent asteroid impacts depend upon knowledge of asteroidal material state and response at extreme conditions. Numerical modeling of kinetic impactor and nuclear ablation scenarios to deflect or disrupt asteroids reveals sensitivities to equation of state, strength, and porosity. We report advances in material models for asteroid mitigation simulations. Equation of state development focuses on asteroidal materials, such as hydrated silicates. Shock experiments are being performed to measure properties of meteoritic material; initial sample temperature can be controlled from 100-1000 K, important for different intercept scenarios. New constitutive models allow improved thermomechanical response predictions for porous asteroids. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Wise, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Controlled impact methods have been employed to obtain dynamic response properties of armor materials. Experimental data have been obtained for high-strength ceramics. Continued analysis of time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements has produced systematic material-property data for Hugoniot and release response, initial and post-yield strength, pressure-induced phase transformation, and dynamic fracture strength. A new technique has been developed to measure hydrodynamic properties of ceramic through shock-wave experiments on metal-ceramic composites and data obtained for silicon carbide. Additional data on several titanium diboride ceramics and high-quality aluminum oxide ceramic have been acquired, and issues regarding the influence of microstructure on dynamic properties have emerged. Comparison of dynamic (Hugoniot elastic limit) strength and indentation hardness data has been performed and important correlations revealed. Innovative impact experiments on confined and unconfined alumina rods using axial and transverse VISAR diagnostics have been demonstrated which permit acquisition of multiaxial dynamic response data. Dynamic failure properties of a high-density aluminosilicate glass, similar in composition to the intergranular glassy phase of some aluminas, have been investigated with regard to yield, spall, and failure-wave propagation.

  18. Electrostatic testing of thin plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1988-01-01

    Ten thin plastic materials (Velostat, RCAS 1200, Llumalloy, Herculite 80, RCAS 2400, Wrightlon 7000, PVC, Aclar 22A, Mylar, and Polyethylene) were tested for electrostatic properties by four different devices: (1) The static decay meter, (2) the manual triboelectric testing device, (3) the robotic triboelectric testing device, and (4) the resistivity measurement adapter device. The static decay meter measured the electrostatic decay rates in accordance with the Federal Test Method Standard 101B, Method 4046. The manual and the robotic triboelectric devices measured the triboelectric generated peak voltages and the five-second decay voltages in accordance with the criteria for acceptance standards at Kennedy Space Center. The resistivity measurement adapter measured the surface resistivity of each material. An analysis was made to correlate the data among the four testing devices. For the material tested the pass/fail results were compared for the 4046 method and the triboelectric testing devices. For the limited number of materials tested, the relationship between decay rate and surface resistivity was investigated as well as the relationship between triboelectric peak voltage and surface resistivity.

  19. Properties of five toughened matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of toughened matrix composite materials offers an attractive solution to the problem of poor damage tolerance associated with advanced composite materials. In this study, the unidirectional laminate strengths and moduli, notched (open-hole) and unnotched tension and compression properties of quasi-isotropic laminates, and compression-after-impact strengths of five carbon fiber/toughened matrix composites, IM7/E7T1-2, IM7/X1845, G40-800X/5255-3, IM7/5255-3, and IM7/5260 have been evaluated. The compression-after-impact (CAI) strengths were determined primarily by impacting quasi-isotropic laminates with the NASA Langley air gun. A few CAI tests were also made with a drop-weight impactor. For a given impact energy, compression after impact strengths were determined to be dependent on impactor velocity. Properties and strengths for the five materials tested are compared with NASA data on other toughened matrix materials (IM7/8551-7, IM6/1808I, IM7/F655, and T800/F3900). This investigation found that all five materials were stronger and more impact damage tolerant than more brittle carbon/epoxy composite materials currently used in aircraft structures.

  20. The impact of bone and suture material properties on mandibular function in Alligator mississippiensis: testing theoretical phenotypes with finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reed, David A; Porro, Laura B; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Lemberg, Justin B; Holliday, Casey M; Anapol, Fred; Ross, Callum F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The functional effects of bone and suture stiffness were considered here using finite element models representing three different theoretical phenotypes of an Alligator mississippiensis mandible. The models were loaded using force estimates derived from muscle architecture in dissected specimens, constrained at the 18th and 19th teeth in the upper jaw and 19th tooth of the lower jaw, as well as at the quadrate-articular joint. Stiffness was varied systematically in each theoretical phenotype. The three theoretical phenotypes included: (i) linear elastic isotropic bone of varying stiffness and no sutures; (ii) linear elastic orthotropic bone of varying stiffness with no sutures; and (iii) linear elastic isotropic bone of a constant stiffness with varying suture stiffness. Variation in the isotropic material properties of bone primarily resulted in changes in the magnitude of principal strain. By comparison, variation in the orthotropic material properties of bone and isotropic material properties of sutures resulted in: a greater number of bricks becoming either more compressive or more tensile, changing between being either dominantly compressive or tensile, and having larger changes in the orientation of maximum principal strain. These data indicate that variation in these model properties resulted in changes to the strain regime of the model, highlighting the importance of using biologically verified material properties when modeling vertebrate bones. When bones were compared within each set, the response of each to changing material properties varied. In two of the 12 bones in the mandible, varied material properties within sutures resulted in a decrease in the magnitude of principal strain in bricks adjacent to the bone/suture interface and decreases in stored elastic energy. The varied response of the mandibular bones to changes in suture stiffness highlights the importance of defining the appropriate functional unit when addressing relationships of

  1. Thermal expansion properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.; Mackey, G. B.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal expansion data for several composite materials, including generic epoxy resins, various graphite, boron, and glass fibers, and unidirectional and woven fabric composites in an epoxy matrix, were compiled. A discussion of the design, material, environmental, and fabrication properties affecting thermal expansion behavior is presented. Test methods and their accuracy are discussed. Analytical approaches to predict laminate coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) based on lamination theory and micromechanics are also included. A discussion is included of methods of tuning a laminate to obtain a near-zero CTE for space applications.

  2. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  3. Nondestructive Material Testing Using OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stifter, D.

    The fact that optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides information on internal structures of scattering tissue in a noninvasive way has led to a broad acceptance of OCT for dedicated biomedical imaging and diagnostics applications. Outside the biomedical field, an irreversible alteration of an object under investigation by the characterization method itself is likewise undesirable, especially in the case that such an object has to be further used with its original state maintained. For this purpose, a variety of so-called nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is nowadays at hand,with OCT as novel technique exhibiting a huge potential to add valuable contributions to nondestructive testing and evaluation of semitransparent, scattering materials with structural features on the micron scale. Therefore, within this chapter, a broad range of applications for OCT in NDT is presented, ranging from examples of industrial quality control over classification and authentication tasks to the evaluation of materials in research and development.The individual applications are listed according to the category of information obtained from the individual measurements, starting with the evaluation of the pure surface structure, proceeding to thickness measurements of layered systems, to imaging of internal 3D structures and finally leading to the determination of functional information.

  4. Handbook of photothermal test data on encapsulant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.; Oda, K. L.; Chung, S. Y.; Smith, M. V.; Gupta, A.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory tests performed to characterize candidate encapsulation materials with respect to changes in their physical and chemical properties caused by photothermal aging are described. Several key material properties relating directly to material degradation and deterioration of performance were identified and were monitored as functions of aging conditions and time. A status report on accelerated testing activities is provided and experimental data are presented. It will be updated periodically as more data become available.

  5. Material properties of common suture materials in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Najibi, S; Banglmeier, R; Matta, Jm; Tannast, M

    2010-01-01

    Suture materials in orthopaedic surgery are used for closure of wounds, repair of fascia, muscles, tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, and cerclage or tension band of certain fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of eleven commonly used sutures in orthopaedic surgery. Three types of braided non-absorbable and one type of braided absorbable suture material with different calibers (n=77) underwent biomechanical testing for maximum load to failure, strain, and stiffness. All samples were tied by one surgeon with a single SMC (Seoul Medical Center) knot and three square knots. The maximum load to failure and strain were highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #0 Ethibond Excel (p<0.001). The stiffness was highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #2-0 Vicryl (p<0.001). In all samples, the failure of the suture material occurred at the knot There was no slippage of the knot in any of the samples tested. This data will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in selection and application of appropriate suture materials and calibers to specific tasks. PMID:21045977

  6. MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF COMMON SUTURE MATERIALS IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Najibi, S; Banglmeier, R; Matta, JM; Tannast, M

    2010-01-01

    Suture materials in orthopaedic surgery are used for closure of wounds, repair of fascia, muscles, tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, and cerclage or tension band of certain fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of eleven commonly used sutures in orthopaedic surgery. Three types of braided non-absorbable and one type of braided absorbable suture material with different calibers (n=77) underwent biomechanical testing for maximum load to failure, strain, and stiffness. All samples were tied by one surgeon with a single SMC (Seoul Medical Center) knot and three square knots. The maximum load to failure and strain were highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #0 Ethibond Excel (p<0.001). The stiffness was highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #2-0 Vicryl (p<0.001). In all samples, the failure of the suture material occurred at the knot There was no slippage of the knot in any of the samples tested. This data will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in selection and application of appropriate suture materials and calibers to specific tasks. PMID:21045977

  7. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grande

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  8. Thermal Systems and Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    During my internship, I was involved in Boeing Thermal System/M&P, which handles maintenance and repairs of shuttle tiles, blankets, gap fillers, etc. One project I took part in was the revision of TPS-227, a repair process to tiles that entailed drilling out tile damage and using a cylindrical insert to fill the hole. The previous specification used minimal adhesive for application and when the adhesive cured, there would be several voids in the adhered material, causing an unsatisfactory bond. The testing compared several new methods and I analyzed the number of voids produced by each method to determine which one was most effective at eliminating void space. We revised the original process to apply a light adhesive coat to the top 25% of the borehole and a heavy coat to 100% of the insert. I was also responsible for maintaining the subnominal bond database, which records all unsatisfactory SIP (Strain Isolator Pad) bonds. I then archived each SIP physically for future referral data and statistics. In addition, I performed post-flight tile inspections for damages and wrote dispositions to have these tiles repaired. This also included writing a post-flight damage report for a section of Atlantis and creating summarized repair process guidelines for orbiter technicians.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF DAMAGED ENERGETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Hust, G; Dehaven, M; Chidester, S; Glascoe, L; Hoffman, M; Maienschein, J L

    2010-03-10

    We recently conducted damaged experiments on three explosives (mechanical damage on LX-04 and thermal experiments on HPP and PBXN-9) and characterized the effect of damage on some material properties. The MTS equipment was used to apply compressive cycling to LX-04 pressed parts and the results showed that older LX-04 parts became mechanically weaker than newer parts. After repeated compressive cycling for over 20,000 times, older LX-04 parts failed but newer LX-04 parts survived. Thermal insults were applied to PBXN-9 and HPP at 180 C and 200 C, respectively in unconfined conditions for several hours. The thermally-damaged HPP sample suffered 12.0% weight losses and a volume expansion of 20% was observed. Porosity of the damaged HPP increased to 25% after thermal exposure, which led to higher gas permeability. Burn rates of damaged PBXN-9 were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of pristine samples but burn rates of damaged HPP were only slightly higher than those of pristine HPP. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability at high temperatures were made on HPP samples and the results showed that the gas permeability increased by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude.

  10. Property Data Summaries for Advanced Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 150 NIST Property Data Summaries for Advanced Materials (Web, free access)   Property Data Summaries are topical collections of property values derived from surveys of published data. Thermal, mechanical, structural, and chemical properties are included in the collections.

  11. Property testing of unitary operators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Guoming

    2011-11-15

    In this paper, we systematically study property testing of unitary operators. We first introduce a distance measure that reflects the average difference between unitary operators. Then we show that, with respect to this distance measure, the orthogonal group, quantum juntas (i.e., unitary operators that only nontrivially act on a few qubits of the system), and the Clifford group can be all efficiently tested. In fact, their testing algorithms have query complexities independent of the system's size and have only one-sided error. Then we give an algorithm that tests any finite subset of the unitary group, and demonstrate an application of this algorithm to the permutation group. This algorithm also has one-sided error and polynomial query complexity, but it is unknown whether it can be efficiently implemented in general.

  12. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  13. Synthesis of new materials with properties ameliorated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baira, F.; Benfarhi, S.; Zidani, S.

    2012-09-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer in nature. It is used mainly for the production of paper bet also as a reinforcement in the polymer matrixes[1]. The modification of this polysaccharide presents a great interest, for it is the main constituent of agricultural wastes. It is well known that the microcrystalline cellulose gives, after chemical modification, new biodegradable materials[2], which may be used, for instance, for packaging. The esterification of cellulose necessitates an acid pretreatment which makes hydroxyl groups more accessible by breaking hydrogen bonds. X-rays diffraction analysis showed a feeble diminution of the treated samples cristallinity[3]. Cellulose, activated in this way, is esterified in a classic way in DMF, in the presence of triethylamine, LiCl and acid chloride at 60C° for 24 hours[4]. The obtained ester is precipitated in MeOH. The residue, dissolved in CHCl3, gives after evaporation in the open air, a plastic film surface. The water drop test has shown the hydrophobe properties of the plastic film surface. Our work is the study of the preparation of composite materials from the basis of their derivatives. Well as the study of the photopolymerisation kinetic, and the chemical degradation. The obtained films were analyzed by IR-TF, and the volumetrie[5,6]. As a conclusion, we have prepared composite materials with improved properties with reference to the matrix alone.

  14. Large scale Hugoniot material properties for Danby Marble

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, E.J.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation experiments of nuclear underground testing carried out using the HYDROPLUS methodology for yield verifications of non-standard tests. The objective of this test series was to demonstrate the accuracy of stress and velocity measurements in hard, low porosity rock, to obtain comparisons of large-scale material properties with those obtained from laboratory testing of the same material, and to address the problems posed by a material having a clear precursor wave preceding the main shock wave. The test series consisted of three individual experimental tests. The first established material properties of the Danby marble selected for use in the experiments. The second and third tests looked at stress and velocity gage errors obtained when gages were placed in boreholes and grouted into place.

  15. Fire tests for airplane interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tustin, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    Large scale, simulated fire tests of aircraft interior materials were carried out in salvaged airliner fuselage. Two "design" fire sources were selected: Jet A fuel ignited in fuselage midsection and trash bag fire. Comparison with six established laboratory fire tests show that some laboratory tests can rank materials according to heat and smoke production, but existing tests do not characterize toxic gas emissions accurately. Report includes test parameters and test details.

  16. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing of Spacesuit Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sarah; Gallus, Tim; Tapia, Susana; Ball, Elizabeth; Beeson, Harold

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on electrical arc ignition testing of spacesuit materials is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Test Objectives; 3) Test Sample Materials; 4) Test Methods; 5) Scratch Test Objectives; 6) Cotton Scratch Test Video; 7) Scratch Test Results; 8) Entire Date Plot; 9) Closeup Data Plot; 10) Scratch Test Problems; 11) Poke Test Objectives; 12) Poke Test Results; 13) Poke Test Problems; 14) Wire-break Test Objectives; 15) Cotton Wire-Break Test Video; 16) High Speed Cotton Wire-break Test Video; 17) Typical Data Plot; 18) Closeup Data Plot; 19) Wire-break Test Results; 20) Wire-break Tests vs. Scratch Tests; 21) Urethane-coated Nylon; and 22) Moleskin.

  17. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  18. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1994-08-02

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

  19. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1994-01-01

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges.

  20. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  1. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  2. SNLL materials testing compression facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, W.A.; Brandon, S.L.; Korellis, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This report explains software enhancements and fixture modifications which expand the capabilities of a servo-hydraulic test system to include static computer-controlled ''constant true strain rate'' compression testing on cylindrical specimens. True strains in excess of -1.0 are accessible. Special software features include schemes to correct for system compliance and the ability to perform strain-rate changes; all software for test control and data acquisition/reduction is documented.

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Eighteenth quarterly progress report, August 12-November 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Davis, M.

    1980-12-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. A survey was made of elastomers for use as gaskets for the photovoltaic module. Of the wide variety of materials examined EPDM offered the optimum combination of low compression set and low cost. The preference for EPDM is borne out by its long history of use as an automobile gasket. The commercial availability of materials that would be useful for sealants between the edge of the module and the gasket was investigated. Butyl sealants have the best combination of physical properties, low cost and a well-documented history of performance. A preferred composition has not yet been identified. One laminating type pottant ethylene/methyl acrylate copolymer (EMA), and two casting polymers, polybutyl acrylate and polyurethane, have been under investigation this past quarter. An EMA formulation has been developed which is easily extrudable and cures to a high gel content. So far only one commercial US source (Quinn) of aliphatic polyurethane has been located. Work is continuing to improve reaction rate as well as to eliminate source(s) of bubble formation during module fabrication. Considerable effort was spent in developing an improved polybutyl acrylate casting formulation providing high gel. Many viable curing systems are now available: however, the best formulation considering physical properties, freedom from bubbles as well as cure time utilizes Lupersol II (aliphatic peroxide) initiator. This initiator gives the desired gel after 20 minute cure at 45/sup 0/C or 12 minute cure at 55/sup 0/C.

  4. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of... test for the membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be submitted to the Commandant...

  5. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  6. Database for the Tribological Properties of Self-Lubricating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T. R.; Thom, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    A test program to determine the tribological properties of several self-lubricating composites was performed. Testing was done using an LFW-1 Friction and Wear machine. Each material was tested at four load levels (66 N, 133 N, 266 N, and 400 N) under ambient conditions. The coefficient of friction and wear rate was determined for each material, and a relative ranking of the composites was made.

  7. Materials Compatibility Testing in Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, R.; Bromley, G.; Mason, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; McNeal, C.; Lyles, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Materials test methods from the 1960's have been used as a starting point in evaluating materials for today's space launch vehicles. These established test methods have been modified to incorporate today's analytical laboratory equipment. The Orbital test objective was to test a wide range of materials to incorporate the revolution in polymer and composite materials that has occurred since the 1960's. Testing is accomplished in 3 stages from rough screening to detailed analytical tests. Several interesting test observations have been made during this testing and are included in the paper. A summary of the set-up, test and evaluation of long-term storage sub-scale tanks is also included. This sub-scale tank test lasted for a 7-month duration prior to being stopped due to a polar boss material breakdown. Chemical evaluations of the hydrogen peroxide and residue left on the polar boss surface identify the material breakdown quite clearly. The paper concludes with recommendations for future testing and a specific effort underway within the industry to standardize the test methods used in evaluating materials.

  8. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity fire behaviour remains poorly understood and a significant risk for spaceflight An experiment is under development that will provide the first real opportunity to examine this issue focussing on two objectives: a) Flame Spread. b) Material Flammability. This experiment has been shown to be feasible on both ESA's ATV and Orbital Science's Cygnus vehicles with the Cygnus as the current base-line carrier. An international topical team has been formed to develop concepts for that experiment and support its implementation: a) Pressure Rise prediction. b) Sample Material Selection. This experiment would be a landmark for spacecraft fire safety with the data and subsequent analysis providing much needed verification of spacecraft fire safety protocols for the crews of future exploration vehicles and habitats.

  9. Exploring the influence of loading geometry on the plastic flow properties of geological materials: Results from combined torsion + axial compression tests on calcite rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey-Crump, S. J.; Xiao, W. F.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; May, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    For technical reasons, virtually all plastic deformation experiments on geological materials have been performed in either pure shear or simple shear. These special case loading geometries are rather restrictive for those seeking insight into how microstructure evolves under the more general loading geometries that occur during natural deformation. Moreover, they are insufficient to establish how plastic flow properties might vary with the 3rd invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor (J3) which describes the stress configuration, and so applications that use those flow properties (e.g. glaciological and geodynamical modelling) may be correspondingly compromised. We describe an inexpensive and relatively straightforward modification to the widely used Paterson rock deformation apparatus that allows torsion experiments to be performed under simultaneously applied axial loads. We illustrate the performance of this modification with the results of combined stress experiments performed on Carrara marble and Solnhofen limestone at 500°-600 °C and confining pressures of 300 MPa. The flow stresses are best described by the Drucker yield function which includes J3-dependence. However, that J3-dependence is small. Hence for these initially approximately isotropic calcite rocks, flow stresses are adequately described by the J3-independent von Mises yield criterion that is widely used in deformation modelling. Loading geometry does, however, have a profound influence on the type and rate of development of crystallographic preferred orientation, and hence of mechanical anisotropy. The apparatus modification extends the range of loading geometries that can be used to investigate microstructural evolution, as well as providing greater scope for determining the shape of the yield surface in plastically anisotropic materials.

  10. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Twenty-third quarterly progress report for period ending February 12, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.; Baum, B.

    1982-04-01

    During the past quarter technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings. These treatments have been applied to Sunadex glass, Tedlar and oriented acrylic film. The treatments are based on silicone, acrylic, and fluorosilane chemistries. After one year of outdoor exposure, the most effective treatment of Sunadex glass appears to be a fluorosilane designated L-1668, and for both the organic films a silane modified adduct of perfluoric acid gave the best results. After one year of time there is evidence that the treatments are slowly being lost and consequently a maintenance schedule may be required to maintain effectiveness over long periods of time. An accelerated aging test program is underway for the dual purpose of generating practical and empirical data relating to the service life of candidate encapsulation materials, and to provide data that may be useful in a predictive type of analysis.

  11. Investigations of test methods, material properties, and processes, for solar-cell encapsulants. Twenty-second quarterly progress report for period ending November 12, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Investigations were continued into pottants, soil resistant coatings and low cost substrate materials. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups for use as solar module pottants were evaluated for suitability on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics. One formulation was selected as being acceptable for industrial evaluation. This urethane is characterized by high transparency, low mix viscosity, fast cure time and surprising lack of moisture sensitivity that has given trouble with previous urethane compositions. This material is produced with an ultraviolet stabilizer system already blended in. An experimental program was continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings. These treatments have been applied to Sunadex glass, Tedlar and oriented acrylic film. The treatments are based on silicone, acrylic and fluorosilane chemistries. Test specimens are being exposed to outdoor soiling conditions with subsequent testing for short circuit-current loss using a standard cell device. After nine months of outdoor exposure, the most effective treatment appears to be a silane modified adduct of perfluorodecanoic acid. The degree of soiling also appears to correlate to the amount of rainfall that results in a natural cleaning of the surface. Wood products, such as hardboard, are potentially the lowest cost candidate substrates identified to date. The difficulty with the use of these materials lies in the very high hygroscopic expansion coefficients. Periods of dryout followed by subsequent moisture regain results in large expansions and contractions that result in cell fracture. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings to prevent this effect. Both metal foils and organic films bonded to the hardboard with appropriate adhesives were found to dramatically decrease the hygroscopic response and lower the expansion coefficient by four orders of magnitude.

  12. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  13. Fundamental properties of semiconductor materials, and material performance in detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for determining fundamental properties of semiconductor materials, their performance as radiation detectors, and their service life as such detectors are given. Relationships were established between the minority carrier lifetime in the bulk of the material and the charge collection efficiency of the detector.

  14. Learning targeted materials properties from data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Turab; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Dezhen, Xue; Theiler, James; Hogden, John

    We compare several strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young's (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The strategy is decomposed into two steps: a regressor is trained to predict elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the results.

  15. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  16. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  17. Quarantine testing and biocharacterization of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Mieszkuc, B. J.; Simmonds, R. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Quarantine testing was conducted to ensure the safety of all life on earth. The plants and animals which were exposed to lunar material were carefully observed for prolonged periods to determine if any mutation or changes in growing characteristics and behavior occurred. The quarantine testing was terminated after the Apollo 14 flight when it became apparent that previously returned lunar material contained no potentially harmful agents. Further biological experimentation with the lunar material was conducted to determine its chemical, physical, and nutritional qualities.

  18. Investigation of test methods material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Fifteenth quarterly progress report, November 12, 1979-February 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1980-03-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Work performed during this quarter included the development of anti-blocking treatments for EVA sheet intended for use as a lamination pottant. Initial evaluation studies were begun on a new pottant compound, polybutyl acrylate, to assess its preparation and handling characteristics. Corrosion studies using a standard salt spray test wre conducted to determine the degree of protection afforded to a number of metals when encapsulated in candidate pottant compounds. Pottants and outer cover candidates were exposed to intervals of accelerated uv stress aging using the RS/4 fluorescent sunlamp. Results are discussed. (WHK)

  19. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  20. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  1. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevant performance properties of new materials as they are discovered and tested.

  2. 14 CFR 29.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... § 29.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical...

  3. 14 CFR 27.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Material strength properties and design....613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical basis....

  4. 14 CFR 29.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... § 29.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical...

  5. 14 CFR 27.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material strength properties and design....613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical basis....

  6. 14 CFR 29.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... § 29.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical...

  7. 14 CFR 29.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... § 29.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical...

  8. 14 CFR 27.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and design....613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical basis....

  9. 14 CFR 23.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... Design and Construction § 23.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on...

  10. 14 CFR 27.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and design....613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on a statistical basis....

  11. 14 CFR 23.613 - Material strength properties and design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and design... Design and Construction § 23.613 Material strength properties and design values. (a) Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material meeting specifications to establish design values on...

  12. Emergent properties of magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliff, William Davis, II

    In Tolstoy's War and Peace, history is presented as a tapestry spun from the daily interactions of large numbers of individuals. Even if one understands individuals, it is very difficult to predict history. Similarly, the interactions of large numbers of electrons give rise to properties that one would not initially guess from their microscopic interactions. During the course of my dissertation, I have explored emergent phenomena in a number of contexts. In ZnCr2O4, geometric frustration gives rise to a plethora of equivalent ground states. From these, a lower dimensional set of collinear spins on hexagons are selected to form the building blocks of the lattice. In MgTi2O4, quantum spins dimerize and form a unique chiral ordering pattern on the spinel lattice. Descending into two dimensions, differences in size and charge give rise to an ordering between triangular layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic ions. This triangular lattice allows for the possibility of observing the RVB spin liquid state, or perhaps a valence bond crystal and initial measurements are promising. Also, on the spinel lattice, ionic ordering gives rise to one dimensional chains with their own interesting physics. Finally, in the SrCoxTi1-x O3, system we find that upon reduction, tiny clusters of Co metal precipitate out and chemical inhomogeneity on the microscale may determine much of the physics. This has relevance to a number of recent claims of room temperature ferromagnism in dilute magnetic systems. In all of these systems, complex behavior emerges from well understood microscopic behavior. For me, this is the fascination of strongly correlated electronic systems.

  13. Frictional Ignition Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Steve; Rosales, Keisa; Robinson, Michael J.; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The space flight community has been investigating lightweight composite materials for use in propellant tanks for both liquid and gaseous oxygen for space flight vehicles. The use of these materials presents some risks pertaining to ignition and burning hazards in the presence of oxygen. Through hazard analysis process, some ignition mechanisms have been identified as being potentially credible. One of the ignition mechanisms was reciprocal friction; however, test data do not exist that could be used to clear or fail these types of materials as "oxygen compatible" for the reciprocal friction ignition mechanism. Therefore, testing was performed at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to provide data to evaluate this ignition mechanism. This paper presents the test system, approach, data results, and findings of the reciprocal friction testing performed on composite sample materials being considered for propellant tanks.

  14. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  15. Space simulation test for thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardgrove, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Tests were run in TRW's Combined Environment Facility to examine the degradation of thermal control materials in a simulated space environment. Thermal control materials selected for the test were those presently being used on spacecraft or predicted to be used within the next few years. The geosynchronous orbit environment was selected as the most interesting. One of the goals was to match degradation of those materials with available flight data. Another aim was to determine if degradation can adequately be determined with accelerated or short term ground tests.

  16. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  17. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  18. From Microstructures to Predict Properties of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Gang

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the precise and fundamental manner in which materials structures (nanostructures or microstructures) and their evolution influences properties and service lifetimes of advanced materials profoundly impacts material design and today materials design plays an increasingly important rôle in many engineering applications. Linking structures to properties and predicting properties of materials is fundamental step for materials design. First, a framework of applications of multiscale modeling to property prediction of advanced materials will be briefly presented. As an example, a methodology will be shown to link micro-scale to the continuum scale, integrating microstructure modeling with the large Thermo-Calc^ database. This paradigm was successfully applied to the case of Fe-12Ni-6Mn maraging steel. Next, methodology for integrating first-principle calculation into simulations of microstructure evolution will be reviewed. Our methods are sufficiently reliable to permit control and fabrication of quantum-dots structures, nanocrystals, and particle-reinforced nanocomposites, as well as assist in the predictive behavior of macro-scale colloids, aerosols, and other soft matter systems.

  19. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  20. Tactual perception of liquid material properties.

    PubMed

    Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, studies into the tactual perception of two liquid material properties, viscosity and wetness, are reviewed. These properties are very relevant in the context of interaction with liquids, both real, such as cosmetics or food products, and simulated, as in virtual reality or teleoperation. Both properties have been the subject of psychophysical characterisation in terms of magnitude estimation experiments and discrimination experiments, which are discussed. For viscosity, both oral and manual perception is discussed, as well as the perception of the viscosity of a mechanical system. For wetness, the relevant cues are identified and factors affecting perception are discussed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn pertaining to both properties.

  1. Tactual perception of liquid material properties.

    PubMed

    Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, studies into the tactual perception of two liquid material properties, viscosity and wetness, are reviewed. These properties are very relevant in the context of interaction with liquids, both real, such as cosmetics or food products, and simulated, as in virtual reality or teleoperation. Both properties have been the subject of psychophysical characterisation in terms of magnitude estimation experiments and discrimination experiments, which are discussed. For viscosity, both oral and manual perception is discussed, as well as the perception of the viscosity of a mechanical system. For wetness, the relevant cues are identified and factors affecting perception are discussed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn pertaining to both properties. PMID:25128819

  2. Thermal protection materials: Thermophysical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    This publication presents a thermophysical property survey on materials that could potentially be used for future spacecraft thermal protection systems (TPS). This includes data that was reported in the 1960's as well as more current information reported through the 1980's. An attempt was made to cite the manufacturers as well as the data source in the bibliography. This volume represents an attempt to provide in a single source a complete set of thermophysical data on a large variety of materials used in spacecraft TPS analysis. The property data is divided into two categories: ablative and reusable. The ablative materials have been compiled into twelve categories that are descriptive of the material composition. An attempt was made to define the Arrhenius equation for each material although this data may not be available for some materials. In a similar manner, char data may not be available for some of the ablative materials. The reusable materials have been divided into three basic categories: thermal protection materials (such as insulators), adhesives, and structural materials.

  3. Explosive materials equivalency, test methods and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koger, D. M.; Mcintyre, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to concepts of explosive equivalency of energetic materials based on specific airblast parameters. A description is provided of a wide bandwidth high accuracy instrumentation system which has been used extensively in obtaining pressure time profiles of energetic materials. The object of the considered test method is to determine the maximum output from the detonation of explosive materials in terms of airblast overpressure and positive impulse. The measured pressure and impulse values are compared with known characteristics of hemispherical TNT data to determine the equivalency of the test material in relation to TNT. An investigation shows that meaningful comparisons between various explosives and a standard reference material such as TNT should be based upon the same parameters. The tests should be conducted under the same conditions.

  4. Sludge stabilization boat material test plan

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-04-05

    This document provides instructions for testing different types of potential boat materials in the HC-21C muffle furnace process. The boats must withstand corrosive environments at up to 1000 degrees C.

  5. Ares I-X USS Material Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). Material characterization tests were conducted to quantify the material behavior for use in the CIFS analyses. Fatigue crack growth rate, Charpy impact, and fracture tests were conducted on the parent and welded A516 Grade 70 steel. The crack growth rate tests confirmed that the material behaved in agreement with literature data and that a salt water environment would not significantly degrade the fatigue resistance. The Charpy impact tests confirmed that the fracture resistance of the material did not have a significant reduction for the expected operational temperatures of the vehicle.

  6. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  7. Material Property Characterization of AS4/VRM-34 Textile Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Johnston, William M

    2013-01-01

    Several material properties (modulus, strengths, and fracture toughness) of a textile composite have been evaluated to provide input data to analytical models of Pultruded Rod Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS). The material system is based on warp-knitted preforms of AS4 carbon fibers and VRM-34 epoxy resin, which have been processed via resin infusion and oven curing. Tensile, compressive, shear, and fracture toughness properties have been measured at ambient and elevated temperatures. All specimens were tested in as-fabricated (dry) condition. Specimens were tested with and without through-thickness stitching.

  8. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  9. Electronic materials testing in commercial aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Dieter

    A device for the electronic testing of materials used in commercial aircraft engines is described. The instrument can be used for ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, and nonferromagnetic metallic materials, and it functions either optically or acoustically. The design of the device is described and technical data are given. The device operates under the principle of controlled self-inductivity. Its mode of operation is described.

  10. Material properties study of the MJ-2 grout

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.B.

    1988-08-01

    Material properties experimental tests using the high pressure testing equipment at LLNL have been performed on the grout used in the Mini Jade-2 event (MJ-2) as part of a high pressure equation of state study sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency in support of the Misty Echo experiment at the Nevada Test Site. The material properties tests performed at LLNL and included in this report are (1) pressure-volume compression studies to 3.6 GPa, (2) pressure-volume compression and unloading studies to /approximately/1 GPa, and (3) material strength versus confining pressure to /approximately/1 GPa. These data are compared with dynamic results and with other static data using this grout. 4 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  12. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  13. Understanding and Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of LIGA Fabricated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Lavan, D.A.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-25

    LIGA fabricated materials and components exhibit several processing issues affecting their metallurgical and mechanical properties, potentially limiting their usefulness for MEMS applications. For example, LIGA processing by metal electrodeposition is very sensitive to deposition conditions which causes significant processing lot variations of mechanical and metallurgical properties. Furthermore, the process produces a material with a highly textured lenticular rnicrostructural morphology suggesting an anisotropic material response. Understanding and controlling out-of-plane anisotropy is desirable for LIGA components designed for out-of-plane flexures. Previous work by the current authors focused on results from a miniature servo-hydraulic mechanical test frame constructed for characterizing LIGA materials. Those results demonstrated microstructural and mechanical properties dependencies with plating bath current density in LIGA fabricated nickel (LIGA Ni). This presentation builds on that work and fosters a methodology for controlling the properties of LIGA fabricated materials through processing. New results include measurement of mechanical properties of LIGA fabricated copper (LIGA Cu), out-of-plane and localized mechanical property measurements using compression testing and nanoindentation of LIGA Ni and LIGA Cu.

  14. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  15. Corona And Ultraviolet Equipment For Testing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.

    1993-01-01

    Two assemblies of laboratory equipment developed for use in testing abilities of polymers, paints, and other materials to withstand ultraviolet radiation and charged particles. One is vacuum ultraviolet source built around commercial deuterium lamp. Other exposes specimen in partial vacuum to both ultraviolet radiation and brush corona discharge. Either or both assemblies used separately or together to simulate approximately combination of solar radiation and charged particles encountered by materials aboard spacecraft in orbit around Earth. Also used to provide rigorous environmental tests of materials exposed to artificial ultraviolet radiation and charged particles in industrial and scientific settings or to natural ultraviolet radiation and charged particles aboard aircraft at high altitudes.

  16. Test Report: Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning tests were performed on composite materials as a part of an investigation of electromagnetic effects on the materials. Samples were subjected to direct and remote simulated lightning strikes. Samples included various thicknesses of graphite filament reinforced plastic (GFRP), material enhanced by expanded aluminum foil layers, and material with an aluminum honeycomb core. Shielding properties of the material and damage to the sample surfaces and joints were investigated. Adding expanded aluminum foil layers and increasing the thickness of GFRP improves the shielding effectiveness against lightning induced fields and the ability to withstand lightning strikes. A report describing the lightning strike tests performed by the U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, STERT-TE-E-EM, is included as an appendix.

  17. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

    2007-01-31

    This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

  18. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Slape, R J

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  19. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  20. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  1. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-10-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

  2. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-09-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  3. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  4. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Encapsulation task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    During this quarter, flat-plate solar collector systems were considered and six basic construction elements were identified: outer coatings, superstrates, pottants, substrates, undercoats, and adhesives. Materials surveys were then initiated to discover either generic classes or/and specific products to function as each construction element. Cost data included in the surveys permit ready evaluation of each material. Silicones, fluorocarbons, glass, and acrylic polymers have the highest inherent weatherability of materials studied to date. Only acrylics, however, combine low costs, environmental resistance, and potential processability. This class will receive particular emphasis.

  5. Intellectual property analysis of holographic materials business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya; Hunt, David

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents an overview of intellectual property in the field of holographic photosensitive materials and highlights the possibilities offered by patent searching and analysis. Thousands of patent documents relevant to holographic materials have been uncovered by the study. The search was performed in the following databases: U.S. Patent Office, European Patent Office, and Japanese Patent Office for the time frame of 1971 through November 2005. The patent analysis has unveiled trends in patent temporal distribution, leading IP portfolios, companies competition within the holographic materials market and other interesting insights.

  6. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  7. Systems and methods for predicting materials properties

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Fischer, Chris; Tibbetts, Kevin; Morgan, Dane; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2007-11-06

    Systems and methods for predicting features of materials of interest. Reference data are analyzed to deduce relationships between the input data sets and output data sets. Reference data includes measured values and/or computed values. The deduced relationships can be specified as equations, correspondences, and/or algorithmic processes that produce appropriate output data when suitable input data is used. In some instances, the output data set is a subset of the input data set, and computational results may be refined by optionally iterating the computational procedure. To deduce features of a new material of interest, a computed or measured input property of the material is provided to an equation, correspondence, or algorithmic procedure previously deduced, and an output is obtained. In some instances, the output is iteratively refined. In some instances, new features deduced for the material of interest are added to a database of input and output data for known materials.

  8. Electromagnetic properties of material coated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, L.; Berrie, J.; Burkholder, R.; Dominek, A.; Walton, E.; Wang, N.

    1989-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of material coated conducting surfaces were investigated. The coating geometries consist of uniform layers over a planar surface, irregularly shaped formations near edges and randomly positioned, electrically small, irregularly shaped formations over a surface. Techniques to measure the scattered field and constitutive parameters from these geometries were studied. The significance of the scattered field from these geometries warrants further study.

  9. Studies of acoustical properties of bulk porous flexible materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic prediction and measurement of bulk porous materials with flexible frames is investigated. The acoustic properties of Kevlar 29 are examined. Various acoustic tests are employed to determine impedance, sound wave propagation, and wave pressure equations for the highly porous fiber composites. The derivation of design equations and future research goals are included.

  10. Test Plan for Composite Hydrogen Getter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    2000-11-09

    The intent of this test plan is to provide details of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) effort to evaluate composite getter materials for eventual use in expanding the wattage limits for transportation of contact-handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). This effort is funded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) under Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR-1-9-MW-45 and is the result of a competitive process initiated by a MWFA request for proposals. In response to this request, SRTC presented data on several composite getter materials that demonstrated good potential for application in transportation of transuranic wastes. The tests outlined in the SRTC proposal for composite getter materials should demonstrate compliance with functional requirements provided by the MWFA in a Statement of Work (SOW) which accompanied the request for proposals. Completion of Phase 1 testing, as defined in the TTP, should provide sufficient data to determine if composite getters should progress to Phase s 2 and 3. These test results will provide support for future safety reviews as part of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) certification process to utilize getter technology. This test plan provides details of the test descriptions, test objectives, required measurements, data quality objectives, data analysis, and schedule information relevant to Phase 1 of the TTP. The results of these tests are expected to help identify any potential weaknesses in the use of composite getter for transportation of CH-TRU wastes. Where a potential weakness is identified, this will be addressed as part of Phase 2 of the proposed effort. It is also important to recognize that these tests are focused on the individual composite getter materials and not the engineered system that would eventually be used in a TRUPACT-II. However, these test results will be very helpful in establishing the requirements for the design of a TRUPACT-II getter system that is included as part of the propo sed Phase

  11. Spacecraft material flammability testing and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledoux, Paul W.

    1987-01-01

    Material and configuration testing for the Space Shuttle is mainly at 30 percent oxygen concentration at 70 kPa (10.2 psia). This is the worst case atmosphere during a mission and occurs 10 hours prior to extravehicular activity. The pressure is reduced from the nominal 101 kPa (14.7 paia) and the oxygen concentration is increased to 30 percent for medical reasons to prevent the bends during the extravehicular activity. NASA has tested many materials at 23.8, 25.9 and 30 percent oxygen levels for the Shuttle program. Data is given to show how flammability of material is affected by percentage of oxygen for those materials that would be considered for spacecraft applications.

  12. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  13. Patch tests with fragrance materials and preservatives.

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; Liem, D H; Nater, J P; van Ketel, W G

    1985-02-01

    179 patients suspected of cosmetic allergy were patch tested with a series of 16 fragrance materials and 9 preservatives. In 67 patients (37.4%), 1 or more of these substances gave positive reactions. In the group of fragrance materials, the largest numbers of positive patch test reactions were seen to isoeugenol, oak moss, geraniol, alpha-amylcinnamic alcohol, and a mixture of alpha-amylcinnamic aldehyde and alpha-hexylcinnamic aldehyde. The fragrance mix in the ICDRG standard series detected nearly 80% of cases of contact allergy to fragrance materials other than its constituents. In the group of preservatives, Kathon CG and quaternium-15 scored the highest number of positive reactions. It is argued that the commonly used patch test concentrations of 2% for oak moss and geraniol may be too low to detect all cases of sensitization.

  14. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  15. Characterization of the physical properties for solid granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Guenther, Chris; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph S.; Banta, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the behavior of a system is strongly governed by the components within that system. For multiphase systems incorporating solid powder-like particles, there are many different physical properties which need to be known to some level of accuracy for proper design, modeling, or data analysis. In the past, the material properties were determined initially as a secondary part of the study or design. In an attempt to provide results with the least level of uncertainty, a procedure was developed and implemented to provide consistent analysis of several different types of materials. The properties that were characterized included particle sizing and size distributions, shape analysis, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocities, void fractions, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. In the methods used for this experiment, a novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Materials of known properties were initially characterized to validate the accuracy and methodology, prior to testing materials of unknown properties. The procedures used yielded valid and accurate results, with a high level of repeatability. A database of these materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future designs. It is also anticipated that further development of these procedures wil be expanded increasing the properties included in the database.

  16. Principles for supplying virus-tested material.

    PubMed

    Varveri, Christina; Maliogka, Varvara I; Kapari-Isaia, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Production of virus-tested material of vegetatively propagated crops through national certification schemes has been implemented in many developed countries for more than 60 years and its importance for being the best virus control means is well acknowledged by growers worldwide. The two most important elements of certification schemes are the use of sensitive, reliable, and rapid detection techniques to check the health status of the material produced and effective and simple sanitation procedures for the elimination of viruses if present in candidate material before it enters the scheme. New technologies such as next-generation sequencing platforms are expected to further enhance the efficiency of certification and production of virus-tested material, through the clarification of the unknown etiology of several graft-transmissible diseases. The successful production of virus-tested material is a demanding procedure relying on the close collaboration of researchers, official services, and the private sector. Moreover, considerable efforts have been made by regional plant protection organizations such as the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), and the European Union and the USA to harmonize procedures, methodologies, and techniques in order to assure the quality, safety, and movement of the vegetatively propagated material produced around the world.

  17. Estimation of uncertain material parameters using modal test data

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.; Laird, D.L.; Carne, T.G.; Sagartz, M.J.

    1997-11-01

    Analytical models of wind turbine blades have many uncertainties, particularly with composite construction where material properties and cross-sectional dimension may not be known or precisely controllable. In this paper the authors demonstrate how modal testing can be used to estimate important material parameters and to update and improve a finite-element (FE) model of a prototype wind turbine blade. An example of prototype blade is used here to demonstrate how model parameters can be identified. The starting point is an FE model of the blade, using best estimates for the material constants. Frequencies of the lowest fourteen modes are used as the basis for comparisons between model predictions and test data. Natural frequencies and mode shapes calculated with the FE model are used in an optimal test design code to select instrumentation (accelerometer) and excitation locations that capture all the desired mode shapes. The FE model is also used to calculate sensitivities of the modal frequencies to each of the uncertain material parameters. These parameters are estimated, or updated, using a weighted least-squares technique to minimize the difference between test frequencies and predicted results. Updated material properties are determined for axial, transverse, and shear moduli in two separate regions of the blade cross section: in the central box, and in the leading and trailing panels. Static FE analyses are then conducted with the updated material parameters to determine changes in effective beam stiffness and buckling loads.

  18. (02.2) Scoping experiments; (02.3) long-term corrosion testing and properties evaluation of candidate waste package basket material

    SciTech Connect

    VanKonynenburg, R. A.

    1996-12-20

    The work described in this activity plan addresses Information Need 2.7.3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (l), which reads Determination that the design criteria in lOCFR60.130 through 60.133 and any appropriate additional design objectives pertaining to criticality control have been met. This work falls under section WBS 1.2.2.5 2 (Basket Materials) of WBS 1.2.2.5 (Waste Package Materials) in the Work Breakdown Structure of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  19. Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in our approach to EVA suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete 50 EVAs in the dirt under intense UV exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising its mobility. We conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials to determine performance degradation after exposure to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. This testing will help mature the material technologies and provide performance data that can be used by not only the space suit development teams but for all Mars inflatable and soft goods derived structures from airlocks to habitats.

  20. Offgassing test methodology for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, Dale A.

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the use of composite materials has occurred during the past 20 years. Associated with this increased use is the potential for employees to be exposed to offgassing components from composite systems. Various components in composite systems, particularly residual solvents, offgas under various conditions. The potential for offgassing to occur increases as a composite material is heated either during cure or during lay-up operations. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the offgassing characteristics of a composite system. A joint effort between AIA and SACMA resulted in the drafting of a proposed test method for evaluating the offgassing potential of composite materials. The purpose of testing composite materials for offgassing is to provide the industrial hygienist with information which can be used to assess the safety of the workplace. This paper outlines the proposed test method and presents round robin testing data associated with the test method. Also in this presentation is a discussion of classes of compounds which require specialized sampling techniques.

  1. Application for managing model-based material properties for simulation-based engineering

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Edward L.

    2009-03-03

    An application for generating a property set associated with a constitutive model of a material includes a first program module adapted to receive test data associated with the material and to extract loading conditions from the test data. A material model driver is adapted to receive the loading conditions and a property set and operable in response to the loading conditions and the property set to generate a model response for the material. A numerical optimization module is adapted to receive the test data and the model response and operable in response to the test data and the model response to generate the property set.

  2. Durability Testing of Commercial Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schienle, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Technical efforts by AlliedSignal Engines in DOE/NASA-funded project from February, 1978 through December, 1995 are reported in the fields ceramic materials for gas turbine engines and cyclic thermal durability testing. A total of 29 materials were evaluated in 40 cyclic oxidation exposure durability tests. Ceramic test bars were cyclically thermally exposed to a hot combustion environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F) for periods of up to 3500 hours, simulating conditions typically encountered by hot flowpath components in an automotive gas turbine engine. Before and after exposure, quarter-point flexure strength tests were performed on the specimens, and fractography examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to determine failure origins.

  3. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  4. Characterization of Viscoelastic Properties of Polymeric Materials Through Nanoindentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Bandorawalla, T.; Herring, H. M.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoindentation is used to determine the dynamic viscoelastic properties of six polymer materials. It is shown that varying the harmonic frequency of the nanoindentation does not have any significant effect on the measured storage and loss moduli of the polymers. Agreement is found between these results and data from DMA testing of the same materials. Varying the harmonic amplitude of the nanoindentation does not have a significant effect on the measured properties of the high performance resins, however, the storage modulus of the polyethylene decreases as the harmonic amplitude increases. Measured storage and loss moduli are also shown to depend on the density of the polyethylene.

  5. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  6. The in-plane shear properties of pultruded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Baik-Soon

    1998-12-01

    This thesis presents the details for a new in-plane shear test method applicable to pultruded materials reinforced with continuous strand mat (CSM) and rovings. The loading system and the size of the specimen are different from those currently used in the ASTM D-5379 specification in order to reduce the effect of the inherent heterogeneity of the pultruded materials. Then, the performance of the ASTM D-5379 V-notched beam test fixture and that of the newly developed test fixture at the Georgia Institute of Technology will be discussed. The thesis also presents various predicted techniques for estimating the in-plane shear modulus of pultruded materials from the properties of the constituents. Finally, a third-order polynomial shear stress---shear strain (tau - gamma) equation is proposed for more accurate structural analysis of pultruded materials reinforced with rovings and continuous strand mats.

  7. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  8. Properties of granular analogue model materials: A community wide survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkmüller, M.; Schreurs, G.; Rosenau, M.; Kemnitz, H.

    2016-08-01

    We report the material properties of 26 granular analogue materials used in 14 analogue modelling laboratories. We determined physical characteristics such as bulk density, grain size distribution, and grain shape, and performed ring shear tests to determine friction angles and cohesion, and uniaxial compression tests to evaluate the compaction behaviour. Mean grain size of the materials varied between c. 100 and 400 μm. Analysis of grain shape factors shows that the four different classes of granular materials (14 quartz sands, 5 dyed quartz sands, 4 heavy mineral sands and 3 size fractions of glass beads) can be broadly divided into two groups consisting of 12 angular and 14 rounded materials. Grain shape has an influence on friction angles, with most angular materials having higher internal friction angles (between c. 35° and 40°) than rounded materials, whereas well-rounded glass beads have the lowest internal friction angles (between c. 25° and 30°). We interpret this as an effect of intergranular sliding versus rolling. Most angular materials have also higher basal friction angles (tested for a specific foil) than more rounded materials, suggesting that angular grains scratch and wear the foil. Most materials have an internal cohesion in the order of 20-100 Pa except for well-rounded glass beads, which show a trend towards a quasi-cohesionless (C < 20 Pa) Coulomb-type material. The uniaxial confined compression tests reveal that rounded grains generally show less compaction than angular grains. We interpret this to be related to the initial packing density after sifting, which is higher for rounded grains than for angular grains. Ring-shear test data show that angular grains undergo a longer strain-hardening phase than more rounded materials. This might explain why analogue models consisting of angular grains accommodate deformation in a more distributed manner prior to strain localisation than models consisting of rounded grains.

  9. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  10. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T.A.; Johnsen, B.P.; Nagy, A.

    1995-10-01

    The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  11. Correlation of composite material test results with finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guƫu, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper are presented some aspects regarding the method of simulation of composite materials testing with finite element analysis software. There were simulated tensile and shear tests of specimens manufactured from glass fiber reinforced polyester. For specimens manufacturing two types of fabrics were used: unidirectional and bidirectional. Experimentally determined elastic properties of composite material were used as input data. Modeling of composite architecture of the specimens was performed with ANSYS Composite PrepPost software. Finite element analysis stresses and strains on strain gauges bonding area were considered and compared with the real values in a diagram. After results comparison, potential causes of deviations were identified.

  12. Materials property definition and generation for carbon-carbon and carbon phenolic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, A. R.; Mathis, J. R.; Starrett, H. S.; Koenig, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A data base program to generate statistically significant material-property data for carbon-carbon and carbon phenolic materials to be used in designs of Space Shuttle is described. The program, which will provide data necessary for thermal and stress modeling of Shuttle nozzle and exit cone structures, includes evaluation of tension, compression, shear strength, shear modulus, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, permeability, and emittance for both materials; the testing of carbon phenolic materials also includes CTE, off-gassing, pyrolysis, and RTG. Materials to be tested will be excised from Space Shuttle inlet, throat, and exit cone billets and modified involute carbon-carbon exit cones; coprocessed blocks, panels, and cylinders will also be tested.

  13. Moisture effect on mechanical properties of polymeric composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airale, A. G.; Carello, M.; Ferraris, A.; Sisca, L.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of moisture on the mechanical properties of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was investigated. Four materials had been take into account considering: both 2×2-Twill woven carbon fibre or glass fibre, thermosetting matrix (Epoxy Resin) or thermoplastic matrix (Polyphenylene Sulfide). The specimens were submitted for 1800 hours to a hygrothermic test to evaluate moisture absorption on the basis of the Fick's law and finally tested to verify the mechanical properties (ultimate tensile strength). The results showed that the absorbed moisture decreases those properties of composites which were dominated by the matrix or the interface, while was not detectable the influence of water on the considered fibre. An important result is that the diffusion coefficient is highest for glass/PPS and lowest for carbon/epoxy composite material. The results give useful suggestions for the design of vehicle components that are exposed to environmental conditions (rain, snow and humidity).

  14. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  15. Thermoelastic analysis of solar cell arrays and their material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M. A.; Rowe, W. M.; Yasui, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    A thermoelastic stress analysis procedure is reported for predicting the thermally induced stresses and failures in silicon solar cell arrays. A prerequisite for the analysis is the characterization of the temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties of the solar cell materials. Extensive material property testing was carried out in the temperature range -200 to +200 C for the filter glass, P- and N-type silicon, interconnector metals, solder, and several candidate silicone rubber adhesives. The analysis procedure is applied to several solar cell array design configurations. Results of the analysis indicate the optimum design configuration, with respect to compatible materials, effect of the solder coating, and effect of the interconnector geometry. Good agreement was found between results of the analysis and the test program.

  16. Testing of SRS and RFETS Nylon Bag Material

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    This report compares the effects of radiation and heating on nylon bagout materials used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Recently, to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C), FB-Line has replaced the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags normally used to package cans of plutonium-bearing material with nylon bags. LDPE and PVC are not soluble in the nitric acid dissolver solution used in F-Canyon, so cans bagged using these materials had to be repackaged before they were added to the dissolver. Because nylon dissolves in nitric acid, cans bagged in nylon can be charged to the F-Canyon dissolvers without repackaging, thereby reducing handling requirements and personnel exposure. As part of a program to process RFETS SS and C at SRS, RFETS has also begun to use a nylon bagout material. The RFETS bag materials is made from a copolymer of nylon 6 and nylon 6.9, while the SRS material is made from a nylon 6 monomer. In addition, the SRS nylon has an anti-static agent added. The RFETS nylon is slightly softer than the SRS nylon, but does not appear to be as resistant to flex cracks initiated by contact with sharp corners of the inner can containing the SS and C.2 FB-Line Operations has asked for measurement of the effects of radiation and heating on these materials. Specifically, they have requested a comparison of the material properties of the plastics before and after irradiation, a measurement of the amount of outgassing when the plastics are heated, and a calculation of the amount of radiolytic gas generation. Testing was performed on samples taken from material that is currently used in FB-Line (color coded orange) and at RFETS. The requested tests are the same tests previously performed on the original and replacement nylon and LDPE bag materials.3,4,5. To evaluate the effect of irradiation on material properties, tensile stresses and elongations to break

  17. Encapsulation task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; White, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an investigation of solar module encapsulation systems applicable to the Low-Cost Solar Array Project 1986 cost and performance goals are presented. Six basic construction elements were identified and their specific uses in module construction defined. A uniform coating basis was established for each element. The survey results were also useful in revealing price ranges for classes of materials and estimating the cost allocation for each element within the encapsulating cost goal. The six construction elements were considered to be substrates, superstrates, pottants, adhesives, outer covers and back covers.

  18. MISSE 6-Testing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S; Kinard, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment by placing them in space environment for several months. In this paper, a few materials and components from NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that have been flown on MISSE 6 mission will be discussed. These include laser and optical elements for photonic devices. The pre-characterized MISSE 6 materials were packed inside a ruggedized Passive Experiment Container (PEC) that resembles a suitcase. The PEC was tested for survivability due to launch conditions. Subsequently, the MISSE 6 PEC was transported by the STS-123 mission to International Space Station (ISS) on March 11, 2008. The astronauts successfully attached the PEC to external handrails and opened the PEC for long term exposure to the space environment.

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventeenth quarterly progress report, May 12-August 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1980-09-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Development efforts have emphasized the reformulation of polybutyl acrylate, a liquid pottant used in the casting encapsulation process. This material has been modified to yield a composition with much faster cure at lower temperatures. Minimodules have been successfully prepared from this low cost compound and are currently being evaluated by thermal/humidity cycling. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used for the examination of thermal stability in some of the pottant compounds of current interest. This method was useful in determining the temperatures at which oxidative or pyrolysis reactions resulted in degradation of the polymers. All the candidate pottants showed degradation onsets of over 200/sup 0/C. The effectiveness of a new primer was determined during this period. This formulation was similar to the silane coupling agent used in past experimentation but was modified with a peroxide to enhance the activity. Excellent bound strengths were obtained to glass, and mild steel that were resistant to immersion in boiling water. EVA to low iron glass gave an average bond strength of 35 lbs per inch of width. This new primer was also evaluated for the corrosion protection that could be provided to metal surfaces when primed and encapsulated in EVA. (WHK)

  20. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  1. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed Central

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex®, ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight® 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young’s modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young’s modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape. PMID:27190472

  2. Elastic therapeutic tape: do they have the same material properties?

    PubMed

    Boonkerd, Chuanpis; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Elastic therapeutic tape has been widely used for rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries. Tapes with different elastic properties serve different treatment purposes with inappropriate tension reducing tape effectiveness. Many tapes are available in the market, but studies on tape properties are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the material properties of elastic therapeutic tape. [Subjects and Methods] Brands of elastic therapeutic tape included KinesioTex(®), ATex, Mueller, 3M, and ThaiTape. The Material Testing System Insight(®) 1 Electromechanical Testing Systems was used to apply a tensile force on elastic therapeutic tape. Ten specimens of each brand were tested. Stress, load, and Young's modulus at 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and maximum point were collected. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc testing was used to analyze tape parameters. [Results] Maximum elongation and Young's modulus at all percentages were significantly different between brands. There were no differences in maximum load and maximum stress. [Conclusion] Mechanical properties are different for commercial elastic therapeutic tapes. Physiotherapists and other clinicians should be aware of mechanical tape properties to correctly apply kinesio tape.

  3. Optical properties of glazing materials at normal incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Powles, R.

    2001-10-01

    Measurements of spectral transmittance T and reflectance R at normal incidence continue to be the most common and accurate source of energy performance data for glazing materials. Prediction of these radiometric properties from more fundamental materials data is often confounded by the complexity and uncertainty of coating structures. Angle-dependent radiometric properties of coated glazing will probably be predicted from normal-incidence data rather than being measured at many angles. The general error level demonstrated in round-robin tests is on the order 1-2%; it is often necessary to achieve better levels of performance. Based on results obtained following the round-robin tests, it is expected that accuracy of better than 0.5% can be generally achieved. A new type of absolute standard reference is described and tested with promising results.

  4. The Evaluation of Flammability Properties Regarding Testing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvaldová, Linda Makovická; Gašpercová, Stanislava

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we address the historical comparison methods with current methods for the assessment of flammability characteristics for materials an especially for wood, wood components and wooden buildings. Nowadays in European Union brings harmonization in evaluated of standards into each European country and try to make one concept of evaluated the flammability properties. In each European country to the one standard level which will be used by evaluation of materials regarding flammability. In our article we focused mainly on improving the evaluation methods in terms of flammability characteristics of using materials at building industry. In the article we present examples of different assessment methods at their own test methods in terms of fire prevention. On the base of old compared of materials by STN, BS and DIN methods for testing materials on fire and new methods of evaluating the flammability properties regarding EU standards before and after starting the flash over.

  5. Material modeling of biofilm mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Laspidou, C S; Spyrou, L A; Aravas, N; Rittmann, B E

    2014-05-01

    A biofilm material model and a procedure for numerical integration are developed in this article. They enable calculation of a composite Young's modulus that varies in the biofilm and evolves with deformation. The biofilm-material model makes it possible to introduce a modeling example, produced by the Unified Multi-Component Cellular Automaton model, into the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS. Compressive, tensile, and shear loads are imposed, and the way the biofilm mechanical properties evolve is assessed. Results show that the local values of Young's modulus increase under compressive loading, since compression results in the voids "closing," thus making the material stiffer. For the opposite reason, biofilm stiffness decreases when tensile loads are imposed. Furthermore, the biofilm is more compliant in shear than in compression or tension due to the how the elastic shear modulus relates to Young's modulus. PMID:24560820

  6. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  7. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  8. Neural networks as tools for predicting materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Materials science is of fundamental significance to science and technology because our industrial base and society depend upon our ability to develop advanced materials. Materials and materials processing cuts across almost every sector of industry. The key in all of these areas is the ability to rapidly screen possible designs which will have significant impact. However up to now materials design and processing have been to a large extent empirical sciences. In addition we are still unable to design new alloys and polymers to meet application specific requirements. Being able to do so quickly and at minimum cost would provide an incredible advantage. Obviously, the ability to predict physical, chemical, or mechanical properties of compounds prior to their synthesis is of great technological value in optimizing their design, processing, or recycling. In addition, in order to realize the ultimate goal of materials by computational design, the reverse problem, prediction of chemical structure based on desired properties, has to be resolved. Research at ORNL has lead to the development of a novel computational paradigm (coupling computational neural networks with graph theory, genetic algorithms, wavelet theory, fuzzy logic, molecular dynamics, and quantum chemistry) capable of performing accurate computational synthesis (both predictions of properties or the design of compounds that have specified performance criteria). The computational paradigm represents a hybrid of a number of emerging technologies and has proven to work very well for test compounds ranging from small organic molecules to polymeric materials. Fundamental to the method is the neural network-based formulation of the correlations between structure and properties. The advantages of this method is in its ease of use, speed, accuracy, and that it can be used to predict both properties from structure, and also structure from properties.

  9. Molecule-based electrorheological material with luminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Xing; Liao, Fu-Hui; Shang, Yan-Li; Jia, Yun-Ling; Li, Jun-Ran

    2013-02-01

    Molecule-based electrorheological (ER) materials with luminescence property, based on β-cyclodextrin [(C6O5H10)7, β-CD] inclusion compounds between β-CD (host) and the rare earth (RE) (RE=Tb, Eu) complex (guest), have been synthesized as a novel type of ER materials using β-CD, Tb(NO3)3, Eu(NO3)3, sulphosalicylic acid (C7H6O6S·2H2O, SSA) and m-phthalic acid (C8H6O4, MPA) as original materials. The composition, ER performance, luminescence property and dielectric property of the materials have been studied. The results show that the rare earth complex in the cavity of β-CD may enhance the ER performance of β-CD, and the complex (Tb-SSA) of Tb3+ can improve more effectively the ER activity of β-CD than that (Eu-MPA) of Eu3+ among both of the complexes. The composition and structure are the dominant factors in improving the ER effect. The fluorescence intensity, fluorescence lifetime and emission quantum yield of the particle materials and their suspensions in silicone oil have been tested, and fine luminescence performance has been detected. The material with ER activity and luminescence performance is a novel multifunctional material which would have wide application prospect.

  10. Ground Deployment Demonstration and Material Testing for Solar Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoqi; Cheng, Zhengai; Liu, Yufei; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Solar Sail is a kind of spacecraft that can achieve extremely high velocity by light pressure instead of chemical fuel. The great accelerate rely on its high area-to-mass ratio. So solar sail is always designed in huge size and it use ultra thin and light weight materials. For 100-meter class solar sail, two key points must be considered in the design process. They are fold-deployment method, and material property change in space environment. To test and verify the fold-deployment technology, a 8*8m principle prototype was developed. Sail membrane folding in method of IKAROS, Nanosail-D , and new proposed L-shape folding pattern were tested on this prototype. Their deployment properties were investigated in detail, and comparisons were made between them. Also, the space environment suitability of ultra thin polyimide films as candidate solar sail material was analyzed. The preliminary test results showed that membrane by all the folding method could deploy well. Moreover, sail membrane folding by L-shape pattern deployed more rapidly and more organized among the three folding pattern tested. The mechanical properties of the polyimide had no significant change after electron irradiation. As the preliminary research on the key technology of solar sail spacecraft, in this paper, the results of the study would provide important basis on large-scale solar sail membrane select and fold-deploying method design.

  11. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Jim

    2010-10-06

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  12. The shipboard exposure testing of aircraft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankins, E.; Kozol, J.; Lee, E. W.

    1995-09-01

    The aircraft carrier environment provides the most severe conditions to which naval aircraft materials are exposed. The combination of humidity, temperature, salt content from the water vapor, and sulfur dioxide from aircraft exhausts creates an extremely corrosive environment. Under these conditions, unprotected high-strength aluminum alloys exhibit extensive exfoliation during relatively short periods of exposure. Although various ASTM standards have been established to characterize corrosion (ranging from exfoliation to general corrosion and pitting), there is no laboratory test that compares with real-time aircraft exposure. Still, accelerated laboratory tests have been devised that well simulate the exposure of aluminum alloys in the natural environment, although there is no real correlation for aluminum-lithium alloys. Considering these factors, this paper compares the results of shipboard exposure testing with those obtained from laboratory accelerated tests.

  13. Magnetic properties of frictional volcanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan; Biggin, Andrew; Ferk, Annika; Leonhardt, Roman

    2015-04-01

    During dome-building volcanic eruptions, highly viscous magma extends through the upper conduit in a solid-like state. The outer margins of the magma column accommodate the majority of the strain, while the bulk of the magma is able to extrude, largely undeformed, to produce magma spines. Spine extrusion is often characterised by the emission of repetitive seismicity, produced in the upper <1 km by magma failure and slip at the conduit margins. The rheology of the magma controls the depth at which fracture can occur, while the frictional properties of the magma are important in controlling subsequent marginal slip processes. Upon extrusion, spines are coated by a carapace of volcanic fault rocks which provide insights into the deeper conduit processes. Frictional samples from magma spines at Mount St. Helens (USA), Soufriere Hills (Montserrat) and Mount Unzen (Japan) have been examined using structural, thermal and magnetic analyses to reveal a history of comminution, frictional heating, melting and cooling to form volcanic pseudotachylyte. Pseudotachylyte has rarely been noted in volcanic materials, and the recent observation of its syn-eruptive formation in dome-building volcanoes was unprecedented. The uniquely high thermal conditions of volcanic environments means that frictional melt remains at elevated temperatures for longer than usual, causing slow crystallisation, preventing the development of some signature "quench" characteristics. As such, rock-magnetic tests have proven to be some of the most useful tools in distinguishing pseudotachylytes from their andesite/ dacite hosts. In volcanic pseudotachylyte the mass normalised natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) when further normalised with the concentration dependent saturation remanence (Mrs) was found to be higher than the host rock. Remanence carriers are defined as low coercive materials across all samples, and while the remanence of the host rock displays similarities to an anhysteretic remanent

  14. Test-mass material selection for STEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    This is a report on the work done of a rather informal working group set up during the Phase A studies to suggest suitable materials for the test masses of the differential accelerometers for the ESA STEP-M3 mission. The most important work was done regarding theory by Thibault Damour (IHES, Paris) and for test-mass design by Nick Lockerbie (Strathclyde University, UK). Valuable ideas contributed by T Quinn, P Fayet, H J Paik, A Bernard and P Touboul are acknowledged.

  15. CPL Materials Life Cycle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchko, Matthew T.

    1992-01-01

    The Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) Materials Life Cycle Test Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) will identify the operational parameters controlling the performance of a CPL over an extended period of time. The primary purpose of the facility is to investigate the long-term chemical compatibility between the anhydrous ammonia working fluid and the CPL materials of construction. Chemical reactions occurring within the system may produce non-condensable gases or particulate debris that can lead to a degradation in system performance. Small liquid samples will be drawn from the system at specific time intervals and analyzed to check for the presence of non-condensable gases. Periodic maximum and minimum heat load tests will be performed on the CPL to monitor trends in the overall system performance.

  16. Optimization of pyrolysis properties using TGA and cone calorimeter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Hee; Yoon, Kyung-Beom

    2013-04-01

    The present paper describes an optimization work to obtain the properties related to a pyrolysis process in the solid material such as density, specific heat, conductivity of virgin and char, heat of pyrolysis and kinetic parameters used for deciding pyrolysis rate. A repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to obtain the pyrolysis-related properties. In the previous study all properties obtained only using a cone calorimeter but in this paper both the cone calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) are used for precisely optimizing the pyrolysis properties. In the TGA test a very small mass is heated up and conduction and heat capacity in the specimen is negligible so kinetic parameters can first be optimized. Other pyrolysis-related properties such as virgin/char specific heat and conductivity and char density are also optimized in the cone calorimeter test with the already decided parameters in the TGA test.

  17. Exploring a Code's Material Properties Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Ann

    2011-06-01

    LANL is moving its simulation workload to the laboratory's 2- and 3-D ASC hydrodynamic codes. Aggressive validation of these material simulation capabilities against experimental data is underway. Choosing appropriate material properties models and parameter values for a simulation is an area of particular concern. To address this issue, each material and experiment combination should be systematically examined through a set of code simulations. In addition to comparing competing materials models, the effect of simulation choices such as mesh size and ALE schemes for mesh untangling needs to be explored. Thoroughly understanding how such choices affect the calculated results of single physics simulations provides a user with a well-informed basis from which to ascertain how accurately a more complicated simulation portrays physical reality. Results for Lagrangian/ALE simulations of some experiments which are typically used for validation of strength and damage models will be presented. These material processes are the result of significant localization of strain and stress, which can be difficult to capture adequately on a finite-size mesh. Modeled strength experiments may include the lower strain rate (~104 s-1) gas gun driven Taylor impacts, the higher strain rate (~105 - 106 s-1) HE products driven perturbed plates, and the high shear tophats. Modeled damage experiments may include gas-gun driven flyer plates and electro-magnetically-driven cylindrical configurations.

  18. [Polyurethane denture base material "Pentalur" and modified polyurethane compositions: comparative study of mechanical properties].

    PubMed

    Al'ter, Iu M; Tkachuk, A-M P; Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Sutugina, T F; Ogorodnikov, M Iu

    2013-01-01

    Results of laboratory tests of polyurethane based material "Pentalur" conducted to determine its mechanical properties proved the material to meet basic requirements for removable dentures materials. The introduction of simple poluethers with certain molecular weight as well as 1,4-butanediol allows varying polyurethane properties in a fairly wide range. This range of polyurethane mechanical properties along with good biocompatibility opens new possibilities in creation of removable dentures with improved functional properties as well as maxillofacial prosthesis.

  19. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the compressed sand column with the protective water jacket removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  20. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the top of the sand column with the metal platten removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  1. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  2. The role of material properties in adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When two solid surfaces are brought into contact strong adhesive bond forces can develop between the materials. The magnitude of the forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between solids is addressed from a theoretical consideration of the electronic nature of the surfaces and experimentally relating bond forces to the nature of the interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties correlated with adhesion include, atomic or molecular orientation, reconstruction and segregation as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where dissimilar solids are in contact the contribution of each is considered as is the role of their interactive chemistry on bond strength. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation and state. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers and diamond. They are reviewed both in single and polycrystalline form. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  3. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mechanical test data for thermal barrier coatings, including modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data, are reviewed in support of the development of durability models for heat engine applica-tions. The materials include 7 and 8 wt % yttria partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) as well as a cermet ma-terial (PSZ +10 wt % NiCoCrAlY). Both air plasma sprayed and electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  4. New Monolayered Materials Exhibiting Unusual Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Martin, Ivar; Littlewood, Peter B.

    Computationally based approaches are allowing to progress in the discovery and design of nano-scaled materials. Here we propose a series of new mono-layered compounds with exotic properties. By means of density functional theory calculations we demonstrate that the pentagonal arrangement of SiC2 yields an inverted distribution of the p-bands which leads to an unusual electronic behaviour of the material under strain [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (33), pp 19469]. A different pentagonal arrangement of C atoms enables the formation of Dirac cones which, unlike graphene, exhibit a strain-mediated tunable band gap. This work is supported by DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  6. Screening and tests of materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The outgassing properties of materials and other considerations on materials acceptance for space applications are discussed. The uses of the outgassing data for the evaluation of important performance characteristics of a space system are indicated. The deficiencies and advantages of the ASTM-E595-77 test method and materials acceptance criteria are discussed. Also discussed are the advantages for the selection of the materials and the uses of the data provided by the long-term measurements of the outgassing rates and surface re-emission of materials. The paper concludes that the results of the ASTM method with additional derived data on the material properties can be used for the initial evaluation of a space system's characteristics. Materials data on outgassing and re-emission rates at various temperatures obtained from the more expensive, long-term QCM and TGA measurements should be obtained when a detailed analysis of a system is suggested based on the various considerations discussed in the paper.

  7. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  8. Clinical Biospecimens: Reference Materials, Certified for Nominal Properties?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report makes the case for clinical biospecimens to be certified for nominal properties, in particular the diagnosis, and to attain the level of Reference Materials. Clinical certified biospecimens that are collected, processed, characterized, stored, and distributed by biobanks are urgently needed to facilitate diagnostic test development, evaluation, and quality assurance. Four examples are provided to illustrate this purpose and the certification approaches that could be applied are proposed. PMID:24749878

  9. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Oxygen materials compatibility testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    Particle impact and frictional heating tests of metals in high pressure oxygen, are conducted in support of the design of an advanced rocket engine oxygen turbopump. Materials having a wide range of thermodynamic properties including heat of combustion and thermal diffusivity were compared in their resistance to ignition and sustained burning. Copper, nickel and their alloys were found superior to iron based and stainless steel alloys. Some materials became more difficult to ignite as oxygen pressure was increased from 7 to 21 MPa (1000 to 3000 psia).

  10. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  11. Mechanics of Granular Materials Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown from all three sides by its video camera during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown approximately 20 and 60 minutes after the start of an experiment on STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  13. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  14. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  15. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  16. Materials Compatibility Testing in RSRM ODC: Free Cleaner Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; Sagers, Neil W.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Government regulations have mandated production phase-outs of a number of solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, an ozone-depleting chemical (ODC). This solvent was used extensively in the production of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) for the Space Shuttle. Many tests have been performed to identify replacement cleaners. One major area of concern in the selection of a new cleaner has been compatibility. Some specific areas considered included cleaner compatibility with non-metallic surfaces, painted surfaces, support materials such as gloves and wipers as well as corrosive properties of the cleaners on the alloys used on these motors. The intent of this paper is to summarize the test logic, methodology, and results acquired from testing the many cleaner and material combinations.

  17. Materials characterization of cermet anodes tested in a pilot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Strachan, D.M.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T.; Richards, N.E.

    1993-02-01

    Cermet anodes were evaluated as nonconsumable substitutes for carbon anodes using a pilot-scale reduction cell at the Reynolds Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. After pilot cell testing, tile anodes were subjected to extensive materials characterization and physical properties measurements at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Significant changes in the composition of the cermet anodes were observed including the growth of a reaction layer and penetration of electrolyte deep into the cermet matrix. Fracture strength and toughness were measured as a function of temperature and the ductile-brittle transition wasreduced by 500C following pilot cell testing. These results imply difficulties with anode material and control of operating conditions in the pilot cell, and suggest that additional development work be performed before the cermet anodes are used in commercial reduction cells. The results also highlight specific fabrication and operational considerations that should be addressed in future testing.

  18. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  19. Tailoring material properties of sputtered beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    Doped beryllium is a material of considerable interest to both the ICF and the weapons communities, as well as finding application in specialized industrial settings (e.g., x-ray windows and mirrors). Some of these uses require conformal coating of thin films on (possibly) irregularly-shaped surfaces. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) is often used to accomplish this, and sputtering is often the technique of choice. Among its advantages are that the depositing atoms are relatively energetic, leading to more compact films. Moreover, by simply applying a voltage bias to the substrate, ambient noble gas ions will bombard the growing film, which can cause further densification and other modifications to the microstructure. Sputtering is also well suited to the introduction of dopants, even those that are insoluble. Most applications of these novel materials will require fundamental knowledge of their properties. Because so many can be devised, such information is generally unavailable. The objective of the effort has been to systematically study the properties of films produced under different conditions, with an emphasis on surface finish and permeability. They have made extensive use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy to determine the microstructure of the films, along with composition probes (mainly x-ray fluorescence) to quantify the chemical structure. The studies can be roughly divided into three categories. First, there are those in which the properties of pure or Cu-doped Be films have been investigated, especially on randomly-agitated spherical capsules. Included are studies of the effects of a constant substrate bias ranging from 0 to 120 v and application of an intermittent bias during deposition. Second, there are experiments in which the structure of the depositing films has been modified via the incorporation of dopants, primarily boron. Finally, there have been numerous attempts to characterize the permeability of Be coatings at

  20. Material and Flexural Properties of Fiber-reinforced Rubber Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminger, Nicholas P.

    The purpose of this research is to determine the material properties of rubber concrete with the addition of fibers, and to determine optimal mixture dosages of rubber and fiber in concrete for structural applications. Fiber-reinforced concrete and rubberized concrete have been researched separately extensively, but this research intends to combine both rubber and fiber in a concrete matrix in order to create a composite material, fiber-reinforced rubber concrete (FRRC). Sustainability has long been important in engineering design, but much of the previous research performed on sustainable concrete does not result in a material that can be used for practical purposes. While still achieving a material that can be used for structural applications, economical considerations were given when choosing the proportions and types of constituents in the concrete mix. Concrete mixtures were designed, placed, and tested in accordance with common procedures and standards, with an emphasis on practicality. Properties that were investigated include compressive strength, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility. The basis for determining the optimal concrete mixture is one that is economical, practical, and exhibits ductile properties with a significant strength. Results show that increasing percentages of rubber tend to decrease workability, unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, and modulus of elasticity while the toughness is increased. The addition of steel needle fibers to rubber concrete increases unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility of the composite material.

  1. Interdisciplinary research on the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Several investigations concerning the properties and processing of brittle ceramic materials as related to design considerations are briefly described. Surface characterization techniques, fractography, high purity materials, creep properties, impact and thermal shock resistance, and reaction bonding are discussed.

  2. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  3. Microwave dielectric properties of plant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Jedlicka, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Three waveguide transmission systems covering the 1-2, 3.5-6.5, and 7.5-8.5 GHZ bands were used to measure the dielectric properties of vegetation material as a function of moisture content and microwave frequency. The materials measured included, primarily, the leaves and stalks of corn and wheat. Dielectric measurements also were made of the liquid included in the vegetation material after it was extracted from the vegetation by mechanical means. The extracted liquids were found to have an equivalent NaCl salinity of about 10 per mil, which can have a significant effect on the dielectric loss at frequencies below 5 GHz. The results of attempts to model the dielectric constant of the vegetatioon-water mixture in terms of the dielectric constants and volume fractions of its constituent parts (i.e., bulk vegetation, air, bound water, and free water) are discussed. Additionally, measurements of the temporal variations in the total attenuation at 10.2 GHz are presented for a corn canopy and a soybean canopy.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  5. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison.

    PubMed

    Re, Dino; De Angelis, Francesco; Augusti, Gabriele; Augusti, Davide; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison.

    PubMed

    Re, Dino; De Angelis, Francesco; Augusti, Gabriele; Augusti, Davide; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  7. Materials screening chamber for testing materials resistance to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Carruth, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    A unique test chamber for exposing material to a known flux of oxygen atoms is described. The capabilities and operating parameters of the apparatus include production of an oxygen atom flux in excess of 5 x 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm-sec, controlled heating of the sample specimen, RF circuitry to contain the plasma within a small volume, and long exposure times. Flux measurement capabilities include a calorimetric probe and a light titration system. Accuracy and limitations of these techniques are discussed. An extension to the main chamber to allow simultaneous ultraviolet and atomic oxygen exposure is discussed. The oxygen atoms produced are at thermal energies. Sample specimens are maintained at any selected temperature between ambient and 200 C, to within + or - 2 C. A representative example of measurements made using the chamber is presented.

  8. Mechanical properties of a porous mullite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Modulus of rupture specimens were used to determine crack growth parameters of a porous mullite material. Strength testing was performed in ambient and moist environments. The power law crack growth rate parameters n and 1n B in 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 44.98 and 0.94, respectively. The inert strength, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus were also determined and found to be 19 MPa, 055 MPa(m) exp 1/2, and 11.6 GPa, respectively.

  9. Explosive Train Scale Safety Testing of Candidate Booster Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoodley, Andrew; Wright, Mark; Flegg, Gareth; Vine, Tracey

    2009-06-01

    A concern for initiation train design is that the use of relatively sensitive explosives to initiate an IHE could degrade its inherent safety properties. In order to understand the effect of a more sensitive explosive on an IHE, it is important to characterise the candidate explosive train materials as they would be utilised. To support the safety assessment of candidate booster explosives, a collaboration was established to evaluate the response of various formulations of interest (UF-TATB, LLM- 105, FOX-7, HMX and TATB) in the Explosive Train Scale Safety tests developed by QinetiQ. This report describes the three experimental configurations (slow and fast cook-off and shock sensitivity) and the results for the aforementioned materials. All of the materials displayed good safety characteristics in the fast cook-off, resulting in low order deflagrations. The TATB based, LLM-105 and most of the HMX based materials also displayed a similar response in the slow cook-off tests, yielding a low order event. The shock sensitivity experiments ranked the materials in the expected order, with UF-TATB yielding the least sensitive result recorded in the XTSS tests to date.

  10. Proficiency Testing for Evaluating Aerospace Materials Test Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, D.; Motto, S.; Peyton, S.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    ASTM G 86 and ASTM G 74 are commonly used to evaluate materials susceptibility to ignition in liquid and gaseous oxygen systems. However, the methods have been known for their lack of repeatability. The inherent problems identified with the test logic would either not allow precise identification or the magnitude of problems related to running the tests, such as lack of consistency of systems performance, lack of adherence to procedures, etc. Excessive variability leads to increasing instances of accepting the null hypothesis erroneously, and so to the false logical deduction that problems are nonexistent when they really do exist. This paper attempts to develop and recommend an approach that could lead to increased accuracy in problem diagnostics by using the 50% reactivity point, which has been shown to be more repeatable. The initial tests conducted indicate that PTFE and Viton A (for pneumatic impact) and Buna S (for mechanical impact) would be good choices for additional testing and consideration for inter-laboratory evaluations. The approach presented could also be used to evaluate variable effects with increased confidence and tolerance optimization.

  11. Characterization of the electromechanical properties of EAP materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrita, Stewart; Bhattachary, Kaushik; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh

    2001-01-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAP) are an emerging class of actuation materials. Their large electrically induced strains (longitudinal or bending), low density, mechanical flexibility, and ease of processing offer advantages over traditional electroactive materials. However, before the capability of these materials can be exploited, their electrical and mechanical behavior must be properly quantified. Two general types of EAP can be identified. The first type is ionic EAP, which requires relatively low voltages (<10V) to achieve large bending deflections. This class usually needs to be hydrated and electrochemical reactions may occur. The second type is Electronic-EAP and it involves electrostrictive and/or Maxwell stresses. This type of materials requires large electric fields (>100MV/m) to achieve longitudinal deformations at the range from 4 - 360%. Some of the difficulties in characterizing EAP include: nonlinear properties, large compliance (large mismatch with metal electrodes), nonhomogeneity resulting from processing, etc. To support the need for reliable data, the authors are developing characterization techniques to quantify the electroactive responses and material properties of EAP materials. The emphasis of the current study is on addressing electromechanical issues related to the ion-exchange type EAP also known as IPMC. The analysis, experiments and test results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Taji, T; Hiasa, K; Tsuga, K; Akagawa, Y

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic viscoelastic properties of seven commercially available vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials. Five rectangular specimens (2 x 10 x 30 mm) were prepared from each material. The complex modulus E* (MPa) and loss tangent (tan delta) of each specimen were determined with a non-resonance forced vibration method using an automatic dynamic viscoelastometer at 1 Hz after 1 day of dry storage, and after 1, 30, 60, 90 and 180 days of wet storage at 37 degrees C. All data were analysed using one-way anova and Bonferroni/Dunn's test for multiple comparisons with a significance level of P < 0.01. All materials varied widely in terms of viscoelasticities and showed both an increase in E* and a decrease in tan delta at 1 Hz after the 1-day wet storage. After 60 days of wet storage, both E* and tan delta did not change significantly. The stiffer materials (>30% filler content) with high E* values (>2.00 MPa) showed elastic behaviour with tan delta values of around 0.03. The softer materials (6% filler content) with high tan delta values (initial value > 0.10) showed viscous behaviour and were easily affected by water absorption after the 1-day wet storage. It can be concluded that for the proper selection of vinyl polysiloxane denture soft lining materials, it is very important to evaluate the viscoelastic properties after 60 days of wet storage. PMID:19840358

  13. ESP - Data From Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicone Materials - 2009

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Schneider

    2010-02-24

    Enhanced Surveillance Project (ESP) funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until ESP funding allowed the restart in FY97. This report will provide data on materials used on various programs and on experimental materials not used in production. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  14. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicone Materials - 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Schneider

    2011-12-31

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. This report will provide data on materials used in production and on experimental materials not used in production. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  15. Properties of granular analogue model materials: A community wide survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkmüller, Matthias; Schreurs, Guido; Rosenau, Matthias; Kemnitz, Helga

    2016-04-01

    We report the material properties of 26 granular analogue materials used in 14 analogue modelling laboratories. We determined physical characteristics such as bulk density, grain size distribution, and grain shape, and performed ring shear tests to determine friction angles and cohesion, and uniaxial compression tests to evaluate the compaction behaviour. Mean grain size of the materials varied between (c. 100 and 400 micrometer). Analysis of grain shape factors show that the four different classes of granular materials (14 quartz sands, 5 dyed quartz sands, 4 heavy mineral sands and 3 size fractions of glass beads) can be broadly divided into two groups consisting of 12 angular and 14 rounded materials. Grain shape has an influence on friction angles, with most angular materials having higher internal friction angles (between c. 35° and 40°) than rounded materials, whereas well-rounded glass beads have the lowest internal friction angles (between c. 25° and 30°). We interpret this as an effect of intergranular sliding versus rolling . Most angular materials have also higher basal friction angles (tested for a specific foil) than more rounded materials, suggesting that angular grains scratch and wear the foil., Most materials have a cohesion in the order of 10-100 Pa except for well-rounded glass beads, which show a trend towards a quasi-cohesionless (C <10 Pa) Coulomb-type material. The uniaxial confined compression tests reveal that rounded grains generally show less compaction than angular grains. We interpret this to be related to the initial packing density reached during sieving which is higher for rounded grains than for angular grains. Ring-shear test data show that angular grains undergo a longer strain-hardening phase than more rounded materials. This might explain why analogue models consisting of angular grains accommodate deformation in a more distributed manner prior to strain localisation than models consisting of rounded grains. Also, models

  16. MHD air preheaters: Preliminary firing tests for materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    Valente, T. )

    1994-11-01

    The development of power generation by MHD involves many basic and engineering questions. A critical problem is the selection, design and fabrication of construction materials for components, particularly for the air preheaters. Their durability and reliability must be guaranteed for thousands of hours. Open-cycle MHD power plants have indirect air preheating using Cowper-type regenerators. The maximum temperature that can be obtained with the preheating system depends upon the thermo-mechanical properties of the materials used. Commercially available magnesia, alumina and zirconia were fired at 1800, 1850, 1950 and 2000 C with 12-h soak times. The results show that the magnesia-based materials with a high content of pure periclase magnesia are the most promising for air preheater application in a MHD power plant with an indirect preheating system. Four samples behaved well after the 2000 C firing test. Further thermomechanical tests are necessary to select the most suitable materials and to decide the maximum working temperature of the materials. If direct preheating is used, the materials selected might not be the most suitable.

  17. Multidimensional Testing of Thermal Protection Materials in the Arcjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Ellerby, Donald T.; Switzer, Matt R.; Squire, Thomas Howard

    2010-01-01

    Many thermal protection system materials used for spacecraft heatshields have anisotropic thermal properties, causing them to display significantly different thermal characteristics in different directions, when subjected to a heating environment during flight or arcjet tests. The anisotropic effects are enhanced in the presence of sidewall heating. This paper investigates the effects of anisotropic thermal properties of thermal protection materials coupled with sidewall heating in the arcjet environment. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and LI-2200 materials (the insulation material of Shuttle tiles) were used for this study. First, conduction-based thermal response simulations were carried out, using the Marc.Mentat finite element solver, to study the effects of sidewall heating on PICA arcjet coupons. The simulation showed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. Arcjet tests at the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) at NASA Ames Research Center were performed later on instrumented coupons to obtain temperature history at sidewall and various radial locations. The details of instrumentation and experimental technique are the prime focus of this paper. The results obtained from testing confirmed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. The test results were later used to validate the two-dimensional ablation, thermal response, and sizing program, TITAN. The test data and model predictions were found to be in excellent agreement

  18. Multidimensional Tests of Thermal Protection Materials in the Arcjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Ellerby, Donald T.; Switzer, Mathew R.; Squire, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Many thermal protection system materials used for spacecraft heatshields have anisotropic thermal properties, causing them to display significantly different thermal characteristics in different directions, when subjected to a heating environment during flight or arcjet tests. This paper investigates the effects of sidewall heating coupled with anisotropic thermal properties of thermal protection materials in the arcjet environment. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and LI-2200 materials (the insulation material of Shuttle tiles) were used for this study. First, conduction-based thermal response simulations were carried out, using the Marc.Mentat finite element solver, to study the effects of sidewall heating on PICA arcjet coupons. The simulation showed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. Arcjet tests at the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) at NASA Ames Research Center were performed later on instrumented coupons to obtain temperature history at sidewall and various radial locations. The details of instrumentation and experimental technique are the prime focus of this paper. The results obtained from testing confirmed that sidewall heating plays a significant role in thermal response of these models. The test results were later used to verify the two-dimensional ablation, thermal response, and sizing program, TITAN. The test data and model predictions were found to be in excellent agreement

  19. THERMAL PREDICTIONS OF NEW COMPOSITE MATERIAL DURING INPILE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; W. David Swank; Heng Ban; Kurt Harris; Adam Zabriskie

    2011-09-01

    An inpile experiment is currently underway wherein specimens comprised of a newly developed material are being irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in conjunction with Utah State University under the auspices of the ATR National Scientific User Facility. This paper provides the thermophysical properties of this new material measured prior to irradiation. After the irradiation campaign is complete, the thermophysical properties of the specimens will be measured and compared to the preirradiation values. A finite-element model was constructed to predict bounding specimen temperatures during irradiation. Results from the thermal hydraulic modeling, including the steady-state temperatures of the specimens within sealed capsules, are presented. After the irradiation campaign is completed, best-estimate thermal predictions will be performed for the individual specimens using the actual as-run irradiation power levels.

  20. Characterization of ion-exchange membrane materials: properties vs structure.

    PubMed

    Berezina, N P; Kononenko, N A; Dyomina, O A; Gnusin, N P

    2008-06-22

    This review focuses on the preparation, structure and applications of ion-exchange membranes formed from various materials and exhibiting various functions (electrodialytic, perfluorinated sulphocation-exchange and novel laboratory-tested membranes). A number of experimental techniques for measuring electrotransport properties as well as the general procedure for membrane testing are also described. The review emphasizes the relationships between membrane structures, physical and chemical properties and mechanisms of electrochemical processes that occur in charged membrane materials. The water content in membranes is considered to be a key factor in the ion and water transfer and in polarization processes in electromembrane systems. We suggest the theoretical approach, which makes it possible to model and characterize the electrochemical properties of heterogeneous membranes using several transport-structural parameters. These parameters are extracted from the experimental dependences of specific electroconductivity and diffusion permeability on concentration. The review covers the most significant experimental and theoretical research on ion-exchange membranes that have been carried out in the Membrane Materials Laboratory of the Kuban State University. These results have been discussed at the conferences "Membrane Electrochemistry", Krasnodar, Russia for many years and were published mainly in Russian scientific sources.

  1. Interdisciplinary research on the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The advancement of material performance and design methodology as related to brittle materials was investigated. The processing and properties of ceramic materials as related to design requirements was also studied.

  2. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  3. A comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of nanofibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubun, German P.; Bessudnova, Nadezda O.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration or replacement of lost or damaged hard tooth tissues remain a reconstructive clinical dentistry challenge. One of the most promising solutions to this problem is the development of novel concepts and methodologies of tissue engineering for the synthesis of three-dimensional graft constructs that are equivalent to original organs and tissues. This structural and functional compatibility can be reached by producing ultra-thin polymer filament scaffolds. This research aims through a series of studies to examine different methods of polymer filament material special preparation and test mechanical properties of the produced materials subjected to a tensile strain. Nanofibrous material preparation using chemically pure acetone and mixtures of ethanol/water has shown no significant changes in sample surface morphology. The high temperature impact on material morphology has resulted in the modification of fiber structure. In the course of mechanical tests it has been revealed the dependence of the material strength on the spinning solution compositions. The results achieved point to the possibility to develop nanofibrous materials with required parameters changing the methodology of spinning solution production.

  4. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Materials with Nanometer Scale Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    William D. Nix

    2004-10-31

    We have been engaged in research on the mechanical properties of materials with nanometer-scale microstructural dimensions. Our attention has been focused on studying the mechanical properties of thin films and interfaces and very small volumes of material. Because the dimensions of thin film samples are small (typically 1 mm in thickness, or less), specialized mechanical testing techniques based on nanoindentation, microbeam bending and dynamic vibration of micromachined structures have been developed and used. Here we report briefly on some of the results we have obtained over the past three years. We also give a summary of all of the dissertations, talks and publications completed on this grant during the past 15 years.

  6. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Arnold, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in various organizations. In part these are fueled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven by the need for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to sensitive information such as proprietary data. Further, the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analyses requires both processing of large volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and complex materials data input for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of economy often generates great needs for sharing a single "gold source" of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply chains. Fortunately, material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands and evolved to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access, version, and quality controls; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) data "pedigree" traceability mechanisms; (iv) data searching, reporting and viewing tools; and (v) access to the information via a wide range of interfaces. In this paper the important requirements for advanced material data management systems, future challenges and opportunities such as automated error checking, data quality characterization, identification of gaps in datasets, as well as functionalities and business models to fuel database growth and maintenance are discussed.

  7. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Barabash, Oleg M

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in various organizations. In part these are fuelled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven by the needs for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Further, the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analyses requires both processing of large volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and complex materials data input for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of economy often generates great needs for sharing a single gold source of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply-chains. Fortunately material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands and evolved to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access, version, and quality controls; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) data pedigree traceability mechanisms; (iv) data searching, reporting and viewing tools; and (v) access to the information via a wide range of interfaces. In this paper the important requirements for advanced material data management systems, future challenges and opportunities such as automated error checking, data quality characterization, identification of gaps in datasets, as well as functionalities and business models to fuel database growth and maintenance are discussed.

  8. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  9. Learning to apply models of materials while explaining their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Background:Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose:This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials. Sample:An experimental group is 27 Finnish upper secondary school students and control group included 18 students from the same school. Design and methods:In quasi-experimental setting, students were guided through predict, observe, explain activities in four practical work situations. It was intended that the structural models would encourage students to learn how to identify and apply appropriate models when predicting and explaining situations. The lessons, organised over a one-week period, began with a teacher's demonstration and continued with student experiments in which they described the properties and behaviours of six household products representing three different materials. Results:Most students in the experimental group learned to apply the models correctly, as demonstrated by post-test scores that were significantly higher than pre-test scores. The control group showed no significant difference between pre- and post-test scores. Conclusions:The findings indicate that the intervention where students engage in predict, observe, explain activities while several materials and models are confronted at the same time, had a positive effect on learning outcomes.

  10. Testing methods and techniques: Strength of materials and components. A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The methods, techniques, and devices used in testing the mechanical properties of various materials are presented. Although metals and metal alloys are featured prominently, some of the items describe tests on a variety of other materials, from concrete to plastics. Many of the tests described are modifications of standard testing procedures, intended either to adapt them to different materials and conditions, or to make them more rapid and accurate. In either case, the approaches presented can result in considerable cost savings and improved quality control. The compilation is presented in two sections. The first deals specifically with material strength testing; the second treats the special category of fracture and fatigue testing.

  11. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, K.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Allen, T.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. Here, it is vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility and deformation characteristics be defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objective is to describe the research results in two areas for the above goal: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compressed under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress.

  12. Reliability Testing of Advanced Interconnect Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R. R.; Strus, M. C.; Chiaramonti, A. N.; Kim, Y. L.; Jung, Y. J.; Read, D. T.

    2011-11-01

    We describe the development of electrical test methods to evaluate damage that determines reliability in advanced, small-scale conductors, including damascene copper and aligned carbon nanotube networks. Rapid thermal cycling induced during high-current AC stressing provides a means for measuring lifetimes associated with cyclic plasticity and/or diffusive damage in damascene copper. The specific type of damage that develops depends on the line geometry and the nature of the stress state induced within the lines during cycling. Voids form in both fully passivated and partially passivated lines under high levels of hydrostatic tension. Dislocation activity takes place in partially passivated lines in the presence of high shears. High-current DC stressing provides a means for evaluating the fabrication quality of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks, in what we believe to be the first lifetime degradation tests of such materials. While classic electromigration is unlikely in nanocarbon, we observed through resistance changes two forms of degradation that we believe are tied to the nanotube packing and resulting conduction path density through the network: a gradual build-up of damage, and a more abrupt, unpredictable form of damage accumulation, which may be linked to sudden changes in network morphology due to stressing.

  13. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  14. Preparation and properties on hollow nano-structured smoke material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Dai, Meng-yan; Fang, Guo-feng; Shi, Wei-dong; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Hai-feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser guidance and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. Notwithstanding, military smoke, as a rapid and effective passive jamming means, can effectively counteract the attack of enemy precision-guided weapons by scattering and absorbability. Conventional smoke has good attenuation capability only to visible light (0.4-0.76 μm), but hardly any effect to other electromagnetic wave band. The weapon systems of laser guidance and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including near IR (1-3 μm), middle IR (3-5 μm), far IR (8-14 μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting and using new efficient obscurant materials, which is one of the important factors that develop smoke technology, have become a focus and attracted more interests around the world. Then nano-structured materials that are developing very quickly have turned into our new choice. Hollow nano-structured materials (HNSM) have many special properties because of their nano-size wall-thickness and sub-micron grain-size. After a lot of HNSM were synthesized in this paper, their physical and chemical properties, including grain size, phase composition, microstructure, optical properties and resistivity were tested and analysed. Then the experimental results of the optical properties showed that HNSM exhibit excellent wave-absorbing ability in ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions. On the basis of the physicochemmical properties, HNSM are firstly applied in smoke technology field. And the obscuration performance of HNSM smoke was tested in smoke chamber. The testing waveband included 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. Then the main parameters were obtained, including the attenuation rate, the transmission rate, the mass extinction coefficient, the efficiency obscuring time, and the sedimentation rate, etc. The main parameters of HNSM smoke were

  15. Development and mechanical properties of construction materials from lunar simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1992-01-01

    Development of versatile engineering materials from locally available materials in space is an important step toward the establishment of outposts on the Moon and Mars. Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. It is also vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and tensile, flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility, and deformation characteristics are defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objectives include two areas: (1) thermal 'liquefaction' of lunar simulant (at about 1100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.), and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compacted under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress. Details of the development of intermediate ceramic composites (ICC) and testing for their flexural and compression characteristics were described in various reports and papers. The subject of behavior of compacted simulant under vacuum was described in previous progress reports and publications; since the presently available device allows vacuum levels up to only 10(exp -4) torr, it is recommended that a vacuum pump that can allow higher levels of vacuum be utilized for further investigation.

  16. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Arnold, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in industry, research organizations and government agencies. In part these are fuelled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and development and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven to employ sophisticated methods and software tools for managing their mission-critical materials information by the needs for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Furthermore the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analysis approaches, particularly for composite materials, requires both processing of much larger volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and much more complex materials data input requirements for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of engineering processes and outsourcing of design and development activities generates much greater needs for sharing a single gold source of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply-chains. Fortunately material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands. They have evolved from hard copy archives, through simple electronic databases, to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access control, version control, and quality control; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) mechanisms for ensuring that all data is traceable to its pedigree sources: details of testing programs, published sources, etc; (iv) tools for searching, reporting and viewing the data; and (v

  17. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) CWP (Cold Water Pipe) Laboratory Test Program. Materials Project Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Fiberglass sandwich wall structures emerged as leading candidates for the OTEC cold water pipe because of their high strength to weight ratio, their flexibility in selecting directional properties, their resistance to electrochemical interaction, their ease of deployment and their relative low cost. A review of the literature established reasonable confidence that FRP laminates could meet the OTEC requirements; however, little information was available on the performance of core materials suitable for OTEC applications. Syntactic foam cores of various composition and density were developed and tested for mechanical properties and seawater absorption.

  18. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  19. [Mechanical properties and biological evaluation of buffalo horn material].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanbin; Zhou, Qunfei; Shan, Guanghua; Cao, Ping; Huang, Yaoxiong; Ao, Ningjian

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical properties and biological evaluation of buffalo horn material were examined in this study. The effects of sampling position of buffalo horn on mechanical properties were investigated with uniaxial tension and micron indentation tests. Meanwhile, the variation of element contents in different parts of buffalo horn was determined with elemental analysis, and the microstructure of the horn was measured with scanning electron microscopy. In addition, biological evaluation of buffalo horn was studied with hemolytic test, erythrocyte morphology, platelet and erythrocyte count, and implantation into mouse. Results showed that the buffalo horn had good mechanical properties and mechanical characteristic values of it gradually increased along with the growth direction of the horn, which may be closely related to its microstructure and element content of C, N, and S in different parts of the buffalo horn. On the other hand, because the buffalo horn does not have toxicity, it therefore does not cause hemolysis of erythrocyte and has a good affinity with it. Buffalo horn has good histocompatibility but meanwhile it may induce the platelet adhesion and aggregation. Even so, it does not continue to rise to induce a large number of platelet to aggregate with resulting blood clotting. Therefore, the buffalo horn material has been proved to possess good blood compatibility according to the preliminary evaluation. PMID:25868248

  20. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells

    PubMed Central

    Fitzer, Susan C.; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Kamenos, Nicholas A.; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature. PMID:25540244

  1. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells.

    PubMed

    Fitzer, Susan C; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature.

  2. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  3. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Package O-Ring Seal Material Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E.; Ferrell, P.C.; Knight, R.C.

    1994-09-30

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Package O-Ring Seal Material Validation Test was conducted to validate the use of the Butyl material as a primary seal throughout the required temperature range. Three tests were performed at (1) 233 K ({minus}40 {degrees}F), (2) a specified operating temperature, and (3) 244 K ({minus}20 {degrees}F) before returning to room temperature. Helium leak tests were performed at each test point to determine seal performance. The two major test objectives were to establish that butyl rubber material would maintain its integrity under various conditions and within specified parameters and to evaluate changes in material properties.

  4. Tensile tests of ITER TF conductors jacket materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Kеilin, V. E.; Krivykh, A. V.; Diev, D. N.; Dinisilov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Tronza, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The set of very tough requirements has been formulated for TF jacket materials with extremely high plasticity at liquid helium temperature. The stainless steel 316LN-IG is recommended to be used for TF jacket tubes. Samples of 316LN-IG tubes (whole tubes and sub-size samples) made of the material from the same electro slag remelt have been tested in different conditions - as received tubes and tubes after prescribed compaction, 2.5% deformation at room temperature and heat treatment at 650 0C, 200 hours. The tensile tests were carried out at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures down to 4.2 K, meeting corresponding ASME and ASTM requirements. The low temperature testing devices are described. The tests results for sub-size samples and whole tubes show that the latter tests are considerably more representative and important for butt weld qualification at LHe temperature. It was observed that the ferromagnetic properties of all samples and especially of butt welds increase with lowering the temperature and increasing the degree of deformation. At LHe temperature a non-uniform and highly localized serrated deformations were observed.

  5. Factors Influencing the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural and Food Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of materials are defined, and the major factors that influence these properties of agricultural and food materials, namely, frequency of the applied radio-frequency or microwave electric fields, and water content, temperature, and density of the materials, are discussed on the ...

  6. Synthesis Properties and Electron Spin Resonance Properties of Titanic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jung Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Tak Hee; Sun, Min Ho; Jang, Young Bae; Cho, Sung June

    2009-04-19

    Titanic materials were synthesized by hydrothermal method of TiO{sub 2} anatase in 10M LiOH, 10M NaOH, and 14M KOH at 130 deg. C for 30 hours. Alkaline media were removed from the synthesized products using 0.1N HCl aqueous solution. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm, and electron spin resonance. Different shapes of synthesized products were observed through the typical electron microscope and indicated that the formation of the different morphologies depends on the treatment conditions of highly alkaline media. Many micropores were observed in the cubic or octahedral type of TiO{sub 2} samples through the typical electron microscope and Langmuir adsorption-desorption isotherm of liquid nitrogen at 77 deg. K. Electron spin resonance studies have also been carried out to verify the existence of paramagnetic sites such as oxygen vacancies on the titania samples. The effect of alkali metal ions on the morphologies and physicochemical properties of nanoscale titania are discussed.

  7. Composite materials for implant applications in the human body: Characterization and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, R.D.; Gilbertson, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    This book evaluates the implementation of composite materials for bone joint replacement in man by the use of biological models. Various composite materials have been characterized and tested. Computerized tomography was used to calculate material and structural properties of the bone around the implants.

  8. Comparative analysis of physicochemical properties of root perforation sealer materials

    PubMed Central

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Villa, Ricardo Dalla

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the solubility, dimensional alteration, pH, electrical conductivity, and radiopacity of root perforation sealer materials. Materials and Methods For the pH test, the samples were immersed in distilled water for different periods of time. Then, the samples were retained in plastic recipients, and the electrical conductivity of the solution was measured. The solubility, dimensional alteration, and radiopacity properties were evaluated according to Specification No. 57 of the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA). Statistical analyses were carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. When the sample distribution was not normal, a nonparametric ANOVA was performed with a Kruskal-Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results The results showed that white structural Portland cement (PC) had the highest solubility, while mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based cements, ProRoot MTA (Dentsply-Tulsa Dental) and MTA BIO (Ângelus Ind. Prod.), had the lowest values. MTA BIO showed the lowest dimensional alteration values and white PC presented the highest values. No differences among the tested materials were observed in the the pH and electrical conductivity analyses. Only the MTA-based cements met the ANSI/ADA recommendations regarding radiopacity, overcoming the three steps of the aluminum step wedge. Conclusions On the basis of these results, we concluded that the values of solubility and dimensional alteration of the materials were in accordance with the ANSI/ADA specifications. PCs did not fulfill the ANSI/ADA requirements regarding radiopacity. No differences were observed among the materials with respect to the pH and electrical conductivity analyses. PMID:25110644

  9. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  10. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  11. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not. PMID:27461917

  12. Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test.

    PubMed

    Frankl, My; Philips, Björn; Berggraf, Lene; Ulvenes, Pål; Johansson, Robert; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N = 82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N = 197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample α = 0.88/Student sample α = 0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (α = 0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (α = 0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (α = 0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC > 0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC = 0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (rxy  = -0.229; p < 0.01) and anxiety (rxy  = -0.315; p < 0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not.

  13. Materials Tested on the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Miria Finckenor, a materials engineer, analyzes samples in her laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The materials spent several years exposed to the harsh space env...

  14. Understanding Material Property Impacts on Co-Current Flame Spread: Improving Understanding Crucial for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary (Technical Monitor); Rangwala, Ali S.; Buckley, Steven G.; Torero, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    The prospect of long-term manned space flight brings fresh urgency to the development of an integrated and fundamental approach to the study of material flammability. Currently, NASA uses two tests, the upward flame propagation test and heat and visible smoke release rate test, to assess the flammability properties of materials to be used in space under microgravity conditions. The upward flame propagation test can be considered in the context of the 2-D analysis of Emmons. This solution incorporates material properties by a "mass transfer number", B in the boundary conditions.

  15. Development of materials screening tests for oxygen-enriched environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. L.; Pippen, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    The criteria governing materials to be used in an oxygen enriched atmosphere and tests to determine suitability for fireproof considerations in spacecraft design are discussed. The nine tests applied to materials before acceptance in spacecraft construction are presented. The application of the standard tests to determine ranking of materials is included.

  16. Trusted materials using orthogonal testing. 2015 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to prove (or disprove) that a reasonable number of simple tests can be used to provide a unique data signature for materials, changes in which could serve as a harbinger of material deviation, prompting further evaluations. The routine tests are mutually orthogonal to any currently required materials specification tests.

  17. The compressive material properties of the plantar soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, William R; Blevins, Joanna J

    2007-01-01

    The plantar soft tissue is the primary means of physical interaction between a person and the ground during locomotion. Dynamic loads greater than body weight are borne across the entire plantar surface during each step. However, most testing of these tissues has concentrated on the structural properties of the heel pad. The purpose of this study was to determine the material properties of the plantar soft tissue from six locations beneath: the great toe (subhallucal), the 1st, 3rd and 5th metatarsal heads (submetatarsal), the lateral midfoot (lateral submidfoot) and the heel (subcalcaneal). We obtained specimens from these locations from 11 young, non-diabetic donors; the tissue was cut into 2 cm x 2 cm blocks and the skin was removed. Stress relaxation experiments were conducted and the data were fit using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory. To determine tissue modulus, energy loss and the effect of test frequency, we also conducted displacement controlled triangle waves at five frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 10 Hz. The subcalcaneal tissue was found to have an increased relaxation time compared to the other areas. The subcalcaneal tissue was also found to have an increased modulus and decreased energy loss compared to the other areas. Across all areas, the modulus and energy loss increased for the 1 and 10 Hz tests compared to the other testing frequencies. This study is the first to generate material properties for all areas of the plantar soft tissue, demonstrating that the subcalcaneal tissue is different than the other plantar soft tissue areas. These data will have implications for foot computational modeling efforts and potentially for orthotic pressure reduction devices.

  18. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  19. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of versatile engineering materials from locally available materials in space is an important step toward establishment of outposts such as on the moon and Mars. Here development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. It is also vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility, and deformation characteristics are defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objectives include two areas: (1) thermal liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 1100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a traxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compacted under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or insitu stress. The second area was described in previous progress reports and publications; since the presently available device allows vacuum levels up to only 10(exp -4) torr, it is recommended that a vacuum pump that can allow higher levels of vacuum is acquired.

  20. Acoustic cloaking transformations from attainable material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a general methodology and a set of practical recipes for the construction of ultra-broadband acoustic cloaks—structures that can render themselves and a concealed object undetectable by means of acoustic scattering. The acoustic cloaks presented here are designed and function analogously to electromagnetic cloaks. However, acoustic cloaks in a fluid medium do not suffer the bandwidth limitations imposed on their electromagnetic counterparts by the finite speed of light in vacuum. In the absence of specific metamaterials having arbitrary combinations of quasi-static speed of sound and mass density, we explore the flexibility of continuum transformations that produce approximate cloaking solutions. We show that an imperfect, eikonal acoustic cloak (that is, one which is not impedance matched but is valid in the geometrical optics regime) with negligible dispersion can be designed using a simple layered geometry. Since a practical cloaking device will probably be composed of combinations of solid materials rather than fluids, it is necessary to consider the full elastic properties of such media, which support shear waves in addition to the compression waves associated with the acoustic regime. We perform a systematic theoretical and numerical investigation of the role of shear waves in elastic cloaking devices. We find that for elastic metamaterials with Poisson's ratio ν>0.49, shear waves do not alter the cloaking effect. Such metamaterials can be built from nearly incompressible rubbers (with ν≈0.499) and fluids. We expect this finding to have applications in other acoustic devices based on the form-invariance of the scalar acoustic wave equation.

  1. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 2: Aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The relative toxicity of thermodegradation (pyrolysis/combustion) products of aircraft materials was studied. Two approaches were taken to assess the biological activity of the pyrolysis/combustion products of these materials: (1) determine the acute lethality to rats from inhalation of these pyrolysates and (2) examine the tendency for sublethal exposure to the pyrolysates to disrupt behavioral (shock avoidance) performance of exposed rats. The ralative importance of lethality vs. behavioral effects in selection of a material may be dictated by whether or not individuals potentially exposed to such products, would have an opportunity to escape if they were behaviorally capable of doing so. If so, the second parameter would assume greater importance, but if not the first parameter may be of much greater importance in selecting materials.

  2. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  3. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well-determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  4. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  5. Evaluation of mechanical properties of structural materials at cryogenic temperatures and international standardization for those methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.

    2014-01-01

    Testing methods for mechanical properties of structural materials at cryogenic temperatures had been developed rapidly after 1980, however, until 1985 many researches on cryogenic structural materials have been reported using their own methods and new materials have been developed for ITER. Since 1986, a series of international inter-laboratory comparisons on the evaluation of mechanical properties of cryogenic structural materials have been performed among the participants of US-Japan cooperation project and VAMAS (the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) in order to establish unified test methods. Through these international collaborations and Round-Robin Tests, we have accumulated knowledge about mechanical tests at 4 K, and have prepared a draft of an international standard for tensile testing in liquid helium. After testing conditions, strain measurements and other technical points have been discussed, those drafts were submitted to ISO. The outline, development, and discussion of the documents so far, with the results of RRTs, were discussed.

  6. Correlations among ultrasonic propagation factors and fracture toughness properties of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1976-01-01

    Empirical evidence was developed to show that a close relation exists among fracture toughness, yield strength, and ultrasonic attenuation properties of metallic materials. The evidence was obtained by ultrasonic probing of specimens of two maraging steels and a titanium alloy. It was concluded that nondestructive ultrasonic methods can be used to indirectly evaluate fracture-related material properties. The results suggest that these nondestructive ultrasonic measurements can also serve as an adjunct to destructive testing, measurement, and analysis of fracture properties.

  7. SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program has potentially wide application to the testing and structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. The test program will provide a basis for characterization of the dynamic failure criteria for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant, insulation, inhibitor and liners. This experimental investigation will also endeavor to obtain a consistent complete set of materials test data. This test will be used to improve and revise the presently used theoretical math models for SRM propellant, insulators, inhibitor, liners, and O-ring seals.

  8. Method and apparatus for testing surface characteristics of a material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David L. (Inventor); Kersker, Karl D. (Inventor); Richardson, David E. (Inventor); Stratton, Troy C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method, apparatus and system for testing characteristics of a material sample is provided. The system includes an apparatus configured to house the material test sample while defining a sealed volume against a surface of the material test sample. A source of pressurized fluid is in communication with, and configured to pressurize, the sealed volume. A load applying apparatus is configured to apply a defined load to the material sample while the sealed volume is monitored for leakage of the pressurized fluid. Thus, the inducement of surface defects such as microcracking and crazing may be detected and their effects analyzed for a given material. The material test samples may include laminar structures formed of, for example, carbon cloth phenolic, glass cloth phenolic, silica cloth phenolic materials or carbon-carbon materials. In one embodiment the system may be configured to analyze the material test sample while an across-ply loading is applied thereto.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of elastomeric materials for O-ring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1989-01-01

    Redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster necessitated re-evaluation of the material used in the field joint O-ring seals. This research project was established to determine the viscoelastic characteristics of five candidate materials. The five materials are: two fluorocarbon compounds, two nitrile compounds, and a silicon compound. The materials were tested in a uniaxial compression test to determine the characteristic relaxation functions. These tests were performed at five different temperatures. A master material curve was developed for each material from the experimental data. The results of this study are compared to tensile relaxation tests. Application of these results to the design analysis is discussed in detail.

  10. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of experimental silicone soft lining materials.

    PubMed

    Santawisuk, Wallapat; Kanchanavasita, Widchaya; Sirisinha, Chakrit; Harnirattisai, Choltacha

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamic viscoelastic properties of experimental silicone soft lining materials, Silastic MDX 4-4210 reinforced with silica fillers. Storage modulus (E'), loss modulus (E") and damping factor (tan delta) were determined using a dynamic mechanical analyzer under a deformation strain level of 0.27% at test frequency and a temperature range of 1 Hz and 0 to 60 degrees C, respectively. The degree of silica dispersion was also studied using a field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test results indicated that the prepared silicone elastomers provided a significantly greater damping factor, but less storage modulus than GC Reline Soft and Tokuyama Sofreliner Tough (p<0.001). The storage moduli, loss moduli and damping factor of the experimental silicone elastomers increased with increasing amounts of fumed silica. In conclusion, the experimental silicone elastomers revealed acceptable dynamic viscoelastic properties to be used as denture soft lining materials.

  11. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  12. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  13. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.; Esgar, Jack B.; Gougeon, Meade; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft. long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications.

  14. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  15. Absorption properties of waste matrix materials

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J.B.

    1997-06-01

    This paper very briefly discusses the need for studies of the limiting critical concentration of radioactive waste matrix materials. Calculated limiting critical concentration values for some common waste materials are listed. However, for systems containing large quantities of waste materials, differences up to 10% in calculated k{sub eff} values are obtained by changing cross section data sets. Therefore, experimental results are needed to compare with calculation results for resolving these differences and establishing realistic biases.

  16. Studies of molecular properties of polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace environment effects (high energy electrons, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen, and aircraft fluids) on polymeric and composite materials considered for structural use in spacecraft and advanced aircraft are examined. These materials include Mylar, Ultem, and Kapton. In addition to providing information on the behavior of the materials, attempts are made to relate the measurements to the molecular processes occurring in the material. A summary and overview of the technical aspects are given along with a list of the papers that resulted from the studies. The actual papers are included in the appendices and a glossary of technical terms and definitions is included in the front matter.

  17. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic Material Tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Ehle, Curt; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RSRM nozzle liner components have been analyzed and tested to explore the occurrence of anomalous material performance known as pocketing erosion. Primary physical factors that contribute to pocketing seem to include the geometric permeability, which governs pore pressure magnitudes and hence load, and carbon fiber high temperature tensile strength, which defines a material limiting capability. The study reports on the results of a coupled thermostructural finite element analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) material tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory (the LHMEL facility). Modeled test configurations will be limited to the special case of where temperature gradients are oriented perpendicular to the composite material ply angle. Analyses were conducted using a transient, one-dimensional flow/thermal finite element code that models pore pressure and temperature distributions and in an explicitly coupled formulation, passes this information to a 2-dimensional finite element structural model for determination of the stress/deformation behavior of the orthotropic fiber/matrix CCP. Pore pressures are generated by thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin which evolve as a multi-component gas phase which is partially trapped in the porous microstructure of the composite. The nature of resultant pressures are described by using the Darcy relationships which have been modified to permit a multi-specie mass and momentum balance including water vapor condensation. Solution to the conjugate flow/thermal equations were performed using the SINDA code. Of particular importance to this problem was the implementation of a char and deformation state dependent (geometric) permeability as describing a first order interaction between the flow/thermal and structural models. Material property models are used to characterize the solid phase mechanical stiffness and failure. Structural calculations were performed using the ABAQUS code. Iterations were made

  18. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  19. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  20. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  1. Effect of storage on tensile material properties of bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Chiao; Kemper, Andrew R; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2014-01-01

    Cadaveric tissue models play an important role in the assessment and optimization of novel restraint systems for reducing abdominal injuries. However, the effect of tissue preservation by means of freezing on the material properties of abdominal tissues remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of frozen storage time on the material responses of the liver parenchyma in tensile loading. Specimens from ten bovine livers were equally divided into three groups: fresh, 30-day frozen storage, and 60-day frozen storage. All preserved specimens were stored at -12°C. Dog-bone specimens from each preservation group were randomly assigned to one of three strain rates (0.01s(-1), 0.1s(-1), and 1.0s(-1)) and tested to failure in tensile loading. The local material response recorded at the tear location and the global material response of the whole specimen of the liver parenchyma specimens were investigated based on the experimental data and optimized analytical material models. The local and global failure strains decreased significantly between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 30 days (p<0.05), and between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 60 days (p<0.05) for all three loading rates. Changes on the material model parameters were also observed between fresh and preserved specimens. Preservation by means of frozen storage was found to affect both the material and failure response of bovine liver parenchyma in tensile loading. The stiffness of the tissue increased with increased preservation time and increased strain rate. In summary, significant changes (p<0.05) between the failure strain of previously frozen liver parenchyma samples and fresh samples were demonstrated at both global and local levels in this study. In addition, nonlinear and viscoelastic characteristics of the liver parenchyma were observed in tension for both fresh and preserved samples.

  2. Elucidating the role of interfacial materials properties in microfluidic packages.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thayne L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to discover a method to investigate the properties of interfaces as described by a numerical physical model. The model used was adopted from literature and applied to a commercially available multiphysics software package. By doing this the internal properties of simple structures could be elucidated and then readily applied to more complex structures such as valves and pumps in laminate microfluidic structures. A numerical finite element multi-scale model of a cohesive interface comprised of heterogeneous material properties was used to elucidate irreversible damage from applied strain energy. An unknown internal state variable was applied to characterize the damage process. Using a constrained blister test, this unknown internal state variable could be determined for an adherend/adhesive/adherend body. This is particularly interesting for laminate systems with microfluidic and microstructures contained within the body. A laminate structure was designed and fabricated that could accommodate a variety of binary systems joined using nearly any technique such as adhesive, welding (solvent, laser, ultrasonic, RF, etc.), or thermal. The adhesive method was the most successful and easy to implement but also one of the more difficult to understand, especially over long periods of time. Welding methods are meant to achieve a bond that is similar to bulk properties and so are easier to predict. However, methods of welding often produce defects in the bonds.. Examples of the test structures used to elucidate the internal properties of the model were shown and demonstrated. The real life examples used this research to improve upon current designs and aided in creating complex structures for sensor and other applications.

  3. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  4. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waal's forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have

  5. Investigation of the mechanical properties of ceramic breeder materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienst, W.; Zimmermann, H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to characterize ceramic breeder materials for fusion reactors, mechanical properties were measured on Li 2SiO 3, Li 4SiO 4, and also on some LiAlO 2 samples for comparison. Literature data on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of all breeder materials considered were compiled to compare their presumable sensitivity to thermal stresses. The highest level of thermal shock resistance is predicted for LiAlO 2, and the lowest level for Li 4SiO 4. Thermal shock tests, made by dipping pellets into a hot metal melt, confined the relation for LiAlO 2 and Li 4SiO 4. Young's modulus was determined by ultrasound velocity measurement, and fracture strength was measured on pellet samples under compression. The scatter in compressive strength is exceptionally large, partly due to various grain size, and does not suggest a definite ranking of the different breeder materials. Compressive creep tests were made at temperatures of 750-950°C for about 100 h each. An extrapolated creep rate of 10 -6/h was used to estimate a conservative temperature limit of total microstructure stability.

  6. Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing on Fuel Cladding Using an Expanded Plug Wedge Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2013-08-01

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at ORNL and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials. This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell utilizing an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are the simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of specimen strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results. The basic approach of this test method is to apply an axial compressive load to a cylindrical plug of polyurethane (or other materials) fitted inside a short ring of the test material to achieve radial expansion of the specimen. The diameter increase of the specimen is used to calculate the circumferential strain accrued during the test. The other two basic measurements are total applied load and amount of plug compression (extension). A simple procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves. However, several deficiencies exist in this expanded-plug loading ring test, which will impact accuracy of test results and introduce potential shear failure of the specimen due to inherited large axial compressive stress from the expansion plug test. First of all, the highly non-uniform stress and strain distribution resulted in the gage section of the clad. To ensure reliable testing and test repeatability, the potential for highly non-uniform stress distribution or displacement/strain deformation has to be eliminated at the gage section of the specimen. Second, significant

  7. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  8. Dielectric properties of agricultural materials and their application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is prepared as a comprehensive source of information on dielectric properties of agricultural materials for scientific researchers and engineers involved in practical application of radio-frequency and microwave energy for potential problem solutions. Dielectric properties of materials det...

  9. Transport processes in partially saturate concrete: Testing and liquid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Chiara

    The measurement of transport properties of concrete is considered by many to have the potential to serve as a performance criterion that can be related to concrete durability. However, the sensitivity of transport tests to several parameters combined with the low permeability of concrete complicates the testing. Gas permeability and diffusivity test methods are attractive due to the ease of testing, their non-destructive nature and their potential to correlate to in-field carbonation of reinforced concrete structures. This work was aimed at investigating the potential of existing gas transport tests as a way to reliably quantify transport properties in concrete. In this study gas permeability and diffusivity test methods were analyzed comparing their performance in terms of repeatability and variability. The influence of several parameters was investigated such as moisture content, mixture proportions and gas flow. A closer look to the influence of pressure revealed an anomalous trend of permeability with respect to pressure. An alternative calculation is proposed in an effort to move towards the determination of intrinsic material properties that can serve as an input for service life prediction models. The impact of deicing salts exposure was also analyzed with respect to their alteration of the degree of saturation as this may affect gas transport in cementitious materials. Limited information were previously available on liquid properties over a wide range of concentrations. To overcome this limitation, this study quantified surface tension, viscosity in presence of deicing salts in a broad concentration range and at different temperatures. Existing models were applied to predict the change of fluid properties during drying. Vapor desorption isotherms were obtained to investigate the influence of deicing salts presence on the non-linear moisture diffusion coefficient. Semi-empirical models were used to quantify the initiation and the rate of drying using liquid

  10. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  11. ABINIT: First-principles approach to material and nanosystem properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, X.; Amadon, B.; Anglade, P.-M.; Beuken, J.-M.; Bottin, F.; Boulanger, P.; Bruneval, F.; Caliste, D.; Caracas, R.; Côté, M.; Deutsch, T.; Genovese, L.; Ghosez, Ph.; Giantomassi, M.; Goedecker, S.; Hamann, D. R.; Hermet, P.; Jollet, F.; Jomard, G.; Leroux, S.; Mancini, M.; Mazevet, S.; Oliveira, M. J. T.; Onida, G.; Pouillon, Y.; Rangel, T.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Sangalli, D.; Shaltaf, R.; Torrent, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Zerah, G.; Zwanziger, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    ABINIT [ http://www.abinit.org] allows one to study, from first-principles, systems made of electrons and nuclei (e.g. periodic solids, molecules, nanostructures, etc.), on the basis of Density-Functional Theory (DFT) and Many-Body Perturbation Theory. Beyond the computation of the total energy, charge density and electronic structure of such systems, ABINIT also implements many dynamical, dielectric, thermodynamical, mechanical, or electronic properties, at different levels of approximation. The present paper provides an exhaustive account of the capabilities of ABINIT. It should be helpful to scientists that are not familiarized with ABINIT, as well as to already regular users. First, we give a broad overview of ABINIT, including the list of the capabilities and how to access them. Then, we present in more details the recent, advanced, developments of ABINIT, with adequate references to the underlying theory, as well as the relevant input variables, tests and, if available, ABINIT tutorials. Program summaryProgram title: ABINIT Catalogue identifier: AEEU_v1_0 Distribution format: tar.gz Journal reference: Comput. Phys. Comm. Programming language: Fortran95, PERL scripts, Python scripts Computer: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Operating system: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Sequential, or parallel with proven speed-up up to one thousand processors. RAM: Ranges from a few Mbytes to several hundred Gbytes, depending on the input file. Classification: 7.3, 7.8 External routines: (all optional) BigDFT [1], ETSF IO [2], libxc [3], NetCDF [4], MPI [5], Wannier90 [6] Nature of problem: This package has the purpose of computing accurately material and nanostructure properties: electronic structure, bond lengths, bond angles, primitive cell size, cohesive energy, dielectric properties, vibrational properties, elastic properties, optical properties, magnetic properties, non-linear couplings, electronic and

  12. Exposure effects on the optical properties of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Sarah; Cathcart, J. Michael; Harrell, J. Timothy

    2008-04-01

    Georgia Tech recently initiated a weathering effects measurement program to monitor the optical properties of several common building materials. A set of common building materials were placed outdoors and optical property measurements made over a series of weeks to assess the impact of exposure on these properties. Both reflectivity and emissivity measurements were made. Materials in this program included aluminum flashing, plastic sheets, bricks, roof shingles, and tarps. This paper will discuss the measurement approach, experimental setup, and present preliminary results from the optical property measurements.

  13. "TPSX: Thermal Protection System Expert and Material Property Database"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas H.; Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a computer program for storing, organizing, and accessing information about thermal protection materials. The program, called Thermal Protection Systems Expert and Material Property Database, or TPSX, is available for the Microsoft Windows operating system. An "on-line" version is also accessible on the World Wide Web. TPSX is designed to be a high-quality source for TPS material properties presented in a convenient, easily accessible form for use by engineers and researchers in the field of high-speed vehicle design. Data can be displayed and printed in several formats. An information window displays a brief description of the material with properties at standard pressure and temperature. A spread sheet window displays complete, detailed property information. Properties which are a function of temperature and/or pressure can be displayed as graphs. In any display the data can be converted from English to SI units with the click of a button. Two material databases included with TPSX are: 1) materials used and/or developed by the Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, and 2) a database compiled by NASA Johnson Space Center 9JSC). The Ames database contains over 60 advanced TPS materials including flexible blankets, rigid ceramic tiles, and ultra-high temperature ceramics. The JSC database contains over 130 insulative and structural materials. The Ames database is periodically updated and expanded as required to include newly developed materials and material property refinements.

  14. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  15. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects. PMID:19141951

  16. Materials properties, loads, and stress analysis, Spartan REM: Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical properties, load tests, and stress analysis of the Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) is presented. The fracture properties of the components of the unit are also discussed. Detailed engineering drawings are included.

  17. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  18. MISSE-X Tests the Materials of Tomorrow's Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Technology Demonstration Missions (TDM) focus on maturing technology for use in future missions. The Materials on International Space Station Experiment-X, MISSE-X, will test numerous materi...

  19. Research on the icephobic properties of fluoropolymer-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuqing; Xia, Qiang; Zhu, Lin; Xue, Jian; Wang, Qingjun; Chen, Qing-min

    2011-03-01

    Fluoropolymer, because of the extremely low surface energy, could be non-stick to water and thus could be a good candidate as anti-icing materials. In this paper, the icephobic properties of a series of fluoropolymer materials including pristine PTFE plates (P-PTFE), sandblasted PTFE plates (SB-PTFE), two PTFE coatings (SNF-1 and SNF-CO1), a fluorinated room-temperature vulcanized silicone rubber coating (F-RTV) and a fluorinated polyurethane coating (F-PU) have been investigated by using SEM, XPS, ice adhesion strength (tensile and shear) tests, and static and dynamic water contact angle analysis. Results show that the fluoropolymer material with a smooth surface can significantly reduce ice adhesion strength but do not show obvious effect in reducing ice accretion at -8 °C. Fluoropolymers with sub-micron surface structures can improve the hydrophobicity at normal temperature. It leads to an efficient reduction in the ice accretion on the surface at -8 °C, due to the superhydrophobicity of the materials. But the hydrophobicity of this surface descends at a low temperature with high humidity. Consequently, once ice layer formed on the surface, the ice adhesion strength enhanced rapidly due to the existence of the sub-micron structures. Ice adhesion strength of fluoropolymers is highly correlated to CA reduction observed when the temperature was changed from 20 °C to -8 °C. This property is associated with the submicron structure on the surface, which allows water condensed in the interspace between the sub-micron protrudes at a low temperature, and leads to a reduced contact angle, as well as a significantly increased ice adhesion strength.

  20. Comparison of Autogenous and Alloplastic Cranioplasty Materials Following Impact Testing.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert D; Salt, Craig; Konofaos, Petros

    2015-07-01

    Alloplastic materials are often used when significant defects exist. Benefits include no donor site morbidity, relative ease of use, limitless supply, and predictable durability. Depending on the type of alloplast, limitations include a persistent risk of extrusion and infection. Of particular interest in relation to cranioplasties is the ability of the material to provide neuroprotection. The integrity and neuroprotective properties of autologous bone flaps, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and high-density porous polyethylene (PP) were evaluated following impact testing. Three groups of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) underwent a cranioplasty with either a bone flap, PMMA, or PP. In the control group (N = 4), the animals had no cranioplasty. At the end of the eighth week, an impact was delivered to the center of each cranioplasty. At necropsy each cranium and brain was evaluated grossly and histologically. There was a statistical significant difference among groups for the severity of the hemorrhage (P = 0.022) and the grade of cranioplasty disruption (P = 0.0045). Autologous bone was found to be the weakest of the materials tested. In this group severe injury resulted at much lower energy levels than was observed in the control, PMMA, or PP groups. Both PMMA and PP were resistant to fracture and disruption. PMMA provided the greatest neuroprotection, followed by PP. Autologous bone provided the least protection with cranioplasty disruption and severe brain injury occurring in every patient. Brain injury patterns correlated with the degree of cranioplasty disruption regardless of the cranioplasty material. Regardless of the energy of impact, lack of dislodgement generally resulted in no obvious brain injury.

  1. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  2. GUIDE TO CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND TESTING INSTRUMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Projects, Inc., Washington, DC.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY WAS PREPARED FOR CONSULTANTS WHO SERVE OEO MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARM WORKER PROGRAMS. THE FIRST SECTION PERTAINS TO CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND INCLUDES (1) READING AND LANGUAGE, (2) ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, (3) SOCIAL STUDIES, (4) MATHEMATICS, (5) VOCATIONAL, AND (6) CHILDREN'S SERIES. THE SECOND PART IS A LIST OF TESTING…

  3. Novel organosilicon phantoms as testing material for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Armanetti, Paolo; Masciullo, Cecilia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Cecchini, Marco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The contrast in photoacoustic (PA) imaging depends on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, as well as on his optical absorption and scatter properties. Thanks to these futures, this novel modality could offer additional specificity compared to conventional ultrasound techniques, being able to reveal the signal of absorbing materials and chomophores, e.g. endogenous molecules like haemoglobin or specific near infrared dyes or plasmonic contrast agents. The development of semi-quantitative protocols for the assessment of the contrast enhancement, is one of the key aspect of the ongoing research, that could open new routes to the use of PA imaging for a variety of applications in preclinical research of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we designed and tested a tissue mimicking polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom for photoacoustic applications, with tailored biomechanical/optical and geometrical properties. In order to modulate the light fluence and penetration, that remains one of the major challenge for this technique, we added titanium dioxide and black ink, rendering the optical absorption and scattering coefficients similar to those of biological tissues. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  4. Characterization of sapphire: For its material properties at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Harman Singh

    There are numerous needs for sensing, one of which is in pressure sensing for high temperature application such as combustion related process and embedded in aircraft wings for reusable space vehicles. Currently, silicon based MEMS technology is used for pressure sensing. However, due to material properties the sensors have a limited range of approximately 600 °C which is capable of being pushed towards 1000 °C with active cooling. This can introduce reliability issues when you add more parts and high flow rates to remove large amounts of heat. To overcome this challenge, sapphire is investigated for optical based pressure transducers at temperatures approaching 1400 °C. Due to its hardness and chemical inertness, traditional cutting and etching methods used in MEMS technology are not applicable. A method that is being investigated as a possible alternative is laser machining using a picosecond laser. In this research, we study the material property changes that occur from laser machining and quantify the changes with the experimental results obtained by testing sapphire at high-temperature with a standard 4-point bending set-up.

  5. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  6. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  7. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Son, Sehwan; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidene) phenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl) 4'-[(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it.

  8. Materials development for ITER shielding and test blanket in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Wu, J. H.; Liu, X.; Wang, P. H.; Wang, Z. H.; Li, Z. N.; Wang, X. S.; Zhang, P. C.; Zhang, N. M.; Fu, H. Y.; Liu, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    China is a member of the ITER program and is developing her own materials for its shielding and test blanket modules. The materials include vacuum-hot-pressing (VHP) Be, CuCrZr alloy, 316L(N) and China low activation ferritic/martensitic (CLF-1) steels. Joining technologies including Be/Cu hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and electron beam (EB) weldability of 316L(N) were investigated. Chinese VHP-Be showed good properties, with BeO content and ductility that satisfy the ITER requirements. Be/Cu mock-ups were fabricated for Be qualification tests at simulated ITER vertical displacement event (VDE) and heat flux cycling conditions. Fine microstructure and good mechanical strength of the CuCrZr alloy were achieved by a pre-forging treatment, while the weldability of 316L(N) by EB was demonstrated for welding depths varying from 5 to 80 mm. Fine microstructure, high strength, and good ductility were achieved in CLF-1 steel by an optimized normalizing, tempering and aging procedure.

  9. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  10. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, A.; Seidt, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen's stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s-1 to 200 s-1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing).

  11. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  12. Impact of time-dependency on long-term material testing and modeling of polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeffrey E.

    2008-09-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has an important role in orthopaedic implants because of its favorable properties as an articulating surface. UHMWPE component testing often focuses on measuring the long-term fatigue or wear response of the material that could be realized during many years of use. However, the impact of time-dependent properties of UHMWPE on such tests is not well characterized. In particular, altering the frequency of loading and allowing for material creep or relaxation can significantly alter the stress/strain state of the material, and therefore affect long-term mechanical properties (e.g. wear, fatigue) that are dependent on the constitutive state. The goal of this work is to use advanced, validated material modeling of UHMPWE that incorporates time-dependent properties to explore the effects of frequency and rest time on the mechanical response of UHMWPE.

  13. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. PMID:27376498

  14. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided.

  15. Testing of novel desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents the results of testing of desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling and dehumidification applications. In testing desiccant materials, we used a gravimetric technique to measure the moisture capacity of four desiccant materials. These materials were microporous silica gel powder, macroporous silica gel powder, polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, and a silica-gel/epoxy composite. The microporous silica gel powder had the most desirable moisture capacity properties of the four materials tested for desiccant cooling applications. The polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt showed some promise. Our testing of dehumidifier matrices included measuring the pressure drop and heat- and mass-transfer rate characteristics of a silica-gel/corrugated dehumidifier matrix under conditions typical of desiccant cooling systems. The matrix is a section of a commercial dehumidifier. The transient dehumidification capacity of the matrix was calculated from the tests and compared with previously tested matrices. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  17. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation...

  18. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation...

  19. Properties and testing of loose-fill cellulosic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.; Harris, W.W.

    1982-02-01

    New methods for measuring thermal resistance, permeability to air, settled density, and compressibility of loose-fill cellulosic insulation (LFCI) are described. The resultant property measurements are discussed. Chemical analyses were completed on the LFCI in the sampling. The results represent a first attempt to assess the variability of products and fire-retardant formulations. Chemical characteristics have been compared with test performance. Compounds present in the insulations tested were not identified directly but were deduced from elemental analyses. The amount of water-soluble fire retardant in LFCI products were found to vary from 14 to 36 wt %. Formulations containing from one to five separate compounds were identified. It was observed that products containing above 20 wt % fire-retardant chemicals had the highest acceptance (pass) rate for the combustion tests specified by federal specification HH-I-515D. The overall performance of the LFCI materials tested was poor as measured by HH-I-515D methods. Results for the important smoldering-combustion test yielded passing rates from 30.6 to 62.7%. Seventy-five percent of the LFCI specimens passed the radiant panel test. The percentage of the sample that passed both the smoldering-combustion and the radiant panel test ranged from 42 to 50%. The blower-cyclone-shaker (BCS) test for settled density has been subjected to continued interlaboratory evaluation.Laboratory results have been compared with field measurements to determine the applicability of the test as a predictor. The average of the results of the BCS Test compares very closely (<1%) with field data from four cities. Individual materials, however, can show differences between field and laboratory results of up to 20%.

  20. Effect of High-Humidity Testing on Material Parameters of Flexible Printed Circuit Board Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahokallio, Sanna; Saarinen, Kirsi; Frisk, Laura

    2013-09-01

    The tendency of polymers to absorb moisture impairs especially their electrical and mechanical properties. These are important characteristics for printed circuit board (PCB) materials, which should provide mechanical support as well as electrical insulation in many different environments in order to guarantee safe operation for electrical devices. Moreover, the effects of moisture are accelerated at increased temperatures. In this study, three flexible PCB dielectric materials, namely polyimide (PI), fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were aged over different periods of time in a high-humidity test, in which the temperature was 85°C and relative humidity 85%. After aging, the changes in the structure of the polymers were studied by determining different material parameters such as modulus of elasticity, glass-transition temperature, melting point, coefficient of thermal expansion, water absorption, and crystallinity, and changes in the chemical structure with several techniques including thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, moisture analysis, and a precision scale. The results showed that PI was extremely stable under the aging conditions and therefore an excellent choice for electrical applications under harsh conditions. Similarly, FEP proved to be relatively stable under the applied aging conditions. However, its crystallinity increased markedly during aging, and after 6000 h of aging the results indicated oxidation. PET suffered from hydrolysis during the test, leading to its embrittlement after 2000 h of aging.

  1. Simple Test For Organic Material In Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barzana, Eduardo; Klibanov, Alexander; Karel, Marcus

    1989-01-01

    Dried enzymes and color indicators test sensitively and selectively. Dehydrated enzymes used in convenient method for analyzing gases for specific organic substances, outside laboratory. Method used to detect alcohol in breath or formaldehyde in gas streams. Used for simple semiquantitative detection or for precise quantitative measurement.

  2. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Test cells comprise specimen sand contained in a latex membrane (with a grid pattern for CCD cameras) between metal end plates and housed in a water-filled Lexan jacket. Experiment flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture.

  3. Hydrodynamics and Material Properties Experiments Using Pulsed Power Techniques*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinovsky, Robert; Trainor, R. James

    1999-06-01

    Within the last few years a new approach for exploring dynamic material properties and advanced hydrodynamics at extreme conditions has joined the traditional techniques of high velocity guns,and explosives. The principle tool is the high precision, magnetically imploded, near-solid density liner. The most attractive pulse power system for driving such experiments is an ultra-highcurrent, low impedance, microsecond time-scale source that is economical both the build and operate. Liner specifications vary but in general share requirements for a high degree of symmetry and uniformity after implosion. When imploded in free flight to velocities 10-30 km/sec and kinetic energies of from one to 25 MJ/cm of height, liners are attractive impactors for producing strong (>10 Mbar) shocks in the target. Simple geometries can, in principle, produce multi-shock environments to reach off-hugoniot states. When filled with a compressible material, liners can deliver almost adiabatic compression to the target. When the liner surrounds a (small)nearly incompressible target material, for example a condensed noble gas, a liner can deliver enormous pressure to the target almost isentropically. When the compressible material is a magnetic field, flux compression can results in compressed fields above 1000 tesla in macroscopic volumes for materials studies.In this paper we will review basic scaling argumentsthat set the scale of environments available. We will mention the pulse power technology under development at Los Alamos and provide a summary of results from experiments testing solid metal liners under magnetic drive and a few examples of experiments performed withinterim systems. Other papers in this conference will provide specific proposals for pulse power driven shock-wave experiments.

  4. Problems of predicting material property retention during long term service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Yu. P.; Khomutov, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure of materials-science studies accompanying the process of product development, manufacture and service is offered. It provides correct selection of materials, trustworthy prediction of their behavior, high reliability of their operation in products of space-rocket application. Reliable prediction of material behavior during long-term service is achieved by breaking up the complex effect of the environment into individual factors and by analyzing the effect of each factor on the properties of the material.

  5. Data base for crack growth properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Lawrence, Victor B.; Nguy, Henry L.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized data base of crack growth properties of materials was developed for use in fracture control analysis of rocket engine components and other NASA space hardware. The software system has files of basic crack growth rate data, other fracture mechanics material properties such as fracture toughness and environmental crack growth threshold values, and plotting and fitting routines for deriving material properties for use in fracture control analysis. An extensive amount of data was collected and entered, and work is continuing on compiling additional data. The data base and software codes are useful both for fracture control analysis and for evaluation or development of improved crack growth theories.

  6. IMAP: Interferometry for Material Property Measurement in MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.D.; Miller, S.L.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-03-10

    An interferometric technique has been developed for non-destructive, high-confidence, in-situ determination of material properties in MEMS. By using interferometry to measure the full deflection curves of beams pulled toward the substrate under electrostatic loads, the actual behavior of the beams has been modeled. No other method for determining material properties allows such detailed knowledge of device behavior to be gathered. Values for material properties and non-idealities (such as support post compliance) have then been extracted which minimize the error between the measured and modeled deflections. High accuracy and resolution have been demonstrated, allowing the measurements to be used to enhance process control.

  7. Nonlinear elastic properties of various man-made materials

    SciTech Connect

    Darvennes, C.M.; Hou, X.

    1998-12-31

    Second harmonic generation was measured in several man-made materials for possible application of nonlinear elastic properties to non-destructive testing. Samples included several thicknesses of two types of carbon fiber/polymer matrix composites, three types of concretes, and plywood. Steel and Aluminum specimens were used as references and one of the composite samples was evaluated before and after fatigue cycles. Some interesting observations were made: (1) the two composites were much more nonlinear than the metals, (2) the concretes and the wood were extremely absorptive, (3) one of the concrete samples exhibited a third harmonic but no second harmonic, and (4) fatigue cycles significantly increased the second harmonic, even though no damage was observed by C-scan. The possible applications of these results to NDE will be discussed.

  8. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  9. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials, test series 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Bricker, R. W.; Kuminecz, J. F.; Supkis, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft flammability tests in which the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials was evaluated by comparing their burning characteristics with those of other fire-resistant aircraft materials were described. New-fire-resistant materials that are more economical and better suited for aircraft use than the previously tested fire-resistant materials were tested. The fuel ignition source for one test was JP-4; a smokeless fuel was used for the other test. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. The results indicate that, similar to the fire-resistant materials tested previously, the new materials decompose rather than ignite and do not support fire propagation. Furthermore, the new materials did not produce a flash fire.

  10. Optical techniques for determining dynamic material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Miniature plates are laser-launched with a 10-Joule Nd:YAG for one-dimensional (1-D) impacts on to target materials much like gas gun experiments and explosive plane wave plate launch. By making the experiments small, flyer plates (3 mm diameter x 50 micron thick) and targets (10 mm diameter x 200 micron thick), 1-D impact experiments can be performed in a standard laser-optical laboratory with minimum confinement and collateral damage. The laser-launched plates do not require the traditional sabot on gas guns nor the explosives needed for explosive planewave lenses, and as a result are much more amenable to a wide variety of materials and applications. Because of the small size very high pressure gradients can be generated with relative ease. The high pressure gradients result in very high strains and strain rates that are not easily generated by other experimental methods. The small size and short shock duration (1 - 20 ns) are ideal for dynamically measuring bond strengths of micron-thick coatings. Experimental techniques, equipment, and dynamic material results are reported.

  11. Material behavior and materials problems in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Owens, D.K.; Heifetz, D.B.; Mills, B.E.; Pontau, A.E.; Wampler, W.R.; Doyle, B.L.; Lee, S.R.; Watson, R.D.; Croessmann, C.D.

    1988-05-01

    This paper reviews the experience with first-wall materials over a 20-month period of operation spanning 1985--1987. Experience with the axisymmetric inner wall limiter, constructed of graphite tiles, will be described including the necessary conditioning procedures needed for impurity and particle control of high power ({le}20 MW) neutral injection experiments. The thermal effects in disruptions have been quantified and no significant damage to the bumper limiter has occurred as a result of disruptions. Carbon and metal impurity redeposition effects have been quantified through surface analysis of wall samples. Estimates of the tritium retention in the graphite limiter tiles and redeposited carbon films have been made based on analysis of deuterium retention in removed graphite tiles and wall samples. New limiter structures have been designed using a 2D carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material for RF antenna protection. Laboratory tests of the important thermal, mechanical and vacuum properties of C/C materials will be described. Finally, the last series of experiments in TFTR with in-situ Zr/Al surface pumps will be described. Problems with Ar/Al embrittlement have led to the removal of the getter material from the in-torus environment. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of eleven alloys were evaluated. The eleven alloys studied were three nitriding alloys (Super Nitralloy, Nitralloy 135, and Nitralloy N), four case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS 600, CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2), and four throughhardening alloys (Vasco Matrix II,AISI W-1, AISI S-2 and AISI O-2). Several different heat treatments and/or melting processes were studied on the three carburizing alloy steels. Metallurgical analyses were made before and after the RC rig tests. Test data were statistically analyzed using the Weibull distribution function. B-10 lives were compared versus VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and carburized VAR AISI 9310, as reference alloys.

  13. Outgassing and contamination properties of prospective Apollo Telescope Mount materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poehlmann, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the test techniques used to evaluate the outgassing and contamination characteristics of prospective Apollo telescope mount (ATM) materials are reviewed. These include a screening test providing information on weight losses of materials, weights of their condensed outgas products, and white-light scattered by the condensed products. They also include an ultraviolet-region screening test and a comprehensive continuous in situ weight-loss test. Examples are presented of data obtained from each of the tests on various prospective ATM materials.

  14. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 4. Optical materials, Part 2 - Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the optical properties of laser materials. Topics considered include: fundamental properties; transmitting materials; crystals; glasses; plastics; filter materials; mirror and reflector materials; polarizer materials; special properties; linear electrooptic materials; magnetooptic materials; elastooptic materials; photorefractive materials; and liquid crystals.

  15. Measurement of mechanical and thermophysical properties of dimensionally stable materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawal, Suraj P.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical, thermal, and physical property test data was generated for as-fabricated advanced composite materials at room temperature (RT), -150 and 250 F. The results are documented of mechanical and thermophysical property tests of IM7/PEEK and discontinuous SiC/Al (particulate (p) and whisker (w) reinforced) composites which were tested at three different temperatures to determine the effect of temperature on material properties. The specific material systems tested were IM7/PEEK (0)8, (0, + or - 45, 90)s, (+ or - 30, 04)s, 25 vol. pct. (v/o) SiCp/Al, and 25 v/o SiCw/Al. RT material property results of IM7/PEEK were in good agreement with the predicted values, providing a measure of consolidation integrity attained during fabrication. Results of mechanical property tests indicated that modulus values at each test temperature were identical, whereas the strength (e.g., tensile, compressive, flexural, and shear) values were the same at -150 F, and RT, and gradually decreased as the test temperature was increased to 250 F. Similar trends in the strength values was also observed in discontinuous SiC/Al composites. These results indicate that the effect of temperature was more pronounced on the strength values than modulus values.

  16. Material Properties for the Simulation of Cold Pressing of Armstrong CP-Ti Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Kiggans, Jim; Peter, William H; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Wang, Yanli; Clark, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    A review of the mechanical property data needed for the process simulation of cold pressing was conducted. The material property data for the newly developed low-cost commercially pure titanium, CP-Ti, powders made by Armstrong process was presented. The following data was obtained from mechanical testing: Youngs modulus, bulk modulus, failure line for the plasticity model. The Youngs modulus and bulk modulus were obtained from the uniaxial compression tests of a cylinder. The failure line for the plasticity model was obtained from failure compression tests. Materials testing software was written to provide automatic test control and data acquisition during material testing, such as axial displacement, axial stress, radial strain, and failure stress.

  17. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, A.R.; Cotts, D.B.; Wall, J.A.; Bouquet, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    With an eye towards applications in the space radiation environment and in nuclear instrumentation, the contributors to this volume provide a multi-disciplinary review of theory and experimentation with conductivity in dielectrics, especially insulators, to establish guidelines for design of materials which do not electrically discharge or breakdown. The authors' analysis of polymer literature suggests several candidates for the purpose of proposing anti-static polymers for use in the space radiation environment. Experimental data is systematically referenced and suggestions for improving such data are made. The book also contains an extensive reference list.

  18. The development of test methodology for testing glassy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1987-01-01

    The inherent brittleness of glass invariably leads to a large variability in strength data and a time dependence in strength (i.e., static fatigue). Loading rate plays a large role in strength values. Glass is found to be weaker when supporting loads over long periods as compared to glass which undergoes rapid loading. In this instance the purpose of rapid loading is to fail the glass before any significant crack growth occurs. However, a decrease in strength occurs with a decrease in loading rate, pursuant to substantial crack extension. These properties complicate the structural design allowable for the utilization of glass components in applications such as mirrors for the Space Telescope and AXAF for Spacelab and the space station.

  19. Microwave sensors for nondestructive testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasri, Tuami; Glay, David; Mamouni, Ahmed; Leroy, Yves

    1999-10-01

    Much of today's applications in nondestructive testing by microwaves use an automatic network analyzer. As a result, there is a need for systems to reduce the cost of this kind of techniques. Fortunately, now we can benefit from the cost reduction of the microwave components, induced by the considerable development of the communication market, around 2 and 10 GHz. So, it seems reasonable to think that microwaves will take advantage of this new situation to assert themselves in this application field. In this context we conceive and develop original equipment competitive in term of price and reliability.

  20. Preparation and Use of Polish Mushroom Proficiency Testing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina

    2008-08-14

    Mushroom reference materials have been prepared and characterized for the use in proficiency tests according to a procedure established within the frame of an IAEA Interregional Technical Cooperation Project. The materials were used for conducting the proficiency tests in Poland in 2005-2007. The results obtained by participating laboratories are presented and discussed.

  1. Material Properties of the Human Lumbar Facet Joint Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jesse S.; Khalsa, Partap S.

    2005-01-01

    The human facet joint capsule is one of the structures in the lumbar spine that constrains motions of vertebrae during global spine loading (e.g., physiological flexion). Computational models of the spine have not been able to include accurate nonlinear and viscoelastic material properties, as they have not previously been measured. Capsules were tested using a uniaxial ramp-hold protocol or a haversine displacement protocol using a commercially available materials testing device. Plane strain was measured optically. Capsules were tested both parallel and perpendicular to the dominant orientation of the collagen fibers in the capsules. Viscoelastic material properties were determined. Parallel to the dominant orientation of the collagen fibers, the complex modulus of elasticity was E* = 1.63MPa, with a storage modulus of E′ = 1.25MPa and a loss modulus of: E″ = 0.39MPa. The mean stress relaxation rates for static and dynamic loading were best fit with first-order polynomials: B (ɛ) = 0.1110 ɛ − 0.0733 and B (ɛ) = −0.1249ɛ 11794-8181 +0.0190, respectively. Perpendicular to the collagen fiber orientation, the viscous and elastic secant moduli were 1.81 and 1.00 MPa, respectively. The mean stress relaxation rate for static loading was best fit with a first-order polynomial: B (ɛ) = − 0.04ɛ − 0.06. Capsule strength parallel and perpendicular to collagen fiber orientation was 1.90 and 0.95 MPa, respectively, and extensibility was 0.65 and 0.60, respectively. Poisson’s ratio parallel and perpendicular to fiber orientation was 0.299 and 0.488, respectively. The elasticity moduli were nonlinear and anisotropic, and capsule strength was larger aligned parallel to the collagen fibers. The phase lag between stress and strain increased with haversine frequency, but the storage modulus remained large relative to the complex modulus. The stress relaxation rate was strain dependent parallel to the collagen fibers, but was strain independent perpendicularly

  2. Ballistic Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Emmerling, William C.; Altobelli, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to develop a consistent set of material property and impact test data, and failure analysis, for a variety of materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property information and impact test results are obtained using identical materials, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. This report describes ballistic impact testing which has been conducted on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade.

  3. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Linzer, M.

    1990-02-06

    This patent describes an apparatus disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot materials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals. It comprises: a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, a transmitter mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and a receiver mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer.

  4. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Linzer, M.

    1988-08-23

    An apparatus is disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot materials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals, which includes a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, transmitting means mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and receiving means mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer. 2 figs.

  5. Fusion materials irradiation test facility test-cell instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, J. L.; Burke, R. J.

    1982-05-01

    Many of the facility instrumentation components and systems currently under development, though specifically designed for FMIT purposes, are similar to those useful for fusion reactors. Various ceramic-insulated signal-cable components are being evaluated for 14-MeV neutron tolerance. Thermocouples are shown to decalibrate in high energy fields. Nondestructive optical viewing of deuteron-induced residual gas flow is planned for beam profiling in real space and phase space. Various optics were irradiated to 10(18) n/cm(2) at 14 MeV with good results. Feasibility of neutron and gamma field imaging was demonstrated using pinhole collimator and microchannel plate devices. Infrared thermography and optical monitoring of the target surface is being investigated. Considerable experience on the compatibility of optical and insulator materials with (highly reactive) lithium was obtained.

  6. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of nine alloys were evaluated in Rolling Contact (RC) rigs. Test conditions included a Hertzian stress at 4,826 MPa (700 ksi), a rolling speed of 6.23 m/sec (245 in/sec.). Tests were run with a Type I oil (MIL-L-7808G) at room temperature. B-10 lives (10% failure rate) of alloys were compared versus reference alloys, VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and VAR AISI 9310. Six case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS600, CBS1000M, EX00014, Vasco X-2 and EX00053) and three through-hardening alloys (AISI M-50, VascoMax 350 and Vasco Matrix 2 evaluated, showed RCF performance inferior or equivalent to that of AISI 9310 and AISI M-50. It was also found that the effects of vacuum melting processes, different tempering temperatures, freezing cycle during heat treating, shot peening, gold plating and chrome plating employed in the present investigation did not significantly affect RCF life.

  7. Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials: A Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    2003-05-01

    Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook offers the reader a self-contained, concise and up-to-date collection of the key properties of 125 of the most common and important optical materials used in modern optics, laser physics and technology, spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics and laser applications. This comprehensive volume presents not only the classical properties but also those that have appeared in the three decades since the invention of the laser. The presentation of the material is given in a clear tabular form with more than 1000 references. A wide variety of readers, ranging from workers in both industry and academia, to lecturers and students at postgraduate and undergraduate levels, will find Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook an invaluable resource.

  8. Interdisciplinary research concerning the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The nature and properties of ceramic materials as they relate to solid state physics and metallurgy are studied. Special attention was given to the applications of ceramics to NASA programs and national needs.

  9. Material Properties of the Mandibular Trabecular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Éva; Magyar, Lóránt; Bojtár, Imre

    2014-01-01

    The present paper introduces a numerical simulation aided, experimental method for the measurement of Young's modulus of the trabecular substance in the human mandible. Compression tests were performed on fresh cadaveric samples containing trabecular bone covered with cortical layer, thus avoiding the destruction caused by the sterilization, preservation, and storage and the underestimation of the stiffness resulting from the individual failure of the trabeculae cut on the surfaces. The elastic modulus of the spongiosa was determined by the numerical simulation of each compression test using a specimen specific finite element model of each sample. The received mandibular trabecular bone Young's modulus values ranged from 6.9 to 199.5 MPa. PMID:27006933

  10. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  11. Novel thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J. A.

    1999-01-13

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. For example, an approximately 20% improvement in effective thermal conductivity is observed when 5 vol.% CuO nanoparticles are added to water. Even more importantly, the heat transfer coefficient of water under dynamic flow conditions is increased more than 15% with the addition of less than 1 vol.% CuO particles. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films are being produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition techniques. Preliminary results have indicated that the thermal conductivity is reduced by approximately a factor-of-two at room temperature in 10 nm grain-sized YSZ compared to coarse-grained or single crystal YSZ.

  12. Distributed databases for materials study of thermo-kinetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toher, Cormac

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput computational materials science provides researchers with the opportunity to rapidly generate large databases of materials properties. To rapidly add thermal properties to the AFLOWLIB consortium and Materials Project repositories, we have implemented an automated quasi-harmonic Debye model, the Automatic GIBBS Library (AGL). This enables us to screen thousands of materials for thermal conductivity, bulk modulus, thermal expansion and related properties. The search and sort functions of the online database can then be used to identify suitable materials for more in-depth study using more precise computational or experimental techniques. AFLOW-AGL source code is public domain and will soon be released within the GNU-GPL license.

  13. Rheological properties of granular materials - Critical parameters and mixing rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, Alisa Victoria

    2011-12-01

    Granular materials can be found at any stage of processing in many industries, such as food, pharmaceuticals, catalysts, and chemicals. These materials exhibit a variety of flow patterns, and their state and behavior differ from application to application. Since there is a lack of fundamental understanding of particulate or powder behavior, multiple problems can be encountered during routine manufacturing. Scale-up can also be a challenge, as the lack of constitutive equations for granular materials forces most scaleup efforts to follow the trial-and-error route. Powder characterization measurements are employed as both a selection tool and a predictive method for the material's process performance. Therefore, it plays a very important role in process and product development. The numerous existing methods used to characterize the flow properties of powders are mostly application-specific and it is not clear how they correlate with each other or with process performance. Moreover, understanding the relationships between the material properties and the processing conditions is necessary for a successful design of a continuous manufacturing system, which has been a major focus for pharmaceutical industry in the recent years. Before such changes can be implemented, a better understanding of fundamental physical phenomena governing powder flow behavior must be developed. In this work we study particulate/powder flow behavior experimentally using several characterization methods, including the Gravitational Displacement Rheometer (an avalanching tester), the rotational shear cell, and the compressibility tester. We establish the variables of interest through correlative comparison and study the differences and similarities between the methods in order to investigate particulate/powder flow behavior during processing and characterization. A mixing rule for principal stresses is developed through investigation of shear behavior of binary mixtures in a shear cell. In order

  14. Determining significant material properties: A discovery approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to further understanding of materials science. The experiment itself can be informative for persons of any age past elementary school, and even for some in elementary school. The preparation of the plastic samples is readily accomplished by persons with resonable dexterity in the cutting of paper designs. The completion of the statistical Design of Experiments, which uses Yates' Method, requires basic math (addition and subtraction). Interpretive work requires plotting of data and making observations. Knowledge of statistical methods would be helpful. The purpose of this experiment is to acquaint students with the seven classes of recyclable plastics, and provide hands-on learning about the response of these plastics to mechanical tensile loading.

  15. MIDAS (Material Implementation, Database, and Analysis Source): A comprehensive resource of material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Norquist, P; Barton, N; Durrenberger, K; Florando, J; Attia, A

    2010-12-13

    MIDAS is aimed to be an easy-to-use and comprehensive common source for material properties including both experimental data and models and their parameters. At LLNL, we will develop MIDAS to be the central repository for material strength related data and models with the long-term goal to encompass other material properties. MIDAS will allow the users to upload experimental data and updated models, to view and read materials data and references, to manipulate models and their parameters, and to serve as the central location for the application codes to access the continuously growing model source codes. MIDAS contains a suite of interoperable tools and utilizes components already existing at LLNL: MSD (material strength database), MatProp (database of materials properties files), and MSlib (library of material model source codes). MIDAS requires significant development of the computer science framework for the interfaces between different components. We present the current status of MIDAS and its future development in this paper.

  16. Statistical distribution of mechanical properties for three graphite-epoxy material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, C.; Sorem, J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy composites are playing an increasing role as viable alternative materials in structural applications necessitating thorough investigation into the predictability and reproducibility of their material strength properties. This investigation was concerned with tension, compression, and short beam shear coupon testing of large samples from three different material suppliers to determine their statistical strength behavior. Statistical results indicate that a two Parameter Weibull distribution model provides better overall characterization of material behavior for the graphite-epoxy systems tested than does the standard Normal distribution model that is employed for most design work. While either a Weibull or Normal distribution model provides adequate predictions for average strength values, the Weibull model provides better characterization in the lower tail region where the predictions are of maximum design interest. The two sets of the same material were found to have essentially the same material properties, and indicate that repeatability can be achieved.

  17. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  18. The effects of material property assumptions on predicted meltpool shape for laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chong; Ashby, Kathryn; Phan, Nam; Pal, Deepankar; Stucker, Brent

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide guidance on material specifications for powders used in laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing (AM) processes. The methodology was to investigate how different material property assumptions in a simulation affect meltpool prediction and by corrolary how different material properties affect meltpool formation in AM processes. The sensitvity of meltpool variations to each material property can be used as a guide to help drive future research and to help prioritize material specifications in requirements documents. By identifying which material properties have the greatest affect on outcomes, metrology can be tailored to focus on those properties which matter most; thus reducing costs by eliminating unnecessary testing and property charaterizations. Futhermore, this sensitivity study provides insight into which properties require more accurate measurements, thus motivating development of new metrology methods to measure those properties accurately.

  19. Correlating Flammability of Materials with FTIR Analysis Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Robin; Whitfield, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to correlate flammability data with FTIR test results. Kydex 100 is a blend of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride and polymethylmethacrylate, with some filler materials. Samples supplied were 0.125 in. thick. 10 samples were taken from a sheet of Kydex and analyzed for flammability and by FTIR spectroscopy. This material was utilized as a round robin sample for flammability testing. The flammability test results were found to vary across the same sheet.

  20. Materials thermal and thermoradiative properties/characterization technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, D. P.; Ho, C. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Reliable properties data on well characterized materials are necessary for design of experiments and interpretation of experimental results. The activities of CINDAS to provide data bases and predict properties are discussed. An understanding of emissivity behavior is important in order to select appropriate methods for non-contact temperature determination. Related technical issues are identified and recommendations are offered.

  1. The design and modeling of periodic materials with novel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jonathan Bernard

    Cellular materials are ubiquitous in our world being found in natural and engineered systems as structural materials, sound and energy absorbers, heat insulators and more. Stochastic foams made of polymers, metals and even ceramics find wide use due to their novel properties when compared to monolithic materials. Properties of these so called hybrid materials, those that combine materials or materials and space, are derived from the localization of thermomechanical stresses and strains on the mesoscale as a function of cell topology. The effects of localization can only be generalized in stochastic materials arising from their inherent potential complexity, possessing variations in local chemistry, microstructural inhomogeneity and topological variations. Ordered cellular materials on the other hand, such as lattices and honeycombs, make for much easier study, often requiring analysis of only a single unit-cell. Theoretical bounds predict that hybrid materials have the potential to push design envelopes offering lighter stiffer and stronger materials. Hybrid materials can achieve very low and even negative coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) while retaining a relatively high stiffness -- properties completely unmatched by monolithic materials. In the first chapter of this thesis a two-dimensional lattice is detailed that possess near maximum stiffness, relative to the tightest theoretical bound, and low, zero and even appreciably negative thermal expansion. Its CTE and stiffness are given in closed form as a function of geometric parameters and the material properties. This result is confirmed with finite elements (FE) and experiment. In the second chapter the compressive stiffness of three-dimensional ordered foams, both closed and open cell, are predicted with FE and the results placed in property space in terms of stiffness and density. A novel structure is identified that effectively achieves theoretical bounds for Young's, shear and bulk modulus

  2. Thermophysical properties of materials based on silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blinder, A.V.; Bolgar, A.S.; Petrovskii, V.Ya.

    1995-09-01

    The heat capacity and thermal conductivity of materials based on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are investigated for the first time. The temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity of the composites studied is calculated. The influence of structural changes on the nature of the thermophysical properties of materials based on {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  3. Heat Transmission Properties of Insulating and Building Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 81 NIST Heat Transmission Properties of Insulating and Building Materials (Web, free access)   NIST has accumulated a valuable and comprehensive collection of thermal conductivity data. Version 1.0 of the database includes data for over 2000 measurements, covering several categories of materials including concrete, fiberboard, plastics, thermal insulation, and rubber.

  4. Use of material dielectric properties for agricultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of materials for applications in agriculture are reviewed, and research findings on use of dielectric heating of materials and on sensing of product moisture content and other quality factors are discussed. Dielectric heating applications, include treatment of seed...

  5. Multifunctional materials exhibiting spin crossover and liquid-crystalline properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredyuk, M.; Gaspar, Ana B.; Ksenofontov, V.; Reiman, S.; Galyametdinov, Y.; Haase, W.; Rentschler, E.; Gütlich, P.

    2005-11-01

    The physical characterization of a new class of Fe(II) multifunctional SCO materials exhibiting spin crossover and liquid crystalline properties in the room temperatures region is reported. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and optical polarizing microscopy studies have been performed on such materials.

  6. Perspective: Interactive material property databases through aggregation of literature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ram; Sparks, Taylor D.

    2016-05-01

    Searchable, interactive, databases of material properties, particularly those relating to functional materials (magnetics, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, etc.) are curiously missing from discussions of machine-learning and other data-driven methods for advancing new materials discovery. Here we discuss the manual aggregation of experimental data from the published literature for the creation of interactive databases that allow the original experimental data as well additional metadata to be visualized in an interactive manner. The databases described involve materials for thermoelectric energy conversion, and for the electrodes of Li-ion batteries. The data can be subject to machine-learning, accelerating the discovery of new materials.

  7. Metamaterials: composite materials with unnatural electromagnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pniewski, Jacek; Saj, W. M.; Antosiewicz, Tomasz; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2005-08-01

    The idea of a substance with simultaneously negative values of dielectric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μ presented by Veselago in 1968 has been brought to reality. Firstly, negative permittivity ɛ(ω) of a three dimensional photonic structure composed of thin metal wires was experimentally demonstrated in the GHz range. Secondly, a concept of split ring resonator has appeared and a structure composed of such metal resonators was shown to have negative permeability μ. Consequently, in a so called double negative, both ɛ(ω) and μ(ω) < 0, composite material made of cells consisting of a split ring resonator and a wire unnatural phenomenon of negative refraction was experimentally observed in the microwave spectral region. Recently, perfect lenses made of metamaterial with negative refraction index, photonic crystal or metal slabs were used to focus light below the diffraction limit of resolution. Electromagnetic transport of energy in plasmon waveguides made of subwavelength metallic elements offers a great potential value for nanoscale photonic devices of the future.

  8. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Encapsulation task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project. Thirteenth quarterly progress report, May 12, 1979-August 12, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Springborn Laboratories is engaged in a study of evaluating potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project (LSA) funded by DOE. The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the product of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Current technical activities are directed primarily towards the development of a solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer as the pottant. Due to the surface tack of EVA, a slip sheet of release paper is required between each layer to prevent the plies from adhering. Manufacturers were surveyed and a source for inexpensive release paper in roll form was identified. A survey of separator materials was also conducted. Corrosion studies using a standard salt spray test were used to determine the degree of protection offered to a variety of metals by encapsulation in EVA pottant. Due to the low surface hardness of EVA and the remaining sensitivity to ultraviolet light, outer covers are required to prevent soiling and improve the weatherability. Two candidate films (Korad 212 and Tedlar UT) have been identified for this function. These films are somewhat scratch and abrasion sensitive, however, and their useful life can be prolonged with the application of thin layers of abrasion resistant hard coats. A survey of manufacturers of these coatings was performed and the products compared. Field trials of outdoor performance must be performed to fully assess the durability of these coatings.

  9. Pressure measurement using thermal properties of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Pessoa, José Dalton; Calbo, Adonai Gimenes

    2004-06-01

    This work presents a design and two methods, one isothermal and one isovolumetric, for pressure measurements based on the compressibility coefficient (κ) and thermal expansibility (α) of the fluid under test. The setup and relevant construction details are described. To demonstrate the applicability of the isovolumetric measurement method, the setup was calibrated with respect to a Bourdon-type manometer; the other isothermic method was analyzed to determine construction details that could realize resolution requirements. The authors determined the effect of ambient temperature on device operation and the time response of the isovolumetric method. The device can be used to estimate the compressibility of a fluid and, in addition, could become an alternative for direct plant cell turgor measurement.

  10. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  11. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  12. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  13. Cryogenic Chamber for Servo-Hydraulic Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, John J.; Tuttle, James

    2009-01-01

    A compact cryogenic test chamber can be cooled to approximately 5 to 6 Kelvin for materials testing. The system includes a temperature controller and multiple sensors to measure specimen temperature at different locations. The testing chamber provides a fast and easy method to perform materials testing at lower than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The purpose of the chamber is to cool a composite lap shear specimen to approximately 20 K so that tensile test force and displacement data may be acquired at this cryogenic temperature range.

  14. Optimizing material properties of composite plates for sound transmission problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Ting; Pawar, S. J.; Huang, Jin H.

    2015-01-01

    To calculate the specific transmission loss (TL) of a composite plate, the conjugate gradient optimization method is utilized to estimate and optimize material properties of the composite plate in this study. For an n-layer composite plate, a nonlinear dynamic stiffness matrix based on the thick plate theory is formulated. To avoid huge computational efforts due to the combination of different composite material plates, a transfer matrix approach is proposed to restrict the dynamic stiffness matrix of the composite plate to a 4×4 matrix. Moreover, the transfer matrix approach has also been used to simplify the complexity of the objective function gradient for the optimization method. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the present algorithm by comparing the TL of the optimal composite plate with that of the original plate. Small number of iterations required during convergence tests illustrates the efficiency of the optimization method. The results indicate that an excellent estimation for the composite plate can be obtained for the desired sound transmission.

  15. Properties of photon tunneling through single-negative materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm

    2005-02-15

    The photon tunneling phenomena in the composite barriers of single-negative materials were analyzed. It was found that the tunneling through such a barrier shifts TE- and TM-polarization light waves laterally (parallel to the material interface) in two opposite directions, causing them to be divided into two waves after tunneling. This property could not be obtained with double-positive and (or) double-negative materials.

  16. Material properties effects on the detonation spreading and propagation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Elizabeth Green; Morris, John S; Novak, Alan M; Kennedy, James E

    2010-01-01

    Recent dynamic testing of Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) has focused on understanding the material properties affecting the detonation propagation, spreading, behavior and symmetry. Small scale gap testing and wedge testing focus on the sensitivity to shock with the gap test including the effects of particle size and density. Floret testing investigates the detonation spreading as it is affected by particle size, density, and binder content. The polyrho testing illustrates the effects of density and binder content on the detonation velocity. Finally the detonation spreading effect can be most dramatically seen in the Mushroom and Onionskin tests where the variations due to density gradients, pressing methods and geometry can be seen on the wave breakout behavior.

  17. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  18. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  19. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  20. Adsorbent materials development and testing for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, L.K.; Dai, S.; Hay, B.P.; Janke, C.J.; Mayes, R.T.; Sun, X.; Tsouris, C.

    2013-07-01

    The extraction of uranium from seawater has been the focus of a research project for the U.S. Department of Energy to develop amidoxime functional group adsorbents using radiation-induced graphing on polymer-based fiber materials and subsequent chemical conversion of the radical sites to form the desired adsorbent material. Materials with promising uranium adsorption capacities were prepared through a series of parametric studies on radiation dose, time, temperature, graphing solutions, and properties of the base polymer materials. A laboratory screening protocol was developed to determine the uranium adsorption capacity to identify the most promising candidate materials for seawater testing. (authors)

  1. Improvement of materials surface properties by rf glow discharge treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.B.; Chen, X.; Tian, X.Q.; Cha, L.Z.

    2006-07-15

    Materials surface properties were improved by the application of a rf glow discharge treatment for vacuum and electronic applications. The surface morphology was studied under different glow discharge treatments and it could be shown by experiments that the roughness of materials surface varied due to the glow discharge treating process and that a clean and smooth surface could be obtained after the treatment. The experimental results revealed that the outgassing rates for different gases decreased and the evacuating properties for the materials improved following the application of the glow discharge treatment.

  2. Mechanical and Vibration Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Material with Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Kray, Nicholas; Gemeinhardt, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing turbomachinery blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. Before implementation of a piezoelectric element within a PMFC blade, the effect on PMFC mechanical properties needs to be understood. This study attempts to determine how the inclusion of a packaged piezoelectric patch affects the material properties of the PMFC. Composite specimens with embedded piezoelectric patches were tested in four-point bending, short beam shear, and flatwise tension configurations. Results show that the embedded piezoelectric material does decrease the strength of the composite material, especially in flatwise tension, attributable to failure at the interface or within the piezoelectric element itself. In addition, the sensing properties of the post-cured embedded piezoelectric materials were tested, and performed as expected. The piezoelectric materials include a non-flexible patch incorporating solid piezoceramic material, and two flexible patch types incorporating piezoelectric fibers. The piezoceramic material used in these patches was Navy Type-II PZT.

  3. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Semelsberger, Troy; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kg system), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/L system). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material propertiesdand most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-03

    The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

  5. Fabrication and optical properties of pyrene-Eu hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Xu, Bo; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2013-02-01

    Lanthanide-containing organic-inorganic hybrid materials have drawn much attention in the research of materials with multifunctional and modulated optical properties. Here, large area pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures constructed of a large amount of nanowires are successfully fabricated through physical vapor codeposition method at low temperature (77 K). Further optical property characterizations indicate that the pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures exhibit enhanced green light emission under blue light excitation compared with other fabricated samples (pyrene nanostructures, Eu nanoparticles, and pyrene/Cu hybrid nanostructures). The results indicate the occurrence of an energy transfer process from the sensitizing pyrene nanostructures to Eu. Pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures with unique photoluminescence properties may have promising applications in phosphors, light-emitting device, and UV-vis photo sensor. The results also prove that the physical vapor codeposition method is an effective way for design of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with controllable and tunable optical properties.

  6. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Linzer, Melvin

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot terials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals, which includes a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, a transmitter mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and a receiver mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer.

  7. Innovations in thermoelectric materials research: Compound agglomeration, testing and preselection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez de Cardenas, Hugo Francisco Lopez

    Thermoelectric materials have the capacity to convert a temperature differential into electrical power and vice versa. They will represent the next revolution in alternative energies once their efficiencies are enhanced so they can complement other forms of green energies that depend on sources other than a temperature differential. Progress in materials science depends on the ability to discover new materials to eventually understand them and to finally improve their properties. The work presented here is aimed at dynamizing the screening of materials of thermoelectric interest. The results of this project will enable: theoretical preselection of thermoelectric compounds based on their bandgap and a rapid agglomeration method that does not require melting or sintering. A special interest will be given to Iodine-doped TiSe2 that generated extraordinary results and a new set of equations are proposed to accurately describe the dependence of the power factor and the figure of merit on the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  8. High strain-rate testing of parachute materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, Kenneth W.; Totten, John J.; Waye, Donald E.

    1994-12-01

    Research at Sandia National Laboratories has shown a strain rate dependence of many materials used in the production of parachutes. Differences in strength of 30% have been found between strain rates of 12/s and slow rates normally used to define material properties for lightweight nylon cloth. These structures are sometimes deployed in a rapid fashion and the loading is experienced in milliseconds; the production of material data in the same loading regime is required for full understanding of material response. Also, material behavior suitable for structural analysis of these structures is required for successful analysis. This is especially important when different materials are used in the same fabric structure. Determining the distribution of load to various portions of a nylon and Kevlar parachute requires the correct moduli and material behavior in the analytical model. The effect of strain rate on the material properties of nylon and Kevlar components commonly used in parachute construction are reported in this paper. These properties are suitable for use in analytical models of these fabric structures.

  9. High strain-rate testing of parachute materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.; Totten, J.J.; Waye, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Research at Sandia National Laboratories has shown a strain rate dependence of many materials used in the production of parachutes. Differences in strength of 30% have been found between strain rates of 12 sec{sup {minus}1} and slow rates normally used to define material properties for lightweight nylon cloth. These structures are sometimes deployed in a rapid fashion and the loading is experienced in milliseconds; the production of material data in the same loading regime is required for full understanding of material response. Also, material behavior suitable for structural analysis of these structures is required for successful analysis. This is especially important when different materials are used in the same fabric structure. Determining the distribution of load to various portions of a nylon and Kevlar parachute requires the correct moduli and material behavior in the analytical model. The effect of strain rate on the material properties of nylon and Kevlar components commonly used in parachute construction are reported in this paper. These properties are suitable for use in analytical models of these fabric structures.

  10. Dynamic material properties of refractory materials: Tantalum and tantalum/tungsten alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Lassila, D.H.; Steinberg, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    We have made a careful set of impact wave-profile measurements (16 profiles) on tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys at relatively low stresses (to 15 GPa). Alloys used were Ta{sub 97.5}W{sub 2.5} and Ta{sub 90}W{sub 10} (wt. %) with oxygen contents of 30--70 ppM. Information available from these experiments includes Hugoniot, elastic limits, loading fates, spall strength, unloading paths, reshock structure and specimen thickness effects. Hugoniot and spall properties are illustrated, and are consistent with expectations from earlier work. Modeling the tests with the Steinberg-Lund rate-dependent material model provides for an excellent match of the shape of the plastic wave, although the release wave is not well modeled. There is also a discrepancy between experiments and calculations regarding the relative timing of the elastic and plastic waves that may be due to texture effects.

  11. A study of the effect of selected material properties on the ablation performance of artificial graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Eighteen material properties were measured on 45 different, commercially available, artificial graphites. Ablation performance of these same graphites were also measured in a Mach 2 airstream at a stagnation pressure of 5.6 atm. Correlations were developed, where possible, between pairs of the material properties. Multiple regression equations were then formulated relating ablation performance to the various material properties, thus identifying those material properties having the strongest effect on ablation performance. These regression equations reveal that ablation performance in the present test environment depends primarily on maximum grain size, density, ash content, thermal conductivity, and mean pore radius. For optimization of ablation performance, grain size should be small, ash content low, density and thermal conductivity high, and mean pore radius large.

  12. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  13. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  14. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  15. Milestone 4: Test plan for Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS). Task 3: Composite tank materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the detailed test plan for the series of tests enumerated in the preceding section. The purpose of this plan is to present the test objectives, test parameters and procedures, expected performance and data analysis plans, criteria for success, test schedules, and related safety provisions and to describe the test articles, test instrumentation, and test facility requirements. Initial testing will be performed to screen four composite materials for suitability for SSTO LH2 tank loads and environmental conditions. The laminates for this testing will be fabricated by fiber placement, which is the manufacturing approach identified as baseline for the tank wall. Even though hand layup will be involved in fabricating many of the internal structural members of the tank, no hand-layup laminates will be evaluated in the screening or subsequent characterization testing. This decision is based on the understanding that mechanical properties measured for hand-layup material should be at least equivalent to properties measured for fiber-placed material, so that the latter should provide no less than a conservative approximation of the former. A single material will be downselected from these screening tests. This material will be subsequently characterized for impact-damage tolerance and durability under conditions of mechanical and thermal cycling, and to establish a preliminary design database to support ongoing analysis. Next, testing will be performed on critical structural elements fabricated from the selected material. Finally, the 8-foot diameter tank article, containing the critical structural features of the full-scale tank, will be fabricated by fiber placement and tested to verify its structural integrity and LH2 containment.

  16. Designing functionally graded materials with superior load-bearing properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Ming-Jie; Zhang, Denzil

    2012-03-01

    Ceramic prostheses often fail from fracture and wear. We hypothesize that these failures may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus at the ceramic surface. In this study, we elucidate the effect of elastic modulus profile on the flexural damage resistance of functionally graded materials (FGMs), providing theoretical guidelines for designing FGMs with superior load-bearing property. The Young's modulus of the graded structure is assumed to vary in a power-law relation with a scaling exponent n; this is in accordance with experimental observations from our laboratory and elsewhere. Based on the theory for bending of graded beams, we examine the effect of n value and bulk-to-surface modulus ratio (E(b)/E(s)) on stress distribution through the graded layer. Theory predicts that a low exponent (0.15materials with various n values and E(b)/E(s) ratios can be fabricated by infiltrating alumina and zirconia with a low-modulus glass. Flexural tests show that graded alumina and zirconia with suitable values of these parameters exhibit superior load-bearing capacity, 20-50% higher than their homogeneous counterparts. Improving load-bearing capacity of ceramic materials could have broad impacts on biomedical, civil, structural, and an array of other engineering applications.

  17. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  18. A Summary of the Fatigue Properties of Wind Turbine Materials

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, HERBERT J.

    1999-10-07

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. The materials used to construct these machines are subjected to a unique loading spectrum that contains several orders of magnitude more cycles than other fatigue critical structures, e.g., an airplane. To facilitate fatigue designs, a large database of material properties has been generated over the past several years that is specialized to materials typically used in wind turbines. In this paper, I review these fatigue data. Major sections are devoted to the properties developed for wood, metals (primarily aluminum) and fiberglass. Special emphasis is placed on the fiberglass discussion because this material is current the material of choice for wind turbine blades. The paper focuses on the data developed in the U.S., but cites European references that provide important insights.

  19. Thermal properties of graphene and nanostructured carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2011-08-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth of interest by the scientific and engineering communities in the thermal properties of materials. Heat removal has become a crucial issue for continuing progress in the electronic industry, and thermal conduction in low-dimensional structures has revealed truly intriguing features. Carbon allotropes and their derivatives occupy a unique place in terms of their ability to conduct heat. The room-temperature thermal conductivity of carbon materials span an extraordinary large range -- of over five orders of magnitude -- from the lowest in amorphous carbons to the highest in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Here, I review the thermal properties of carbon materials focusing on recent results for graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanostructured carbon materials with different degrees of disorder. Special attention is given to the unusual size dependence of heat conduction in two-dimensional crystals and, specifically, in graphene. I also describe the prospects of applications of graphene and carbon materials for thermal management of electronics.

  20. Structural and Radiation Shielding Properties of a Martian Habitat Material Synthesized From In-Situ Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Caranza, S.; Bhattacharya, M.; Makel, D. B.

    2006-01-01

    The 2 primary requirements of a Martian habitat structure include sufficient structural integrity and effective radiation shielding. In addition, the capability to synthesize such building materials primarily from in-situ resources would significantly reduce the cost associated with transportation of such materials and structures from earth. To demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach we have fabricated samples in the laboratory using simulated in-situ resources, evaluated radiation shielding effectiveness using radiation transport codes and radiation test data, and conducted mechanical properties testing. In this paper we will present experimental results that demonstrate the synthesis of polyethylene from a simulated Martian atmosphere and the fabrication of a composite material using simulated Martian regolith with polyethylene as the binding material. Results from radiation transport calculations and data from laboratory radiation testing using a 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam will be discussed. Mechanical properties of the proposed composite as a function of composition and processing parameters will also be presented.

  1. Perceived object stability depends on shape and material properties.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julian; Barnett-Cowan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Humans can detect whether an unstable object will fall or right itself, suggesting that the visual system can extract an object's center of mass (COM) and relate this to its base of support. While the COM can be approximated by its shape, this assumes uniform density. We created images of computer-generated goblets made of different materials to assess whether the visual system estimates an object's COM from both shape and material properties. The images were either uniformly dense (e.g., glass, gold, etc.) or made of composite materials (e.g., glass and gold) and positioned upright or upside-down near a table ledge. We compared each goblet's critical angle (CA), the angle at which each goblet is equally likely to fall or right itself, to the perceived CA in a two-alternative-forced-choice paradigm. Participants also rank-ordered 20 materials by density on a questionnaire. The results show that observers accurately estimate the CA for all goblets and are sensitive to subtle changes of an object's COM with change in shape and composite material properties. Importantly, rated density - as measured from the questionnaire - and true material density were positively correlated, suggesting that humans might maintain a representation of relative material density with which to assess object stability. We conclude that the brain is able to assess an object's behavior in a gravitational environment by forming a reliable assessment of an object's COM from both its geometric shape and material properties.

  2. TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    2000-08-07

    The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.

  3. Rationale and summary of methods for determining ultrasonic properties of materials at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.

    1995-02-09

    This report is a summary of the methods used to determine ultrasonic velocities through the many materials tested at the Acoustic Properties of Materials Laboratory. Ultrasonic velocity techniques enable the determination of material properties, including elastic moduli, without harming the materials being tested, an advantage some over mechanical methods. Ultrasonic modulus determination has other advantages as well: (1) relative ease and low cost of material preparation; and (2) comparative analysis to physical testing as a function of material loading rate dependence. In addition, ultrasonic measurement provides clues to determine grain size and orientation, and provides a relative indication of material anisotropy with respect to the material geometry. The authors usually perform ultrasonic measurements on materials in ambient atmospheric conditions, and in a relatively free-free condition. However, the authors can perform them in other environments, as required. This paper describes some of the techniques used in this laboratory and shows how ultrasonic velocities are used to establish elastic constants. It also includes a sample test report for a homogeneous isotropic solid, along with a list of references.

  4. Quantitative measurement of nanomechanical properties in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei

    In this work, quantitative Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) was used to measure nanomechanical properties and to determine microstructural morphology in fiber reinforced composites and hard calcified tissue. In carbon fiber reinforced composites, the fiber-matrix interphase is of interest as it affects the primary load-transfer process and thereby bulk mechanical properties of reinforced composites. The study of properties in the interphase region is important for an understanding of the bulk mechanical properties, which have been shown affected by moisture-based environmental degradation. Single point AFAM testing has been used to quantitatively determine elastic properties at the fiber-matrix interphase by taking advantage of the high spatial scanning resolution capable of measuring interphase dimensions. Carbon-fiber epoxy composite samples were degraded in laboratory conditions by exposure to a accelerated hydrothermal degradation environment in deionized water and salt water. Composite degradation has been characterized by the change in the epoxy matrix contact stiffness and the interphase properties. A decrease in matrix stiffness was found to coincide with the environmental exposure and moisture absorption of the samples. Interphase stiffness measurements indicate a constant interphase thickness as a function of environmental exposure. Chemical analysis of the epoxy using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy indicate hydrolysis of the C-O-C and Epoxide bonds which contribute to the decrease in epoxy mechanical properties. Accelerated degradation by salt water and deionized water both resulted in degradation of the epoxy, though the presence of sodium chloride showed less degradation. From SEM, debonding of the fiber-matrix interface was observed to be more severe when exposed to a salt water environment. In performing quantitative AFAM measurements, the effects of tip shape on the contact mechanics at the epoxy interface were found to influence the reported

  5. Corrosion properties of second-generation conductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groshart, E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of silver-filled epoxy adhesives and silver-filled nitrocellulose lacquer as RFI control materials, a number of new materials have been introduced. The resin carriers have been changed in an effort to make the materials more usable or more EPA acceptable and the fillers have been varied in an effort to make the materials less costly. The corrosion-related properties of second-generation materials were assessed, including adhesives, caulks, and greases. Aluminum 2024 was used as the only substrate material. Ten days of salt fog was used as the corrosive environment. If a noble material such as silver, nickel, or carbon is sandwiched with aluminum an increase in dc resistance results given enough time. If this is unsatisfactory electrically it should either not be used or have all corrosive environments excluded.

  6. Extreme mechanical properties of materials under extreme pressure and temperature conditions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, A.; Armentrout, M. M.; Xie, M.; Weinberger, M.; Kaner, R. B.; Tolbert, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    A strong synergy ties together the high-pressure subfields of mineral physics, solid-state physics, and materials engineering. The catalog of studies measuring the mechanical properties of materials subjected to large differential stresses in the diamond anvil cell demonstrates a significant pressure-enhancement of strength across many classes of materials, including elemental solids, salts, oxides, silicates, and borides and nitrides. High pressure techniques—both radial diffraction and laser heating in the diamond anvil cell—can be used to characterize the behavior of ultrahard materials under extreme conditions, and help test hypotheses about how composition, structure, and bonding work together to govern the mechanical properties of materials. The principles that are elucidated by these studies can then be used to help design engineering materials to encourage desired properties. Understanding Earth and planetary interiors requires measuring equations of state of relevant materials, including oxides, silicates, and metals under extreme conditions. If these minerals in the diamond anvil cell have any ability to support a differential stress, the assumption of quasi-hydrostaticity no longer applies, with a resulting non-salubrious effect on attempts to measure equation of state. We illustrate these applications with the results of variety of studies from our laboratory and others’ that have used high-pressure radial diffraction techniques and also laser heating in the diamond anvil cell to characterize the mechanical properties of a variety of ultrahard materials, especially osmium metal, osmium diboride, rhenium diboride, and tungsten tetraboride. We compare ambient condition strength studies such as hardness testing with high-pressure studies, especially radial diffraction under differential stress. In addition, we outline criteria for evaluating mechanical properties of materials at combination high pressures and temperatures. Finally, we synthesize our

  7. Material properties of brachiopod shell ultrastructure by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Cusack, Maggie; Zhu, Wenzhong; England, Jennifer; Hughes, John

    2007-02-22

    Mineral-producing organisms exert exquisite control on all aspects of biomineral production. Among shell-bearing organisms, a wide range of mineral fabrics are developed reflecting diverse modes of life that require different material properties. Our knowledge of how biomineral structures relate to material properties is still limited because it requires the determination of these properties on a detailed scale. Nanoindentation, mostly applied in engineering and materials science, is used here to assess, at the microstructural level, material properties of two calcite brachiopods living in the same environment but with different modes of life and shell ultrastructure. Values of hardness (H) and the Young modulus of elasticity (E) are determined by nanoindentation. In brachiopod shells, calcite semi-nacre provides a harder and stiffer structure (H approximately 3-6 GPa; E=60-110/120 GPa) than calcite fibres (H=0-3 GPa; E=20-60/80 GPa). Thus, brachiopods with calcite semi-nacre can cement to a substrate and remain immobile during their adult life cycle. This correlation between mode of life and material properties, as a consequence of ultrastructure, begins to explain why organisms produce a wide range of structures using the same chemical components, such as calcium carbonate.

  8. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined. 14 figs.

  9. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined.

  10. Damage testing of sapphire and Ti: sapphire laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion bonded sapphire and Ti (Titanium). Sapphire laser materials that will be damage tested to determine if there is an increase in damage threshold. Photographed in building 1145, photographic studio.

  11. Modern Technologies of Nondestructive Testing of Construction Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the modern methods of research of building materials (such as styrofoam, cement, concrete admixtures, etc.), applied in the Far Eastern Federal University. The latest equipment described for these studies and modern methods of testing.

  12. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Shivrayan, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer's recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success. PMID:25684905

  13. High-rate mechanical properties of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walley, S. M.; Siviour, C. R.; Drodge, D. R.; Williamson, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the many thousands of studies that have been performed on the energy release mechanisms of high energy materials, relatively few studies have been performed (a few hundred) into their mechanical properties. Since it is increasingly desired to model the high rate deformation of such materials, it is of great importance to gather data on their response so that predictive constitutive models can be constructed. This paper reviews the state of the art concerning what is known about the mechanical response of high energy materials. Examples of such materials are polymer bonded explosives (used in munitions), propellants (used to propel rockets), and pyrotechnics (used to initiate munitions and also in flares).

  14. Effect of exposure test conditions on leaching behavior of inorganic contaminants from recycled materials for roadbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanakura, Hirofumi Osako, Masahiro; Kida, Akiko

    2009-05-15

    Throughout the utilization of recycled materials, weathering factors such as humidity, gas composition and temperature have the potential to change the material properties and enhance the release of inorganic contaminants. In this research, the effects of weathering factors on recycled gravel materials for roadbeds were evaluated by applying three kinds of accelerating exposure tests: freezing-melting cycle test, carbonation test, and dry-humid cycle test. The effects of exposure tests were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and serial batch leaching test, making it possible to identify the change in release mechanisms. Sixteen elements, mainly metals, were investigated. Tested samples were molten slag from municipal solid waste, molten slag from automobile shredded residue, and crushed natural stone. After the exposure tests, the increase of cumulative release in the leaching test was generally less than 2.0 times that of the samples without the exposure test. Among the three test conditions, freezing-melting showed a slightly higher effect of enhancing the release of constituents. XRD analysis showed no change in chemical species. From these results, it was determined that the stony samples were stable enough so that their properties were not significantly changed by the exposure tests.

  15. Effect of exposure test conditions on leaching behavior of inorganic contaminants from recycled materials for roadbeds.

    PubMed

    Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Osako, Masahiro; Kida, Akiko

    2009-05-01

    Throughout the utilization of recycled materials, weathering factors such as humidity, gas composition and temperature have the potential to change the material properties and enhance the release of inorganic contaminants. In this research, the effects of weathering factors on recycled gravel materials for roadbeds were evaluated by applying three kinds of accelerating exposure tests: freezing-melting cycle test, carbonation test, and dry-humid cycle test. The effects of exposure tests were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and serial batch leaching test, making it possible to identify the change in release mechanisms. Sixteen elements, mainly metals, were investigated. Tested samples were molten slag from municipal solid waste, molten slag from automobile shredded residue, and crushed natural stone. After the exposure tests, the increase of cumulative release in the leaching test was generally less than 2.0 times that of the samples without the exposure test. Among the three test conditions, freezing-melting showed a slightly higher effect of enhancing the release of constituents. XRD analysis showed no change in chemical species. From these results, it was determined that the stony samples were stable enough so that their properties were not significantly changed by the exposure tests.

  16. Mechanical properties of materials at micro/nano scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei-Hua

    Mechanical properties of materials in small dimensions, including the depth-dependent hardness at the nano/micrometer scales, and the mechanical characterization of thin films and nanotubes, are reported. The surface effect on the depth-dependent nano/microhardness was studied and an apparent surface stress was introduced to represent the energy dissipated per unit area of a solid surface. A plastic bearing ratio model was proposed for the nanoindentation of rough surfaces. The energy dissipation occurring at the indented surface is among the factors that cause the Indentation Size Effect (ISE) at the micro/nanometer scales. Furthermore, an elastic-plastic bearing ratio model was developed for nanoindentation of rough surfaces with a flat indenter tip. The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results and finite element simulations, from which the elastic constant and the surface hardness were extracted. The surface hardness exhibits an inverse ISE due to the interaction of asperities. The nanoindentation tests on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) may lead to the formation of carbon tubes, which are rolled up by the delaminated graphite layers. The nanoindentation loading-unloading curves reveal single pop-in and multiple pop-in phenomena, which is induced by fracture of the graphite layers and/or by delamination between the layers. From the load at pop-in, the fracture strength of the layers and/or the bonding strength between the layers can be estimated by the elastic field model for Hertzian contact including sliding friction for transverse isotropy. Two novel methods were developed to estimate the mechanical properties of films, including the Raman spectra method for the estimation of residual stresses in thin ferroelectric films and the microbridge testing method for the mechanical characterization of trilayer thin films. Mechanical characterization was also carried out on Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) nanotubes with each being comprised of

  17. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of low-dimensional nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xianluo

    2007-05-01

    Nanometer scale structures represent an exciting and rapidly expanding area of research. Studies on new physical/chemical properties and applications of nanomaterials and nanostructures are possible only when nanostructured materials are made available with desired size, morphology, crystal and microstructure, and composition. Thus, controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is the essential aspect of nanotechnology. This thesis describes the development of simple and versatile solution-based approaches to synthesize low-dimensional nanostructures. The first major goal of this research is to design and fabricate morphology-controlled alpha-Fe 2O3 nanoarchitectures in aqueous solution through a programmed microwave-assisted hydrothermal route, taking advantage of microwave irradiation and hydrothermal effects. Free-standing alpha-Fe2O3 nanorings are prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in the presence of phosphate ions. The as-formed architecture of alpha-Fe2O 3 nanorings is an exciting new member in the family of iron oxide nanostructures. Our preliminary results demonstrate that sensors made of the alpha-Fe 2O3 nanorings exhibit high sensitivity not only for bio-sensing of hydrogen peroxide in a physiological solution but also for gas-sensing of alcohol vapor at room temperature. Moreover, monodisperse alpha-Fe 2O3 nanocrystals with continuous aspect-ratio tuning and fine shape control are achieved by controlling the experimental conditions. The as-formed alpha-Fe2O3 exhibits shape-dependent infrared optical properties. The growth process of colloidal alpha-Fe 2O3 crystals in the presence of phosphate ions is discussed. In addition, through an efficient microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, self-assembled hierarchical alpha-Fe2O3 nanoarchitectures are synthesized on a large scale. The second major goal of this research is to develop convenient microwave-hydrothermal approaches for the fabrication of carbon-based nanocomposites: (1) A one-pot solution-phase route, namely

  19. Data on Material Properties and Panel Compressive Strength of a Plastic-bonded Material of Glass Cloth and Canvas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zender, George W; Schuette, Evan H; Weinberger, Robert A

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented of tests for determining the tensile, compressive, and bending properties of a material of plastic-bonding glass cloth and canvas layers. In addition, 10 panel specimens were tested in compression. Although the material is not satisfactory for primary structural use in aircraft when compared on a strength-weight basis with other materials in common use, there appears to be potential strength in the material that will require research for development. These points are considered in some detail in the concluding discussion of the report. An appendix shows that a higher tensile strength can be obtained by changes in the type of weave used in the glass-cloth reinforcement.

  20. Development and Demonstration of Material Properties Database and Software for the Simulation of Flow Properties in Cementitious Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Flach, G.

    2015-03-30

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to develop a new Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) software module designated as FLOExcel. FLOExcel incorporates a uniform database to capture material characterization data and a GoldSim model to define flow properties for both intact and fractured cementitious materials and estimate Darcy velocity based on specified hydraulic head gradient and matric tension. The software module includes hydraulic parameters for intact cementitious and granular materials in the database and a standalone GoldSim framework to manipulate the data. The database will be updated with new data as it comes available. The software module will later be integrated into the next release of the CBP Toolbox, Version 3.0. This report documents the development efforts for this software module. The FY14 activities described in this report focused on the following two items that form the FLOExcel package; 1) Development of a uniform database to capture CBP data for cementitious materials. In particular, the inclusion and use of hydraulic properties of the materials are emphasized; and 2) Development of algorithms and a GoldSim User Interface to calculate hydraulic flow properties of degraded and fractured cementitious materials. Hydraulic properties are required in a simulation of flow through cementitious materials such as Saltstone, waste tank fill grout, and concrete barriers. At SRNL these simulations have been performed using the PORFLOW code as part of Performance Assessments for salt waste disposal and waste tank closure.

  1. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  2. Design of meta-materials with novel thermoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Seth

    The development of new techniques in micro-manufacturing in recent years has enabled the fabrication of material microstructures with essentially arbitrary designs, including those with multiple constituent materials and void space in nearly any geometry. With an essentially open design space, the onus is now on the engineer to design composite materials which are optimal for their purpose. These new materials, called meta-materials or materials with architected microstructures, offer the potential to mix and match properties in a way that exceeds that of traditional composites. We concentrate on the thermal and elastic properties of isotropic meta-materials, and design microstructures with combinations of Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and mass density which are not found among naturally-occurring or traditional composite materials. We also produce designs with thermal expansion far below other materials. We use homogenization theory to predict the material properties of a bulk meta-material comprised of a periodic lattice of unit cells, then use topology optimization to rearrange two constituent materials and void space within the unit cell in order to extremize an objective function which yields the combinations of properties we seek. This method is quite general and can be extended to consider additional properties of interest. We constrain the design space to satisfy material isotropy directly (2D), or to satisfy cubic symmetry (3D), from which point an isotropy constraint function is easily applied. We develop and use filtering, nonlinear interpolation, and thresholding methods to render the design problem well-posed, and as a result ensure our designs are manufacturable. We have written two computer implementations of this design methodology. The first is for creating two-dimensional designs, which can run on a serial computer in approximately half an hour. The second is a parallel implementation to allow

  3. Some attributes of a language for property-based testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Neagoe, Vicentiu; Bishop, Matt

    2004-11-01

    Property-based testing is a testing technique that evaluates executions of a program. The method checks that specifications, called properties, hold throughout the execution of the program. TASpec is a language used to specify these properties. This paper compares some attributes of the language with the specification patterns used for model-checking languages, and then presents some descriptions of properties that can be used to detect common security flaws in programs. This report describes the results of a one year research project at the University of California, Davis, which was funded by a University Collaboration LDRD entitled ''Property-based Testing for Cyber Security Assurance''.

  4. Biologic properties of surgical scaffold materials derived from dermal ECM.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Katherine M; Luo, Xiao; Finkelstein, Eric B; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Goldman, Scott M; Sundback, Cathryn A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Neville, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Surgical scaffold materials manufactured from donor human or animal tissue are increasingly being used to promote soft tissue repair and regeneration. The clinical product consists of the residual extracellular matrix remaining after a rigorous decellularization process. Optimally, the material provides both structural support during the repair period and cell guidance cues for effective incorporation into the regenerating tissue. Surgical scaffold materials are available from several companies and are unique products manufactured by proprietary methodology. A significant need exists for a more thorough understanding of scaffold properties that impact the early steps of host cell recruitment and infiltration. In this study, a panel of in vitro assays was used to make direct comparisons of several similar, commercially-available materials: Alloderm, Medeor Matrix, Permacol, and Strattice. Differences in the materials were detected for both cell signaling and scaffold architecture-dependent cell invasion. Material-conditioned media studies found Medeor Matrix to have the greatest positive effect upon cell proliferation and induction of migration. Strattice provided the greatest chemotaxis signaling and best suppressed apoptotic induction. Among assays measuring structure-dependent properties, Medeor Matrix was superior for cell attachment, followed by Permacol. Only Alloderm and Medeor Matrix supported chemotaxis-driven cell invasion beyond the most superficial zone. Medeor Matrix was the only material in the chorioallantoic membrane assay to support substantial cell invasion. These results indicate that both biologic and structural properties need to be carefully assessed in the considerable ongoing efforts to develop new uses and products in this important class of biomaterials.

  5. The dynamic shear properties of structural honeycomb materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Maheri, M. R.

    A technique is described for measuring the dynamic modulus and damping of honeycomb materials. Results of tests on both aluminium and Nomex honeycombs are presented and compared with those reported in the literature.

  6. Control over magnetic properties in bulk hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Quesada, Adrian; Saerbeck, Thomas; Rubia, Miguel Angel De La; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Jose Francisco; Schuller, Ivan K.; UCSD Collaboration; Instituto de Ceramica, Madrid Collaboration; Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble Collaboration

    We present control of coercivity and remanent magnetization of a bulk ferromagnetic material embedded in bulk vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) by using a standard bulk synthesis procedure. The method generalizes the use of structural phase transitions of one material to control structural and magnetic properties of another. A structural phase transition (SPT) in the V2O3 host material causes magnetic properties of Ni to change as function of temperature. The remanent magnetization and the coercivity are reversibly controlled by the SPT without additional external magnetic fields. The reversible tuning shown here opens the pathway for controlling the properties of a vast variety of magnetic hybrid bulk systems. This Work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science, U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Science, DMR under grant DE FG02 87ER-45332.

  7. The effects of proton radiation on UHMWPE material properties for space flight and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Chad S.; Lucas, Eric M.; Marro, Justin A.; Kieu, Tri M.; DesJardins, John D.

    2011-11-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymer widely used as a radiation shielding material in space flight applications and as a bearing material in total joint replacements. As a long chain hydrocarbon based polymer, UHMWPE's material properties are influenced by radiation exposure, and prior studies show that gamma irradiation is effective for both medical sterilization and increased wear resistance in total joint replacement applications. However, the effects of space flight radiation types and doses on UHMWPE material properties are poorly understood. In this study, three clinically relevant grades of UHMWPE (GUR 1020, GUR 1050, and GUR 1020 blended with Vitamin E) were proton irradiated and tested for differences in material properties. Each of the three types of UHMWPE was irradiated at nominal doses of 0 Gy (control), 5 Gy, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, and 35 Gy. Following irradiation, uniaxial tensile testing and thermal testing using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) were performed. Results show small but significant changes in several material properties between the control (0 Gy) and 35 Gy samples, indicating that proton irradiation could have a effect on the long term performance of UHMWPE in both medical and space flight applications.

  8. Atomistic methodologies for material properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Research on two dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and MoS2, now involves thousands of researchers worldwide cutting across physics, chemistry, engineering and biology. Due to the extraordinary properties of 2D materials, research extends from fundamental science to novel applications of 2D materials. From an engineering point of view, understanding the material properties of 2D materials under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of 2D-material-based devices at the nanoscale. Even at the nanoscale, molecular systems typically consist of a vast number of atoms. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable us to understand the properties of assemblies of molecules in terms of their structure and the microscopic interactions between them. From a continuum approach, mechanical properties and thermal properties, such as strain, stress, and heat capacity, are well defined and experimentally measurable. In MD simulations, material systems are considered to be discrete, and only interatomic potential, interatomic forces, and atom positions are directly obtainable. Besides, most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable since there is no singularity in MD simulations. However, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at the nanoscale. Therefore, equivalent definition of a physical quantity both in atomic scale and macroscopic scale is necessary in order to understand molecular and continuum scale phenomena concurrently. This work introduces atomistic simulation methodologies, based on interatomic potential and interatomic forces, as a tool to unveil the mechanical properties, thermal properties and fracture mechanical properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale. Among many 2D materials, graphene and MoS2 have attracted intense interest. Therefore, we applied our

  9. Micro-mechanical properties of bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiev, V.; Markovsky, A.; Aznakayev, E.; Zakiev, I.; Gursky, E.

    2005-09-01

    Investigation of physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (ceramics for crowns, silver amalgam, cements and materials on a polymeric basis) properties by the modern methods and correspondence their physical-mechanical properties to the physical-mechanical properties of native teeth is represented. The universal device "Micron-Gamma" is built for this purpose. This device allows investigate the physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (an elastic modulus, micro-hardness, destruction energy, resistance to scratching) by the methods of continuous indentation, scanning and pricking. A new effective method as well as its device application for the investigation of surface layers of materials and their physical-mechanical properties by means of the constant indenting of an indenter is realized. This method is based on the automatic registration of loading (P) on the indenter with the simultaneous measurement of its indentation depth (h). The results of investigations are presented on a loading diagram P=f(h) and as a digital imaging on the PC. This diagram allows get not only more diverse characteristics in the real time regime but also gives new information about the stomatologic material properties. Therefore, we can to investigate the wide range of the physical-mechanical properties of stomatologic materials. "Micron-alpha" is digital detection device for light imaging applications. It enables to detect the very low material surface relief heights and restoration of surface micro topography by a sequence data processing of interferential data of partially coherent light also. "Micron-alpha" allows: to build 2D and 3D imaging of a material surface; to estimate the quantitatively characteristics of a material surface; to observe the imaging interferential pictures both in the white and in the monochromatic light; to carry out the investigation of blood cells, microbes and biological macromolecules profiles. The method allows

  10. BMDO materials testing in the EOIM-3 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley Y.; Brinza, David E.; Minton, Timothy K.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials-3 (EOIM-3) experiment served as a testbed for a variety of materials that are candidates for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) space assets. The materials evaluated on this flight experiment were provided by BMDO contractors and technology laboratories. A parallel ground-based exposure evaluation was conducted using the Fast Atom Sample Tester (FAST) atomic-oxygen simulation facility at Physical Sciences, Inc. The EOIM-3 flight materials were exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of approximately 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. The ground-based exposure fluence of 2.0 - 2.5 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm permits direct comparison with that of the flight-exposed specimens. The results from the flight test conducted aboard STS-46 and the correlative ground-based exposure are summarized here. A more detailed correlation study is presented in the JPL Publication 93-31 entitled 'Flight-and Ground-Test Correlation Study of BMDO SDS Materials: Phase 1 Report'. In general, the majority of the materials survived the AO environment with their performance tolerances maintained for the duration of the exposure. Optical materials, baffles, and coatings performed extremely well as did most of the thermal coatings and tribological materials. A few of the candidate radiator, threat shielding, and structural materials showed significant degradation. Many of the coatings designed to protect against AO erosion of sensitive materials performed this function well.

  11. Physical properties of materials derived from diamondoid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, W. A.; Dahl, J. E. P.; Carlson, R. M. K.; Melosh, N. A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2015-01-01

    Diamondoids are small hydrocarbon molecules which have the same rigid cage structure as bulk diamond. They can be considered the smallest nanoparticles of diamond. They exhibit a mixture of properties inherited from bulk cubic diamond as well as a number of unique properties related to their size and structure. Diamondoids with different sizes and shapes can be separated and purified, enabling detailed studies of the effects of size and structure on the diamondoids' properties and also allowing the creation of chemically functionalized diamondoids which can be used to create new materials. Most notable among these new materials are self-assembled monolayers of diamondoid-thiols, which exhibit a number of unique electron emission properties.

  12. Fibrous random materials: From microstructure to macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdchi, K.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite materials, fuel cells, heat exchangers and (biological)filters. Fluid flow through these materials plays an important role in many engineering applications and processes, such as textiles and paper manufacturing or transport of (under)ground water and pollutants. While most porous materials have complex geometry, some can be seen as two-dimensional particulate/fibrous systems, in which we introduce several microscopic quantities, based on Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations, to characterize their microstructure. In particular, by analyzing the topological properties of Voronoi polygons, we observe a smooth transition from disorder to order, for increasing packing fraction. Using fully resolved finite element (FE) simulations of Newtonian, incompressible fluid flow perpendicular to the fibres, the macroscopic permeability is calculated in creeping flow regimes. The effect of fibre arrangement and local crystalline regions on the macroscopic permeability is discussed and the macroscopic property is linked to the microscopic structural quantities.

  13. Spectral reflectance properties of carbon-bearing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Moslow, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    The 0.3-2.6 micrometers spectral reflectance properties of carbon polymorphs (graphite, carbon black, diamond), carbides (silicon carbide, cementite), and macromolecular organic-bearing materials (coal, coal tar extract, oil sand, oil shale) are found to vary from sample to sample and among groups. The carbon polymorphs are readily distinguishable on the basis of their visible-near infrared spectral slopes and shapes. The spectra of macromolecular organic-bearing materials show increases in reflectance toward longer wavelengths, exceeding the reflectance rise of more carbon-rich materials. Reflectance spectra of carbonaceous materials are affected by the crystal structure, composition, and degree of order/disorder of the samples. The characteristic spectral properties can potentially be exploited to identify individual carbonaceous grains in meteorites (as separates or in situ) or to conduct remote sensing geothermometry and identification of carbonaceous phases on asteroids.

  14. Dielectric Characteristics of Microstructural Changes and Property Evolution in Engineered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Jallisa Janet

    Heterogeneous materials are increasingly used in a wide range of applications such as aerospace, civil infrastructure, fuel cells and many others. The ability to take properties from two or more materials to create a material with properties engineered to needs is always very attractive. Hence heterogeneous materials are evolving into more complex formulations in multiple disciplines. Design of microstructure at multiple scales control the global functional properties of these materials and their structures. However, local microstructural changes do not directly cause a proportional change to the global properties (such as strength and stiffness). Instead, local changes follow an evolution process including significant interactions. Therefore, in order to understand property evolution of engineered materials, microstructural changes need to be effectively captured. Characterizing these changes and representing them by material variables will enable us to further improve our material level understanding. In this work, we will demonstrate how microstructural features of heterogeneous materials can be described quantitatively using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BbDS). The frequency dependent dielectric properties can capture the change in material microstructure and represent these changes in terms of material variables, such as complex permittivity. These changes in terms of material properties can then be linked to a number of different conditions, such as increasing damage due to impact or fatigue. Two different broadband dielectric spectroscopy scanning modes are presented: bulk measurements and continuous scanning to measure dielectric property change as a function of position across the specimen. In this study, we will focus on ceramic materials and fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites as test bed material systems. In the first part of the thesis, we will present how different micro-structural design of porous ceramic materials can be captured

  15. Reflector and Shield Material Properties for Project Prometheus

    SciTech Connect

    J. Nash

    2005-11-02

    This letter provides updated reflector and shield preliminary material property information to support reactor design efforts. The information provided herein supersedes the applicable portions of Revision 1 to the Space Power Program Preliminary Reactor Design Basis (Reference (a)). This letter partially answers the request in Reference (b) to provide unirradiated and irradiated material properties for beryllium, beryllium oxide, isotopically enriched boron carbide ({sup 11}B{sub 4}C) and lithium hydride. With the exception of {sup 11}B{sub 4}C, the information is provided in Attachments 1 and 2. At the time of issuance of this document, {sup 11}B{sub 4}C had not been studied.

  16. Guidelines for identification of concrete in a materials property database

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Frohnsdorff, G.

    1995-12-31

    Guidelines for the identification of concrete in a materials property database are presented to address the complex problem of distinguishing one concrete from another. These guidelines are based on a logical scheme for systematically organizing and subdividing data and information about concrete and its constituents; they reflect consensus recommendations for a multilevel material description and designation system. Aspects of the guidelines include a classification system used to establish a series of primary identifiers, methods for reporting constituent information and mixture proportions, fields describing the source of the concrete and its processing history, and recommendations for reporting baseline or reference properties.

  17. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  18. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  19. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  20. An Approach to the Flammability Testing of Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation reviews: (1) Current approach to evaluation of spacecraft materials flammability (2) The need for and the approach to alternative routes (3) Examples of applications of the approach recommended a) Crew Module splash down b) Crew Module depressurization c) Applicability of NASA's flammability test data to other sample configurations d) Applicability of NASA's ground flammability test data to spacecraft environments

  1. Worldwide trends in engine coolants, cooling system materials and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on worldwide trends in engine coolants, cooling systems, materials and testings. Topics covered include: Internationalization of the Automotive Industry - Global Responses in the Functional Fluid Area; Analysis of Coolants from Diesel Engines; Cavitation Damage of Diesel Engine Wet- Cylinder Liners; and Development of Test Stand to Measure the Effect of Coolant Composition on Engine Coolant Pump Seal Leakage.

  2. Arcjet Testing of Micro-Meteoroid Impacted Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Munk, Michelle M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    There are several harsh space environments that could affect thermal protection systems and in turn pose risks to the atmospheric entry vehicles. These environments include micrometeoroid impact, extreme cold temperatures, and ionizing radiation during deep space cruise, all followed by atmospheric entry heating. To mitigate these risks, different thermal protection material samples were subjected to multiple tests, including hyper velocity impact, cold soak, irradiation, and arcjet testing, at various NASA facilities that simulated these environments. The materials included a variety of honeycomb packed ablative materials as well as carbon-based non-ablative thermal protection systems. The present paper describes the results of the multiple test campaign with a focus on arcjet testing of thermal protection materials. The tests showed promising results for ablative materials. However, the carbon-based non-ablative system presented some concerns regarding the potential risks to an entry vehicle. This study provides valuable information regarding the capability of various thermal protection materials to withstand harsh space environments, which is critical to sample return and planetary entry missions.

  3. Characterization of mechanical properties of materials using ultrasound broadband spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Megha; Prasad, Abhinav; Bellare, Jayesh R; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the characterization of homogenous materials (metals, alloys, glass and polymers) by a simple broadband ultrasonic interrogation method. The novelty lies in the use of ultrasound in a continuous way with very low input power (0 dBm or less) and analysis of the transmitted acoustic wave spectrum for material property characterization like speed of sound, density and dimensions of a material. Measurements were conducted on various thicknesses of samples immersed in liquid where continuous-wave, frequency swept ultrasonic energy was incident normal to the sample surface. The electro-acoustic transmission response is analyzed in the frequency domain with respect to a specifically constructed multi-layered analytical model. From the acoustic signature of the sample materials, material properties such as speed of sound and acoustic impedance can be calculated with experimentally derived values found to be in general agreement with the literature and with pulse-echo technique establishing the basis for a non-contact and non-destructive technique for material characterization. Further, by looking at the frequency spacing of the peaks of water when the sample is immersed, the thickness of the sample can be calculated independently from the acoustic response. This technique can prove to be an effective non-contact, non-destructive and fast material characterization technique for a wide variety of materials.

  4. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  5. Solar Sail Material Performance Property Response to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehls, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar[TM], Teonex[TM], and CPl (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were

  6. Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wentao; Gao, Likun; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde; Lu, Yun; Li, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties were obtained successfully by precipitated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles on the wood surface and then treated with a layer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The as-fabricated wood composites exhibited excellent magnetic property and the water contact angle of the OTS-modified magnetic wood surface reached as high as 150°, revealed the superhydrophobic property. Moreover, accelerated aging tests suggested that the treated wood composites also have an excellent anti-ultraviolet property.

  7. Determination of contamination character of materials in space technology testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, D. L.; Coulson, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    The contamination character of selected materials used in space technology testing is presented. Many of these materials contain components that become volatile in a space environment. Most previous data were limited to weight loss or vapor pressure. However, these parameters are not necessarily a direct measure of the contamination character of these materials. Selected materials were exposed to a thermal-vacuum environment, and the degree of contamination was measured by collecting the outgases from these materials on a cold test mirror surface. The degradation of reflectivity of the mirror was measured over a spectral range from 1100 A to 2.5 microns. Half the mirror's surface was also exposed to UV irradiation to determine its effects on the contaminative character of the depositing outgases. The amount of deposit per unit area was measured by microbalances mounted near the mirror; the sensor of one microbalance was UV irradiated. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to determine the composition of the outgases.

  8. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus). These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6-10 weeks) and intermediate (13-19 weeks) adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26-34 weeks). Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given location maintains a

  9. Development of Testing Methodologies for the Mechanical Properties of MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This effort is to investigate and design testing strategies to determine the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as investigate the development of a MEMS Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). One item of potential interest is the design of a test for the Weibull size effect in pressure membranes. The Weibull size effect is a consequence of a stochastic strength response predicted from the Weibull distribution. Confirming that MEMS strength is controlled by the Weibull distribution will enable the development of a probabilistic design methodology for MEMS - similar to the GRC developed CARES/Life program for bulk ceramics. However, the primary area of investigation will most likely be analysis and modeling of material interfaces for strength as well as developing a strategy to handle stress singularities at sharp corners, filets, and material interfaces. This will be a continuation of the previous years work. The ultimate objective of this effort is to further develop and verify the ability of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) code to predict the time-dependent reliability of MEMS structures subjected to multiple transient loads.

  10. Material Properties from Air Puff Corneal Deformation by Numerical Simulations on Model Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; de la Hoz, Andrés; Marcos, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate a new method for reconstructing corneal biomechanical properties from air puff corneal deformation images using hydrogel polymer model corneas and porcine corneas. Methods Air puff deformation imaging was performed on model eyes with artificial corneas made out of three different hydrogel materials with three different thicknesses and on porcine eyes, at constant intraocular pressure of 15 mmHg. The cornea air puff deformation was modeled using finite elements, and hyperelastic material parameters were determined through inverse modeling, minimizing the difference between the simulated and the measured central deformation amplitude and central-peripheral deformation ratio parameters. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on the model cornea materials as well as on corneal strips, and the results were compared to stress-strain simulations assuming the reconstructed material parameters. Results The measured and simulated spatial and temporal profiles of the air puff deformation tests were in good agreement (< 7% average discrepancy). The simulated stress-strain curves of the studied hydrogel corneal materials fitted well the experimental stress-strain curves from uniaxial extensiometry, particularly in the 0–0.4 range. Equivalent Young´s moduli of the reconstructed material properties from air-puff were 0.31, 0.58 and 0.48 MPa for the three polymer materials respectively which differed < 1% from those obtained from extensiometry. The simulations of the same material but different thickness resulted in similar reconstructed material properties. The air-puff reconstructed average equivalent Young´s modulus of the porcine corneas was 1.3 MPa, within 18% of that obtained from extensiometry. Conclusions Air puff corneal deformation imaging with inverse finite element modeling can retrieve material properties of model hydrogel polymer corneas and real corneas, which are in good correspondence with those obtained from uniaxial extensiometry

  11. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-02-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  12. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  13. Development of fire test methods for airplane interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tustin, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fire tests were conducted in a 737 airplane fuselage at NASA-JSC to characterize jet fuel fires in open steel pans (simulating post-crash fire sources and a ruptured airplane fuselage) and to characterize fires in some common combustibles (simulating in-flight fire sources). Design post-crash and in-flight fire source selections were based on these data. Large panels of airplane interior materials were exposed to closely-controlled large scale heating simulations of the two design fire sources in a Boeing fire test facility utilizing a surplused 707 fuselage section. Small samples of the same airplane materials were tested by several laboratory fire test methods. Large scale and laboratory scale data were examined for correlative factors. Published data for dangerous hazard levels in a fire environment were used as the basis for developing a method to select the most desirable material where trade-offs in heat, smoke and gaseous toxicant evolution must be considered.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Eating Attitudes Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocker, Liette B.; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Jensen, Barbara E.; Zhang, James J.

    2007-01-01

    The study was designed to examine the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two widely adopted EAT models were tested: three-factor (Dieting, Bulimia and Food Preoccupation, and Oral Control) with 26 items (Garner, Olmsted, Bohr, & Garfinkel, 1982),…

  15. Effective Mechanical Properties of Lattice Material Fabricated by Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-kyum; Rosen, David W; Duty, Chad E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a two-step homogenization method is proposed and implemented for evaluating effective mechanical properties of lattice structured material fabricated by the material extrusion additive manufacturing process. In order to consider the characteristics of the additive manufacturing process in estimation procedures, the levels of scale for homogenization are divided into three stages the levels of layer deposition, structural element, and lattice structure. The method consists of two transformations among stages. In the first step, the transformation between layer deposition and structural element levels is proposed to find the geometrical and material effective properties of structural elements in the lattice structure. In the second step, the method to estimate effective mechanical properties of lattice material is presented, which uses a unit cell and is based on the discretized homogenization method for periodic structure. The method is implemented for cubic lattice structure and compared to experimental results for validation purposes.

  16. Compression molding and tensile properties of thermoplastic potato starch materials.

    PubMed

    Thunwall, Mats; Boldizar, Antal; Rigdahl, Mikael

    2006-03-01

    The mechanical and melt flow properties of two thermoplastic potato starch materials with different amylose contents were evaluated. The materials were prepared by mixing starch, glycerol, and water, mainly in the weight proportions of 10:3:4.5. Compression molding was used to produce sheets/films with a thickness in the range of 0.3-1 mm. After conditioning at 53% relative humidity (RH) and 23 C, the glycerol-plasticized sheets with a higher amylose content (HAP) were stronger and stiffer than the normal thermoplastic starch (NPS) with an amylose content typical for common potato starch. The tensile modulus at 53% RH was about 160 MPa for the high-amylose material and about 120 MPa for the plasticized NPS. The strain at break was about 50% for both materials. The stress at break was substantially higher for the HAP materials than for the NPS materials, 9.8 and 4.7 MPa, respectively. Capillary viscometry at 140 C showed that the high-amylose material had a higher melt viscosity and was more shear-thinning than the NPS. Dynamic mechanical measurements indicated a broad transition temperature range for both types of starch material. The main transition peaks for glycerol-plasticized starch were located at about room temperature with the transition for the HAP material being at a somewhat higher temperature than that of the NPS material with a lower amylose content. It was also noted that the processing conditions used during the compression molding markedly affected the mechanical properties of the starch material.

  17. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Nanoscale Hydroxyapatite-Based Bone Reconstructive Materials with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ajduković, Zorica R; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Ignjatović, Nenad L; Stojanović, Zoran; Mladenović-Antić, Snezana B; Kocić, Branislava D; Najman, Stevo; Petrović, Nenad D; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2016-02-01

    In the field of oral implantology the loss of bone tissue prevents adequate patient care, and calls for the use of synthetic biomaterials with properties that resemble natural bone. Special attention is paid to the risk of infection after the implantation of these materials. Studies have suggested that some nanocontructs containing metal ions have antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, compared to hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite/poly-lactide-co-glycolide. The antibacterial effects of these powders were tested against two pathogenic bacterial strains: Escherichia coi (ATCC 25922) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), using the disc diffusion method and the quantitative antimicrobial test in a liquid medium. The quantitative antimicrobial test showed that all of the tested biomaterials have some antibacterial properties. The effects of both tests were more prominent in case of S. aureus than in E coli. A higher percentage of cobalt in the crystal structure of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles led to an increased antimicrobial activity. All of the presented biomaterial samples were found to be non-hemolytic. Having in mind that the tested of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca/Co-HAp) material in given concentrations shows good hemocompatibility and antimicrobial effects, along with its previously studied biological properties, the conclusion can be reached that it is a potential candidate that could substitute calcium hydroxyapatite as the material of choice for use in bone tissue engineering and clinical practices in orthopedic, oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

  20. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.