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Sample records for material provenance clays

  1. Mineralogy and provenance of clays in miarolitic cavities of the Pikes Peak Batholith, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Clay samples from 105 cavities within miarolitic granitic pegmatites throughout the Pikes Peak batholith, in Colorado, were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Smectite (beidellite), illite, and kaolinite were found within the cavities. Calculation of crystallite-thickness distribution (CTD), mean thickness of the crystallites, and variance in crystallite thickness, as deduced from XRD patterns, allowed a determination of provenance and mode of formation for illite and smectite. Authigenic miarolitic-cavity illite and smectite show lognormal CTDs and larger mean thicknesses of crystallites than do their soil-derived counterparts; non-lognormal illite in a cavity results from mixing of cavity and soil illite. Analysis of mean thickness and thickness variance shows that crystal growth of illite is initiated by a nucleation event of short duration, followed by surface-controlled kinetics. Crystallization of the miarolitic cavity clays is presumed to occur by neoformation from hydrothermal fluids. The assessment of provenance allows a determination of regional and local distributions of clay minerals in miarolitic cavities within the Pikes Peak batholith.

  2. Clay mineral distribution and provenance in the Heuksan mud belt, Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyen Goo; Kim, Soon-Oh; Kwak, Kyeong Yoon; Choi, Hunsoo; Khim, Boo-Keun

    2015-12-01

    The Heuksan mud belt (HMB), located in the southeastern Yellow Sea, runs parallel to the southwest coast of Korea. In this study, the distribution and relative contribution of four major clay minerals are investigated using 101 surface sediment samples collected in the course of KIOST (2001, 2010, 2011) and KIGAM (2012) cruises, as well as 33 river sediment samples (four from the Huanghe River, three from the Changjiang River, and 26 from Korean rivers) in order to clarify the provenance of fine-grained sediments in the HMB. Based on this currently largest and most robust dataset available for interpretation, the clay mineral assemblages of the fine-grained sediments in the HMB are found to be on average composed of 64.7% illite, 17.9% chlorite, 11.4% kaolinite, and 5.9% smectite. Overall, the clay mineral assemblages are similar in both the northern and the southern parts of the HMB, although smectite seems to be relatively enriched in the southern part, whereas kaolinite is slightly more dominant in the northern part. This clearly indicates that the clays are mostly derived from Korean rivers and, in the southern part of the HMB, partly also from the Huanghe River in China. The new data thus confirm and strengthen the tentative interpretation of some earlier work based on a more limited dataset.

  3. Variations in the provenance of the late Neogene Red Clay deposits in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yuan; Beets, Christiaan J.; Tang, Hui; Prins, Maarten A.; Lahaye, Yann; van Elsas, Roel; Sukselainen, Leena; Kaakinen, Anu

    2016-04-01

    The voluminous loess-Red Clay deposits in northern China forming part of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) are valuable terrestrial archives of climatic evolution for the late Cenozoic Era. Fundamental in reconstructing the late Miocene and Pliocene wind patterns and aridification history is a detailed knowledge of the provenance of these deposits. This paper provides end member modelling of bulk grain-size distributions and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons for three distant Red Clay sequences in the northeastern (Baode), southern (Lantian) and western (Dongwan) CLP. Data show that these different sections each display a distinctive compositional structure indicating variable depositional processes, but they also share two significant zircon age populations of 200-300 Ma and 400-500 Ma. While the Permian-Triassic (200-300 Ma) group accounts for a larger proportion of zircons' ages in the northeastern (NE) CLP, the Ordovician-Silurian (400-500 Ma) component is dominant in the southern and western CLP. It is suggested that the Red Clay in the southern and western CLP was mainly derived from the Northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP) and the Taklimakan desert by low-level westerly winds. Samples of the NE CLP show an increased signature of sediments transported by near-surface northwesterly winds from the broad area of the Central Asian Orogen Belt (CAOB). This spatial transport and deposition pattern is supported by the results from the backtrace trajectory modelling of the dominant dust transport pathways in the CLP. It is noted that the Red Clay sample of around 3.6 Ma obtained from the NE CLP shows increased detrital contributions from its west, possibly indicating an intensified westerly wind strength and/or aridity of the NTP and Taklimakan desert due to the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and Tianshan Mountains in the Pliocene. The onset of enhanced drainage of the Yellow River caused by the increased denudation of the NETP since 3.6 Ma could also have contributed to this.

  4. A quantification model for the structure of clay materials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liansheng; Sang, Haitao; Chen, Haokun; Sun, Yinlei; Zhang, Longjian

    2016-07-04

    In this paper, the quantification for clay structure is explicitly explained, and the approach and goals of quantification are also discussed. The authors consider that the purpose of the quantification for clay structure is to determine some parameters that can be used to quantitatively characterize the impact of clay structure on the macro-mechanical behaviour. According to the system theory and the law of energy conservation, a quantification model for the structure characteristics of clay materials is established and three quantitative parameters (i.e., deformation structure potential, strength structure potential and comprehensive structure potential) are proposed. And the corresponding tests are conducted. The experimental results show that these quantitative parameters can accurately reflect the influence of clay structure on the deformation behaviour, strength behaviour and the relative magnitude of structural influence on the above two quantitative parameters, respectively. These quantitative parameters have explicit mechanical meanings, and can be used to characterize the structural influences of clay on its mechanical behaviour.

  5. A global renewable mix with proven technologies and common materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Garcia-Ladona, E.; Turiel, A.

    2012-04-01

    A global alternative mix to fossil fuels is proposed, based on proven renewable energy technologies that do not use scarce materials. Taking into account the availability of materials, the resulting mix consists of a combination of onshore and offshore wind turbines, concentrating solar power stations, hydroelectricity and wave power devices attached to the offshore turbines. Solar photovoltaic power could contribute to the mix if its dependence on scarce materials is solved. Material requirements are studied for the generation, power transport and for some future transport systems. The order of magnitude of copper, aluminium, neodymium, lithium, nickel, zinc and platinum that might be required for the proposed solution is obtained and compared with available reserves. While the proposed global alternative to fossil fuels seems technically feasible, lithium, nickel and platinum could become limiting materials for future vehicles fleet if no global recycling system were implemented and rechargeable zinc-air batteries could not be developed. As much as 60% of the current copper reserves would have to be employed in the implementation of the proposed solution. Altogether, the availability of materials may become a long-term physical constraint, preventing the continuation of the usual exponential growth of energy consumption.

  6. Clay mineralogy indicates the muddy sediment provenance in the estuarine-inner shelf of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Liu, Qing; Wang, Chenglong; Ge, Chendong; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    The estuarine-inner shelf mud regions of the East China Sea (ECS) are valuable for studying the source-to-sink processes of fluvial sediments deposited since the Holocene. In this study, we present evidence of the provenance and environmental evolution of two cores (S5-2 and JC07) from the estuarine-inner shelf regions of the ECS over the past 100 years based on 210Pb dating, high-resolution grain size measurements and clay mineral analyses. The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblages of cores S5-2 and JC07 are dominated by illite, followed by kaolinite and chlorite, and present scarce amounts of smectite. A comparison of these clay mineral assemblages with several major sources reveals that the fine sediments on the estuarine-inner shelf of the ECS represent a mixture of provenances associated with the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, as well as smaller rivers. However, the contribution of each provenance has varied greatly over the past hundred years, as indicated by the down-core variability due to strong sediment reworking and transport on the inner shelf and the reduction of the sediment load from the Yangtze River basin. In the mud region of the Yangtze River estuary, the sediment from 1930 to 1956 was primarily derived from the Yangtze River, although the Yellow River was also an important influence. From 1956 to 2013, the Yellow River contribution decreased, whereas the Yangtze River contribution correspondingly increased. In the Zhe-Min mud region, the Yangtze River contributed more sediment than did other rivers from 1910 to 1950; however, the Yangtze River contribution gradually decreased from 1950 to 2013. Moreover, the other small rivers accounted for minor contributions, and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) played an important role in the sediment transport process in the ECS. Our results indicate that the weakening/strengthening of the EAWM and a decrease in the sediment load of the Yangtze River influenced the transport and fate of sediment

  7. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  8. Fate and Tranport of MTBE in Clay-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lenczewski, m e

    2001-12-01

    A recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey identified methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a constituent of reformulated gasoline, as the most common contaminant of urban aquifers in the United States. MTBE has been released into groundwater supplies by leaking underground fuel tanks. In Illinois, it has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies and although detection was intermittent, levels were high enough to be offensive to users in some Illinois communities. MTBE is also being used in Mexico to solve the problem of air quality; however, it has the potential to harm the drinking water quality in the process. Early research on MTBE considered it resistant to biodegradation and unable to adsorb to soils and sediments. However, recent evidence indicates that biodegradation does occur under certain conditions and that sorption can occur to organic materials. This research project will investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and its sorption to the clay-rich glacial till found in northern Illinois and lacustrine clays found in the Chalco Basin, Mexico City, Mexico whose interaction with MTBE has not previously been studied. The principal hypothesis of this research is that the microorganisms and environmental factors in clay-rich materials will increase the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE as compared to sandy materials. The experiments will simulate a spill of MTBE or downgradient from a gasoline spill. Microcosms and batch isotherm experiments will be used to demonstrate the potential for biodegradation and sorption in these materials; however, laboratory results are not considered reliable estimates of actual field sorption and biodegradation rates. Therefore long-term column experiments will also be conducted in which large sample volumes of material that simulate the heterogeneities naturally observed in the environment. This research will increase understanding of the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE and lay the necessary groundwork to implement

  9. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeabilitymore » to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.« less

  10. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    PubMed

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  11. Determining The Provenance Of Sedimentary Materials On Mars Through Analog Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The amount and types of sedimentary material available for transport can control the types of features that result from aeolian or fluvial processes. For example, if sediment availability increases dune forms transition from barchans to linear dunes. The availability of sediment and the erodibilty of the landscape can influence drainage divides, catchment areas, and stream type. There is abundant evidence of both aeolian and fluvial sediments on Mars with grain sizes ranging from silt/clay to pebbles and cobbles. However, what is unique about Mars is that the dominant rock type on the surface is basalt, and basalt does not typically weather into coarser particles sizes larger than silt/clay. So where does all the sand come from on Mars? Chemical weathering would produce clays. While mechanical weathering is possible, there are really only two end member processes: impact cratering and physical abrasion. Impact cratering can produce a wide range of particle sizes from house sized boulders to fine dust, but how much sand can be expected to be produced from impact craters? Physical abrasion is likely to be inefficient on Mars, resulting in the fast breakdown of sand-sized particles while producing more silt/clay sized particles. Other processes for generating sand on Mars include hyaloclastic, phreatomagmatic, and pyroclastic. These processes typically require the presence of water. This presentation will explore the possible diagnostic characteristics of sediments generated from these different processes. It will also show how basaltic sediments change as they are transported by water, wind, and ice. The image shows the physical characteristics of basaltic sediment transported by different geologic processes.

  12. Fluoride content of clay minerals and argillaceous earth materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Josephus; Glass, H.D.; White, W.A.; Trandel, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable method, utilizing a fluoride ion-selective electrode, is described for the determination of fluoride in clays and shales. Interference by aluminum and iron is minimal. The reproducibility of the method is about ±5% at different levels of fluoride concentration.Data are presented for various clay minerals and for the <2-µm fractions of marine and nonmarine clays and shales. Fluoride values range from 44 ppm (0.0044%) for nontronite from Colfax, WA, to 51,800 ppm (5.18%) for hectorite from Hector, CA. In general, clays formed under hydrothermal conditions are relatively high in fluoride content, provided the hydrothermal waters are high in fluoride content. Besides hectorite, dickite from Ouray, CO, was found to contain more than 50 times as much fluoride (6700 ppm) as highly crystalline geode kaolinite (125 ppm). The clay stratum immediately overlying a fluorite mineralized zone in southern Illinois was found to have a higher fluoride content than the same stratum in a nonmineralized zone approximately 1 mile away. Nonmarine shales in contact with Australian coals were found to be lower in fluoride content than were marine shales in contact with Illinois coals.It is believed that, in certain instances, peak shifts on DTA curves of similar clay minerals are the result of significant differences in their fluoride content.

  13. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  14. Polyimide-Clay Composite Materials for Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of nanometer-sized clay particles into a polyimide matrix has been shown to enhance the physical properties of specific polymer systems. The clay comprises large stacked platelets of the oxides of aluminum and silicon. These sheets have long dimensions on the order of tenths of a micrometer and thicknesses of several nanometers. Homogeneous dispersion of the clay platelets in the polymer matrix is necessary to achieve those enhancements in polymer properties. Natural montmorillonite with the empirical formula Na0.33Mg0.33Al1.67(OH)2(Si4O10) contains exchangeable inorganic cations. The clay lamellae stack together with the positive sodium ions situated between the surfaces of the individual sheets to balance negatively charged oxygen atoms that are on the surfaces of the sheets. These surface charges contribute to strong electrostatic forces which hold the sheets together tightly. Exfoliation can be accomplished only with unusual measures. In preparing clay nanocomposites, we have taken two steps to try to reduce these interlamellar forces in order to promote the separation (exfoliation) of the sheets and the dispersion of the individual clay particles throughout the organic polymer matrix. In the first step, some of the surface Na(+) ions are replaced with Li(+) ions. Unlike sodium cations, the lithium cations migrate into the interior of the lamellae when the system is heated. Their departure from the surface reduces the surface charge and therefore the attractive forces between the sheets. The loss of alkali metal cations from the surface can be measured as the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay. For example, we found that the CEC of montmorillonite clay was reduced by almost two thirds by treating it with lithium ions and heating to 250 C for 24 hr. Lesser heating has a smaller effect on the CEC. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the d-spacing decreased from ca. 1.34 to 0.97 nm, apparently a consequence of a collapse of the clay

  15. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation.

  16. Phosphoric acid purification through different raw and activated clay materials (Southern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Wafa; Tlili, Ali

    2017-05-01

    This study concerns the purification of Tunisian phosphoric acid produced by the Tunisian Chemical Group (TCG), using raw and activated clays materials from Southern Tunisia. The Gafsa basin clays samples (Jebel Hamadi (JHM); Jebel Stah (JS) and the El Hamma sample (Jebel Aïdoudi (JAD)) were activated with 3 M, HCl solution. Phosphoric acid purification was performed on raw and activated clays. Mineralogical characterisation was carried out using the X-ray powder diffraction method and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Textural changes between raw and activated clays were identified using SEM observations and specific surface analysis. Jebel Hamadi clays were almost dominated by smectite associated with kaolinite and illite traces, while Jebel Stah and Jebel Aïdoudi clays were composed of the association of smectite, illite and kaolinite. It is worth noting that the position of the smectite (001) reflection increased after the acidic activation in all studied samples, indicating the relaxation of the smectite structure along the c-axis. This was corroborated by the increasing specific surface area of the clay particles with the activation process. The specific surface area was close to 50 m2/g and 200 m2/g, for raw and activated materials, respectively. The maximum phosphoric acid purification was obtained by using activated clays with 3 N HCl for 4 h. This performance correlated with the maximum of the external specific surface area which generated strong acid sites. Furthermore, the best results of phosphoric acids purification from TCG were obtained at a specific consumption equivalent to 30 Kg of clay/ton of P2O5. These results showed that the best phosphoric acid purification was yielded by Jebel Aïdoudi clay. In all cases, the highest organic carbon reduction rates in the phosphoric acid after filtration were obtained at 90°C.

  17. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Marwa; Aranda, Pilar; Ben Haj Amara, Abdessalem; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ZnO/SiO 2 -clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica-organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP) dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica-organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP) homogeneously assembled to the clay-SiO 2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO 2 -clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite-silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM). The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO 2 -clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants.

  18. The clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic composition for fine-grained fraction of sediments from northwestern South China Sea: implications for sediment provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, G.

    2013-12-01

    *Guanqiang Cai caiguanqiang@sina.com Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou, 510760, P.R. China As the largest marginal sea in the western pacific, the South China Sea (SCS) receives large amount of terrigenous material annually through numerous rivers from surrounding continents and islands, which make it as the good place for the study of source to sink process. Yet few studies put emphasis on the northwestern continental shelf and slope in the SCS, even though most of the detrital materials derived from the Red River and Hainan Island are deposited in this area, and northwestern shelf plays a significant role in directly linking the South China, the Indochina and the South China Sea and thus controlling the source to sink process of terrestrial sediment. We presented the clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic composition of fine-grained fraction for sediments from northwestern SCS, in order to identify sediment source and transportation. The results show that the clay mineral of northwestern SCS sediments are mainly illite (30%~59%), smectite (20%~40%) and kaolinite (8%~35%), with minor chlorite. The illite chemical index varies between 0.19 and 0.75 with an average of 0.49, indicating an intensive hydrolysis in the source region. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of sediments range from 0.716288 to 0.734416 (average of 0.724659), and ɛ Nd(0) values range from -10.31 to -11.62 (average of -10.93), which suggest that the source rocks of these sediments are derived from continental crust. The Hainan Island is an important source for sediments deposited in the nearshore and western shelf, especially for illite, kaolinite and smectite clay minerals. Furthermore, the relatively high contents of kaolinite and smectite in sediments from eastern shelf and southern slope of Hainan Island are also controlled by the supply of terrigenous materials from Hainan, which cannot be resulted from sedimentary differentiation of the Pearl and Red river sediments. And the correlation analysis

  19. Characterization of Zeolite in Zeolite-Geopolymer Hybrid Bulk Materials Derived from Kaolinitic Clays

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hayami; Hashimoto, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid materials have been formed when kaolin was used as a starting material. Their characteristics are of interest because they can have a wide pore size distribution with micro- and meso-pores due to the zeolite and geopolymer, respectively. In this study, Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid bulk materials were fabricated using four kinds of kaolinitic clays (a halloysite and three kinds of kaolinite). The kaolinitic clays were first calcined at 700 °C for 3 h to transform into the amorphous aluminosilicate phases. Alkali-activation treatment of the metakaolin yielded bulk materials with different amounts and types of zeolite and different compressive strength. This study investigated the effects of the initial kaolinitic clays on the amount and types of zeolite in the resultant geopolymers as well as the strength of the bulk materials. The kaolinitic clays and their metakaolin were characterized by XRD analysis, chemical composition, crystallite size, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR analysis, and specific surface area measurements. The correlation between the amount of zeolite formed and the compressive strength of the resultant hybrid bulk materials, previously reported by other researchers was not positively observed. In the studied systems, the effects of Si/Al and crystalline size were observed. When the atomic ratio of Si/Al in the starting kaolinitic clays increased, the compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials increased. The crystallite size of the zeolite in the hybrid bulk materials increased with decreasing compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials. PMID:28809241

  20. Poly(vinyl acetate)/clay nanocomposite materials for organic thin film transistor application.

    PubMed

    Park, B J; Sung, J H; Park, J H; Choi, J S; Choi, H J

    2008-05-01

    Nanocomposite materials of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and organoclay were fabricated, in order to be utilized as dielectric materials of the organic thin film transistor (OTFT). Spin coating condition of the nanocomposite solution was examined considering shear viscosity of the composite materials dissolved in chloroform. Intercalated structure of the PVAc/clay nanocomposites was characterized using both wide-angle X-ray diffraction and TEM. Fracture morphology of the composite film on silicon wafer was also observed by SEM. Dielectric constant (4.15) of the nanocomposite materials shows that the PVAc/clay nanocomposites are applicable for the gate dielectric materials.

  1. Analysis of the eukaryotic community and metabolites found in clay wall material used in the construction of traditional Japanese buildings.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Sakihito; Kamei, Kaeko; Nishitani, Maiko; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Clay wall (tsuchikabe in Japanese) material for Japanese traditional buildings is manufactured by fermenting a mixture of clay, sand, and rice straw. The aim of this study was to understand the fermentation process in order to gain insight into the ways waste biomass can be used to produce useful materials. In this study, in addition to Clostridium, we suggested that the family Nectriaceae and the Scutellinia sp. of fungi were important in degrading cell wall materials of rice straw, such as cellulose and/or lignin. The microorganisms in the clay wall material produced sulfur-containing inorganic compounds that may sulfurate minerals in clay particles, and polysaccharides that give viscosity to clay wall material, thus increasing workability for plastering, and possibly giving water-resistance to the dried clay wall.

  2. Further studies on the problems of geomagnetic field intensity determination from archaeological baked clay materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova-Avramova, M.; Kovacheva, M.

    2015-10-01

    heterogeneous due to variable heating conditions in the different parts of the archaeological structures. The study draws attention to the importance of multiple heating for the stabilization of grain size distribution in baked clay materials and the need of elucidation of this question.

  3. Clay pigment structure characterisation as a guide for provenance determination--a comparison between laboratory powder micro-XRD and synchrotron radiation XRD.

    PubMed

    Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Hradilová, Janka; Žižak, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Application of X-ray diffraction (XRD)-based techniques in the analysis of painted artworks is not only beneficial for indisputable identification of crystal constituents in colour layers, but it can also bring insight in material crystal structure, which can be affected by their geological formation, manufacturing procedure or secondary changes. This knowledge might be helpful for art historic evaluation of an artwork as well as for its conservation. By way of example of kaolinite, we show that classification of its crystal structure order based on XRD data is useful for estimation of its provenance. We found kaolinite in the preparation layer of a Gothic wall painting in a Czech church situated near Karlovy Vary, where there are important kaolin deposits. Comparing reference kaolin materials from eight various Czech deposits, we found that these can be differentiated just according to the kaolinite crystallinity. Within this study, we compared laboratory powder X-ray micro-diffraction (micro-XRD) with synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction analysing the same real sample. We found that both techniques led to the same results.

  4. Development of biodegradable foamlike materials based on casein and sodium montmorillonite clay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable foamlike materials based on a naturally occurring polymer (casein protein) and sodium montmorillonite clay (Na+-MMT) were produced through a simple freeze-drying process. By utilizing DL-glyceraldehyde (GC) as a chemical cross-linking agent, the structural integrity of these new aeroge...

  5. Clay mineralogy of the ocean sediments from the Wilkes Land margin, east Antarctica: implications on the paleoclimate, provenance and sediment dispersal pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kamlesh; Bhattacharya, Sanjeeb; Biswas, P.; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Pandey, Mayuri; Pant, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    Core U1359 collected from the continental rise off Wilkes Land, east Antarctica, is analyzed for the clay mineralogy and carbon content. The temporal variation of the clay mineralogical data shows a dominance of illite with chlorite, smectite and kaolinite in decreasing concentration. Clay mineral illite is negatively correlated with smectite which shows enrichment during 6.2-6.8, 5.5-5.8, 4.5 and 2.5 Ma. The mineralogical analyses on the silt size fraction (2-53 μm) of some selected samples were also carried out. The combined result of both the size fractions shows the presence of chlorite and illite in both size fractions, smectite and kaolinite only in clay size fraction (<2 μm) and similarity in the crystallinity and chemistry of illite in both fractions. Similar nature of illite in both fractions suggests negligible role of sorting probably due to the deposition from the waxing ice sheet. During times of ice growth, nearby cratonic east Antarctica shield provided biotite-rich sediments to the depositional site. On the other hand, the presence of smectite, only in the clay size fraction, suggests the effective role of sorting probably due to the deposition from distal source in ice retreat condition. During times of ice retreat, smectite-rich sediment derived from Ross Orogen is transported to the core site through surface or bottom water currents. Poor crystallinity of illite due to degradation further corroborates the ice retreat condition. The ice sheet proximal sediments of U1359 show that in the eastern part of Wilkes Land, the `warming' was initiated during late Miocene.

  6. Peculiarities of non-autoclaved lime wall materials production using clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodchenko, A. A.; Lesovik, V. S.; Cherepanova, I. A.; Volodchenko, A. N.; Zagorodnjuk, L. H.; Elistratkin, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    At present, the development and implementation of energy saving technologies for building materials production, which correspond to modern trends of «green» technologies, become ever more popular. One of the most widely spread wall materials today is a lime brick and stones. The primary raw goods used in production of such materials are quarziferous rocks. However, they have some disadvantages, including low strength index at the intermediate phase of their production, especially in case with a raw brick, which is an issue in the production of high-hollow goods due to low strength index of raw materials and the nonoptimal matrix structure. The conducted experiments confirmed the possibility to control structurization of building composites due to application of nonconventional argillous raw materials. Besides, the material and mineral composition of nonconventional clay rocks ensures the optimal microstructure thus providing for the production of efficient wall building materials via energy saving technology.

  7. A mechanism of basal spacing reduction in sodium smectitic clay materials in contact with DNAPL wastes.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Otero-Diaz, Margarita; Demond, Avery H

    2016-09-01

    There has been concern regarding the possible attack of clays in aquitards, slurry walls and landfill liners by dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) wastes, resulting in cracking. Despite the fact that a reduction in basal spacing in sodium smectitic clay materials has been linked to cracking, no plausible mechanism by which this reduction occurs in contact with waste DNAPLs has been formulated. To elucidate a mechanism, screening studies were conducted that showed that the combination of an anionic surfactant (AOT), a nonionic surfactant (TritonX-100) and a chlorinated solvent, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), could replicate the basal spacing reduction and cracking behavior of water-saturated bentonite caused by two waste DNAPLs obtained from the field. FTIR measurements of this system showed a displacement of the HOH bending band of water symptomatic of desiccation. Sorption measurements showed that the uptake of AOT by bentonite increased eight fold in the presence of TritonX-100 and PCE. The evidence presented here supports a mechanism of syneresis, involving the extraction of water from the interlayer space of the clay through the synergistic sorption of a nonionic and anionic surfactant mixture. It is speculated that the solvation of water in reverse micellar aggregates is the process driving the syneresis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Interfacial reactions between humic-like substances and lateritic clay: application to the preparation of "geomimetic" materials.

    PubMed

    Goure-Doubi, Herve; Martias, Céline; Lecomte-Nana, Gisèle Laure; Nait-Ali, Benoît; Smith, Agnès; Thune, Elsa; Villandier, Nicolas; Gloaguen, Vincent; Soubrand, Marilyne; Konan, Léon koffi

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the strengthening of "geomimetic" materials, especially the chemical bonding between clay and humic substances. The mineral matter is lateritic clay which mainly consists in kaolinite, goethite, hematite and quartz. The other starting products are fulvic acid (FA) and lime. The preparation of these geomimetic materials is inspired from the natural stabilization of soils by humic substances occurring over thousands of years. The present process involves acidic and alkaline reactions followed by a curing period of 18days at 60°C under a water saturated atmosphere. The acceleration of the strengthening process usually observed in soils makes this an original process for treatment of soils. The consolidation of the "geomimetic" materials could result from two major phenomena: (i) chemical bonding at the interface between the clay particles and iron compounds and the functional groups of the fulvic acid, (ii) a partial dissolution of the clay grains followed by the precipitation of the cementitious phases, namely calcium silicate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrates and mixed calcium silicum and aluminum hydrates. Indeed, the decrease of the BET specific area of the lateritic clay after 24 h of reaction with FA added to the structural reorganization observed between 900 and 1000°C in the "geomimetic" material, and to the results of adsorption measurements, confirm the formation of organo-ferric complexes. The presence of iron oxides in clay, in the form of goethite, appears to be another parameter in favor of a ligand exchange process and the creation of binding bridges between FA and the mineral matter. Indeed all faces of goethite are likely to be involved in complexation reactions whereas in lateritic clay only lateral faces could be involved. The results of the adsorption experiments realized at a local scale will improve our understandings about the process of adsorption of FA on lateritic

  9. Zr-doped TiO2 supported on delaminated clay materials for solar photocatalytic treatment of emerging pollutants.

    PubMed

    Belver, C; Bedia, J; Rodriguez, J J

    2017-01-15

    Solar light-active Zr-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles were successfully immobilized on delaminated clay materials by a one-step sol-gel route. Fixing the amount of TiO 2 at 65wt.%, this work studies the influence of Zr loading (up to 2%) on the photocatalytic activity of the resulting Zr-doped TiO 2 /clay materials. The structural characterization demonstrates that all samples were formed by a delaminated clay with nanostructured anatase assembled on its surface. The Zr dopant was successfully incorporated into the anatase lattice, resulting in a slight deformation of the anatase crystal and the reduction of the band gap. These materials exhibit high surface area with a disordered mesoporous structure formed by TiO 2 particles (15-20nm) supported on a delaminated clay. They were tested in the solar photodegradation of antipyrine, usually used as an analgesic drug and selected as an example of emerging pollutant. High degradation rates have been obtained at low antipyrine concentrations and high solar irradiation intensities with the Zr-doped TiO 2 /clay catalyst, more effective than the undoped one. This work demonstrates the potential application of the synthesis method for preparing novel and efficient solar-light photocatalysts based on metal-doped anatase and a delaminated clay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clay minerals: Properties and applications to dermocosmetic products and perspectives of natural raw materials for therapeutic purposes-A review.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Bertolino, Silvana Raquel Alina; Cuffini, Silvia Lucia; Ducart, Diego Fernando; Bretzke, Pedro Eriberto; Leonardi, Gislaine Ricci

    2017-12-20

    Clay minerals are layered materials with a number of peculiar properties, which find many relevant applications in various industries. Since they are easily found everywhere, they are particularly attractive due to their economic viability. In the cosmetic industry, clay minerals are often used as excipients to stabilize emulsions or suspensions and to modify the rheological behavior of these systems. They also play an important role as adsorbents or absorbents, not only in cosmetics but also in other industries, such as pharmaceuticals. This reviewer believes that since this manuscript is presented as covering topical applications that include pharmaceuticals, some types of clay minerals should be considered as a potential material to be used as drug delivery systems. We review several applications of clay minerals to dermocosmetic products, relating them to the underlying properties of these materials and exemplifying with a number of clay minerals available in the market. We also discuss the use of clay minerals in topically-applied products for therapeutic purposes, specially for skin treatment and protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement of Plant Establishment on Dredged Material Sites with Mycorrhizal Fungi and Clay Amendments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    montmorillonite enhanced the growth of smooth brome grass. Topsoil, the clays attapulgite and kaolinite , and the commercial products Agrosoke anj Stawetwere...clays bentonite, attapulgite, kaolinite , and montmorillonite . Trade name and company addresses for the clays are listed in Table 1. Agrosoke and Stawet...desertcoZa, G. etunicatwn, and G. intraradice8. The clays attapulgite, ben- tonite, kaclinite,/and montmorillonite from various commercial sources were

  12. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  13. Description of Arundel Clay ornithomimosaur material and a reinterpretation of Nedcolbertia justinhofmanni as an "Ostrich Dinosaur": biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Chase Doran

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record of dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous of Eastern North America is scant, especially since a few stratigraphic units from the east are fossiliferous. Among these stratigraphic units, the Arundel Clay of the eastern seaboard has produced the best-characterized dinosaur faunas known from the Early Cretaceous of Eastern North America. The diverse dinosaur fauna of the Arundel Clay has been thoroughly discussed previously, but a few of the dinosaur species originally described from the Arundel Clay are still regarded as valid genera. Much of the Arundel material is in need of review and redescription. Among the fossils of dinosaurs from this stratigraphic unit are those referred to ornithomimosaurs. Here, the researcher describes ornithomimosaur remains from the Arundel Clay of Prince George's County, Maryland which may be from two distinct ornithomimosaur taxa. These remains provide key information on the theropods of the Early Cretaceous of Eastern North America. Recent discoveries of small theropod material from the Arundel Clay possibly belonging to ornithomimosaurs are also reviewed and described for the first time. The description of the Arundel material herein along with recent discoveries of basal ornithomimosaurs in the past 15 years has allowed for comparisons with the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia justinhofmanni , suggesting the latter animal was a basal ornithomimosaur rather than a "generalized" coelurosaur as it was originally described. Comparisons between the Arundel ornithomimosaur material and similar Asian and European specimens suggest that both extremely basal ornithomimosaurs and more intermediate or derived forms may have coexisted throughout the northern hemisphere during the Early Cretaceous.

  14. Silver-embedded modified hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposites as antibacterial materials.

    PubMed

    Roy, Buddhadeb; Bharali, Pranjal; Konwar, B K; Karak, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Silver-embedded modified hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposites were prepared at different wt.% of octadecyl amine-modified montmorillonite at a constant silver concentration (1 wt.%). UV-visible, XRD and TEM studies confirmed the formation of silver nanoparticles. Compared to the system without silver and clay, the gloss from 70° to 94°, scratch hardness from 4 to 5.8 kg, impact strength from 60 to 90 cm, tensile strength from 8.5 to 15.5 MPa, adhesive strength from 5 to 7.1 × 10(9)N/m, flexibility from >6 to <4mm, and thermostability from 230 to 260 °C increased for the modified system. Resistance to aqueous 10% HCl, 0.5% NaOH, 10% NaCl also increased. The nanocomposites showed antibacterial activity in well diffusion assays against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC11632), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC11774), Escherichia coli (MTCC40), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC7814) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC10031). The results showed that these nanocomposites have potential to be used as antimicrobial materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biocompatible high performance hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposite as an implantable material.

    PubMed

    Barua, Shaswat; Dutta, Nipu; Karmakar, Sanjeev; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Aidew, Lipika; Buragohain, Alak K; Karak, Niranjan

    2014-04-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are in extensive use in the domain of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. High performance hyperbranched epoxy is projected here as a potential biomaterial for tissue regeneration. Thermosetting hyperbranched epoxy nanocomposites were prepared with Homalomena aromatica rhizome oil-modified bentonite as well as organically modified montmorillonite clay. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques confirmed the strong interfacial interaction of clay layers with the epoxy matrix. The poly(amido amine)-cured thermosetting nanocomposites exhibited high mechanical properties like impact resistance (>100 cm), scratch hardness (>10 kg), tensile strength (48-58 MPa) and elongation at break (11.9-16.6%). Cytocompatibility of the thermosets was found to be excellent as evident by MTT and red blood cell hemolytic assays. The nanocomposites exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536), Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC14468) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) strains. In vivo biocompatibility of the best performing nanocomposite was ascertained by histopathological study of the brain, heart, liver and skin after subcutaneous implantation in Wistar rats. The material supported the proliferation of dermatocytes without induction of any sign of toxicity to the above organs. The adherence and proliferation of cells endorse the nanocomposite as a non-toxic biomaterial for tissue regeneration.

  16. Provenance and environmental risk of windblown materials from mine tailing ponds, Murcia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Hossein; Abbaspour, Ali; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Gabarrón, María; Shahrokh, Vajihe; Faz, Angel; Acosta, Jose A

    2018-05-31

    Atmospheric particulates play a vital role in the transport of potentially toxic metals, being an important exposure pathways of people to toxic elements, which is faster and can occur in a much larger scale than water, soil and biota transport. Windblown materials in abandoned tailing ponds have not been well examined. The objectives of this investigation were: to study the major physical and geochemical properties of the materials eroded by wind inside the tailing ponds, and to understand the relative contribution of different sources to its heavy metals concentration. Study area is located in Cartagena-La Union mining district (SE Spain), where metallic mining of Fe, Pb and Zn has been developed for more than 2500 years. Wind-eroded particulates were monthly collected at 3 different heights (20, 50, and 80 cm) from the ground for a period of a full year using 4 dust collectors. Four tailing samples and 4 surface soil samples from the surrounding hills were also taken. Dust, soil, and tailing samples were examined for pH, particle size distribution, electrical conductivity, calcium carbonate content, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Mn, Co, Ni, Ti and Zr concentrations. The results indicated that very coarse textured, slightly saline, and almost neutral wind-eroded deposits were generated with a very high temporal variability throughout the year. They also showed that the concentration of Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn, in the dust samples is extraordinarily high (18, 1254, 1831, and 5747 mg kg -1 respectively), whereas Co, Ni, and Cu had concentrations into the range of background concentrations found in the Earth's crust (3.8, 12, and 60 mg kg -1 respectively). Besides, the concentration of both categories of heavy metals in the dust samples was higher than that in tailing and less than that of the soils. The barren surfaces of tailing ponds and also the surface soils of the surrounding area seem to be the major contributors to the dust collected. Therefore, abandoned mines as

  17. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  18. Mechanisms of removal of three widespread pharmaceuticals by two clay materials.

    PubMed

    Dordio, A V; Miranda, S; Prates Ramalho, J P; Carvalho, A J Palace

    2017-02-05

    Pharmaceutical residues presence in the environment is among nowadays top emergent environmental issues. For removal of such pollutants, adsorption is a generally efficient process that can be complementary to conventional treatment. Research of cheap, widely available adsorbents may make this process economically attractive. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the capacity of two clay materials (exfoliated vermiculite, LECA) to adsorb gemfibrozil, mefenamic acid and naproxen in lab-scale batch assays. Results show that both adsorbents are able to remove the pharmaceuticals from aqueous medium. Although vermiculite exhibited higher adsorption capacities per unit mass of adsorbent, LECA yielded higher absolute removals of the pharmaceuticals due to the larger mass of adsorbent. Quantum chemistry calculations predicted that the forms of binding of the three molecules to the vermiculite surface are essentially identical, but the adsorption isotherm of naproxen differs substantially from the other two's. The linear forms of the latter impose limits at lower concentrations to the removal efficiencies of these pharmaceuticals by vermiculite, thereby electing LECA as more efficient. Notwithstanding, vermiculite's high specific adsorption capacity and also its much faster adsorption kinetics suggest that there may be some benefits in combining both materials as a composite adsorbent solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency.

  20. Constructing wetlands: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a building material in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here the option of dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct 10.000 ha of wetland will soon go under construction. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a six-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling as well as yellowing of foliage. The N:P ratios of plant tissue were low and were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Plant analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose that when building wetlands from these mud deposits Fe-tolerant species are used rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the building material and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  1. Impact of High Concentration Solutions on Hydraulic Properties of Geosynthetic Clay Liner Materials

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of landfill high concentration solutions erosion on geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) materials permeability. The permeation tests on the GCL, submerged using different kinds of solutions with different concentrations, were carried out systematically by taking these chemical solutions as permeant liquids. Based on seasonal variations of ion concentrations in Chenjiachong landfill leachate (Wuhan Province), CaCl2, MgCl2, NaCl, and KCl were selected as chemical attack solutions to carry out experimental investigations under three concentrations (50 mM, 100 mM, 200 mM) and soak times (5, 10, and 20 days). The variation law of the GCL hydraulic conductivity under different operating conditions was analyzed. The relationship between GCL hydraulic conductivity, chemical solutions categories, concentrations, and soak times were further discussed. The GCL hydraulic conductivity, when soaked and permeated with high concentration chemical solutions, increases several times or exceeds two orders of magnitude, as compared with the permeation test under normal conditions that used water as the permeant liquid. This reveals that GCL is very susceptible to chemical attack. For four chemical solutions, the chemical attack effect on GCL hydraulic conductivity is CaCl2 > MgCl2 > KCl > NaCl. The impact of soak times on GCL hydraulic conductivity is the cooperative contribution of the liner chemical attack reaction and hydration swelling. A longer soak time results in a more advantageous hydration swelling effect. The chemical attack reaction restrains the hydration swelling of the GCL. Moreover, the GCL hydraulic conductivity exponentially decreases with the increased amplitude of thickness.

  2. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  3. Clays, specialty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the specialty clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. The specialty clays mined in the U.S. are ball clay, fuller's earth, bentonite, fire clay, and kaolin. Sales of specialty clays in the U.S. were around 17 Mt in 1997. Approximately 53 kt of specialty clays were imported.

  4. Screening of heavy metal containing waste types for use as raw material in Arctic clay-based bricks.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Vestbø, Andreas Peter

    2016-11-10

    In the vulnerable Arctic environment, the impact of especially hazardous wastes can have severe consequences and the reduction and safe handling of these waste types are therefore an important issue. In this study, two groups of heavy metal containing particulate waste materials, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly and bottom ashes and mine tailings (i.e., residues from the mineral resource industry) from Greenland were screened in order to determine their suitability as secondary resources in clay-based brick production. Small clay discs, containing 20 or 40% of the different particulate waste materials, were fired and material properties and heavy metal leaching tests were conducted before and after firing. Remediation techniques (washing in distilled water and electrodialytical treatment) applied to the fly ash reduced leaching before firing. The mine tailings and bottom ash brick discs obtained satisfactory densities (1669-2007 kg/m 3 ) and open porosities (27.9-39.9%). In contrast, the fly ash brick discs had low densities (1313-1578 kg/m 3 ) and high open porosities (42.1-51. %). However, leaching tests on crushed brick discs revealed that heavy metals generally became more available after firing for all the investigated materials and that further optimisation is therefore necessary prior to incorporation in bricks.

  5. The influence of using quicklime and volcanic ash as stabilizing materials in clay viewed from CBR value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastuty, Ika Puji; Sofyan, Tri Alby; Roesyanto

    2017-11-01

    The condition of the soil in Indonesia in varied, viewed from its bearing capacity. The soil is one of the materials which plays a very important role in a construction or foundation so that it is very necessary to have soil with its adequate technical properties. In reality, often founding inadequate soil properties such as in its compressibility, permeability, and plasticity. The objective of the research was to find out the physical properties, technical properties, CBR value, and stabilization of clay by adding quicklime and volcanic ash as stabilizing materials. The mixing combination is 2%, 4% quicklime, and 2%-24% volcanic ash. The value of Water Content for original soil was 34.33% and Specific Gravity original soil was 2.65. The result of the research showed that the stabilizing materials from quicklime and volcanic ash could improve the physical and mechanical properties of clay. The value of Atterberg Limits decreased from 29.88% to 11.33% in the variation of 4% Q+24% VA, while the most maximal value of CBR was found in the variation of 4% Q+8% VA at 9.01%.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  7. Use of natural clays as sorbent materials for rare earth ions: Materials characterization and set up of the operative parameters.

    PubMed

    Iannicelli-Zubiani, Elena Maria; Cristiani, Cinzia; Dotelli, Giovanni; Gallo Stampino, Paola; Pelosato, Renato; Mesto, Ernesto; Schingaro, Emanuela; Lacalamita, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Two mineral clays of the montmorillonite group were tested as sorbents for the removal of Rare Earths (REs) from liquid solutions. Lanthanum and neodymium model solutions were used to perform uptake tests in order to: (a) verify the clays sorption capability, (b) investigate the sorption mechanisms and (c) optimize the experimental parameters, such as contact time and pH. The desorption was also studied, in order to evaluate the feasibility of REs recovery from waters. The adsorption-desorption procedure with the optimized parameters was also tested on a leaching solution obtained by dissolution of a dismantled NdFeB magnet of a hard-disk. The clays were fully characterized after REs adsorption and desorption by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); the liquid phase was characterized via Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analyses. The experimental results show that both clays are able to capture and release La and Nd ions, with an ion exchange mechanism. The best total efficiency (capture ≈ 50%, release ≈ 70%) is obtained when the uptake and release processes are performed at pH=5 and pH=1 respectively; in real leached scrap solutions, the uptake is around 40% but release efficiency is strongly decreased passing from a mono-ion system to a real system (from 80% to 5%). Furthermore, a strong matrix effect is found, with the matrix largely affecting both the uptake and the release of neodymium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  9. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  10. Field-to-laboratory analysis of clay wall coatings as passive removal materials for ozone in buildings.

    PubMed

    Darling, E; Corsi, R L

    2017-05-01

    Ozone reacts readily with many indoor materials, as well as with compounds in indoor air. These reactions lead to lower indoor than outdoor ozone concentrations when outdoor air is the major contributor to indoor ozone. However, the products of indoor ozone reactions may be irritating or harmful to building occupants. While active technologies exist to reduce indoor ozone concentrations (i.e, in-duct filtration using activated carbon), they can be cost-prohibitive for some and/or infeasible for dwellings that do not have heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. In this study, the potential for passive reduction of indoor ozone by two different clay-based interior surface coatings was explored. These coatings were exposed to occupied residential indoor environments and tested bimonthly in environmental chambers for quantification of ozone reaction probabilities and reaction product emission rates over a 6-month period. Results indicate that clay-based coatings may be effective as passive removal materials, with relatively low by-product emission rates that decay rapidly within 2 months. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  12. Antimicrobial nanocomposites based on natural modified materials: a review of carbons and clays.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Valásková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The review is focused on the recent research and development of antimicrobial nanocomposites based on selected carbon nanomaterials and natural nanoclay minerals. The nanocomposites comprised of two or several components, where at least one presents antimicrobial properties, are discussed. Yet the most popular agent remains silver as nanoparticle or in ionic form. Second, broadly studied group, are organics as additives or polymeric matrices. Both carbons and clays in certain forms possess antimicrobial properties. A lot of interest is put on to research graphene oxide. The low-environmental impact technologies-based on sustainable biopolymers have been studied. Testing of antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials is performed most frequently on E. coli and S. aureus bacterias.

  13. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  14. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  15. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  16. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  17. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  18. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was applied to measure the effective pore diffusion coefficient (Dp) for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions in a silt/clay sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux" diffusion studies were conducted in which [U(VI)] in both aqueous and solid phases was measured as a function of distance in the diffusion cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed contaminant U(VI) in the solid phase containing extractable background U(VI). The effect of sorption kinetics on U(VI) interparticle diffusion was evaluated by comparing sorption-retarded diffusion models with sorption described either as equilibrium or intraparticle diffusion-limited processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that (1) a single pore diffusion coefficient can simulate the diffusion of total aqueous U(VI), and (2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling sorption-retarded diffusion under the given experimental conditions. Dp of 1.6-1.7 x 10(-6) cm2/s was estimated in aqueous solution at pH 8.0 and saturated with respect to calcite, as relevant to some subsurface regions of the Hanford site.

  19. Inorganic raw materials economy and provenance of chipped industry in some stone age sites of northern and central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Amilcare; Boschian, Giovanni; Crisci, Gino Mirocle; Danese, Ermanno; De Francesco, Anna Maria; Dini, Mario; Fontana, Federica; Giampietri, Alessandra; Grifoni, Renata; Guerreschi, Antonio; Liagre, Jérémie; Negrino, Fabio; Radi, Giovanna; Tozzi, Carlo; Tykot, Robert

    2004-06-01

    An opportunistic and local choice of raw materials is typically attested in the Lower and Middle Paleolithic industries throughout Italy. The quality of the raw material usually affected the flaking technology and quality of the products. In the Upper Paleolithic and the Mesolithic, raw material procurement strategies were more complex. Flint was exploited both locally, in areas where abundant outcrops of raw materials were available (such as the Lessini mountains), and in distant localities, after which it was transported or exchanged over medium/long distances. Different routes of exchange were thus followed in the various periods; good reconstruction of these routes have been provided by a study of the Garfagnana sites in Northern Tuscany, and the Mesolithic deposit of Mondeval de Sora (Dolomites). An interesting example of a Late Upper Paleolithic flint quarry and workshop were found in Abruzzo, in the San Bartolomeo shelter. The extended trade of obsidian from Lipari, Palmarola and Sardinia to the Italian Peninsula is attested in the Neolithic, with some differences concerning the age and different areas.

  20. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  1. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  2. Polyurethane rigid foam, a proven thermal insulating material for applications between +130°C and -196°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demharter, Anton

    Polyurethanes are high molecular weight polymers based on the polyaddition of polyfunctional hydroxyl-group containing compounds and polyisocyanates. A wide variety of properties can be tailored to fulfil the requirements of different applications: soft to hard, plastic, elastic or thermoset, compact or foamed. Compared with other insulating materials, PUR rigid foam is highly competitive. There are five product-related advantages: lowest thermal conductivity, high mechanical and chemical properties at both high and low temperatures, all major international fire safety requirements can be satisfied, the ability to form sandwich structures with various facer materials, and the new generation of PUR is CFC-free and recyclable. Rigid polyurethane foams perform well in most areas of low-temperature insulations. Products in density ranging from approximately 30 to 200 kg m -3 withstand temperatures down to -196°C. Typical applications are: refrigerated vehicles, road and rail tankers, vessels for refrigerated cargo, pipelines, liquid gas tanks for LPG and LNG and cryogenic wind tunnels. The paper presents applications, corresponding properties of the rigid foams used, and also other insulating materials in competition to PUR are discussed.

  3. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  4. Within-storm and Seasonal Differences in Particulate Organic Material Composition and Sources in White Clay Creek, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Aalto, R. E.; Newbold, J. D.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The material exported from a watershed reflects its origin and the processes it undergoes during downhill and downstream transport. Due to its nature as a complex mixture of material, the composition of POM integrates the physical, biological, and chemical processes effecting watershed material. In this study, we integrate sediment fingerprint analyses common in geomorphological studies of mineral suspended particulate material (SPM) with biological and ecological characterizations of particulate organic carbon (POC). Through this combination, we produce quantifiable budgets of particulate organic carbon and mineral material, as well as integrate our calculations of carbon and mineral cycling in a complex, human-influenced watershed. More specifically, we quantify the composition and sources of POM in the third-order White Clay Creek Watershed, and examine the differences in composition and source with hydrologic variations produced by storms and seasonality. POM and watershed sources have been analyzed for particle size, mineral surface area, total mineral elemental composition, fallout radioisotope activity for common erosion tracers (7Be, 210Pb, 137Cs), and organic carbon and nitrogen content with stable isotope (13C, 15N) abundance. Results indicate a difference in POM source with season as well as within individual storms. Beryllium-7 activity, an indicator of landscape surface erosion, nearly triples within a single spring storm, from 389 mBq/g on the rising limb and 1190 mBq/g at the storm hydrograph peak. Fall storms have even lower 7Be concentrations, below 100 mBq/g. Furthermore, weight-percent of organic carbon nearly doubles from 4 - 5% during spring storms to over 8% during fall storms, with smaller variation occurring within individual storms. Despite changes in percent organic carbon, organic carbon to mineral surface area ratios and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios remain similar within storms and across seasons.

  5. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  7. Composite TiO2/clays materials for photocatalytic NOx oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Karapati, S.; Petridis, D.; Vaimakis, T.; Trapalis, C.

    2014-11-01

    TiO2 photocatalyst received much attention for air purification applications especially for removal of air pollutants like NOx, VOCs etc. It has been established that the activity of the photocatalyst can be significantly enhanced by its immobilization onto suitable substrates like inorganic minerals, porous silica, hydroxyapatite, adsorbent materials like activated carbon, various co-catalysts such as semiconductors, graphene, reduced graphite oxide, etc. In the present work, photocatalytic composite materials consisted of mineral substrate and TiO2 in weight ratio 1:1 were manufactured and examined for oxidation and removal of nitric oxides NOx (NO and NO2). Commercial titania P25 (Evonik-Degussa) and urea-modified P25 were used as photocatalytically active components. Inorganic minerals, namely kunipia, talk and hydrotalcite were selected as supporting materials due to their layered structure and expected high NOx adsorption capability. Al3+ and Ca2+ intercalation was applied in order to improve the dispersion of TiO2 and its loading into the supporting matrix. The X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed the binary structure of the composites and homogeneous dispersion of the photocatalyst into the substrates. The photocatalytic behavior of the materials in NOx oxidation and removal was investigated under UV and visible light irradiation. The composite materials exhibited superior photocatalytic activity than the bare titania under both types of irradiation. Significant visible light activity was recorded for the composites containing urea-modified titania that was accredited to the N-doping of the semiconductor. Among the different substrates, the hydrotalcite caused highest increase in the NOx removal, while among the intercalation ions the Ca2+ was more efficient. The results were related to the improved dispersion of the TiO2 and the synergetic activity of the substrates as NOx adsorbers.

  8. Treatments for clays in aggregates used to produce cement concrete, bituminous materials, and chip seals : technical report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    The clay contamination of coarse and fine aggregates and its effects on pavement performance of portland cement concrete, bituminous mixes and chip seals is a major concern for Texas Department of Transportation. We proposed (i) to determine what typ...

  9. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  10. Slag of Greek provenance uses in materials science and geophysics: implications for a highly potential material in the service of the development of Greek economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontakianakos, G.; Baziotis, I.; Sotiriadis, K.; Goulas, G.; Liakopoulos, S.; Karastathis, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) is a secondary raw material that can be used as an alternative low energy binder. Hydraulic properties can be occurred through its alkali activation. GGBS is characterized by the glassy to crystalline ratio and by its chemical and mineralogical composition. Acidic slag cannot easily get crystallized in oppose to the basic one. Crystalline phases show very low reactivity with Ca(OH)2, while amorphous phases can easily react in the presence of basic substances. The aim of the present study was to study the evolution of new advanced silicate materials presenting high durability at high temperature environments. Specimens were produced using two types of slag of Greek origin. The first type was a ferrous slag, while the second one was calcareous. Their maximum particle size was 4 mm and 0.07 mm respectively. Specimens were prepared using the above slag types and siliceous sand as an aggregate. Sand was divided according to European Standard EN 196-1 in three fractions: PG1 (1

  11. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studiesmore » of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.« less

  12. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  13. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  14. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  15. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  16. Dynamic mechanical properties and anisotropy of synthetic shales with different clay minerals under confining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Fei; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Ding, Pinbo; Shuai, Da

    2018-03-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of reservoir rocks significantly as the type of clay minerals, their volume and distribution, and their orientation control the shale's intrinsic anisotropic behaviours. Clay minerals are the most abundant materials in shale, and it has been proven extremely difficult to measure the elastic properties of natural shale by means of a single variable (in this case, the type of clay minerals), due to the influences of multiple factors, including water, TOC content and complex mineral compositions. We used quartz, clay (kaolinite, illite and smectite), carbonate and kerogen extract as the primary materials to construct synthetic shale with different clay minerals. Ultrasonic experiments were conducted to investigate the anisotropy of velocity and mechanical properties in dry synthetic and natural shale as a function of confining pressure. Velocities in synthetic shale are sensitive to the type of clay minerals, possibly due to the different structures of the clay minerals. The velocities increase with confining pressure and show higher rate of velocity increase at low pressures, and P-wave velocity is usually more sensitive than S-wave velocity to confining pressure according to our results. Similarly, the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase with applied pressure, and the results also reveal that E11 is always larger than E33 and ν31 is smaller than ν12. Velocity and mechanical anisotropy decrease with increasing stress, and are sensitive to stress and the type of clay minerals. However, the changes of mechanical anisotropy with applied stress are larger compared with the velocity anisotropy, indicating that mechanical properties are more sensitive to the change of rock properties.

  17. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  18. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  19. Three-dimensionally interconnected Si frameworks derived from natural halloysite clay: a high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hao; Xiong, Hao; Liu, Xiaohe; Chen, Gen; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Haidong; Ma, Renzhi; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2018-05-23

    On account of its high theoretical capacity, silicon (Si) has been regarded as a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries. Extracting Si content from earth-abundant and low-cost aluminosilicate minerals, rather than from artificial silica (SiO2) precursors, is a more favorable and practical method for the large-scale application of Si anodes. In this work, three-dimensionally interconnected (3D-interconnected) Si frameworks with a branch diameter of ∼15 nm are prepared by the reduction of amorphous SiO2 nanotubes derived from natural halloysite clay. Benefiting from their nanostructure, the as-prepared 3D-interconnected Si frameworks yield high reversible capacities of 2.54 A h g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 after 50 cycles, 1.87 A h g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 after 200 cycles, and 0.97 A h g-1 at 2 A g-1 after a long-term charge-discharge process of 500 cycles, remarkably outperforming the commercial Si material. Further, when the as-prepared Si frameworks and commercial LiCoO2 cathodes are paired in full cells, a high anode capacity of 0.98 A h g-1 is achieved after 100 cycles of rapid charge/discharge at 2 A g-1. This work provides a new strategy for the synthesis of high-capacity Si anodes derived from natural aluminosilicate clay.

  20. Innocent Until Proven Guilty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Catherine; Whitaker, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    In the criminal justice system, defendants accused of a crime are presumed innocent until proven guilty. Statistical inference in any context is built on an analogous principle: The null hypothesis--often a hypothesis of "no difference" or "no effect"--is presumed true unless there is sufficient evidence against it. In this…

  1. The effect of clay nanoparticleon the retention and attack of drywood termite (Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, T.; Winarni, B.; Kusuma, I. W.; Arung, E. T.; Budiarso, E.

    2018-04-01

    The aplication of clay nanoparticles as wood preservative was intended to examine its resistant to infestation of drywood termite (C. cynocephalusLight). Loam was crushed into small pieces as clay nanoparticles, which was used as wood preservative that was soluble in water. The material was dissolved with water in a given concentration and put it into anggerung (Trema orientalis), white meranti (Shorea bracteolata) and sengon (Paraseriehthes falcataria) by full cell method or impregnation. The tested samples were preserved by clay nanoparticles at the air pressure 60 psi for 2 hours and then furnace-dried, and tested by infestation of drywood termites. Results of the research showed that mortality of the drywood termites on those three preserved woods with clay nanoparticles by concentration of 2.5% and 5%, which reached 96.4% and 100% on average, respectively, in comparison without preservation by average mortality value was 27.4%. The highest retention of clay nanoparticle was 24.89 kg.m3 was obtained by concentration of 5% for white merantiand the lowest was 9.32 kg.m3 by concentration of 2.5% for anggerung. The application of clay nanoparticle as effective wood preservative against the infestation of drywood termite by concentration of 5% has been proven by mortality 100%.

  2. Provenance Store Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  3. Clay: The Forgotten Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Doris Marie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the tactile and kinesthetic areas of learning children experience when using clay. Includes practical tips for using and storing clay for preschool use and notes the differences between potters' clay and play dough. (HTH)

  4. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  5. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    part of it is reduced, another is formed. This is the fundamental geochemical aspect of the genesis of green clay minerals; they contain iron in both oxidation states.Unfortunately modern methods of mineral analysis on a microscopic scale, electron microbeam and others, do not allow the determination of the different oxidation states of iron especially for nonstoichiometric minerals. One can use Mössbauer spectral analysis, but the scales of observations are not the same (Mössbauer needing more material); one method used for observations on a microscale, the other on a macroscale. Given the problems of micro- and macroscale observations, oxidation state information is almost excluded from data gathered since the 1980s or so, and hence information concerning the relations of iron reduction and clay genesis must be taken from older studies. A second, much greater problem is that little X-ray diffraction (XRD) work is done on samples which are analyzed chemically by electron microbeam studies. In the past both types of information, structural and chemical, were available for the same sample. Hence not only do we have no precise chemical data for many samples (oxidation state of iron), but there is a rarity of mineral structural information to go along with the incomplete chemistry. This is critical for the study of clay minerals, because slight chemical changes in a clay mineral are frequently accompanied by changes in its structure, especially when one deals with interstratified clay minerals (mica/smectites for example). In fact, the tendency to obtain more and more precision (analysis of a smaller and smaller sized sample) has led to a total loss of mineralogical data. The Heisenberg principle is unwittingly verified by geologists. We know more about a small part of a sample, but we know less about its whole. As a result, the following discussion is based largely upon old data, those which combine iron oxidation states and XRD information.

  6. Wetland eco-engineering: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-09-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a foundation in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here, dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct wetland will soon begin. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a 6-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling and yellowing of foliage. The N : P ratios of the plant tissue were low, and these were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Subsequent analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose the use of Fe-tolerant species rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the situated sediment and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  7. From Provenance Standards and Tools to Queries and Actionable Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludaescher, B.

    2017-12-01

    The W3C PROV standard provides a minimal core for sharing retrospective provenance information for scientific workflows and scripts. PROV extensions such as DataONE's ProvONE model are necessary for linking runtime observables in retrospective provenance records with conceptual-level prospective provenance information, i.e., workflow (or dataflow) graphs. Runtime provenance recorders, such as DataONE's RunManager for R, or noWorkflow for Python capture retrospective provenance automatically. YesWorkflow (YW) is a toolkit that allows researchers to declare high-level prospective provenance models of scripts via simple inline comments (YW-annotations), revealing the computational modules and dataflow dependencies in the script. By combining and linking both forms of provenance, important queries and use cases can be supported that neither provenance model can afford on its own. We present existing and emerging provenance tools developed for the DataONE and SKOPE (Synthesizing Knowledge of Past Environments) projects. We show how the different tools can be used individually and in combination to model, capture, share, query, and visualize provenance information. We also present challenges and opportunities for making provenance information more immediately actionable for the researchers who create it in the first place. We argue that such a shift towards "provenance-for-self" is necessary to accelerate the creation, sharing, and use of provenance in support of transparent, reproducible computational and data science.

  8. Initiation and development of slickenlined surfaces in clay-rich material of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Schleicher, Anja

    2016-04-01

    During the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which is part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (stage 3), the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula (Japan), from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf. Underlying the Kumano Basin sediments, the Nankai accretionary prism appears, below 975.5 mbsf. It accreted during Upper Miocene to Pliocene times and is formed mainly by turbiditic silty claystone with rarely observed sandstone intercalations. Cuttings from both the 1-4 mm and >4 mm size fractions were investigated, showing slickenlined surfaces and deformation bands together with carbonate veins throughout the entire section from 1045.5 until 3058.5 mbsf. A scaly fabric is increasingly observed below approximately 2400 mbsf. Clay-rich cuttings were selected at different depth for specific SEM-EDS analysis, in order to investigate the initiation and development of the slickenlined surfaces, from both a structural and mineralogical point of view. Two end-members of the slickenlined surface types were observed: a) isolated smooth and uniform planes, between 20 and 50 μm long, formed by single grains of smectite with marked lineations and frequently jagged boundaries and b) microfaults (longer than 100 μm) with sharp boundaries to the undeformed rock, formed by aggregates of illite and smectite and with a well-developed lineation. In transition between these two end-member types, planes that are apparently unconnected draw a single plane and show subparallel lineations. Concerning the orientation of the slickenlines, it seems to be coherent with that observed in an array of conjugated faults, i.e. all the slickenlines belong to the same plane, in turn sub-perpendicular to the intersection of conjugated planes. These observations suggest that the slickenlined surfaces initiated along single grains of smectite and that with increasing

  9. Burnt clay magnetic properties and palaeointensity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Mariya; Lesigyarski, Deyan

    2014-05-01

    Burnt clay structures found in situ are the most valuable materials for archaeomagnetic studies. From these materials the full geomagnetic field vector described by inclination, declination and intensity can be retrieved. The reliability of the obtained directional results is related to the precision of samples orientation and the accuracy of characteristic remanence determination. Palaeointensity evaluations depend on much more complex factors - stability of carried remanent magnetization, grain-size distribution of magnetic particles and mineralogical transformations during heating. In the last decades many efforts have been made to shed light over the reasons for the bad success rate of palaeointensity experiments. Nevertheless, sometimes the explanation of the bad archaeointensity results with the magnetic properties of the studied materials is quite unsatisfactory. In order to show how difficult is to apply a priory strict criteria for the suitability of a given collection of archaeomagnetic materials, artificial samples formed from four different baked clays are examined. Two of the examined clay types were taken from clay deposits from different parts of Bulgaria and two clays were taken from ancient archaeological baked clay structures from the Central part of Bulgaria and the Black sea coast, respectively. The samples formed from these clays were repeatedly heated in known magnetic field to 700oC. Different analyses were performed to obtain information about the mineralogical content and magnetic properties of the samples. The obtained results point that all clays reached stable magnetic mineralogy after the repeated heating to 700oC, the main magnetic mineral is of titano/magnetite type and the magnetic particles are predominantly with pseudo single domain grain sizes. In spite that, the magnetic properies of the studied clays seem to be very similar, reliable palaeointensity results were obtained only from the clays coming from clay deposits. The

  10. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  11. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  12. Provenance and flux of detrital materials in Lake Suigetsu sediment (SG12 core) and their temporal changes during the last 20 kyrs based on color and XRF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Tada, R.; Nakagawa, T.; Gotanda, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Nagashima, K.; Irino, T.; Sugisaki, S.; Kojima, H.; Horiuchi, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Suigetsu in Central Japan is known for its annual lamination (varve) starting from 70kys ago. Extremely precise Age-depth model is established for SG06 core based on over 800 14C dates obtained on terrestrial leaf fossils and wiggle-matched to stalagmite 14C records constrained by varve counts (Staff et al., 2013). By projecting this age model to newly drilled core from the same site, we can obtain precisely age-controlled high resolution paleoenvironmental record around the Lake Suigetsu drainage. It is likely that detrital materials in Lake Suigetsu sediments have several different sources such as soil on the slopes around the lake itself, aeolian dust from inland Asia, and suspended particles supplied from Hasu river through lake Mikata, which is located immediately upstream of Lake Suigetsu and trapping most of coarse detrital grains. However, the relative contribution from each detrital source and its temporal changes are poorly known. The lack of knowledge on relative contribution of different detrital sources limits utility of detrital materials as proxies of paleo-environments. In this study, we are aiming to reconstruct the history of precipitation changes in the drainage area of Lake Suigetsu during the Holocene to explore the relationship between precipitation in the Japan Sea side of SW Japan, behavior of Asian monsoon system as an important component of the global climate system. It is well known that flux of suspended particles in rivers increases with precipitation. In order for us to be able to use the Hasu river's flux of suspended particles as the precipitation proxy, however, we first need to establish a simple and swift way to estimate the contribution of detrital materials from Hasu River flowing through Lake Mikata into Lake Suigetsu. We carried out color measurement with 5mm resolution on split half core surface of the sediment drilled in the summer of 2012(SG12), and compared these values to chemical composition data by XRF microscanner

  13. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    at the upper right, the small mesa -- a flat-topped hill -- at the center of the image is a remnant of an overlying rock layer that was eroded away. The greenish clay areas at the base of the hill were exposed by erosion of the overlying rock. The images at the upper right and lower left both show that the reddish-toned olivine occurs as sand dunes on top of the greenish clay deposits. The image at the lower right shows details of the clay-rich rock, including that they are extensively fractured into small, polygonal blocks just a few meters in size. Taken together, the CRISM and HiRISE data show that the clay-rich rocks are the oldest at the site, that they are exposed where overlying rock has been eroded away, and that the olivine is not part of the clay-rich rock. Rather it occurs in sand dunes blowing across the clay.

    Many more images of Nili Fossae and other clay-rich areas will be taken over the next two years. They will be used to try to understand the earliest climate of Mars that is recorded in the planet's rocks.

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

    CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument will also watch the seasonal variations in Martian dust and ice aerosols, and water content in surface materials o leading to new understanding of the climate.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the Califonia Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft.

  14. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-06-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  15. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  16. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  17. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  18. Design and characterization of a composite material based on Sr(II)-loaded clay nanotubes included within a biopolymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Del Buffa, Stefano; Bonini, Massimo; Ridi, Francesca; Severi, Mirko; Losi, Paola; Volpi, Silvia; Al Kayal, Tamer; Soldani, Giorgio; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-06-15

    This paper reports on the preparation, characterization, and cytotoxicity of a hybrid nanocomposite material made of Sr(II)-loaded Halloysite nanotubes included within a biopolymer (3-polyhydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) matrix. The Sr(II)-loaded inorganic scaffold is intended to provide mechanical resistance, multi-scale porosity, and to favor the in-situ regeneration of bone tissue thanks to its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The interaction of the hybrid system with the physiological environment is mediated by the biopolymer coating, which acts as a binder, as well as a diffusional barrier to the Sr(II) release. The degradation of the polymer progressively leads to the exposure of the Sr(II)-loaded Halloysite scaffold, tuning its interaction with osteogenic cells. The in vitro biocompatibility of the composite was demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests on L929 fibroblast cells. The results indicate that this composite material could be of interest for multiple strategies in the field of bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  20. Potential of Sr isotopic analysis in ceramic provenance studies: Characterisation of Chinese stonewares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Greig, Alan; Collerson, Kenneth D.; Zhuo, Zhen-Xi; Feng, Yue-Xin

    2005-11-01

    We compare the trace element and Sr isotopic compositions of stoneware bodies made in Yaozhou and Jizhou to characterise these Chinese archaeological ceramics and examine the potential of Sr isotopes in provenance studies. Element concentrations determined by ICP-MS achieve distinct characterisation for Jizhou samples due to their restricted variation, yet had limited success with Yaozhou wares because of their large variability. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr ratios in Yaozhou samples have a very small variation and are all significantly lower than those of Jizhou samples, which show a large variation and cannot be well characterised with Sr isotopes. Geochemical interpretation reveals that 87Sr/86Sr ratios will have greater potential to characterise ceramics made of low Rb/Sr materials such as kaolin clay, yet will show larger variations in ceramics made of high Rb/Sr materials such as porcelain stone.

  1. Provenance through Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Shepherd, A.; Allison, M. D.; Kinkade, D.; Rauch, S.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to reproduce scientific results is a cornerstone of the scientific method, and access to the data upon which the results are based is essential to reproducibility. Access to the data alone is not enough though, and research communities have recognized the importance of metadata (data documentation) to enable discovery and data access, and facilitate interpretation and accurate reuse. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was first funded in late 2006 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Biology and Chemistry Sections to help ensure that data generated during NSF OCE funded research would be preserved and available for future use. The BCO-DMO was formed by combining the formerly independent data management offices of two marine research programs: the United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (US JGOFS) and the US GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics (US GLOBEC) program. Since the US JGOFS and US GLOBEC programs were both active (1990s) there have been significant changes in all aspects of the research data life cycle, and the staff at BCO-DMO has modified the way in which we manage data contributed to the office. The supporting documentation that describes each dataset was originally displayed as a human-readable text file retrievable via a Web browser. BCO-DMO still offers that form because our primary audience is marine researchers using Web browser clients; however we are seeing an increased demand to support machine client access. Metadata records from the BCO-DMO data system are now extracted and published out in a variety of formats. The system supports ISO 19115, FGDC, GCMD DIF, schema.org Dataset extension, formal publication with a DOI, and RDF with semantic markup including PROV-O, FOAF and more. In the 1990s, data documentation helped researchers locate data of interest and understand the provenance sufficiently to determine fitness for purpose. Today, providing data

  2. Confine Clay in an Alternating Multilayered Structure through Injection Molding: A Simple and Efficient Route to Improve Barrier Performance of Polymeric Materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feilong; Deng, Hua; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Ke; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2015-05-20

    Various methods have been devoted to trigger the formation of multilayered structure for wide range of applications. These methods are often complicated with low production efficiency or require complex equipment. Herein, we demonstrate a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of polymeric sheets containing multilayered structure with enhanced barrier property through high speed thin-wall injection molding (HSIM). To achieve this, montmorillonite (MMT) is added into PE first, then blended with PP to fabricate PE-MMT/PP ternary composites. It is demonstrated that alternating multilayer structure could be obtained in the ternary composites because of low interfacial tension and good viscosity match between different polymer components. MMT is selectively dispersed in PE phase with partial exfoliated/partial intercalated microstructure. 2D-WAXD analysis indicates that the clay tactoids in PE-MMT/PP exhibits an uniplanar-axial orientation with their surface parallel to the molded part surface, while the tactoids in binary PE-MMT composites with the same overall MMT contents illustrate less orientation. The enhanced orientation of nanoclay in PE-MMT/PP could be attributed to the confinement of alternating multilayer structure, which prohibits the tumbling and rotation of nanoplatelets. Therefore, the oxygen barrier property of PE-MMT/PP is superior to that of PE-MMT because of increased gas permeation pathway. Comparing with the results obtained for PE based composites in literature, outstanding barrier property performance (45.7% and 58.2% improvement with 1.5 and 2.5 wt % MMT content, respectively) is achieved in current study. Two issues are considered responsible for such improvement: enhanced MMT orientation caused by the confinement in layered structure, and higher local density of MMT in layered structure induced denser assembly. Finally, enhancement in barrier property by confining impermeable filler into alternating multilayer structure through such

  3. Insights into the Geographic Sequence of Deglaciation in the Weddell Sea Embayment by Provenance of Ice-Rafted Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Licht, K.; Agrios, L.; Brachfeld, S. A.; van de Flierdt, T.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Ehrmann, W. U.; Zhai, X.; Cai, Y.; Corley, A. D.; Kuhn, G.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemical and geochronological fingerprint of rock debris eroded and carried by ice streams may be used to identify the provenance of iceberg-rafted debris (IRD) in the marine sediment record. During ice retreat following glacial maxima, it has been shown that there is an increase in IRD accumulation in marine sediments underlying the western limb of the Weddell Gyre. Here we present IRD provenance records from sediment core PS1571-1 in the NW Weddell Sea, and interpret these records in terms of the geographic sequence of ice sheet retreat in the Weddell Sea embayment during the most recent deglaciation. We first characterize the source areas of eroded debris around the Weddell Sea Embayment, using published mapping of the embayment and new material from: 1. Till in modern moraines at the edges of ice streams, including the Foundation Ice Stream, the Academy Glacier, and the Recovery Glacier; and 2. Subglacial till and proximal glaciomarine sediment from existing cores located along the front of the Filchner and Ronne Ice Shelves, collected on past expeditions of the RV Polarstern. The analyses on these samples include 40Ar/39Ar hornblende and biotite thermochronology and U-Pb zircon geochronology on individual mineral grains, and K-Ar thermochronology, Nd isotopes, and clay mineralogy on the clay grain size fraction. Results so far indicate that samples along the front of the Filchner and Ronne Ice Shelves record the geochemical and geochronological fingerprint that would be expected from tracing ice flow lines back to the bedrock terranes. The Ronne (west), Hughes (central), and Filchner (east) sectors have distinguishable provenance source signatures, and further subdivision is possible. In core PS1571-1, downcore IRD provenance changes reflect iceberg output and ice sheet retreat from the different sectors of the embayment through the last deglaciation. The detrital provenance method of interpreting the geographic sequence of ice retreat can equally be

  4. Geochemical signatures of bedded cherts of the upper La Luna Formation in Táchira State, western Venezuela: Assessing material provenance and paleodepositional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbán, G.; Martínez, M.; Márquez, G.; Rey, O.; Escobar, M.; Esquinas, N.

    2017-01-01

    Here we undertook an inorganic geochemical study of Cenomanian-Campanian bedded cherts (the Táchira Ftanita Member of the La Luna Formation) in the western region of the Táchira State, Venezuela. The aim of this study was to determine the paleo-oceanographic and paleo-environmental conditions that governed the deposition of chert beds and put forward a sedimentation model for the Táchira Ftanita Member in the study area. Seventy-two chert samples were collected and trace/rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Rb, Cs, Th, U, Y, Co, and Sc) and major/trace elements (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, P2O5, Mn, Ba, Sr, Cr, Ni, and V) were determined by ICP-MS and ICP-OES, respectively. On the basis of the stratigraphic abundance and distribution of relatively immobile elements, as well as the distribution of rare earth elements, we established that the detrital sediments associated with the sequences studied have matching characteristics with distinct continental materials, with an intermediate composition, thus pointing to the Guayana Massif as the main source of sediments. In addition, we also determined the influence of hydrothermal input on the chemical composition of some cherts from La Molina Mine. On the basis of geochemistry, we found a biological influence regarding the uptake of dissolved silica for forming chert beds. The application of parameters for relatively immobile elements allowed us to establish a still proximal continental-margin (hemipelagic) for most samples from the Zorca River and a continental-margin for almost all the cherts from the Delicias-Villa Páez section and the remaining samples from La Molina Mine. Finally, we propose that the rhythmicity that accompanies the sequence of bedded cherts is related to changes in the intensity of upwelling patterns of water and/or to variability in the supply of silica dissolved in the Táchira sub-basin.

  5. Empowering Provenance in Data Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondylakis, Haridimos; Doerr, Martin; Plexousakis, Dimitris

    The provenance of data has recently been recognized as central to the trust one places in data. This paper presents a novel framework in order to empower provenance in a mediator based data integration system. We use a simple mapping language for mapping schema constructs, between an ontology and relational sources, capable to carry provenance information. This language extends the traditional data exchange setting by translating our mapping specifications into source-to-target tuple generating dependencies (s-t tgds). Then we define formally the provenance information we want to retrieve i.e. annotation, source and tuple provenance. We provide three algorithms to retrieve provenance information using information stored on the mappings and the sources. We show the feasibility of our solution and the advantages of our framework.

  6. Obsidian provenance research in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Glascock, Michael D

    2002-08-01

    The characterization of archaeological materials to support provenance research has grown rapidly over the past few decades. Volcanic obsidian has several unique properties that make it the ideal archaeological material for studying prehistoric trade and exchange. This Account describes our laboratory's development of a systematic methodology for the characterization of obsidian sources and artifacts from Mesoamerica and other regions of North and South America in support of archaeological research.

  7. Intercalated layered clay composites and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phukan, Anjali

    Supported inorganic reagents are rapidly emerging as new and environmentally acceptable reagents and catalysts. The smectite group of layered clay minerals, such as, Montmorillonite, provides promising character for adsorption, catalytic activity, supports etc. for their large surface area, swelling behavior and ion exchange properties. Aromatic compounds intercalated in layered clays are useful in optical molecular devices. Clay is a unique material for adsorption of heavy metals and various toxic substances. Clay surfaces are known to be catalytically active due to their surface acidity. Acid activated clays possess much improved surface areas and acidities and have higher pore volumes so that can absorb large molecules in the pores. The exchangeable cations in clay minerals play a key role in controlling surface acidity and catalytic activity. Recently, optically active metal-complex-Montmorillonite composites are reported to be active in antiracemization purposes. In view of the above, a research work, relating to the preparation of different modified clay composites and their catalytic applications were carried out. The different aspects and results of the present work have been reported in four major chapters. Chapter I: This is an introductory chapter, which contains a review of the literature regarding clay-based materials. Clay minerals are phyllosilicates with layer structure. Montmorillonite, a member of smectite group of clay, is 2:1 phyllosilicate, where a layer is composed of an octahedral sheet sandwiched by two tetrahedral sheets. Such clay shows cation exchange capacity (CEC) and is expressed in milli-equivalents per 100 gm of dry clay. Clays can be modified by interaction with metal ion, metal complexes, metal cluster and organic cations for various applications. Clays are also modified by treating with acid followed by impregnation with metal salts or ions. Montmorillonite can intercalate suitable metal complexes in excess of CEC to form double

  8. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  9. Knowledge Provenance in Semantic Wikis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, L.; Bao, J.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Collaborative online environments with a technical Wiki infrastructure are becoming more widespread. One of the strengths of a Wiki environment is that it is relatively easy for numerous users to contribute original content and modify existing content (potentially originally generated by others). As more users begin to depend on informational content that is evolving by Wiki communities, it becomes more important to track the provenance of the information. Semantic Wikis expand upon traditional Wiki environments by adding some computationally understandable encodings of some of the terms and relationships in Wikis. We have developed a semantic Wiki environment that expands a semantic Wiki with provenance markup. Provenance of original contributions as well as modifications is encoded using the provenance markup component of the Proof Markup Language. The Wiki environment provides the provenance markup automatically, thus users are not required to make specific encodings of author, contribution date, and modification trail. Further, our Wiki environment includes a search component that understands the provenance primitives and thus can be used to provide a provenance-aware search facility. We will describe the knowledge provenance infrastructure of our Semantic Wiki and show how it is being used as the foundation of our group web site as well as a number of project web sites.

  10. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  11. The altarpieces of Della Robbia atelier in Marche region: investigations on technology and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, M. L.; Barcelli, S.; Barcaioni, S.; Bouquillon, A.; Padeletti, G.; Pallante, P.

    2013-12-01

    Dissemination of Della Robbia glazed terracotta in the Marche (Italy) region started from the third decade of the 16th century. Numerous altarpieces, some of which no longer exist, document this artistic production. The protagonists of this diffusion phase were two of Andrea Della Robbia's sons, Marco (Fra Mattia) and Francesco (Fra Ambrogio). This paper shows the results of the scientific investigations carried out on constitutive materials of different altarpieces located in South Marche belonging to the Fra Mattia's production: the Coronation of Virgin between Saints Rocco, Sebastian, Peter martyr and Antonio abbot, dated back to 1527-1530, located in the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta in Montecassiano; the Annunciation, dated back to 1520, placed in the church of S. Maria del Soccorso in Arcevia; the fragmentary Crowned Madonna and saints altarpiece, probably realized after 1531, today preserved in Civic Museum of Ripatransone. The first altarpiece was made in Montecassiano using two different assembling or production techniques: the external part of the lunette and the pillar strips are made of glazed polychrome terracotta, while the altar step and the internal part are an interesting and uncommon example of polychrome painted terracotta. The provenance of the glazed Arcevia altarpiece is not clear yet: some historians hypothesize a local manufacture of Fra Mattia and some others a Roman or Florentine production. The remaining parts of Ripatransone altarpiece are partially glazed and partially not coated perhaps because they were unfinished and not yet painted. Clay body samples collected from the above mentioned altarpieces were investigated using different analytical techniques (OM, XRD, XRF, PIXE) to point out differences in chemical and mineralogical composition and to determine if the altarpieces were made by using local raw clay materials or other clays from Tuscany or Campania as in the Della Robbia previous production. A comparison has also been

  12. Provenance of the terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Wetherill, G W

    1994-01-01

    Earlier work on the simultaneous accumulation of the asteroid belt and the terrestrial planets is extended to investigate the relative contribution to the final planets made by material from different heliocentric distances. As before, stochastic variations intrinsic to the accumulation processes lead to a variety of final planetary configurations, but include systems having a number of features similar to our solar system. Fifty-nine new simulations are presented, from which thirteen are selected as more similar to our solar system than the others. It is found that the concept of "local feeding zones" for each final terrestrial planet has no validity for this model. Instead, the final terrestrial planets receive major contributions from bodies ranging from 0.5 to at least 2.5 AU, and often to greater distances. Nevertheless, there is a correlation between the final heliocentric distance of a planet and its average provenance. Together with the effect of stochastic fluctuations, this permits variation in the composition of the terrestrial planets, such as the difference in the decompressed density of Earth and Mars. Biologically important light elements, derived from the asteroidal region, are likely to have been significant constituents of the Earth during its formation.

  13. Incorporating Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil and sodium bentonite nano-clay open a new perspective to use zein films as bioactive packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Kashiri, Mahboobeh; Maghsoudlo, Yahya; Khomeiri, Morteza

    2017-10-01

    Active zein films with different levels of Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil were produced successfully. To enhance properties of this biopolymer for food packaging applications, sodium bentonite clay was used at two levels (2 and 4%). The results indicated that the addition of Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil caused a reduction in tensile strength and Young's modulus and slight increase in the percent of elongation at break of the films. Maximum solubility in water and water vapor permeability was observed by incorporation of 10% Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil in the zein matrix. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs of zein film were verified by the exfoliation of the layers of sodium bentonite clay in the zein matrix. Stronger films with lower water vapor permeability and water solubility were evident of good distribution of sodium bentonite clay in the zein matrix. According to the results, 2% sodium bentonite clay was selected for evaluation of nano active film properties. Water vapor permeability, UV light barrier, tensile strength, and Young's modulus values of active films were improved by incorporation of 2% sodium bentonite clay. The antibacterial activity of different contents of Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil in vapor phase demonstrated that use of Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil in the liquid phase was more effective than in vapor phase. The antibacterial zein-based films showed that active zein film with 5 and 10% Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil had reductions of 1.68 log and 2.99 log, respectively, against Listeria monocytogenes and 1.39 and 3.07 log against Escherichia coli. Nano active zein film containing 10% Z. multiflora Boiss. essential oil and 2% sodium bentonite clay showed better antibacterial properties against L. monocytogenes (3.23 log) and E. coli (3.17 log).

  14. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  15. Deformation and Fabric in Compacted Clay Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Pineda, J.; Luzin, V.; Suwal, L.; Kisi, E. H.; Allameh-Haery, H.

    2018-05-01

    Hydromechanical anisotropy of clay soils in response to deformation or deposition history is related to the micromechanics of platelike clay particles and their orientations. In this article, we examine the relationship between microstructure, deformation, and moisture content in kaolin clay using a technique based on neutron scattering. This technique allows for the direct characterization of microstructure within representative samples using traditional measures such as orientation density and soil fabric tensor. From this information, evidence for a simple relationship between components of the deviatoric strain tensor and the deviatoric fabric tensor emerge. This relationship may provide a physical basis for future anisotropic constitutive models based on the micromechanics of these materials.

  16. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  17. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  18. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  19. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  20. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  1. A new locality of palygorskite-rich clay from the southeastern Yucatán: a potential material source for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krekeler, Mark P. S.; Kearns, Lance E.

    2009-08-01

    A palygorskite unit was discovered in a road cut of undifferentiated Tertiary limestone between the villages of El Pariso and San Roman (18°49.309N, 88°37.861W) in the southeastern Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. This is the southern most locality of a clay-rich sedimentary unit reported in the literature for the Tertiary carbonates of the Yucatán Peninsula. This occurrence indicates a much wider range of palygorskite-rich clay deposition than previously recognized. The lithology is 99% clay and 1% sand to silt size diagenetic quartz grains. The clay consists of approximately 85% palygorskite, 15% montmorillonite and trace amounts of titanium oxides. EDS analyses on palygorskite are largely consistent with sedimentary palygorskites from other coastal marine settings, however palygorskite has a low total Fe content (average = 0.40 wt% expressed as Fe2O3) compared to many other sedimentary palygorskites. Montmorillonite chemical compositions are typical and compared to the palygorskite have substantially higher Fe2O3 concentrations (average = 3.90 wt%). The low percentage of coarse grains in the lithology combined with a high proportion of palygorskite and lack of detrimental trace minerals suggest the deposit is of industrial grade; however, it has limited reserves (6,000 m3). The unit could be potentially used in a wide array of environmental applications which are needed in the region including liners for landfills and constructed wetlands. The unit is in a geographic location which would serve the expanding economy of the region. This resource has the potential to have great impact on the quality of the local environment and the economy of a region under great environmental threat.

  2. Phosphates in some Missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Foord, Eugene E.; Keller, David J.; Keller, Walter D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays.The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River. In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspore, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore (“burley”" clay).The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality.The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite. The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water, nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore

  3. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  4. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  5. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  6. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazardmore » index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.« less

  7. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, I.; ćanakciı, H.; Mavi, B.; Günoǧlu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of diferent fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioacitivty. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  8. Understanding bias in provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Malusà, Marco; Vezzoli, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Innumerable pieces of information are stored in the sedimentary archive. Each single sediment layer contains billions of detrital grains, and every grain preserves imprints of its geological story. If we learn to read, compare, and combine these messages properly, through a deeper understanding of physical and chemical processes that modify sediment composition during the sedimentary cycle, provenance analysis may eventually enable us to reconstruct more accurately the geological processes that shaped the Earth's crust in the past. Interpreting detrital modes is not straightforward because provenance signals issued from source rocks become progressively blurred by multiple noises in the sedimentary environment ("environmental bias"; Komar, 2007), and finally during post-depositional history ("diagenetic bias"; Morton and Hallsworth, 2007). During transport and deposition, detrital minerals are segregated in different size fractions and environments according to their size, density and shape (Rubey, 1933; Garzanti et al., 2008). Heavy-mineral concentration can increase by an order of magnitude due to selective-entrainment effects, with potentially overwhelming impact on chemical composition and provenance estimates based on detrital-geochronology data (Garzanti et al., 2009). Conversely, heavy-mineral concentration is typically reduced by an order of magnitude in Alpine and Himalayan foreland-basin deposits older than the Pleistocene (Garzanti and Andò, 2007). Extensive chemical dissolution can occur even prior to deposition during weathering in hot humid climates (Velbel, 2007). Primary provenance signals can be isolated and assessed by studying first modern sediments in hyperarid settings (i.e., free from diagenetic and weathering bias). Next, weathering, hydraulic-sorting, and diagenetic effects can be singled out by analysing sediments of similar provenance produced in contrasting climatic conditions, sediments transported in diverse modes and deposited in

  9. Geochemical Identification in Sediment Provenance during Glacial/Interglacial Period: the Southern Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. K.; Jung, J.; Lee, J. I.; Yoo, K. C.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Clay mineralogy and crystal size distribution in marine sediment is used for the indication of a sediment provenance and climatic changes. Objective of this study is to trace the sediment provenances in the Southern Drake Passage with clay mineralogy, elemental composition and crystal size distributions (CSDs) of clay mineral. In the present study, X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) measurements showed that smectite, illite and chlorite are dominant phases. The semi-quantitative analysis showed that the relatively proportion of smectite is 50 - 60% in interglacial stage, 30 - 39% in glacial stage. Comparing with REE data, sediments supply was influenced by Weddell sea current and Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Moreover, elemental composition and microscopic analysis of smectites were carried by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The composition of smectite clay minerals were plotted on the tertiary diagram indicating that Smectite in Drake Passage was transported from three provenances: South Shetland island, east and west side of Antarctic peninsula during glacial - interglacial period. The CSDs of smectite also indicate the various source of smectite. The variation in the values of α (mean thickness) and β2 (shape or uniformity of the distribution) of smectite grain size will be discussed in terms of the sediment provenance.

  10. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  11. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  12. Provenance Data in Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    B A R B I E R • F E N G • G U N D E C H A • L I U P R O...least h -hops (a positive integer constant) away from terminals. For user B , the Provenance Data Framework proposed in Section 4.1, accurately identifies...Anderson, R. May, and B . Anderson. Infectious Diseases of Humans: Dynamics and Control, volume 28. Wiley Online Library, 1992. 31, 32 [7] G. Barbier and H

  13. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  14. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  15. Reinforcement of natural rubber latex by nanosize montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantatherdtam, Rattana

    Based on the unique character of montmorillonite namely its layer structure and the ability of silicate particles to separate into nanometer-size platelets, natural rubber (polyisoprene)/clay composites were obtained by mixing rubber latex with clay-water dispersion and coagulating the mixture. The resulting film had greatly improved mechanical properties compared with films using micron-sized fillers. Further, both modulus and toughness were improved; in many composite system an improvement in modulus leads to a loss of toughness. X-ray diffraction results indicated that clay platelets dispersed in the rubber matrix on the nanoscale level with some macromolecules intercalated into the clay gallery. The observed considerable improvement in mechanical properties, coupled with a theoretical model of composite modulus suggests a dispersed structure of clay in the composite. While not all clay particles are exfoliated, data suggest that a reasonable fraction of exfoliated materials is required to explain the experimental results.

  16. Infrared analysis of clay bricks incorporated with spent shea waste from the shea butter industry.

    PubMed

    Adazabra, A N; Viruthagiri, G; Shanmugam, N

    2017-04-15

    The peculiar challenge of effective disposing abundant spent shea waste and the excellent compositional variation tolerance of clay material offered an impetus to examine the incorporation of spent shea waste into clay material as an eco-friendly disposal route in making clay bricks. For this purpose, the chemical constituent, mineralogical compositions and thermal behavior of both clay material and spent shea waste were initially characterized from which modelled brick specimens incorporating 5-20 wt% of the waste into the clay material were prepared. The clay material showed high proportions of SiO 2 (52.97 wt%) and Al 2 O 3 (27.10 wt%) indicating their rich kaolinitic content: whereas, the inert nature of spent shea waste was exhibited by their low oxide content. The striking similarities in infrared absorption bands of pristine clay material and clay materials incorporated with 15 wt% of spent shea waste showed that the waste incorporation had no impact on bond formation of the clay bricks. Potential performance benefits of developing bricks from clay material incorporated with spent shea waste included improved fluxing agents, economic sintering and making of sustainable bricks. Consequently, the analytical results authenticate the incorporation of spent shea waste into clay materials for various desired benefits aside being an environmental correct route of its disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling the Provenance of Crater Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Huei; Minton, David A.

    2014-11-01

    The cratering history of the Moon provides a way to study the violent early history of our early solar system. Nevertheless, we are still limited in our ability to interpret the lunar cratering history because the complex process of generation and subsequent transportation and destruction of impact melt products is relatively poorly understood. Here we describe a preliminary model for the transport of datable impact melt products by craters over Gy timescales on the lunar surface. We use a numerical model based on the Maxwell Z-model to model the exhumation and transport of ejecta material from within the excavation flow of a transient crater. We describe our algorithm for rapidly estimating the provenance of ejecta material for use in a Monte Carlo cratering code capable of simulating lunar cratering over Gy timescales.

  18. Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Thomas M.; Warren, Holly; Panhuis, Marc in het

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that the electrical response upon exposure to humid atmosphere is influenced by clay-chitosan interactions, i.e., the resistance of clay–CNT materials decreases, whereas that of clay–CNT–chitosan increases. PMID:28348277

  19. Ontology-Driven Provenance Management in eScience: An Application in Parasite Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Weatherly, D. Brent; Mutharaju, Raghava; Anantharam, Pramod; Sheth, Amit; Tarleton, Rick L.

    Provenance, from the French word "provenir", describes the lineage or history of a data entity. Provenance is critical information in scientific applications to verify experiment process, validate data quality and associate trust values with scientific results. Current industrial scale eScience projects require an end-to-end provenance management infrastructure. This infrastructure needs to be underpinned by formal semantics to enable analysis of large scale provenance information by software applications. Further, effective analysis of provenance information requires well-defined query mechanisms to support complex queries over large datasets. This paper introduces an ontology-driven provenance management infrastructure for biology experiment data, as part of the Semantic Problem Solving Environment (SPSE) for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi). This provenance infrastructure, called T.cruzi Provenance Management System (PMS), is underpinned by (a) a domain-specific provenance ontology called Parasite Experiment ontology, (b) specialized query operators for provenance analysis, and (c) a provenance query engine. The query engine uses a novel optimization technique based on materialized views called materialized provenance views (MPV) to scale with increasing data size and query complexity. This comprehensive ontology-driven provenance infrastructure not only allows effective tracking and management of ongoing experiments in the Tarleton Research Group at the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), but also enables researchers to retrieve the complete provenance information of scientific results for publication in literature.

  20. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    PubMed

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  1. Quick Clay and Landslides of Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; de Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  2. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  3. Moving Along: Sporting Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Presents a junior high school student art project where three-dimensional art sculptures of surfing, snow boarding, or dirt biking were created. Discusses how the students created their three-dimensional works of art using a clay-slab technique. (CMK)

  4. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  5. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    PubMed Central

    Mutman, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation. PMID:23766671

  6. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  7. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Atreya, S. K.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise ~20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000oC and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures <500oC, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near ~750oC. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the ~20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the

  8. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures < 500 C, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near approx 750 C. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection

  9. Effects of Kaolin Clay on the Mechanical Properties of Asphaltic Concrete AC14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. E.; Ramadhansyah, P. J.; Rafsanjani, M. H.; Norhidayah, A. H.; Yaacob, H.; Hainin, M. R.; Warid, M. N. Mohd; Satar, M. K. I. Mohd; Aziz, Md Maniruzzaman A.; Mashros, N.

    2018-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of kaolin clay on the mechanical properties of asphaltic concrete AC14 through Marshall Stability, resilient modulus, and dynamic creep tests. Four replacement levels of kaolin clay (2%, 4%, 6%, and 8% by weight of the binder) were considered. Kaolin clay functioned as an effective filler replacement material to increase the mechanical properties of asphalt mixtures. Asphaltic concrete with 2% to 4% kaolin clay replacement level exhibited excellent performance with good stability, resilient modulus, and creep stiffness.

  10. CALCINED CLAYS AS A LOW EMISSION CEMENT SUBSTITUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study provides a better understanding of clay-cement materials including: (i) their associated energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions of their manufacturing and transport, (ii) their structural performance and properties, and (iii) their emission characteristics affe...

  11. SLIDE PRESENTATION: LIMITATIONS OF USE OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the design and construction issues pertaining to the use of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLSs) in waste containment. The presentation covers new materials, potential design and construction pitfalls and a summary of ongoing research.

  12. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  13. Painting with Clay: A Study of the Masters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Plasticine clay is a bendable material that is easily manipulated by students of all ages. It is a great material to work with because it does not dry out from day to day, so high-school students can work on an extended project. They do not have to worry about the clay drying and cracking, and the entire work of art does not have to be completed…

  14. Clays of Ladon Basin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-23

    Ladon Basin was a large impact structure that was filled in by the deposits from Ladon Valles, a major ancient river on Mars as seen in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). These wet sediments were altered into minerals such as various clay minerals. Clays imply chemistry that may have been favorable for life on ancient Mars, if anything lived there, so this could be a good spot for future exploration by rovers and perhaps return of samples to Earth. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 52.1 centimeters (20.5 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 156 centimeters (61.4 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22183

  15. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Anthony R.; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-01-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  16. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  17. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  19. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  20. CEC-normalized clay-water sorption isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, W. F.; Revil, A.

    2011-11-01

    A normalized clay-water isotherm model based on BET theory and describing the sorption and desorption of the bound water in clays, sand-clay mixtures, and shales is presented. Clay-water sorption isotherms (sorption and desorption) of clayey materials are normalized by their cation exchange capacity (CEC) accounting for a correction factor depending on the type of counterion sorbed on the mineral surface in the so-called Stern layer. With such normalizations, all the data collapse into two master curves, one for sorption and one for desorption, independent of the clay mineralogy, crystallographic considerations, and bound cation type; therefore, neglecting the true heterogeneity of water sorption/desorption in smectite. The two master curves show the general hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure curve at low relative humidity (below 70%). The model is validated against several data sets obtained from the literature comprising a broad range of clay types and clay mineralogies. The CEC values, derived by inverting the sorption/adsorption curves using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, are consistent with the CEC associated with the clay mineralogy.

  1. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  2. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  3. Effect of clays on the fire-retardant properties of a polyethylenic copolymer containing intumescent formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Simone P S; Estevão, Luciana R M; Nascimento, Regina S V

    2008-01-01

    Organophilic clay particles were added to a standard intumescent formulation and, since the role of clay expansion or intercalation is still a matter of much controversy, several clays with varying degrees of interlayer distances were evaluated. The composites were obtained by blending the nanostructured clay and the intumescent system with a polyethylenic copolymer. The flame-retardant properties of the materials were evaluated by the limiting oxygen index (LOI), the UL-94 rating and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the addition of highly expanded clays to the ammonium polyphosphate and pentaerythritol formulation does not significantly increase the flame retardancy of the mixture, when measured by the LOI and UL-94. However, when clays with smaller basal distances were added to the intumescent formulation, a synergistic effect was observed. In contrast, the simple addition of clays to the copolymer, without the intumescent formulation, did not increase the fire retardance of the materials. PMID:27877975

  4. Launch Services, a Proven Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, W. C.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    From a commercial perspective, the ability to justify "leap frog" technology such as reusable systems has been difficult to justify because the estimated 5B to 10B investment is not supported in the current flat commercial market coupled with an oversupply of launch service suppliers. The market simply does not justify investment of that magnitude. Currently, next generation Expendable Launch Systems, including Boeing's Delta IV, Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5, Ariane V ESCA and RSC's H-IIA are being introduced into operations signifying that only upgrades to proven systems are planned to meet the changes in anticipated satellite demand (larger satellites, more lifetime, larger volumes, etc.) in the foreseeable future. We do not see a new fleet of ELVs emerging beyond that which is currently being introduced, only continuous upgrades of the fleet to meet the demands. To induce a radical change in the provision of launch services, a Multinational Government investment must be made and justified by World requirements. The commercial market alone cannot justify such an investment. And if an investment is made, we cannot afford to repeat previous mistakes by relying on one system such as shuttle for commercial deployment without having any back-up capability. Other issues that need to be considered are national science and security requirements, which to a large extent fuels the Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Former Soviet Union, European and United States space transportation entries. Additionally, this system must support or replace current Space Transportation Economies with across-the-board benefits. For the next 10 to 20 years, Multinational cooperation will be in the form of piecing together launch components and infrastructure to supplement existing launch systems and reducing the amount of non-recurring investment while meeting the future requirements of the End-User. Virtually all of the current systems have some form of multinational participation: Sea Launch

  5. Field trip guidebook on environmental impact of clays along the upper Texas coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Theron D.; Ming, Douglas W.; Tuck, Lisa Kay

    1991-01-01

    The field trip was prepared to provide an opportunity to see first hand some the environmental hazards associated with clays in the Houston, Texas area. Because of the very high clay content in area soils and underlying Beaumont Formation clay, Houston is a fitting location to host the Clay Mineral Society. Examinations were made of (1) expansive soils, (2) subsidence and surface faulting, and (3) a landfill located southeast of Houston at the Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority where clay is part of the liner material.

  6. Aluminium - Cobalt-Pillared Clay for Dye Filtration Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, A.; Widiarsih

    2018-04-01

    The manufacture of membrane support from cobalt aluminium pillared clay has been conducted. This research was conducted by mixing a clay suspension with pillared solution prepared from the mixture of Co(NO3)2.6H2O and AlCl3.6H2O. The molar ratio between Al and Co was 75:25 and the ratio of [OH-]/[metal] was 2. The clay suspension was stirred for 24 hours at room temperature, filtered and dried. The dried clay was then calcined at 200°C, 300°C and 400°C with a ramp rate of 2°C/min. Aluminium-cobalt-pillared clay was then characterized by XRD and GSA and moulded become a membrane support for subsequent tests on dye filtration. The XRD analysis showed that basal spacing (d 001) value of aluminium cobalt was 19.49 Å, which was higher than the natural clay of 15.08Å however, the basal spacing decreased with increasing calcination temperature. The result of the GSA analysis showed that the pore diameter of the aluminium cobalt pillared clay membrane was almost the same as that of natural clay that were 34.5Å and 34.2Å, respectively. Nevertheless, the pillared clay has a more uniform pore size distribution. The results of methylene blue filtration measurements demonstrated that the membrane filter support could well which shown by a clear filtrate at all concentrations tested. The value of rejection and flux decreased with the increasing concentration of methylene blue. The values of dye rejection and water flux reached 99.89% and 5. 80 x 10-6 kg min-1, respectively but they decreased with increasing concentration of methylene blue. The results of this study indicates that the aluminium-pillared clay cobalt could be used as membrane materials especially for ultrafiltration.

  7. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  8. Active Provenance in Data-intensive Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Mihajlovski, Andrej; Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities are building platforms where the usage of data-intensive workflows is crucial to conduct their research campaigns. However managing and effectively support the understanding of the 'live' processes, fostering computational steering, sharing and re-use of data and methods, present several bottlenecks. These are often caused by the poor level of documentation on the methods and the data and how users interact with it. This work wants to explore how in such systems, flexibility in the management of the provenance and its adaptation to the different users and application contexts can lead to new opportunities for its exploitation, improving productivity. In particular, this work illustrates a conceptual and technical framework enabling tunable and actionable provenance in data-intensive workflow systems in support of reproducible science. It introduces the concept of Agile data-intensive systems to define the characteristic of our target platform. It shows a novel approach to the integration of provenance mechanisms, offering flexibility in the scale and in the precision of the provenance data collected, ensuring its relevance to the domain of the data-intensive task, fostering its rapid exploitation. The contributions address aspects of the scale of the provenance records, their usability and active role in the research life-cycle. We will discuss the use of dynamically generated provenance types as the approach for the integration of provenance mechanisms into a data-intensive workflow system. Enabling provenance can be transparent to the workflow user and developer, as well as fully controllable and customisable, depending from their expertise and the application's reproducibility, monitoring and validation requirements. The API that allows the realisation and adoption of a provenance type is presented, especially for what concerns the support of provenance profiling, contextualisation and precision. An actionable approach to provenance

  9. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  10. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  11. Tailoring the mechanical properties of SU-8/clay nanocomposites: polymer microcantilever fabrication perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Ojijo, Vincent; Cele, Hastings; Joubert, Trudi; Suprakas, Sinha Ray; Land, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    SU-8/Clay nanocomposite is considered as a candidate material for microcantilever sensor fabrication. Organically modified montmorillonite clay nanoparticles are dispersed in the universally used negative photoresist polymer SU-8, for a low cost material, which is also biocompatible. If varying the clay loading of the composite material yields a variation of the Young's modulus, the tailored material stiffness presents an opportunity for fabrication of microcantilevers with tunable sensor sensitivity. With this microcantilever application perspective, mechanical and thermal properties of the material were investigated. SU-8/Clay nanocomposite samples were prepared with clay loadings from 1wt% - 10wt%. Tensile test results show a general trend of increase in composite modulus with an increase in the clay loading up to 7wt%, followed by a small drop at 10wt%. The composite material indeed yields moderate variation of the Young's modulus. It was also found that the thermal degradation peak of the material occurred at 300°C, which is beyond the operating temperature of typical microcantilever sensor applications. The fabrication of a custom designed microcantilever array chip with the SU-8/Clay nanocomposite material was achieved in a class 100 cleanroom, using spin-coating and photolithography microfabrication techniques. The optimization of the process for fabricating microcantilever with the SU-8/Clay nanocomposite material is discussed in this paper. The results of this research are promising for cheaper mass production of low cost disposable, yet sensitive, microcantilever sensor elements, including biosensor applications.

  12. Provenance Storage, Querying, and Visualization in PBase

    SciTech Connect

    Kianmajd, Parisa; Ludascher, Bertram; Missier, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We present PBase, a repository for scientific workflows and their corresponding provenance information that facilitates the sharing of experiments among the scientific community. PBase is interoperable since it uses ProvONE, a standard provenance model for scientific workflows. Workflows and traces are stored in RDF, and with the support of SPARQL and the tree cover encoding, the repository provides a scalable infrastructure for querying the provenance data. Furthermore, through its user interface, it is possible to: visualize workflows and execution traces; visualize reachability relations within these traces; issue SPARQL queries; and visualize query results.

  13. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crasto de Lima, F. D.; Miwa, R. H.; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2017-11-01

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ˜20 and ˜130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  14. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  15. MCloud: Secure Provenance for Mobile Cloud Users

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-03

    Feasibility of Smartphone Clouds , 2015 15th IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Cluster, Cloud and Grid Computing (CCGrid). 04-MAY- 15, Shenzhen, China...final decision. MCloud: Secure Provenance for Mobile Cloud Users Final Report Bogdan Carbunar Florida International University Computing and...Release; Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 03-10-2016 31-May-2013 30-May-2016 Final Report: MCloud: Secure Provenance for Mobile Cloud Users The views

  16. Secure Location Provenance for Mobile Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    SECURE LOCATION PROVENANCE FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM JULY 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...PROVENANCE FOR MOBILE DEVICES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-12-2-0254 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 69220K 6. AUTHOR(S) Ragib Hasan...based services allow mobile device users to access various services based on the users’ current physical location information. Path-critical applications

  17. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  18. Tracking Provenance of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Yelena; Halem, Milton

    2010-01-01

    Tremendous volumes of data have been captured, archived and analyzed. Sensors, algorithms and processing systems for transforming and analyzing the data are evolving over time. Web Portals and Services can create transient data sets on-demand. Data are transferred from organization to organization with additional transformations at every stage. Provenance in this context refers to the source of data and a record of the process that led to its current state. It encompasses the documentation of a variety of artifacts related to particular data. Provenance is important for understanding and using scientific datasets, and critical for independent confirmation of scientific results. Managing provenance throughout scientific data processing has gained interest lately and there are a variety of approaches. Large scale scientific datasets consisting of thousands to millions of individual data files and processes offer particular challenges. This paper uses the analogy of art history provenance to explore some of the concerns of applying provenance tracking to earth science data. It also illustrates some of the provenance issues with examples drawn from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Data Processing System (OMIDAPS) run at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center by the first author.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units—interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis—also are uniquely revealed by the SEM.Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types.

  20. Curiosity is Ready for Clay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-22

    This mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Curiosity rover looks uphill at Mount Sharp, which Curiosity has been climbing. Spanning the center of the image is an area with clay-bearing rocks that scientists are eager to explore; it could shed additional light on the role of water in creating Mount Sharp. The mosaic was assembled from dozens of images taken by Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam). It was taken on Sol 1931 back in January. Mount Sharp stands in the middle of Gale Crater, which is 96 miles (154 kilometers) in diameter. This mound, which Curiosity has been climbing since 2014, likely formed in the presence of water at various points of time in Mars ancient history. That makes it an ideal place to study how water influenced the habitability of Mars billions of years ago. The scene has been white-balanced so the colors of the rock materials resemble how they would appear under daytime lighting conditions on Earth. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22313

  1. Adsorption of bacteriophages on clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Puls, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and φX-174) on clays (hectorite, saponite, kaolinite, and clay fraction of samples collected from a landfill site). The thermodynamic study not only determines the feasibility of the process but also provides information on the relative magnitudes of the different forces under a particular set of conditions. The total free energy of interaction during sorption of bacteriophages on clays (ΔG) has been assumed to be the summation of ΔGH (ΔG due to hydrophobic interactions) and ΔGEL (ΔG due to electrostatic interactions). The magnitude of ΔGH was determined from the different interfacial tensions (γ) present in the system, while ΔGEL was calculated from ζ-potentials of the colloidal particles. Calculated results show that surface hydrophobicities of the selected sorbents and sorbates dictate sorption. Among the selected bacteriophages, maximum sorption was observed with T-2, while hectorite has the maximum sorption capacity. Experimental results obtained from the batch adsorption studies also corroborated those obtained from the theoretical study.

  2. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  3. Coupled Heat and Moisture Transport Simulation on the Re-saturation of Engineered Clay Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. H.; Chuang, Y. F.

    2014-12-01

    Engineered clay barrier plays a major role for the isolation of radioactive wastes in a underground repository. This paper investigates the resaturation processes of clay barrier, with emphasis on the coupling effects of heat and moisture during the intrusion of groundwater to the repository. A reference bentonite and a locally available clay were adopted in the laboratory program. Soil suction of clay specimens was measured by psychrometers embedded in clay specimens and by vapor equilibrium technique conducted at varying temperatures so as to determine the soil water characteristic curves of the two clays at different temperatures. And water uptake tests were conducted on clay specimens compacted at various densities to simulate the intrusion of groundwater into the clay barrier. Using the soil water characteristic curve, an integration scheme was introduced to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated clay. It was found that soil suction decreases as temperature increases, resulting in a reduction in water retention capability. The finite element method was then employed to carry out the numerical simulation of the saturation process in the near field of a repository. Results of the numerical simulation were validated using the degree of saturation profile obtained from the water uptake tests on the clays. The numerical scheme was then extended to establish a model simulating the resaturation process after the closure of a repository. Finally, the model was then used to evaluate the effect of clay barrier thickness on the time required for groundwater to penetrate the clay barrier and approach saturation. Due to the variation in clay suction and thermal conductivity with temperature of clay barrier material, the calculated temperature field shows a reduction as a result of incorporating the hydro-properties in the calculations.

  4. Enhanced sorption of trichloroethene by smectite clay exchanged with Cs+.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vaneet; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J

    2006-02-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) is one of the most common pollutants in groundwater, and Cs+ can be a cocontaminant at nuclear facilities. Smectite clays have large surface areas, are common in soils, have high affinities for some organic contaminants, and hence can potentially influence the transport of organic pollutants entering soils and sediments. The exchangeable cations present near smectite clay surfaces can radically influence the sorption of organic pollutants by soil clays. This research was undertaken to determine the effect of Cs+, and other common interlayer cations, such as K+ and Ca2+, on the sorption of TCE by a reference smectite clay saponite. Cs-saturated clay sorbed the most TCE, up to 3500 mg/kg, while Ca-saturated smectite sorbed the least. We hypothesize that the stronger sorption of TCE by the Cs-smectite can be attributed to the lower hydration energy and hence smaller hydrated radius of Cs+, which expands the lateral clay surface domains available for sorption. Also, Cs-smectite interlayers are only one or two water layers thick, which may drive capillary condensation of TCE. Our results implicate enhanced retention of TCE in aquifer materials containing smectites accompanied by Cs+ cocontamination.

  5. Kisameet Glacial Clay: an Unexpected Source of Bacterial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Sarah L.; Behroozian, Shekooh; Xu, Wanjing; Surette, Michael G.; Li, Loretta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Widespread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is providing the impetus to explore novel sources of antimicrobial agents. Recently, the potent antibacterial activity of certain clay minerals has stimulated scientific interest in these materials. One such example is Kisameet glacial clay (KC), an antibacterial clay from a deposit on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. However, our understanding of the active principles of these complex natural substances is incomplete. Like soils, clays may possess complex mixtures of bacterial taxa, including the Actinobacteria, a clade known to be rich in antibiotic-producing organisms. Here, we present the first characterization of both the microbial and geochemical characteristics of a glacial clay deposit. KC harbors surprising bacterial species richness, with at least three distinct community types. We show that the deposit has clines of inorganic elements that can be leached by pH, which may be drivers of community structure. We also note the prevalence of Gallionellaceae in samples recovered near the surface, as well as taxa that include medically or economically important bacteria such as Actinomycetes and Paenibacillus. These results provide insight into the microbial taxa that may be the source of KC antibacterial activity and suggest that natural clays may be rich sources of microbial and molecular diversity. PMID:28536287

  6. Degradation of Nylon-6/Clay Nanocomposites in NO(x)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, J. S.; Devries, K. L.

    2000-04-01

    Nylon-6 is an important engineering polymer that, in its fully spherulitic (bulk) form, has many applications in gears, rollers, and other long life cycle components. In 1993, Toyota commercialized a nylon-6/clay nanocomposite out of which it produced the timing belt cover for the 1993 Camry. Although these hybrid nanocomposites show significant improvements in their mechanical response characteristics, including yield strength and heat distortion temperature, little is known about the degradation of these properties due to environmental pollutants like NOx. Nylon-6 fibers are severely degraded by interaction with NOx and other pollutants, showing a strong synergism between applied load and environmental degradation. While the nanocomposites show a significant reduction in permeability of gases and water due to the incorporation of lamellar clay, their susceptibility to non-diffusional mechano-chemical degradation is unknown. The fracture toughness of these nylon-6/day nanocomposites increases, not as a function of clay content, but as a function of the volume of nylon-6 polymer chains influenced by the clay lamellar surfaces. Both the clay and the constrained volume offer the nanocomposites some protection from the deleterious effects of NOx. The time-to-failure at a given stress intensity factor as a function of clay content and constrained volume will be discussed along with fracture toughness of the materials.

  7. New polyelectrolyte complex from pectin/chitosan and montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marcia Parente Melo; de Mello Ferreira, Ivana Lourenço; de Macedo Cruz, Mauricio Tavares

    2016-08-01

    A new nanocomposite hydrogel was prepared by forming a crosslinked hybrid polymer network based on chitosan and pectin in the presence of montmorillonite clay. The influence of clay concentration (0.5 and 2% wt) as well as polymer ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) was investigated carefully. The samples were characterized by different techniques: transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, swelling degree and compression test. Most samples presented swelling degree above 1000%, which permits characterizing them as superabsorbent material. Images obtained by transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of clay nanoparticles into hydrogel. The hydrogels' morphological properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscope in high and low-vacuum. The micrographs showed that the samples presented porous. The incorporation of clay produced hydrogels with differentiated morphology. Thermogravimetric analysis results revealed that the incorporation of clay in the samples provided greater thermal stability to the hydrogels. The compression resistance also increased with addition of clay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  9. Effect of red clay on diesel bioremediation and soil bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Choi, Sungjong; Hong, Hyerim; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-08-01

    Red clay is a type of soil, the red color of which results from the presence of iron oxide. It is considered an eco-friendly material, with many industrial, cosmetic, and architectural uses. A patented method was applied to red clay in order to change its chemical composition and mineral bioavailability. The resulting product was designated processed red clay. This study evaluates the novel use of red clay and processed red clay as biostimulation agents in diesel-contaminated soils. Diesel biodegradation was enhanced in the presence of red clay and processed red clay by 4.9- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and the number of culturable bacterial cells was correlated with the amount of diesel biodegradation. The growth of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and Cupriavidus necator was promoted by both types of red clays. Culture-independent community analysis determined via barcoded pyrosequencing indicated that Nocardioidaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Caulobacteraceae were enriched by diesel contamination. Bacterial strain isolation from naphthalene- and liquid paraffin-amended media was affiliated with enriched taxa based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity. We suggest that the biostimulating mechanism of red clay and processed red clay is able to support bacterial growth without apparent selection for specific bacterial species.

  10. Impact of clay minerals on sulfate-reducing activity in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, D.; Suflita, J.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Krumholz, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfate-reduction activity occurs in a heterogeneous manner throughout the terrestrial subsurface. Low-activity regions are often observed in the presence of clay minerals. Here we report that clays inhibit sulfate reduction activity in sediments and in a pure culture of Desulfovibriovulgaris. Clay minerals including bentonite and kaolinite inhibited sulfate reduction by 70–90% in sediments. Intact clays and clay colloids or soluble components, capable of passing through a 0.2-µm filter, were also inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Other adsorbent materials, including anion or cation exchangers and a zeolite, did not inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments, suggesting that the effect of clays was not due to their cation-exchange capacity. We observed a strong correlation between the Al2O3content of clays and their relative ability to inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments (r2 = 0.82). This suggested that inhibition might be a direct effect of Al3+ (aq) on the bacteria. We then tested pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and showed it to act in a similar manner to clay. As dissolved aluminum is known to be toxic to a variety of organisms at low concentrations, our results suggest that the effects of clay on sulfate-reducing bacteria may be directly due to aluminum. Thus, our experiments provide an explanation for the lack of sulfate-reduction activity in clay-rich regions and presents a mechanism for the effect.

  11. Effects of an iron-silicon material, a synthetic zeolite and an alkaline clay on vegetable uptake of As and Cd from a polluted agricultural soil and proposed remediation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Aijun; Wang, Yani; Ling, Xiaodan; Chen, Zhe; Tang, Yetao; Qiu, Hao; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2017-04-01

    Economic and highly effective methods of in situ remediation of Cd and As polluted farmland in mining areas are urgently needed. Pot experiments with Brassica chinensis L. were carried out to determine the effects of three soil amendments [a novel iron-silicon material (ISM), a synthetic zeolite (SZ) and an alkaline clay (AC)] on vegetable uptake of As and Cd. SEM-EDS and XRD analyses were used to investigate the remediation mechanisms involved. Amendment with ISM significantly reduced the concentrations of As and Cd in edible parts of B. chinensis (by 84-94 % and 38-87 %, respectively), to levels that met food safety regulations and was much lower than those achieved by SZ and AC. ISM also significantly increased fresh biomass by 169-1412 % and 436-731 % in two consecutive growing seasons, while SZ and AC did not significantly affect vegetable growth. Correlation analysis suggested that it was the mitigating effects of ISM on soil acidity and on As and Cd toxicity, rather than nutrient amelioration, that contributed to the improvement in plant growth. SEM-EDS analysis showed that ISM contained far more Ca, Fe and Mn than did SZ or AC, and XRD analysis showed that in the ISM these elements were primarily in the form of silicates, oxides and phosphates that had high capacities for chemisorption of metal(loid)s. After incubation with solutions containing 800 mg L -1 AsO 4 2- or Cd 2+ , ISM bound distinctly higher levels of As (6.18 % in relative mass percent by EDS analysis) and Cd (7.21 % in relative mass percent by EDS analysis) compared to SZ and AC. XRD analysis also showed that ISM facilitated the precipitation of Cd 2+ as silicates, phosphates and hydroxides, and that arsenate combined with Fe, Al, Ca and Mg to form insoluble arsenate compounds. These precipitation mechanisms were much more active in ISM than in SZ or AC. Due to the greater pH elevation caused by the abundant calcium silicate, chemisorption and precipitation mechanisms in ISM treatments

  12. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents themore » distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository

  13. Clay-based polymer nanocomposites: research and commercial development.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q H; Yu, A B; Lu, G Q; Paul, D R

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of clay-based polymer nanocomposites. Clay minerals, due to their unique layered structure, rich intercalation chemistry and availability at low cost, are promising nanoparticle reinforcements for polymers to manufacture low-cost, lightweight and high performance nanocomposites. We introduce briefly the structure, properties and surface modification of clay minerals, followed by the processing and characterization techniques of polymer nanocomposites. The enhanced and novel properties of such nanocomposites are then discussed, including mechanical, thermal, barrier, electrical conductivity, biodegradability among others. In addition, their available commercial and potential applications in automotive, packaging, coating and pigment, electrical materials, and in particular biomedical fields are highlighted. Finally, the challenges for the future are discussed in terms of processing, characterization and the mechanisms governing the behaviour of these advanced materials.

  14. Applying Content Management to Automated Provenance Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Gibson, Tara D.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-04-10

    Workflows and data pipelines are becoming increasingly valuable in both computational and experimen-tal sciences. These automated systems are capable of generating significantly more data within the same amount of time than their manual counterparts. Automatically capturing and recording data prove-nance and annotation as part of these workflows is critical for data management, verification, and dis-semination. Our goal in addressing the provenance challenge was to develop and end-to-end system that demonstrates real-time capture, persistent content management, and ad-hoc searches of both provenance and metadata using open source software and standard protocols. We describe our prototype, which extends the Kepler workflow toolsmore » for the execution environment, the Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) content management software for data services, and an existing HTTP-based query protocol. Our implementation offers several unique capabilities, and through the use of standards, is able to pro-vide access to the provenance record to a variety of commonly available client tools.« less

  15. Provenance testing at Michigan Technological University

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Sajdak

    1970-01-01

    The location of M.T.U. in the Keweenaw Peninsula of Upper Michigan provides some unique advantages and disadvantages in provenance testing and tree improvement research. Extremes in summer and winter temperatures are uncommon because of the moderating effect of Lake Superior. Near the Lake we have about 140 frost-free days while inland the frost-free season is only 80...

  16. Community Education Proven Practices II: Networking Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Designed to be used by those who wish to initiate or further develop community education programs at the state and local levels, this publication is one of a series of "Proven Practices" developed by federally-funded state and local community education projects. The booklet describes the administrative design and the process used to…

  17. Sorption of Cesium on smectite-rich clays from the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) and their mixtures with sand.

    PubMed

    Vejsada, J; Jelínek, E; Randa, Z; Hradil, D; Prikryl, R

    2005-01-01

    Sorption is an important process for the transport of radionuclides through backfill materials in a radioactive waste underground repository. Within this study, sorption of Cs on selected Czech clay materials and their mixtures with sand was investigated by batch tests. The experiments were performed under oxic conditions at 25 degrees C. Synthetic groundwater as a liquid phase and unconditioned clays (as they were provided by their producer) were used to reach the natural conditions as close as possible. Distribution ratios (Rds) of Cs for all selected clays rise with increase of the clay fraction in clay/sand mixtures in agreement with previous works studying sorption behaviour of such mixtures. The rise of Rds is from 10(2) cm3 g(-1) for mixtures with 80% of sand to 10(3) cm3 g(-1) for pure clays. There are significant differences between natural and technologically modified clays.

  18. Falling for Clay Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that integrated science and art education. Explains that students create ceramic bowls by using real leaves. Discusses the process of creating the ceramic bowls, including how to glaze the bowls. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  19. Characterisation of the wall-slip during extrusion of heavy-clay products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocserha, I.; Gömze, A. L.; Kulkov, S.; Kalatur, E.; Buyakova, S. P.; Géber, R.; Buzimov, A. Y.

    2017-01-01

    During extrusion through the extrusion die, heavy-clay compounds are usually show plug flow with extensive slip at the wall of the die. In this study, the viscosity and the thickness of the slip layer were investigated. For the examination a brick-clay from Malyi (Hungary) deposit was applied as a raw material. The clay was characterised by XRPD, BET, SEM and granulometry. As the slip layer consists of suspension of the fine clay fraction so the clay minerals content of the clay (d<2µm) was separated by the help of sedimentation. The viscosity of suspension with different water content was measured by means of rotational viscosimeter. The thickness of the slip layer was calculated from the measured viscosity and other data obtained from an earlier study with capillary rheometer. The calculated thickness value showed a tendency to reach a limit value by increasing the extrusion speed.

  20. California Bearing Ratio (CBR) test on stabilization of clay with lime addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastuty, I. P.; Roesyanto; Limbong, M. N.; Oberlyn, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    Clay is a type of soil with particles of certain minerals giving plastic properties when mixed with water. Soil has an important role in a construction, besides as a building material in a wide variety of civil engineering works, soil is also used as supporting foundation of the building. Basic properties of clay are rock-solid in dry and plastic with medium water content. In high water content, clay becomes sticky like (cohesive) and soften. Therefore, clay stabilization is necessary to repair soil’s mechanical properties. In this research, lime is use as a stabilizer that contains the Ca+ element to bond bigger particles. Lime used is slaked lime Ca(OH)2. Clay used has liquid limitation (LL) value of 47.33%, plasticity index of 29.88% and CBR value 6.29. The results explain about 10% lime mixture variation gives the optimum stabilized clay with CBR value of 8.75%.

  1. The Nicobar Fan and sediment provenance: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 362, NE Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, K. T.; Pouderoux, H.; Milliken, K. L.; Carter, A.; Chemale, F., Jr.; Kutterolf, S.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Backman, J.; McNeill, L. C.; Dugan, B.; Expedition 362 Scientists, I.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Expedition 362 (6 Aug-6 Oct 2016) was designed to drill the input materials of the north Sumatran subduction zone, part of the 5000 km long Sunda subduction system and to understand the origin of the Mw 9.2 earthquake and tsunami that devastated coastal communities around the Indian Ocean in 2004 linked to unexpectedly shallow seismogenic slip and a distinctive forearc prism structure (1,2,3). Two sites, U1480 and U1481 on the Indian oceanic plate 250 km SW of the subduction zone on the eastern flank of the Ninetyeast Ridge, were drilled, cored, and logged to a maximum depth of 1500 m below seafloor. The input materials of the north Sumatran subduction zone are a thick (up to 4-5 km) succession mainly of Bengal-Nicobar Fan siliciclastic sediments overlying a mainly pelagic/hemipelagic succession, with igneous and volcaniclastic material above oceanic basement. At Sites U1480 and U1481, above the igneous basement ( 60-70 Ma), the sedimentary succession comprises deep-marine tuffaceous deposits with igneous intrusions, overlain by pelagic deposits, including chalk, and a thick Nicobar Fan succession of sediment gravity-flow (SGF) deposits, mainly turbidites and muddy debrites. The Nicobar Fan deposits (estimated total volume of 9.2 x 106 km3: 3) represent >90% of the input section at the drill sites and many of the beds are rich in plant material. These beds are intercalated with calcareous clays. Sediment accumulation rates reached 10-40 cm/kyr in the late Miocene to Pliocene, but were much reduced since 1.6 Ma. The onset of Nicobar Fan deposition at the drill sites ( 9.5 Ma; 2) is much younger than was anticipated precruise ( 30-40 Ma), based on previous regional analyses of Bengal-Nicobar Fan history and presumptions of gradual fan progradation. Our preliminary results suggest that the Nicobar Fan was active between 1.6 and 9.5 Ma, and possibly since 30 Ma (3). The observed mineralogical assemblage of the SGF deposits and zircon age dating are consistent with

  2. Studies on adsorption capacity of clay-Sargassum sp biosorbent for Cr (VI) removal in wastewater from electroplating industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Tine; Aprilyanti, Selvia; Apriani, Rachmawati; Sisnayati

    2017-11-01

    Various raw biosorbents have been studied for pollutant treatment of heavy metals contained in wastewater. In this study, clay and brown seaweed, Sargassum sp, are used for hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] biosorption. The adsorption capacity is adequately improved by combining clay and Sargassum sp as the adsorbent agent. Ion exchange of metal ions has shown strong coordination cross-linkage due to organic functional hydroxyl groups (OH-) contained in brown seaweed that provide sites to capture and bind the metal ions. Clay is known as an inexpensive adsorbent due to its wide availability besides its large specific surface area. Combining clay and Sargassum sp as biosorbent resulting better adsorption, the adsorption capacity reaches most favorable results of 99.39% at Sargassum: clay ratio of 40:60 on contact time 10 h. This study has proven that composit biosorbent used has succeeded in reducing hexavalent chromium pollutant in wastewater.

  3. PAV ontology: provenance, authoring and versioning.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Belhajjame, Khalid; Gray, Alasdair Jg; Goble, Carole; Clark, Tim

    2013-11-22

    Provenance is a critical ingredient for establishing trust of published scientific content. This is true whether we are considering a data set, a computational workflow, a peer-reviewed publication or a simple scientific claim with supportive evidence. Existing vocabularies such as Dublin Core Terms (DC Terms) and the W3C Provenance Ontology (PROV-O) are domain-independent and general-purpose and they allow and encourage for extensions to cover more specific needs. In particular, to track authoring and versioning information of web resources, PROV-O provides a basic methodology but not any specific classes and properties for identifying or distinguishing between the various roles assumed by agents manipulating digital artifacts, such as author, contributor and curator. We present the Provenance, Authoring and Versioning ontology (PAV, namespace http://purl.org/pav/): a lightweight ontology for capturing "just enough" descriptions essential for tracking the provenance, authoring and versioning of web resources. We argue that such descriptions are essential for digital scientific content. PAV distinguishes between contributors, authors and curators of content and creators of representations in addition to the provenance of originating resources that have been accessed, transformed and consumed. We explore five projects (and communities) that have adopted PAV illustrating their usage through concrete examples. Moreover, we present mappings that show how PAV extends the W3C PROV-O ontology to support broader interoperability. The initial design of the PAV ontology was driven by requirements from the AlzSWAN project with further requirements incorporated later from other projects detailed in this paper. The authors strived to keep PAV lightweight and compact by including only those terms that have demonstrated to be pragmatically useful in existing applications, and by recommending terms from existing ontologies when plausible. We analyze and compare PAV with related

  4. PAV ontology: provenance, authoring and versioning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Provenance is a critical ingredient for establishing trust of published scientific content. This is true whether we are considering a data set, a computational workflow, a peer-reviewed publication or a simple scientific claim with supportive evidence. Existing vocabularies such as Dublin Core Terms (DC Terms) and the W3C Provenance Ontology (PROV-O) are domain-independent and general-purpose and they allow and encourage for extensions to cover more specific needs. In particular, to track authoring and versioning information of web resources, PROV-O provides a basic methodology but not any specific classes and properties for identifying or distinguishing between the various roles assumed by agents manipulating digital artifacts, such as author, contributor and curator. Results We present the Provenance, Authoring and Versioning ontology (PAV, namespace http://purl.org/pav/): a lightweight ontology for capturing “just enough” descriptions essential for tracking the provenance, authoring and versioning of web resources. We argue that such descriptions are essential for digital scientific content. PAV distinguishes between contributors, authors and curators of content and creators of representations in addition to the provenance of originating resources that have been accessed, transformed and consumed. We explore five projects (and communities) that have adopted PAV illustrating their usage through concrete examples. Moreover, we present mappings that show how PAV extends the W3C PROV-O ontology to support broader interoperability. Method The initial design of the PAV ontology was driven by requirements from the AlzSWAN project with further requirements incorporated later from other projects detailed in this paper. The authors strived to keep PAV lightweight and compact by including only those terms that have demonstrated to be pragmatically useful in existing applications, and by recommending terms from existing ontologies when plausible. Discussion

  5. Geological and technological characterization of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous clay deposits (Jebel Ammar, northeastern Tunisia) for ceramic industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben M'barek-Jemaï, Moufida; Sdiri, Ali; Ben Salah, Imed; Ben Aissa, Lassaad; Bouaziz, Samir; Duplay, Joelle

    2017-05-01

    Late Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous clays of the Jebel Ammar study site were used as raw materials for potential applications in ceramic industry. Physico-chemical characterization of the collected samples was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and dilatometry (Bugot's curve). Geotechnical study was also undertaken by the assessment of plasticity and liquidity limits. It was found that high concentrations of silica, alumina with SiO2/Al2O3 ratio characterized the studied clays; its high amounts of CaO and Fe2O3 in the Late Jurassic clays indicated their calcareous nature. In addition, technological tests indicated moderate to low plasticity values for the Late Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous clays, respectively. Clay fraction (<2 μm) reached 50% of the natural clay in some cases. Mineralogical analysis showed that Jurassic clays were dominated by smectite, illite and kaolinite, as clay mineral species; calcite was the main associated mineral. Lower Cretaceous clays were mainly composed of abundant illite accompanied by well-crystallized smectite and kaolinite. Kaolinite gradually increased upwards, reaching 70% of the total clay fraction (i.e. <2 μm). Quartz, calcite and feldspar were the main non-clay minerals. Based on these analyses, the clays meet technological requirements that would allow their use in the ceramic industry and for the manufacturing of ceramic tiles.

  6. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes.

    PubMed

    Ragan, Eric D; Endert, Alex; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance information and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research.

  7. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric; Alex, Endert; Sanyal, Jibonananda

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance informationmore » and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research« less

  8. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes

    DOE PAGES

    Ragan, Eric; Alex, Endert; Sanyal, Jibonananda; ...

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance informationmore » and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research« less

  9. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  10. Quantifying the provenance of aeolian sediments using multiple composite fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Benli; Niu, Qinghe; Qu, Jianjun; Zu, Ruiping

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new fingerprinting method that uses multiple composite fingerprints for studies of aeolian sediment provenance. We used this method to quantify the provenance of sediments on both sides of the Qinghai-Tibetan Railway (QTR) in the Cuona Lake section of the Tibetan Plateau (TP), in an environment characterized by aeolian and fluvial interactions. The method involves repeatedly solving a linear mixing model based on mass conservation; the model is not limited to spatial scale or transport types and uses all the tracer groups that passed the range check, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and a strict analytical solution screening. The proportional estimates that result from using different composite fingerprints are highly variable; however, the average of these fingerprints has a greater accuracy and certainty than any single fingerprint. The results show that sand from the lake beach, hilly surface, and gullies contribute, respectively, 48%, 31% and 21% to the western railway sediments and 43%, 33% and 24% to the eastern railway sediments. The difference between contributions from various sources on either side of the railway, which may increase in the future, was clearly related to variations in local transport characteristics, a conclusion that is supported by grain size analysis. The construction of the QTR changed the local cycling of materials, and the difference in provenance between the sediments that are separated by the railway reflects the changed sedimentary conditions on either side of the railway. The effectiveness of this method suggests that it will be useful in other studies of aeolian sediments.

  11. Investigating the Influence of Clay Mineralogy on Stream Bank Erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, R. K.; Stine, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Soil scientists concerned with erosion of agricultural fields and geotechnical engineers concerned with the mechanical behavior of soils under different conditions have both examined the role of clay mineralogy in controlling soil/sediment properties. Fluvial geomorphologists studying stream channel erosion and stability have focused more on the effects of particle-size distribution, vegetation and rooting. The clay mineralogy of bed and bank sediment has the potential to influence cohesiveness and erodibility, however. The goal of this study is to determine the influence of clay mineralogy on the erodibility of natural stream bank sediment, utilizing techniques drawn from pedology and soil mechanics. Bank samples were collected from eleven sites in small watersheds in central and western Virginia. To obtain sediment containing a range of different clay minerals, watersheds with different types of bedrock were chosen for sampling. Rock types included mafic to felsic metamorphic and igneous rocks, shale, sandstone, and limestone. Where stream bank materials were clearly stratified, different layers were sampled separately. X-ray diffraction of the clay-fraction of the sediment indicates the presence of kaolinite, illite, vermiculite, and mixed-layer clay minerals in various abundances in the different samples. Clay content is 9-46%, as determined by the hydrometer method, and textures range from silty clay and silt loam to clay loam and sandy loam. Organic mater contents range from 1-5% by the loss-on-ignition method. Bulk density of intact sediment samples averages 1.5 g/cc. Liquid limits range from 23-41 with one sample having a value of 65; plasticity indices range from 15-22. While these tests predict that the samples would show a range of mechanical behaviors, the channel morphology at the sampling sites was not strikingly different, all having steep cut banks eroded primarily by scour with no evidence of mass movement and most having a width/depth ratio around

  12. Distributions of clay minerals in surface sediments of the middle Bay of Bengal: Source and transport pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingrui; Liu, Shengfa; Shi, Xuefa; Feng, Xiuli; Fang, Xisheng; Cao, Peng; Sun, Xingquan; Wenxing, Ye; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Kornkanitnan, Narumol

    2017-08-01

    The clay mineral contents in 110 surface sediment samples collected from the middle of the Bay of Bengal were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the provenance and transport patterns. The illite content was highest, followed by chlorite, kaolinite and then smectite, with average weight percent distributions of 52%, 22%, 14% and 12%, respectively. Illite and chlorite had similar distribution pattern, with higher contents in the northern and central areas and lower contents in the southern area, whereas smectite showed the opposite distribution pattern. Kaolinite show no obvious higher or lower areas and the southern ;belt; was one of the highest content areas. Based on the spatial distribution characteristics and cluster analysis results, the study area can be classified into two provinces. Province I covers the southwestern area and contains high concentrations of illite and smectite sediments. Province II covers most sites and is also characterized by high concentrations of illite, but the weight percent of smectite is only half of that of province I. According to a quantitative estimate using end-member clay minerals contents, the relative contributions from the Himalayan source and the Indian source are 63% and 37% on average, respectively. Integrative analysis indicates that the hydrodynamic environment in the study area, especially the turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation, plays an important role in the spatial distribution and dispersal of the clay fraction in the sediments. The sediments in province I are mainly from the Indian source transported by the East Indian Coastal Current (EICC) and the surface monsoon circulation with minor contributions from the Himalayan source while the sediments in province II are mainly from the Himalayan source transported by turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation with little contribution from Indian river materials.

  13. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  14. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  15. The Fame of Sharkey Clay

    Treesearch

    W. M. Broadfoot

    1962-01-01

    Sharkey clay is now important to the Southern forest industry because it supports so much of the hardwood resource-more than any other soil within the Mississippi Delta-and its extent will continue to make it important to Delta forestry.

  16. Direct visualization of clay microfabric signatures driving organic matter preservation in fine-grained sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Kenneth J.; Bennett, Richard H.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Curry, Ann; Abril, Maritza; Biesiot, Patricia M.; Hulbert, Matthew H.

    2007-04-01

    We employed direct visualization of organic matter (OM) sequestered by microfabric signatures in organo-clay systems to study mechanisms of OM protection. We studied polysaccharides, an abundant class of OM in marine sediments, associated with the nano- and microfabric of clay sediment using a novel application of transmission electron microscopy, histochemical staining (periodic acid-thiosemicarbazide-silver proteinate), and enzymatic digestion techniques. We used two experimental organo-clay sediment environments. First, laboratory-consolidated sediment with 10% chitin (w/w) added was probed for chitin before and after digestion with chitinase. Second, fecal pellets from the polychaete Heteromastus filiformis were used as a natural environment rich in clay and polysaccharides. Sections of this material were probed with silver proteinate for polysaccharides before and after digestion with a mixture of enzymes (amylase, cellulase, chitinase, dextranase, and pectinase). In both environments, chitin or other polysaccharides were found within pores, bridging clay domains, and attached to clay surfaces in undigested samples. Digested samples showed chitin or polysaccharides more closely associated with clay surfaces and in small pores. Our results imply protective roles for both sorption to clay surfaces and encapsulation within clay microfabric signatures.

  17. Unraveling the antibacterial mode of action of a clay from the Colombian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Londono, Sandra Carolina; Williams, Lynda B

    2016-04-01

    Natural antibacterial clays can inhibit growth of human pathogens; therefore, understanding the antibacterial mode of action may lead to new applications for health. The antibacterial modes of action have shown differences based on mineralogical constraints. Here we investigate a natural clay from the Colombian Amazon (AMZ) known to the Uitoto natives as a healing clay. The physical and chemical properties of the AMZ clay were compared to standard reference materials: smectite (SWy-1) and kaolinite (API #5) that represent the major minerals in AMZ. We tested model Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC #25922) and Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis ATCC #6633) bacteria to assess the clay's antibacterial effectiveness against different bacterial types. The chemical and physical changes in the microbes were examined using bioimaging and mass spectrometry of clay digests and aqueous leachates. Results indicate that a single dose of AMZ clay (250 mg/mL) induced a 4-6 order of magnitude reduction in cell viability, unlike the reference clays that did not impact bacterial survival. AMZ clay possesses a relatively high specific surface area (51.23 m(2)/g) and much higher total surface area (278.82 m(2)/g) than the reference clays. In aqueous suspensions (50 mg clay/mL water), soluble metals are released and the minerals buffer fluid pH between 4.1 and 4.5. We propose that the clay facilitates chemical interactions detrimental to bacteria by absorbing nutrients (e.g., Mg, P) and potentially supplying metals (e.g., Al) toxic to bacteria. This study demonstrates that native traditional knowledge can direct scientific studies.

  18. Physicochemical of pillared clays prepared by several metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Nino; Kristiani, Anis

    2017-03-01

    Natural clays could be modified by the pillarization method, called as Pillared Clays (PILCs). PILCs have been known as porous materials that can be used for many applications, one of the fields is catalysis. PILCs as two dimensional materials are interesting because their structures and textural properties can be controlled by using a metal oxide as the pillar. Different metal oxide used as the pillar causes different properties results of pillared clays. Usually, natural smectite clays/bentonites are used as a raw material. Therefore, a series of bentonite pillared by metal oxides was prepared through pillarization method. Variation of metals pillared into bentonite are aluminium, chromium, zirconium, and ferro. The physicochemical properties of catalysts were characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurement. Noteworthy characterization results showed that different metals pillared into bentonite affected physical and chemical properties, i.e. basal spacing, surface area, pore size distribution, thermal stability and acidity.

  19. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  20. Prebiotic carbon in clays from Orgueil and Ivuna (CI), and Tagish Lake (C2 ungrouped) meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopic (EELS) study of the Ivuna and Orgueil (CI), and Tagish Lake (C2 ungrouped) carbonaceous chondrite meteorites shows two types of C-clay assemblages. The first is coarser-grained (to 1 μm) clay flakes that show an intense O K edge from the silicate together with a prominent C K edge, but without discrete C particles. Nitrogen is common in some clay flakes. Individual Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorite clay flakes contain up to 6 and 8 at% C, respectively. The C K-edge spectra from the clays show fine structure revealing aromatic, aliphatic, carboxylic, and carbonate C. The EELS data shows that this C is intercalated with the clay flakes. The second C-clay association occurs as poorly crystalline to amorphous material occurring as nanometer aggregates of C, clay, and Fe-O-rich material. Some aggregates are dominated by carbonaceous particles that are structurally and chemically similar to the acid insoluble organic matter. The C K-edge shape from this C resembles that of amorphous C, but lacking the distinct peaks corresponding to aliphatic, carboxylic, and carbonate C groups. Nanodiamonds are locally abundant in some carbonaceous particles. The abundance of C in the clays suggest that molecular speciation in the carbonaceous chondrites is partly determined by the effects of aqueous processing on the meteorite parent bodies, and that clays played an important role. This intricate C-clay association lends credence to the proposal that minerals were important in the prebiotic chemical evolution of the early solar system.

  1. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Hammond, Glenn Edward

    reactive-transport and reaction path modeling. The focus of these investigations into the nature of sacrificial zones is to evaluate the chemical effects of heterogeneous chemical reactions at EBS interfaces. The difference in barrier material types and the extent of chemical reactions within these interfacial domains generates changes in mineral abundances. These mineralogical alterations also result in volume changes that, although small, could affect the interface bulk porosity. As in previous deliverables, this report is structured according to various national laboratory contributions describing R&D activities applicable to clay/shale/argillite media.« less

  2. Kisameet Glacial Clay: an Unexpected Source of Bacterial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Sarah L; Behroozian, Shekooh; Xu, Wanjing; Surette, Michael G; Li, Loretta; Davies, Julian

    2017-05-23

    Widespread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is providing the impetus to explore novel sources of antimicrobial agents. Recently, the potent antibacterial activity of certain clay minerals has stimulated scientific interest in these materials. One such example is Kisameet glacial clay (KC), an antibacterial clay from a deposit on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. However, our understanding of the active principles of these complex natural substances is incomplete. Like soils, clays may possess complex mixtures of bacterial taxa, including the Actinobacteria , a clade known to be rich in antibiotic-producing organisms. Here, we present the first characterization of both the microbial and geochemical characteristics of a glacial clay deposit. KC harbors surprising bacterial species richness, with at least three distinct community types. We show that the deposit has clines of inorganic elements that can be leached by pH, which may be drivers of community structure. We also note the prevalence of Gallionellaceae in samples recovered near the surface, as well as taxa that include medically or economically important bacteria such as Actinomycetes and Paenibacillus These results provide insight into the microbial taxa that may be the source of KC antibacterial activity and suggest that natural clays may be rich sources of microbial and molecular diversity. IMPORTANCE Identifying and characterizing the resident microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi) is key to understanding the ecology, chemistry, and homeostasis of virtually all sites on Earth. The Kisameet Bay deposit in British Columbia, Canada, holds a novel glacial clay with a history of medicinal use by local indigenous people. We previously showed that it has potent activity against a variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, suggesting it could complement our dwindling arsenal of antibiotics. Here, we have characterized the microbiome of this deposit to gain insight

  3. Rheological study of clay-kaolin aqueous suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapasin, R.; Lucchini, F.

    1984-01-01

    Rheological characteristics of clay-kaolin aqueous suspensions were studied by a rotational viscometer to correlate their behavior with the properties of ceramic slips for casting containing quartz, feldspars, and other nonplastic materials. In particular, the effects of the different amounts of dry materials and deflocculant (mixture 1:1 of Na2CO3 and Na2SiO3) and of temperatures on the shear-time-dependent properties of suspensions were examined.

  4. Thermophysical and mechanical characterization of clay bricks reinforced by alfa or straw fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhamdouni, Y.; Khabbazi, A.; Benayad, C.; Mounir, S.; Dadi, A.

    2017-03-01

    This work is part of the valuation of local materials such as clay (earth), alfa fiber and straw fiber. The goal is to use these materials as bricks in rural construction. These materials are abundant, natural, and renewable. The objective of this work is to study the thermal and mechanical behavior of a new material by mixing clay (chosen as the binder) with different mass percentages of alfa fiber (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%), and to compare these results with those of materials often used in the construction of individual houses in rural Morocco (clay + straw). The results obtained prove to us that using straw fibers can reduce the thermal conductivity compared to alfa fiber, which allows to have energy savings of 2% to 7%. By against, alfa fibers can improve the mechanical behavior of clay-based materials when compared to the clay + straw material (an increase of 8% to 17% in the tractive resistance by bending and 6% to 18% for compression resistance). These results also specify the optimal usage conditions of these fibers (alfa and straw) in the clay bricks.

  5. On sorption and swelling of CO 2 in clays

    DOE PAGES

    Busch, A.; Bertier, P.; Gensterblum, Y.; ...

    2016-03-23

    One well-studied technology is the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2), and a number of demonstration projects around the world have proven its feasibility and challenges. Storage conformance and seal integrity are among the most important aspects, as they determine risk of leakage as well as limits for storage capacity and injectivity. By providing evidence for safe storage is critical for improving public acceptance. Most caprocks are composed of clays as dominant mineral type which can typically be illite, kaolinite, chlorite or smectite. A number of recent studies addressed the interaction between CO 2 and these different clays andmore » it was shown that clay minerals adsorb considerable quantities of CO 2. For smectite this uptake can lead to volumetric expansion followed by the generation of swelling pressures. On the one hand CO 2 adsorption traps CO 2, on the other hand swelling pressures can potentially change local stress regimes and in unfavourable situations shear-type failure is assumed to occur. Moreover, for storage in a reservoir having high clay contents the CO 2 uptake can add to storage capacity which is widely underestimated so far. Smectite-rich seals in direct contact with a dry CO 2 plume at the interface to the reservoir might dehydrate leading to dehydration cracks. Such dehydration cracks can provide pathways for CO 2 ingress and further accelerate dewatering and penetration of the seal by supercritical CO 2. At the same time, swelling may also lead to the closure of fractures or the reduction of fracture apertures, thereby improving seal integrity. Finally, the goal of this communication is to theoretically evaluate and discuss these scenarios in greater detail in terms of phenomenological mechanisms, but also in terms of potential risks or benefits for carbon storage.« less

  6. Data Provenance in Photogrammetry Through Documentation Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, N.; Bruseker, G.; Guillem, A.; Bellido Castañeda, D.; Coughenour, C.; Domajnko, M.; de Kramer, M.; Ramos Calles, M. M.; Stathopoulou, E. K.; Suma, R.

    2016-06-01

    Documenting the relevant aspects in digitisation processes such as photogrammetry in order to provide a robust provenance for their products continues to present a challenge. The creation of a product that can be re-used scientifically requires a framework for consistent, standardised documentation of the entire digitisation pipeline. This article provides an analysis of the problems inherent to such goals and presents a series of protocols to document the various steps of a photogrammetric workflow. We propose this pipeline, with descriptors to track all phases of digital product creation in order to assure data provenance and enable the validation of the operations from an analytic and production perspective. The approach aims to support adopters of the workflow to define procedures with a long term perspective. The conceptual schema we present is founded on an analysis of information and actor exchanges in the digitisation process. The metadata were defined through the synthesis of previous proposals in this area and were tested on a case study. We performed the digitisation of a set of cultural heritage artefacts from an Iron Age burial in Ilmendorf, Germany. The objects were captured and processed using different techniques, including a comparison of different imaging tools and algorithms. This augmented the complexity of the process allowing us to test the flexibility of the schema for documenting complex scenarios. Although we have only presented a photogrammetry digitisation scenario, we claim that our schema is easily applicable to a multitude of 3D documentation processes.

  7. Tracing dust provenance in paleoclimate records using mineralogical and isotopic fingerprints: additional clues from present-day studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bory, A. J.; Skonieczny, C.; Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Grousset, F. E.; Biscaye, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    Dust records retrieved from ice and sediment cores represent some of our most valuable evidence for modifications of atmospheric circulation on various times scales over the last few Pleistocene glacial and interglacial climate cycles. These data also contribute to the documentation of changes in continental paleo-environments (e.g., changes in aridity), changes in iron inputs to the ocean, as well as changes in the hydrological cycle. Interpreting ice and sediment-core dust records, and using them for modelling purposes, requires firstly a good understanding of the dust provenance and its possible temporal variability. Specific intrinsic tracers such as clay mineralogy, major and trace elements, and radiogenic isotopes (strontium, neodymium, lead) have been used for this purpose, with variable effectiveness. One difficulty lies in the fact that these measurements require significant amount of mineral particles and can thus only be obtained at low temporal resolution, either because of the low dust concentration in ice cores or because of the low mass accumulation rates and bioturbation in marine sediments. As a result, dust samples extracted from ice and sediment cores for provenance investigation average long periods of time and may reflect mixtures from various source areas, complicating the interpretation of the data. Still, provenance tracers (clay mineralogy and Sr-Nd isotopes in particular) made possible for instance the discrimination of which continents provided most of the dust deposited in remote locations such as Greenland and Antarctica during the dusty glacial stages. The locations of the contributing source areas, however, were not precisely identified. During the low-dust, interglacial periods, provenance has proven more difficult to establish unambiguously, even at broad (i.e., continental) geographic scales. In other aeolian deposits, such as Asian loess or marine sediments off West Africa, the provenance of the dust is still poorly constrained

  8. Provenance of sediments from Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Christof; Hall, Robert; Gough, Amy

    2017-04-01

    The island of Sumatra is situated at the south-western margin of the Indonesian archipelago. Sumatra is affected by active continental margin volcanism along the Sunda Trench, west of Sumatra as a result of active northeast subduction of the Indian plate under the Eurasian plate. Exposures of the Palaeozoic meta-sedimentary basement are mainly limited in extent to the northeast-southwest trending Barisan Mountain chain. The younger Cenozoic rocks are widespread across Sumatra, but can be grouped into structurally subdivided 'fore-arc', 'intramontane', and 'back-arc' basins. However, the formation of the basins pre-dates the current magmatic arc, thus a classical arc-related generation model can not be applied. The Cenozoic formations are well studied due to hydrocarbon enrichment, but little is known about their provenance history. A comprehensive sedimentary provenance study of the Cenozoic formations can aid in the wider understanding of Sumatran petroleum plays, can contribute to palaeographic reconstruction of western SE Asia, and might help to simplify the overall stratigraphy of Sumatra. This work represents a multi-proxy provenance study of sedimentary rocks from the main Cenozoic basins of Sumatra, alongside sediment from present-day river systems. The project refines the provenance in two ways: first, by studying the heavy mineral assemblages of the targeted formations, and secondly, by U-Pb detrital zircon dating using LA-ICP-MS to identify the age-range of the potential sediment sources. Preliminary U-Pb zircon age-data of >1500 concordant grains (10% discordant cut-off), heavy mineral compositions, and thin section analysis from two fieldwork seasons indicate a mixed provenance model, with a proximal igneous source, and mature basement rocks. An increase of the proximal signature in Lower-Miocene strata indicated by the occurrence of unstable heavy mineral phases such as apatite, and clinopyroxene suggests a major change of the source at the Oligocene

  9. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Riboulleau, A.; du Châtelet, E. Armynot; Lorenzoni, L.; Tribovillard, N.; Murray, R. W.; Müller-Karger, F.; Astor, Y. M.

    2013-02-01

    The mineralogical composition of 95 surface sediment samples from the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay-mineral main provenance and distribution within the Cariaco Basin. The spatial variability of the data set was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps. These maps are used to identify present-day dominant sources for each clay-mineral species in agreement with the geological characteristics of the main river watersheds emptying into the basin. This approach allows (1) identifying the most distinctive clay-mineral species/ratios that determine particle provenance, (2) evaluating the respective contribution of local rivers, and (3) confirming the minimal present-day influence of the Orinoco plume on the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. The Tuy, Unare, and Neveri Rivers are the main sources of clay particles to the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. At present, the Tuy River is the main contributor of illite to the western part of the southern Cariaco Basin continental shelf. The Unare River plume, carrying smectite and kaolinite, has a wide westward propagation, whereas the Neveri River contribution is less extended, providing kaolinite and illite toward the eastern Cariaco Basin. The Manzanares, Araya, Tortuga, and Margarita areas are secondary sources of local influence. These insights shed light on the origin of present-day terrigenous sediments of the Cariaco Basin and help to propose alternative explanations for the temporal variability of clay mineralogy observed in previously published studies.

  10. Searching for reciclability of modified clays for an environmental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Antequera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants related to the food industry by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and

  11. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  12. Provenance and recycling of Arabian desert sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vermeesch, Pieter; Andò, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Valagussa, Manuel; Allen, Kate; Kadi, Khalid; Al-Juboury, Ali

    2013-04-01

    This study seeks to determine the ultimate origin of aeolian sand in Arabian deserts by high-resolution petrographic and heavy-mineral techniques combined with zircon U-Pb geochronology. Point-counting is used here as the sole method by which unbiased volume percentages of heavy minerals can be obtained. A comprehensive analysis of river and wadi sands from the Red Sea to the Bitlis-Zagros orogen allowed us to characterize all potential sediment sources, and thus to quantitatively constrain provenance of Arabian dune fields. Two main types of aeolian sand can be distinguished. Quartzose sands with very poor heavy-mineral suites including zircon occupy most of the region comprising the Great Nafud and Rub' al-Khali Sand Seas, and are largely recycled from thick Lower Palaeozoic quartzarenites with very minor first-cycle contributions from Precambrian basement, Mesozoic carbonate rocks, or Neogene basalts. Instead, carbonaticlastic sands with richer lithic and heavy-mineral populations characterize coastal dunes bordering the Arabian Gulf from the Jafurah Sand Sea of Saudi Arabia to the United Arab Emirates. The similarity with detritus carried by the axial Tigris-Euphrates system and by transverse rivers draining carbonate rocks of the Zagros indicates that Arabian coastal dunes largely consist of far-travelled sand, deposited on the exposed floor of the Gulf during Pleistocene lowstands and blown inland by dominant Shamal northerly winds. A dataset of detrital zircon U-Pb ages measured on twelve dune samples and two Lower Palaeozoic sandstones yielded fourteen identical age spectra. The age distributions all show a major Neoproterozoic peak corresponding to the Pan-African magmatic and tectonic events by which the Arabian Shield was assembled, with minor late Palaeoproterozoic and Neoarchean peaks. A similar U-Pb signature characterizes also Jafurah dune sands, suggesting that zircons are dominantly derived from interior Arabia, possibly deflated from the Wadi al

  13. Provenance and recycling of Arabian desert sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vermeesch, Pieter; Andò, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Valagussa, Manuel; Allen, Kate; Kadi, Khalid A.; Al-Juboury, Ali I. A.

    2013-05-01

    This study seeks to determine the ultimate origin of aeolian sand in Arabian deserts by high-resolution petrographic and heavy-mineral techniques combined with zircon U-Pb geochronology. Point-counting is used here as the sole method by which unbiased volume percentages of heavy minerals can be obtained. A comprehensive analysis of river and wadi sands from the Red Sea to the Bitlis-Zagros orogen allowed us to characterize all potential sediment sources, and thus to quantitatively constrain provenance of Arabian dune fields. Two main types of aeolian sand can be distinguished. Quartzose sands with very poor heavy-mineral suites including zircon occupy most of the region comprising the Great Nafud and Rub' al-Khali Sand Seas, and are largely recycled from thick Lower Palaeozoic quartzarenites with very minor first-cycle contributions from Precambrian basement, Mesozoic carbonate rocks, or Neogene basalts. Instead, carbonaticlastic sands with richer lithic and heavy-mineral populations characterize coastal dunes bordering the Arabian Gulf from the Jafurah Sand Sea of Saudi Arabia to the United Arab Emirates. The similarity with detritus carried by the axial Tigris-Euphrates system and by transverse rivers draining carbonate rocks of the Zagros indicates that Arabian coastal dunes largely consist of far-travelled sand, deposited on the exposed floor of the Gulf during Pleistocene lowstands and blown inland by dominant Shamal northerly winds. A dataset of detrital zircon U-Pb ages measured on twelve dune samples and two Lower Palaeozoic sandstones yielded fourteen identical age spectra. The age distributions all show a major Neoproterozoic peak corresponding to the Pan-African magmatic and tectonic events by which the Arabian Shield was assembled, with minor late Palaeoproterozoic and Neoarchean peaks. A similar U-Pb signature characterizes also Jafurah dune sands, suggesting that zircons are dominantly derived from interior Arabia, possibly deflated from the Wadi al

  14. Influence of nanosize clay platelets on the mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, P; Balasubramanian, M

    2006-12-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polyester composite and hybrid nanoclay-fiber reinforced composites were prepared by hand lay-up process. The mechanical behavior of these materials and the changes as a result of the incorporation of both nanosize clay and glass fibers were investigated. Composites were prepared with a glass fibre content of 25 vol%. The proportion of the nanosize clay platelets was varied from 0.5 to 2.5 vol%. Hybrid clay-fiber reinforced polyester composite posses better tensile, flexural, impact, and barrier properties. Hybrid clay-fiber reinforced polyester composites also posses better shear strength, storage modulus, and glass transition temperature. The optimum properties were found to be with the hybrid laminates containing 1.5 vol% nanosize clay.

  15. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Toulkeridis, T; Goldstein, S L; Clauer, N; Kroner, A; Lowe, D R

    1994-03-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  16. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  17. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  18. Assessment of the Mechanical Properties of Sisal Fiber-Reinforced Silty Clay Using Triaxial Shear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment. PMID:24982951

  19. Influence of clay minerals on curcumin properties: Stability and singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Joyce L. S.; Valandro, Silvano R.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Schmitt, Carla C.

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has showed promising photophysical properties regarding to biological and chemical sciences. However, the main barrier for those applications are their low solubility and stability in aqueous solution. The effects of two different clay minerals, the montmorillonite (SWy-2) and the Laponite RD (Lap) nanoclay, on the stabilization of Curcumin were investigated. Their effects were compared with two well-established environments (acidic and neutral aqueous media). CUR/clay hybrids were prepared using a simple and fast method, where CUR solution was added into clay suspensions, to obtain well dispersed hybrids in water. The degradation process of CUR and CUR/clays hybrids was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopic. For both studied hybrids, the CUR degradation process was suppressed by the presence of the clay particles. Furthermore, the Lap showed a great stabilization effect than SWy-2. This behavior was due to the smaller particle size and higher exfoliation ability of Lap, providing a large surface for CUR adsorption compared to SWy-2. The degradation process of CUR solutions and CUR/clay hybrids was also studied in the presence of light. CUR photodegradation process was faster not only in the aqueous solution but also in the clay suspension compared to those studied in the dark. The presence of clay particles accelerated the photodegradation of CUR due to the products formation in the reactions between CUR and oxygen radicals. Our results showed that the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) of CUR were about 59% higher in the clay suspensions than CUR in aqueous solution. Therefore, the formation of CUR/clay hybrids, in particularly with Lap, suppressed the degradation in absence light of CUR and increased the singlet oxygen generation, which makes this hybrids of CUR/clay a promising material to enlarge the application of CUR in the biological sciences.

  20. Cytocompatibility and uptake of halloysite clay nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vergaro, Viviana; Abdullayev, Elshad; Lvov, Yuri M; Zeitoun, Andre; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross; Leporatti, Stefano

    2010-03-08

    Halloysite is aluminosilicate clay with hollow tubular structure of 50 nm external diameter and 15 nm diameter lumen. Halloysite biocompatibility study is important for its potential applications in polymer composites, bone implants, controlled drug delivery, and for protective coating (e.g., anticorrosion or antimolding). Halloysite nanotubes were added to different cell cultures for toxicity tests. Its fluorescence functionalization by aminopropyltriethosilane (APTES) and with fluorescently labeled polyelectrolyte layers allowed following halloysite uptake by the cells with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quantitative Trypan blue and MTT measurements performed with two neoplastic cell lines model systems as a function of the nanotubes concentration and incubation time indicate that halloysite exhibits a high level of biocompatibility and very low cytotoxicity, rendering it a good candidate for household materials and medicine. A combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging techniques have been employed to elucidate the structure of halloysite nanotubes.

  1. Delineation of a quick clay zone at Smørgrav, Norway, with electromagnetic methods under geotechnical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Bastani, Mehrdad; Donohue, Shane; Persson, Lena; Aspmo Pfaffhuber, Andreas; Reiser, Fabienne; Ren, Zhengyong

    2013-05-01

    In many coastal areas of North America and Scandinavia, post-glacial clay sediments have emerged above sea level due to iso-static uplift. These clays are often destabilised by fresh water leaching and transformed to so-called quick clays as at the investigated area at Smørgrav, Norway. Slight mechanical disturbances of these materials may trigger landslides. Since the leaching increases the electrical resistivity of quick clay as compared to normal marine clay, the application of electromagnetic (EM) methods is of particular interest in the study of quick clay structures. For the first time, single and joint inversions of direct-current resistivity (DCR), radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) and controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT) data were applied to delineate a zone of quick clay. The resulting 2-D models of electrical resistivity correlate excellently with previously published data from a ground conductivity metre and resistivity logs from two resistivity cone penetration tests (RCPT) into marine clay and quick clay. The RCPT log into the central part of the quick clay identifies the electrical resistivity of the quick clay structure to lie between 10 and 80 Ω m. In combination with the 2-D inversion models, it becomes possible to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of the quick clay zone. As compared to the inversions of single data sets, the joint inversion model exhibits sharper resistivity contrasts and its resistivity values are more characteristic of the expected geology. In our preferred joint inversion model, there is a clear demarcation between dry soil, marine clay, quick clay and bedrock, which consists of alum shale and limestone.

  2. Titian: Data Provenance Support in Spark

    PubMed Central

    Interlandi, Matteo; Shah, Kshitij; Tetali, Sai Deep; Gulzar, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Seunghyun; Kim, Miryung; Millstein, Todd; Condie, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    Debugging data processing logic in Data-Intensive Scalable Computing (DISC) systems is a difficult and time consuming effort. Today’s DISC systems offer very little tooling for debugging programs, and as a result programmers spend countless hours collecting evidence (e.g., from log files) and performing trial and error debugging. To aid this effort, we built Titian, a library that enables data provenance—tracking data through transformations—in Apache Spark. Data scientists using the Titian Spark extension will be able to quickly identify the input data at the root cause of a potential bug or outlier result. Titian is built directly into the Spark platform and offers data provenance support at interactive speeds—orders-of-magnitude faster than alternative solutions—while minimally impacting Spark job performance; observed overheads for capturing data lineage rarely exceed 30% above the baseline job execution time. PMID:26726305

  3. A unified framework for managing provenance information in translational research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A critical aspect of the NIH Translational Research roadmap, which seeks to accelerate the delivery of "bench-side" discoveries to patient's "bedside," is the management of the provenance metadata that keeps track of the origin and history of data resources as they traverse the path from the bench to the bedside and back. A comprehensive provenance framework is essential for researchers to verify the quality of data, reproduce scientific results published in peer-reviewed literature, validate scientific process, and associate trust value with data and results. Traditional approaches to provenance management have focused on only partial sections of the translational research life cycle and they do not incorporate "domain semantics", which is essential to support domain-specific querying and analysis by scientists. Results We identify a common set of challenges in managing provenance information across the pre-publication and post-publication phases of data in the translational research lifecycle. We define the semantic provenance framework (SPF), underpinned by the Provenir upper-level provenance ontology, to address these challenges in the four stages of provenance metadata: (a) Provenance collection - during data generation (b) Provenance representation - to support interoperability, reasoning, and incorporate domain semantics (c) Provenance storage and propagation - to allow efficient storage and seamless propagation of provenance as the data is transferred across applications (d) Provenance query - to support queries with increasing complexity over large data size and also support knowledge discovery applications We apply the SPF to two exemplar translational research projects, namely the Semantic Problem Solving Environment for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi SPSE) and the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR) project, to demonstrate its effectiveness. Conclusions The SPF provides a unified framework to effectively manage provenance of translational

  4. Sorption-desorption behavior of PCP on soil organic matter and clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xunchi; Cutright, Teresa J

    2006-08-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) contamination is a severe environmental problem due to its widespread occurrence, toxicity and recalcitrance. In order to gain a better understanding of the fate of PCP in soils, the role of the soil organic matter (SOM) and clay minerals in the PCP sorption-desorption was studied on two bulk field soils, two subsoils (i.e., SOM or clay-removed soil) and two artificial soils. The two field soils used were a silty loam from New Mexico (NM) containing 10% clay and a sandy-clay-loam from Colombia (CO) South America comprised of 18% clay minerals. The bulk CO soil containing kaolinite sorbed significantly less PCP than the NM soil. All soils depicted an apparent hysteresis during sorption. The CO bulk and subsoils desorbed 14-20% and 15-26% of the sorbed PCP respectively whereas the NM bulk and subsoils desorbed only 4-12% and 5-16%, respectively. Experiments conducted with pure clay and artificial soils indicated that the expandable clay minerals were key sorbent material. Additional studies to investigate the interaction between SOM and clay minerals are needed to fully understand sorptive phenomena.

  5. Insightful understanding of the role of clay topology on the stability of biomimetic hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and CO2-dried porous aerogel microspheres.

    PubMed

    Frindy, Sana; Primo, Ana; Qaiss, Abou El Kacem; Bouhfid, Rachid; Lahcini, Mohamed; Garcia, Hermenegildo; Bousmina, Mosto; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2016-08-01

    Three natural clay-based microstructures, namely layered montmorillonite (MMT), nanotubular halloysite (HNT) and micro-fibrillar sepiolite (SP) were used for the synthesis of hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and porous aerogel microspheres. At a first glance, a decrease in the viscosity of the three gel-forming solutions was noticed as a result of breaking the mutual polymeric chains interaction by the clay microstructure. Upon casting, chitosan-clay films displayed enhanced hydrophilicity in the order CSclay microstructure, an improvement in the mechanical properties of the chitosan-clay films has been substantiated with CS-SP reaching the highest value at 5% clay loading. While clay addition provides a way to resist the shrinkage occurring for native chitosan, the enhanced hydrophilicity associated to the water content affects the efficacy of the CO2 super-critical drying as the most hydrophilic CS-SP microspheres face the highest shrinkage, resulting in a lowest specific surface area compared to CS-HNT and CS-MMT. Chitosan-clay exhibits enhanced thermal properties with the degradation delayed in the order CSclay compared to native chitosan, evidencing the beneficial protective effect of the clay particulates for the biopolymer. However, under hydrothermal treatment, the presence of clay was found to be detrimental to the material stability as a significant shrinkage occurs in hybrid CS-clay microspheres, which is attributed again to their increased hydrophilicity compared to the native polymeric microspheres. In this framework, a peculiar behavior was observed for CS-MMT, with the microspheres standing both against contraction during CO2 gel drying and under hydrothermal conditions. The knowledge gained from this rational design will constitute a guideline toward the preparation of ultra-stable, practically-optimized food

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  7. Identification and characterization of hydrothermally altered zones in granite by combining synthetic clay content logs with magnetic mineralogical investigations of drilled rock cuttings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Carola; Kontny, Agnes; Kohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Clay minerals as products of hydrothermal alteration significantly influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crystalline rock. Therefore, the localization and characterization of alteration zones by downhole measurements is a great challenge for the development of geothermal reservoirs. The magnetite bearing granite of the geothermal site in Soultz-sous-Forêts (France) experienced hydrothermal alteration during several tectonic events and clay mineral formation is especially observed in alteration halos around fracture zones. During the formation of clay minerals, magnetite was oxidized into hematite, which significantly reduces the magnetic susceptibility of the granite from ferrimagnetic to mostly paramagnetic values. The aim of this study was to find out if there exists a correlation between synthetic clay content logs (SCCLs) and measurements of magnetic susceptibility on cuttings in the granite in order to characterize their alteration mineralogy. Such a correlation has been proven for core samples of the EPS1 reference well. SCCLs were created from gamma ray and fracture density logs using a neural network. These logs can localize altered fracture zones in the GPK1-4 wells, where no core material is available. Mass susceptibility from 261 cutting samples of the wells GPK1-GPK4 was compared with the neural network derived synthetic logs. We applied a combination of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements with optical and electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to discriminate different stages of alteration. We found, that also in the granite cuttings an increasing alteration grade is characterized by an advancing oxidation of magnetite into hematite and a reduction of magnetic susceptibility. A challenge to face for the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility data from cuttings material is that extreme alteration grades can also display increased susceptibilities due to the formation of secondary magnetite

  8. A Scientific Data Provenance API for Distributed Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, Bibi; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Stephan, Eric G.

    Data provenance has been an active area of research as a means to standardize how the origin of data, process event history, and what or who was responsible for influencing results is explained. There are two approaches to capture provenance information. The first approach is to collect observed evidence produced by an executing application using log files, event listeners, and temporary files that are used by the application or application developer. The provenance translated from these observations is an interpretation of the provided evidence. The second approach is called disclosed because the application provides a firsthand account of the provenancemore » based on the anticipated questions on data flow, process flow, and responsible agents. Most observed provenance collection systems collect lot of provenance information during an application run or workflow execution. The common trend in capturing provenance is to collect all possible information, then attempt to find relevant information, which is not efficient. Existing disclosed provenance system APIs do not work well in distributed environment and have trouble finding where to fit the individual pieces of provenance information. This work focuses on determining more reliable solutions for provenance capture. As part of the Integrated End-to-end Performance Prediction and Diagnosis for Extreme Scientific Workflows (IPPD) project, an API was developed, called Producer API (PAPI), which can disclose application targeted provenance, designed to work in distributed environments by means of unique object identification methods. The provenance disclosure approach used adds additional metadata to the provenance information to uniquely identify the pieces and connect them together. PAPI uses a common provenance model to support this provenance integration across disclosure sources. The API also provides the flexibility to let the user decide what to do with the collected provenance. The collected provenance can

  9. Provenance research: investigation of genetic diversity associated with geography

    Treesearch

    Robert Z. Callaham

    1963-01-01

    Provenance in forestry refers to the population of trees growing at n particular place of origin. Provenance research defines the genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation associated with geographic source. Information on provenance is important in assuring sources of seed to give well-adapted, productive trees and in directing breeding of...

  10. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds.

    PubMed

    David Walter, W; Walsh, Daniel P; Farnsworth, Matthew L; Winkelman, Dana L; Miller, Michael W

    2011-02-15

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings.

  11. Mineralogy and thermal properties of clay from Slatina (Ub, Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosevic, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Jelic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    The "Slatina" deposit, Ub, Serbia was opened in 1965 and represents one of few deposits exploited by "Kopovi" a.d., Ub, company. Deposit is composed of clay layers belonging to Neogene sediments that are widespread transgressive over granitoid rocks of Cer mountain and Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Clay is mostly of illite-montmorillonite-kaolinite type and they are generally used as ceramic materials while some of the layers are used as fire-resistant materials. In this study we present mineralogical and thermal characterization of two samples to determine their application as industrial materials. Chemical and mineral composition was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) on powder and oriented samples, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and granulometry. Cationic exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) was determined using spectrophotometry and methylene blue (MB). Thermal properties where determined by gravimetry (120, 350, 600 and 1000 oC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Quantitative mineral composition obtained by Rietveld refinement of combined chemical and XRD data shows that the sample 1(SC) is mainly smectite-illite (45%) and kaolinite (14%) clay with 19% of quartz, 10% feldspars and 7% of limonite, while sample 2(SV) is smectite-illite (43%) and kaolinite (11%) clay with 10% of quartz, 15% feldspars and 7% of limonite. Both samples have low content of impurities (carbonate minerals). Medium grain size (μm) goes from 1.02 (SSA = 104 m2/g) for sample 1(SC) to 0.71 (SSA = 117 m2/g) for sample 2(SV) while their CEC is 12.7 and 14.9 mmol/100g for 1(SC) and 2(SV) respectively. IR spectra of the samples shows larger amount of smectite clays with quartz and carbonate minerals for both samples which is in accordance with XRD data. DTA data shows couple of events that are endothermic. First one (100-200 oC) is associated with loss of moisture and constitutive water, second

  12. Kisameet Clay Exhibits Potent Antibacterial Activity against the ESKAPE Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Behroozian, Shekooh; Svensson, Sarah L; Davies, Julian

    2016-01-26

    The ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens cause an increasing number of nosocomial infections worldwide since they escape the inhibitory effect of the available antibiotics and the immune response. Here, we report the broad-spectrum and potent antibacterial activity of Kisameet clay, a natural clay mineral from British Columbia, Canada, against a group of multidrug-resistant ESKAPE strains. The results suggest that this natural clay might be developed as a therapeutic option for the treatment of serious infections caused by these important pathogens. More than 50 years of misuse and overuse of antibiotics has led to a plague of antibiotic resistance that threatens to reduce the efficacy of antimicrobial agents available for the treatment of infections due to resistant organisms. The main threat is nosocomial infections in which certain pathogens, notably the ESKAPE organisms, are essentially untreatable and contribute to increasing mortality and morbidity in surgical wards. The pipeline of novel antimicrobials in the pharmaceutical industry is essentially empty. Thus, there is a great need to seek for new sources for the treatment of recalcitrant infectious diseases. We describe experiments that demonstrate the efficacy of a "natural" medicine, Kisameet clay, against all of the ESKAPE strains. We suggest that this material is worthy of clinical investigation for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2016 Behroozian et al.

  13. First Direct Detection of Clay Minerals on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.; Owensby, P. D.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    Magnesian clays or clay-type minerals were conclusively detected in the martian regolith. Near-IR spectral observations of Mars using the Mauna Kea 2.2-m telescope show weak but definite absorption bands near microns. The absorption band positions and widths match those produced by combined OH stretch and Mg-OH lattice modes and are diagnostic of minerals with structural OH such as clays and amphiboles. Likely candidate minerals include serpentine, talc, hectorite, and sponite. There is no spectral evidence for aluminous hydroxylated minerals. No distinct band occurs at 2.55 microns, as would be expected if carbonates were responsible for the 2.35 micron absorption. High-albedo regions such as Elysium and Utopia have the strongest bands near 2.35 microns, as would be expected for heavily weathered soils. Low-albedo regions such as Iapygia show weaker but distinct bands, consistent with moderate coatings, streaks, and splotches of bright weathered material. In all areas observed, the 2.35-micron absorption is at least three times weaker than would be expected if well-crystallized clay minerals made up the bulk of bright soils on Mars.

  14. Scientific Workflows + Provenance = Better (Meta-)Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludaescher, B.; Cuevas-Vicenttín, V.; Missier, P.; Dey, S.; Kianmajd, P.; Wei, Y.; Koop, D.; Chirigati, F.; Altintas, I.; Belhajjame, K.; Bowers, S.

    2013-12-01

    The origin and processing history of an artifact is known as its provenance. Data provenance is an important form of metadata that explains how a particular data product came about, e.g., how and when it was derived in a computational process, which parameter settings and input data were used, etc. Provenance information provides transparency and helps to explain and interpret data products. Other common uses and applications of provenance include quality control, data curation, result debugging, and more generally, 'reproducible science'. Scientific workflow systems (e.g. Kepler, Taverna, VisTrails, and others) provide controlled environments for developing computational pipelines with built-in provenance support. Workflow results can then be explained in terms of workflow steps, parameter settings, input data, etc. using provenance that is automatically captured by the system. Scientific workflows themselves provide a user-friendly abstraction of the computational process and are thus a form of ('prospective') provenance in their own right. The full potential of provenance information is realized when combining workflow-level information (prospective provenance) with trace-level information (retrospective provenance). To this end, the DataONE Provenance Working Group (ProvWG) has developed an extension of the W3C PROV standard, called D-PROV. Whereas PROV provides a 'least common denominator' for exchanging and integrating provenance information, D-PROV adds new 'observables' that described workflow-level information (e.g., the functional steps in a pipeline), as well as workflow-specific trace-level information ( timestamps for each workflow step executed, the inputs and outputs used, etc.) Using examples, we will demonstrate how the combination of prospective and retrospective provenance provides added value in managing scientific data. The DataONE ProvWG is also developing tools based on D-PROV that allow scientists to get more mileage from provenance metadata

  15. Primordial clays on Mars formed beneath a steam or supercritical atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Kevin M; Parman, Stephen W; Mustard, John F

    2017-12-06

    On Mars, clay minerals are widespread in terrains that date back to the Noachian period (4.1 billion to 3.7 billion years ago). It is thought that the Martian basaltic crust reacted with liquid water during this time to form hydrated clay minerals. Here we propose, however, that a substantial proportion of these clays was formed when Mars' primary crust reacted with a dense steam or supercritical atmosphere of water and carbon dioxide that was outgassed during magma ocean cooling. We present experimental evidence that shows rapid clay formation under conditions that would have been present at the base of such an atmosphere and also deeper in the porous crust. Furthermore, we explore the fate of a primordial clay-rich layer with the help of a parameterized crustal evolution model; we find that the primordial clay is locally disrupted by impacts and buried by impact-ejected material and by erupted volcanic material, but that it survives as a mostly coherent layer at depth, with limited surface exposures. These exposures are similar to those observed in remotely sensed orbital data from Mars. Our results can explain the present distribution of many clays on Mars, and the anomalously low density of the Martian crust in comparison with expectations.

  16. Primordial clays on Mars formed beneath a steam or supercritical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Mustard, John F.

    2017-12-01

    On Mars, clay minerals are widespread in terrains that date back to the Noachian period (4.1 billion to 3.7 billion years ago). It is thought that the Martian basaltic crust reacted with liquid water during this time to form hydrated clay minerals. Here we propose, however, that a substantial proportion of these clays was formed when Mars’ primary crust reacted with a dense steam or supercritical atmosphere of water and carbon dioxide that was outgassed during magma ocean cooling. We present experimental evidence that shows rapid clay formation under conditions that would have been present at the base of such an atmosphere and also deeper in the porous crust. Furthermore, we explore the fate of a primordial clay-rich layer with the help of a parameterized crustal evolution model; we find that the primordial clay is locally disrupted by impacts and buried by impact-ejected material and by erupted volcanic material, but that it survives as a mostly coherent layer at depth, with limited surface exposures. These exposures are similar to those observed in remotely sensed orbital data from Mars. Our results can explain the present distribution of many clays on Mars, and the anomalously low density of the Martian crust in comparison with expectations.

  17. Enhanced cellular preservation by clay minerals in 1 billion-year-old lakes.

    PubMed

    Wacey, David; Saunders, Martin; Roberts, Malcolm; Menon, Sarath; Green, Leonard; Kong, Charlie; Culwick, Timothy; Strother, Paul; Brasier, Martin D

    2014-07-28

    Organic-walled microfossils provide the best insights into the composition and evolution of the biosphere through the first 80 percent of Earth history. The mechanism of microfossil preservation affects the quality of biological information retained and informs understanding of early Earth palaeo-environments. We here show that 1 billion-year-old microfossils from the non-marine Torridon Group are remarkably preserved by a combination of clay minerals and phosphate, with clay minerals providing the highest fidelity of preservation. Fe-rich clay mostly occurs in narrow zones in contact with cellular material and is interpreted as an early microbially-mediated phase enclosing and replacing the most labile biological material. K-rich clay occurs within and exterior to cell envelopes, forming where the supply of Fe had been exhausted. Clay minerals inter-finger with calcium phosphate that co-precipitated with the clays in the sub-oxic zone of the lake sediments. This type of preservation was favoured in sulfate-poor environments where Fe-silicate precipitation could outcompete Fe-sulfide formation. This work shows that clay minerals can provide an exceptionally high fidelity of microfossil preservation and extends the known geological range of this fossilization style by almost 500 Ma. It also suggests that the best-preserved microfossils of this time may be found in low-sulfate environments.

  18. Enhanced cellular preservation by clay minerals in 1 billion-year-old lakes

    PubMed Central

    Wacey, David; Saunders, Martin; Roberts, Malcolm; Menon, Sarath; Green, Leonard; Kong, Charlie; Culwick, Timothy; Strother, Paul; Brasier, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Organic-walled microfossils provide the best insights into the composition and evolution of the biosphere through the first 80 percent of Earth history. The mechanism of microfossil preservation affects the quality of biological information retained and informs understanding of early Earth palaeo-environments. We here show that 1 billion-year-old microfossils from the non-marine Torridon Group are remarkably preserved by a combination of clay minerals and phosphate, with clay minerals providing the highest fidelity of preservation. Fe-rich clay mostly occurs in narrow zones in contact with cellular material and is interpreted as an early microbially-mediated phase enclosing and replacing the most labile biological material. K-rich clay occurs within and exterior to cell envelopes, forming where the supply of Fe had been exhausted. Clay minerals inter-finger with calcium phosphate that co-precipitated with the clays in the sub-oxic zone of the lake sediments. This type of preservation was favoured in sulfate-poor environments where Fe-silicate precipitation could outcompete Fe-sulfide formation. This work shows that clay minerals can provide an exceptionally high fidelity of microfossil preservation and extends the known geological range of this fossilization style by almost 500 Ma. It also suggests that the best-preserved microfossils of this time may be found in low-sulfate environments. PMID:25068404

  19. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  20. Fracture behavior of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Wang, Ke; Kotaki, Masaya; Hu, Charmaine; He, Chaobin

    2006-12-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/clay nanocomposites have been prepared via a reactive compounding approach with an epoxy based masterbatch. Compared with PP and common PP/organoclay nanocomposites, the PP/clay nanocomposites based on epoxy/clay masterbatch have higher impact strength. The phenomenon can be attributed to the epoxy phase dispersed uniformly in the PP matrix, which may act as impact energy absorber and helps to form a large damage zone, thus a higher impact strength value is achieved.

  1. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Stavitskaya, Anna V.; Chudakov, Yaroslav A.; ...

    2017-02-16

    We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube’s central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube’s wall allowing up to 9more » wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.« less

  2. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Stavitskaya, Anna V.; Chudakov, Yaroslav A.

    We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube’s central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube’s wall allowing up to 9more » wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.« less

  3. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Stavitskaya, Anna V.; Chudakov, Yaroslav A.; Ivanov, Evgenii V.; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Darrat, Yusuf A.; Lvov, Yuri M.

    2017-12-01

    We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length 1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube's central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube's wall allowing up to 9 wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  4. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Stavitskaya, Anna V.; Chudakov, Yaroslav A.; Ivanov, Evgenii V.; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Darrat, Yusuf A.; Lvov, Yuri M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3–5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube’s central lumen resulting in 10–12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube’s wall allowing up to 9 wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:28458738

  5. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, Vladimir A; Stavitskaya, Anna V; Chudakov, Yaroslav A; Ivanov, Evgenii V; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Darrat, Yusuf A; Lvov, Yuri M

    2017-01-01

    We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c .50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube's central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube's wall allowing up to 9 wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  6. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  7. Clay Mineral Structure Similar to Clays Observed in Mudstone on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-09

    This schematic shows the atomic structure of the smallest units that make up the layers and interlayer region of clay minerals. This structure is similar to the clay mineral in drilled rock powder collected by NASA Curiosity Mars rover.

  8. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved cell disruption of Pichia pastoris utilizing aminopropyl magnesium phyllosilicate (AMP) clay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Il; Wu, Yuanzheng; Kim, Ka-Lyun; Kim, Geun-Joong; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2013-06-01

    An efficient method for Pichia cell disruption that employs an aminopropyl magnesium phyllosilicate (AMP) clay-assisted glass beads mill is presented. AMP clay is functionalized nanocomposite resembling the talc parent structure Si8Mg6O20(OH)4 that has been proven to permeate the bacterial membrane and cause cell lysis. The recombinant capsid protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115 was used as demonstration system for their ability of self-assembly into icosahedral virus-like particles (VLPs). The total protein concentration reached 4.24 mg/ml after 4 min treatment by glass beads mill combined with 0.2 % AMP clay, which was 11.2 % higher compared to glass beads mill only and the time was half shortened. The stability of purified CCMV VLPs illustrated AMP clay had no influence on virus assembly process. Considering the tiny amount added and simple approach of AMP clay, it could be a reliable method for yeast cell disruption.

  10. Effects of simulated clay gouges on the sliding behavior of Tennessee sandston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Logan, John M.

    1981-06-01

    of a fault zone in understanding the effects of intrafault materials on the fault motion. Based on the present experimental results incorporated with some other experimental data, it is argued that although the stabilizing effect of montmorillonite and vermiculite is indeed remarkable at room temperature, the effect should be much less pronounced at elevated temperatures, due perhaps to the dewatering of the clays. In most geological environments where shallow earthquakes occur, the stabilizing effect of clays is probably not so conspicuous as to completely suppress the unstable motion of a fault.

  11. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  12. A Scientific Data Provenance Harvester for Distributed Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Eric G.; Raju, Bibi; Elsethagen, Todd O.

    Data provenance provides a way for scientists to observe how experimental data originates, conveys process history, and explains influential factors such as experimental rationale and associated environmental factors from system metrics measured at runtime. The US Department of Energy Office of Science Integrated end-to-end Performance Prediction and Diagnosis for Extreme Scientific Workflows (IPPD) project has developed a provenance harvester that is capable of collecting observations from file based evidence typically produced by distributed applications. To achieve this, file based evidence is extracted and transformed into an intermediate data format inspired in part by W3C CSV on the Web recommendations, calledmore » the Harvester Provenance Application Interface (HAPI) syntax. This syntax provides a general means to pre-stage provenance into messages that are both human readable and capable of being written to a provenance store, Provenance Environment (ProvEn). HAPI is being applied to harvest provenance from climate ensemble runs for Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project funded under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Earth System Modeling (ESM) program. ACME informally provides provenance in a native form through configuration files, directory structures, and log files that contain success/failure indicators, code traces, and performance measurements. Because of its generic format, HAPI is also being applied to harvest tabular job management provenance from Belle II DIRAC scheduler relational database tables as well as other scientific applications that log provenance related information.« less

  13. Selective Clay Placement within a Silicate Clay-Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite and the Effect on Physical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Scheiman, Daniel A; Kohlmman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    Many epoxy systems under consideration for composite pressure vessels are composed of toughened epoxy resins. In this work, epoxy blends containing both rigid aromatic and flexible aliphatic components were prepared, to model toughened systems, and determine the optimum route of silicate addition. Compositions were chosen such that both glassy and rubbery resins were obtained at room temperature. The physical properties of the nanocomposites varied with T(g) and silicate placement, however, nanocomposite T(g)s were observed which exceeded that of the base resin by greater than 10 C. The tensile strength of the glassy resin remained constant or decreased on the dispersion of clay while that of the rubbery material doubled. Selectively placing the clay in the aliphatic component of the rubbery blend resulted in a greater than 100% increase in material toughness.

  14. Big Data Provenance: Challenges, State of the Art and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Purawat, Shweta; Nguyen, Mai; Altintas, Ilkay

    2015-01-01

    Ability to track provenance is a key feature of scientific workflows to support data lineage and reproducibility. The challenges that are introduced by the volume, variety and velocity of Big Data, also pose related challenges for provenance and quality of Big Data, defined as veracity. The increasing size and variety of distributed Big Data provenance information bring new technical challenges and opportunities throughout the provenance lifecycle including recording, querying, sharing and utilization. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities of Big Data provenance related to the veracity of the datasets themselves and the provenance of the analytical processes that analyze these datasets. It also explains our current efforts towards tracking and utilizing Big Data provenance using workflows as a programming model to analyze Big Data.

  15. Big Data Provenance: Challenges, State of the Art and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Purawat, Shweta; Nguyen, Mai; Altintas, Ilkay

    2017-01-01

    Ability to track provenance is a key feature of scientific workflows to support data lineage and reproducibility. The challenges that are introduced by the volume, variety and velocity of Big Data, also pose related challenges for provenance and quality of Big Data, defined as veracity. The increasing size and variety of distributed Big Data provenance information bring new technical challenges and opportunities throughout the provenance lifecycle including recording, querying, sharing and utilization. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities of Big Data provenance related to the veracity of the datasets themselves and the provenance of the analytical processes that analyze these datasets. It also explains our current efforts towards tracking and utilizing Big Data provenance using workflows as a programming model to analyze Big Data. PMID:29399671

  16. Fire performance of fiber board coated with nano kaolin-clay film

    Treesearch

    Zhijia Liu; John F. Hunt; Zhiyong Cai

    2013-01-01

    Fiberboard is a common interior material used both in China and the United States of America. The increase in demand for interior materials has raised concerns regarding combustibility of the materials. The pyrolysis characteristics of fiber, phenolic resin (PF), and nano kaolin-clay (NK) were investigated using thermogravimetry. The fire performances of samples coated...

  17. Clay Nanocomposite/Aerogel Sandwich Structures for Cryotanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi; Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, J. Chris; Meador, Michael

    2006-01-01

    GRC research has led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 60-70% lower gas permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. More recent work has produced new composites with more than a 100-fold reduction in helium permeability. Use of these advanced, high barrier composites would eliminate the need for a liner in composite cryotanks, thereby simplifying construction and reducing propellant leakage. Aerogels are attractive materials for use as cryotank insulation because of their low density and low thermal conductivity. However, aerogels are fragile and have poor environmental stability, which have limited their use to certain applications in specialized environments (e.g., in certain types of nuclear reactors as Cerenkov radiation detectors, and as thermal insulators aboard space rovers on Mars). New GRC developed polymer crosslinked aerogels (X-Aerogels) retain the low density of conventional aerogels, but they demonstrate a 300-fold increase in their mechanical strength. Currently, our strongest materials combine a density of approx. 0.45 g/cc, a thermal conductivity of approx. 0.04 W/mK and a compressive strength of 185 MPa. Use of these novel aerogels as insulation materials/structural components in combination with the low permeability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites could significantly reduce cryotank weight and improve durability.

  18. Provenance, age, and environment of mid-Wisconsinan slackwater lake sediment in the St. Louis Metro East area, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Grimley, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Valleys tributary to the Mississippi River contain fossiliferous slackwater lake sediment (Equality Formation) deposited in response to aggradation of the Mississippi River valley during the last glaciation. In the St. Louis Metro East area, the lower part of the Equality Formation is primarily laminated, fossiliferous silt and clay deposited from about 44,150 to 24,310 14C yr B.P. The upper Equality Formation is primarily very fine sand to silt deposited from about 21,200 to 17,000 14C yr B.P. Among the four cores that sample this succession in the St. Louis Metro East area, core MNK-3 (38.64EN, 90.01EW) was selected for detailed study. Three sources are distinguished by the following characteristics: (1) gray smectite-quartz-Se-rich, feldspar-poor material of the Des Moines, Wadena, and James lobes; (2) reddish brown kaolinite-Cu-Fe-rich sediment of the Superior and Rainy lobes; and (3) brown illite-dolomite-Sr-rich sediment of the Lake Michigan and Green Bay lobes. The earliest sediments (44,150 to 41,700 14C yr B.P.) were derived from the central and western provenances and are chronocorrelative with the lower Roxana Silt. A hiatus occurred from about 41,700 to 29,030 14C yr B.P. when much of the middle Roxana Silt (Meadow Member) was deposited on adjacent uplands. The youngest sediment includes evidence of heightened activity of the Superior Lobe at about 29,000 14C yr B.P., the Lake Michigan and Green Bay lobes from about 25,000 to 24,000 14C yr B.P., and the Wadena-Des Moines-James lobes at about 21,000 14C yr B.P. ?? 2005 Society. Published by University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  19. Data Provenance Architecture for the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, F.; Irving, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The pace at which geoscientific insights inform societal development quickens with time and these insights drive decisions and actions of ever-increasing human and economic significance. Until recently academic, commercial and government bodies have maintained distinct bodies of knowledge to support scientific enquiry as well as societal development. However, it has become clear that the curation of the body of data is an activity of equal or higher social and commercial value. We address the community challenges in the curation of, access to, and analysis of scientific data including: the tensions between creators, providers and users; incentives and barriers to sharing; ownership and crediting. We also discuss the technical and financial challenges in maximising the return on the effort made in generating geoscientific data. To illustrate how these challenges might be addressed in the broader geoscientific domain, we describe the high-level data governance and analytical architecture in the upstream Oil Industry. This domain is heavily dependent on costly and highly diverse geodatasets collected and assimilated over timeframes varying from seconds to decades. These data must support both operational decisions at the minute-hour timefame and strategic and economic decisions of enterprise or national scale, and yet be sufficiently robust to last the life of a producing field. We develop three themes around data provenance, data ownership and business models for data curation. 1/ The overarching aspiration is to ensure that data provenance and quality is maintained along the analytical workflow. Hence if data on which a publication or report changes, the report and its publishers can be notified and we describe a mechanism by which dependent knowledge products can be flagged. 2/ From a cost and management point of view we look at who "owns" data especially in cases where the cost of curation and stewardship is significant compared to the cost of acquiring the data

  20. Geochemical provenance of Florida basement components

    SciTech Connect

    Heatherington, A.L.; Mueller, P.A.; Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    The pre-Cretaceous basement of Florida is generally considered to be exotic with respect to Proterozoic Laurentia. Paleontologic and paleomagnetic evidence have suggested a Gondwanan provenance for the Floridan basement, as either a peri-Gondwanide terrane or as a rifted block of the West African craton. The report of generally similar lithologic sequences and a record of similar Ar-Ar cooling ages in some Floridan and West African lithologic units has led to very specific correlations between these units. U-Pb, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr geochronologic studies as well as isotopic and elemental abundance data have been used to evaluate the validity of these correlations.more » Results indicate: (1) geochemical similarities between volcanic rocks of northeastern Florida and a Pan-African metavolcanic sequence (Niokola-Koba group) exposed in Senegal; (2) an absence of a Grenvillian-age (i.e., Laurentian) component in zircons separated from a Paleozoic Suwanee basin sandstone; and (3) whole-rock Sm-Nd and U-Pb zircon evidence for an Archean ([approximately]3.0 Ga) component in the neo-Proterozoic Osceola granitoid(s). Although silicic rocks from throughout Florida have Nd model ages (T[sub DM]) that are predominantly Grenvillian (1.1--1.4 Ga), the absence of a Grenvillian component in zircons separated from granite and sandstone suggests that the model ages represent a mixture of older and younger components. Overall, the evidence for Birimian ([approximately]2.1 Ga) and Liberian ([approximately]3.0 Ga) age components in the Florida basement are consistent with its origin as a rifted block of cratonic Gondwana. In addition to demonstrating a strong affinity between the Florida basement and cratonic West Africa/northern South America, these data provide a basis for comparison with other circum-Atlantic terranes traditionally described as Avalonian/Cadomian, etc.« less

  1. Securing Provenance of Distributed Processes in an Untrusted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syalim, Amril; Nishide, Takashi; Sakurai, Kouichi

    Recently, there is much concern about the provenance of distributed processes, that is about the documentation of the origin and the processes to produce an object in a distributed system. The provenance has many applications in the forms of medical records, documentation of processes in the computer systems, recording the origin of data in the cloud, and also documentation of human-executed processes. The provenance of distributed processes can be modeled by a directed acyclic graph (DAG) where each node represents an entity, and an edge represents the origin and causal relationship between entities. Without sufficient security mechanisms, the provenance graph suffers from integrity and confidentiality problems, for example changes or deletions of the correct nodes, additions of fake nodes and edges, and unauthorized accesses to the sensitive nodes and edges. In this paper, we propose an integrity mechanism for provenance graph using the digital signature involving three parties: the process executors who are responsible in the nodes' creation, a provenance owner that records the nodes to the provenance store, and a trusted party that we call the Trusted Counter Server (TCS) that records the number of nodes stored by the provenance owner. We show that the mechanism can detect the integrity problem in the provenance graph, namely unauthorized and malicious “authorized” updates even if all the parties, except the TCS, collude to update the provenance. In this scheme, the TCS only needs a very minimal storage (linear with the number of the provenance owners). To protect the confidentiality and for an efficient access control administration, we propose a method to encrypt the provenance graph that allows access by paths and compartments in the provenance graph. We argue that encryption is important as a mechanism to protect the provenance data stored in an untrusted environment. We analyze the security of the integrity mechanism, and perform experiments to measure

  2. Evaluating Weathering of Food Packaging Polyethylene-Nano-clay Composites: Release of Nanoparticles and their Impacts.

    PubMed

    Han, Changseok; Zhao, Amy; Varughese, Eunice; Sahle-Demessie, E

    2018-01-01

    Nano-fillers are increasingly incorporated into polymeric materials to improve the mechanical, barrier or other matrix properties of nanocomposites used for consumer and industrial applications. However, over the life cycle, these nanocomposites could degrade due to exposure to environmental conditions, resulting in the release of embedded nanomaterials from the polymer matrix into the environment. This paper presents a rigorous study on the degradation and the release of nanomaterials from food packaging composites. Films of nano-clay-loaded low-density polyethylene (LDPE) composite for food packaging applications were prepared with the spherilene technology and exposed to accelerated weathering of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation or low concentration of ozone at 40 °C. The changes in the structural, surface morphology, chemical and physical properties of the films during accelerated weathering were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative changes in properties of pristine and aged materials and the release of nano-clay proceeded slowly until 130 hr irradiation and then accelerated afterward resulting complete degradation. Although nano-clay increased the stability of LDPE and improved thermal and barrier properties, they accelerated the UV oxidation of LDPE. With increasing exposure to UV, the surface roughness, chemiluminescence index, and carbonyl index of the samples increased while decreasing the intensity of the wide-angle X-ray diffraction pattern. Nano-clay particles with sizes ranging from 2-8 nm were released from UV and ozone weathered composite. The concentrations of released nanoparticles increased with an increase in aging time. Various toxicity tests, including reactive oxygen species generation and cell activity/viability were also performed on the released nano-clay and clay polymer. The released nano-clays basically did not show toxicity. Our combined results demonstrated the degradation properties of nano-clay particle-embedded LDPE composites

  3. Study of Usage Areas of Clay Samples of Asphaltite Quarries in Sirnak, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Oyku

    2017-12-01

    The asphaltite of Sirnak, Turkey are in the form of 12 veins and their total reserves are anticipated to be approximately 200 million tons in a field of 25.000 hectares. The asphaltites at the Sirnak region are in the form of fault and crack fillings and take place together with clay minerals at their side rock. The main raw materials used in the production of cement are limestone, clay and marn known as sedimentary rocks. Limestone for CaO and clay minerals for SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, which are the main compounds of clinker production, are the main raw materials. Other materials containing these four oxides like marn are also used as cement raw material. Conformity levels of the raw materials to be used in cement production vary according to their chemical compounds. The rocks to be used as clay mineral are evaluated by taking the rate of silicate and alumina into consideration. The soils suitable for brick-tile productions are named as sandy clay. Their difference from the ceramic clays is that they are richer in terms of iron, silica and carbonate. These soils are also known under the names such as clay, arid, alluvium, silt, loam and argil. Inside these soils, minerals such as quartz, montmorillonite, kaolinite, calcite, limonite, hidromika, sericite, illite, and chlorite are available. Some parts of the soils consist of clays in amorphous structure. Limestone parts, gypsums, organic substances and bulky rock residuals spoil the quality. The soils suitable for brick production may not be suitable for tile production. In this case, their sandy soils should be mixed up with the clays with fine granule structure which is high in plasticity. During asphaltite mining in Sirnak region, clays forming side rock are gathered at dump sites. In this study; SQX analyses of the clay samples taken from Avgamasya, Seridahli and Segürük asphaltite veins run in Sirnak region are carried out and their usage areas are searched.

  4. Key Provenance of Earth Science Observational Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Plale, B.; Aktas, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Purohit, P.; Jensen, S.; Graves, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the sheer volume of data increases, particularly evidenced in the earth and environmental sciences, local arrangements for sharing data need to be replaced with reliable records about the what, who, how, and where of a data set or collection. This is frequently called the provenance of a data set. While observational data processing systems in the earth sciences have a long history of capturing metadata about the processing pipeline, current processes are limited in both what is captured and how it is disseminated to the science community. Provenance capture plays a role in scientific data preservation and stewardship precisely because it can automatically capture and represent a coherent picture of the what, how and who of a particular scientific collection. It reflects the transformations that a data collection underwent prior to its current form and the sequence of tasks that were executed and data products applied to generate a new product. In the NASA-funded Instant Karma project, we examine provenance capture in earth science applications, specifically the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Science Investigator-led Processing system (SIPS). The project is integrating the Karma provenance collection and representation tool into the AMSR-E SIPS production environment, with an initial focus on Sea Ice. This presentation will describe capture and representation of provenance that is guided by the Open Provenance Model (OPM). Several things have become clear during the course of the project to date. One is that core OPM entities and relationships are not adequate for expressing the kinds of provenance that is of interest in the science domain. OPM supports name-value pair annotations that can be used to augment what is known about the provenance entities and relationships, but in Karma, annotations cannot be added during capture, but only after the fact. This limits the capture system's ability to record something it

  5. Correlation between thermal behavior of clays and their chemical and mineralogical composition: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Yanti, Evi; Pratiwi, I.

    2018-02-01

    Clay's abundance has been widely used as industrial raw materials, especially ceramic and tile industries. Utilization of these minerals needs a thermal process for producing ceramic products. Two studies conducted by Septawander et al. and Chin C et al., showed the relationship between thermal behavior of clays and their chemical and mineralogical composition. Clays are characterized by XRD analysis and thermal analysis, ranging from 1100°C to 1200°C room temperature. Specimen of raw materials of clay which is used for the thermal treatment is taken from different geological conditions and formation. In raw material, Quartz is almost present in all samples. Halloysite, montmorillonite, and feldspar are present in Tanjung Morawa raw clay. KC and MC similar kaolinite and illite are present in the samples. The research illustrates the interrelationships of clay minerals and chemical composition with their heat behavior. As the temperature of combustion increases, the sample reduces a significant weight. The minerals which have undergone a transformation phase became mullite, cristobalite or illite and quartz. Under SEM analysis, the microstructures of the samples showed irregularity in shape; changes occurred due the increase of heat.

  6. Deep sea authigenic clays as a sink for seawater Mg through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Ramos, D. S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The most enigmatic sink of many elements in the global ocean is the formation of authigenic aluminosilicates. Pelagic clays cover 40% of the seafloor and "reverse weathering" type reactions within this lithology have the potential to be a large sink of seawater Mg and affect carbon cycling in the ocean. We use pelagic clays from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 Site U1366 in the South Pacific Gyre to track authigenic aluminosilicates with two complementary methods: (1) Mg isotopic analyses, and (2) bulk sediment geochemistry with provenance modeling. Mg isotopic analyses of the bulk, unleached clay samples reveal isotopic values significantly heavier than average continental crust (δ26Mg = -0.1 to -0.3%o) indicating significant authigenic uptake. The bulk sediment geochemistry (i.e., major, trace, rare earth element concentrations) and multivariate statistical models of provenance determine the mass fraction of six different sediment sources that mixed to create the sediments: Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, excess Si, dust, and two altered volcanic ashes. A significant correlation between the mass fraction of one of the specific altered ash end-member and the δ26Mg signature allows us to characterize and track the abundance of the authigenic aluminosilicate component downcore. Trends in the provenance models suggest that the elements that compose the authigenic aluminosilicates may originate from volcanic ash, biogenic Si, and/or hydrothermal plume deposits. We examine variations in the spatial and temporal contributions of each of these sources and assess how these variations may have affected the amount of Mg authigenically consumed by deep sea authigenic clays through the Cenozoic. If the authigenic aluminosilicates are created by "reverse weathering" reactions, their formation also has important implications for carbon cycling in the global ocean.

  7. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  8. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain... kaolin. Kaolinite or china clay is whiter, less contaminated with extraneous minerals, and less plastic...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain... kaolin. Kaolinite or china clay is whiter, less contaminated with extraneous minerals, and less plastic...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain... kaolin. Kaolinite or china clay is whiter, less contaminated with extraneous minerals, and less plastic...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain... kaolin. Kaolinite or china clay is whiter, less contaminated with extraneous minerals, and less plastic...

  12. Data provenance assurance in the cloud using blockchain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sachin; Red, Val; Kamhoua, Charles; Kwiat, Kevin; Njilla, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    Ever increasing adoption of cloud technology scales up the activities like creation, exchange, and alteration of cloud data objects, which create challenges to track malicious activities and security violations. Addressing this issue requires implementation of data provenance framework so that each data object in the federated cloud environment can be tracked and recorded but cannot be modified. The blockchain technology gives a promising decentralized platform to build tamper-proof systems. Its incorruptible distributed ledger/blockchain complements the need of maintaining cloud data provenance. In this paper, we present a cloud based data provenance framework using block chain which traces data record operations and generates provenance data. We anchor provenance data records into block chain transactions, which provide validation on provenance data and preserve user privacy at the same time. Once the provenance data is uploaded to the global block chain network, it is extremely challenging to tamper the provenance data. Besides, the provenance data uses hashed user identifiers prior to uploading so the blockchain nodes cannot link the operations to a particular user. The framework ensures that the privacy is preserved. We implemented the architecture on ownCloud, uploaded records to blockchain network, stored records in a provenance database and developed a prototype in form of a web service.

  13. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Multivariate Statistics for Pottery Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascock, M. D.; Neff, H.; Vaughn, K. J.

    2004-06-01

    The application of instrumental neutron activation analysis and multivariate statistics to archaeological studies of ceramics and clays is described. A small pottery data set from the Nasca culture in southern Peru is presented for illustration.

  14. Synthesis and innovation of PLA/clay nanocomposite characterization againts to mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Agusnar, H.; Wirjosentono, B.; Tamrin; Marpaung, H.; Rihayat, T.; Nurhanifa; Adriana

    2018-03-01

    Plastic polymer is one of the most dominant materials of daily human activities because of its multifunctional nature, light and strong and anti-corrosion so it is easy to apply in various equipment. Plastic is generally derived from petroleum material so it is nonbiodegradable. Therefore, this study aims to create a breakthrough of natural and biodegradable biodegradable plastic materials from plant starch (pisok kepok starch) with the help of 3 types of acid (HNO3, HCl and H2SO4) called Poly Lactid Acid (PLA). PLA is enhanced by mixing with a clay material with a variation of 1, 3 and 5% composition to form a PLA / Clay Nanocomposite material which is expected to have superior properties and resemble conventional plastics in general. Several types of characterization were performed to see the quality of the resulting material including tensile strength test with UTM tool, thermal endurance test with TGA tool, morphological structure test using SEM tool and additional test to see filler clay quality through X-RD tool. Based on the characterization of tensile and thermal test, 5B nanocomposite with addition of 5% clay and HCl acid aid showed the best tensile strength of 36 Mpa and the highest stability was 446,63 oC. Based on the results of morphological analysis of the best samples (5B) showed good interface ties. Meanwhile, based on the results of filler analysis, the opening of clay layer d-spacing occurred at 0.355 nm.

  15. The provenance of Taklamakan desert sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, Martin; Vermeesch, Pieter; Carter, Andrew; Bird, Anna; Stevens, Thomas; Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Dutt, Ripul; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu

    2016-03-01

    Sand migration in the vast Taklamakan desert within the Tarim Basin (Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region, PR China) is governed by two competing transport agents: wind and water, which work in diametrically opposed directions. Net aeolian transport is from northeast to south, while fluvial transport occurs from the south to the north and then west to east at the northern rim, due to a gradual northward slope of the underlying topography. We here present the first comprehensive provenance study of Taklamakan desert sand with the aim to characterise the interplay of these two transport mechanisms and their roles in the formation of the sand sea, and to consider the potential of the Tarim Basin as a contributing source to the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP). Our dataset comprises 39 aeolian and fluvial samples, which were characterised by detrital-zircon U-Pb geochronology, heavy-mineral, and bulk-petrography analyses. Although the inter-sample differences of all three datasets are subtle, a multivariate statistical analysis using multidimensional scaling (MDS) clearly shows that Tarim desert sand is most similar in composition to rivers draining the Kunlun Shan (south) and the Pamirs (west), and is distinctly different from sediment sources in the Tian Shan (north). A small set of samples from the Junggar Basin (north of the Tian Shan) yields different detrital compositions and age spectra than anywhere in the Tarim Basin, indicating that aeolian sediment exchange between the two basins is minimal. Although river transport dominates delivery of sand into the Tarim Basin, wind remobilises and reworks the sediment in the central sand sea. Characteristic signatures of main rivers can be traced from entrance into the basin to the terminus of the Tarim River, and those crossing the desert from the south to north can seasonally bypass sediment through the sand sea. Smaller ephemeral rivers from the Kunlun Shan end in the desert and discharge their sediment there. Both river run

  16. Chemistry of the Marlboro Clay in Virginia and Implications for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Cai, Y.; Corley, A.; Liang, J. A.; Powars, D.; Goldstein, S. L.; Kent, D. V.; Broecker, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was a global hyperthermal ( 5ºC warming) event marked by a rapid carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of >1‰ in the marine carbonate record (e.g. Zeebe et al. Nature Geoscience 2009). Possible explanations for the CIE include intrusion of a sill complex into organic carbonate (Aarnes et al. J. Geol. Soc. 2015), dissolution of methane hydrates (Thomas et al. Geology 2002), and a comet impact event (Schaller et al. Science 2016). Here we present new data across the PETM from the VirginiaDEQ-USGS Surprise Hill (SH) core, Northumberland Co., VA. We analyzed the Marlboro Clay, a thick, kaolinite-rich clay unit that marks the initiation of the PETM in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain of North America, as well as units above and below it. Bulk sediment records a δ13C excursion of approximately -5‰ across the CIE, while benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides spp.) record a synchronous excursion of approximately -4.5‰. These results are consistent with other records from the New Jersey Coastal Plain (Makarova et al. Paleoceanography 2017). The excursion coincides with an increase in magnetic susceptibility, a decrease in bulk CaCO3 content, and an 2.5‰ decrease of δ18O in both the bulk sediment and benthic foraminifera of the SH core. Pb isotope analyses of the <63 μm fraction sediments indicate a unique provenance make-up for the Marlboro Clay. The results of the study thus indicate that PETM Marlboro Clay was not generated simply by intensified weathering of the same source area as the underlying Aquia Formation and overlying Nanjemoy Formation. Any hypothesis that aims to explain the mechanism that triggered the PETM must also account for the observed distinct provenance make-up of the Marlboro Clay.

  17. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelling capacity, reactivity to acids and inconsiderable toxicity. Of course, these are highly cost effectual. This special report on clay minerals provides a bird's eye view of the chemical composition and structure of these minerals and their influence on the release properties of active medicinal agents. Endeavor has been made to rope in myriad applications depicting the wide acceptability of these clay minerals. PMID:28031881

  19. Single clay sheets inside electrospun polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    2005-03-01

    Nanofibers were prepared from polymer solution with clay sheets by electrospinning. Plasma etching, as a well controlled process, was used to supply electrically excited gas molecules from a glow discharge. To reveal the structure and arrangement of clay layers in the polymer matrix, plasma etching was used to remove the polymer by controlled gasification to expose the clay sheets due to the difference in reactivity. The shape, flexibility, and orientation of clay sheets were studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Additional quantitative information on size distribution and degree of exfoliation of clay sheets were obtained by analyzing electron micrograph of sample after plasma etching. Samples in various forms including fiber, film and bulk, were thinned by plasma etching. Morphology and dispersion of inorganic fillers were studied by electron microscopy.

  20. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  1. In situ synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of tungstophosphoric acid encapsulated into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Han, Chunying; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Songjie

    2012-07-01

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) incorporated with tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) has been synthesized via in situ introducing P and W source in the acidic suspension of the clay interlayer template during the formation of the silica pillared clay. The samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and SEM techniques. The results showed that the HPW formed by in situ method has been effectively introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay and its Keggin structure remained perfectly after formation of the materials. In addition, samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. HPW in the incorporated samples was better dispersed into the silica pillared clay than in the impregnated samples. The results of catalytic tests indicated that the encapsulated materials demonstrated better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of clay on the dissolution of nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, K.

    2001-09-01

    In a nuclear waste repository, the waste glass can interact with metals, backfill materials (if present) and natural host rock. Of the various host rocks considered, clays are often reported to delay the onset of the apparent glass saturation, where the glass dissolution rate becomes very small. This effect is ascribed to the sorption of silica or other glass components on the clay. This can have two consequences: (1) the decrease of the silica concentration in solution increases the driving force for further dissolution of glass silica, and (2) the transfer of relatively insoluble glass components (mainly silica) from the glass surface to the clay makes the alteration layer less protective. In recent literature, the latter explanation has gained credibility. The impact of the environmental materials on the glass surface layers is however not well understood. Although the glass dissolution can initially be enhanced by clay, there are arguments to assume that it will decrease to very low values after a long time. Whether this will indeed be the case, depends on the fate of the released glass components in the clay. If they are sorbed on specific sites, it is likely that saturation of the clay will occur. If however the released glass components are removed by precipitation (growth of pre-existing or new secondary phases), saturation of the clay is less likely, and the process can continue until exhaustion of one of the system components. There are indications that the latter mechanism can occur for varying glass compositions in Boom Clay and FoCa clay. If sorption or precipitation prevents the formation of protective surface layers, the glass dissolution can in principle proceed at a high rate. High silica concentrations are assumed to decrease the dissolution rate (by a solution saturation effect or by the impact on the properties of the glass alteration layer). In glass corrosion tests at high clay concentrations, silica concentrations are, however, often higher

  3. Sedimentary provenance of Maastrichtian oil shales, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Douaa; Wagreich, Michael; Mohamed, Ramadan S.; Zaki, Rafat

    2017-04-01

    Maastrichtian oil shales are distributed within the Central Eastern Desert in Egypt. In this study elemental geochemical data have been applied to investigate the probable provenance of the sedimentary detrital material of the Maastrichtian oil shale beds within the Duwi and the Dakhla formations. The Maastrichtian oil shales are characterized by the enrichment in Ca, P, Mo, Ni, Zn, U, Cr and Sr versus post-Archean Australian shales (PAAS). The chondrite-normalized patterns of the Maastrichtian oil shale samples are showing LREE enrichment, HREE depletion, slightly negative Eu anomaly, no obvious Ce anomaly and typical shale-like PAAS-normalized patterns. The total REE well correlated with Si, Al, Fe, K and Ti, suggesting that the REE of the Maastrichtian oil shales are derived from terrigenous source. Chemical weathering indices such as Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), Chemical Proxy of Alteration (CPA) and Plagioclase Index of Alteration (PIA) indicate moderate to strong chemical weathering. We suggest that the Maastrichtian oil shale is mainly derived from first cycle rocks especially intermediate rocks without any significant inputs from recycled or mature sources. The proposed data illustrated the impact of the parent material composition on evolution of oil shale chemistry. Furthermore, the paleo-tectonic setting of the detrital source rocks for the Maastrichtian oil shale is probably related to Proterozoic continental island arcs

  4. Analytical Expressions for Thermo-Osmotic Permeability of Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalvès, J.; Ji Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M.; Tremosa, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new formulation for the thermo-osmotic permeability of natural pore solutions containing monovalent and divalent cations is proposed. The mathematical formulation proposed here is based on the theoretical framework supporting thermo-osmosis which relies on water structure alteration in the pore space of surface-charged materials caused by solid-fluid electrochemical interactions. The ionic content balancing the surface charge of clay minerals causes a disruption in the hydrogen bond network when more structured water is present at the clay surface. Analytical expressions based on our heuristic model are proposed and compared to the available data for NaCl solutions. It is shown that the introduction of divalent cations reduces the thermo-osmotic permeability by one third compared to the monovalent case. The analytical expressions provided here can be used to advantage for safety calculations in deep underground nuclear waste repositories.

  5. Influence of Alkali Resistant (Ar) Fibreglass in Porcelain Clay for Manufacturing Vitrified Clay Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhmal Hanapi, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sufizar; Taib, Hariati; Ismail, Al Emran; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Salleh, Salihatun Md; Sadikin, Azmahani; Mahzan, Shahruddin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the characteristics of porcelain ceramic with influence of milled Alkali Resistant (AR) fiberglass for manufacturing vitrified clay pipes. In this study, raw materials consist of porcelain clay and AR fiberglass were refined into powders less than 90μm. Subsequently, these samples were compacted into cylindrical pellet for chemical analysis using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The ceramic sample was produced by mixing different weight percentage of AR glass to porcelain ceramic with 3 wt%, 6 wt%, 9 wt% and 12 wt%. Subsequently, the sample was compacted with 3 ton of pressure load and sintered at 900 °C, 1000 °C, 1100 °C and 1200 °C. The phase identification by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and microstructural analysis were performed for the sintered sample. Chemical analysis revealed that the significant element for all raw material are SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O and K2O. Phase identification analysis shown that sample sintered at 1000 °C produces quartz (SiO2), berlinite (AlPO4), albite (NaAlSi3O8) and calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CaMgAlSiO). The formation of primary mullite was observed in sample sintered at 1100 °C. The image of microstructural morphology denoted that the formation of glassy phase with decreasing amount of void when sintering temperature and addition of AR glass were increased, which correspond well to phase identification analysis.

  6. Compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lat, D. C.; Ali, N.; Jais, I. B. M.; Baharom, B.; Yunus, N. Z. M.; Salleh, S. M.; Azmi, N. A. C.

    2018-04-01

    This study is carried out to determine the geotechnical properties and compressibility characteristics of marine clay collected at Sabak Bernam. The compressibility characteristics of this soil are determined from 1-D consolidation test and verified by existing correlations by other researchers. No literature has been found on the compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay. It is important to carry out this study since this type of marine clay covers large coastal area of west coast Malaysia. This type of marine clay was found on the main road connecting Klang to Perak and the road keeps experiencing undulation and uneven settlement which jeopardise the safety of the road users. The soil is indicated in the Generalised Soil Map of Peninsular Malaysia as a CLAY with alluvial soil on recent marine and riverine alluvium. Based on the British Standard Soil Classification and Plasticity Chart, the soil is classified as a CLAY with very high plasticity (CV). Results from laboratory test on physical properties and compressibility parameters show that Sabak Bernam Marine Clay (SBMC) is highly compressible, has low permeability and poor drainage characteristics. The compressibility parameters obtained for SBMC is in a good agreement with other researchers in the same field.

  7. The ENABLER - Based on proven NERVA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Julie M.; Pierce, Bill L.

    The ENABLER reactor for use in a nuclear thermal propulsion engine uses the technology developed in the NERVA/Rover program, updated to incorporate advances in the technology. Using composite fuel, higher power densities per fuel element, improved radiation resistant control components and the advancements in use of carbon-carbon materials; the ENABLER can provide a specific impulse of 925 seconds, an engine thrust to weight (excluding reactor shield) approaching five, an improved initial mass in low Earth orbit and a consequent reduction in launch costs and logistics problems. This paper describes the 75,000 lbs thrust ENABLER design which is a low cost, low risk approach to meeting tommorrow's space propulsion needs.

  8. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectancemore » spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.« less

  9. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  10. Curiosity is Ready for Clay (Highlighted)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-22

    This mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Curiosity rover looks uphill at Mount Sharp, which Curiosity has been climbing. Highlighted in white is an area with clay-bearing rocks that scientists are eager to explore; it could shed additional light on the role of water in creating Mount Sharp. The mosaic was assembled from dozens of images taken by Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam). It was taken on Sol 1931 back in January. Mount Sharp stands in the middle of Gale Crater, which is 96 miles (154 kilometers) in diameter. This mound, which Curiosity has been climbing since 2014, likely formed in the presence of water at various points of time in Mars ancient history. That makes it an ideal place to study how water influenced the habitability of Mars billions of years ago. The scene has been white-balanced so the colors of the rock materials resemble how they would appear under daytime lighting conditions on Earth. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22312

  11. Development of photopolymerizable clay nanocomposites utilizing reactive dispersants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu-Adom, Kwame

    Nanocomposites hold tremendous promise for expanding the utility of polymeric materials. However, accessing particulate sizes in the nanoscale domain continues to be a scientific challenge, especially in highly cross-linked photopolymerizable systems. In this study, photopolymerizable nanocomposites utilizing clay nanoparticles and reactive dispersants have been developed. The influence of particle size, dispersant-clay interactions, and surfactant concentration on photopolymerization behavior and nanoparticle dispersion has been elucidated. Clay particles serve as templates upon which surfactants aggregate during photopolymerization. This results in higher photopolymerization rates with addition of increasing concentrations of polymerizable surfactants. Furthermore, polymerizable surfactants induce faster photopolymerization rates compared to non-polymerizable analogues in systems that have ionically-bound dispersants on the particle surface. Utilizing reactive organoclays induces significant changes to the photopolymerization behavior depending on the choice of reactive functionality employed. Faster acrylate photopolymerization rates occur in photopolymer systems containing thiol-modified clays, while much slower rates occur for nonpolymerizable organoclay systems. In addition, chemical compatibility between monomer and clay dispersant (based on chemical similarity or polarity) allows enhancement of exfoliation in photopolymerizable formulations. With polymerizable dispersants, exfoliation is readily achieved in various multifunctional acrylate systems. The degree of exfoliation depends on the position of the reactive group relative to the surfactant's cationic site and the type of functionality. Thiolated organoclays exfoliate during polymerization, while methacrylated clays show substantially less dependence on polymerization behavior. Interestingly, changes in the physical properties of the resulting nanocomposite are independent of the degree of exfoliation

  12. Twenty-year performance in a white oak provenance test

    Treesearch

    Philip A. O' Connor

    2005-01-01

    In 1983 a limited-range provenance test for white oak (Quercus alba L.) was established at the Starve Hollow SRA in cooperation with the North Central Forest Experiment Station. The planting was made up of half-sib progeny of nine families/provenances representing six states from Mississippi through Minnesota.

  13. Adaptation of eastern whitepine provenances to planting sites

    Treesearch

    Maurice E., Jr. Demeritt; Peter W. Garrett

    1996-01-01

    Eastern white pine provenances from the extreme limits of the natural range of this species are changing from above- and below-average stability to average stability for height growth with increasing age. The regression method is useful for evaluating the stability of provenance to planting sites. The same general conclusions are reached for the performance at...

  14. Sugar maple provenance study: West Virginia outplanting - 10-year results

    Treesearch

    G. W. Wendel; W. J. Gabriel

    1980-01-01

    After 10 years, survival of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) provenances outplanted in West Virginia did not differ significantly. Total height, height growth and dbh measurements were significantly different among provenances. Fifty percent of the trees had major forks below 9.0 feet. Thirty-eight percent of the trees had no forks but 71 percent...

  15. The problem of site variation within red pine provenance experiments

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Holst

    1966-01-01

    In spite of care taken in the selection of site and experimental design of provenance experiments, site heterogenity within the experimental area may be more complex than was anticipated when the experiment was established. The present paper describes a problem of this nature encountered in a red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) provenance experiment at...

  16. Provenance variation in Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. in California

    Treesearch

    B.M. Emery; F. Thomas Ledig

    1987-01-01

    In California, the Lake Albacutya provenance of river red gum was clearly superior in volume growth to 22 other provenances collected throughout the range of the species in Australia. It had at least 2.5 times the volume of the plantation mean at 5.5 years, consistent with its performance in other countries with Mediterranean climates like California's. Other...

  17. Melt-state rheology, solid-state mechanical properties and microstructure of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have the potential usefulness in industrial applications such as automotive and packaging due to their strong, light-weight and inexpensive properties. However, to respond to needs of various applications it is crucial to understand the crystallization and rheological properties of these materials. Our initial hypothesis was that the processing conditions such as shear rate, shear strain and temperature affect the crystallization kinetics of intercalated polypropylene nanocomposites. Another hypothesis was that the compatibilizer, PP-MA, affects the role of the nucleating agent, sodium benzoate. The final hypothesis was that the rheological properties of nanocomposites depend on the degree of clay dispersion. By means of time-resolved small-angle light scattering, we were able to demonstrate that clay enhances the crystallization kinetics in nanocomposites and its result differs significantly from that of pure polypropylene. Characteristic crystallization times are extracted from the time evolution of integral measures of the angularly dependent parallel polarized and cross polarized light scattering intensity. Flow acceleration of crystallization kinetics has been observed for the polymer nanocomposites at applied strain rates for which flow has only modest effect on polypropylene crystallization. Furthermore, we were able to conclude that the addition of the nucleating agent sodium benzoate in the presence of polypropylene grafted maleic anhydride is not effective in accelerating crystallization. The rheological properties of two types of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites, with different degrees of clay dispersion have been measured in both linear and non-linear viscoelastic regime. In the linear viscoelastic regime, the storage and loss modulus of nanocomposites increases when clay loading increases. The storage and loss modulus of unsonicated nanocomposites are higher than the sonicated ones because the ultrasonic processing alters

  18. Properties of Residue from Olive Oil Extraction as a Raw Material for Sustainable Construction Materials. Part I: Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-García, Almudena; Martínez-García, Carmen; Cotes-Palomino, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Action on climate, the environment, and the efficient use of raw materials and resources are important challenges facing our society. Against this backdrop, the construction industry must adapt to new trends and environmentally sustainable construction systems, thus requiring lines of research aimed at keeping energy consumption in new buildings as low as possible. One of the main goals of this research is to efficiently contribute to reducing the amount of residue from olive oil extraction using a two-phase method. This can be achieved by producing alternative structural materials to be used in the construction industry by means of a circular economy. The technical feasibility of adding said residue to ceramic paste was proven by analyzing the changes produced in the physical properties of the paste, which were then compared to the properties of the reference materials manufactured with clay without residue. Results obtained show that the heating value of wet pomace can contribute to the thermal needs of the sintering process, contributing 30% of energy in pieces containing 3% of said material. Likewise, adding larger amounts of wet pomace to the clay body causes a significant decrease in bulk density values. PMID:28772461

  19. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Susceptibility and Mineral Zonations Controlled by Provenance in Loess along the Illinois and Central Mississippi River Valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimley, D.A.; Follmer, L.R.; McKay, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) patterns have proven useful for regional stratigraphic correlations of zones within thick, oxidized Peoria and Roxana Silts along the Illinois and Central Mississippi River valleys for more than 350 km. Variations in MS of C horizon loess are controlled by silt-sized magnetite content and are interpreted to reflect changes in sediment provenance due to fluctuations of the Superior and Lake Michigan glacier lobes and the diversion of the Mississippi River to its present course. Grain size distributions and scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that stratigraphic changes in MS are not significantly influenced by eolian sorting or diagenetic dissolution, respectively. Three compositional zones (lower, middle, and upper) are delineated within Peoria Silt which usually can be traced in the field by MS, the occurrence of clay beds, interstadial soils, and/or subtle color changes. These zones can be correlated with, but are generally of more practical use than, previously studied dolomite zones (McKay, 1977) or clay mineral zones (Frye et al., 1968). However, mineralogical analyses can help to substantiate zone boundaries when in question. MS and compositional zones may indirectly record a climatic signal, primarily through the effect that global cooling has had on ice lobe fluctuations in the Upper Mississippi drainage basin. ?? 1998 University of Washington.

  1. Fracture in Kaolinite clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2017-11-01

    Clay minerals are involved in many natural (landslides, river channels) and industrial processes (ceramics, cosmetics, oil recovery). They are plate shaped charged colloids and exhibit different flow properties than simpler colloids when suspended in a liquid such as thixotropy and shear-banding. kaolinite platelets are non-swelling, meaning that the stacks formed by the platelets do not have water layers, and thus the suspension does not have a sol-gel transition. However, it has been shown that kaolinite suspensions possesses a non-zero yield stress even at low concentrations, indicating that the particles arrange themselves in a structure through attractive interactions. Here, we experimentally investigate the sedimentation of kaolinite suspensions in a Hele-Shaw cell. The sedimentation of these dilute suspensions can display solid behavior like fracture, revealed in cross-polarized light, which is linked to the failure of the weakly-bonded structure (typical yield stress 10-2 Pa). By changing the interaction potential of the particles (by sonication or introducing salts), we show through these sedimentation experiments, how the fracture pattern can be avoided. Research was sponsored by the Army Research Laboratory and was accomplished under Grant Number 569074.

  2. Color measurement of methylene blue dye/clay mixtures and its application using economical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosevic, Maja; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Logar, Mihovil

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the clay mineral components of clay materials by staining tests is rapid and simple, but their applicability is restricted because of the mutual interference of the common components of clay materials and difficulties in color determination. The change of color with concentration of the dye is related to the use of colorants as a field test for identifying clay minerals and has been improved over the years to assure the accuracy of the tests (Faust G. T., 1940). The problem of measurement and standardization of color may be solved by combination of colors observed in staining tests with prepared charts of color chips available in the Munsell Book of Color, published by Munsell Color Co. Under a particular set of illumination conditions, a human eye can achieve an approximate match between the color of the dyed clay sample and that of a standard color chip, even though they do have different spectral reflectance characteristics. Experiments were carried out with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy on selected clay samples (three montmorillonite, three kaolinite and one mix-layer clay samples) saturated with different concentration of methylene blue dye solution. Dominant wavelength and purity of the color was obtained on oriented dry samples and calculated by use of the I. C. I. (x, y) - diagram in the region of 400-700 nm (reflectance spectra) without MB and after saturation with different concentrations of MB solutions. Samples were carefully photographed in the natural light environment and processed with user friendly and easily accessible applications (Adobe color CC and ColorHexa encyclopedia) available for android phones or tablets. Obtained colors were compared with Munsell standard color chips, RGB and Hexa color standards. Changes in the color of clay samples in their interaction with different concentration of the applied dye together with application of economical methods can still be used as a rapid fieldwork test. Different types of clay

  3. Relevance of magnetic properties for the characterisation of burnt clays and archaeological tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatrice, C.; Coïsson, M.; Ferrara, E.; Olivetti, E. S.

    The archaeomagnetism of pottery, bricks and tiles is typically employed for dating inferences, yet the magnetic properties of ancient ceramics can also be convenient for their characterisation, to evaluate the technological conditions applied for their production (temperature, atmosphere, and duration of firing), as well as to distinguish groups of sherds having different provenance. In this work, the measurement of hysteresis loops has been applied and combined with colour survey to characterise the magnetic properties of burnt clays and archaeological tiles. Four calcareous and non-calcareous clays, along with seventeen tile fragments excavated from the sites of the ancient Roman towns of Pompeii and Gravina di Puglia, in Southern Italy, are examined. The ferrimagnetic character of the clays, in general, enhances with increasing firing temperatures until vitrification processes occur (900-1000 °C) dissolving iron oxides and dispersing the colour and magnetic properties they provide. High values of saturation magnetization are observed in clays with relevant calcareous content after firing above 900 °C, which results in the formation of Ca-silicates able to delay the onset of the vitrification processes. Magnetic properties of the tiles have been evaluated in terms of the high coercivity (i.e. mainly ferrimagnetic) or low coercivity behaviour (i.e. including relevant paramagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions). Enhanced ferrimagnetic character, mostly depending on the growth in number and volume of iron oxide particles, is associated with the development of an intense reddish hue.

  4. Leachability of fired clay brick incorporating with sewage sludge waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Sarani, Noor Amira; Rahmat, Nur Aqma Izurin; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    Sewage sludge is sewerage from wastewater treatment plants that generates millions tons of sludge ever year. Regarding this activity, it causes lack management of waste which is harmful to the surrounding conditions. Therefore, this study is focuses on the incorporation of sewage sludge waste into fired clay brick to provide an option of disposal method, producing adequate quality of brick as well as limiting the heavy metal leachability to the environment. Sewage sludge brick (SSB) mixtures were incorporated with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of sewage sludge waste (SSW). Heavy metals of crushed SSB were determined by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) according to Method 1311 of United State Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) standard. From the results obtained, up to 20% of SSW could be incorporated into fired clay brick and comply with the USEPA standard. Therefore, this study revealed that by incorporating SSW into fired clay brick it could be an alternative method to dispose the SSW and also could act as a replacement material for brick manufacturing with appropriate mix and design.

  5. Properties of fired clay brick incorporating with sewage sludge waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Sarani, Noor Amira; Rahmat, Nur Aqma Izurin; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    The production of sludge in wastewater treatment plant is about to increase every year and most of the sludge was directly disposed to landfill. In addition, the constraint to treat sludge is very high in cost and time- consuming could be disadvantages to the responsible parties. Therefore, this research was conducted to utilize sludge produced from the wastewater treatment plant into fired clay brick as one of the alternatives of disposal method. In this study, the research attempt to incorporate sewage sludge waste (SSW) into fired clay brick. The sewage sludge brick (SSB) mixtures were incorporated with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% of SSW. The manufactured bricks were fired at 1050°C with heating rate of 1°C/min. Physical and mechanical properties test were conducted such as shrinkage, density, water absorption and compressive strength. As the conclusion, brick with utilization 5% of SSW is acceptable to produce good quality of brick. This study shows by using SSW in fired clay brick could be an alternative method to dispose of the SSW and also could act as a replacement material for brick manufacturing with appropriate mix and design.

  6. Feasibility of Plasma Treated Clay in Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites Powders for use Laser Sintering (LS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansoori, Alaa; Seabright, Ryan; Majewski, C.; Rodenburg, C.

    2017-05-01

    The addition of small quantities of nano-clay to nylon is known to improve mechanical properties of the resulting nano-composite. However, achieving a uniform dispersion and distribution of the clay within the base polymer can prove difficult. A demonstration of the fabrication and characterization of plasma-treated organoclay/Nylon12 nanocomposite was carried out with the aim of achieving better dispersion of clay platelets on the Nylon12 particle surface. Air-plasma etching was used to enhance the compatibility between clays and polymers to ensure a uniform clay dispersion in composite powders. Downward heat sintering (DHS) in a hot press is used to process neat and composite powders into tensile and XRD specimens. Morphological studies using Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) were undertaken to characterize the fracture surfaces and clay dispersion in powders and final composite specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) testing performed that the etched clay (EC) is more stable than the nonetched clay (NEC), even at higher temperatures. The influence of the clay ratio and the clay plasma treatment process on the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites was studied by tensile testing. The composite fabricated from (3% EC/N12) powder showed ~19 % improvement in elastic modulus while the composite made from (3% NEC/N12) powder was improved by only 14%). Most notably however is that the variation between tests is strongly reduced when etch clay is used in the composite. We attribute this to a more uniform distribution and better dispersion of the plasma treated clay within polymer powders and ultimately the composite.

  7. Sulfates and Clays in Columbus Crater, Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-21

    Sulfates are found overlying clay minerals in sediments within Columbus Crater, a depression that likely hosted a lake in the past in this image based on information from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  8. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  9. Dynamic properties of composite cemented clay.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuan-Qiang; Liang, Xu

    2004-03-01

    In this work, the dynamic properties of composite cemented clay under a wide range of strains were studied considering the effect of different mixing ratio and the change of confining pressures through dynamic triaxial test. A simple and practical method to estimate the dynamic elastic modulus and damping ratio is proposed in this paper and a related empirical normalized formula is also presented. The results provide useful guidelines for preliminary estimation of cement requirements to improve the dynamic properties of clays.

  10. Clay-mediated reactions of HCN oligomers - The effect of the oxidation state of the clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Alwis, K. W.; Edelson, E. H.; Mount, N.; Hagan, W. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays which contain Fe(III) inhibit the oligomerization of aqueous solutions of HCN. The inhibitory effect is due to the rapid oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile, a key intermediate in HCN oligomerization, by the Fe(III) incorporated into the aluminosilicate lattice of the clay. The Fe(III) oxidizes diaminomaleonitrile to diiminosuccinonitrile, a compound which is rapidly hydrolyzed to HCN and oxalic acid derivatives. Diaminomaleonitrile is not oxidized when Fe(III) in the montmorillonite is reduced with hydrazine. The oxidation state of the clay is an important variable in experiments designed to simulate clay catalysis on the primitive earth.

  11. Evaluation of used fuel disposition in clay-bearing rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

    The R&D program from the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) has documented key advances in coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) modeling of clay to simulate its complex dynamic behavior in response to thermal and hydrochemical feedbacks. These efforts have been harnessed to assess the isolation performance of heat-generating nuclear waste in a deep geological repository in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations. This report describes the ongoing disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled THMC process models, hydrothermal experiments on barrier clay interactions, used fuel and canister material degradation, thermodynamic database development, and reactive transport modeling of the near-field under non-isothermalmore » conditions. These play an important role to the evaluation of sacrificial zones as part of the EBS exposure to thermally-driven chemical and transport processes. Thermal inducement of chemical interactions at EBS domains enhances mineral dissolution/precipitation but also generates mineralogical changes that result in mineral H2O uptake/removal (hydration/dehydration reactions). These processes can result in volume changes that can affect the interface / bulk phase porosities and the mechanical (stress) state of the bentonite barrier. Characterization studies on bentonite barrier samples from the FEBEX-DP international activity have provided important insight on clay barrier microstructures (e.g., microcracks) and interactions at EBS interfaces. Enhancements to the used fuel degradation model outlines the need to include the effects of canister corrosion due the strong influence of H2 generation on the source term.« less

  12. Preparation and properties of recycled HDPE/clay hybrids

    Treesearch

    Yong Lei; Qinglin Wu; Craig M. Clemons

    2007-01-01

    Hybrids based on recycled high density polyethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt compounding. The influence of blending method, compatibilizers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation, RHDPE crystallization behavior, and the mechanical properties of RHDPE/clay hybrids were investigated. Both maleated polyethylene (MAPE) and titanate could...

  13. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  14. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    PubMed Central

    David Walter, W.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Miller, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors—especially soil properties—have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. PMID:21326232

  16. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  17. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples.

    PubMed

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. "Small" market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  18. Applications of biotite inclusion composition to zircon provenance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Boehnke, Patrick; Mark Harrison, T.

    2017-09-01

    Detrital zircons are the only confirmed surviving remnants of >4.03 Ga crust while younger detrital zircons provide a parallel record of more recent crustal evolution to that preserved in crystalline rocks. Zircons often preserve inclusions that may provide clues as to the origins of out-of-context grains in the sedimentary record. Previous studies have established that inclusions of biotite in magmatic zircon are compositionally well-matched to biotite in the source rock matrix, although a direct application to ancient detrital zircons has not been made. A number of studies have documented variations in the Fe, Mg, and Al contents of magmatic biotite from different source rocks and tectonic settings, suggesting that biotite inclusions may indeed serve as provenance indicators for detrital zircons. Consistent with earlier studies, we find that the FeO*/MgO ratio of magmatic biotite from continental arcs, collisional, and within-plate settings varies with relative oxidation state as well as whole-rock FeO*/MgO, while its Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO) varies with whole-rock A/CNK (molar Al/(2 ṡ Ca + Na + K)). Biotite from oxidized metaluminous and reduced S-type granitoids can be readily distinguished from each other using FeO*/MgO and Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO), while biotite from reduced I-type and oxidized peraluminous granites may in some cases be more ambiguous. Biotite from peralkaline and reduced A-type granites are also distinguishable from all other categories by Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO) and FeO*/MgO, respectively. Biotite inclusions in Hadean zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia indicate a mixture of metaluminous and reduced S-type host rocks, while inclusions in 3.6-3.8 Ga detrital zircons from the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt indicate more oxidized peraluminous magmas. These results highlight the diversity of felsic materials on the early Earth and suggest that biotite inclusions are applicable to zircon provenance throughout the sedimentary record.

  19. Determination of trace elements and their concentrations in clay balls: problem of geophagia practice in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Arhin, Emmanuel; Zango, Musah S

    2017-02-01

    Ten samples of 100 g weight were subsampled from 1400 g of the clay balls from which the contained trace element levels were determined by X-ray fluorescence technique. The results of trace elements in the clay balls were calibrated using certified reference materials "MAJMON" and "BH-1." The results showed elevated concentrations but with different concentration levels in the regions, particularly with arsenic, chromium, cobalt, Cs, Zr and La. These trace elements contained in the clay balls are known to be hazardous to human health. Thence the relatively high concentrations of these listed trace elements in clay balls in the three regions, namely Ashanti, Upper East and Volta, which are widely sold in markets in Ghana, could present negative health impact on consumers if consumed at 70 g per day or more and on regular basis. On the basis of these, the study concludes an investigation to establish breakeven range for trace element concentrations in the clay balls as it has been able to demonstrate the uneven and elevated values in them. The standardized safe ranges of trace elements will make the practice safer for the people that ingest clay balls in Ghana.

  20. In vitro toxicological assessment of clays for their use in food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Puerto, María; Pichardo, Silvia; Jordá, María; Moreno, F Javier; Aucejo, Susana; Jos, Ángeles

    2013-07-01

    Montmorillonite based clays have a wide range of applications that are going to contribute to increase human exposure to these materials. One of the most promising uses of clays is the development of reinforced food contact materials that results in nanocomposites with improved barrier properties. Different organoclays have been developed introducing modifiers in the natural clay which is commercially available. However, the toxicological aspects of these materials have been scarcely studied so far. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of a non-modified clay (Cloisite Na+) and an organoclay (Cloisite 30B) have been investigated in the hepatic cell line HepG2. Only Cloisite 30B showed cytotoxicity. In order to elucidate the toxic mechanisms underlying these effects, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress and genotoxicity biomarkers were assayed. Moreover, a morphology study with light and electron microscopy was performed. Results showed genotoxic effects and glutathione decrease. The most relevant ultraestructural alterations observed were mitochondrial degeneration, dilated endomembrane systems, heterophagosomes formation, fat droplets appearance and presence of nuclear lipid inclusions. Cloisite 30B, therefore, induces toxic effects in HepG2 cells. Further research is needed to assess the risk of this clay on the human health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SEIS-PROV: Practical Provenance for Seismological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischer, L.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely recognized that reproducibility is crucial to advance science, but at the same time it is very hard to actually achieve. This results in it being recognized but also mostly ignored by a large fraction of the community. A key ingredient towards full reproducibility is to capture and describe the history of data, an issue known as provenance. We present SEIS-PROV, a practical format and data model to store provenance information for seismological data. In a seismological context, provenance can be seen as information about the processes that generated and modified a particular piece of data. For synthetic waveforms the provenance information describes which solver and settings therein were used to generate it. When looking at processed seismograms, the provenance conveys information about the different time series analysis steps that led to it. Additional uses include the description of derived data types, such as cross-correlations and adjoint sources, enabling their proper storage and exchange. SEIS-PROV is based on W3C PROV (http://www.w3.org/TR/prov-overview/), a standard for generic provenance information. It then applies an additional set of constraints to make it suitable for seismology. We present a definition of the SEIS-PROV format, a way to check if any given file is a valid SEIS-PROV document, and two sample implementations: One in SPECFEM3D GLOBE (https://geodynamics.org/cig/software/specfem3d_globe/) to store the provenance information of synthetic seismograms and another one as part of the ObsPy (http://obspy.org) framework enabling automatic tracking of provenance information during a series of analysis and transformation stages. This, along with tools to visualize and interpret provenance graphs, offers a description of data history that can be readily tracked, stored, and exchanged.

  2. New research on the origin of mottled clay in Quaternary basins in the coastal area of south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Gao, Quanzhou; Chen, Guoneng

    2018-06-01

    Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) mottled clay occurs widely in Late Quaternary basins in south China coastal areas. Current research attributes its origin to exposure weathering of Late Pleistocene marine/fluvial deposits during the LGM. However, field data suggest that this is not the case as there is no gradual transition in lithology, grain size, structure and material composition among these layers. Instead, the mottled clay possesses sedimentary characteristics of exotic dust. In this study, three typical drill cores in the Pearl River Delta were studied using grain size analysis, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and geochemical analysis to ascertain the clay's sedimentary characteristics and origin. Grain size distribution patterns and parameters of the mottled clay were similar to those of a typical loess, indicating aeolian origin. In DRS curves, the peak height of hematite > goethite, indicating that the mottled clay had not experienced strong hydration and constitutes a continental product. This conforms to a typical loess but differs from the underlying marine/fluvial deposits. The chemical composition of the mottled clay was homogeneous in the vertical and planar directions. Upper continental crust (UCC) normalized curves of major and trace elements of the mottled clay were close to the average UCC and were consistent with typical aeolian deposits. The spatial and temporal distribution characteristics and relationship with the underlying layer suggest that the mottled clay was a loess-like deposit during the LGM and its mottled structure originated from strong modification of oxidation during the postglacial period after homogeneous dust had accumulated.

  3. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  4. Examination and Manipulation of Clay Aggregates - Initial Inquiry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-06

    and the first conclusions in the examination and testing of clay aggregates composed of montmorillonite clay and a polysaccharide (xanthan gum, also...and the first conclusions in the examination and testing of clay aggregates composed of montmorillonite clay and a polysaccharide (xanthan gum, also...PSU and the X-gum content from 0% to 10% of the mineral content of the clay (by weight). Montmorillonite was used in all the suspensions prepared

  5. The Symbiotic Relationship between Scientific Workflow and Provenance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the symbiotic nature of scientific workflows and provenance. We will also discuss the current trends and real world challenges facing these two distinct research areas. Although motivated differently, the needs of the international science communities are the glue that binds this relationship together. Understanding and articulating the science drivers to these communities is paramount as these technologies evolve and mature. Originally conceived for managing business processes, workflows are now becoming invaluable assets in both computational and experimental sciences. These reconfigurable, automated systems provide essential technology to perform complex analyses by coupling together geographically distributed disparate data sources and applications. As a result, workflows are capable of higher throughput in a shorter amount of time than performing the steps manually. Today many different workflow products exist; these could include Kepler and Taverna or similar products like MeDICI, developed at PNNL, that are standardized on the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). Provenance, originating from the French term Provenir “to come from”, is used to describe the curation process of artwork as art is passed from owner to owner. The concept of provenance was adopted by digital libraries as a means to track the lineage of documents while standards such as the DublinCore began to emerge. In recent years the systems science community has increasingly expressed the need to expand the concept of provenance to formally articulate the history of scientific data. Communities such as the International Provenance and Annotation Workshop (IPAW) have formalized a provenance data model. The Open Provenance Model, and the W3C is hosting a provenance incubator group featuring the Proof Markup Language. Although both workflows and provenance have risen from different communities and operate independently, their mutual

  6. Proven Alternatives for Aboveground Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper, developed for EPA's Engineering Forum, identifies and summarizes experiences with proven aboveground treatment alternatives for arsenic in groundwater, and provides information on their relative effectiveness and cost.

  7. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Zope, Indraneel S.; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition. PMID:28800095

  8. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  9. Mechanical reinforcement and environmental effects on a nylon-6/clay nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, J. Stebbins

    2000-10-01

    Hybridization, or modifying the organic polymers with inorganic constituents, is one method of achieving mechanical property improvements in polymeric materials while preserving processing characteristics. Toyota Central Research developed, and Ube Industries commercialized, one such hybrid nanocomposite: nylon-6/montmorillonite clay. This dissertation explores mechanisms of reinforcement in these nylon-6/clay nanocomposites and studies their degradation by atmospheric pollutants. A 100% improvement in modulus, 77% improvement in yield stress, and 54°C improvement in heat distortion temperature over nylon-6 were observed in extruded 5 wt% clay nanocomposite sheets. Infrared absorption spectrography and dynamic mechanical analysis were used to investigate the mechanisms of reinforcement in these nanocomposites. The improved mechanical properties, increased heat distortion temperature, reduced diffusion rate, and lower susceptibility to degradation in NO x observed where attributed to constraint of polymer chain motion by interaction with clay lamellae. Changes in the loss tangent peak in the glass transition region of the dynamic mechanical data provide an estimate of the volume of chains constrained by complexation of their mid-chain amide oxygen groups with the charged clay lamellae. X-ray analysis, optical microscopy, and light scattering were used to study changes in crystallization due to this complexation. Photomicrographs indicate that the morphology of the crystallites change from spherulitic to planar with the addition of clay. Decreases in diffusion rates of water and total water absorption were demonstrated in immersion experiments. Complexation of nylon-6 with 5 wt% clay reduces the total absorption of water by over 16%. The plane stress fracture toughness of extruded 5 wt% clay nanocomposite was 46% greater than that of nylon-6. The degradation of the nanocomposites in calcium chloride solution and NOx was examined through post exposure residual

  10. Restful Implementation of Catalogue Service for Geospatial Data Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L. C.; Yue, P.; Lu, X. C.

    2013-10-01

    Provenance, also known as lineage, is important in understanding the derivation history of data products. Geospatial data provenance helps data consumers to evaluate the quality and reliability of geospatial data. In a service-oriented environment, where data are often consumed or produced by distributed services, provenance could be managed by following the same service-oriented paradigm. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW) is used for the registration and query of geospatial data provenance by extending ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM). Recent advance of the REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm has shown great promise for the easy integration of distributed resources. RESTful Web Service aims to provide a standard way for Web clients to communicate with servers based on REST principles. The existing approach for provenance catalogue service could be improved by adopting the RESTful design. This paper presents the design and implementation of a catalogue service for geospatial data provenance following RESTful architecture style. A middleware named REST Converter is added on the top of the legacy catalogue service to support a RESTful style interface. The REST Converter is composed of a resource request dispatcher and six resource handlers. A prototype service is developed to demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  11. Lightweight Provenance Service for High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip

    Provenance describes detailed information about the history of a piece of data, containing the relationships among elements such as users, processes, jobs, and workflows that contribute to the existence of data. Provenance is key to supporting many data management functionalities that are increasingly important in operations such as identifying data sources, parameters, or assumptions behind a given result; auditing data usage; or understanding details about how inputs are transformed into outputs. Despite its importance, however, provenance support is largely underdeveloped in highly parallel architectures and systems. One major challenge is the demanding requirements of providing provenance service in situ. Themore » need to remain lightweight and to be always on often conflicts with the need to be transparent and offer an accurate catalog of details regarding the applications and systems. To tackle this challenge, we introduce a lightweight provenance service, called LPS, for high-performance computing (HPC) systems. LPS leverages a kernel instrument mechanism to achieve transparency and introduces representative execution and flexible granularity to capture comprehensive provenance with controllable overhead. Extensive evaluations and use cases have confirmed its efficiency and usability. We believe that LPS can be integrated into current and future HPC systems to support a variety of data management needs.« less

  12. The Effect of a Rapid Heating Rate, Mechanical Vibration and Surfactant Chemistry on the Structure–Property Relationships of Epoxy/Clay Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Nuhiji, Betime; Attard, Darren; Thorogood, Gordon; Hanley, Tracey; Magniez, Kevin; Bungur, Jenny; Fox, Bronwyn

    2013-01-01

    The role of processing conditions and intercalant chemistry in montmorillonite clays on the dispersion, morphology and mechanical properties of two epoxy/clay nanocomposite systems was investigated in this paper. This work highlights the importance of employing complementary techniques (X-ray diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering, optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) to correlate nanomorphology to macroscale properties. Materials were prepared using an out of autoclave manufacturing process equipped to generate rapid heating rates and mechanical vibration. The results suggested that the quaternary ammonium surfactant on C30B clay reacted with the epoxy during cure, while the primary ammonium surfactant (I.30E) catalysed the polymerisation reaction. These effects led to important differences in nanocomposite clay morphologies. The use of mechanical vibration at 4 Hz prior to matrix gelation was found to facilitate clay dispersion and to reduce the area fraction of I.30E clay agglomerates in addition to increasing flexural strength by over 40%. PMID:28811457

  13. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  14. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of immobilized Ni-Co bimetallic using Tapanuli clay for catalyst application

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryanti,; Juwono, Ariadne L., E-mail: ariadne@sci.ui.ac.id; Krisnandi, Yuni K.

    2016-04-19

    Heterogeneous catalysts hold various advantages, namely, easy to separate from their products, reusable and regarded as environmental friendly materials. The synthesis of immobilized Ni monometallic, Co monometallic and Ni-Co bimetallic by Tapanuli clay were carried out using intercalation method. Firstly, the synthesis of Na-Bentonite was conducted to provide sufficient area to immobilize bimetal in the clay interlayer. Secondly, Ni, Co and Ni-Co were immobilized in the Tapanuli clay interlayer. Several techniques, such as X-Ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infra Red and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis were applied to characterize and compare the properties of the synthesized materials. The results showed thatmore » the insertion of Ni, Co and Ni-Co in the clay interlayer occurred through a cation exchange reaction. The Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis for Ni-Co bimetallic showed that the immobilized Ni and Co in the clay is in the ratio of 1:1. Catalytic test with Gas Chromatography showed that Ni-Co bimetallic generates a higher yield percentage compared to Ni and Co monometallic.« less

  16. Origin, distribution, and rapid removal of hydrothermally formed clay at Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, David

    1983-01-01

    Clay minerals are locally abundant in two hydrothermal areas at Mount Baker-Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Field. The silt- and clay-size fractions of volcanic debris that is undergoing alteration at and near the ground surface around areas of current fumarolic activity in Sherman Crater are largely dominated by alunite and a silica phase, either opal or cristobalite, but contain some kaolinite and smectite. Correspondingly, the chemistry of solutions at the surface of the crater, as represented by the crater lake, favors the formation of alunite over kaolinite. In contrast, vent-filling debris that was ejected to the surface from fumaroles in 1975 contains more than 20 percent clay-size material in which kaolinite and smectite are dominant. The youngest eruptive deposit (probably 19th century) on the crater rim was also altered prior to ejection and contains as much as 27 percent clay-size material in which kaolinite, smectite, pyrophyllite, and mixed-layer illitesmectite are abundant. The hydrothermal products, kaolinite and alunite, are present in significant amounts in five large Holocene mudflows that originated at the upper cone of Mount Baker. The distribution of kaolinite in crater and valley deposits indicates that, with the passage of time, increasingly greater amounts of this clay mineral have been incorporated into large mass movements from the upper cone. Either erosion has cut into more kaolinitic parts of the core of Sherman Crater, or the amount of kaolinite has increased through time in Sherman Crater.

  17. The effect of clay nanoparticles as reinforcement on mechanical properties of bioplastic base on cassava starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harunsyah; Sariadi; Raudah

    2018-01-01

    Plastics have been used widely for packaging material since long time ago. However, environmentally friendly plastics or plastics whose raw materials come from natural polymers are still very low in development. Efforts have been conducted to develop environmental friendly plastic from renewable resources such as biopolymer. The aim of this paper is to study the influence of clay nanoparticles as reinforcment on the mechanical properties of bioplastic were prepared by solution-casting method. The content of clay nanoparticles in the bioplastic was varied from 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8% and 1.0% (w/w) by weight of starch. Structural characterization was done by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Surface morphologies of the plastic film were examined by scanning electron microscope.The result showed that the Tensile strength was improved significantly with the addition of clay nanoparticles. The maximum tensile strength obtained was 24.18 M.Pa on the additional of clay nanoparticles by 0.6% and plasticizer by 25%. Based on data of FTIR, the produced bioplastic did not change the group function and it can be concluded that the interaction in bioplastic produced was only a physical interaction. The bioplastic based on cassava starch-clay nanoparticles and plasticizer glycerin showed that interesting mechanical properties being transparent, clear, homogeneous, flexible and easy to be handled.

  18. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  19. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms. PMID:26218593

  20. Polymer based nanocomposites with nanofibers and exfoliated clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer solutions, containing clay sheets, were electrospun into nanofibers and microfibers that contained clay sheets inside. Controllable removal of polymer by plasma etching from the surface of fibers revealed the arrangement of clay. The shape, flexibility, size distribution and arrangement of clay sheets were observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The clay sheets were partially aligned in big fibers with normal direction of clay sheets perpendicular to fiber axis. Crumpling of clay sheets inside fibers was observed when the fiber diameter was comparable to the lateral size of clay sheets. Single sheets of clay were observed both by catching clay sheets dispersed in water with electrospun nanofiber mats and by the deliberate removal of most of the polymer in the fibers. Thin, flexible gas barrier films, that are reasonably strong, were assembled from clay sheets and polymer nanofibers. Structure of composite films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Continuous film of clay sheets were physically attached to the surface of fiber mats. Spincoating film of polymer and clay sheets was reinforced by electrospun fiber scaffold. Certain alignment of clay sheets was observed in the vicinity of fibers.

  1. Clay Chemistry's Influence on the Average Carbon Content and Particle Size at the Ninety-Six Historical Site, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, L.; Werts, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Ninety-Six National Historic Site is located in Greenwood County, SC. Recent geologic mapping of this area has revealed differences in soil properties over short distances within the park. We studied the chemistry of the clay minerals found within the soils to see if there was a correlation between the amounts of soil organic carbon contained in the soil and particle size in individual soil horizons. Three different vegetation areas, including an old field, a deciduous forest, and a pine forest were selected to see what influence vegetation type had on the clay chemistry and carbon levels as well. Four samples containing the O, A, and B horizons were taken from each location and we studied the carbon and nitrogen content using an elemental analyzer, particle size using a Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer, and clay mineralogy with powder X-ray diffraction of each soil sample. Samples from the old field and pine forest gave an overall negative correlation between carbon content and clay percentage, which is against the normal trend for Southern Piedmont Ultisols. The deciduous forest samples gave no correlation at all between its carbon content and clay percentage. Together, all three locations show the same negative relationship, while once separated into vegetation type and A and B horizons it shows even more abnormal relationships of negative while several show no correlation (R2= 0.007403- 0.56268). Using powder XRD, we ran clay samples from each A and B horizon for the clay mineralogy. All three vegetation areas had the same results of containing quartz, kaolinite, and Fe oxides, therefore, clay chemistry is not a reason behind the abnormal trend of a negative correlation between average carbon content and clay percentage. Considering that all three locations have the same climate, topography, and parent material of metagranite, it could be reasonable to assume these results are a factor of environmental and biological influences rather than clay type.

  2. Enhanced magnetization of the Marlboro Clay as a product of soil pyrogenesis at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Dennis V.; Lanci, Luca; Wang, Huapei; Wright, James D.

    2017-09-01

    The kaolinite-rich Marlboro Clay was deposited on the inner shelf in the Salisbury Embayment of the U.S. Atlantic margin at the onset of the carbon isotope excursion marking the 56 Ma Paleocene-Eocene boundary and is characterized by an anomalously high concentration of magnetic nanoparticles of enigmatic origin that give rise to notably intense bulk magnetization. Recent studies point to a magnetic assemblage that is dominated by single-domain magnetite particles that tend to be isolated rather than arranged in chains, the most distinguishing feature of magnetotactic bacteria fossils. On the other hand, it is very unlikely that the nanoparticles can be condensates of an impact plume given the meter-scale thickness of the Marlboro Clay. We obtained new data from a landward proximal site at Wilson Lake on the New Jersey Coastal Plain and find that the abrupt increase in magnetite nanoparticles is virtually coincident stratigraphically with the recently reported impact spherule layer at the base of the Marlboro Clay in the same core. Yet the high field magnetic susceptibility, a measure of total iron concentration, and strontium isotope values on bulk sediment, an indicator of sediment weathering provenance, are not different in the Marlboro Clay from the immediately underlying Vincentown Formation. We suggest that the distinctive magnetic properties of the Marlboro Clay originated from pyromagnetic soil enhancement by widespread wildfires on the adjoining drainage area. The pyrogenetic products were soon washed from the denuded landscape and rapidly deposited as mud-waves across the shelf, becoming the Marlboro Clay. A few percent of incinerated biomass ends up as calcite known as wood ash stone and can inherit its light carbon isotope composition. Disseminated wood ash stone entrained in the Marlboro Clay could contribute to the landward increase in amplitude of the carbon isotope excursion in bulk carbonate data. A plausible trigger for the initial conflagration

  3. Clay Mineral Crystal Structure Tied to Composition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This diagram illustrates how the dimensions of clay minerals' crystal structure are affected by which ions are present in the composition of the mineral. Different clay minerals were identified this way at two sites in Mars' Gale Crater: "Murray Buttes" and "Yellowknife Bay." In otherwise identical clay minerals, a composition that includes aluminum and ferric iron ions (red dots) results in slightly smaller crystalline unit cells than one that instead includes magnesium and ferrous iron ions (green dots). Ferric iron is more highly oxidized than ferrous iron. Crystalline cell units are the basic repeating building blocks that define minerals. X-ray diffraction analysis, a capability of the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, identifies minerals from their crystalline structure. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21148

  4. Cryosalt Formation in Delaminated Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    -montmorillonite at hosting hydrohalite, the results of this study can be used to suggest that delaminated Na-montmorillonite sheets encapsulate the salt solutions and by preventing sublimation of water, promotes crystallization of hydrohalite. As delamination is not possible in Ca-montmorillonite, water more readily sublimated from the system, leaving behind a dry Ca-montmorillonite/NaCl assemblage. As such, this work identified processes through which clay minerals can affect the formation of cryosalts that are not only of importance to terrestrial environments of the cryosphere but also to atmospheric processes involving dust aerosols. [1] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), Scientific Reports. 6, 32136. [2] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 7, 2849-2855. [3] Wagner, R., Möhler O., Schnaiter, M. (2012), 33, 8557-8571.

  5. Performance and genetic variation of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) in provenance and progeny trials in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Kevyn E. Wightman; Sheila E. Ward; Jeremy P. Haggar; Bartolo Rodriguez Santiago; Jonathan P. Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Stocks of the valuable big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) are declining, and trials for growth and pest resistance are needed to select material for plantations. Seeds were collected from 67 open-pollinated trees from five provenances in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and planted in three provenance/progeny trials in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico, in...

  6. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  7. Modification and characterization of montmorillonite clay for the extraction of zearalenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Kerri-Ann Alicia

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of organisms belonging to the fungus kingdom. The cost associated with mycotoxin contamination in the USA and Canada is approximately US $5 billion. Zearalenone (ZEN), a resorcylic acid lactone, is produced by various members of the genus Fusarium . These fungi often colonize a variety of foods and feedstuffs including, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, barley, and other cereal grains. This metabolite has estrogenic effects in farm animals with pigs being the most sensitive. ZEN induces hyperestrogenism and can cause infertility, reduced sex drive, fetal mummification, and abortions. Clays have successfully been used in the animal feed industry as an adsorbent and binders for certain small, water soluble mycotoxins. These mycotoxins are attracted to the electrical imbalance between the layers of the clays caused by isomorphic substitution of structural atoms. The mycotoxins are sequestered in the clay layers and pass harmlessly through the animal. However, ZEN is water insoluble and is not extracted easily with aluminosilicate clays. Therefore the modification of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) clays with organic cations has been proposed to render the clays hydrophobic and increase the ZEN binding capacity. The goal of this study was to develop a safe and cost effective organophilic material able to bind and extract zearalenone, to investigate the factors most important to extraction, and to investigate the fundamental properties between the clay-surfactant-mycotoxin systems that lead to extraction. The clay was modified by cation exchange reactions with tricaprylmethylammonium (TCMA) chloride and generic corn oil. The organophilic clays were then characterized using XRD, FTIR, and TGA analytical techniques. These techniques were used to determine the change in fundamental clay properties that would lead to the extraction of ZEN. Desorption studies were performed to determine any increase in toxicity that might be

  8. Sediment characteristics and provenance of the Taiwan Shoal in the southern Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, W. S.; Lin, A. T.; Kuo, L. W.; Lee, Y. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Taiwan Shoal in the southern Taiwan Strait exhibits a lobe-shaped shallow water area, with a depth less than around 40 m and an area approximately of 13,000 km2. The Shoal consists of relict sediments remnant from deltaic deposits during the last glacial period and associated with the paleo-Min River. We collected seafloor sediments in and around the Taiwan Shoal to study the sediment characteristics and provenance of the Shoal as well as Taiwanese river sediments to characterize sediment sourced from southern Taiwan. Our results help to understand possible sediment delivery pathways in a source-to-sink context from the southern Taiwan Strait to the northern South China Sea. The method of X-ray diffraction is used to identify mineral compositions for muds and mineral compositions are examined under polarized microscope for sands. Zircon grains are separated from heavy minerals for U-Pb dating in order to understand the sediment source terranes. Sediments of the Taiwan Shoal are mostly tawny-colored, medium to coarse-grained sands with abundant shell fragments and shallow-water benthic foraminifera. Sediments to the south of the Taiwan Shoal and in the outer shelf consist of dark brown-colored and fine-grained sands with rare shell fragments. Siliciclastic compositions of the Taiwan Shoal sediments are mostly quartz. The second abundant composition is rock fragments with more occurrences near the Chinese coastline and the Penghu archipelago. Slate fragments are found to occur near Taiwan, especially in the Penghu Channel area. Clay minerals from the Penghu Channels and south of the Taiwan Shoal are dominated by illite and chlorite with minor smectite and kaolinite. The sediment colors and mineral species are very different for the sediments of the Taiwan Shoal and outer shelf, revealing that these two areas featuring different oceanographic processes and sediment provenance.

  9. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  10. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  11. Clay Fabric of Gassy Submarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    28°54󈧑 ° 89°30󈧎" 38 125 11.9 39 559 81 *The Lambert coordinates of Core B- I A: X = 2,594,001; Y = 82,970. The Lambert coordinates of Core B-2... X = 2,585,823: Y = 90,832. Location fluid before critical point drying under equivalent in situ down- hole pressure, was constructed. The detailed...it appeared that Clay Fabric vs. Degassing ime with a specimen size of 7 x 7 x 20 mm the clay fabric in the central portion of a specimen will not

  12. Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have exhibited superior strength and thermo- oxidative properties as compared to pure polymers for use in air and space craft; however, there has often been difficulty completely dispersing the clay within the matrices of the polymer. In order to improve this process, the cation exchange capacity of lithium clay is first lowered using twenty-four hour heat treatments of no heat, 130 C, 150 C, or 170 C to fixate the lithium ions within the clay layers so that they are unexchangeable. Generally, higher temperatures have generated lower cation exchange capacities. An ion exchange involving dodecylamine, octadecylamine, or dimethyl benzidine (DMBZ) is then employed to actually expand the clay galleries. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy can be used to determine whether the clay has been successfully exfoliated. Finally, resins of DMBZ with clay are then pressed into disks for characterization using dynamic mechanical analyzer and oven- aging techniques in order to evaluate their glass transition, modulus strength, and thermal-oxidative stability in comparison to neat DMBZ. In the future, they may also be tested as composites for flexural and laminar shear strength.

  13. Signal or noise? Separating grain size-dependent Nd isotope variability from provenance shifts in Indus delta sediments, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonell, T. N.; Li, Y.; Blusztajn, J.; Giosan, L.; Clift, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Rare earth element (REE) radioisotope systems, such as neodymium (Nd), have been traditionally used as powerful tracers of source provenance, chemical weathering intensity, and sedimentary processes over geologic timescales. More recently, the effects of physical fractionation (hydraulic sorting) of sediments during transport have called into question the utility of Nd isotopes as a provenance tool. Is source terrane Nd provenance resolvable if sediment transport strongly induces noise? Can grain-size sorting effects be quantified? This study works to address such questions by utilizing grain size analysis, trace element geochemistry, and Nd isotope geochemistry of bulk and grain-size fractions (<63μm, 63-125 μm, 125-250 μm) from the Indus delta of Pakistan. Here we evaluate how grain size effects drive Nd isotope variability and further resolve the total uncertainties associated with Nd isotope compositions of bulk sediments. Results from the Indus delta indicate bulk sediment ɛNd compositions are most similar to the <63 µm fraction as a result of strong mineralogical control on bulk compositions by silt- to clay-sized monazite and/or allanite. Replicate analyses determine that the best reproducibility (± 0.15 ɛNd points) is observed in the 125-250 µm fraction. The bulk and finest fractions display the worst reproducibility (±0.3 ɛNd points). Standard deviations (2σ) indicate that bulk sediment uncertainties are no more than ±1.0 ɛNd points. This argues that excursions of ≥1.0 ɛNd points in any bulk Indus delta sediments must in part reflect an external shift in provenance irrespective of sample composition, grain size, and grain size distribution. Sample standard deviations (2s) estimate that any terrigenous bulk sediment composition should vary no greater than ±1.1 ɛNd points if provenance remains constant. Findings from this study indicate that although there are grain-size dependent Nd isotope effects, they are minimal in the Indus delta such

  14. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  15. Provenance Usage in the OceanLink Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narock, T.; Arko, R. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Cheatham, M.; Fils, D.; Finin, T.; Hitzler, P.; Janowicz, K.; Jones, M.; Krisnadhi, A.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mickle, A.; Raymond, L. M.; Schildhauer, M.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    A wide spectrum of maturing methods and tools, collectively characterized as the Semantic Web, is helping to vastly improve thedissemination of scientific research. The OceanLink project, an NSF EarthCube Building Block, is utilizing semantic technologies tointegrate geoscience data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards. Provenance is a vital componentin meeting both the scientific and engineering requirements of OceanLink. Provenance plays a key role in justification and understanding when presenting users with results aggregated from multiple sources. In the engineering sense, provenance enables the identification of new data and the ability to determine which data sources to query. Additionally, OceanLink will leverage human and machine computation for crowdsourcing, text mining, and co-reference resolution. The results of these computations, and their associated provenance, will be folded back into the constituent systems to continually enhance precision and utility. We will touch on the various roles provenance is playing in OceanLink as well as present our use of the PROV Ontology and associated Ontology Design Patterns.

  16. Computational provenance in hydrologic science: a snow mapping example.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Jeff; Frew, James

    2009-03-13

    Computational provenance--a record of the antecedents and processing history of digital information--is key to properly documenting computer-based scientific research. To support investigations in hydrologic science, we produce the daily fractional snow-covered area from NASA's moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS). From the MODIS reflectance data in seven wavelengths, we estimate the fraction of each 500 m pixel that snow covers. The daily products have data gaps and errors because of cloud cover and sensor viewing geometry, so we interpolate and smooth to produce our best estimate of the daily snow cover. To manage the data, we have developed the Earth System Science Server (ES3), a software environment for data-intensive Earth science, with unique capabilities for automatically and transparently capturing and managing the provenance of arbitrary computations. Transparent acquisition avoids the scientists having to express their computations in specific languages or schemas in order for provenance to be acquired and maintained. ES3 models provenance as relationships between processes and their input and output files. It is particularly suited to capturing the provenance of an evolving algorithm whose components span multiple languages and execution environments.

  17. Clay Shrines by 75 Fifth Graders. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1999 (Mexico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Marsha

    This curriculum unit, incorporating an art specialist's experience and knowledge gained in Mexico as a participant in the Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, focuses on the creation of a ceramic shrine by 75 fifth graders. The ceramic shrine described in the unit uses clay, paint, varnish, collage materials, and tin for…

  18. Results of Laboratory Tests of the Filtration Characteristics of Clay-Cement Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Sol’skii, S. V., E-mail: solskiysv@vniig.ru; Lopatina, M. G., E-mail: LoptainaMG@vniig.ru; Legina, E. E.

    Laboratory studies of the filtration characteristics of clay-cement concrete materials for constructing filtering diaphragms of earth dams by the method of secant piles are reported. Areas for further study aimed at improving the quality of construction, increasing operational safety, and developing a standards base for the design, construction, and operation of these systems are discussed.

  19. Technology and Organisation of Inka Pottery Production in the Leche Valley. Part I: Study of Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, F.; Häusler, W.; Wagner, U.

    2003-09-01

    We report on an interdisciplinary approach to the study of finds of unfired clay lumps and unfired broken vessels from two workshops in the Leche Valley, north coast of Peru. The material is used as a reference in the study of pottery making at both workshops.

  20. Characterization of Heat-treated Clay Minerals in the Context of Nuclear Waste Disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteo, E. N.; Wang, Y.; Kruichak, J. N.; Mills, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes, if any, that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of repository-relevant clay minerals (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and montmorillonite), were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-1000 °C. These samples were characterized to determine surface area, mineralogical alteration, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Our results show that for conditions up to 500 °C, no significant change occurs, so long as the clay mineral remains mineralogically intact. At temperatures above 500 °C, transformation of the layered silicates into silica phases leads to alteration that impacts important clay characteristics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Nation Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: SAND2015-6524 A

  1. The ultimate mineral processing challenge: Recovery of rare earths, phosphorus and uranium from Florida phosphatic clay

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Patrick; Liang, Haijun; Jin, Zhen

    We report phosphate beneficiation in Florida generates more than one tonne of phosphatic clay, or slime, per tonne of phosphate rock produced. Since the start of the practice of large-scale washing and desliming for phosphate beneficiation, more than 2 Gt of slime has accumulated, containing approximately 600 Mt of phosphate rock, 600 kt of rare earth elements (REEs) and 80 million kilograms of uranium. The recovery of these valuable elements from the phosphatic clay is one of the most challenging endeavors in mineral processing, because the clay is extremely dilute, with an average solids concentration of 3 percent, and finemore » in size, with more than 50 percent having particle size smaller than 2 μm, and it contains nearly 50 percent clay minerals as well as large amounts of magnesium, iron and aluminum. With industry support and under funding from the Critical Materials Institute, the Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory undertook the task to recover phosphorus, rare earths and uranium from Florida phosphatic clay. This paper presents the results from the preliminary testing of two approaches. The first approach involves three-stage cycloning using cyclones with diameters of 12.4 cm (5 in.), 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 2.54 cm (1 in.), respectively, to remove clay minerals followed by flotation and leaching. The second approach is a two-step leaching process. In the first step, selective leaching was conducted to remove magnesium, thus allowing the production of phosphoric acid suitable for the manufacture of diammonium phosphate (DAP) in the second leaching step. The results showed that multistage cycloning with small cyclones is necessary to remove clay minerals. Finally, selective leaching at about pH 3.2 using sulfuric acid was found to be effective for removing more than 80 percent of magnesium from the feed with minimal loss of phosphorus.« less

  2. The ultimate mineral processing challenge: Recovery of rare earths, phosphorus and uranium from Florida phosphatic clay

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Patrick; Liang, Haijun; Jin, Zhen; ...

    2017-11-01

    We report phosphate beneficiation in Florida generates more than one tonne of phosphatic clay, or slime, per tonne of phosphate rock produced. Since the start of the practice of large-scale washing and desliming for phosphate beneficiation, more than 2 Gt of slime has accumulated, containing approximately 600 Mt of phosphate rock, 600 kt of rare earth elements (REEs) and 80 million kilograms of uranium. The recovery of these valuable elements from the phosphatic clay is one of the most challenging endeavors in mineral processing, because the clay is extremely dilute, with an average solids concentration of 3 percent, and finemore » in size, with more than 50 percent having particle size smaller than 2 μm, and it contains nearly 50 percent clay minerals as well as large amounts of magnesium, iron and aluminum. With industry support and under funding from the Critical Materials Institute, the Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory undertook the task to recover phosphorus, rare earths and uranium from Florida phosphatic clay. This paper presents the results from the preliminary testing of two approaches. The first approach involves three-stage cycloning using cyclones with diameters of 12.4 cm (5 in.), 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 2.54 cm (1 in.), respectively, to remove clay minerals followed by flotation and leaching. The second approach is a two-step leaching process. In the first step, selective leaching was conducted to remove magnesium, thus allowing the production of phosphoric acid suitable for the manufacture of diammonium phosphate (DAP) in the second leaching step. The results showed that multistage cycloning with small cyclones is necessary to remove clay minerals. Finally, selective leaching at about pH 3.2 using sulfuric acid was found to be effective for removing more than 80 percent of magnesium from the feed with minimal loss of phosphorus.« less

  3. Wave-induced ripple development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco H.; Mouazé, Dominique; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments that aim to provide a fuller understanding of ripple development within clay-sand mixture substrates under oscillatory flow conditions. The work was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull and constituted 6 separate runs, in which 5 runs were conducted under identical sets of regular waves (an additional run was conducted under irregular waves, but is not discussed in present paper). The bed content was systematically varied in its composition ranging from a pure sand bed through to a bed comprising 7.4% clay. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action, during and after, each run. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive clay materials in the substrate on ripple evolution under waves. Most importantly, addition of clay in the bed dramatically slowed down the rate of ripple development and evolution. The equilibrium time of each run increased exponentially from 30 minutes under the control conditions of a pure sand bed, rising to ~350 minutes for the bed with the highest fraction of clay. The paper discusses the slower ripple growth rates with higher cohesive fractions, via an influence on critical shear, but highlights that the end equilibrium size of ripples is found to be independent of increasing substrate clay fraction. The suspended particles mass (SPM) concentration indicates that clay particles were suspended and winnowed by wave action. Additionally, laser granulometry of the final substrates verified that ripple crests were composed of pure sand layers that were absent at ripple troughs, reflecting a relatively higher winnowing efficiency at wave ripples crest. The winnowing process and its efficiency is inexorably linked to wave ripple development and evolution. The implications of the results

  4. LA-ICP-MS as Tool for Provenance Analyses in Arctic Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildau, Antje; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The hydraulic transport of sediments is a major geological process in terrestrial and marine systems and is responsible for the loss, redistribution and accumulation of minerals. Provenance analyses are a powerful tool for assessing the origin and dispersion of material in ancient and modern fluvial and marine sediments. Provenance-specific heavy minerals (e.g., zircon, rutile, tourmaline) can therefore be used to provide valuable information on the formation of ore deposits (placer deposits), and the reconstruction of paleogeography, hydrology, climate conditions and developments. The application of provenances analyses for the latter reason is of specific interest, since there is need for research on the progressing climate change, and heavy minerals represent good proxies for the evaluation of recent and past changes in the climate. The study of these fine particles provides information about potential regional or long distance transport paths, glacial / ice drift and current flows, freezing and melting events as well as depositional centers for the released sediments. Classic methods applied for provenance analyses are mapping of the presence / absence of diagnostic minerals, their grain size distribution, modal mineralogy and the analysis of variations in ratio of two or more heavy minerals. Electron microprobe has been established to discover changes in mineral chemistry of individual mineral phases, which can indicate fluctuations or differences in the provenance. All these methods bear the potential of high errors that lower the validity of the provenance analyses. These are for example the misclassification of mineral species due to undistinguishable optical properties or the limitations in the detection / variations of trace elements using the election microprobe. For this case study, marine sediments from the Arctic Ocean have been selected to test if LA-ICP-MS can be established as a key technique for precise and reliable provenance analyses. The Laptev

  5. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    PubMed

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol.

  6. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.

    2014-08-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decademore » or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for

  7. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  8. Using Domain Requirements to Achieve Science-Oriented Provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Eric G; Halter, Todd D; Critchlow, Terence J

    2010-06-18

    Using Domain Requirements to Achieve Science-Oriented Provenance Eric Stephan1 Todd Halter1 Terence Critchlow1 Paulo Pinheiro da Silva2 Leonardo Salayandia2 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA, USA 2 University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso TX, USA Abstract. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radi- ation Measurement Program (ARM) is adopting the use of formalized provenance to support observational data products produced by ARM operations and relied upon by researchers. Because of the diversity of needs in the climate community provenance will need to be conveyed in a domain-oriented context. This paper explores a use case where semanticmore » abstract workflows (SAW) are employed as a means to filter, aggregate, and contextually describe the historical events responsible for the ARM data product the scientist is relying upon.« less

  9. Linked data and provenance in biological data webs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Miles, Alistair; Klyne, Graham; Shotton, David

    2009-03-01

    The Web is now being used as a platform for publishing and linking life science data. The Web's linking architecture can be exploited to join heterogeneous data from multiple sources. However, as data are frequently being updated in a decentralized environment, provenance information becomes critical to providing reliable and trustworthy services to scientists. This article presents design patterns for representing and querying provenance information relating to mapping links between heterogeneous data from sources in the domain of functional genomics. We illustrate the use of named resource description framework (RDF) graphs at different levels of granularity to make provenance assertions about linked data, and demonstrate that these assertions are sufficient to support requirements including data currency, integrity, evidential support and historical queries.

  10. Provenance of aeolian sands in the Hetao Plain, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingchen; Cai, Maotang; Ye, Peisheng; Ye, Mengni; Li, Chenglu; Wu, Hang; Lu, Jing; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Zhirong; Luzhou, Yangfan; Liu, Chao

    2018-06-01

    Patches of aeolian sand are distributed throughout the Hetao Plain, which pose threats to farming and agriculture. Identification of the provenance of the aeolian sands may help with efforts to alleviate ecological stress in Inner Mongolia and in the paleoenvironmental interpretation of sandy sequences. This study uses geochemical data to determine the provenance of aeolian sands from the Hetao Plain. Provenance discrimination diagrams revealed that the aeolian sands were mainly derived from mixed source felsic granites and granodiorites, which have undergone weak sedimentary recycling. The chemical index of alteration and A-CN-K data indicated that the aeolian sediments were transported over a short distance. Comparison of trace element and rare earth element (REE) ratios of the aeolian sands with rock samples from potential source areas has revealed that aeolian sand deposits in the Hetao Plain were mainly derived from Sertengshan and Yellow River sediments. The Langshan and Ordos Plateau may represent additional sand sources for the Hetao Plain.

  11. Rare earth elements in weathering profiles and sediments of Minnesota: Implications for provenance studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morey, G.B.; Setterholm, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The relative abundance of rare earth elements in sediments has been suggested as a tool for determining their source rocks. This correlation requires that weathering, erosion, and sedimentation do not alter the REE abundances, or do so in a predictable manner. We find that the rare earth elements are mobilized and fractionated by weathering, and that sediments derived from the weathered materials can display modifications of the original pattern of rare earth elements of some due to grain-size sorting of the weathered material. However, the REE distribution pattern of the provenance terrane can be recognized in the sediments.

  12. Automated Generation of Technical Documentation and Provenance for Reproducible Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, B.; Medyckyj-Scott, D.; Spiekermann, R.; Ausseil, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    Data provenance and detailed technical documentation are essential components of high-quality reproducible research, however are often only partially addressed during a research project. Recording and maintaining this information during the course of a project can be a difficult task to get right as it is a time consuming and often boring process for the researchers involved. As a result, provenance records and technical documentation provided alongside research results can be incomplete or may not be completely consistent with the actual processes followed. While providing access to the data and code used by the original researchers goes some way toward enabling reproducibility, this does not count as, or replace, data provenance. Additionally, this can be a poor substitute for good technical documentation and is often more difficult for a third-party to understand - particularly if they do not understand the programming language(s) used. We present and discuss a tool built from the ground up for the production of well-documented and reproducible spatial datasets that are created by applying a series of classification rules to a number of input layers. The internal model of the classification rules required by the tool to process the input data is exploited to also produce technical documentation and provenance records with minimal additional user input. Available provenance records that accompany input datasets are incorporated into those that describe the current process. As a result, each time a new iteration of the analysis is performed the documentation and provenance records are re-generated to provide an accurate description of the exact process followed. The generic nature of this tool, and the lessons learned during its creation, have wider application to other fields where the production of derivative datasets must be done in an open, defensible, and reproducible way.

  13. PIXE study on the provenance of Chinese ancient porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Cheng, H. S.; Lin, J. W.; Yang, F. J.

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports the PIXE study on the provenance of Chinese ancient porcelain made in 7-10th century. The chemical compositions of Jun celadon samples made at Juntai, Linru and Hunyuan kilns, the white-glazed porcelain samples made at Ding, Huangye and Dangyangyu kilns, and the Ru celadon samples made at Qiangliang Temple were measured by external-beam PIXE, and the factor analysis was applied for identifying their provenances. Experimental results show that the porcelain products made at different kilns can be distinguished according to the compositional differences measured by PIXE.

  14. Provenance in Data Interoperability for Multi-Sensor Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leptoukh, Greg; Berrick, Steve; Shen, Suhung; Prados, Ana; Fox, Peter; Yang, Wenli; Min, Min; Holloway, Dan; Enloe, Yonsook

    2008-01-01

    As our inventory of Earth science data sets grows, the ability to compare, merge and fuse multiple datasets grows in importance. This requires a deeper data interoperability than we have now. Efforts such as Open Geospatial Consortium and OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) have broken down format barriers to interoperability; the next challenge is the semantic aspects of the data. Consider the issues when satellite data are merged, cross-calibrated, validated, inter-compared and fused. We must match up data sets that are related, yet different in significant ways: the phenomenon being measured, measurement technique, location in space-time or quality of the measurements. If subtle distinctions between similar measurements are not clear to the user, results can be meaningless or lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. Most of these distinctions trace to how the data came to be: sensors, processing and quality assessment. For example, monthly averages of satellite-based aerosol measurements often show significant discrepancies, which might be due to differences in spatio- temporal aggregation, sampling issues, sensor biases, algorithm differences or calibration issues. Provenance information must be captured in a semantic framework that allows data inter-use tools to incorporate it and aid in the intervention of comparison or merged products. Semantic web technology allows us to encode our knowledge of measurement characteristics, phenomena measured, space-time representation, and data quality attributes in a well-structured, machine-readable ontology and rulesets. An analysis tool can use this knowledge to show users the provenance-related distrintions between two variables, advising on options for further data processing and analysis. An additional problem for workflows distributed across heterogeneous systems is retrieval and transport of provenance. Provenance may be either embedded within the data payload, or transmitted

  15. Provenance and geochemical behavior of fluorine in the soils of an endemic fluorosis belt, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbandi, Reza; Moore, Farid; Keshavarzi, Behnam

    2017-05-01

    The concentration of fluorine, major, trace and rare earth elements (REEs) were used to estimate the probable sources and provenance of fluorine in the soils of an endemic fluorosis belt in central Iran. Total fluorine (TF) in soils varied from 146 to 406 mg/kg with a mean of 277.5 mg/kg. Calculated enrichment factor (EF) and single factor pollution index (SFPI) revealed that the majority of soil samples were moderately contaminated by fluorine. The very strong positive correlation of TF with weathering indices and soil's fine sized fractions indicated that chemical weathering and alteration of parent rocks/soils are the main controlling factors of fluorine behavior in soils. Fluorine affinity to immobile transition trace elements and REEs suggested the role of heavy minerals as the potential F host phases. Modal mineralogy along with SEM-EDX analysis indicated that apatite, fluorapophyllite, epidote, biotite, muscovite and chlorite, as well as, clay minerals are the main F-bearing minerals in the studied soils. Discriminant, bivariate and ternary diagrams of elemental compositions displayed similar geochemical signature of soils to intermediate-acidic rocks and local shales. Based on the weathering indices, soils were immature and showed a non-steady state weathering trend from upper continental crust (UCC), acidic and intermediate igneous source rocks towards shale composition possibly due to mixing of moderately weathered and un-weathered sources of different primary compositions.

  16. Hydration Phase Diagram of Clay Particles from Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Honorio, Tulio; Brochard, Laurent; Vandamme, Matthieu

    2017-11-07

    Adsorption plays a fundamental role in the behavior of clays. Because of the confinement between solid clay layers on the nanoscale, adsorbed water is structured in layers, which can occupy a specific volume. The transition between these states is intimately related to key features of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. In this article, we consider the hydration states of clays as phases and the transition between these states as phase changes. The thermodynamic formulation supporting this idea is presented. Then, the results from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of sodium montmorillonite are used to derive hydration phase diagrams. The stability analysis presented here explains the coexistence of different hydration states at clay particle scale and improves our understanding of the irreversibilities of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. Our results provide insights into the mechanics of the elementary constituents of clays, which is crucial for a better understanding of the macroscopic behavior of clay-rich rocks and soils.

  17. Performance of Willow Clones on Sharkey Clay

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Ferguson

    1983-01-01

    Random clones of black willow (Salix nigra) and sandbar willow (S. exigua) from near Stoneville, MS and of S. argebtinensis and S. babylonica X S. alba were grown in Sharkey clay near Stoneville, MS for 11 years. S. babylonica X S. alba grew best throughout the...

  18. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD...)(1), the ingredient is used as an indirect human food ingredient with no limitation other than...

  19. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  20. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  1. Heat of transport of air in clay.

    PubMed

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    By measuring the thermomolecular pressure difference and using principles of irreversible thermodynamics, heat of transport of air in clay and its coefficient of diffusion are found. A comparison of thermotranspiration and pressure driven gas fluxes through concrete slab in homes is examined. It is shown that thermotranspiration air/radon flow may greatly exceed diffusion (pressure driven) flow in homes.

  2. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  3. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  4. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  5. Diffusion in Clay Layers and Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a collaborative SERDP-funded study, researchers from the Air Force Institute of Technology, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Michigan developed a numerical model that simulates the enhanced transport of CAHs into and out of low permeability clay ...

  6. Geophysical characterization of areas prone to quick-clay landslides using radio-magnetotelluric and seismic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunguo; Malehmir, Alireza; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Landslides attributed to quick clays have not only considerable influences on surface geomorphology, they have caused delays in transportation systems, environmental problems and human fatalities, especially in Scandinavia and North America. If the subsurface distributions of quick clays are known, potential damages can be mitigated and the triggers of landslides can better be studied and understood. For this purpose, new radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) and seismic data were acquired in an area near the Göta River in southwest Sweden that contains quick clays and associated landslides. High-resolution data along 4 new lines, in total 3.8 km long, were acquired and merged with earlier acquired data from the site. Velocity and resistivity models derived from first breaks and RMT data were used to delineate subsurface geology, in particular the bedrock surface and coarse-grained materials that overlay the bedrock. The latter often are found underlying quick clays at the site. Comparably high-resistivity and sometimes high-velocity regions within marine clays are attributed to a combination of leached salt from marine clays or potential quick clays and coarse-grained materials. The resistivity and tomographic velocity models suggest a much larger role of the coarse-grained materials at the site than previously thought, but they also suggest two different scenarios for triggering quick-clay landslides at the site. These scenarios are related to the erosion of the riverbank, increased pore-pressure and surface topography when close to the river and human activity when away from the river and where bowl-shaped bedrock surrounds the sediments.

  7. Preparation and characterization of 'green' hybrid clay-dye nanopigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Mehmet; Onganer, Yavuz; Tabak, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    We obtained a low cost and abundant nanopigment material composed of Rhodamine B (Rh-B) organic dye compound and Unye bentonite (UB) clay from Turkey. The characterization of the nanopigment was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal analysis techniques. According to the result of texture analyses, we showed that the particle size distribution (d: 0.5-mean distribution) of Rh-B/UB nanopigment material was around 100 nm diameter. It was also demonstrated that the samples had a particle size around nm diameter in SEM images. As seen in the PXRD and thermal analysis, there is a difference in basal spacing by 1.46° (2θ) and a higher mass loss by 7.80% in the temperature range 200-500 °C compared to the raw bentonite.

  8. Can Clays in Livestock Feed Promote Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Pathogenic Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Valverde, José Ramón; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry has long been associated with the appearance of antibiotic resistance and virulence factor determinants. Nonetheless, the number of cases of human infection involving resistant or virulent microorganisms that originate in farms is increasing. While many antibiotics have been banned as dietary supplements in some countries, other additives thought to be innocuous in terms of the development and spread of antibiotic resistance are used as growth promoters. In fact, several clay materials are routinely added to animal feed with the aim of improving growth and animal product quality. However, recent findings suggest that sepiolite, a clay additive, mediates the direct transfer of plasmids between different bacterial species. We therefore hypothesize that clays present in animal feed facilitate the horizontal transfer of resistance determinants in the digestive tract of farm animals.

  9. Polyacrylamide sorption opportunity on interlayer and external pore surfaces of contaminant barrier clays.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Hilary I; Bae, Sunyoung

    2005-01-01

    Physico-chemical interactions among polymer molecules in aqueous solution and clay mineralogical/textural characteristics influence the sorption of polymer molecules on clay barrier minerals. Amendment of potentially unstable barrier clays with aqueous polymers can improve barrier material resistance to environmental stresses during service. In this research, the ability of molecular coils of polyacrylamide (PAM) to overlap in solution and to enter interlayer space in Na-montmorillonite (specific surface=31.82+/-0.22 m2 g(-1)) and kaolinite (specific surface=18+/-2 m2 g(-1)) were analyzed theoretically and experimentally, using solution viscosity measurements, and X-ray diffractometry. Experimental data on two theoretical indices: relative size ratio (RSR); and molecular availability (Ma) that are formulated to scale polymer molecular sorption on clay interlayer, indicate that the sorption of PAM A (Mw=4000000) and PAM B (Mw=7000000) does not produce any significant change in the d-spacing of both clay minerals. Although the negative Ma values of -3.51 g l(-1) for PAM A and -3.88 g l(-1) for PAM B indicate high levels of entanglement of polymer molecular coils in solution, sorption data confirm that the entangled coils are still able to sorb onto Na-montmorillonite highly and kaolinite to a lesser extent.

  10. Role of Interfaces in Elasticity and Failure of Clay-Organic Nanocomposites: Toughening upon Interface Weakening?

    PubMed

    Hantal, György; Brochard, Laurent; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz-Joseph; Coasne, Benoit

    2017-10-24

    Synthetic organic-inorganic composites constitute a new class of engineering materials finding applications in an increasing range of fields. The interface between the constituting phases plays a pivotal role in the enhancement of mechanical properties. In exfoliated clay-organic nanocomposites, individual, high aspect ratio clay sheets are dispersed in the organic matrix providing large interfaces and hence efficient stress transfer. In this study, we aim at elucidating molecular-scale reinforcing mechanisms in a series of model clay-organic composite systems by means of reactive molecular simulations. In our models, two possible locations of failure initiation are present: one is the interlayer space of the clay platelet, and the other one is the clay-organic interface. We systematically modify the cohesiveness of the interface and assess how the failure mechanism changes when the different model composites are subjected to a tensile test. Besides a change in the failure mechanism, an increase in the released energy at the interface (meaning an increased overall toughness) are observed upon weakening the interface by bond removal. We propose a theoretical analysis of these results by considering a cohesive law that captures the effect of the interface on the composite mechanics. We suggest an atomistic interpretation of this cohesive law, in particular, how it relates to the degree of bonding at the interface. In a broader perspective, this work sheds light on the importance of the orthogonal behavior of interfaces to nanocomposites.

  11. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  12. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.

  13. Carbon dioxide intercalation in Na-fluorohectorite clay at near-ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Jon Otto; Hemmen, Henrik; Rolseth, Erlend G.; Fonseca, Davi; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Plivelic, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    A molecular dynamics study by Cygan et al.[1] shows the possibility of intercalation and retention of CO2 in smectite clays at 37 ^oC and 200 bar, which suggests that clay minerals may prove suitable for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. In this work we show from x-ray diffraction measurements that gaseous CO2 intercalates into the interlayer space of the synthetic smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The mean interlayer distance of the clay when CO2 is intercalated is 12.5 å at -20 C and 15 bar. The magnitude of the expansion of the interlayer upon intercalation is indistinguishable from that of the dehydrated-monohydrated intercalation of H2O, but this possibility is ruled out by careful repeating the measurements exposing the clay to nitrogen gas. The dynamics of the CO2 intercalation process displays a higher intercalation rate at increased pressure, and the rate is several orders of magnitude slower than that of water or vapor at ambient pressure and temperature.[4pt] [1] Cygan, R. T.; Romanov, V. N.; Myshakin, E. M. Natural materials for carbon capture; Techincal report SAND2010-7217; Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque, New Mexico, November, 2010.

  14. Sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea during the last 800 kyrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, B. K.; Horikawa, K.; Asahara, Y.; Kim, J. E.; Ikehara, M.; Lee, J.

    2017-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 355 conducted to drill 1109.4 m penetration at Site U1456 in the Laxmi Basin of the Arabian Sea. Four lithologic units are defined onboard at Site U1456 (Pandey et al., 2016). Unit I is 121 m long, consisting mostly of pelagic carbonates (nannofossil ooze and/or foraminifera-rich nannofossil ooze) interbedded with thin terrigenous (clay, silt, and sand) turbidite layers. The age model of Unit I was determined by the correlation of δ18O fluctuations of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) to LR04 stacks, estimating 1.2 Ma. A total of 60 samples, collected in the context of magnetic susceptibility (MS) changes at a discrete interval from a composite section (Holes U1456A and U1456C) of Unit I, were analyzed to measure Nd and Sr isotopes of detrital fraction. Based on Nd and Sr isotopes, the sediment provenance in the Laxmi Basin during the last 800 kyrs was traced in response to the monsoon activity between the interglacial and glacial periods. ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr vary in a range from -12.4 to -8.0 and from 0.712 to 0.727, respectively. The correlation between ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr is quite linear, indicating that the sediments were provided mainly by two dominant sources. Considering the ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr end-members of sediment sources (i.e., river sediments), the Tapi River and Narmada River are the main contributors of sediments to Site U1456 with a little influence by the modern Indus River. However, the glacial sediments from the Indus River and the Mahi River may supply an additional fraction, leading to less ɛNd and more 87Sr/86Sr at Site U1456. Judged by the sediment sources, the sediments in the Laxmi Basin are characterized by the mixture of different provenances. In addition, it should be noted that the low ɛNd and high 87Sr/86Sr values coincide largely with high MS and vice versa, irrespectively of the glacial-interglacial change. Thus, rather than the sediment provenances, ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr

  15. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  16. Zeta Potential Measurements on Three Clays from Turkey and Effects of Clays on Coal Flotation

    PubMed

    Hussain; Dem&idot;rc&idot;; özbayoğlu

    1996-12-25

    There is a growing trend of characterizing coal and coal wastes in order to study the effect of clays present in them during coal washing. Coarse wastes from the Zonguldak Coal Washery, Turkey, were characterized and found to contain kaolinite, illite, and chlorite. These three clays, obtained in almost pure form from various locations in Turkey, have been subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to assess their purity and zeta potential measurements in order to evaluate their properties in terms of their surface charge and point of zero charge (pzc) values. It was found from XRD data that these clays were almost pure and their electrokinetic potential should therefore be representative of their colloidal behavior. All three clay minerals were negatively charged over the range from pH 2.5 to 11. Chlorite and illite have pzc at pH 3 and pH 2.5, respectively, whereas kaolinite has no pzc. The effect of these clays in Zonguldak coal, wastes, and black waters on coal flotation was studied by floating artificial mixtures of Zonguldak clean coal (4.5% ash) and individual clay. The flotation tests on coal/individual clay revealed that each clay influences coal flotation differently according to its type and amount. Illite had the worst effect on coal floated, followed by chlorite and kaolinite. The loss of yield in coal was found to be 18% for kaolinite, 20% for chlorite, and 28% for illite, indicating the worst effect of illite and least for kaolinite during coal flotation.

  17. Advanced applications of numerical modelling techniques for clay extruder design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Saravanakumar

    Ceramic materials play a vital role in our day to day life. Recent advances in research, manufacture and processing techniques and production methodologies have broadened the scope of ceramic products such as bricks, pipes and tiles, especially in the construction industry. These are mainly manufactured using an extrusion process in auger extruders. During their long history of application in the ceramic industry, most of the design developments of extruder systems have resulted from expensive laboratory-based experimental work and field-based trial and error runs. In spite of these design developments, the auger extruders continue to be energy intensive devices with high operating costs. Limited understanding of the physical process involved in the process and the cost and time requirements of lab-based experiments were found to be the major obstacles in the further development of auger extruders.An attempt has been made herein to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) based numerical modelling techniques to reduce the costs and time associated with research into design improvement by experimental trials. These two techniques, although used widely in other engineering applications, have rarely been applied for auger extruder development. This had been due to a number of reasons including technical limitations of CFD tools previously available. Modern CFD and FEA software packages have much enhanced capabilities and allow the modelling of the flow of complex fluids such as clay.This research work presents a methodology in using Herschel-Bulkley's fluid flow based CFD model to simulate and assess the flow of clay-water mixture through the extruder and the die of a vacuum de-airing type clay extrusion unit used in ceramic extrusion. The extruder design and the operating parameters were varied to study their influence on the power consumption and the extrusion pressure. The model results were then validated using results from

  18. Investigation of mechanical properties of hemp/glass fiber reinforced nano clay hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unki, Hanamantappa Ningappa; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    Over the last twenty to thirty years composite materials have been used in engineering field. Composite materials possess high strength, high strength to weight ratio due to these facts composite materials are becoming popular among researchers and scientists. The major proportion of engineering materials consists of composite materials. Composite materials are used in vast applications ranging from day-to-day household articles to highly sophisticated applications. In this paper an attempt is made to prepare three different composite materials using e-glass and Hemp. In this present investigation hybrid composite of Hemp, Glass fiber and Nano clay will be prepared by Hand-layup technique. The glass fiber used in this present investigation is E-glass fiber bi-directional: 90˚ orientation. The composite samples will be made in the form of a Laminates. The wt% of nanoclay added in the preparation of sample is 20 gm constant. The fabricated composite Laminate will be cut into corresponding profiles as per ASTM standards for Mechanical Testing. The effect of addition of Nano clay and variation of Hemp/glass fibers will be studied. In the present work, a new Hybrid composite is developed in which Hemp, E glass fibers is reinforced with epoxy resin and with Nano clay.

  19. Toluene, Methanol and Benzaldehyde Removal from Gas Streams by Adsorption onto Natural Clay and Faujasite-Y type Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zaitan, Hicham; Mohamed, Elham F; Valdés, Héctor; Nawdali, Mostafa; Rafqah, Salah; Manero, Marie Hélène

    2016-12-01

    A great number of pollution problems come as a result of the emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) into the environment and their control becomes a serious challenge for the global chemical industry. Adsorption is a widely used technique for the removal of VOCs due to its high efficiency, low cost, and convenient operation. In this study, the feasibility to use a locally available clay, as adsorbent material to control VOCs emissions is evaluated. Natural clay is characterised by different physical-chemical methods and adsorptive interaction features between VOCs and natural clay are identified. Toluene (T), methanol (M) and benzaldehyde (B) are used here as representatives of three different kinds of VOCs. Adsorption isotherms onto natural clay and faujasite-Y type zeolite (Fau Y) are obtained at room temperature. According to Langmuir model data, maximum adsorption capacities (qm) of Fez natural clay and zeolite toward methanol (M), toluene (T) and benzaldehyde (B) at 300 K are 8, 0.89 and 3.1 mmol g-1, and 15, 1.91 and 13.9 mmol g-1 respectively. In addition, the effect of temperature on the adsorption of toluene onto natural clay is evaluated in the range from 300 to 323K. An increase on temperature reduces the adsorption capacity of natural clay toward toluene, indicating that an exothermic physical adsorption process takes place. The enthalpy of adsorption of toluene onto Fez natural clay was found to be -54 kJ mol-1. A preliminary cost analysis shows that natural clay could be used as an alternative low cost adsorbent in the control of VOCs from contaminated gas streams with a cost of US$ 0.02 kg-1 compared to Fau Y zeolite with US$ 10 kg-1.

  20. Scots pine in eastern Nebraska: A provenance study

    Treesearch

    Ralph A. Read

    1971-01-01

    Seedling progenies of 36 rangewide provenances of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) were established in a field test in eastern Nebraska. Results in growth and other characteristics after 8 years reveal that (1) southern origins bordering the Mediterranean grow slowly to moderately fast and remain dark green in winter, (2) central European origins grow very fast and turn...

  1. Seasonal growth in white pine seedlings from different provenances

    Treesearch

    Frank S., Jr. Santamour

    1960-01-01

    The Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, in cooperation with other experiment stations in the United States and Canada, began a range-wide provenance test of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) in 1955. Seed was collected from 31 different locations in 17 states and 4 Canadian provinces. In most places collections were made from 10 trees at each location. The seed...

  2. Climate Data Provenance Tracking for Just-In-Time Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, S.; Nadeau, D.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    The "Climate Data Management System" (CDMS) was created in 1996 as part of the Climate Data Analysis Tools suite of software. It provides a simple interface into a wide variety of climate data formats, and creates NetCDF CF-Compliant files. It leverages the NumPy framework for high performance computation, and is an all-in-one IO and computation package. CDMS has been extended to track manipulations of data, and trace that data all the way to the original raw data. This extension tracks provenance about data, and enables just-in-time (JIT) computation. The provenance for each variable is packaged as part of the variable's metadata, and can be used to validate data processing and computations (by repeating the analysis on the original data). It also allows for an alternate solution for sharing analyzed data; if the bandwidth for a transfer is prohibitively expensive, the provenance serialization can be passed in a much more compact format and the analysis rerun on the input data. Data provenance tracking in CDMS enables far-reaching and impactful functionalities, permitting implementation of many analytical paradigms.

  3. Scab susceptibility of a provenance collection of pecan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scab (caused by Fusicladium effusum) is the most economically destructive disease of pecan in the Southeast US. Epidemics are favored by rainfall and high humidity. A provenance collection of ~950 pecan trees from 19 locations representing the native range of the species is located in Byron, Georgia...

  4. Differential susceptibility of white fir provenances to balsam twig aphid

    Treesearch

    George T. Ferrell

    1989-01-01

    Susceptibility of Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona provenances of white fir (Abies concolor [Gord. & Glend.] Lindl.) to crown injury caused by balsam twig aphid (Mindarus abietinus Koch.) was assessed in an experimental plantation in the central Sierra Nevada in California. Bud phenology was observed to explore...

  5. Hydro-mechanical properties of the Red Salt Clay (T4) - Relevancy of the minimum stress criterion for barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkley, W.; Popp, T.; Salzer, K.; Gruner, M.; Böttge, V.

    The so-called Red Salt Clay (T4) is deposited as clay-rich clastic sediment at the base of the Aller-series forming a persistent lateral layer of up to 20 m thickness above the lower Zechstein-series. The clay layers may act as a protective shield in the hanging wall of gas storages or underground repositories in salt formations, thus resulting in a multi-barrier system. As a proof of its reliability comprehensive hydro-mechanical investigations were performed on clay samples recovered at different sites in Germany. Most important, rock tightness against various fluids was confirmed in the lab and field-scale. Remarkably, only if the fluid pressure equalises the acting minimal stress (i.e. violence of the “minimum stress criterion”) a significant increase of permeability is observed (“pathway dilatation”) but no macro-frac. However, the material properties from different locations showed a significant variability according to different burial depths. Thus the Red Salt Clay may act as natural analogue, representing the material variability of various indurated clays. In addition, the existing knowledge gained from practical mining activities can be used to evaluate extreme in situ loading conditions.

  6. Petrography and geochemistry of the Middle Miocene Gebel El Rusas sandstones, Eastern Desert, Egypt: Implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2017-10-01

    Petrography and bulk rock geochemistry of the Middle Miocene sandstones of the lower and upper members of Gebel El Rusas Formation along the Egyptian Red Sea Coastal plain, have been investigated to determine the provenance, tectonic setting, and weathering condition of this formation. The Lower Member is formed mainly of sandstones and conglomerates with clay interbeds. The Upper Member is more calcareous and formed mainly of sandstones and limestones with marls and clays intercalations. Petrographically, the Lower Member sandstones are mostly immature and classified as arkoses with an average framework composition of Q_{66}F_{29}R5, and the Upper Member sandstones are partly submature (more quartzose, less feldspathic) and classified as subarkoses with an average framework composition of Q_{80}F_{17}R3. The Gebel El Rusas sandstones are enriched in Sr, Ba, Zr and Rb and depleted in Co and U, as compared to UCC. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) values suggest moderate weathering conditions. The geochemistry results revealed that the Gebel El Rusas sandstones were derived from felsic-granitic source rocks and deposited in a passive margin of a synrift basin. The inferred tectonic setting for Middle Miocene Gebel El Rusas sandstones in the study area is consistent with the regional geology of the Eastern Desert of Egypt during Middle Miocene.

  7. The Use of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites in Wastewater Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Rytwo, Giora

    2012-01-01

    Some agricultural effluents are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants: their pretreatment is necessary to avoid clogging of the filtering devices by colloidal matter. The colloidal stability of the effluents is mainly due to mutual repulsive forces that keep charged particles in suspension. Pretreatment processes are based on two separate stages: (a) neutralization of the charges (“coagulation”) and (b) bridging between several small particles to form larger aggregates that sink, leaving clarified effluent (“flocculation”). The consequent destabilization of the colloidal suspension lowers total suspended solids (TSSs), turbidity, and other environmental quality parameters, making the treatments that follow more efficient. Clay-based materials have been widely used for effluent pretreatment and pollutant removal. This study presents the use of nanocomposites, comprised of an anchoring particle and a polymer, as “coagoflocculants” for the efficient and rapid reduction of TSS and turbidity in wastewater with a high organic load. The use of such particles combines the advantages of coagulant and flocculant by neutralizing the charge of the suspended particles while bridging between them and anchoring them to a denser particle (the clay mineral), enhancing their precipitation. Very rapid and efficient pretreatment is achieved in one single treatment step. PMID:22454607

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of Co sorption in clay montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Rebaza, A. V.; Montes, M. L.; Taylor, M. A.; Errico, L. A.; Alonso, R. E.

    2018-03-01

    Montmorillonite (MMT) clays are 2:1 layered structures which in natural state may allocate different hydrated cations such as M-nH2O (M = Na, Ca, Fe, etc) in its interlayer space. Depending on the capability for ion sorption, these materials are interesting for environmental remediation. In this work we experimentally study the Co sorption in a natural Na-MMT using UV-visible spectrometry and XRD on semi-oriented samples, and then analyze the sorption ability of this clay by means of ab initio calculation performed on pristine MMT. The structural properties of Na-MMT and Co-adsorbed MMT, and the hyperfine parameters at different atomic sites were analyzed and compared with the experimental ones for the first, and for the case of the hyperfine parameters, presented for the first time for the last. The theoretical predictions based on total energy considerations confirm that Co incorporation replacing Na is energetically favorable. Also, the basal spacing d001 experimentally obtained is well reproduced.

  9. Adsorption of Radioactive Cesium to Illite-Sericite Mixed Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. H.; Choung, S.; Park, C. S.; Jeon, S.; Han, J. H.; Han, W. S.

    2016-12-01

    Once radioactive cesium is released into aquatic environments through nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, it is harmful to human and ecological system for a long time (t1/2 = 30.2 years) because of its chemical toxicity and γ-radiation. Sorption mechanism is mainly applied to remove the cesium from aquatic environments. Illite is one of effective sorbent, considering economical cost for remediation. Although natural illite is typically produced as a mixture with sericite formed by phyllic alteration in hydrothermal ore deposits, the effects of illite-sericite mixed clays on cesium sorption was rarely studied. This study evaluated the sorption properties of cesium to natural illite collected at Yeongdong in Korea as the world-largest illite producing areas (termed "Yeongdong illite"). The illite samples were analyzed by XRF, XRD, FT-IR and SEM-EDX to determine mineralogy, chemical composition, and morphological characteristics, and used for batch sorption experiments. Most of "Yeongdong illite" samples predominantly consist of sericite, quartz, albite, plagioclase feldspar and with minor illite. Cesium sorption distribution coefficients (Kd,Cs) of various "Yeongdong illite" samples ranged from 500 to 4000 L/kg at low aqueous concentration (Cw 10-7 M). Considering Kd,Cs values were 400 and 6000 using reference sericite and illite materials, respectively, in this study, these results suggested that high contents of sericite significantly affect the decrease of sorption capabilities for radiocesium by natural illite (i.e., illite-sericite mixed clay).

  10. Experimental investigations of the wettability of clays and shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysenko, Artem; Clennell, Ben; Sedev, Rossen; Burgar, Iko; Ralston, John; Raven, Mark; Dewhurst, David; Liu, Keyu

    2009-07-01

    Wettability in argillaceous materials is poorly understood, yet it is critical to hydrocarbon recovery in clay-rich reservoirs and capillary seal capacity in both caprocks and fault gouges. The hydrophobic or hydrophilic nature of clay-bearing soils and sediments also controls to a large degree the movement of spilled nonaqueous phase liquids in the subsurface and the options available for remediation of these pollutants. In this paper the wettability of hydrocarbons contacting shales in their natural state and the tendencies for wettability alteration were examined. Water-wet, oil-wet, and mixed-wet shales from wells in Australia were investigated and were compared with simplified model shales (single and mixed minerals) artificially treated in crude oil. The intact natural shale samples (preserved with their original water content) were characterized petrophysically by dielectric spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, plus scanning electron, optical and fluorescence microscopy. Wettability alteration was studied using spontaneous imbibition, pigment extraction, and the sessile drop method for contact angle measurement. The mineralogy and chemical compositions of the shales were determined by standard methods. By studying pure minerals and natural shales in parallel, a correlation between the petrophysical properties, and wetting behavior was observed. These correlations may potentially be used to assess wettability in downhole measurements.

  11. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, J C; Schwenzer, S P; Leveille, R; Westall, F; Wiens, R C; Mangold, N; Bristow, T; Edwards, P; Berger, G

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ∽7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component. PMID:26213668

  12. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  13. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE PAGES

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; ...

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO₂-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more » in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  14. Representing annotation compositionality and provenance for the Semantic Web

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though the annotation of digital artifacts with metadata has a long history, the bulk of that work focuses on the association of single terms or concepts to single targets. As annotation efforts expand to capture more complex information, annotations will need to be able to refer to knowledge structures formally defined in terms of more atomic knowledge structures. Existing provenance efforts in the Semantic Web domain primarily focus on tracking provenance at the level of whole triples and do not provide enough detail to track how individual triple elements of annotations were derived from triple elements of other annotations. Results We present a task- and domain-independent ontological model for capturing annotations and their linkage to their denoted knowledge representations, which can be singular concepts or more complex sets of assertions. We have implemented this model as an extension of the Information Artifact Ontology in OWL and made it freely available, and we show how it can be integrated with several prominent annotation and provenance models. We present several application areas for the model, ranging from linguistic annotation of text to the annotation of disease-associations in genome sequences. Conclusions With this model, progressively more complex annotations can be composed from other annotations, and the provenance of compositional annotations can be represented at the annotation level or at the level of individual elements of the RDF triples composing the annotations. This in turn allows for progressively richer annotations to be constructed from previous annotation efforts, the precise provenance recording of which facilitates evidence-based inference and error tracking. PMID:24268021

  15. Clay Mineralogy of AN Alluvial Aquifer in a Mountainous, Semiarid Terrain, AN Example from Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, W. C.; Lim, D.; Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Pickering, R. A.; Williams, K. H.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Long, P. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial sediments deposited along the Colorado River corridor in the semi-arid regions of central to western Colorado can be important hosts for legacy contamination including U, V, As and Se. These alluvial sediments host aquifers which are thought to provide important "hot spots" and "hot moments" for microbiological activity controlling organic carbon processing and fluxes in the subsurface. Relatively little is known about the clay mineralogy of these alluvial aquifers and the parent alluvial sediments in spite of the fact that they commonly include lenses of silt-clay materials. These lenses are typically more reduced than coarser grained materials, but zones of reduced and more oxidized materials are present in these alluvial aquifer sediments. The clay mineralogy of the non-reduced parent alluvial sediments of the alluvial aquifer located in Rifle, CO (USA) is composed of chlorite, smectite, illite, kaolinite and quartz. The clay mineralogy of non-reduced fine-grained materials at Rifle are composed of the same suite of minerals found in the sediments plus a vermiculite-smectite intergrade that occurs near the bottom of the aquifer near the top of the Wasatch Formation. The clay mineral assemblages of the system reflect the mineralogically immature character of the source sediments. These assemblages are consistent with sediments and soils that formed in a moderately low rainfall climate and suggestive of minimal transport of the alluvial sediments from their source areas. Chlorite, smectite, smectite-vermiculite intergrade, and illite are the likely phases involved in the sorption of organic carbon and related microbial redox transformations of metals in these sediments. Both the occurrence and abundance of chlorite, smectite-vermiculite, illite and smectite can therefore exert an important control on the contaminant fluxes and are important determinants of biogeofacies in mountainous, semiarid terrains.

  16. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite

  17. Bridging the provenance gap: opportunities and challenges tracking in and ex silico provenance in sUAS workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomer, A.

    2017-12-01

    Data provenance - the record of the varied processes that went into the creation of a dataset, as well as the relationships between resulting data objects - is necessary to support the reusability, reproducibility and reliability of earth science data. In sUAS-based research, capturing provenance can be particularly challenging because of the breadth and distributed nature of the many platforms used to collect, process and analyze data. In any given project, multiple drones, controllers, computers, software systems, sensors, cameras, imaging processing algorithms and data processing workflows are used over sometimes long periods of time. These platforms and processing result in dozens - if not hundreds - of data products in varying stages of readiness-for-analysis and sharing. Provenance tracking mechanisms are needed to make the relationships between these many data products explicit, and therefore more reusable and shareable. In this talk, I discuss opportunities and challenges in tracking provenance in sUAS-based research, and identify gaps in current workflow-capture technologies. I draw on prior work conducted as part of the IMLS-funded Site-Based Data Curation project in which we developed methods of documenting in and ex silico (that is, computational and non-computation) workflows, and demonstrate this approaches applicability to research with sUASes. I conclude with a discussion of ontologies and other semantic technologies that have potential application in sUAS research.

  18. Seamless Provenance Representation and Use in Collaborative Science Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missier, P.; Ludaescher, B.; Bowers, S.; Altintas, I.; Anand, M. K.; Dey, S.; Sarkar, A.; Shrestha, B.; Goble, C.

    2010-12-01

    The notion of sharing scientific data has only recently begun to gain ground in science, where data is still considered a private asset. There is growing evidence, however, that the benefits of scientific collaboration through early data sharing during the course of a science project may outgrow the risk of losing exclusive ownership of the data. As exemplar success stories are making the headlines[1], principles of effective information sharing have become the subject of e-science research. In particular, any piece of published data should be self-describing, to the extent necessary for consumers to determine its suitability for reuse in their own projects. This is accomplished by associating a body of formally specified and machine-processable metadata to the data. When data is produced and reused by independent groups, however, metadata interoperability issues emerge. This is the case for provenance, a form of metadata that describes the history of a data product, Y. Provenance is typically expressed as a graph-structured set of dependencies that account for the sequence of computational or interactive steps that led to Y, often starting from some primary, observational data. Traversing dependency graphs is one of the mechanisms used to answer questions on data reliability. In the context of the NSF DataONE project[2], we have been studying issues of provenance interoperability in scientific collaboration scenarios. Consider a first scientist, Alice, who publishes a data product X along with its provenance, and a second scientist who further transforms X into a new product Y, also along with its provenance. A third scientist, who is interested in Y, expects to be able to trace Y's history up to the inputs used by Alice. This is only possible, however, if provenance accumulates into a single, uniform graph that can be seamlessly traversed. This becomes problematic when provenance is captured using different tools and computational models (i.e. workflow systems

  19. Sediment management and renewability of floodplain clay for structural ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, M. J.; Wiersma, A. P.; Middelkoop, H.; van der Perk, M.; Bakker, M.; Maljers, D.; Hobo, N.; Makaske, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Netherlands have vast resources of clay that are exploited for the fabrication of structural ceramic products such as bricks and roof tiles. The extraction of clay creates land surface lowerings of about 1.5 m, of which the majority are located in the embanked floodplains of the rivers Rhine and Meuse. At these surface lowerings, clay is replenished within several decades. This study explores to which extent the clay can be regarded as a renewable resource, with potential for sustainable use. For this purpose, first the current and past clay consumption is calculated. Subsequently, clay deposition in the floodplains is estimated from literature data on clay accumulation using sediment traps, heavy metal and radionuclide distribution in soil profiles, and from morphological modelling studies. These estimates of clay-deposition and consumption are then compared following three approaches that consider various temporal and spatial scales of clay deposition. This allows us to establish the extent to which man determines sedimentary processes in the Dutch floodplains. Consequently, using the sediment response to the land surface lowering resulting from clay extraction, we explore sediment management options for the Dutch Rhine and Meuse. Altogether we argue that clay has been, probably is, and certainly can be managed as a renewable mineral resource.

  20. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  1. Provenance for Runtime Workflow Steering and Validation in Computational Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinuso, A.; Krischer, L.; Krause, A.; Filgueira, R.; Magnoni, F.; Muraleedharan, V.; David, M.

    2014-12-01

    Provenance systems may be offered by modern workflow engines to collect metadata about the data transformations at runtime. If combined with effective visualisation and monitoring interfaces, these provenance recordings can speed up the validation process of an experiment, suggesting interactive or automated interventions with immediate effects on the lifecycle of a workflow run. For instance, in the field of computational seismology, if we consider research applications performing long lasting cross correlation analysis and high resolution simulations, the immediate notification of logical errors and the rapid access to intermediate results, can produce reactions which foster a more efficient progress of the research. These applications are often executed in secured and sophisticated HPC and HTC infrastructures, highlighting the need for a comprehensive framework that facilitates the extraction of fine grained provenance and the development of provenance aware components, leveraging the scalability characteristics of the adopted workflow engines, whose enactment can be mapped to different technologies (MPI, Storm clusters, etc). This work looks at the adoption of W3C-PROV concepts and data model within a user driven processing and validation framework for seismic data, supporting also computational and data management steering. Validation needs to balance automation with user intervention, considering the scientist as part of the archiving process. Therefore, the provenance data is enriched with community-specific metadata vocabularies and control messages, making an experiment reproducible and its description consistent with the community understandings. Moreover, it can contain user defined terms and annotations. The current implementation of the system is supported by the EU-Funded VERCE (http://verce.eu). It provides, as well as the provenance generation mechanisms, a prototypal browser-based user interface and a web API built on top of a NoSQL storage

  2. 40 KG Sample of Fish-Clay from Stevns Klint, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Hansen, H. J.; Rasmussen, K. L.

    1992-07-01

    In March 1986 a 50-m-long exposure of the cliff at Stevns Klint fell down and exposed about 40 square meters of Fish Clay. Due to this extraordinary event we were able to pick by hand about 50 kg black KT boundary layer material. After drying, the material was homogenized using a wooden pestle and an agate mortar. The powdered material was sieved through 200 mesh nylon gauze. The fraction larger than 200 mesh was collected and powdered again in an agate mortar. After four repetitions the amount of material with grain size less than 200 mesh was about 40 kg. The fraction larger than 200 mesh was reduced to about 7 kg. The 40-kg powder was mixed in a rotating polyethylene drum for three weeks. The material was analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence analysis for about 40 elements. INAA was made on 20 aliquots with weight about 300 mg, 20 aliquots with weight about 80 mg, and 30 with weights between 10 and 20 mg. The preliminary results show that our KT boundary sample (1) is very homogeneous, (2) is very close in composition to other K-T boundary clays analyzed by us or described in the literature, and (3) has an Ir concentration of 32 +- 2 ng/g. We hope that our Fish Clay sample (termed by us "Mesozoic Midnight") after analysis in other laboratories and by other analytical methods may qualify as reference material in analytical work on boundary clay material.

  3. Clay mineral formation and transformation in rocks and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three mechanisms for clay mineral formation (inheritance, neoformation, and transformation) operating in three geological environments (weathering, sedimentary, and diagenetic-hydrothermal) yield nine possibilities for the origin of clay minerals in nature. Several of these possibilities are discussed in terms of the rock cycle. The mineralogy of clays neoformed in the weathering environment is a function of solution chemistry, with the most dilute solutions favoring formation of the least soluble clays. After erosion and transportation, these clays may be deposited on the ocean floor in a lateral sequence that depends on floccule size. Clays undergo little reaction in the ocean, except for ion exchange and the neoformation of smectite; therefore, most clays found on the ocean floor are inherited from adjacent continents. Upon burial and heating, however, dioctahedral smectite reacts in the diagenetic environment to yield mixed-layer illite-smectite, and finally illite. With uplift and weathering, the cycle begins again. Refs.

  4. Lime as an Anti-Plasticizer for Self-Compacting Clay Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Winnefeld, Frank; Flatt, Robert J.; Habert, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the modification of clay properties with inorganic additives to deflocculate and flocculate inorganic soil for the development of a material that would be as easy to use as the current concrete products, but with a much lower environmental impact. Considering that the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, we first introduce potential determining ions to deflocculate the clay particles and to reduce the yield stress of the earth material. Their efficiency is characterized using zeta potential measurements and rheological tests. We then achieve the flocculation of clay particles by using natural minerals that slowly dissolve in the interstitial liquid and ultimately precipitate calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). The precipitation products are identified by X-ray diffraction and the consequences of this delayed precipitation are followed by oscillatory rheometric measurements. Finally, it is suggested that in this process, C–S–H precipitation is not used as a binding vector but as an anti-plasticizer that removes the inorganic dispersant additives. PMID:28773453

  5. Lime as an Anti-Plasticizer for Self-Compacting Clay Concrete.

    PubMed

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Winnefeld, Frank; Flatt, Robert J; Habert, Guillaume

    2016-04-29

    This paper focuses on the modification of clay properties with inorganic additives to deflocculate and flocculate inorganic soil for the development of a material that would be as easy to use as the current concrete products, but with a much lower environmental impact. Considering that the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, we first introduce potential determining ions to deflocculate the clay particles and to reduce the yield stress of the earth material. Their efficiency is characterized using zeta potential measurements and rheological tests. We then achieve the flocculation of clay particles by using natural minerals that slowly dissolve in the interstitial liquid and ultimately precipitate calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The precipitation products are identified by X-ray diffraction and the consequences of this delayed precipitation are followed by oscillatory rheometric measurements. Finally, it is suggested that in this process, C-S-H precipitation is not used as a binding vector but as an anti-plasticizer that removes the inorganic dispersant additives.

  6. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields a very broad range of adsorption energies, and it is unclear a priori which evaluation is better. QMC reveals that in the systems considered here it is essential to account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces since this alters both the absolute and relative adsorption energies of water and methanol. We show, via FF simulations, that incorrect relative energies can lead to significant changes in the interfacial densities of water and methanol solutions at the kaolinite interface. Despite the clear improvements offered by the vdW-corrected and the vdW-inclusive functionals, absolute adsorption energies are often overestimated, suggesting that the treatment of vdW forces in DFT is not yet a solved problem. PMID:27917256

  7. Strontium isotopes in otoliths of a non-migratory fish (slimy sculpin): Implications for provenance studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, Sean R.; Fernandez, Diego P.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Cerling, Thure E.; Brown, Randy J.; Wooller, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in 87Sr/86Sr ratios of river-dissolved strontium (Sr) across geologically diverse environments provides a useful tool for investigating provenance, connectivity and movement patterns of various organisms and materials. Evaluation of site-specific 87Sr/86Sr temporal variability throughout study regions is a prerequisite for provenance research, but the dynamics driving temporal variability are generally system-dependent and not accurately predictable. We used the time-keeping properties of otoliths from non-migratory slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) to evaluate multi-scale 87Sr/86Sr temporal variability of river waters throughout the Nushagak River, a large (34,700 km2) remote watershed in Alaska, USA. Slimy sculpin otoliths incorporated site-specific temporal variation at sub-annual resolution and were able to record on the order of 0.0001 changes in the 87Sr/86Sr ratio. 87Sr/86Sr profiles of slimy sculpin collected in tributaries and main-stem channels of the upper watershed indicated that these regions were temporally stable, whereas the Lower Nushagak River exhibited some spatio-teporal variability. This study illustrates how the behavioral ecology of a non-migratory organism can be used to evaluate sub-annual 87Sr/86Sr temporal variability and has broad implications for provenance studies employing this tracer.

  8. Geochemistry of loess-paleosol sediments of Kashmir Valley, India: Provenance and weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Chandra, Rakesh

    2013-04-01

    Middle to Late Pleistocene loess-paleosol sediments of Kashmir Valley, India, were analyzed for major, trace and REE elements in order to determine their chemical composition, provenance and intensity of palaeo-weathering of the source rocks. These sediments are generally enriched with Fe2O3, MgO, MnO, TiO2, Y, Ni, Cu, Zn, Th, U, Sc, V and Co while contents of SiO2, K2O, Na2O, P2O5, Sr, Nb and Hf are lower than the UCC. Chondrite normalized REE patterns are characterized by moderate enrichment of LREEs, relatively flat HREE pattern (GdCN/YbCN = 1.93-2.31) and lack of prominent negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.73-1.01, average = 0.81). PAAS normalized REE are characterized by slightly higher LREE, depleted HREE and positive Eu anomaly. Various provenance discrimination diagrams reveal that the Kashmir Loess-Paleosol sediments are derived from the mixed source rocks suggesting large provenance with variable geological settings, which apparently have undergone weak to moderate recycling processes. Weathering indices such as CIA, CIW and PIA values (71.87, 83.83 and 80.57 respectively) and A-CN-K diagram imply weak to moderate weathering of the source material.

  9. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reactive Transport Modeling and Changes in Porosity at Reactive Interfaces in a HLW repository in Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, J.; Mon, A.; Montenegro, L.; Naves, A.; Fernández, J.

    2016-12-01

    High-level radioactive waste disposal in a deep geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept which combines natural barriers such as the geological formation and artificial barriers such as metallic containers, bentonite and concrete buffers and sealing materials. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyperalkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyperalkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a nonisothermal reactive transport model of the long-term interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. This problem involves large pH changes with a hyperalkaline high-pH plume, complex mineral dissolution/precipitation patterns, cation exchange reactions and proton surface complexation. These reactions lead to large changes in porosity which can even lead to pore clogging. Model results show that magnetite, the main corrosion product, precipitates and reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete-clay interfaces at 1 Ma are equal to 10, 25 and 25 mm thick, respectively. The results of our simulations share many of the features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Narrow alteration zones; and 2) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete-clay

  11. Quantitative Metrics for Provenance in the Global Change Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, R. A.; Tipton, K.; Elamparuthy, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Global Change Information System (GCIS) is an open-source web-based resource to provide traceable provenance for government climate information, particularly the National Climate Assessment and other climate science reports from the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Since 2014, GCIS has been adding and updating information and linking records to make the system as complete as possible for the key reports. Our total count of records has grown to well over 20,000, but until recently there hasn't been an easy way to measure how well all those records were serving the mission of providing provenance. The GCIS team has recently established quantitative measures of whether each record has sufficient metadata and linkages to be useful for users of our featured climate reports. We will describe our metrics and show how they can be used to guide future development of GCIS and aid users of government climate data.

  12. Development of eco-friendly porous fired clay bricks using pore-forming agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Bories, Cecile; Borredon, Marie-Elisabeth; Vedrenne, Emeline; Vilarem, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Today, clay bricks are facing technological challenges and are uncompetitive compared to materials such as concrete. Their performance must be improved if they are to stand up to the competition. Increasing environmental concerns over the accumulation of unmanaged wastes from agricultural or industrial productions have made these good candidates for incorporation into building materials to improve their performance. This process leads to the formation of pores in the bricks, producing lightweight and sustainable building materials. This paper reviews the different pore-forming agents from renewable or mineral resources as described in the literature. It also presents the impact of pore-forming agents on the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of clay bricks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overview of the evolution of clay mineralogy in the Gulf of Mexico: implications for regional climate and drainage history of the Mississippi and Brazos-Trinity Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, T.; John, C. M.; Flemings, P. B.; Behrmann, J.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we present the overview and preliminary results of the analysis of clay minerals in two mini basins drilled during IODP Expedition 308. The goal of our project is to explore the vertical and temporal trends in clay mineralogy in the Ursa Basin and the Brazos-Trinity basin #4. The Brazos-Trinity basin was the sink for sands and clays carried by the Brazos and Trinity Rivers, while the Ursa basin was the sink for sediments carried by the Mississippi river. Reconstructing clay minerals (phyllosilicates <2μm in size) accumulations at these locations could thus potentially yield information on changes in the transport and the source of the siliclastic material transported in the course of the Pleistocene by these three rivers. Moreover, because the type of clay formed in soils through weathering processes largely depend on temperature and amount of precipitation, the dataset generated could provide clues on past climate changes. Some of the mechanisms that are hypothesized to play a major role in controlling clay accumulation in the basins investigated are reworking of clays on the American continent (controlled at the time-scale investigated here by changes in precipitation) and turbidity current deposition (controlled mainly by sea-level changes and thus glacio-eustasy). Finally, a major focusing point of Expedition 308 was sediment physical properties in an overpressured basin. Because each clay mineral specie has a specific average grain sizes, physical properties and cation exchange capacity, the clay mineral composition of the sediment investigated here (dominated by clay-sized particles) may partly control how these sediments react to changes in pressure and temperature. Thus, clay mineral data could contribute to our understanding of the physical properties of the sediments in overpressured basins, and collaborations with geotechnical scientist are planned.

  14. Understanding the role of clay minerals in the chromium(VI) bioremoval by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCTCC AB93066 under growth condition: microscopic, spectroscopic and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chunxi; Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Yuewu; Ruan, Bo; Li, Liping; Tran, Lytuong; Zhu, Nengwu; Dang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to investigate the role of clay minerals, e.g., kaolinite and vermiculite, in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under growth condition in glucose-amended mediums as a method for treating Cr(VI)-contaminated subsurface environment such as soil. Our results indicated that glucose could acted as an essential electron donor, and clay minerals significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by improving the consumption rate of glucose and stimulating the growth and propagation of P. aeruginosa. Cr(VI) bioreduction by both free cells and clay minerals-amended cells followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, with the latter one fitting better. The mass balance analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis found that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) and the adsorption of total chromium on clay minerals-bacteria complex was small, implying that Cr(VI) bioremoval was not mainly due to the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto cells or clay minerals or clay minerals-cells complex but mainly due to the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of P. aeruginosa under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the addition of clay minerals (e.g. vermiculite) decreased the surface roughness of Cr(VI)-laden cells and changed the cell morphology and dimension. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that organic matters such as aliphatic species and/or proteins played an important role in the combination of cells and clay minerals. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the attachment of cells on the surface of clay minerals, indicating that clay minerals could provide a microenvironment to protect cells from Cr(VI) toxicity and serve as growth-supporting materials. These findings manifested the underlying influence of clay minerals on microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and gave an understanding of the interaction between pollutants, the environment and the biota.

  15. Comparison of tetrachloromethane sorption to an alkylammonium-clay and an alkyldiammonium-clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    The interlamellar space of Wyoming bentonite (clay) was modified by exchanging either decyltrimethyl-ammonium (DTMA) or decyltrimethyldiammonium (DTMDA) cations for inorganic ions, and tetrachloromethane sorption to the resulting two organoclays from water was studied at 10, 20, and 35??C. Only one end of the 10-carbon alkyl chain of the DTMA cation is attached to the silica surface of the clay mineral, and tetrachloromethane sorption of DTMA-clay is characterized by isotherm linearity, noncompetitive sorption, weak solute uptake, and a relatively low heat of sorption. Both ends of the 10-carbon chain of the DTMDA cation are attached to the silica surface of the clay mineral, and tetrachloromethane sorption to DTMDA-clay is characterized by nonlinear isotherms, competitive sorption, strong solute uptake, and a relatively high, exothermic heat of sorption that varies as a function of the mass of tetrachloromethane sorbed. Therefore, the attachment of both ends of the alkyl chain to the interlamellar mineral surface appears to change the sorption mechanism from a partition-dominated process to an adsorption-dominated process. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  16. Surface Properties and Permeability of Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride)-Clays (PVDF/Clays) Composite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramono, E.; Ahdiat, M.; Simamora, A.; Pratiwi, W.; Radiman, C. L.; Wahyuningrum, D.

    2017-07-01

    Surface properties are important factors that determine the performance of ultrafiltration membranes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of clay addition on the surface properties and membrane permeability of PVDF (poly-vinylidene fluoride) membranes. Three types of clay with different particle size were used in this study, namely montmorillonite-MMT, bentonite-BNT and cloisite 15A-CLS. The PVDF-clay composite membranes were prepared by phase inversion method using PEG as additive. The hydrophobicity of membrane surface was characterized by contact angle. The membrane permeability was determined by dead- end ultrafiltration with a trans-membrane pressure of 2 bars. In contact angle measurement, water contact angle of composite membranes is higher than PVDF membrane. The addition of clays decreased water flux but increased of Dextran rejection. The PVDF-BNT composite membranes reach highest Dextran rejection value of about 93%. The type and particle size of clay affected the hydrophobicity of membrane surface and determined the resulting membrane structure as well as the membrane performance.

  17. Nonalbumin proteinuria predominates in biopsy-proven tenofovir nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sise, Meghan E; Hirsch, Jamie S; Canetta, Pietro A; Herlitz, Leal; Mohan, Sumit

    2015-05-15

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) nephrotoxicity is characterized by proximal renal tubular injury and dysmorphic mitochondria resulting in proteinuria, orthoglycemic glycosuria, and other markers of proximal tubular dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of proteinuria in patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity. Retrospective chart review. Patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity were identified and their medical charts and biopsy reports were reviewed. Comparison was made with HIV-infected patients not on TDF who underwent kidney biopsy. We identified 43 biopsy-proven cases of TDF nephrotoxicity; mean age 54.7 ± 0.4 years, 53% men, 42% whites. Thirty-seven cases reported proteinuria by dipstick of which only 60% had at least 2+ proteinuria. Twenty-seven patients had urine protein quantified by either 24-h collection or spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; median proteinuria was 1742 mg/day [interquartile range (IQR) 1200-2000 mg] and 1667 mg/g creatinine (IQR 851-1967 mg/g), respectively. Ten patients had concurrent urinary albumin measured, with a median 236 mg/g creatinine (IQR 137-343 mg/g). The mean urine albumin-to-urine protein ratio (uAPR) was 0.17 (IQR 0.14-0.19), confirming that TDF nephrotoxicity is primarily associated with nonalbumin proteinuria. Control cases had a uAPR of 0.65 (IQR 0.55-0.79) P < 0.001. Histopathology showed the predominance of proximal tubular injury with characteristic mitochondrial abnormalities. In the largest published cohort of patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity, we show that low uAPR is a reliable feature of this disease. Because of the predominance of nonalbumin proteinuria, dipstick urinalysis may be unreliable in TDF nephrotoxicity.

  18. Provenance of sandstones in the Golconda terrane, north central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.A.

    1991-02-01

    The upper Paleozoic Golconda terrane of north-central Nevada is a composite of several structurally bounded subterranes made of clastic, volcanic, and carbonate rocks. The clastic rocks provide important clues for the interpretation of the provenance and paleogeographic settings of the different lithologic assemblages found in these subterranes. Two petrographically distinct sandstones are identified in the Golconda terrane in the Osgood Mountains and the Hot springs Range of north-central Nevada. The sandstone of the Mississippian Farrel Canyon Formation, part of the Dry Hills subterrane, is characterized by quartzose and sedimentary and lithic-rich clasts with a small feldspar component. in contrast, themore » sandstone of the Permian Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is a silty quartzarenite with no lithic component, and a very limited feldspar component. The sandstone of the Farrel Canyon Formation is similar to nonvolcanic sandstones reported from elsewhere in the Golconda terrane. Modal data reflect a provenance of a recycled orogen and permit the interpretation that it could have been derived from the antler orogen as has been proposed for other sandstones of the golconda terrane. The sandstone of the Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is more mature than any of the other sandstones in either the Golconda terrane, the Antler overlap sequence, or the Antler foreland basin sequence. Modal data put the Poverty Peak (II) sandstone in the continental block provenance category. The distinct extrabasinal provenances represented in these different sandstones support the idea that the Golconda basin was made up of complex paleogeographic settings, which included multiple sources of extrabasinal sediment.« less

  19. Integrating prediction, provenance, and optimization into high energy workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, M.; Bansal, V.; Friese, R. D.

    We propose a novel approach for efficient execution of workflows on distributed resources. The key components of this framework include: performance modeling to quantitatively predict workflow component behavior; optimization-based scheduling such as choosing an optimal subset of resources to meet demand and assignment of tasks to resources; distributed I/O optimizations such as prefetching; and provenance methods for collecting performance data. In preliminary results, these techniques improve throughput on a small Belle II workflow by 20%.

  20. Provenance Representation in the Global Change Information System (GCIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is a topic that has become very controversial despite strong support within the scientific community. It is common for agencies releasing information about climate change to be served with Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for everything that led to that conclusion. Capturing and presenting the provenance, linking to the research papers, data sets, models, analyses, observation instruments and satellites, etc. supporting key findings has the potential to mitigate skepticism in this domain. The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) is now coordinating the production of a National Climate Assessment (NCA) that presents our best understanding of global change. We are now developing a Global Change Information System (GCIS) that will present the content of that report and its provenance, including the scientific support for the findings of the assessment. We are using an approach that will present this information both through a human accessible web site as well as a machine readable interface for automated mining of the provenance graph. We plan to use the developing W3C PROV Data Model and Ontology for this system.

  1. Lanthanides-clay nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Celedon, Salvador; Quiroz, Carolina; Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2009-05-06

    Complexes of Europium(III) and Terbium(III) with 2,2-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline were inserted into Na-bentonite by ion exchange reactions at room temperature. The products display interlaminar distances and stoichiometries in agreement with the ion exchange capacity and the interlayer space available in the clay. The optical properties of the intercalates, being qualitatively similar to those of the free complexes, are additionally improved with respect to exchange processes with the medium, especially in a moist environment. The protection again hydrolysis, together with the intensity of the optical transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 5}F{sub 2} observed in the nanocomposite, makes these products promising for themore » development of novel optical materials.« less

  2. Halloysite clay nanotubes for controlled release of protective agents.

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Elshad; Lvov, Yuri

    2011-11-01

    Halloysite is a naturally occurring clay mineral with submicron sized hollow cylindrical morphology. Halloysite morphology, structure and properties were characterized by using SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, surface electrokinetic (zeta) potential and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Comparison of the halloysite structure with imogolite was also provided. Halloysite toxicological studies revealed that it is environmentally friendly and biocompatible material. Due to its unique tubular shape and availability in thousands of tons halloysite has potential to be applied as nanocontainers for encapsulation of chemically and biologically active agents such as medicines, pharmaceuticals, antiseptics, corrosion inhibitors, antifouling agents, and doped with them plastics producing smart polymeric nanocomposites with improved mechanical strength. Finally possibility to synthesize metal nanorods within the halloysite lumen was demonstrated.

  3. Clay-bearing Fluvial Deposits in Western Ladon Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Grant, J. A.; Irwin, R. P.; Wilson, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    More than a dozen outcrops of light-toned layered deposits occur in the uplands to the west of Ladon basin in Margaritifer Terra, Mars. We are evaluating the morphology, mineralogy, and distribution of these sedimentary deposits and associated valley systems that dissect the local Noachian bedrock to understand how they reflect source materials and record environmental and climatic conditions during their emplacement. Several craters, including secondary craters from the Holden impact event, also contain sedimentary deposits, suggesting at least some of the deposits are younger than Mid-to-Late Hesperian. All the deposits appear confined within basins, valleys or craters that are breached by valleys. The deposits typically show numerous beds with variable lithologies, suggesting multiple episodes of deposition and/or changing aqueous conditions over time. CRISM spectra extracted from the deposits typically have absorption features around 1.93 and 2.29 μm, consistent with Fe/Mg-smectites. Several deposits within Arda Valles may have been emplaced when the system was blocked at the eastern end by topography associated with two unnamed craters. Deposition emplaced the clay-bearing layered sediments before an outlet was established, enabling drainage onto the lower-lying floor of Ladon basin and formation of an inverted channel within one of the valleys (Figure 1). All the deposits are located 0.5-2 km above clay-bearing deposits found on the Ladon basin floor, including within Ladon Valles, thereby indicating they were not associated with a lake within the basin or late-stage discharge from Ladon Valles. Instead, their sources appear to be localized and associated with the rim materials of the ancient impact structures or nearby weathered bedrock. The upland deposits may have formed concurrently with deposits found to the south in Eberswalde and Holden craters, indicating precipitation and/or snow melt across much of Margaritifer Terra during the Late Hesperian to

  4. Humic acid provenance influence to the adsorption capacity in uranium and thorium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, E.

    2018-01-01

    It is common knowledge that humic acid is organic compound without certain chemical composition since it is derived from different organic materials. Further this raises question whether the different humic acid sample used could lead to different adsorbent properties e.g. adsorption capacity. To address the problem, this paper is aimed to clarify the relation between the provenances of humic acid and synthesized adsorbent properties especially adsorption capacities by quantitative and qualitative functional groups determination including discussion on their effect to the metal ion adsorption mechanism using three humic acid samples. Two commercial samples were derived from recent compost while the other extracted from tertiary carbonaceous mudstone strata.

  5. Capturing and Understanding Experiment Provenance using NiNaC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, C.

    2017-12-01

    A problem the model development team faces at the GFDL is determining climate model experiment provenance. Each experiment is configured with at least one configuration file which may reference other files. The experiment then passes through three phases before completion. Configuration files or other input files may be modified between phases. Finding the modifications later is tedious due to the expanse of the experiment input and duplication across phases. Determining provenance may be impossible if any file has been changed or deleted. To reduce these efforts and address these problems, we propose a new toolset, NiNaC, for archiving experiment provenance from the beginning of the experiment to the end and every phase in-between. Each of the three phases, check-out, build, and run, of the experiment depends on the previous phase. We use a graph to model the phase dependencies. Let each phase be represented by a node. Let each edge correspond to a dependency between phases where the node incident with the tail depends on the node incident with the head. It follows that the dependency graph is a tree. We reduce the problem to finding the lowest common ancestor and diffing the successor nodes. All files related to input for a phase are assigned a checksum. A new file is created to aggregate the checksums. Then each phase is assigned a checksum of aforementioned file as an identifier. Any change to part of a phase configuration will create unique checksums in all subsequent phases. Finding differences between experiments with this toolset is as simple as diffing two files containing checksums found by traversing the tree. One new benefit is that this toolset now allows differences in source code to be found after experiments are run, which was previously impossible for executables that cannot be linked to a known version controlled source code. Knowing that these changes exist allows us to give priority to help desk tickets concerning unmodified supported experiment

  6. Making Sense of 'Big Data' in Provenance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2014-12-01

    Huge online databases can be 'mined' to reveal previously hidden trends and relationships in society. One could argue that sedimentary geology has entered a similar era of 'Big Data', as modern provenance studies routinely apply multiple proxies to dozens of samples. Just like the Internet, sedimentary geology now requires specialised statistical tools to interpret such large datasets. These can be organised on three levels of progressively higher order:A single sample: The most effective way to reveal the provenance information contained in a representative sample of detrital zircon U-Pb ages are probability density estimators such as histograms and kernel density estimates. The widely popular 'probability density plots' implemented in IsoPlot and AgeDisplay compound analytical uncertainty with geological scatter and are therefore invalid.Several samples: Multi-panel diagrams comprising many detrital age distributions or compositional pie charts quickly become unwieldy and uninterpretable. For example, if there are N samples in a study, then the number of pairwise comparisons between samples increases quadratically as N(N-1)/2. This is simply too much information for the human eye to process. To solve this problem, it is necessary to (a) express the 'distance' between two samples as a simple scalar and (b) combine all N(N-1)/2 such values in a single two-dimensional 'map', grouping similar and pulling apart dissimilar samples. This can be easily achieved using simple statistics-based dissimilarity measures and a standard statistical method called Multidimensional Scaling (MDS).Several methods: Suppose that we use four provenance proxies: bulk petrography, chemistry, heavy minerals and detrital geochronology. This will result in four MDS maps, each of which likely show slightly different trends and patterns. To deal with such cases, it may be useful to use a related technique called 'three way multidimensional scaling'. This results in two graphical outputs: an MDS

  7. The location and extent of exfoliation of clay on the fracture mechanisms in nylon 66-based ternary nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yang, Mingshu

    2008-04-01

    The primary focus of this work is to elucidate the location and extent of exfoliation of clay on fracture (under both static and dynamic loading conditions) of melt-compounded nylon 66/clay/SEBS-g-MA ternary nanocomposites fabricated by different blending sequences. Distinct microstructures are obtained depending on the blending protocol employed. The state of exfoliation and dispersion of clay in nylon 66 matrix and SEBS-g-MA phase are quantified and the presence of clay in rubber is shown to have a negative effect on the toughness of the nanocomposites. The level of toughness enhancement of ternary nanocomposites depends on the blending protocol and the capability of different fillers to activate the plastic deformation mechanisms in the matrix. These mechanisms include: cavitation of SEBS-g-MA phase, stretching of voided matrix material, interfacial debonding of SEBS-g-MA particles, debonding of intercalated clay embedded inside the SEBS-g-MA phase, and delamination of intercalated clay platelets. Based on these results, new insights and approaches for the processing of better toughened polymer ternary nanocomposites are discussed.

  8. Novel Biocompatible Thermoresponsive Poly(N-vinyl Caprolactam)/Clay Nanocomposite Hydrogels with Macroporous Structure and Improved Mechanical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Liu, Zhuang; Yang, Chao; Li, Xiao-Ying; Sun, Yi-Min; Deng, Yi; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2017-07-05

    Poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) (PVCL) hydrogels usually suffer from the imporous structure and poor mechanical characteristics as well as the toxicity of cross-linkers, although PVCL itself is biocompatible. In this paper, novel biocompatible thermoresponsive poly(N-vinyl caprolactam)/clay nanocomposite (PVCL-Clay) hydrogels with macroporous structure and improved mechanical characteristics are developed for the first time. The macroporosity in the hydrogel is introduced by using Pickering emulsions as templates, which contain N-vinyl caprolactam (VCL) monomer as dispersed phase and clay sheets as stabilizers at the interface. After polymerization, macropores are formed inside the hydrogels with the residual unreacted VCL droplets as templates. The three-dimensional PVCL polymer networks are cross-linked by the clay nanosheets. Due to the nanocomposite structure, the hydrogel exhibits better mechanical characteristics in comparison to the conventional PVCL hydrogels cross-linked by N,N'-methylene diacrylamide (BIS). The prepared PVCL-Clay hydrogel possesses remarkable temperature-responsive characteristics with a volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) around 35 °C, and provides a feasible platform for cell culture. With macroporous structure and good mechanical characteristics as well as flexible assembly performance, the proposed biocompatible thermoresponsive PVCL-Clay nanocomposite hydrogels are ideal material candidates for biomedical, analytical, and other applications such as entrapment of enzymes, cell culture, tissue engineering, and affinity and displacement chromatography.

  9. Removal of cyanobacterial blooms in Taihu Lake using local soils. I. Equilibrium and kinetic screening on the flocculation of Microcystis aeruginosa using commercially available clays and minerals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Chen, Hao; Zou, Hua; Yan, Hai

    2006-05-01

    Algal removal abilities of 26 clays/minerals were classified into three categories according to the 8-h equilibrium removal efficiency (Q8h) and removal rate at a clay loading of 0.7 g/L. Type I clays (sepiolite, talc, ferric oxide, and kaolinite) had a Q8h > 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) < 15 min, and a t80 < 2.5 h. Type II clays (6 clays) had a Q8h 50-90%, a t50 < 2.5 h, and a t80 > 2.5 h. Type III clays (14 clays) with Q8h < 50%, t50 > 8 h and t80 > 14 h had no practical value in removal of algal blooms. When the clay loading was reduced to 0.2 g/L, Q8h for all the 25 materials decreased to below 60%, except for sepiolite whose Q8h remained about 97%. The high efficiency for sepiolite to flocculate M. aeruginosa cells in freshwaters was due to the mechanism of netting and bridging effect.

  10. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Advanced clay nanocomposites based on in situ photopolymerization utilizing novel polymerizable organoclays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon Ki

    Polymer nanocomposite technology has had significant impact on material design. With the environmental advantages of photopolymerization, a research has recently focused on producing nanocomposites utilizing inexpensive clay particles based on in situ photopolymerization. In this research, novel polymerizable organoclays and thiol-ene photopolymerization have been utilized to develop advanced photopolymer clay nanocomposites and to overcome several limitations in conventional free radical photopolymers. To this end, factors important in nanocomposite processes such as monomer composition, clay dispersion, and photopolymerization behavior in combination with the evolution of ultimate nanocomposite properties have been investigated. For monomer-organoclay compositions, higher chemical compatibility of components induces enhanced clay exfoliation, resulting in photopolymerization rate increases due to an amplified clay template effect. Additionally, by affecting the stoichiometric ratio between thiol and acrylate double bond in the clay gallery, thiolated organoclays enhance thiol-ene copolymerization with increased final thiol conversion while acrylated organoclays encourage acrylate homopolymerization. In accordance with the reaction behavior, incorporation of thiolated organoclays makes polymer chains more flexible with decreased glass transition temperature due to higher formation of thio-ether linkages while adding acrylated organoclays significantly increases the modulus. Photopolymer nanocomposites also help overcome two major drawbacks in conventional free radical photopolymerization, namely severe polymerization shrinkage and oxygen inhibition during polymerization. With addition of a low level of thiol monomers, the oxygen inhibition in various acrylate systems can be overcome by addition of only 5wt% thiolated organoclay. The same amount of polymerizable organoclay also induces up to 90% decreases in the shrinkage stress for acrylate or thiol

  13. Using provenance of terrigenous sediment to reconstruct the Agulhas Leakage during the Early and Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, B.; Franzese, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Agulhas Current, the strongest western boundary current in the southern hemisphere, is uniquely characterized by its strong retroflection. The current carries water southward from the Indian Ocean toward the cape of South Africa, before turning back on itself. At this point of retroflection, some of the current's flow escapes into the southern Atlantic Ocean. This transfer of water from the Indian Ocean to Atlantic Ocean makes up the Agulhas Leakage. The Leakage occurs in a series of eddies and rings located in the Cape Basin south of the African continent. Scientific literature demonstrates that relatively buoyant leakage water has been a determining factor varying strength of the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Current (AMOC), during glacial-interglacial cycles. It has been demonstrated that radiogenic isotope, major, and trace element concentrations serve as a proxy for terrigenous sediment provenance in the Agulhas region. Current understanding is that terrigenous sediment provenance is older during warmer periods of deposition. This corresponds to more input from southeastern African end members, and thus a stronger Agulhas Current, during warming periods in the paleoclimate record. Conversely, younger terrigenous sediment deposited during colder periods, such as the Last Glacial Maximum, suggests a weaker Agulhas Current, and less Agulhas Leakage. In 2016, on the International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 361, sediment cores were drilled at 6 sites in the Greater Agulhas region. A major goal of the expedition was to expand knowledge of the relation between changes in the Agulhas System and changes in paleoclimate, southern African climate, and AMOC. We analyzed sediment from Expedition 361 Site U1479 (35°03.53'S; 17°24.06'E; 2615 mbsl) located where the Agulhas Leakage occurs. We measured Argon, strontium isotope ratios, ɛNd, trace and major element concentrations on the <2 micron clay fraction. Preliminary results foretell promising findings. For

  14. Long-term variations of clay mineral composition in the Andaman Sea (IODP Exp. 353 Site U1447): preliminary result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Khim, B. K.; Cho, H. G.; Kim, S.; 353 Scientists, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Clay mineral studies in the Bengal Fan have allowed the reconstruction of the erosional history of the Himalayan-Tibetan complex since the Early Miocene. Several factors such as climate change and tectonic activity are important for the erosion rate of the Himalaya-Tibet complex. IODP Expedition 353 Site U1447 (10°47.4'N, 93°00'E; 1391 mbsl) was drilled on a ridge 45 km offshore Little Andaman Island in the Andaman Sea, penetrating to total depths of 738 m. Riverine sediments supplied mainly by the Irrawaddy and Salween (draining the Indo-Burman Ranges; smectite-rich) and the Ganga/Brahmaputra (draining the Himalaya; illite-rich) via the surface currents have been known to deposit in the Andaman Sea. We measured clay minerals of 38 sediment samples collected from 150 to 737 m CSF-A at Site U1447 in order to reveal long-term variation patterns of clay minerals and their controlling factors. Age reconstruction of Site U1447 aided by shipboard biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data defined the study interval spanning from the Late Miocene ( 10 Ma) to Early Pleistocene ( 1.25 Ma). At this interval, clay minerals consist mainly of smectite (28-61% with an average of 47%) followed by illite (20-41% with an average of 29%), kaolinite (9-19% with an average of 14%), and chlorite (5-15% with an average of 10%). Variation of clay mineral compositions is divided into three stages; almost consistent variations of all clay minerals (from 750 to 570 m CSF-A; 10.0 to 7.5 Ma), gradual decrease of smectite and increase of illite and chlorite (from 570 to 400 m CSF-A; 7.5 to 4.5 Ma), and great fluctuation of all clay minerals (from 400 to 150 m CSF-A; 4.5 to 1.1 Ma). Such long-term clay mineral changes may be related to provenance switches, tectonic evolution of the source regions, climatic variations, degree of volcanism with basin evolution, sedimentation history by sea level changes or some combination of these factors.

  15. Quantitative mineralogy of the Yukon River system: Changes with reach and season, and determining sediment provenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    mineral dissolution during transport between Eagle and Pilot Station, a distance of over 2000 km. We estimate that approximately 3 wt% of the quartz, 15 wt% of the feldspar (1 wt% of the alkali and 25 wt% of the plagioclase), and 26 wt% of the carbonates (31 wt% of the calcite and 15 wt% of the dolomite) carried by the river dissolve in this reach. The mineralogies of the suspended sediments change with the season. For example, during the summer of 2002 the quartz content varied by 20 wt%, with a minimum in mid-summer. The calcite content varied by a similar amount, and had a maximum corresponding to the quartz minimum. These modes are related to the relative amount of sediment flowing from the White River system, which is relatively poor in quartz, but rich in carbonate minerals. Suspended total clay minerals varied by as much as 25 wt%, with maxima in mid July, and suspended feldspar varied up to 10 wt%. Suspended sediment data from the summers of 2001 and 2003 support the 2002 trends. A calculation technique was developed to determine theproportion of various sediment sources in a mixed sediment by unmixing its quantitative mineralogy. Results from this method indicate that at least three sediment sources can be identified quantitatively with good accuracy. With this technique, sediment mineralogies can be used to calculate the relative flux of sediment from different tributaries, thereby identifying sediment provenance.

  16. Improvement of the Heat Resistance of Prussian Blue Nanoparticles in a Clay Film Composed of Smectite Clay and ε-Caprolactam.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kenta; Nakamura, Takashi; Ebina, Takeo; Ishizaki, Manabu; Kurihara, Masato

    2018-06-04

    Prussian blue (PB) is limited in its application by its breakdown at elevated temperatures. To improve the heat resistance of PB, we prepared a composite film comprising PB nanoparticles (NPs), smectite clay, and an organic compound. The composite film had a microstructure in which PB NPs were intercalated between smectite/organic compound layers. The predominant oxidation temperature of the PB NPs in the composite film was around 500 °C in air, higher than the oxidation temperature of bulk PB in air (250 °C). This improvement in the oxidation temperature may be due to the composite film acting as a barrier to oxygen gas. These results indicate the effectiveness of clay materials for the improvement of heat resistance for low-temperature decomposition compounds, not only PB but also other porous coordination polymers.

  17. Anisotropic Behaviour of Opalinus Clay Through Consolidated and Drained Triaxial Testing in Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favero, Valentina; Ferrari, Alessio; Laloui, Lyesse

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the anisotropic hydro-mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay shale, the host material currently being considered for the construction of a nuclear waste repository in Switzerland. Consolidated and drained triaxial tests on Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri URL have been conducted in order to derive information on its strength and stiffness properties. Opalinus Clay specimens were tested both parallel to bedding (P-specimens) and perpendicular to bedding (S-specimens). The considered effective confining stress range (from 2 to 12 MPa) has been selected in order to reproduce possible in situ stress conditions for the repository. In this work, particular attention has been paid to the experimental procedure in order to ensure consolidated conditions and avoid generation of unwanted excess pore water pressure during drained shearing. The Skempton B parameter has been determined for all the tested specimens in order to ensure saturation. Both single-stage and multistage triaxial testing procedures were adopted in the experimental campaign. The results of the triaxial tests highlight an anisotropic elastic response of Opalinus Clay: S-specimens present a more compliant behaviour than P-specimens. The values of the Young modulus are found to increase with the increase in mean effective stress. The analysis of the peak and ultimate shear strength results reveals that the material behaves in a similar manner regardless of the considered direction of loading (P and S directions) with respect to the bedding orientation. Peak and ultimate failure envelopes for Opalinus Clay were derived for the investigated stress range.

  18. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  19. Intercalation and retention of carbon dioxide in a smectite clay promoted by interlayer cations.

    PubMed

    Michels, L; Fossum, J O; Rozynek, Z; Hemmen, H; Rustenberg, K; Sobas, P A; Kalantzopoulos, G N; Knudsen, K D; Janek, M; Plivelic, T S; da Silva, G J

    2015-03-05

    A good material for CO2 capture should possess some specific properties: (i) a large effective surface area with good adsorption capacity, (ii) selectivity for CO2, (iii) regeneration capacity with minimum energy input, allowing reutilization of the material for CO2 adsorption, and (iv) low cost and high environmental friendliness. Smectite clays are layered nanoporous materials that may be good candidates in this context. Here we report experiments which show that gaseous CO2 intercalates into the interlayer nano-space of smectite clay (synthetic fluorohectorite) at conditions close to ambient. The rate of intercalation, as well as the retention ability of CO2 was found to be strongly dependent on the type of the interlayer cation, which in the present case is Li(+), Na(+) or Ni(2+). Interestingly, we observe that the smectite Li-fluorohectorite is able to retain CO2 up to a temperature of 35°C at ambient pressure, and that the captured CO2 can be released by heating above this temperature. Our estimates indicate that smectite clays, even with the standard cations analyzed here, can capture an amount of CO2 comparable to other materials studied in this context.

  20. Intercalation and Retention of Carbon Dioxide in a Smectite Clay promoted by Interlayer Cations

    PubMed Central

    Michels, L.; Fossum, J. O.; Rozynek, Z.; Hemmen, H.; Rustenberg, K.; Sobas, P. A.; Kalantzopoulos, G. N.; Knudsen, K. D.; Janek, M.; Plivelic, T. S.; da Silva, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    A good material for CO2 capture should possess some specific properties: (i) a large effective surface area with good adsorption capacity, (ii) selectivity for CO2, (iii) regeneration capacity with minimum energy input, allowing reutilization of the material for CO2 adsorption, and (iv) low cost and high environmental friendliness. Smectite clays are layered nanoporous materials that may be good candidates in this context. Here we report experiments which show that gaseous CO2 intercalates into the interlayer nano-space of smectite clay (synthetic fluorohectorite) at conditions close to ambient. The rate of intercalation, as well as the retention ability of CO2 was found to be strongly dependent on the type of the interlayer cation, which in the present case is Li+, Na+ or Ni2+. Interestingly, we observe that the smectite Li-fluorohectorite is able to retain CO2 up to a temperature of 35°C at ambient pressure, and that the captured CO2 can be released by heating above this temperature. Our estimates indicate that smectite clays, even with the standard cations analyzed here, can capture an amount of CO2 comparable to other materials studied in this context. PMID:25739522

  1. Provenance discrimination of sediments in the Zhejiang-Fujian mud belt, East China Sea: Implications for the development of the mud depocenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiting; Li, Anchun; Dong, Jiang; Lu, Jian; Huang, Jie; Wan, Shiming

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, the 800 km elongated mud belt off Zhejiang-Fujian coast, East China Sea (ECS), has been extensively studied for understanding the source to sink processes on the East Asian continental margin in the context of the Asian monsoon. However, to better understand the sediment source and dispersal pattern, the existing mineralogical and geochemical data of adjacent river systems, including the Changjiang River (CJR) and local rivers in Zhejiang, Fujian and Taiwan, need to be systematically reviewed. Therefore, various indicators from published literatures for the provenance discrimination in the mud belt have been summarised in this article. The results show that high diversity of clay mineral assemblages in fluvial sediments being supplied into the mud belt, e.g., dominant illite and chlorite in the CJR, absence of smectite in Taiwan rivers, similar amounts of the four clay mineral species in Zhejiang rivers, and dominant kaolinite in Fujian rivers. On heavy mineralogy, the CJR is dominated by dolomite, hornblende, and flaky minerals; and among of them, dolomite is distinctive for the CJR. For geochemical approaches, elemental compositions, combined with strontium and neodymium isotopes, reflect strong provenance control. However, geochemical and mineralogical compositions are found to vary with grain size, and thus extra caution should be taken when using these parameters as provenance indicator to discriminate the marine sediments with variety of grain-size fractions. In addition, pyrrhotite, occurred in fluvial sediments from western Taiwan, has not been found in sediments derived from mainland China, indicating that magnetic parameters could be used to discriminate sediment provenance. The mud belt formed during sea-level highstand, when modern current system in the ECS has been established, resulting in sediments derived from the CJR have been transported southward since 8 ka. In addition, sediment provenances have not been constant since

  2. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  3. Bentonite Clay as a Natural Remedy: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background: From old times, the human kind has used clays, externally or internally, for maintaining body health or treating some diseases. Meanwhile there are few scientific articles reviewing the beneficial effects of clays on body function. Bentonite clay is one of the available clays in nature, used as traditional habits, and remedies in many cultures. Methods: These articles explored among 2500 scientific articles published in PubMed to sort the scientific works have been done on the effects of this clay on body function (it was about 100 articles). Results: Bentonite has a broad range of action on different parts of body. Conclusion: As traditional remedies seem to have a deep root in maintaining body health, it merits doing more research works on bentonite clay and its impacts on body function. PMID:29026782

  4. Provenance-Powered Automatic Workflow Generation and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Lee, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, scientists have learned how to codify tools into reusable software modules that can be chained into multi-step executable workflows. Existing scientific workflow tools, created by computer scientists, require domain scientists to meticulously design their multi-step experiments before analyzing data. However, this is oftentimes contradictory to a domain scientist's daily routine of conducting research and exploration. We hope to resolve this dispute. Imagine this: An Earth scientist starts her day applying NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) published climate data processing algorithms over ARGO deep ocean temperature and AMSRE sea surface temperature datasets. Throughout the day, she tunes the algorithm parameters to study various aspects of the data. Suddenly, she notices some interesting results. She then turns to a computer scientist and asks, "can you reproduce my results?" By tracking and reverse engineering her activities, the computer scientist creates a workflow. The Earth scientist can now rerun the workflow to validate her findings, modify the workflow to discover further variations, or publish the workflow to share the knowledge. In this way, we aim to revolutionize computer-supported Earth science. We have developed a prototyping system to realize the aforementioned vision, in the context of service-oriented science. We have studied how Earth scientists conduct service-oriented data analytics research in their daily work, developed a provenance model to record their activities, and developed a technology to automatically generate workflow starting from user behavior and adaptability and reuse of these workflows for replicating/improving scientific studies. A data-centric repository infrastructure is established to catch richer provenance to further facilitate collaboration in the science community. We have also established a Petri nets-based verification instrument for provenance-based automatic workflow generation and recommendation.

  5. Intensity and duration of chemical weathering: An example from soil clays of the southeastern Koolau Mountains, Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, Mark J.; Ellen, Stephen D.; McKittrick, Mary Anne

    1993-01-01

    Volcano are markedly more leached than those from younger landscapes in the same precipitation regime. Although smectite may be present, kaolinite is the dominant phase, and accumulations of Fe and Ti occur in the uppermost soil levels. Enrichment of Zr and Ti in these soils, as compared to concentrations in the original basaltic parent material, indicates that as much as 75% of the parent material has been lost. Thus weathering duration may affect soil clay composition in the same way as weathering intensity.Because smectite and halloysite are expandable clay minerals, their presence in soils may decrease slope stability and influence the nature of slope processes. Soil avalanches occur on steep slopes throughout the study area, whereas slow-moving landslides appear to be restricted to gentler slopes in drier parts of the study area where smectite is abundant. The clay mineralogy of soils thus appears to influence the nature of slope processes in the southeastern Koolau Mountains.

  6. Removal of nitrobenzene by immobilized nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effect of clay support and efficiency optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Ying; Xi, Beidou; Mao, Xuhui; Gong, Bin; Li, Rui; Peng, Xing; Liu, Hongliang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, natural clays were used as the support for nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) to fulfill affordable and efficient decontamination materials. In comparison with the kaolinite (K) and montmorillonite (M) supported nZVI materials (K-nZVI and M-nZVI), Hangjin clay supported nZVI (HJ-nZVI) exhibited the best performance for nitrobenzene (NB) removal because of its favorable characteristics, such as higher specific surface area (SSA, 82.0 m2 g-1), larger pore volume (0.1198 cm3 g-1) and bigger average pore diameter (6.2 nm). The NB removal efficiency achieved by HJ-nZVI (93.2 ± 2.8%) was much higher than these achieved by HJ clay alone (38.2 ± 2.3%), nZVI alone (52.3 ± 2.5%) and by the combined use of nZVI and HJ clay (70.2 ± 1.3%). The superior performance of HJ-nZVI was associated with three aspects: the even distribution of nZVIs onto HJ clay, higher payload efficiency of nZVIs and the stronger adsorption capability of HJ clay support. Higher SSA, larger pore volume, favorable cation exchange capacity and structural negative charges all facilitated the payload of iron onto HJ clay. The adsorption process accelerated the reduction via increasing the local concentration of aqueous NB. The high efficiency of HJ-nZVI for decontamination warranted its promising prospect in remediation applications.

  7. Tensile and burning properties of clay/phenolic/GF composite and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Armunanto, V. Bram; Kristiawan, S. Adi

    2016-03-01

    Composite material has been widely used in automotive due to its properties can be improved by combining with reinforcement, like fiber and particle to enhance mechanical properties and burning resistance. This study aims to investigate the tensile and burning properties of hybrid composite combining glass fiber and clay in phenolic resin. The clay was produced from roof tile rejected by tile industries in Sokka, Kebumen, Indonesia. The composite was made using a press mold method for different number of laminates and orientation of woven-roving-glass-fiber/ WRGF (0/90 and ±45), and the total volume fraction of fiber and clay is constant 40%. The specimens were tested using universal testing machine for tensile properties and burning tests apparatus for burning resistance (time to ignite/ TTI and burning rate/ BR). The enhancing of the Clay/Penolic/GF composite can be performed by the increasing of GF laminates, and the composite with 0/90 orientation of WRGF has higher tensile strength and modulus compared to that with ±45 orientation of WRGF. Both composite with 0/90 and ±45 orientation of WRGF have similar burning resistance (TTI and BR) and the composite containing 13 laminates of WR-GF shows the best burning resistance. According to these properties, this composite has good opportunity to be applied as car body panels or other structure in industries due to save weight and high burning resistance.

  8. Clay stabilization by using gypsum and paddy husk ash with reference to UCT and CBR value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesyanto; Iskandar, R.; Hastuty, I. P.; Dianty, W. O.

    2018-02-01

    Clays that have low shear strength need to be stabilized in order to meet the technical requirements to serve as a subgrade material. One of the usual soil stabilization methods is by adding chemicals such as Portland cement, lime, and bitumen. The clay stabilization research was done by adding gypsum and paddy husk ash. The research goals were to find out the value of engineering properties of clay due to the addition of 2% gypsum and 2% - 15% paddy husk ash. The soil was classified as Clay - Low Plasticity (CL) based on USCS and was classified as A-7-6 (10) based on AASHTO classification system. The UCT value of original soil was 1.41 kg/cm2. While the CBR soaked and unsoaked values of original soil were 4.41% and 6.23% respectively. The research results showed the addition of paddy husk ash decreased the value of unconfined compressive strength as well as CBR. The stabilized soil by 2% gypsum and 0% paddy husk ash gave maximum UCT value of 1.67 kg/cm2, while the maximum value of CBR were found 6.71% for CBR soaked and 8.00% for CBR unsoaked. The addition of paddy husk ash did not alter the soil classification according to AASHTO or USCS, even degrade the engineering properties of original soil.

  9. Evaluation of the attenuating properties of selected Greek clays for toxic inorganic elements in landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Mimides, T; Perraki, T

    2000-05-15

    Heavy metal attenuation properties of selected clay material collected from miscellaneous Greek sites is investigated and tested in the laboratory for their suitability, either as liners in hydrologically unsafe sites or as earth covers for sanitary landfill sites. Eleven potentially hazardous elements (As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, V, and Zn) generated by a co-disposal landfill leachate have been considered. Experimental column and static equilibrium methods for the determination of dispersion and adsorption are described. Molecular diffusion dominates the migration phenomena with a velocity range between 1.3 x 10(-5) and 3.5 x 10(-4) cm/s throughout the experiments. A simple way to evaluate dispersion coefficients from breakthrough curves gave values of between 3.90 x 10(-6) and 3.5 x 10(-4) cm2/s, with a mean value of 1.5 x 10(-5). Static adsorption equilibrium studies supported by column runs showed that Freundlich (F = kCn) isotherms express in a better way the assimilative capacities of the tested clays, with k and n values ranging from 0.06 to 1.99 and 0.55 to 1.48 correspondingly. Mathematical models involving non-linear parabolic equations are involved. The experimental data, together with finite difference techniques and some physical clay characteristics, produced trilinear textural diagrams and predictive flow transport convection-dispersion breakthrough curves for a quick estimation of the attenuating properties of clays for heavy metals.

  10. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    PubMed

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Capturing, Harmonizing and Delivering Data and Quality Provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory; Lynnes, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing data have proven to be vital for various scientific and applications needs. However, the usability of these data depends not only on the data values but also on the ability of data users to assess and understand the quality of these data for various applications and for comparison or inter-usage of data from different sensors and models. In this paper, we describe some aspects of capturing, harmonizing and delivering this information to users in the framework of distributed web-based data tools.

  12. The Apollo 16 Mare Component: Petrography, Geochemistry, and Provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Haskin, L. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Gillis, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    The A16 (Apollo16) site in the lunar nearside highlands is 220 km from the nearest mare. Thus it is no surprise that mare basalt samples are uncommon at the site. Here, we present the petrography and geochemistry of 5 new mare basalt samples found at the A16 site. We also discuss possible provenances of all A16 mare basalt samples using high-resolution global data for the distribution of Fe and Ti on the lunar surface derived from Clementine UV-VIS data [1-2].

  13. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals.

  14. 86. Photocopied August 1978. CLAY RAMMING EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Photocopied August 1978. CLAY RAMMING EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION IN THE POWER HOUSE IN 1910. A PILE OF CLAY USED TO FILL THE WASHED-OUT AREAS BENEATH THE FOUNDATIONS IS SHOWN IN THE CENTER OF THE ILLUSTRATION BESIDE THE FILLER PIPE. THE WEIGHT USED TO FORCE THE CLAY DOWN UNDER THE FOUNDATIONS IS SHOWN PRESSING ON THE PLUNGER PIPE. (542) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  15. Rheology of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Clay Nanocomposite Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Jack; Xu, Di; Bhatnagar, Divya; Gersappe, Dilip; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2015-03-01

    The stiffness of PNIPA Gels has been reported could be significant improved by gelation with clay fillers. Here we conducted systematic rheology study of synthesized PNIPA-Clay Composites at different clay concentration, in a range from fluid to strong gel, where G'' dominant changed to G' dominant. Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to analyze the structure of composites and corresponding mechanical changes with increased clays. Where we found viscoelastic behavior become significant only 1.5 times above percolation threshold. The yield stress extrapolated from our rheology results shows good fitting to modified Mooney's theory of suspension viscosity.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Natural Rubber/Organophilic Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales-Fernandes, M.; Esper, F. J.; Silva-Valenzuela, M. G.; Martín-Cortés, G. R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F. R.; Wiebeck, H.

    Natural rubber/organophilic clay nanocomposites were prepared and characterized. A brown bentonite from Paraiba's State, Brazil was modified with a sodium salt and treated with quaternary ammonium salt hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride. The clay in its natural state, after cation exchange with sodium and after organophilization was characterized by XRD, IR, SEM, thermal analysis. Nanocomposite samples were prepared containing 10 resin percent of organophilic clay. The vulcanized samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM. The nanocomposites obtained showed improvement in their mechanical properties in comparison with samples without clay.

  17. Clay mineralogical record on the upper continental slope of the northwestern South China Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Q.; Liu, Z.; Stattegger, K.

    2012-12-01

    Clay mineralogy of two gravity cores (18428 and 18429) on the upper continental slope of the northwestern South China Sea was investigated in order to understand terrigenous sediment sources and to evaluate the contribution from the Red River since the Late Glacial Maximum. Planktonic foramin