Sample records for materials biodegradation research

  1. Biodegradable Materials for Bone Repair and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Verma, Vivek; Rashid, Haroon; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses and summarizes the recent developments and advances in the use of biodegradable materials for bone repair purposes. The choice between using degradable and non-degradable devices for orthopedic and maxillofacial applications must be carefully weighed. Traditional biodegradable devices for osteosynthesis have been successful in low or mild load bearing applications. However, continuing research and recent developments in the field of material science has resulted in development of biomaterials with improved strength and mechanical properties. For this purpose, biodegradable materials, including polymers, ceramics and magnesium alloys have attracted much attention for osteologic repair and applications. The next generation of biodegradable materials would benefit from recent knowledge gained regarding cell material interactions, with better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. The next generations of biodegradable materials for bone repair and regeneration applications require better control of interfacing between the material and the surrounding bone tissue. Also, the mechanical properties and degradation/resorption profiles of these materials require further improvement to broaden their use and achieve better clinical results. PMID:28793533

  2. [The research of biodegradation of a composite material used in reconstructive and reparative surgery of maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V O; Astapenko, O O; Halatenko, N A; Rozhnova, R A

    2013-09-01

    Dates about the research of biodegradation of epoxy-polyurethane composite material used in reconstructive and reparative surgery of maxillofacial area are reflected in the article. Was founded: 1) notable biodegradation of species from epoxy-polyurethane composition in the term of observation up to 6 months was not founded. That testifies their preservation of physical and mechanical properties. 2) founded, that in species from epoxy-polyurethane composition, which contain levamisole, processes of biodegradation are faster then in species from pure epoxy-polyurethane composition and in species from epoxy-polyurethane composition with hydroxyapatite; 3) material from epoxy-polyurethane composition, which contains levamisole and hydroxyapatite, stays in biological environment in small quantity of petty fragments during the incubation in term of 2 years. So, it biodegrades practically totally. Authors suggest on the basis of achieved information, that the use of epoxy-polyurethane constructions that biodegrade, is pertinently in reconstructive maxillofacial surgery.

  3. Materials derived from biomass/biodegradable materials.

    PubMed Central

    Luzier, W D

    1992-01-01

    Interest in biodegradable plastics made from renewable resources has increased significantly in recent years. PHBV (polyhydroxybutyrate-polyhydroxyvalerate) copolymers are good examples of this type of materials. This paper provides an overview of the manufacturing process, properties, biodegradability, and application/commercial issues associated with PHBV copolymers. They are naturally produced by bacteria from agricultural raw materials, and they can be processed to make a variety of useful products, where their biodegradability and naturalness are quite beneficial. PHBV copolymers are still in the first stage of commercialization. But they are presented in this paper as an example of how new technology can help meet society's needs for plastics and a clean environment. Images PMID:1736301

  4. Material Processing and Design of Biodegradable Metal Matrix Composites for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingxin; Guo, Jason L; Mikos, Antonios G; He, Chunyan; Cheng, Guang

    2018-06-04

    In recent years, biodegradable metallic materials have played an important role in biomedical applications. However, as typical for the metal materials, their structure, general properties, preparation technology and biocompatibility are hard to change. Furthermore, biodegradable metals are susceptible to excessive degradation and subsequent disruption of their mechanical integrity; this phenomenon limits the utility of these biomaterials. Therefore, the use of degradable metals, as the base material to prepare metal matrix composite materials, it is an excellent alternative to solve the problems above described. Biodegradable metals can thus be successfully combined with other materials to form biodegradable metallic matrix composites for biomedical applications and functions. The present article describes the processing methods currently available to design biodegradable metal matrix composites for biomedical applications and provides an overview of the current existing biodegradable metal systems. At the end, the manuscript presents and discusses the challenges and future research directions for development of biodegradable metallic matrix composites for biomedical purposes.

  5. Research regarding biodegradable properties of food polymeric products under microorganism activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opran, Constantin; Lazar, Veronica; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Ditu, Lia Mara

    2018-02-01

    Aim of this research is the structural analysis by comparison of the biodegradable properties of two polymeric products made by non-biodegradable polymeric material (polypropylene TIPPLEN H949 A) and biodegradable polymeric material (ECOVIO IS 1335), under microorganism activity in order to give the best solution for the manufacture of food packaging biodegradable products. It presents the results of experimental determinations on comparative analysis of tensile strength for the two types of polymers. The sample weight variations after fungal biodegradation activity revealed that, after 3 months, there are no significant changes in polymeric substratum for non-biodegradable polymeric. The microscopically analysis showed that the fungal filaments did not strongly adhered on the non-biodegradable polymeric material, instead, both filamentous fungi strains adhered and covered the surface of the biodegradable sample with germinated filamentous conidia. The spectral analysis of polymer composition revealed that non-biodegradable polymer polypropylene spectra are identical for control and for samples that were exposed to fungal activity, suggesting that this type of sample was not degraded by the fungi strains. Instead, for biodegradable polymer sample, it was observed significant structural changes across multiple absorption bands, suggesting enzyme activity manifested mainly by Aspergillus niger strain. Structural analysis of interdisciplinary research results, lead, to achieving optimal injection molded technology emphasizing technological parameters, in order to obtain food packaging biodegradable products.

  6. A review on biodegradable materials for cardiovascular stent application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Li-Da; Li, Zhen; Pan, Yu; Sabir, MuhammadIqbal; Zheng, Yu-Feng; Li, Li

    2016-09-01

    A stent is a medical device designed to serve as a temporary or permanent internal scaffold to maintain or increase the lumen of a body conduit. The researchers and engineers diverted to investigate biodegradable materials due to the limitation of metallic materials in stent application such as stent restenosis which requires prolonged anti platelet therapy, often result in smaller lumen after implantation and obstruct re-stenting treatments. Biomedical implants with temporary function for the vascular intervention are extensively studied in recent years. The rationale for biodegradable stent is to provide the support for the vessel in predicted period of time and then degrading into biocompatible constituent. The degradation of stent makes the re-stenting possible after several months and also ameliorates the vessel wall quality. The present article focuses on the biodegradable materials for the cardiovascular stent. The objective of this review is to describe the possible biodegradable materials for stent and their properties such as design criteria, degradation behavior, drawbacks and advantages with their recent clinical and preclinical trials.

  7. Biocompatibility of new drug-eluting biodegradable urethral stent materials.

    PubMed

    Kotsar, Andres; Nieminen, Riina; Isotalo, Taina; Mikkonen, Joonas; Uurto, Ilkka; Kellomäki, Minna; Talja, Martti; Moilanen, Eeva; Tammela, Teuvo L J

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effects of biodegradable stent material (poly-96L/4D-lactic acid [PLA]) on the production of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in vitro and the biocompatibility of new drug-eluting biodegradable urethral stent materials in vivo. Indomethacin, dexamethasone, and simvastatin were used in the materials. The effects of the biodegradable stent material on cytokines and other inflammatory mediators were measured using the Human Cytokine Antibody Array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in THP-1 cells, with bacterial lipopolysaccharide as a positive control. To assess the biocompatibility of the stent materials, we used muscle implantation. Biodegradable stent materials without drug-eluting properties and silicone and latex were used as controls. The measurements were done at 3 weeks and 3 months. The PLA stent material induced production of inflammatory mediators, especially interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta, in vitro. The increase in the production of these mediators with the PLA stent material was smaller than in the cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. In vivo, the effects of the biodegradable materials did not differ at 3 weeks, although, at 3 months, dexamethasone had induced more tissue reactions than had the other materials. At 3 months, fibrosis and chronic inflammatory changes were decreased in the biodegradable material groups compared with the positive control. PLA stent material increased the production of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators less than did positive controls in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility of the drug-eluting biodegradable materials was better than that of the positive controls. Drug-eluting biodegradable urethral stents could potentially offer a new treatment modality in the future. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Biodegradable synthetic implant materials : clinical applications and immunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Witte, F; Calliess, T; Windhagen, H

    2008-02-01

    In the last decade biodegradable synthetic implant materials have been established for various clinical applications. Ceramic materials such as calcium phosphate, bioglass and polymers are now routinely used as degradable implants in the clinical practice. Additionally these materials are now also used as coating materials or as microspheres for controlled drug release and belong to a series of examples for applications as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Because immense local concentrations of degradation products are produced during biodegradation, this review deals with the question whether allergic immune reactions, which have been reported for classical metallic and organic implant materials, also play a role in the clinical routine for synthetic biodegradable materials. Furthermore, possible explanatory theories will be developed to clarify the lack of clinical reports on allergy or sensitization to biodegradable synthetic materials.

  9. Biodegradable Polymeric Materials in Degradable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Biodegradable electronics have great potential to reduce the environmental footprint of devices and enable advanced health monitoring and therapeutic technologies. Complex biodegradable electronics require biodegradable substrates, insulators, conductors, and semiconductors, all of which comprise the fundamental building blocks of devices. This review will survey recent trends in the strategies used to fabricate biodegradable forms of each of these components. Polymers that can disintegrate without full chemical breakdown (type I), as well as those that can be recycled into monomeric and oligomeric building blocks (type II), will be discussed. Type I degradation is typically achieved with engineering and material science based strategies, whereas type II degradation often requires deliberate synthetic approaches. Notably, unconventional degradable linkages capable of maintaining long-range conjugation have been relatively unexplored, yet may enable fully biodegradable conductors and semiconductors with uncompromised electrical properties. While substantial progress has been made in developing degradable device components, the electrical and mechanical properties of these materials must be improved before fully degradable complex electronics can be realized. PMID:29632879

  10. Researches on the development of new composite materials complete / partially biodegradable using natural textile fibers of new vegetable origin and those recovered from textile waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todor, M. P.; Bulei, C.; Heput, T.; Kiss, I.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the research is to develop new fully / partially biodegradable composite materials by using new natural fibers and those recovered from various wastes. Thus, the research aims to obtain some composites with matrix of various types of polymeric materials and the reinforcement phase of textile materials (of different natures, morphologies and composites) so that the resulting products to be (bio)degradable. The textile inserts used as raffle are ecological, non-toxic and biodegradable and they contain (divided or in combination) bast fibers (flax, hemp, jute) and other vegetable fibers (cotton, wool) as plain yarn or fabric, which can replace fibers of glass commonly used in polymeric composites. The main activities described in this article are carried out during the first phase of the research (phase I - initiation of research) and they are oriented towards the choice of types of textile inserts from which the composites will be obtained (the materials needed for the raffle), the choice of the types of polymers (the necessary materials for matrices) and choosing the variants of composites with different types and proportions of the constituent content (proposals and working variants) and choosing the right method for obtaining samples of composite materials (realization technology). The purpose of the research is to obtain composite materials with high structural, thermo-mechanical and / or tribological performances, according to ecological norms and international requirements in order to replace the existing classical materials, setting up current, innovative and high performance solutions, for applications in top areas such as automotive industry and not only.

  11. Biodegradable containers from green waste materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Schettini, Evelia; Pandini, Stefano; Bignotti, Fabio; Vox, Giuliano; D'Amore, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Novel biodegradable polymeric materials based on protein hydrolysate (PH), derived from waste products of the leather industry, and poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEG) or epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were obtained and their physico-chemical properties and mechanical behaviour were evaluated. Different processing conditions and the introduction of fillers of natural origin, as saw dust and wood flour, were used to tailor the mechanical properties and the environmental durability of the product. The biodegradable products, which are almost completely manufactured from renewable-based raw materials, look promising for several applications, particularly in agriculture for the additional fertilizing action of PH or in packaging.

  12. Recent progress on biodegradable materials and transient electronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongfeng; Wang, Liu; Kong, Deying; Yin, Lan

    2018-09-01

    Transient electronics (or biodegradable electronics) is an emerging technology whose key characteristic is an ability to dissolve, resorb, or physically disappear in physiological environments in a controlled manner. Potential applications include eco-friendly sensors, temporary biomedical implants, and data-secure hardware. Biodegradable electronics built with water-soluble, biocompatible active and passive materials can provide multifunctional operations for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as monitoring intracranial pressure, identifying neural networks, assisting wound healing process, etc. This review summarizes the up-to-date materials strategies, manufacturing schemes, and device layouts for biodegradable electronics, and the outlook is discussed at the end. It is expected that the translation of these materials and technologies into clinical settings could potentially provide vital tools that are beneficial for human healthcare.

  13. Development of biodegradable materials; balancing degradability and performance

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mayer, J.M.; Allen, A.L.; Dell, P.A.

    1993-12-31

    The development of biodegradable materials suitable for packaging must take into consideration various performance criteria such as mechanical and barrier properties, as well as rate of biodegradability in given environments. Individual or blended biopolymer films were obtained commercially or blown into film in the laboratory and tested for tensile strength, ultimate elongation and oxygen barrier. These films were then subjected to accelerated marine biodegradation tests as well as simulated marine respirometry. Starch/ethylene vinyl alcohol films exhibited good mechanical and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were very slow to biodegrade in the simulated and excellent oxygen barrier properties, but were verymore » slow to biodegrade in the simulated marine environment. Polyhydroxyalkanoates had good mechanical properties, average oxygen barrier and good biodegradability. Data indicate that performance and biodegradability of packaging can be tailored to needs by combining individual biopolymers in different proportions in blends and laminates.« less

  14. Influence of copper composition on mechanical properties of biodegradable material Mg-Zn-Cu for orthopedic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purniawan, A.; Maulidiah, H. M.; Purwaningsih, H.

    2018-04-01

    Implant is usually used as a treatment of bone fracture. At the moment, non-biodegradable implants is still widely employed in this application. Non-biodegradable implant requires re-surgery to retrieve implants that are installed in the body. It increase the cost and it is painful for the patient itself. In order to solve the problem, Mg-based biodegradable metals is developing so that the material will be compatible with body and gradually degrade in patient's body. However, magnesium has several disadvantages such as high degradation rates and low mechanical properties when compared to the mechanical properties of natural bone. Therefore, it is necessary to add elements into the magnesium alloy. In this research, copper (Cu) was alloyed in Mg alloy based biodegradable material. In addition, Cu is not only strengthening the structure but also for supporting element for the immune system, antibacterial and antifungal. The purpose of this research is to improve mechanical properties of Mg-based biodegradable material using Cu alloying. Powder metallurgy method was used to fabricate the device. The variation used in this research is the composition of Cu (0.5, 1, and 1.5% Cu). The porosity test was performed using apparent porosity test, compressive test and hardness test to know the mechanical properties of the alloy, and the weightless test to find out the material degradation rate. Based on the results can be conclude that Mg-Zn-Cu alloy material with 1% Cu composition is the most suitable specimen to be applied as a candidate for orthopedic devices material with hardness value is 393.6 MPa. Also obtained the value of the compressive test is 153 MPa.

  15. Modeling ready biodegradability of fragrance materials.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, Lidia; Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Boethling, Robert; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, quantitative structure activity relationships were developed for predicting ready biodegradability of approximately 200 heterogeneous fragrance materials. Two classification methods, classification and regression tree (CART) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), were applied to perform the modeling. The models were validated with multiple external prediction sets, and the structural applicability domain was verified by the leverage approach. The best models had good sensitivity (internal ≥80%; external ≥68%), specificity (internal ≥80%; external 73%), and overall accuracy (≥75%). Results from the comparison with BIOWIN global models, based on group contribution method, show that specific models developed in the present study perform better in prediction than BIOWIN6, in particular for the correct classification of not readily biodegradable fragrance materials. © 2015 SETAC.

  16. Biodegradable soy protein isolate-based materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Tang, Dao-Lu; Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2011-10-10

    Recently, there is an increasing interest of using bio-based polymers instead of conventional petroleum-based polymers to fabricate biodegradable materials. Soy protein isolate (SPI), a protein with reproducible resource, good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and processability, has a significant potential in the food industry, agriculture, bioscience, and biotechnology. Up to now, several technologies have been applied to prepare SPI-based materials with equivalent or superior physical and mechanical properties compared with petroleum-based materials. The aim of this review is focused on discussion of the advantages and limitations of native SPI as well as the bulk and surface modification strategies for SPI. Moreover, some applications of SPI-based materials, especially for food preservation and packaging technology, were discussed.

  17. [Biodegradation of polyethylene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Song, Yi-ling; Qin, Xiao-yan

    2007-05-01

    Plastic material is one of the most serious solid wastes pollution. More than 40 million tons of plastics produced each year are discarded into environment. Plastics accumulated in the environment is highly resistant to biodegradation and not be able to take part in substance recycle. To increase the biodegradation efficiency of plastics by different means is the main research direction. This article reviewed the recent research works of polyethylene biodegradation that included the modification and pretreatment of polyethylene, biodegradation pathway, the relevant microbes and enzymes and the changes of physical, chemical and biological properties after biodegradation. The study directions of exploiting the kinds of life-forms of biodegradation polyethylene except the microorganisms, isolating and cloning the key enzymes and gene that could produce active groups, and enhancing the study on polyethylene biodegradation without additive were proposed.

  18. Biodegradable Materials and Metallic Implants-A Review.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2017-09-26

    Recent progress made in biomaterials and their clinical applications is well known. In the last five decades, great advances have been made in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, polymers, composites, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. A variety of bioimplants are currently used in either one of the aforesaid forms. Some of these materials are designed to degrade or to be resorbed inside the body rather than removing the implant after its function is served. Many properties such as mechanical properties, non-toxicity, surface modification, degradation rate, biocompatibility, and corrosion rate and scaffold design are taken into consideration. The current review focuses on state-of-the-art biodegradable bioceramics, polymers, metal alloys and a few implants that employ bioresorbable/biodegradable materials. The essential functions, properties and their critical factors are discussed in detail, in addition to their challenges to be overcome.

  19. Processing and characterization of novel biobased and biodegradable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, Srikanth

    Human society has benefited tremendously from the use of petroleum-based plastics. However, there are growing concerns with their adverse environmental impacts and volatile costs attributed to the skyrocketing oil prices. Additionally most of the petroleum-based polymers are non-biodegradable causing problems about their disposal. Thus, during the last couple of decades, scientists ail over the world have been focusing on developing new polymeric materials that are biobased and biodegradable, also termed as green plastics . This study aims to develop green materials based on polylactide (PLA) biopolymer that can be made from plants. Although PLA can provide important advantages in terms of sustainability and biodegradability, it has its own challenges such as high cost, brittleness, and narrow processing window. These challenges are addressed in this study by investigating both new material formulations and processes. To improve the material properties and control the material costs, PLA was blended with various fillers and modifiers. The types of fillers investigated include carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoparticles and various natural fibers such as pine-wood four, recycled-wood fibers and flax fiber. Using natural fibers as fillers for PLA can result in fully biodegradable and eco-friendly biocomposites. Also due to PLA's sensitivity to moisture and temperature, molecular degradation can occur during processing leading to inferior material properties. To address this issue, one of the approaches adopted by this study was to incorporate a multifunctional chain-extender into PLA, which increased the molecular weight of PLA thereby improving the material properties. To improve the processability and reduce the material cost, both microcellular injection molding and extrusion processes have been studied. The microcellular technology allows the materials to be processed at a lower temperature, which is attractive for thermo- and moisture-sensitive materials like PLA. They

  20. Biodegradation of PVP-CMC hydrogel film: a useful food packaging material.

    PubMed

    Roy, Niladri; Saha, Nabanita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2012-06-20

    Hydrogels can offer new opportunities for the design of efficient packaging materials with desirable properties (i.e. durability, biodegradability and mechanical strength). It is a promising and emerging concept, as most of the biopolymer based hydrogels are supposed to be biodegradable, they can be considered as alternative eco-friendly packaging materials. This article reports about synthetic (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)) and biopolymer (carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) based a novel hydrogel film and its nature of biodegradability under controlled environmental condition. The dry hydrogel films were prepared by solution casting method and designated as 'PVP-CMC hydrogel films'. The hydrogel film containing PVP and CMC in a ratio of 20:80 shows best mechanical properties among all the test samples (i.e. 10:90, 20:80, 50:50, 80:20 and 90:10). Thus, PVP-CMC hydrogel film of 20:80 was considered as a useful food packaging material and further experiments were carried out with this particular hydrogel film. Biodegradation of the PVP-CMC hydrogel films were studied in liquid state (Czapec-Dox liquid medium+soil extracts) until 8 weeks. Variation in mechanical, viscoelastic properties and weight loss of the hydrogel films with time provide the direct evidence of biodegradation of the hydrogels. About 38% weight loss was observed within 8 weeks. FTIR spectra of the hydrogel films (before and after biodegradation) show shifts of the peaks and also change in the peak intensities, which refer to the physico-chemical change in the hydrogel structure and SEM views of the hydrogels show how internal structure of the PVP-CMC film changes in the course of biodegradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biodegradable Materials and Metallic Implants—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress made in biomaterials and their clinical applications is well known. In the last five decades, great advances have been made in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, polymers, composites, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. A variety of bioimplants are currently used in either one of the aforesaid forms. Some of these materials are designed to degrade or to be resorbed inside the body rather than removing the implant after its function is served. Many properties such as mechanical properties, non-toxicity, surface modification, degradation rate, biocompatibility, and corrosion rate and scaffold design are taken into consideration. The current review focuses on state-of-the-art biodegradable bioceramics, polymers, metal alloys and a few implants that employ bioresorbable/biodegradable materials. The essential functions, properties and their critical factors are discussed in detail, in addition to their challenges to be overcome. PMID:28954399

  2. "Green" electronics: biodegradable and biocompatible materials and devices for sustainable future.

    PubMed

    Irimia-Vladu, Mihai

    2014-01-21

    "Green" electronics represents not only a novel scientific term but also an emerging area of research aimed at identifying compounds of natural origin and establishing economically efficient routes for the production of synthetic materials that have applicability in environmentally safe (biodegradable) and/or biocompatible devices. The ultimate goal of this research is to create paths for the production of human- and environmentally friendly electronics in general and the integration of such electronic circuits with living tissue in particular. Researching into the emerging class of "green" electronics may help fulfill not only the original promise of organic electronics that is to deliver low-cost and energy efficient materials and devices but also achieve unimaginable functionalities for electronics, for example benign integration into life and environment. This Review will highlight recent research advancements in this emerging group of materials and their integration in unconventional organic electronic devices.

  3. Research approach to teaching groundwater biodegradation in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, L.; Byl, T.; Painter, R.

    2006-01-01

    TSU in partnership with the USGS has conducted extensive research regarding biode??gradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This research resulted in the development of a numerical approach to modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers that is taught to environmental engineering students in several steps. First, environmental engineering students are taught chemical-reaction engineering principles relating to a wide variety of environmental fate and transport issues. Second, as part of TSU's engineering course curriculum, students use a non-ideal flow laboratory reactor system and run a tracer study to establish residence time distribution (RTD). Next, the students couple that formula to a first-order biodegradation rate and predict the removal of a biodegradable contaminant as a function of residence time. Following this, students are shown data collected from karst bedrock wells that suggest that karst aquifers are analogous to non-ideal flow reactors. The students are challenged to develop rates of biodegradation through lab studies and use their results to predict biodegradaton at an actual contaminated karst site. Field studies are also conducted to determine the accuracy of the students' predictions. This academic approach teaches biodegradation processes, rate-kinetic processes, hydraulic processes and numerical principles. The students are able to experience how chemical engineering principles can be applied to other situations, such as, modeling biodegradation of contaminants in karst aquifers. This paper provides background on the chemical engineering principles and karst issues used in the research-enhanced curriculum. ?? American Society for Engineering Education, 2006.

  4. Biodegradable packing materials from hydrolysates of collagen waste proteins.

    PubMed

    Langmaier, F; Mokrejs, P; Kolomaznik, K; Mladek, M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysates of waste collagen proteins (H), from current industrial manufacture (leather, edible meat product casings, etc.) of mean molecular mass 20-30 kDa by a reaction with dialdehyde starch (DAS), produces hydrogels applicable as biodegradable (or even edible) packaging materials for food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Thermo-reversibility of prepared hydrogels is given by concentrations of H and DAS in a reaction mixture. At concentrations of H 25-30% (w/w) and that of DAS 15-20% (related to weight of hydrolysate), thermo-reversible hydrogels arise, which can be processed into packaging materials by a technique similar to that of soft gelatin capsules (SGC). Exceeding the limit of 20% DAS leads to hydrogels that are thermo-reversible only in part, a further increase in DAS concentration then leads to thermo-irreversible gels whose processing into biodegradable packaging materials necessitates employment of other procedures.

  5. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Murphy, R J; Narayan, R; Davies, G B H

    2009-07-27

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all 'good' or petrochemical-based products are all 'bad'. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated 'home' composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted.

  6. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Narayan, R.; Davies, G. B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all ‘good’ or petrochemical-based products are all ‘bad’. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated ‘home’ composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  7. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys Developed as Bone Repair Materials: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Ren, Zheng; Xu, Yongdong; Pang, Song; Zhao, Xinbing

    2018-01-01

    Bone repair materials are rapidly becoming a hot topic in the field of biomedical materials due to being an important means of repairing human bony deficiencies and replacing hard tissue. Magnesium (Mg) alloys are potentially biocompatible, osteoconductive, and biodegradable metallic materials that can be used in bone repair due to their in situ degradation in the body, mechanical properties similar to those of bones, and ability to positively stimulate the formation of new bones. However, rapid degradation of these materials in physiological environments may lead to gas cavities, hemolysis, and osteolysis and thus, hinder their clinical orthopedic applications. This paper reviews recent work on the use of Mg alloy implants in bone repair. Research to date on alloy design, surface modification, and biological performance of Mg alloys is comprehensively summarized. Future challenges for and developments in biomedical Mg alloys for use in bone repair are also discussed. PMID:29725492

  8. Key parameters in testing biodegradation of bio-based materials in soil.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, D; Mistriotis, A

    2018-09-01

    Biodegradation of plastics in soil is currently tested by international standard testing methods (e.g. ISO 17556-12 or ASTM D5988-12). Although these testing methods have been developed for plastics, it has been shown in project KBBPPS that they can be extended also to lubricants with small modifications. Reproducibility is a critical issue regarding biodegradation tests in the laboratory. Among the main testing variables are the soil types and nutrients available (mainly nitrogen). For this reason, the effect of the soil type on the biodegradation rates of various bio-based materials (cellulose and lubricants) was tested for five different natural soil types (loam, loamy sand, clay, clay-loam, and silt-loam organic). It was shown that use of samples containing 1 g of C in a substrate of 300 g of soil with the addition of 0.1 g of N as nutrient strongly improves the reproducibility of the test making the results practically independent of the soil type with the exception of the organic soil. The sandy soil was found to need addition of higher amount of nutrients to exhibit similar biodegradation rates as those achieved with the other soil types. Therefore, natural soils can be used for Standard biodegradation tests of bio-based materials yielding reproducible results with the addition of appropriate nutrients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study utilization of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrianie, Nuniek; Juliastuti, Sri Rachmania; Ar-rosyidah, Fanny Husna; Rochman, Hilal Abdur

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the existence of energy sources of oil and was limited. Therefore, it was important to searching for new innovations of renewable energy sources by utilizing the waste into a source of energy. On the other hand, the process of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation generated sludge that had calorific value and untapped. Because of the need for alternative sources of energy innovation with the concept of zero waste and the fuel potential from extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste, so it was necessary to study the use of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuel. In addition, sawdust is a waste that had a great quantities and also had a high calorific value to be mixed with extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste. The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of the extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and to determine the potential and a combination of a mixture of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and sawdust which has the best calorific value. The variables of this study was the composition of the waste and sawdust as follows 1:1; 1:3; and 3:1 (mass of sawdust : mass of waste) and time of sawdust carbonization was 10, 15 and 20 minutes. Sawdust was carbonized to get the high heating value. The characteristic of main material and fuel analysis performed with proximate analysis. While the calorific value analysis was performed with a bomb calorimeter. From the research, it was known that extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste had a moisture content of 3.06%; volatile matter 19.98%; ash content of 0.56%; fixed carbon content of 76.4% and a calorific value of 717 cal/gram. And a mixture that had the highest calorific value (4286.5 cal/gram) achieved in comparison sawdust : waste (3:1) by carbonization of sawdust for 20 minutes.

  10. Introduction of Environmentally Degradable Parameters to Evaluate the Biodegradability of Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Geng, Weitao; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Kong, Meimei; Wang, Shufang

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally Degradable Parameter (Ed K) is of importance in the describing of biodegradability of environmentally biodegradable polymers (BDPs). In this study, a concept Ed K was introduced. A test procedure of using the ISO 14852 method and detecting the evolved carbon dioxide as an analytical parameter was developed, and the calculated Ed K was used as an indicator for the ultimate biodegradability of materials. Starch and polyethylene used as reference materials were defined as the Ed K values of 100 and 0, respectively. Natural soil samples were inoculated into bioreactors, followed by determining the rates of biodegradation of the reference materials and 15 commercial BDPs over a 2-week test period. Finally, a formula was deduced to calculate the value of Ed K for each material. The Ed K values of the tested materials have a positive correlation to their biodegradation rates in the simulated soil environment, and they indicated the relative biodegradation rate of each material among all the tested materials. Therefore, the Ed K was shown to be a reliable indicator for quantitatively evaluating the potential biodegradability of BDPs in the natural environment. PMID:22675455

  11. Biodegradable materials for multilayer transient printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian; Liu, Yuhao; Hwang, Suk-Won; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Patnaik, Dwipayan; Cortes, Jonathan Fajardo; Rogers, John A

    2014-11-19

    Biodegradable printed circuit boards based on water-soluble materials are demonstrated. These systems can dissolve in water within 10 mins to yield end-products that are environmentally safe. These and related approaches have the potential to reduce hazardous waste streams associated with electronics disposal. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Evolution of biodegradation of deinking by-products used as alternative cover material.

    PubMed

    Aït-Benichou, Samah; Rodrigues Cabral, Alexandre; Teixeira Panarotto, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Deinking by-products (DBP) have been used as alternative cover material for landfills and mine tailings. Since DBP is biodegradable because of its high cellulose and hemicellulose content, a laboratory experimental program was performed to monitor the evolution of biodegradation and changes in the physico-chemical and geotechnical properties of DBP samples submitted to accelerated biodegradation for 1460 days at 38 degrees C. The evolution of gas and leachate production was monitored in terms of both quality and quantity, which allowed for the calculation of mass loss with time. Under the conditions of the tests (no load applied), 19.6% of the mass was lost as gas, whereas 6.1% was leached out. The results show that biodegradation did not significantly alter the compaction behavior of DBP. The void ratio and water content increased significantly, while the volume of the samples slightly decreased. This seem to indicate that the porous structure of the samples was no longer the same after 1460 d of accelerated biodegradation. A slight increase in the relative density indicates that the organic/inorganic matter ratio increased. The results of permeability tests performed with samples at various stages of biodegradation and at various confining stresses show that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of recompacted biodegraded DBP decreased from 7 x 10(-7)cm/s to approximately 2 x 10(-7)cm/s, as biodegradation advanced.

  13. Evaluation of select blends of cotton byproducts in the manufacture of biodegradable packaging material

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polystyrene is one of the most widely used plastics in the manufacture of packaging materials. Extruded polystyrene foam is commonly sold under the trademark name of StyrofoamTM. Polystyrene packaging is a multibillion dollar a year industry. Since polystyrene is non-biodegradable, a biodegradable m...

  14. Security assessment of magnesium alloys used as biodegradable implant material.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Cao, Z Y; Liu, J G; Feng, C

    2015-01-01

    The security risk of magnesium alloys used as biodegradable implant material was evaluated in this study. Dose-response assessment was conducted by using toxicological data from authoritative public health agencies (World Health Organization) and assuming 1~3 years of uniform corrosion. Through modification calculation, the tolerable corrosion rate of biodegradable magnesium alloys in vivo was proposed, which theoretically ensured the bio-safety of the degradation products. The tolerable limits corresponding to various component elements in magnesium alloys were considered separately, although there are deficits in the toxicological data of some component elements. The influence of corrosion on the strength of magnesium alloys was evaluated, which would contribute to the rationally utilization of magnesium alloys as degradable implant materials. This study illustrates that not only toxicological calculations but also mechanical performance should be taken into consideration when developing novel degradable metallic implant.

  15. Effects of external stress on biodegradable orthopedic materials: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Chu, Chenglin; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-01

    Biodegradable orthopedic materials (BOMs) are used in rehabilitation and reconstruction of fractured tissues. The response of BOMs to the combined action of physiological stress and corrosion is an important issue in vivo since stress-assisted degradation and cracking are common. Although the degradation behavior and kinetics of BOMs have been investigated under static conditions, stress effects can be very serious and even fatal in the dynamic physiological environment. Since stress is unavoidable in biomedical applications of BOMs, recent work has focused on the evaluation and prediction of the properties of BOMs under stress in corrosive media. This article reviews recent progress in this important area focusing on biodegradable metals, polymers, and ceramics.

  16. A review of plastic waste biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Yanful, Ernest K; Bassi, Amarjeet S

    2005-01-01

    With more and more plastics being employed in human lives and increasing pressure being placed on capacities available for plastic waste disposal, the need for biodegradable plastics and biodegradation of plastic wastes has assumed increasing importance in the last few years. This review looks at the technological advancement made in the development of more easily biodegradable plastics and the biodegradation of conventional plastics by microorganisms. Additives, such as pro-oxidants and starch, are applied in synthetic materials to modify and make plastics biodegradable. Recent research has shown that thermoplastics derived from polyolefins, traditionally considered resistant to biodegradation in ambient environment, are biodegraded following photo-degradation and chemical degradation. Thermoset plastics, such as aliphatic polyester and polyester polyurethane, are easily attacked by microorganisms directly because of the potential hydrolytic cleavage of ester or urethane bonds in their structures. Some microorganisms have been isolated to utilize polyurethane as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen source. Aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters have active commercial applications because of their good mechanical properties and biodegradability. Reviewing published and ongoing studies on plastic biodegradation, this paper attempts to make conclusions on potentially viable methods to reduce impacts of plastic waste on the environment.

  17. Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Isabelle; Tighzert, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.

  18. Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Engineering DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Materials Research...Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 845, 2005. Nanoscale Materials Science in Biology and Medicine, Held in Boston, MA on 28 November-2 December 2004...Symp. Proc. Vol. 845 © 2005 Materials Research Society AA1.6 Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering C. J. Bettinger" 3

  19. Biodegradable materials for surgical management of infective endocarditis: new solution or a dead end street?

    PubMed

    Myers, Patrick O; Cikirikcioglu, Mustafa; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2014-08-03

    One third of patients with infective endocarditis will require operative intervention. Given the superiority of valve repair over valve replacement in many indications other than endocarditis, there has been increasing interest and an increasing number of reports of excellent results of valve repair in acute infective endocarditis. The theoretically ideal material for valve repair in this setting is non-permanent, "vanishing" material, not at risk of seeding or colonization. The goal of this contribution is to review currently available data on biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Rigorous electronic and manual literature searches were conducted to identify reports of biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Articles were identified in electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library, using a predetermined search strategy. 49 manuscripts were included in the review. Prosthetic materials needed for valve repair can be summarized into annuloplasty rings to remodel the mitral or tricuspid annulus, and patch materials to replace resected valvar tissue. The commercially available biodegradable annuloplasty ring has shown interesting clinical results in a single-center experience; however further data is required for validation and longer follow-up. Unmodified extra-cellular matrix patches, such as small intestinal submucosa, have had promising initial experimental and clinical results in non-infected valve repair, although in valve repair for endocarditis has been reported in only one patient, and concerns have been raised regarding their mechanical stability in an infected field. These evolving biodegradable devices offer the potential for valve repair with degradable materials replaced with autologous tissue, which could further improve the results of valve repair for infective endocarditis. This is an evolving field with promising experimental or initial clinical results, however long

  20. Biodegradable materials for surgical management of infective endocarditis: new solution or a dead end street?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One third of patients with infective endocarditis will require operative intervention. Given the superiority of valve repair over valve replacement in many indications other than endocarditis, there has been increasing interest and an increasing number of reports of excellent results of valve repair in acute infective endocarditis. The theoretically ideal material for valve repair in this setting is non-permanent, “vanishing” material, not at risk of seeding or colonization. The goal of this contribution is to review currently available data on biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Discussion Rigorous electronic and manual literature searches were conducted to identify reports of biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Articles were identified in electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library, using a predetermined search strategy. 49 manuscripts were included in the review. Prosthetic materials needed for valve repair can be summarized into annuloplasty rings to remodel the mitral or tricuspid annulus, and patch materials to replace resected valvar tissue. The commercially available biodegradable annuloplasty ring has shown interesting clinical results in a single-center experience; however further data is required for validation and longer follow-up. Unmodified extra-cellular matrix patches, such as small intestinal submucosa, have had promising initial experimental and clinical results in non-infected valve repair, although in valve repair for endocarditis has been reported in only one patient, and concerns have been raised regarding their mechanical stability in an infected field. Summary These evolving biodegradable devices offer the potential for valve repair with degradable materials replaced with autologous tissue, which could further improve the results of valve repair for infective endocarditis. This is an evolving field with promising experimental or

  1. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys: A Review of Material Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Persaud-Sharma, Dharam; McGoron, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium based alloys possess a natural ability to biodegrade due to corrosion when placed within aqueous substances, which is promising for cardiovascular and orthopedic medical device applications. These materials can serve as a temporary scaffold when placed in vivo, which is desirable for treatments when temporary supportive structures are required to assist in the wound healing process. The nature of these materials to degrade is attributed to the high oxidative corrosion rates of magnesium. In this review, a summary is presented for magnesium material development, biocorrosion characteristics, as well as a biological translation for these results. PMID:22408600

  2. Laboratory evidence of MTBE biodegradation in Borden aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Mario; Butler, Barbara J.; Church, Clinton D.; Barker, James F.; Nadarajah, Nalina

    2003-02-01

    Mainly due to intrinsic biodegradation, monitored natural attenuation can be an effective and inexpensive remediation strategy at petroleum release sites. However, gasoline additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) can jeopardize this strategy because these compounds often degrade, if at all, at a slower rate than the collectively benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene (BTEX) compounds. Investigation of whether a compound degrades under certain conditions, and at what rate, is therefore important to the assessment of the intrinsic remediation potential of aquifers. A natural gradient experiment with dissolved MTBE-containing gasoline in the shallow, aerobic sand aquifer at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden (Ontario, Canada) from 1988 to 1996 suggested that biodegradation was the main cause of attenuation for MTBE within the aquifer. This laboratory study demonstrates biologically catalyzed MTBE degradation in Borden aquifer-like environments, and so supports the idea that attenuation due to biodegradation may have occurred in the natural gradient experiment. In an experiment with batch microcosms of aquifer material, three of the microcosms ultimately degraded MTBE to below detection, although this required more than 189 days (or >300 days in one case). Failure to detect the daughter product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in the field and the batch experiments could be because TBA was more readily degradable than MTBE under Borden conditions.

  3. Comparison of ready biodegradation estimation methods for fragrance materials.

    PubMed

    Boethling, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Biodegradability is fundamental to the assessment of environmental exposure and risk from organic chemicals. Predictive models can be used to pursue both regulatory and chemical design (green chemistry) objectives, which are most effectively met when models are easy to use and available free of charge. The objective of this work was to evaluate no-cost estimation programs with respect to prediction of ready biodegradability. Fragrance materials, which are structurally diverse and have significant exposure potential, were used for this purpose. Using a database of 222 fragrance compounds with measured ready biodegradability, 10 models were compared on the basis of overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC), a measure of quality for binary classification. The 10 models were VEGA© Non-Interactive Client, START (Toxtree©), Biowin©1-6, and two models based on inductive machine learning. Applicability domain (AD) was also considered. Overall accuracy was ca. 70% and varied little over all models, but sensitivity, specificity and MCC showed wider variation. Based on MCC, the best models for fragrance compounds were Biowin6, VEGA and Biowin3. VEGA performance was slightly better for the <50% of the compounds it identified as having "high reliability" predictions (AD index >0.8). However, removing compounds with one and only one quaternary carbon yielded similar improvement in predictivity for VEGA, START, and Biowin3/6, with a smaller penalty in reduced coverage. Of the nine compounds for which the eight models (VEGA, START, Biowin1-6) all disagreed with the measured value, measured analog data were available for seven, and all supported the predicted value. VEGA, Biowin3 and Biowin6 are judged suitable for ready biodegradability screening of fragrance compounds. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Development of biodegradable foamlike materials based on casein and sodium montmorillonite clay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable foamlike materials based on a naturally occurring polymer (casein protein) and sodium montmorillonite clay (Na+-MMT) were produced through a simple freeze-drying process. By utilizing DL-glyceraldehyde (GC) as a chemical cross-linking agent, the structural integrity of these new aeroge...

  5. Structure-biodegradability study and computer-automated prediction of aerobic biodegradation of chemicals

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Klopman, G.; Tu, M.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown that a combination of two programs, MultiCASE and META, can help assess the biodegradability of industrial organic materials in the ecosystem. MultiCASE is an artificial intelligence computer program that had been trained to identify molecular substructures believed to cause or inhibit biodegradation and META is an expert system trained to predict the aerobic biodegradation products of organic molecules. These two programs can be used to help evaluate the fate of disposed chemicals by estimating their biodegradability and the nature of their biodegradation products under conditions that may model the environment.

  6. Biodegradable packaging materials conception based on starch and polylactic acid (PLA) reinforced with cellulose.

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, Fatma; Bessadok, Atef; Dammak, Mohamed; Jaziri, Mohamed; Ammar, Emna

    2016-10-01

    The plastic materials used for packaging are increasing leading to a considerable amount of undegradable solid wastes. This work deals with the reduction of conventional plastics waste and the natural resources preservation by using cellulosic polymers from renewable resources (alfa and luffa). Plasticized starch films syntheses were achieved at a laboratory scale. These natural films showed some very attractive mechanical properties at relatively low plasticizers levels (12 to 17 % by weight). Furthermore, mixtures including polylactic acid polymer (PLA) and cellulose fibers extracted from alfa and luffa were investigated by melt extrusion technique. When used at a rate of 10 %, these fibers improved the mixture mechanical properties. Both developed materials were biodegradable, but the plasticized starch exhibited a faster biodegradation kinetic compared to the PLA/cellulose fibers. These new materials would contribute to a sustainable development and a waste reduction.

  7. Biodegradability and biodegradation rate of poly(caprolactone)-starch blend and poly(butylene succinate) biodegradable polymer under aerobic and anaerobic environment.

    PubMed

    Cho, H S; Moon, H S; Kim, M; Nam, K; Kim, J Y

    2011-03-01

    The biodegradability and the biodegradation rate of two kinds biodegradable polymers; poly(caprolactone) (PCL)-starch blend and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), were investigated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PCL-starch blend was easily degraded, with 88% biodegradability in 44 days under aerobic conditions, and showed a biodegradation rate of 0.07 day(-1), whereas the biodegradability of PBS was only 31% in 80 days under the same conditions, with a biodegradation rate of 0.01 day(-1). Anaerobic bacteria degraded well PCL-starch blend (i.e., 83% biodegradability for 139 days); however, its biodegradation rate was relatively slow (6.1 mL CH(4)/g-VS day) compared to that of cellulose (13.5 mL CH(4)/g-VS day), which was used as a reference material. The PBS was barely degraded under anaerobic conditions, with only 2% biodegradability in 100 days. These results were consistent with the visual changes and FE-SEM images of the two biodegradable polymers after the landfill burial test, showing that only PCL-starch blend had various sized pinholes on the surface due to attack by microorganisms. This result may be use in deciding suitable final disposal approaches of different types of biodegradable polymers in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ETHANOL BIODEGRADATION FROM GASOLINE RELEASES AND ITS EFFECT ON BTEX BIODEGRADATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    How fast will ethanol biodegrade and what impact will it have on the biodegradation of BTEX in a gasoline spill? This session will provide evidence to answer these questions based on laboratory data. Material from UST spills from Long Island, New York, New Jersey, Florida, and ...

  9. Biodegradation of PuEDTA and Impacts on Pu Mobility

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Xun, Luying; Bolton, Jr., Harvey

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetate (NTA) are synthetic chelating agents, which can form strong water-soluble complexes with radionuclides and metals and has been used to decontaminate and process nuclear materials. Synthetic chelating agents were co-disposed with radionuclides (e.g., 60Co, Pu) and heavy metals enhancing their transport in the subsurface. An understanding of EDTA biodegradation is essential to help mitigate enhanced radionuclide transport by EDTA. The objective of this research is to develop fundamental data on factors that govern the biodegradation of radionuclide-EDTA. These factors include the dominant EDTA aqueous species, the biodegradation of various metal-EDTA complexes, the uptake of various metal-EDTAmore » complexes into the cell, the distribution and mobility of the radionuclide during and after EDTA biodegradation, and the enzymology and genetics of EDTA biodegradation.« less

  10. Algae and their biodegradation effects on building materials in the Ostrava industrial agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtková, H.

    2017-10-01

    Microorganisms cause changes in the building stone, which reduce its usable life and reliability. Microalgae make important parts of the biodegradation consortia of microorganisms on the surface of building materials. Via their metabolites, microalgae affect the stability of mineral components and thus lead to the material destruction. The aim of the paper was to identify aerophytic microalgae on the surface of engineering structures in the Ostrava agglomeration, and to describe the basic interactions between such microorganisms and the building materials, which may lead to the destruction of the materials.

  11. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sustainable hybrid photocatalysts: titania immobilized on carbon materials derived from renewable and biodegradable resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review comprises the preparation, properties and heterogeneous photocatalytic applications of TiO2 immobilized on carbon materials derived from earth-abundant, renewable and biodegradable agricultural residues and sea food waste resources. The overview provides key scientifi...

  13. Process of prototyping coronary stents from biodegradable Fe-Mn alloys.

    PubMed

    Hermawan, Hendra; Mantovani, Diego

    2013-11-01

    Biodegradable stents are considered to be a recent innovation, and their feasibility and applicability have been proven in recent years. Research in this area has focused on materials development and biological studies, rather than on how to transform the developed biodegradable materials into the stent itself. Currently available stent technology, the laser cutting-based process, might be adapted to fabricate biodegradable stents. In this work, the fabrication, characterization and testing of biodegradable Fe-Mn stents are described. A standard process for fabricating and testing stainless steel 316L stents was referred to. The influence of process parameters on the physical, metallurgical and mechanical properties of the stents, and the quality of the produced stents, were investigated. It was found that some steps of the standard process such as laser cutting can be directly applied, but changes to parameters are needed for annealing, and alternatives are needed to replace electropolishing. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biodegradability study of high-erucic-acid-rapeseed-oil-based lubricant additives

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhou, E.; Crawford, R.L.; Shanahan, A.

    1995-12-31

    A variety of high-erucic-acid-rapeseed (HEAR)-oil-based lubricants, lubricant additives, and greases were examined for biodegradability at the University of Idaho Center for Hazardous Waste Remediation Research. Two standard biodegradability tests were employed, a currently accepted US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocol and the Sturm Test. As is normal for tests that employ variable inocula such as sewage as a source of microorganisms, these procedures yielded variable results from one repetition to another. However, a general trend of rapid and complete biodegradability of the HEAR-oil-based materials was observed.

  15. Biodegradable Shape Memory Polymers in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gregory I; Dobrynin, Andrey V; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-11-01

    Shape memory materials have emerged as an important class of materials in medicine due to their ability to change shape in response to a specific stimulus, enabling the simplification of medical procedures, use of minimally invasive techniques, and access to new treatment modalities. Shape memory polymers, in particular, are well suited for such applications given their excellent shape memory performance, tunable materials properties, minimal toxicity, and potential for biodegradation and resorption. This review provides an overview of biodegradable shape memory polymers that have been used in medical applications. The majority of biodegradable shape memory polymers are based on thermally responsive polyesters or polymers that contain hydrolyzable ester linkages. These materials have been targeted for use in applications pertaining to embolization, drug delivery, stents, tissue engineering, and wound closure. The development of biodegradable shape memory polymers with unique properties or responsiveness to novel stimuli has the potential to facilitate the optimization and development of new medical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. JTEC monograph on biodegradable polymers and plastics in Japan: Research, development, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenz, Robert W.

    1995-01-01

    A fact-finding team of American scientists and engineers visited Japan to assess the status of research and development and applications in biodegradable polymers. The visit was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and industry. In Japan, the team met with representatives of 31 universities, government ministries and institutes, companies, and associations. Japan's national program on biodegradable polymers and plastics evaluates new technologies, testing methods, and potential markets for biodegradables. The program is coordinated by the Biodegradable Plastics Society of Japan, which seeks to achieve world leadership in biodegradable polymer technology and identify commercial opportunities for exploiting this technology. The team saw no major new technology breakthroughs. Japanese scientists and engineers are focusing on natural polymers from renewable resources, synthetic polymers, and bacterially-produced polymers such as polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly(amino acids), and polysaccharides. The major polymers receiving attention are the Zeneca PHBV copolymers, Biopol(registered trademark), poly(lactic acid) from several sources, polycaprolactone, and the new synthetic polyester, Bionolle(registered trademark), from Showa High Polymer. In their present state of development, these polymers all have major deficiencies that inhibit their acceptance for large-scale applications.

  17. Biocompatible medical implant materials with binding sites for a biodegradable drug-delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dubai, Haifa; Pittner, Gisela; Pittner, Fritz; Gabor, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Feasibility studies have been carried out for development of a biocompatible coating of medical implant materials allowing the binding of biodegradable drug-delivery systems in a way that their reloading might be possible. These novel coatings, able to bind biodegradable nanoparticles, may serve in the long run as drug carriers to mediate local pharmacological activity. After biodegradation of the nanoparticles, the binding sites could be reloaded with fresh drug-delivering particles. As a suitable receptor system for the nanoparticles, antibodies are anchored. The design of the receptor is of great importance as any bio- or chemorecognitive interaction with other components circulating in the blood has to be avoided. Furthermore, the binding between receptor and the particles has to be strong enough to keep them tightly bound during their lifetime, but on the other hand allow reloading after final degradation of the particles. The nanoparticles suggested as a drug-delivery system for medical implants can be loaded with different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, growth factors, or immunosuppressives. This concept may enable the changing of medication, even after implantation of the medical device, if afforded by patients’ needs. PMID:24198488

  18. Biodegradable and Elastomeric Poly(glycerol sebacate) as a Coating Material for Nitinol Bare Stent

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Hwang, Moon Young; Kim, JiHeung; Chung, Dong June

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized and evaluated biodegradable and elastomeric polyesters (poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)) using polycondensation between glycerol and sebacic acid to form a cross-linked network structure without using exogenous catalysts. Synthesized materials possess good mechanical properties, elasticity, and surface erosion biodegradation behavior. The tensile strength of the PGS was as high as 0.28 ± 0.004 MPa, and Young's modulus was 0.122 ± 0.0003 MPa. Elongation was as high as 237.8 ± 0.64%, and repeated elongation behavior was also observed to at least three times the original length without rupture. The water-in-air contact angles of the PGS surfaces were about 60°. We also analyzed the properties of an electrospray coating of biodegradable PGS on a nitinol stent for the purpose of enhancing long-term patency for the therapeutic treatment of varicose veins disease. The surface morphology and thickness of coating layer could be controlled by adjusting the electrospraying conditions and solution parameters. PMID:24955369

  19. Biodegradation of Organofluorine Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    BIODEGRADATION OF ORGANOFLUORINE COMPOUNDS ECBC-TR-1347 Melissa M. Dixon Steve P. Harvey RESEARCH AND...2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Biodegradation of Organofluorine Compounds 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...compounds as sole carbon sources. This work will be continued in future studies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Organofluorine Biodegradation Defluorination

  20. Mechanical Characteristics, In Vitro Degradation, Cytotoxicity, and Antibacterial Evaluation of Zn-4.0Ag Alloy as a Biodegradable Material

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Schille, Christine; Schweizer, Ernst; Rupp, Frank; Heiss, Alexander; Legner, Claudia; Klotz, Ulrich E.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Zn-based biodegradable metallic materials have been regarded as new potential biomaterials for use as biodegradable implants, mainly because of the ideal degradation rate compared with those of Mg-based alloys and Fe-based alloys. In this study, we developed and investigated a novel Zn-4 wt % Ag alloy as a potential biodegradable metal. A thermomechanical treatment was applied to refine the microstructure and, consequently, to improve the mechanical properties, compared to pure Zn. The yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of the Zn-4Ag alloy are 157 MPa, 261 MPa, and 37%, respectively. The corrosion rate of Zn-4Ag calculated from released Zn ions in DMEM extracts is approximately 0.75 ± 0.16 μg cm–2 day–1, which is higher than that of pure Zn. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed that the Zn-4Ag alloy exhibits acceptable toxicity to L929 and Saos-2 cells, and could effectively inhibit initial bacteria adhesion. This study shows that the Zn-4Ag exhibits excellent mechanical properties, predictable degradation behavior, acceptable biocompatibility, and effective antibacterial properties, which make it a candidate biodegradable material. PMID:29518938

  1. Nanocomposites Based on Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Armentano, Ilaria; Luzi, Francesca; Morena, Francesco; Martino, Sabata; Torre, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    In the present review paper, our main results on nanocomposites based on biodegradable polymers (on a time scale from 2010 to 2018) are reported. We mainly focused our attention on commercial biodegradable polymers, which we mixed with different nanofillers and/or additives with the final aim of developing new materials with tunable specific properties. A wide list of nanofillers have been considered according to their shape, properties, and functionalization routes, and the results have been discussed looking at their roles on the basis of different adopted processing routes (solvent-based or melt-mixing processes). Two main application fields of nanocomposite based on biodegradable polymers have been considered: the specific interaction with stem cells in the regenerative medicine applications or as antimicrobial materials and the active role of selected nanofillers in food packaging applications have been critically revised, with the main aim of providing an overview of the authors’ contribution to the state of the art in the field of biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites. PMID:29762482

  2. Nanocomposites Based on Biodegradable Polymers.

    PubMed

    Armentano, Ilaria; Puglia, Debora; Luzi, Francesca; Arciola, Carla Renata; Morena, Francesco; Martino, Sabata; Torre, Luigi

    2018-05-15

    In the present review paper, our main results on nanocomposites based on biodegradable polymers (on a time scale from 2010 to 2018) are reported. We mainly focused our attention on commercial biodegradable polymers, which we mixed with different nanofillers and/or additives with the final aim of developing new materials with tunable specific properties. A wide list of nanofillers have been considered according to their shape, properties, and functionalization routes, and the results have been discussed looking at their roles on the basis of different adopted processing routes (solvent-based or melt-mixing processes). Two main application fields of nanocomposite based on biodegradable polymers have been considered: the specific interaction with stem cells in the regenerative medicine applications or as antimicrobial materials and the active role of selected nanofillers in food packaging applications have been critically revised, with the main aim of providing an overview of the authors' contribution to the state of the art in the field of biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites.

  3. Here today, gone tomorrow: biodegradable soft robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges to modern technologies is what to do with them when they go irreparably wrong or come to the end of their productive lives. The convention, since the development of modern civilisation, is to discard a broken item and then procure a new one. In the 20th century enlightened environmentalists campaigned for recycling and reuse (R and R). R and R has continued to be an important part of new technology development, but there is still a huge problem of non-recyclable materials being dumped into landfill and being discarded in the environment. The challenge is even greater for robotics, a field which will impact on all aspects of our lives, where discards include motors, rigid elements and toxic power supplies and batteries. One novel solution is the biodegradable robot, an active physical machine that is composed of biodegradable materials and which degrades to nothing when released into the environment. In this paper we examine the potential and realities of biodegradable robotics, consider novel solutions to core components such as sensors, actuators and energy scavenging, and give examples of biodegradable robotics fabricated from everyday, and not so common, biodegradable electroactive materials. The realisation of truly biodegradable robots also brings entirely new deployment, exploration and bio-remediation capabilities: why track and recover a few large non-biodegradable robots when you could speculatively release millions of biodegradable robots instead? We will consider some of these exciting developments and explore the future of this new field.

  4. Porous Biodegradable Metals for Hard Tissue Scaffolds: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yusop, A. H.; Bakir, A. A.; Shaharom, N. A.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.; Hermawan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds have been utilized in tissue regeneration to facilitate the formation and maturation of new tissues or organs where a balance between temporary mechanical support and mass transport (degradation and cell growth) is ideally achieved. Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and porous structure. Metals that can degrade in physiological environment, namely, biodegradable metals, are proposed as potential materials for hard tissue scaffolding where biodegradable polymers are often considered as having poor mechanical properties. Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored degradation behaviour. The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be easily applied to metals. With further optimization in topologically ordered porosity design exploiting material property and fabrication technique, porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. PMID:22919393

  5. Recent innovations in edible and/or biodegradable packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, S; Cuq, B; Gontard, N

    1997-01-01

    Certain newly discovered characteristics of natural biopolymers should make them a choice material to be used for different types of wrappings and films. Edible and/or biodegradable packagings produced from agricultural origin macromolecules provide a supplementary and sometimes essential means to control physiological, microbiological, and physicochemical changes in food products. This is accomplished (i) by controlling mass transfers between food product and ambient atmosphere or between components in heterogeneous food product, and (iii) by modifying and controlling food surface conditions (pH, level of specific functional agents, slow release of flavour compounds), it should be stressed that the material characteristics (polysaccharide, protein, or lipid, plasticized or not, chemically modified or not, used alone or in combination) and the fabrication procedures (casting of a film-forming solution, thermoforming) must be adapted to each specific food product and usage condition (relative humidity, temperature). Some potential uses of these materials (e.g. wrapping of various fabricated foods; protection of fruits and vegetables by control of maturation; protection of meat and fish; control of internal moisture transfer in pizzas), which are hinged on film properties (e.g. organoleptic, mechanical, gas and solute barrier) are described with examples.

  6. In vitro biodegradation behavior, mechanical properties, and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Zn–Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haibo; Wang, Kun; Strich, Randy; Zhou, Jack G.

    2017-01-01

    Zinc–Magnesium (Zn–Mg) alloy as a novel biodegradable metal holds great potential in biodegradable implant applications as it is more corrosion resistant than Magnesium (Mg). However, the mechanical properties, biodegradation uniformity, and cytotoxicity of Zn–Mg alloy remained as concerns. In this study, hot extrusion process was applied to Zn–1 wt % Mg (Zn–1Mg) to refine its microstructure. Effects of hot extrusion on biodegradation behavior and mechanical properties of Zn–1Mg were investigated in comparison with Mg rare earth element alloy WE43. Metallurgical analysis revealed significant grain size reduction, and immersion test found that corrosion rates of WE43 and Zn–1Mg were reduced by 35% and 57%, respectively after extrusion. Moreover, hot extrusion resulted in a much more uniform biodegradation in extruded Zn–1Mg alloy and WE43. In vitro cytotoxicity test results indicated that Zn–1Mg alloy was biocompatible. Therefore, hot extruded Zn–1Mg with homogenous microstructure, uniform as well as slow degradation, improved mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility was believed to be an excellent candidate material for load-bearing biodegradable implant application. PMID:25581552

  7. Biodegradable Sonobuoy Decelerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    material. Two materials studied were polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Single and multilayered PVOH films were evaluated as well...readiness point for technology transition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS biodegrade, decelerator, sonobuoy, polyvinyl alcohol, polyhydroxyalkanoate , marine...Center NGO non-governmental organizations NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration PHA polyhydroxyalkanoate PIA Parachute Industry

  8. Design Considerations for Developing Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Harpreet S.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Manuel, Michele V.

    The integration of biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants into the human body is a complex undertaking that faces major challenges. The complexity arises from the fact that biomaterials must meet both engineering and physiological requirements to ensure the desired properties. Historically, efforts have been focused on the behavior of commercial magnesium alloys in biological environments and their resultant effect on cell-mediated processes. Developing causal relationships between alloy chemistry and micro structure, and its effect on cellular behavior can be a difficult and time intensive process. A systems design approach driven by thermodynamics has the power to provide significant contributions in developing the next generation of magnesium alloy implants with controlled degradability, biocompatibility, and optimized mechanical properties, at reduced time and cost. This approach couples experimental research with theory and mechanistic modeling for the accelerated development of materials. The aim of this article is to enumerate this strategy, design considerations and hurdles for developing new magnesium alloys for use as biodegradable implant materials [1].

  9. A systematic review of biodegradable biliary stents: promising biocompatibility without stent removal.

    PubMed

    Siiki, Antti; Sand, Juhani; Laukkarinen, Johanna

    2018-05-18

    Biodegradable self-expanding stents are an emerging alternative to standard biliary stents as the development of endoscopic insertion devices advances. The aim was to systematically review the existing literature on biodegradable biliary stents. In-vivo studies on the use of biodegradable stents in the biliary duct were systematically reviewed from 1990 to 2017. Despite extensive research on the biocompatibility of stents, the experience so far on their clinical use is limited. A few favorable reports have recently been presented on endoscopically and percutaneously inserted self-expanding biodegradable polydioxanone stents in benign biliary strictures. Another potential indication appears to be postcholecystectomy leak of the cystic duct. The main benefit of biodegradable stents is that stent removal can be avoided. The biocompatibility of the current biodegradable stent materials, most prominently polydioxanone, is well documented. In the few studies currently available, biodegradable stents are reported to be feasible and safe, also in humans. The initial results of the endoscopic use of these stents in benign biliary stricture management and for treating postcholecystectomy bile leaks are promising. Further controlled studies on long-term clinical results and cost-effectiveness are needed.

  10. Poly(glycerol sebacate) - A Novel Biodegradable Elastomer for Tissue Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Langer’ ’Department of Chemical Engineering and 2Division of Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A...for Tissue Engineering DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Materials...Materials Research Society NI 1.1 Poly(glycerol sebacate) - A Novel Biodegradable Elastomer for Tissue Engineering Yadong Wang,’ Barbara J. Sheppard,2 Robert

  11. Biodegradable and edible gelatine actuators for use as artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. D.; Winfield, J.; Ieropoulos, I.; Rossiter, J.

    2014-03-01

    The expense and use of non-recyclable materials often requires the retrieval and recovery of exploratory robots. Therefore, conventional materials such as plastics and metals in robotics can be limiting. For applications such as environmental monitoring, a fully biodegradable or edible robot may provide the optimum solution. Materials that provide power and actuation as well as biodegradability provide a compelling dimension to future robotic systems. To highlight the potential of novel biodegradable and edible materials as artificial muscles, the actuation of a biodegradable hydrogel was investigated. The fabricated gelatine based polymer gel was inexpensive, easy to handle, biodegradable and edible. The electro-mechanical performance was assessed using two contactless, parallel stainless steel electrodes immersed in 0.1M NaOH solution and fixed 40 mm apart with the strip actuator pinned directly between the electrodes. The actuation displacement in response to a bias voltage was measured over hydration/de-hydration cycles. Long term (11 days) and short term (1 hour) investigations demonstrated the bending behaviour of the swollen material in response to an electric field. Actuation voltage was low (<10 V) resulting in a slow actuation response with large displacement angles (<55 degrees). The stability of the immersed material decreased within the first hour due to swelling, however, was recovered on de-hydrating between actuations. The controlled degradation of biodegradable and edible artificial muscles could help to drive the development of environmentally friendly robotics.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of biodegradable polysaccharide and protein-based films containing active agents.

    PubMed

    Kuorwel, Kuorwel K; Cran, Marlene J; Sonneveld, Kees; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Significant interest has emerged in the introduction of food packaging materials manufactured from biodegradable polymers that have the potential to reduce the environmental impacts associated with conventional packaging materials. Current technologies in active packaging enable effective antimicrobial (AM) packaging films to be prepared from biodegradable materials that have been modified and/or blended with different compatible materials and/or plasticisers. A wide range of AM films prepared from modified biodegradable materials have the potential to be used for packaging of various food products. This review examines biodegradable polymers derived from polysaccharides and protein-based materials for their potential use in packaging systems designed for the protection of food products from microbial contamination. A comprehensive table that systematically analyses and categorizes much of the current literature in this area is included in the review.

  13. Corrosion behavior of biodegradable material AZ31 coated with beeswax-colophony resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumelar, Muhammad Dikdik; Putri, Nur Ajrina; Anggaravidya, Mahendra; Anawati, Anawati

    2018-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are potential candidates for biodegradable implant materials owing to their ability to degrade spontaneously in a physiological environment. However, the degradation rate is still considered too fast in human body solution. A coating is typically applied to slowdown corrosion rate of Mg alloys. In this work, an organic coating of mixture beeswax-colophony with ratios of 40-60, 50-50, and 60-40 in wt% was synthesized and applied on commercial magnesium alloyAZ31. The coated specimens were then characterized with SEM and XRF. The corrosion behavior of the coated specimens was evaluated by immersion test in 0.9 wt% NaCl solution at 37°C for 14 days. The results indicated that the coating material improved the corrosion resistance of the AZ31 alloy.

  14. Additional Equipment for Soil Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondráčková, Terezie; Kraus, Michal; Šál, Jiří

    2017-12-01

    Intensification of industrial production, increasing citizens’ living standards, expanding the consumer assortment mean in the production - consumption cycle a constantly increasing occurrence of waste material, which by its very nature must be considered as a source of useful raw materials in all branches of human activity. In addition to strict legislative requirements, a number of circumstances characterize waste management. It is mainly extensive transport associated with the handling and storage of large volumes of substances with a large assortment of materials (substances of all possible physical and chemical properties) and high demands on reliability and time coordination of follow-up processes. Considerable differences in transport distances, a large number of sources, processors and customers, and not least seasonal fluctuations in waste and strong price pressures cannot be overlooked. This highlights the importance of logistics in waste management. Soils that are contaminated with oil and petroleum products are hazardous industrial waste. Methods of industrial waste disposal are landfilling, biological processes, thermal processes and physical and chemical methods. The paper focuses on the possibilities of degradation of oil pollution, in particular biodegradation by bacteria, which is relatively low-cost among technologies. It is necessary to win the fight with time so that no ground water is contaminated. We have developed two additional devices to help reduce oil accident of smaller ranges. In the case of such an oil accident, it is necessary to carry out the permeability test of contaminated soil in time and, on this basis, to choose the technology appropriate to the accident - either in-sit biodegradation - at the site of the accident, or on-sit - to remove the soil and biodegrade it on the designated deposits. A special injection drill was developed for in-sit biodegradation, tossing and aeration equipment of the extracted soil was developed for

  15. Fracture bone healing and biodegradation of AZ31 implant in rats.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, C; Bodelón, O G; Montoya, R; Clemente, C; Garcia-Alonso, M C; Rubio, J C; Escudero, M L

    2015-04-17

    The ideal temporary implant should offer enough mechanical support to allow healing of the fracture and then biodegrade and be resorbed by metabolic mechanisms without causing any toxic effect. The aim of this research has been to simultaneously study in situ bone healing and the biodegradation of AZ31 Mg alloy as an osteosynthesis material. The in vivo study was carried out in AZ31 implants with and without Mg-fluoride coating inserted in un-fractured and fractured femurs of Wistar rats for long experimentation time, from 1 to 13 months, by means of computed tomography, histological and histomorphometric analysis. Tomography analysis showed the bone healing and biodegradation of AZ31 implants. The fracture is healed in 100% of the animals, and AZ31 maintains its mechanical integrity throughout the healing process. Biodegradation was monitored, quantifying the evolution of gas over time by 3D composition of tomography images. In all the studied groups, gas pockets disappear with time as a result of the diffusion process through soft tissues. Histomorphometric studies reveal that after 13 months the 46.32% of AZ31 alloy has been resorbed. The resorption of the coated and uncoated AZ31 implants inserted in fractured femurs after 1, 9 and 13 months does not have statistically significant differences. There is a balance between the biodegradation of AZ31 and bone healing which allows the use of AZ31 to be proposed as an osteosynthesis material.

  16. Comparative study on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of silicate bioceramic coatings on biodegradable magnesium alloy as biodegradable biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, M.; Fathi, M. H.; Savabi, O.; Razavi, S. M.; Hashemibeni, B.; Yazdimamaghani, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2014-03-01

    Many clinical cases as well as in vivo and in vitro assessments have demonstrated that magnesium alloys possess good biocompatibility. Unfortunately, magnesium and its alloys degrade too quickly in physiological media. In order to improve the biodegradation resistance and biocompatibility of a biodegradable magnesium alloy, we have prepared three types of coating include diopside (CaMgSi2O6), akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O6) and bredigite (Ca7MgSi4O16) coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy through a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. In this research, the biodegradation and biocompatibility behavior of samples were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro analysis was performed by cytocompatibility and MTT-assay and the in vivo test was conducted on the implantation of samples in the greater trochanter of adult rabbits. The results showed that diopside coating has the best bone regeneration and bredigite has the best biodegradation resistance compared to others.

  17. High-performance green flexible electronics based on biodegradable cellulose nanofibril paper.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yei Hwan; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Zhang, Huilong; Yao, Chunhua; Zheng, Qifeng; Yang, Vina W; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Park, Dong-Wook; Jiang, Hao; Lee, Juhwan; Qiu, Yijie; Zhou, Weidong; Cai, Zhiyong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-26

    Today's consumer electronics, such as cell phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices, are typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, and sometimes potentially toxic (for example, gallium arsenide) materials. These consumer electronics are frequently upgraded or discarded, leading to serious environmental contamination. Thus, electronic systems consisting of renewable and biodegradable materials and minimal amount of potentially toxic materials are desirable. Here we report high-performance flexible microwave and digital electronics that consume the smallest amount of potentially toxic materials on biobased, biodegradable and flexible cellulose nanofibril papers. Furthermore, we demonstrate gallium arsenide microwave devices, the consumer wireless workhorse, in a transferrable thin-film form. Successful fabrication of key electrical components on the flexible cellulose nanofibril paper with comparable performance to their rigid counterparts and clear demonstration of fungal biodegradation of the cellulose-nanofibril-based electronics suggest that it is feasible to fabricate high-performance flexible electronics using ecofriendly materials.

  18. High-performance green flexible electronics based on biodegradable cellulose nanofibril paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yei Hwan; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Zhang, Huilong; Yao, Chunhua; Zheng, Qifeng; Yang, Vina W.; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Park, Dong-Wook; Jiang, Hao; Lee, Juhwan; Qiu, Yijie; Zhou, Weidong; Cai, Zhiyong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-01

    Today's consumer electronics, such as cell phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices, are typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, and sometimes potentially toxic (for example, gallium arsenide) materials. These consumer electronics are frequently upgraded or discarded, leading to serious environmental contamination. Thus, electronic systems consisting of renewable and biodegradable materials and minimal amount of potentially toxic materials are desirable. Here we report high-performance flexible microwave and digital electronics that consume the smallest amount of potentially toxic materials on biobased, biodegradable and flexible cellulose nanofibril papers. Furthermore, we demonstrate gallium arsenide microwave devices, the consumer wireless workhorse, in a transferrable thin-film form. Successful fabrication of key electrical components on the flexible cellulose nanofibril paper with comparable performance to their rigid counterparts and clear demonstration of fungal biodegradation of the cellulose-nanofibril-based electronics suggest that it is feasible to fabricate high-performance flexible electronics using ecofriendly materials.

  19. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; He, Wen-Jie; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  20. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Edgar; Briceño, Maria Isabel; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2013-01-01

    Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, flexibility, and minimal side effects. Applications of these materials include creation of skin, blood vessels, cartilage scaffolds, and nanosystems for drug delivery. These biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles enhance properties such as bioavailability and stability, and provide controlled release of bioactive compounds. This review evaluates the classification, synthesis, degradation mechanisms, and biological applications of the biodegradable polymers currently being studied as drug delivery carriers. In addition, the use of nanosystems to solve current drug delivery problems are reviewed. PMID:23990720

  1. Fate and Tranport of MTBE in Clay-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lenczewski, m e

    2001-12-01

    A recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey identified methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a constituent of reformulated gasoline, as the most common contaminant of urban aquifers in the United States. MTBE has been released into groundwater supplies by leaking underground fuel tanks. In Illinois, it has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies and although detection was intermittent, levels were high enough to be offensive to users in some Illinois communities. MTBE is also being used in Mexico to solve the problem of air quality; however, it has the potential to harm the drinking water quality in the process. Early research on MTBE considered it resistant to biodegradation and unable to adsorb to soils and sediments. However, recent evidence indicates that biodegradation does occur under certain conditions and that sorption can occur to organic materials. This research project will investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and its sorption to the clay-rich glacial till found in northern Illinois and lacustrine clays found in the Chalco Basin, Mexico City, Mexico whose interaction with MTBE has not previously been studied. The principal hypothesis of this research is that the microorganisms and environmental factors in clay-rich materials will increase the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE as compared to sandy materials. The experiments will simulate a spill of MTBE or downgradient from a gasoline spill. Microcosms and batch isotherm experiments will be used to demonstrate the potential for biodegradation and sorption in these materials; however, laboratory results are not considered reliable estimates of actual field sorption and biodegradation rates. Therefore long-term column experiments will also be conducted in which large sample volumes of material that simulate the heterogeneities naturally observed in the environment. This research will increase understanding of the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE and lay the necessary groundwork to implement

  2. High-performance green flexible electronics based on biodegradable cellulose nanofibril paper

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yei Hwan; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Zhang, Huilong; Yao, Chunhua; Zheng, Qifeng; Yang, Vina W.; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Park, Dong-Wook; Jiang, Hao; Lee, Juhwan; Qiu, Yijie; Zhou, Weidong; Cai, Zhiyong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Today's consumer electronics, such as cell phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices, are typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, and sometimes potentially toxic (for example, gallium arsenide) materials. These consumer electronics are frequently upgraded or discarded, leading to serious environmental contamination. Thus, electronic systems consisting of renewable and biodegradable materials and minimal amount of potentially toxic materials are desirable. Here we report high-performance flexible microwave and digital electronics that consume the smallest amount of potentially toxic materials on biobased, biodegradable and flexible cellulose nanofibril papers. Furthermore, we demonstrate gallium arsenide microwave devices, the consumer wireless workhorse, in a transferrable thin-film form. Successful fabrication of key electrical components on the flexible cellulose nanofibril paper with comparable performance to their rigid counterparts and clear demonstration of fungal biodegradation of the cellulose-nanofibril-based electronics suggest that it is feasible to fabricate high-performance flexible electronics using ecofriendly materials. PMID:26006731

  3. Synthesis of biodegradable plastic from tapioca with N-Isopropylacrylamid and chitosan using glycerol as plasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaubari; Safwani, S.; Riza, M.

    2018-04-01

    One of natural polymers that can be used as raw material in the manufacture of biodegradable plastic is tapioca and chitosan. The addition of other compounds such as glycerol as plasticizer is to improve the characteristics of the plastic that already produced. N- Isopropylacrylamid (NIPAm) is an organic compound that can be synthesized into a polymer or polymer grafting which also biodegradable too. This research aims tostudy the synthesis of biodegradable plastics from tapioca with the addition of chitosan, NIPAm, poly(NIPAm) and analyze the characteristics of biodegradable plastics that already produced. This research was done in three stages, there are (1) polymerization NIPAm, (2) the grafting of chitosan-poly NIPAm and (3) the synthesis of biodegradable plastics from starch mixture with variation of addition chitosan, NIPAm, poly(NIPAm), chitosan-graft-poly(NIPAm) and also variations of glycerol as plasticizer. The results of this research is a thin sheet of plastic which is will get analyzed for the characteristics of functional groups, mechanical, morphological and its biodegradability. FTIR spectra showed the grafting process with the new group formation of CO single-bond at 850 cm-1. Plastic with the addition of NIPAm and 1 ml glycerol has the highest tensile strength value about 31.1 MPa. Plastic with poly(NIPAm) and 4 ml glycerol produces the highest elongation value about 153.72%. Plastic with Chitosan-graft-poly(NIPAm) with 1 ml glycerol has the longest biodegradation because of the small mass-loss for six weeks which is about 6.6%.

  4. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADABILITY OF NON-PETROLEUM OILS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has demonstrated that vegetable oils are amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. This is in contrast to petroleum oils. Vegetable oils are already oxygenated because they are composed of fatty acids and glycerols, which contribute to the biodegradability. A strategy has be...

  5. APPLICATIONS FOR DNA PROBES IN BIODEGRADATION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of DNA:DNA hybridization technology in biodegradation studies is investigated. The rate constants for sediments exposed to synthetic oils could be calculated from the NAH(1+) genotypes and this approach would be useful in predicting the kinetics of aromatic hydrocarbon de...

  6. Optical and mechanical properties of UV-weathered biodegradable PHBV/PBAT nanocomposite films containing halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfato, P.; Avallone, E.; Acierno, D.; Russo, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the increasing use of plastics, stringent environmental issues and the awareness of the progressive reduction of available petrochemical resources have ever more guided the research interest towards the investigation and development of innovative materials intrinsically biodegradable or derived from renewable sources, and generally known as bio-based polymers. Amongst the biobased and biodegradable polymers, many investigations were reported in literature about a family of polyesters known as poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s (PHAs), one of whose most prevalent is poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). In this context, here we report the results of a photo-degradation study performed on biodegradable blown film samples based on a commercial grade PHBV/PBAT formulation. The films, subjected to photo-oxidative weathering in a climatic chamber under UV exposure, were systematically analysed in order to check the chemico-physical changes induced by the aging protocol, taking the as-produced films as the reference materials.

  7. Biodegradable polymer adhesives, hybrids and nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylonakis, Andreas

    Biodegradable polymeric products and organic-inorganic hybrid materials for a diversity of applications are the two main fields on which this research has been focused. A novel biodegradable adhesive, which mimics marine adhesive proteins, has been synthesized by the covalent incorporation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid onto the chitosan backbone. The adhesive strength of these materials varies with the molecular weight of the polysaccharide, the amount of diphenolics present and the curing time. Infrared spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV) have been used to qualitatively and quantitatively establish the amount of the diphenolic moiety present on the backbone of the biodegradable polymers. The as synthesized polymers combine both the adhesive capability of the diphenolic function and the healing effect of chitosan. The biocompatibility and biodegradability of these modified chitosans offer the promise of utility of these novel materials in dental and medical applications. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials with low volume shrinkage and excellent mechanical properties were synthesized by the covalent incorporation of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate on pre-hydrolyzed sol-gel silica. These hybrid materials exhibited low volume shrinkage during polymerization and were crack-free during storage for about twelve months. The mechanical properties of these materials are composition dependent. Incorporation of silica effectively increased the compressive yield stress and modulus of the obtained poly(HEMAGMA-silica) hybrid materials. A series of new electroactive hybrid materials have been synthesized by covalent incorporation of polyaniline into polyacrylate-silica hybrids. The formulation involves the radical co-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate-polyaniline (GMA-PANi) and glycidyl methacrylate2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-silica (GMA-HEMA-silica) to yield poly

  8. High barrier multilayer packaging by the coextrusion method: The effect of nanocomposites and biodegradable polymers on flexible film properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellen, Christopher T.

    The objective of this research was to investigate the use of nanocomposite and multilayer co-extrusion technologies for the development of high gas barrier packaging that is more environmentally friendly than many current packaging system. Co-extruded bio-based and biodegradable polymers that could be composted in a municipal landfill were one direction that this research was aimed. Down-gauging of high performance barrier films using nanocomposite technology and co-extrusion was also investigated in order to reduce the amount of solid waste being generated by the packaging. Although the research is focused on military ration packaging, the technologies could easily be introduced into the commercial flexible packaging market. Multilayer packaging consisting of poly(m-xylylene adipamide) nanocomposite layers along with adhesive and tie layers was co-extruded using both laboratory and pilot-scale film extrusion equipment. Co-extrusion of biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) along with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and tie layers was also accomplished using similar co-extrusion technology. All multilayer films were characterized for gas barrier, mechanical, and thermal properties. The biodegradability of the PVOH and PHA materials in a marine environment was also investigated. The research has shown that co-extrusion of these materials is possible at a research and pilot level. The use of nanocomposite poly(m-xylylene adipamide) was effective in down-gauging the un-filled barrier film to thinner structures. Bio-based PHA/PVOH films required the use of a malefic anhydride grafted PHA tie layer to improve layer to layer adhesion in the structure to avoid delamination. The PHA polymer demonstrated a high rate of biodegradability/mineralization in the marine environment while the rate of biodegradation of the PVOH polymer was slower.

  9. Biodegradation of sorbed chemicals in soil

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Scow, K.M.; Fan, S.; Johnson, C.

    Rates of biodegradation of sorbed chemicals are usually lower in soil than in aqueous systems, in part because sorption reduces the availability of the chemical to microorganisms. Biodegradation, sorption, and diffusion occur simultaneously and are tightly coupled. In soil, the rate of biodegradation is a function of a chemical`s diffusion coefficient, sorption partition coefficient, the distance it must diffuse from the site of sorption to microbial populations that can degrade it, and its biodegradation rate constant. A model (DSB model) was developed that describes biodegradation of chemicals limited in the availability by sorption and diffusion. Different kinetics expressions describe biodegradationmore » depending on whether the reaction is controlled by mass transfer (diffusion and sorption) or the intrinsic biodegradation rate, and whether biodegradation begins during or after the majority of sorption has occurred. We tested the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between how strongly a chemical is sorbed and the chemical`s biodegradation rate. In six soils with different organic carbon contents, there was no relationship between the extent or rate of biodegradation and the sorption partition coefficient for phenanthrene. Aging of phenanthrene residues in soil led to a substantial reduction in the rate of biodegradation compared to biodegradation rates of recently added phenanthrene. Considerable research has focused on identification and development of techniques for enhancing in situ biodegradation of sorbed chemicals. Development of such techniques, especially those involving inoculation with microbial strains, should consider physical mass transfer limitations and potential decreases in bioavailability over time. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

  10. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa) Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Meisam; Guo, Yuebin

    2012-01-09

    Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca) alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized.

  11. Biodegradable Orthopedic Magnesium-Calcium (MgCa) Alloys, Processing, and Corrosion Performance

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Meisam; Guo, Yuebin

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium-Calcium (Mg-Ca) alloy has received considerable attention as an emerging biodegradable implant material in orthopedic fixation applications. The biodegradable Mg-Ca alloys avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. They also provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers. However, the key issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant is the fast corrosion in the human body environment. The ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys is critical for the successful development of biodegradable orthopedic implants. This paper focuses on the functions and requirements of bone implants and critical issues of current implant biomaterials. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Mg-Ca alloys, and the unique properties of novel magnesium-calcium implant materials have been reviewed. Various manufacturing techniques to process Mg-Ca based alloys have been analyzed regarding their impacts on implant performance. Corrosion performance of Mg-Ca alloys processed by different manufacturing techniques was compared. In addition, the societal and economical impacts of developing biodegradable orthopedic implants have been emphasized. PMID:28817036

  12. Biodegradable metals for cardiovascular stents: from clinical concerns to recent Zn - alloys

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Patrick K.; Shearier, Emily R.; Zhao, Shan; Guillory, Roger J.; Zhao, Feng; Goldman, Jeremy; Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic stents are commonly used to promote revascularization and maintain patency of plaqued or damaged arteries following balloon angioplasty. To mitigate the long-term side effects associated with corrosion-resistant stents (i.e. chronic inflammation and late stage thrombosis), a new generation of so-called “bioabsorbable” stents is currently being developed. The bioabsorbable coronary stents will corrode and be absorbed by the artery after completing their task as vascular scaffolding. Research spanning the last two decades has focused on biodegradable polymeric, iron-based, and magnesium-based stent materials. The inherent mechanical and surface properties of metals make them more attractive stent material candidates than their polymeric counterparts. Unfortunately, iron produces a voluminous, retained oxide product in the arterial wall, whereas magnesium and its alloys corrode too rapidly. A third class of metallic bioabsorbable materials that are based on zinc has been introduced in the last few years. As summarized in this contribution, this new zinc-based class of materials demonstrates the potential for an absorbable metallic stent with the mechanical and biodegradation characteristics required for optimal stent performance. They appear to be free of flaws that limit the application of iron- and magnesium-based alloys, and polymers. This review compares bioabsorbable materials and summarizes progress towards bioabsorbable stents. It emphasizes on current understanding of physiological and biological benefits of zinc and its biocompatibility. Finally, the review provides an outlook on challenges in designing zinc-based stents of optimal mechanical properties and biodegradation rate. PMID:27094868

  13. Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by Aspergillus tubingensis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sehroon; Nadir, Sadia; Shah, Zia Ullah; Shah, Aamer Ali; Karunarathna, Samantha C; Xu, Jianchu; Khan, Afsar; Munir, Shahzad; Hasan, Fariha

    2017-06-01

    The xenobiotic nature and lack of degradability of polymeric materials has resulted in vast levels of environmental pollution and numerous health hazards. Different strategies have been developed and still more research is being in progress to reduce the impact of these polymeric materials. This work aimed to isolate and characterize polyester polyurethane (PU) degrading fungi from the soil of a general city waste disposal site in Islamabad, Pakistan. A novel PU degrading fungus was isolated from soil and identified as Aspergillus tubingensis on the basis of colony morphology, macro- and micro-morphology, molecular and phylogenetic analyses. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways in the presence of 2% glucose: (a) on SDA agar plate, (b) in liquid MSM, and (c) after burial in soil. Our results indicated that this strain of A. tubingensis was capable of degrading PU. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we were able to visually confirm that the mycelium of A. tubingensis colonized the PU material, causing surface degradation and scarring. The formation or breakage of chemical bonds during the biodegradation process of PU was confirmed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The biodegradation of PU was higher when plate culture method was employed, followed by the liquid culture method and soil burial technique. Notably, after two months in liquid medium, the PU film was totally degraded into smaller pieces. Based on a comprehensive literature search, it can be stated that this is the first report showing A. tubingensis capable of degrading PU. This work provides insight into the role of A. tubingensis towards solving the dilemma of PU wastes through biodegradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acquisition of an X-Ray Diffractometer with WAXS and SAXS for Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    2. This ligand is known as a sensitizer for applications in dye -sensitized solar cells, and the presence of the amino groups could potentially...achieve different surface properties, thus making them excellent candidates for use as fillers in bio-based biodegradable composite materials...These CNCs are environmentally safe sustainable, biodegradable , carbon neutral, and have low environmental, health and safety risks. Figure 9 below

  15. Tailored biodegradable triblock copolymer coatings obtained by MAPLE: a parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajnicov, S.; Neacsu, P.; Moldovan, A.; Marascu, V.; Bonciu, A.; Ion, R.; Dinca, V.; Cimpean, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2017-11-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable coatings with controllable and tailored chemical and physical characteristics (i.e. morphology and roughness) are of great interest in bone related research applications. Within this research direction, in this work, a series of novel biodegradable coatings based on triblock copolymers poly(lactide- co-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene-glycol)-block-poly(lactide- co-caprolactone) (PLCL-PEG-PLCL) were obtained by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and their morphological characteristics and roughness were modulated by varying target composition and laser fluence. The coatings were used for preliminary in vitro testing with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts. It was found that for a specific range of fluences, the main functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited thin films, as determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, are similar to the molecular structures of the initial material. Depending on the deposition parameters, significant changes in morphologies, i.e. material accumulation in the form of droplets, wrinkles, or carpet-like structures were revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy. The optimized coating characteristics were further correlated to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts response. The ability to control the morphology and to maintain unaltered the chemistry of the deposited material through MAPLE is an important step in creating functional bio-interfaces in the field of biomedical research and tissue engineering.

  16. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  17. The experiment of magnesium ECAP miniplate as alternative biodegradable material (on male white New Zealand rabbits)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiwanto, Siska; Sulistyani, Lilies Dwi; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Supriadi, Sugeng; Priosoeryanto, Bambang Pontjo; Latief, Benny Syariefsyah

    2018-02-01

    Study of biodegradations of Magnesium ECAP (Equal Channel Angular Pressing) miniplate in the osteosynthesis system has been used as a new material for plate and screw in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This miniplate and screw that were made of Magnesium ECAP were implanted in the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. The degradation process was detected through pocket gas that appeared in hard and soft tissues surrounding in the implanted miniplates and screws. From the changes on the tissues, we can assess the biodegradation process by measuring the gas pocket through micro-CT Scan. Upon the first month of study we euthanized the rabbits and made a micro-CT Scan to see how far the effect of the gas pocket was. Histological analyses were performed to investigate the local tissue response adjacent to the Magnesium ECAP miniplates. We analyzed the femur of a rabbit a month, three months, and five months after implantation. The result showed a degradation rate in the implanted Magnesium ECAP miniplate of 0.61±0.39 mm/year. Unlike the screws, miniplates have higher water content and blood flow than bone, therefore they degrade faster. This study shows promising results for further development of Magnesium ECAP and in the production of osteosynthesis material for rigid fixation in Oral and Maxillofacial skeleton.

  18. Effect of Material Parameters on Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Polymers/Nanofibrillated Cellulose (NFC) Nano Composites

    Treesearch

    Yottha Srithep; Ronald Sabo; Craig Clemons; Lih-Sheng Turng; Srikanth Pilla; Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Using natural cellulosic fibers as fillers for biodegradable polymers can result in fully biodegradable composites. Biodegradable composites were prepared using nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) as the reinforcement and poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate, PHBV) as the polymer matrix. The objective of this study was to determine how various additives (i.e.,...

  19. Biodegradable polydepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yakai; Guo, Jintang

    2009-02-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, characterization, biodegradation and usage of bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides. The ring-opening polymerization of morpholine-2,5-dione derivatives using organic Sn and enzyme lipase is discussed. The dependence of the macroscopic properties of the block copolymers on their structure is also presented. Bioresorbable polymers based on polydepsipeptides could be used as biomaterials in drug controlled release, tissue engineering scaffolding and shape-memory materials.

  20. The high throughput investigation of polyphenolic couplers in biodegradable packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhead, Robert Y.; Haynes, Camille T.; Jones, Stephen R.; Smith, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Our goal is to select and develop stimuli-responsive interfacial coupling materials for nanocomposites that will enhance substrate mechanical properties during use but cause triggered disintegration when exposed to the appropriate aqueous environment. The study could potentially provide the scientific underpinning for the development of an interfacially interacting nanocomposite alloy capable of enhanced biodegradation in the aqueous environment. In the first stage of this study it was shown that quaternary ammonium polymers adsorbed on the faces of the montmorillonite platelets, non-ionic polyacrylamides adsorbed on the faces and edges by hydrogen bonding, and anionic polyelectrolytes, carboxylates and sulfonates, did not adsorb at all on the montmorillonite [R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, An investigative study of polymer adsorption to smectite clay: polyelectrolytes and sodium montmorillonite, in: R. Krishnamoorti, R. Vaia (Eds.), Polymer Nanocomposites, American Chemical Society, 2002; R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, C. Haynes, Interaction of hydrophilic polymers with smectite clays, Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 85, American Chemical Society, 2001, p. 419]. The objective of the second part of the study was to examine model polymers in order to guide research aimed at designing coupling polymers that would cause exfoliation of the clay. Based upon the earlier study, polyvinylamine was chosen as the model on the basis that it is a simple polymer with primary amine groups and the polymer charge density could be modified by simply changing the system pH. The aim of this research was to determine the conditions under which polyvinylamine, and selected derivatives of this polymer, would penetrate the galleries of the stacked montmorillonite platelets. The knowledge gained could be applied to predict systems that would facilitate intercalation or exfoliation of sodium montmorillonite. The investigative approach of the third stage was to

  1. Additively manufactured biodegradable porous magnesium.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhou, J; Pavanram, P; Leeflang, M A; Fockaert, L I; Pouran, B; Tümer, N; Schröder, K-U; Mol, J M C; Weinans, H; Jahr, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2018-02-01

    An ideal bone substituting material should be bone-mimicking in terms of mechanical properties, present a precisely controlled and fully interconnected porous structure, and degrade in the human body to allow for full regeneration of large bony defects. However, simultaneously satisfying all these three requirements has so far been highly challenging. Here we present topologically ordered porous magnesium (WE43) scaffolds based on the diamond unit cell that were fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) and satisfy all the requirements. We studied the in vitro biodegradation behavior (up to 4 weeks), mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the developed scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the AM porous WE43 (E = 700-800 MPa) scaffolds were found to fall into the range of the values reported for trabecular bone even after 4 weeks of biodegradation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electrochemical tests and µCT revealed a unique biodegradation mechanism that started with uniform corrosion, followed by localized corrosion, particularly in the center of the scaffolds. Biocompatibility tests performed up to 72 h showed level 0 cytotoxicity (according to ISO 10993-5 and -12), except for one time point (i.e., 24 h). Intimate contact between cells (MG-63) and the scaffolds was also observed in SEM images. The study shows for the first time that AM of porous Mg may provide distinct possibilities to adjust biodegradation profile through topological design and open up unprecedented opportunities to develop multifunctional bone substituting materials that mimic bone properties and enable full regeneration of critical-size load-bearing bony defects. The ideal biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration should be bone-mimicking in terms of mechanical properties, present a fully interconnected porous structure, and exhibit a specific biodegradation behavior to enable full regeneration of bony defects

  2. Acquisition of the Concept "Biodegradable" Through Written Instruction: Pretest and Age Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arganian, Mourad P.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this study/experiment was to determine whether children in the middle elementary grades would be able to learn the concepts "biodegradable agent,""biodegradable material," and "biodegradable process" from a short written lesson. Secondary purposes were to examine the degree to which a pretest, grade level, and sex of the…

  3. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Maryam; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals. PMID:21845076

  4. Polyester-Based (Bio)degradable Polymers as Environmentally Friendly Materials for Sustainable Development

    PubMed Central

    Rydz, Joanna; Sikorska, Wanda; Kyulavska, Mariya; Christova, Darinka

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the polyesters such as polylactide and polyhydroxyalkonoates, as well as polyamides produced from renewable resources, which are currently among the most promising (bio)degradable polymers. Synthetic pathways, favourable properties and utilisation (most important applications) of these attractive polymer families are outlined. Environmental impact and in particular (bio)degradation of aliphatic polyesters, polyamides and related copolymer structures are described in view of the potential applications in various fields. PMID:25551604

  5. Corrosion assessment and enhanced biocompatibility analysis of biodegradable magnesium-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, Luis Enrique

    Magnesium alloys have raised immense interest to many researchers because of its evolution as a new third generation material. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium based alloys experience a natural phenomena to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosive activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, major concerns with such alloys are fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of an implant. In this investigation, three grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS.

  6. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Orthopedic Biodegradable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Wallace, James S.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, orthopedic and oral/maxillofacial implants represent a combined $2.8 billion market, a figure expected to experience significant and continued growth. Although traditional permanent implants have been proved clinically efficacious, they are also associated with several drawbacks, including secondary revision and removal surgeries. Non-permanent, biodegradable implants offer a promising alternative for patients, as they provide temporary support and degrade at a rate matching tissue formation, and thus, eliminate the need for secondary surgeries. These implants have been in clinical use for nearly 25 years, competing directly with, or maybe even exceeding, the performance of permanent implants. The initial implantation of biodegradable materials, as with permanent materials, mounts an acute host inflammatory response. Over time, the implant degradation profile and possible degradation product toxicity mediate long-term biodegradable implant-induced inflammation. However, unlike permanent implants, this inflammation is likely to cease once the material disappears. Implant-mediated inflammation is a critical determinant for implant success. Thus, for the development of a proactive biodegradable implant that has the ability to promote optimal bone regeneration and minimal detrimental inflammation, a thorough understanding of short- and long-term inflammatory events is required. Here, we discuss an array of biodegradable orthopedic implants, their associated short- and long- term inflammatory effects, and methods to mediate these inflammatory events. PMID:22043969

  7. Biodegradation of plastics: current scenario and future prospects for environmental safety.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Temoor; Shahid, Muhammad; Azeem, Farrukh; Rasul, Ijaz; Shah, Asad Ali; Noman, Muhammad; Hameed, Amir; Manzoor, Natasha; Manzoor, Irfan; Muhammad, Sher

    2018-03-01

    Plastic is a general term used for a wide range of high molecular weight organic polymers obtained mostly from the various hydrocarbon and petroleum derivatives. There is an ever-increasing trend towards the production and consumption of plastics due to their extensive industrial and domestic applications. However, a wide spectrum of these polymers is non-biodegradable with few exceptions. The extensive use of plastics, lack of waste management, and casual community behavior towards their proper disposal pose a significant threat to the environment. This has raised growing concerns among various stakeholders to devise policies and innovative strategies for plastic waste management, use of biodegradable polymers especially in packaging, and educating people for their proper disposal. Current polymer degradation strategies rely on chemical, thermal, photo, and biological procedures. In the presence of proper waste management strategies coupled with industrially controlled biodegradation facilities, the use of biodegradable plastics for some applications such as packaging or health industry is a promising and attractive option for economic, environmental, and health benefits. This review highlights the classification of plastics with special emphasis on biodegradable plastics and their rational use, the identified mechanisms of plastic biodegradation, the microorganisms involved in biodegradation, and the current insights into the research on biodegradable plastics. The review has also identified the research gaps in plastic biodegradation followed by future research directions.

  8. Durability of Starch Based Biodegradable Plastics Reinforced with Manila Hemp Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Shinji

    2011-02-25

    The biodegradability of Manila hemp fiber reinforced biodegradable plastics was studied for 240 days in a natural soil and 30 days in a compost soil. After biodegradability tests, weights were measured and both tensile strength tests and microscopic observation were performed to evaluate the biodegradation behavior of the composites. The results indicate that the tensile strength of the composites displays a sharp decrease for up to five days, followed by a gradual decrease. The weight loss and the reduction in tensile strength of biodegradable composite materials in the compost soil are both significantly greater than those buried in natural soil. The biodegradability of these composites is enhanced along the lower portion because this area is more easily attacked by microorganisms.

  9. Durability of Starch Based Biodegradable Plastics Reinforced with Manila Hemp Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradability of Manila hemp fiber reinforced biodegradable plastics was studied for 240 days in a natural soil and 30 days in a compost soil. After biodegradability tests, weights were measured and both tensile strength tests and microscopic observation were performed to evaluate the biodegradation behavior of the composites. The results indicate that the tensile strength of the composites displays a sharp decrease for up to five days, followed by a gradual decrease. The weight loss and the reduction in tensile strength of biodegradable composite materials in the compost soil are both significantly greater than those buried in natural soil. The biodegradability of these composites is enhanced along the lower portion because this area is more easily attacked by microorganisms. PMID:28880000

  10. [Progress on biodegradation of polylactic acid--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Wang, Sha; Liu, Weifeng; Chen, Guanjun

    2008-02-01

    Polylactic acid is a high molecular-weight polyester made from renewable resources such as corn or starch. It is a promising biodegradable plastic due to its mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability. To achieve natural recycling of polylactic acid, relative microorganisms and the underlying mechanisms in the biodegradation has become an important issue in biodegradable materials. Up to date, most isolated microbes capable of degrading polylactic acid belong to actinomycetes. Proteases secreted by these microorganisms are responsible for the degradation. However, subtle differences exist between these polylactic acid degrading enzymes and typical proteases with respect to substrate binding and catalysis. Amino acids relative to catalysis are postulated to be highly plastic allowing their catalytic hydrolysis of polylactic acid. In this paper we reviewed current studies on biodegradation of polylactic acid concerning its microbial, enzymatic reactions and the possible mechanisms. We also discussed the probability of biologically recycling PLA by applying highly efficient strains and enzymes.

  11. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk; Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk; Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energymore » balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.« less

  12. Fixation of mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates and screws.

    PubMed

    Yerit, Kaan C; Enislidis, Georg; Schopper, Christian; Turhani, Dritan; Wanschitz, Felix; Wagner, Arne; Watzinger, Franz; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-09-01

    Little data exist regarding the use of biodegradable plates and screws for the internal fixation of human mandibular fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of biodegradable, self-reinforced poly-L-lactide plates and screws for the internal fixation of fractures of the human mandible. Twenty-two individuals (14 male, 8 female; average age, 26.3 years) with a variety of fracture patterns of the mandible underwent management with a biodegradable fixation system. After surgery, maxillomandibular fixation was applied in 3 cases. Images (panoramic radiograph, computed tomographic scan) were taken immediately after surgery and at the 4-week, 8-week, 12-week, and 24-week intervals. The follow-up period averaged 49.1 weeks (range, 22 to 78 weeks). Mucosal dehiscences over the resorbable devices were present in 2 patients. In 1 of these 2 cases, the material had to be replaced with titanium plates. Mucosal healing and consolidation of the fracture were normal in all other patients. Self-reinforced biodegradable osteosynthesis materials provide a reliable and sufficient alternative to conventional titanium plate systems.

  13. Challenges and opportunities of biodegradable plastics: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Rujnić-Sokele, Maja; Pilipović, Ana

    2017-02-01

    The concept of materials coming from nature with environmental advantages of being biodegradable and/or biobased (often referred to as bioplastics) is very attractive to the industry and to the consumers. Bioplastics already play an important role in the fields of packaging, agriculture, gastronomy, consumer electronics and automotive, but still they have a very low share in the total production of plastics (currently about 1% of the about 300 million tonnes of plastic produced annually). Biodegradable plastics are often perceived as the possible solution for the waste problem, but biodegradability is just an additional feature of the material to be exploited at the end of its life in specific terms, in the specific disposal environment and in a specific time, which is often forgotten. They should be used as a favoured choice for the applications that demand a cheap way to dispose of the item after it has fulfilled its job (e.g. for food packaging, agriculture or medical products). The mini-review presents the opportunities and future challenges of biodegradable plastics, regarding processing, properties and waste management options.

  14. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials. Part III - Biodegradation of thermoformed rigid PLA packaging under industrial composting conditions.

    PubMed

    Musioł, Marta; Sikorska, Wanda; Adamus, Grazyna; Janeczek, Henryk; Richert, Jozef; Malinowski, Rafal; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a forensic engineering study on the biodegradation behaviour of prototype packaging thermoformed from PLA-extruded film and plain PLA film under industrial composting conditions. Hydrolytic degradation in water was conducted for reference. The effects of composting duration on changes in molar mass, glass transition temperature and degree of crystallinity of the polymeric material were monitored using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The chemical structure of water soluble degradation products of the polymeric material was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results show that the biodegradation process is less dependent on the thermoforming process of PLA and more dependent on the composting/degradation conditions that are applied. The increase in the dispersity index, leading to the bimodal molar mass distribution profile, suggests an autocatalytic hydrolysis effect at the early stage of the composting process, during which the bulk hydrolysis mechanism dominantly operates. Both the prototype PLA-packaging and PLA rigid film samples were shown to have a gradual increase in opacity due to an increase in the degree of crystallinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Current trends in biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Chanprateep, Suchada

    2010-12-01

    The microbial polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) positively impact global climate change scenarios by reducing the amount of non-degradable plastic used. A wide variety of different monomer compositions of PHAs has been described, as well as their future prospects for applications where high biodegradability or biocompatibility is required. PHAs can be produced from renewable raw materials and are degraded naturally by microorganisms that enable carbon dioxide and organic compound recycling in the ecosystem, providing a buffer to climate change. This review summarizes recent research on PHAs and addresses the opportunities as well as challenges for their place in the global market. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradation of o-Benzyl-p-Chlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, R. D.; Gledhill, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    The extent of biodegradation of o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol, marketed as a germicide under the name Santophen® 1 (Monsanto Co.), in river water, sewage, and activated sludge was determined. Biodegradation was assessed by use of a colorimetric procedure for phenolic materials, carbon analysis, and CO2 evolution. In unacclimated river water, 0.1 mg of Santophen 1 per liter was degraded within 6 days. In sewage, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/liter levels of Santophen 1 were degraded in 1 day. Acclimated activated sludge achieved 80% biodegradation of 1.0 mg/liter Santophen 1 in 8 h and 100% in 24 h. When effluent from a semicontinuous activated sludge unit, acclimated to 20 mg of Santophen 1 per liter was used as the inoculum for the CO2 evolution procedure, 60% of the total theoretical CO2 was evolved from Santophen 1. Based on the results of these studies, indicating Santophen 1 to be readily biodegraded in at least four biological systems, the continued use of present levels of Santophen 1 should present no significant environmental problems. PMID:4356462

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of a nonylphenol polyethoxylate and toxicity of the biodegradation metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Encarnación; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Núñez-Olea, Josefa; Lechuga, Manuela

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a study was made of the biodegradation of a non-ionic surfactant, a nonylphenol polyethoxylate, in biodegradability tests by monitoring the residual surfactant matter. The influence of the concentration on the extent of primary biodegradation, the toxicity of biodegradation metabolites, and the kinetics of degradation were also determined. The primary biodegradation was studied at different initial concentrations: 5, 25 and 50 mg/L, (at sub-and supra-critical micelle concentration). The NPEO used in this study can be considered biodegradable since the primary biodegradation had already taken place (a biodegradation greater than 80% was found for the different initial concentration tested). The initial concentration affected the shape of the resulting curve, the mean biodegradation rate and the percentage of biodegradation reached (99% in less than 8 days at 5 mg/L, 98% in less than 13 days at 25 mg/L and 95% in 14 days at 50 mg/L). The kinetic model of Quiroga and Sales (1991) was applied to predict the biodegradation of the NPEO. The toxicity value was measured as EC(20) and EC(50). In addition, during the biodegradation process of the surfactant a toxicity analysis was made of the evolution of metabolites generated, confirming that the subproducts of the biodegradation process were more toxic than the original.

  18. Biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams in water.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, A; Bergendahl, J; Rangwala, A

    2015-07-01

    Fluorinated fire-fighting foams may be released into the environment during fire-fighting activities, raising concerns due to the potential environmental and health impacts for some fluorinated organics. The current study investigated (1) the biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams, and (2) the applicability of current standard measures used to assess biodegradability of fluorinated fire-fighting foams. The biodegradability of three fluorinated fire-fighting foams was evaluated using a 28-day dissolved organic carbon (DOC) Die-Away Test. It was found that all three materials, diluted in water, achieved 77-96% biodegradability, meeting the criteria for "ready biodegradability". Defluorination of the fluorinated organics in the foam during biodegradation was measured using ion chromatography. It was found that the fluorine liberated was 1-2 orders of magnitude less than the estimated initial amount, indicating incomplete degradation of fluorinated organics, and incomplete CF bond breakage. Published biodegradability data may utilize biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total organic carbon (TOC) metrics to quantify organics. COD and TOC of four fluorinated compounds were measured and compared to the calculated carbon content or theoretical oxygen demand. It was found that the standard dichromate-based COD test did not provide an accurate measure of fluorinated organic content. Thus published biodegradability data using COD for fluorinated organics quantification must be critically evaluated for validity. The TOC measurements correlated to an average of 91% of carbon content for the four fluorinated test substances, and TOC is recommended for use as an analytical parameter in fluorinated organics biodegradability tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent advances in biopolymers and biopolymer-based nanocomposites for food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Tang, X Z; Kumar, P; Alavi, S; Sandeep, K P

    2012-01-01

    Plastic packaging for food and non-food applications is non-biodegradable, and also uses up valuable and scarce non-renewable resources like petroleum. With the current focus on exploring alternatives to petroleum and emphasis on reduced environmental impact, research is increasingly being directed at development of biodegradable food packaging from biopolymer-based materials. The proposed paper will present a review of recent developments in biopolymer-based food packaging materials including natural biopolymers (such as starches and proteins), synthetic biopolymers (such as poly lactic acid), biopolymer blends, and nanocomposites based on natural and synthetic biopolymers. The paper will discuss the various techniques that have been used for developing cost-effective biodegradable packaging materials with optimum mechanical strength and oxygen and moisture barrier properties. This is a timely review as there has been a recent renewed interest in research studies, both in the industry and academia, towards development of a new generation of biopolymer-based food packaging materials with possible applications in other areas.

  20. Biodegradability of poly(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate) (PBSA) controlled by temperature during the dried-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hana; Maeda, Tomoki; Hotta, Atsushi

    Currently there is a growing interest in biodegradable plastics that can be readily degraded into H2O and CO2. Among them, poly(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate)(PBSA) is one of the mechanically attractive materials that can be biodegraded by surrounding water molecules and microorganisms after the disposal of the plastics. In order to expand the use of PBSA, the proper and effective control of the biodegradability of PBSA should be realized. In this work, the dried-gel process of the PBSA was carefully studied considering the temperature of the process. Three different types of dried PBSA gels were prepared at three different gel-process temperatures. From the biodegradability testing by immersing the PBSA samples in NaOH aq., it was found that the percentage of the weight loss of the PBSA was increased, indicating that the biodegradability was enhanced as the gel preparation temperature became lower. In fact, smaller spherocrystals were observed in PBSA dried at cooler temperature, studied by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was therefore concluded that the microstructures of PBSA could be well controlled by changing the gel preparation temperatures for the precise control of the biodegradability of PBSA. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (No. 15H02298 to A.H.) and a Grant-in-Aid for Research Activity Start-up (No.15H06586 to T.M.) from JSPS: KAKENHI\\x9D.

  1. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates

    PubMed Central

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    Context: In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic–complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. Aims: To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. Materials and Methods: In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and screws using Champy's principle. All the cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically for the type of fracture, need for the intermaxillary fixation (IMF) and its duration, duration of surgery, fixation at operation, state of reduction at operation, state of bone union after operation, anatomic reduction, paresthesia, occlusal discrepancies, soft tissue infection, immediate and late inflammatory reactions related to biodegradation process, and any need for the removal of the plates. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptives, Frequencies, and Chi-square test were used. Results: In our study, the age group range was 5 to 55 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority of patients six, (46.2%). Postoperative occlusal discrepancies were found in seven patients as mild to moderate, which resolved with IMF for 1-8 weeks. There were minimal complications seen and only as soft tissue infection. Conclusions: Use of biodegradable osteosynthesis system is a reliable alternative method for the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures. The biodegradable system still needs to be refined in material quality and handling to match the stability achieved with metal system. Biodegradable plates and screws is an ideal system for pediatric fractures with favorable outcome. PMID:23662255

  2. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) material.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko

    2011-06-01

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  3. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko

    2011-06-01

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  4. Non-biodegradable polymer particles for drug delivery: A new technology for "bio-active" restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Imazato, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Tsuboi, Ririko; Kitagawa, Ranna; Thongthai, Pasiree; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi

    2017-09-26

    To develop dental restorative materials with "bio-active" functions, addition of the capability to release active agents is an effective approach. However, such functionality needs to be attained without compromising the basic properties of the restorative materials. We have developed novel non-biodegradable polymer particles for drug delivery, aimed for application in dental resins. The particles are made using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and a cross-linking monomer trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPT), with a hydrophilic nature to adsorb proteins or water-soluble antimicrobials. The polyHEMA/TMPT particles work as a reservoir to release fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in an effective manner. Application of the polyHEMA/TMPT particles loaded with FGF-2 to adhesives, or those loaded with CPC to resin-based endodontic sealers or denture bases/crowns is a promising approach to increase the success of the treatments by conferring "bio-active" properties to these materials to induce tissue regeneration or to inhibit bacterial infection.

  5. Microbial Enzymatic Degradation of Biodegradable Plastics.

    PubMed

    Roohi; Bano, Kulsoom; Kuddus, Mohammed; Zaheer, Mohammed R; Zia, Qamar; Khan, Mohammed F; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Gupta, Anamika; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-01-01

    The renewable feedstock derived biodegradable plastics are important in various industries such as packaging, agricultural, paper coating, garbage bags and biomedical implants. The increasing water and waste pollution due to the available decomposition methods of plastic degradation have led to the emergence of biodegradable plastics and biological degradation with microbial (bacteria and fungi) extracellular enzymes. The microbes utilize biodegradable polymers as the substrate under starvation and in unavailability of microbial nutrients. Microbial enzymatic degradation is suitable from bioremediation point of view as no waste accumulation occurs. It is important to understand the microbial interaction and mechanism involved in the enzymatic degradation of biodegradable plastics under the influence of several environmental factors such as applied pH, thermo-stability, substrate molecular weight and/or complexity. To study the surface erosion of polymer film is another approach for hydrolytic degradation characteristion. The degradation of biopolymer is associated with the production of low molecular weight monomer and generation of carbon dioxide, methane and water molecule. This review reported the degradation study of various existing biodegradable plastics along with the potent degrading microbes (bacteria and fungi). Patents available on plastic biodegradation with biotechnological significance is also summarized in this paper. This paper assesses that new disposal technique should be adopted for the degradation of polymers and further research is required for the economical production of biodegradable plastics along with their enzymatic degradation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Biodegradability and mechanical properties of poly-([beta]-hyroxybutyrate-Co-[beta]-hydroxyvalerate)-starch blends

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ramsay, B.A.; Langlade, V.; Carreau, P.J.

    1993-04-01

    PHAs, biodegradable thermoplastics, are a promising option to synthetic resins such as polyethylene, in combination with starch, to produce biodegradable plastics. This paper describes the mechanical properties and biodegradability of blends of wheat starch and P(HB-co-HV). The results indicate that the addition of starch to P(HB-co-HV) not only reduces the cost but also leads to a completely biodegradable material whose degradation can be tailored by adjusting the starch/PHA ratio. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mesoscale Laboratory Models of the Biodegradation of Municipal Landfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Zawislanski, P. T.

    2001-12-01

    Stabilization of municipal landfills is a critical issue involving land reuse, leachate treatment, and odor control. In an effort to increase landfill stabilization rates and decrease leachate treatment costs, municipal landfills can be operated as active aerobic or anaerobic bioreactors. Rates of settling and biodegradation were compared in three different treatments of municipal landfill materials in laboratory-scale bioreactors. Each of the three fifty-five-gallon clear acrylic tanks was fitted with pressure transducers, thermistors, neutron probe access tubes, a leachate recirculation system, gas vents, and air injection ports. The treatments applied to the tanks were (a) aerobic (air injection with leachate recirculation and venting from the top), (b) anaerobic (leachate recirculation with passive venting from the top), and (c) a control tank (passive venting from the top and no leachate recirculation). All tanks contained a 10-cm-thick layer of pea gravel at the bottom, overlain by a mixture of fresh waste materials on the order of 5-10 cm in size to an initial height of 0.55 m. Concentrations of O2, CO2 and CH4 were measured at the gas vent, and leachate was collected at the bottom drain. The water saturation in the aerobic and anaerobic tanks averaged 17 % and the control tank averaged 1 %. Relative degradation rates between the tanks were monitored by CO2 and CH4 production rates and O2 respiration rates. Respiration tests on the aerobic tank show a decrease in oxygen consumption rates from 1.3 mol/day at 20 days to 0.1 mol/day at 300 days, indicating usable organics are being depleted. The anaerobic tank produced measurable methane after 300 days that increased to 41% by volume after 370 days. Over the test period, the aerobic tank settled 30 %, the anaerobic tank 18.5 %, and the control tank 11.1 %. The concentrations of metals, nitrate, phosphate, and total organic carbon in the aerobic tank leachate are an order of magnitude lower than in the anaerobic

  8. Materials sciences research. [research facilities, research projects, and technical reports of materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving materials research conducted by various international test facilities are reported. Much of the materials research is classified in the following areas: (1) acousto-optic, acousto-electric, and ultrasonic research, (2) research for elucidating transport phenomena in well characterized oxides, (3) research in semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices, (4) the study of interfaces and interfacial phenomena, and (5) materials research relevant to natural resources. Descriptions of the individual research programs are listed alphabetically by the name of the author and show all personnel involved, resulting publications, and associated meeting speeches.

  9. Opportunities and challenges for the biodegradable magnesium alloys as next-generation biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, biodegradable magnesium alloys emerge as a new class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical devices. Deploying biodegradable magnesium-based materials not only avoids a second surgical intervention for implant removal but also circumvents the long-term foreign body effect of permanent implants. However, these materials are often subjected to an uncontrolled and fast degradation, acute toxic responses and rapid structural failure presumably due to a localized, too rapid corrosion process. The patented Mg–Nd–Zn–based alloys (JiaoDa BioMg [JDBM]) have been developed in Shanghai Jiao Tong University in recent years. The alloy series exhibit lower biodegradation rate and homogeneous nanophasic degradation patterns as compared with other biodegradable Mg alloys. The in vitro cytotoxicity tests using various types of cells indicate excellent biocompatibility of JDBM. Finally, bone implants using JDBM-1 alloy and cardiovascular stents using JDBM-2 alloy have been successfully fabricated and in vivo long-term assessment via implantation in animal model have been performed. The results confirmed the reduced degradation rate in vivo, excellent tissue compatibility and long-term structural and mechanical durability. Thus, this novel Mg-alloy series with highly uniform nanophasic biodegradation represent a major breakthrough in the field and a promising candidate for manufacturing the next generation biodegradable implants. PMID:27047673

  10. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Burnley, Stephen; Phillips, Rhiannon; Coleman, Terry; Rampling, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High Throughput Biodegradation-Screening Test To Prioritize and Evaluate Chemical Biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy J; Goodhead, Andrew K; Acharya, Kishor; Head, Ian M; Snape, Jason R; Davenport, Russell J

    2017-06-20

    Comprehensive assessment of environmental biodegradability of pollutants is limited by the use of low throughput systems. These are epitomized by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Ready Biodegradability Tests (RBTs), where one sample from an environment may be used to assess a chemical's ability to readily biodegrade or persist universally in that environment. This neglects the considerable spatial and temporal microbial variation inherent in any environment. Inaccurate designations of biodegradability or persistence can occur as a result. RBTs are central in assessing the biodegradation fate of chemicals and inferring exposure concentrations in environmental risk assessments. We developed a colorimetric assay for the reliable quantification of suitable aromatic compounds in a high throughput biodegradation screening test (HT-BST). The HT-BST accurately differentiated and prioritized a range of structurally diverse aromatic compounds on the basis of their assigned relative biodegradabilities and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model outputs. Approximately 20 000 individual biodegradation tests were performed, returning analogous results to conventional RBTs. The effect of substituent group structure and position on biodegradation potential demonstrated a significant correlation (P < 0.05) with Hammett's constant for substituents on position 3 of the phenol ring. The HT-BST may facilitate the rapid screening of 100 000 chemicals reportedly manufactured in Europe and reduce the need for higher-tier fate and effects tests.

  12. Impact of hydrocarbon type, concentration and weathering on its biodegradability in soil.

    PubMed

    Maletić, Snežana P; Dalmacija, Božo D; Rončević, Srđan D; Agbaba, Jasmina R; Perović, Svetlana D Ugarčina

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the impact of the hydrocarbon type and concentration, as well as the total effect of the natural weathering process to hydrocarbon biodegradability in sandy soil and the environment. In this experiment, sandy soil was separately contaminated with 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 3.5% of diesel and crude oils. Oil contaminated soil was taken from the Oil Refinery dumping sites after 9 years of weathering, and its concentration was adjusted to the above-mentioned levels. The biodegradation process was monitored by measuring CO(2), evolution rate, hydrocarbon degradation rate and dehydrogenase activity. The favourable concentration ranges for the soil contaminated with diesel oil were 1.0%, with concentrations at about 2.0% causing slightly adverse effects to CO(2) production which was overcome after 2 weeks, and with 3.5% diesel oil causing significant toxicity. For soil contaminated with crude oil, 2.0% was found to be optimum for effective biodegradation, with 3.5% crude oil also causing adverse effects to CO(2) production, although less so than the same concentration of diesel oil. No adverse effect was obtained for any concentration of the weathered oil, as after the weathering process, the remaining contaminants in the soil were mostly poorly degradable constituents like asphaltenes, resins etc. It has been proposed that such residual material from oil degradation is analogous to, and can even be regarded as, humic material. Due to its inert characteristics, insolubility and similarity to humic materials it is unlikely to be environmentally hazardous.

  13. Biodegradation of disinfection byproducts as a potential removal process during aquifer storage recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The biodegradation potential of two drinking water disinfection byproducts was investigated using aquifer materials obtained from approximately 100 and 200 meters below land surface in an aerobic aquifer system undergoing aquifer storage recovery of treated surface water. No significant biodegradation of a model trihalomethane compound, chloroform, was observed in aquifer microcosms under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. In contrast, between 16 and 27 percent mineralization of a radiolabeled model haloacetic acid compound, chloroacetic acid, was observed. These results indicate that although the potential for biodegradation of chloroacetic acid exists in deep aquifer systems, chloroform entrained within these aquifers or formed in situ will tend to persist. These results have important implications for water managers planning to meet anticipated lowered permissible levels of tri-halomethanes in drinking water.The biodegradation potential of two drinking water disinfection byproducts was investigated using aquifer materials obtained from approximately 100 and 200 meters below land surface in an aerobic aquifer system undergoing aquifer storage recovery of treated surface water. No significant biodegradation of a model trihalomethane compound, chloroform, was observed in aquifer microcosms under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. In contrast, between 16 and 27 percent mineralization of a radiolabeled model haloacetic acid compound, chloroacetic acid, was observed. These results indicate that although the potential for biodegradation of chloroacetic acid exists in deep aquifer systems, chloroform entrained within these aquifers or formed in situ will tend to persist. These results have important implications for water managers planning to meet anticipated lowered permissible levels of trihalomethanes in drinking water.Aquifer-storage-recovery injection water often contains disinfection byproducts. Results are presented from a study in which two model disinfection

  14. Biodegradation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Effects on Biodegradability under Co-Existing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-09-27

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major pollutants that are found in contaminated sites, particularly in developed countries such as Japan. Various microorganisms that degrade individual VOCs have been reported, and genomic information related to their phylogenetic classification and VOC-degrading enzymes is available. However, the biodegradation of multiple VOCs remains a challenging issue. Practical sites, such as chemical factories, research facilities, and illegal dumping sites, are often contaminated with multiple VOCs. In order to investigate the potential of biodegrading multiple VOCs, we initially reviewed the biodegradation of individual VOCs. VOCs include chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), and chlorinated methanes (carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane). We also summarized essential information on the biodegradation of each kind of VOC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, together with the microorganisms that are involved in VOC-degrading pathways. Interactions among multiple VOCs were then discussed based on concrete examples. Under conditions in which multiple VOCs co-exist, the biodegradation of a VOC may be constrained, enhanced, and/or unaffected by other compounds. Co-metabolism may enhance the degradation of other VOCs. In contrast, constraints are imposed by the toxicity of co-existing VOCs and their by-products, catabolite repression, or competition between VOC-degrading enzymes. This review provides fundamental, but systematic information for designing strategies for the bioremediation of multiple VOCs, as well as information on the role of key microorganisms that degrade VOCs.

  15. Biodegradation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Effects on Biodegradability under Co-Existing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major pollutants that are found in contaminated sites, particularly in developed countries such as Japan. Various microorganisms that degrade individual VOCs have been reported, and genomic information related to their phylogenetic classification and VOC-degrading enzymes is available. However, the biodegradation of multiple VOCs remains a challenging issue. Practical sites, such as chemical factories, research facilities, and illegal dumping sites, are often contaminated with multiple VOCs. In order to investigate the potential of biodegrading multiple VOCs, we initially reviewed the biodegradation of individual VOCs. VOCs include chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), and chlorinated methanes (carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane). We also summarized essential information on the biodegradation of each kind of VOC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, together with the microorganisms that are involved in VOC-degrading pathways. Interactions among multiple VOCs were then discussed based on concrete examples. Under conditions in which multiple VOCs co-exist, the biodegradation of a VOC may be constrained, enhanced, and/or unaffected by other compounds. Co-metabolism may enhance the degradation of other VOCs. In contrast, constraints are imposed by the toxicity of co-existing VOCs and their by-products, catabolite repression, or competition between VOC-degrading enzymes. This review provides fundamental, but systematic information for designing strategies for the bioremediation of multiple VOCs, as well as information on the role of key microorganisms that degrade VOCs. PMID:28904262

  16. Enhanced crude oil biodegradation in soil via biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-02

    Research on feasible methods for the enhancement of bioremediation in soil contaminated by crude oil is vital in oil-exporting countries such as Kuwait, where crude oil is a major pollutant and the environment is hostile to biodegradation. This study investigated the possibility of enhancing crude oil bioremediation by supplementing soil with cost-effective organic materials derived from two widespread locally grown trees, Conocarpus and Tamarix. Amendments in soils increased the counts of soil microbiota by up to 98% and enhanced their activity by up to 95.5%. The increase in the biodegradation of crude oil (75%) and high levels of alkB expression substantiated the efficiency of the proposed amendment technology for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. The identification of crude-oil-degrading bacteria revealed the dominance of the genus Microbacterium (39.6%), Sphingopyxis soli (19.3%), and Bordetella petrii (19.6%) in unamended, Conocarpus-amended, and Tamarix-amended contaminated soils, respectively. Although soil amendments favored the growth of Gram-negative bacteria and reduced bacterial diversity, the structures of bacterial communities were not significantly altered.

  17. Biopolymer-based thermoplastic mixture for producing solid biodegradable shaped bodies and its photo degradation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulong, Nurulsaidatulsyida; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biopolymers with controllable lifetimes have become increasingly important for many applications in the areas of agriculture, biomedical implants and drug release, forestry, wild life conservation and waste management. Natural oils are considered to be the most important class of renewable sources. They can be obtained from naturally occurring plants, such as sunflower, cotton, linseed and palm oil. In Malaysia, palm oil is an inexpensive and commodity material. Biopolymer produced from palm oil (Bio-VOP) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer and readily available from agriculture. For packaging use however, Bio-VOP is not thermoplastic and its granular form is unsuitable for most uses in the plastics industry, mainly due to processing difficulties during extrusion or injection moulding. Thus, research workers have developed several methods to blend Bio-VOP appropriately for industrial uses. In particular, injections moulding processes, graft copolymerisation, and preparation of blends with thermoplastic polymers have been studied to produce solid biodegradable shaped bodies. HDPE was chosen as commercial thermoplastic materials and was added with 10% Bio-VOP for the preparation of solid biodegradable shaped bodies named as HD-VOP. The UV light exposure of HD-VOP at 12 minutes upon gives the highest strength of this material that is 17.6 MPa. The morphological structure of HD-VOP shows dwi structure surface fracture which is brittle and ductile properties.

  18. The second green revolution? Production of plant-based biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Brian P

    2009-03-01

    Biodegradable plastics are those that can be completely degraded in landfills, composters or sewage treatment plants by the action of naturally occurring micro-organisms. Truly biodegradable plastics leave no toxic, visible or distinguishable residues following degradation. Their biodegradability contrasts sharply with most petroleum-based plastics, which are essentially indestructible in a biological context. Because of the ubiquitous use of petroleum-based plastics, their persistence in the environment and their fossil-fuel derivation, alternatives to these traditional plastics are being explored. Issues surrounding waste management of traditional and biodegradable polymers are discussed in the context of reducing environmental pressures and carbon footprints. The main thrust of the present review addresses the development of plant-based biodegradable polymers. Plants naturally produce numerous polymers, including rubber, starch, cellulose and storage proteins, all of which have been exploited for biodegradable plastic production. Bacterial bioreactors fed with renewable resources from plants--so-called 'white biotechnology'--have also been successful in producing biodegradable polymers. In addition to these methods of exploiting plant materials for biodegradable polymer production, the present review also addresses the advances in synthesizing novel polymers within transgenic plants, especially those in the polyhydroxyalkanoate class. Although there is a stigma associated with transgenic plants, especially food crops, plant-based biodegradable polymers, produced as value-added co-products, or, from marginal land (non-food), crops such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), have the potential to become viable alternatives to petroleum-based plastics and an environmentally benign and carbon-neutral source of polymers.

  19. Current approaches for the assessment of in situ biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Bombach, Petra; Richnow, Hans H; Kästner, Matthias; Fischer, Anko

    2010-04-01

    Considering the high costs and technical difficulties associated with conventional remediation strategies, in situ biodegradation has become a promising approach for cleaning up contaminated aquifers. To verify if in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants is taking place at a contaminated site and to determine if these processes are efficient enough to replace conventional cleanup technologies, a comprehensive characterization of site-specific biodegradation processes is essential. In recent years, several strategies including geochemical analyses, microbial and molecular methods, tracer tests, metabolite analysis, compound-specific isotope analysis, and in situ microcosms have been developed to investigate the relevance of biodegradation processes for cleaning up contaminated aquifers. In this review, we outline current approaches for the assessment of in situ biodegradation and discuss their potential and limitations. We also discuss the benefits of research strategies combining complementary methods to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the complex hydrogeological and microbial interactions governing contaminant biodegradation in the field.

  20. Bioactive and Biodegradable Nanocomposites and Hybrid Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allo, Bedilu A.; Costa, Daniel O.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for bone tissue engineering and regeneration rely on bioactive scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix and act as templates onto which cells attach, multiply, migrate and function. Of particular interest are nanocomposites and organic-inorganic (O/I) hybrid biomaterials based on selective combinations of biodegradable polymers and bioactive inorganic materials. In this paper, we review the current state of bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposite and O/I hybrid biomaterials and their applications in bone regeneration. We focus specifically on nanocomposites based on nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glass (BG) fillers in combination with biodegradable polyesters and their hybrid counterparts. Topics include 3D scaffold design, materials that are widely used in bone regeneration, and recent trends in next generation biomaterials. We conclude with a perspective on the future application of nanocomposites and O/I hybrid biomaterials for regeneration of bone. PMID:24955542

  1. Grey water biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the biodegradability characteristics of grey water constituents is imperative for a proper design and operation of a biological treatment system of grey water. This study characterizes the different COD fractions of dormitory grey water and investigates the effect of applying different conditions in the biodegradation test. The maximum aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and conversion rate for the different COD fractions is determined. The results show that, on average, dormitory grey water COD fractions are 28% suspended, 32% colloidal and 40% dissolved. The studied factors incubation time, inoculum addition and temperature are influencing the determined biodegradability. The maximum biodegradability and biodegradation rate differ between different COD fractions, viz. COD(ss), COD(col) and COD(diss). The dissolved COD fraction is characterised by the lowest degradation rate, both for anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The maximum biodegradability for aerobic and anaerobic conditions is 86 and 70% respectively, whereas the first order conversion rate constant, k₂₀, is 0.119 and 0.005 day⁻¹, respectively. The anaerobic and aerobic conversion rates in relation to temperature can be described by the Arrhenius relation, with temperature coefficients of 1.069 and 1.099, respectively.

  2. Controlling the biodegradability of poly(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate) (PBSA) by solvents used in the dried-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hana; Kamitabira, Saya; Maeda, Tomoki; Hotta, Atsushi

    Considering an environmentally friendly material, poly(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate)(PBSA) is one of the attractive biodegradable plastics that can be eventually degraded into H2O and CO2 by neighboring water molecules and microorganisms after the disposal. In order to expand the application of PBSA, the precise control of the biodegradability of PBSA is necessary. In this study, the dried-gel process was introduced to control the biodegradability of PBSA. The dried PBSA gels were prepared by using three different solvents (toluene, cyclohexanone, and o-dichlorobenzene). The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the PBSA prepared by toluene had smaller spherocrystals than the other PBSA dried-gels prepared by cyclohexanone or o-dichlorobenzene. The biodegradability testing by immersing the three types of PBSA in NaOH aq. showed that the percentage of the weight loss of the PBSA produced by toluene was the highest. The results indicated that the microstructures of PBSA could be controlled by changing solvents during the gel preparations, and that the biodegradability of PBSA could therefore be efficiently modified by changing solvents. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (No. 15H02298 to A.H.) and a Grant-in-Aid for Research Activity Start-up (No.15H06586 to T.M.) from JSPS: KAKENHI\\x9D.

  3. Biodegradability of tannin-containing wastewater from leather industry.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Yao, Kai; Sun, Danhong; Shi, Bi

    2007-08-01

    Tannins occur commonly in the wastewaters from forestry, plant medicine, paper and leather industries. The treatment of this kind of wastewaters, including settling and biodegradation, is usually difficult because tannins are highly soluble in water and would inhibit the growth of microorganisms in activated sludge. The objective of this study is to investigate biodegradability of tannin-containing wastewaters, so as to characterize the pollution properties of such wastewaters and provide a reference for their biological treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The research was typified by using the wastewater collected from vegetable tanning process in leather industry. A model was developed to describe the activated sludge process, and the biodegradation kinetics of vegetable tanning wastewater (VET wastewater) was studied. It was found that the biodegradability of tannin-containing wastewater varies heavily with the content of tannins in wastewater. The biodegradation of VET wastewater with tannin content around 4,900 mg/l occurred inefficiently due to the inhibition of tannins to the activated sludge process, and only 34.7% of biodegradation extent was reached in 14 days of incubation. The optimal biodegradability of VET wastewater was observed when its tannin content was diluted to 490 mg/l, where the COD and tannin removals reached 51.3% and 45.1% respectively in 6 days. Hence, it is suggested that a proper control of tannin content is necessary to achieve an effective biodegradation of tannin-containing wastewaters in wastewater treatment plants.

  4. Materials Research Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofan, Andrew J.

    1986-01-01

    Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites, ceramics, coatings, processing techniques, etc., which are now also in use by U.S. industry. This brochure highlights selected past accomplishments of our materials research and technology staff. It also provides many examples of the facilities available with which we can conduct materials research. The nation is now beginning to consider integrating technology for high-performance supersonic/hypersonic aircraft, nuclear space power systems, a space station, and new research areas such as materials processing in space. As we proceed, I am confident that our materials research staff will continue to provide important contributions which will help our nation maintain a strong technology position in these areas of growing world competition. Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites

  5. Biodegradable HEMA-based hydrogels with enhanced mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Mohamadreza Nassajian; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogels are widely used in the biomedical field. Their main purposes are either to deliver biological active agents or to temporarily fill a defect until they degrade and are followed by new host tissue formation. However, for this latter application, biodegradable hydrogels are usually not capable to sustain any significant load. The development of biodegradable hydrogels presenting load-bearing capabilities would open new possibilities to utilize this class of material in the biomedical field. In this work, an original formulation of biodegradable photo-crosslinked hydrogels based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is presented. The hydrogels consist of short-length poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) chains in a star shape structure, obtained by introducing a tetra-functional chain transfer agent in the backbone of the hydrogels. They are cross-linked with a biodegradable N,O-dimethacryloyl hydroxylamine (DMHA) molecule sensitive to hydrolytic cleavage. We characterized the degradation properties of these hydrogels submitted to mechanical loadings. We showed that the developed hydrogels undergo long-term degradation and specially meet the two essential requirements of a biodegradable hydrogel suitable for load bearing applications: enhanced mechanical properties and low molecular weight degradation products. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1161-1169, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Photocrosslinkable biodegradable elastomers based on cinnamate-functionalized polyesters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congcong; Kustra, Stephen R; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biodegradable elastomers are an emerging class of materials that play a critical role in supporting innovations in bioabsorbable medical implants. This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of poly(glycerol-co-sebacate)-cinnamate (PGS-CinA), a biodegradable elastomer based on hyperbranched polyesters derivatized with pendant cinnamate groups. PGS-CinA can be prepared via photodimerization in the absence of photoinitiators using monomers that are found in common foods. The resulting network exhibits a Young's modulus of 50.5-152.1kPa and a projected in vitro degradation half-life time between 90 and 140days. PGS-CinA elastomers are intrinsically cell-adherent and support rapid proliferation of fibroblasts. Spreading and proliferation of fibroblasts are loosely governed by the substrate stiffness within the range of Young's moduli in PGS-CinA networks that were prepared. The thermo-mechanical properties, biodegradability and intrinsic support of cell attachment and proliferation suggest that PGS-CinA networks are broadly applicable for use in next generation bioabsorable materials including temporary medical devices and scaffolds for soft tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodegradation of natural reinforcing fillers for polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastalygina, E. E.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Popov, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    Twelve different natural raw materials were selected as possible fillers for eco-friendly biocomposites. The target was to find the most biodegradable ones. Two mycological tests were held: in the aqueous and agar media. It was found that two tests showed different results. In aqueous media, the fillers with a high content of water-soluble and easy-hydrolysed compounds demostrated the most intensive biofouling. In agar media, the entire filler was exposed to biodigestion by fungi. Therefore, multi-compound fillers with a set of different macro- and microelements were more biodegradable than others.

  8. BIODEGRADATIVE ANALYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN LABORATORY-SCALE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of research to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of the major biodegradable components of municipal solid waste (MSW). Tests were conducted in quadruplicate in 2-L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane (CH4) yields for gra...

  9. Prediction of biodegradability from chemical structure: Modeling or ready biodegradation test data

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Loonen, H.; Lindgren, F.; Hansen, B.

    1999-08-01

    Biodegradation data were collected and evaluated for 894 substances with widely varying chemical structures. All data were determined according to the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) I test protocol. The MITI I test is a screening test for ready biodegradability and has been described by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline 301 C and European Union (EU) test guideline C4F. The chemicals were characterized by a set of 127 predefined structural fragments. This data set was used to develop a model for the prediction of the biodegradability of chemicals under standardized OECD and EUmore » ready biodegradation test conditions. Partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis was used for the model development. The model was evaluated by means of internal cross-validation and repeated external validation. The importance of various structural fragments and fragment interactions was investigated. The most important fragments include the presence of a long alkyl chain; hydroxy, ester, and acid groups (enhancing biodegradation); and the presence of one or more aromatic rings and halogen substituents (regarding biodegradation). More than 85% of the model predictions were correct for using the complete data set. The not readily biodegradable predictions were slightly better than the readily biodegradable predictions (86 vs 84%). The average percentage of correct predictions from four external validation studies was 83%. Model optimization by including fragment interactions improve the model predicting capabilities to 89%. It can be concluded that the PLS model provides predictions of high reliability for a diverse range of chemical structures. The predictions conform to the concept of readily biodegradable (or not readily biodegradable) as defined by OECD and EU test guidelines.« less

  10. Model coupling intraparticle diffusion/sorption, nonlinear sorption, and biodegradation processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Gossard, Chris M.; Strevett, Keith A.; Kolar, Randall L.; Sabatini, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion, sorption and biodegradation are key processes impacting the efficiency of natural attenuation. While each process has been studied individually, limited information exists on the kinetic coupling of these processes. In this paper, a model is presented that couples nonlinear and nonequilibrium sorption (intraparticle diffusion) with biodegradation kinetics. Initially, these processes are studied independently (i.e., intraparticle diffusion, nonlinear sorption and biodegradation), with appropriate parameters determined from these independent studies. Then, the coupled processes are studied, with an initial data set used to determine biodegradation constants that were subsequently used to successfully predict the behavior of a second data set. The validated model is then used to conduct a sensitivity analysis, which reveals conditions where biodegradation becomes desorption rate-limited. If the chemical is not pre-equilibrated with the soil prior to the onset of biodegradation, then fast sorption will reduce aqueous concentrations and thus biodegradation rates. Another sensitivity analysis demonstrates the importance of including nonlinear sorption in a coupled diffusion/sorption and biodegradation model. While predictions based on linear sorption isotherms agree well with solution concentrations, for the conditions evaluated this approach overestimates the percentage of contaminant biodegraded by as much as 50%. This research demonstrates that nonlinear sorption should be coupled with diffusion/sorption and biodegradation models in order to accurately predict bioremediation and natural attenuation processes. To our knowledge this study is unique in studying nonlinear sorption coupled with intraparticle diffusion and biodegradation kinetics with natural media.

  11. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  12. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  13. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  14. Biodegradability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) after femtosecond laser irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Akimichi; Yada, Shuhei; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradation is a key property for biodegradable polymer-based tissue scaffolds because it can provide suitable space for cell growth as well as tailored sustainability depending on their role. Ultrashort pulsed lasers have been widely used for the precise processing of optically transparent materials, including biodegradable polymers. Here, we demonstrated the change in the biodegradation of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) following irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at different wavelengths. Microscopic observation as well as water absorption and mass change measurement revealed that the biodegradation of the PLGA varied significantly depending on the laser wavelength. There was a significant acceleration of the degradation rate upon 400 nm-laser irradiation, whereas 800 nm-laser irradiation did not induce a comparable degree of change. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that laser pulses at the shorter wavelength dissociated the chemical bonds effectively, resulting in a higher degradation rate at an early stage of degradation. PMID:27301578

  15. Drug loaded biodegradable load-bearing nanocomposites for damaged bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmanas, E. Y.; Gotman, I.; Sharipova, A.; Psakhie, S. G.; Swain, S. K.; Unger, R.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present a short review-scientific report on processing and properties, including in vitro degradation, of load bearing biodegradable nanocomposites as well as of macroporous 3D scaffolds for bone ingrowth. Biodegradable implantable devices should slowly degrade over time and disappear with ingrown of natural bone replacing the synthetic graft. Compared to low strength biodegradable polymers, and brittle CaP ceramics, biodegradable CaP-polymer and CaP-metal nanocomposites, mimicking structure of natural bone, as well as strong and ductile metal nanocomposites can provide to implantable devices both strengths and toughness. Nanostructuring of biodegradable β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate)-polymer (PCL and PLA), β-TCP-metal (FeMg and FeAg) and of Fe-Ag composites was achieved employing high energy attrition milling of powder blends. Nanocomposite powders were consolidated to densities close to theoretical by high pressure consolidation at ambient temperature—cold sintering, with retention of nanoscale structure. The strength of developed nanocomposites was significantly higher as compared with microscale composites of the same or similar composition. Heat treatment at moderate temperatures in hydrogen flow resulted in retention of nanoscale structure and higher ductility. Degradation of developed biodegradable β-TCP-polymer, β-TCP-metal and of Fe-Ag nanocomposites was studied in physiological solutions. Immersion tests in Ringer's and saline solution for 4 weeks resulted in 4 to 10% weight loss and less than 50% decrease in compression or bending strength, the remaining strength being significantly higher than the values reported for other biodegradable materials. Nanostructuring of Fe-Ag based materials resulted also in an increase of degradation rate because of creation on galvanic Fe-Ag nanocouples. In cell culture experiments, the developed nanocomposites supported the attachment the human osteoblast cells and exhibited no signs of cytotoxicity

  16. Synthetic biodegradable functional polymers for tissue engineering: a brief review.

    PubMed

    BaoLin, Guo; Ma, Peter X

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds play a crucial role in tissue engineering. Biodegradable polymers with great processing flexibility are the predominant scaffolding materials. Synthetic biodegradable polymers with well-defined structure and without immunological concerns associated with naturally derived polymers are widely used in tissue engineering. The synthetic biodegradable polymers that are widely used in tissue engineering, including polyesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, polyurethane, and poly (glycerol sebacate) are summarized in this article. New developments in conducting polymers, photoresponsive polymers, amino-acid-based polymers, enzymatically degradable polymers, and peptide-activated polymers are also discussed. In addition to chemical functionalization, the scaffold designs that mimic the nano and micro features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are presented as well, and composite and nanocomposite scaffolds are also reviewed.

  17. Impact of stent strut design in metallic stents and biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Foin, Nicolas; Lee, Renick D; Torii, Ryo; Guitierrez-Chico, Juan Luis; Mattesini, Alessio; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo; Davies, Justin E; Di Mario, Carlo; Joner, Michael; Virmani, Renu; Wong, Philip

    2014-12-20

    Advances in the understanding of healing mechanisms after stent implantation have led to the recognition of stent strut thickness as an essential factor affecting re-endothelialization and overall long term vessel healing response after Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI). Emergence of Drug-eluting stents (DESs) with anti-proliferative coating has contributed to reducing the incidence of restenosis and Target Lesion Revascularization (TVR), while progress and innovations in stent materials have in the meantime facilitated the design of newer platforms with more conformability and thinner struts, producing lesser injury and improving integration into the vessel wall. Recent advances in biodegradable metal and polymer materials now also allow for the design of fully biodegradable platforms, which are aimed at scaffolding the vessel only temporarily to prevent recoil and constrictive remodeling of the vessel during the initial period required, and are then progressively resorbed thereby avoiding the drawback of leaving an unnecessary implant permanently in the vessel. The aim of this article is to review recent evolution in stent material and stent strut design while understanding their impact on PCI outcomes. The article describes the different metallic alloys and biodegradable material properties and how these have impacted the evolution of stent strut thickness and ultimately outcomes in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biodegradable/Compostable Composites From Ligno-Cellulosic Fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased importance of renewable resources for raw materials and recyclabi1ity/biodegradability of the product at the end of the useful life are demanding a shift from petroleum-based synthetics to agro-based natural fibers in automotive interiors. Natural fiber composites can contribute greatl...

  19. Enhanced bone screw fixation with biodegradable bone cement in osteoporotic bone model.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, Tiina; Koistinen, Arto; Kröger, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2012-09-27

    The purpose of this study was to study the potential of novel biodegradable PCL bone cement to improve bone screw fixation strength in osteoporotic bone. The biomechanical properties of bone cement (ε-polycaprolactone, PCL) and fixation strength were studied using biomechanical tests and bone screws fixed in an osteoporotic bone model. Removal torques and pullout strengths were assessed for cortical, self-tapping, and cancellous screws inserted in the osteoporotic bone model (polyurethane foam blocks with polycarbonate plate) with and without PCL bone cement. Open cell and cellular rigid foam blocks with a density of 0.12 g/cm3 were used in this model. Removal torques were significantly (more than six-fold) improved with bone cement for cancellous screws. Furthermore, the bone cement improved pullout strengths three to 12 times over depending on the screw and model material. Biodegradable bone cement turned out to be a very potential material to stabilize screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. The results warrant further research before safe clinical use, especially to clarify clinically relevant factors using real osteoporotic bone under human body conditions and dynamic fatigue testing for long-term performance.

  20. Coupling UV-H2O2 to accelerate dimethyl phthalate (DMP) biodegradation and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Song, Jiaxiu; Yang, Lihui; Bai, Qi; Li, Rongjie; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), an important industrial raw material, is an endocrine disruptor of concern for human and environmental health. DMP exhibits slow biodegradation, and its coupled treatment by means of advanced oxidation may enhance its biotransformation and mineralization. We evaluated two ways of coupling UV-H2O2 advanced oxidation to biodegradation: sequential coupling and intimate coupling in an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor (ICBBR). During sequential coupling, UV-H2O2 pretreatment generated carboxylic acids that depressed the pH, and subsequent biodegradation generated phthalic acid; both factors inhibited DMP biodegradation. During intimately coupled UV-H2O2 with biodegradation, carboxylic acids and phthalic acid (PA) did not accumulate, and the biodegradation rate was 13 % faster than with biodegradation alone and 78 % faster than with biodegradation after UV-H2O2 pretreatment. Similarly, DMP oxidation with intimate coupling increased by 5 and 39 %, respectively, compared with biodegradation alone and sequential coupling. The enhancement effects during intimate coupling can be attributed to the rapid catabolism of carboxylic acids, which generated intracellular electron carriers that directly accelerated di-oxygenation of PA and relieved the inhibition effect of PA and low pH. Thus, intimate coupling optimized the impacts of energy input from UV irradiation used together with biodegradation.

  1. Biodegradable Polyphosphazene-Based Blends for Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ogueri, Kenneth S.; Escobar Ivirico, Jorge L.; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Allcock, Harry R.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal tissue injury or disease and the subsequent functional impairment is at an alarming rate. It continues to be one of the most challenging problems in the human health care. Regenerative engineering offers a promising transdisciplinary strategy for tissues regeneration based on the convergence of tissue engineering, advanced materials science, stem cell science, developmental biology and clinical translation. Biomaterials are emerging as extracellular-mimicking matrices designed to provide instructive cues to control cell behavior and ultimately, be applied as therapies to regenerate damaged tissues. Biodegradable polymers constitute an attractive class of biomaterials for the development of scaffolds due to their flexibility in chemistry and the ability to be excreted or resorbed by the body. Herein, the focus will be on biodegradable polyphosphazene-based blend systems. The synthetic flexibility of polyphosphazene, combined with the unique inorganic backbone, has provided a springboard for more research and subsequent development of numerous novel materials that are capable of forming miscible blends with poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA). Laurencin and co-workers has demonstrated the exploitation of the synthetic flexibility of Polyphosphazene that will allow the design of novel polymers, which can form miscible blends with PLAGA for biomedical applications. These novel blends, due to their well-tuned biodegradability, and mechanical and biological properties coupled with the buffering capacity of the degradation products, constitute ideal materials for regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues. Lay Summary Regenerative engineering aims to regenerate complex tissues to address the clinical challenge of organ damage. Tissue engineering has largely focused on the restoration and repair of individual tissues and organs, but over the past 25 years, scientific, engineering, and medical advances have led to the introduction of

  2. Biodegradable Polyphosphazene-Based Blends for Regenerative Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogueri, Kenneth S; Escobar Ivirico, Jorge L; Nair, Lakshmi S; Allcock, Harry R; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-03-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal tissue injury or disease and the subsequent functional impairment is at an alarming rate. It continues to be one of the most challenging problems in the human health care. Regenerative engineering offers a promising transdisciplinary strategy for tissues regeneration based on the convergence of tissue engineering, advanced materials science, stem cell science, developmental biology and clinical translation. Biomaterials are emerging as extracellular-mimicking matrices designed to provide instructive cues to control cell behavior and ultimately, be applied as therapies to regenerate damaged tissues. Biodegradable polymers constitute an attractive class of biomaterials for the development of scaffolds due to their flexibility in chemistry and the ability to be excreted or resorbed by the body. Herein, the focus will be on biodegradable polyphosphazene-based blend systems. The synthetic flexibility of polyphosphazene, combined with the unique inorganic backbone, has provided a springboard for more research and subsequent development of numerous novel materials that are capable of forming miscible blends with poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA). Laurencin and co-workers has demonstrated the exploitation of the synthetic flexibility of Polyphosphazene that will allow the design of novel polymers, which can form miscible blends with PLAGA for biomedical applications. These novel blends, due to their well-tuned biodegradability, and mechanical and biological properties coupled with the buffering capacity of the degradation products, constitute ideal materials for regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues. Regenerative engineering aims to regenerate complex tissues to address the clinical challenge of organ damage. Tissue engineering has largely focused on the restoration and repair of individual tissues and organs, but over the past 25 years, scientific, engineering, and medical advances have led to the introduction of this new

  3. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Lei, Meijuan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-04-29

    It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  4. Use and application of gelatin as potential biodegradable packaging materials for food products.

    PubMed

    Nur Hanani, Z A; Roos, Y H; Kerry, J P

    2014-11-01

    The manufacture and potential application of biodegradable films for food application has gained increased interest as alternatives to conventional food packaging polymers due to the sustainable nature associated with their availability, broad and abundant source range, compostability, environmentally-friendly image, compatibility with foodstuffs and food application, etc. Gelatin is one such material and is a unique and popularly used hydrocolloid by the food industry today due to its inherent characteristics, thereby potentially offering a wide range of further and unique industrial applications. Gelatin from different sources have different physical and chemical properties as they contain different amino acid contents which are responsible for the varying characteristics observed upon utilization in food systems and when being utilized more specifically, in the manufacture of films. Packaging films can be successfully produced from all gelatin sources and the behaviour and characteristics of gelatin-based films can be altered through the incorporation of other food ingredients to produce composite films possessing enhanced physical and mechanical properties. This review will present the current situation with respect to gelatin usage as a packaging source material and the challenges that remain in order to move the manufacture of gelatin-based films nearer to commercial reality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  6. Silk Fibroin Based Porous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Shuqin; Li, Mingzhong

    2009-01-01

    Silk from the Bombyx mori silkworm is a protein-based fiber. Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) is one of the most important candidates for biomedical porous material based on its superior machinability, biocompatibility, biodegradation, bioresorbability, and so on. In this paper, we have reviewed the key features of SF. Moreover we have focused on the morphous, technical processing, and biocompatibility of SF porous materials, followed by the application research. Finally, we provide a perspective the potential and problems of SF porous materials.

  7. Tissue Reaction to a Novel Bone Substitute Material Fabricated With Biodegradable Polymer-Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticle Composite.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hideo; Jinno, Yohei; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Atsuta, Ikiru; Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel bone substitute material fabricated using a biodegradable polymer-calcium phosphate nanoparticle composite. Porous structured poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticle composite, which was fabricated using solid-liquid phase separation and freeze-drying methods, was grafted into bone defects created in rat calvarium or tibia. Rats were killed 4 weeks after surgery, and histological analyses were performed to evaluate new bone formation. Scanning electron microscopic observation showed the interconnecting pores within the material and the pore diameter was approximately 100 to 300 μm. HA nanoparticles were observed to be embedded into the PLLA beams. In the calvarial implantation model, abundant blood vessels and fibroblastic cells were observed penetrating into pores, and in the tibia model, newly formed bone was present around and within the composite. The PLLA-HA nanoparticle composite bone substitute developed in this study showed biocompatibility, elasticity, and operability and thus has potential as a novel bone substitute.

  8. Modelling for environmental assessment of municipal solid waste landfills (part II: biodegradation).

    PubMed

    Garcia de Cortázar, Amaya Lobo; Lantarón, Javier Herrero; Fernández, Oscar Montero; Monzón, Iñaki Tejero; Lamia, Maria Fantelli

    2002-12-01

    The biodegradation module of a simulation program for municipal solid waste landfills (MODUELO) was developed. The biodegradation module carries out the balance of organic material starting with the results of the hydrologic simulation and the waste composition. It simulates the biologic reactions of hydrolysis of solids and the gasification of the dissolved biodegradable material. The results of this module are: organic matter (COD, BOD and elemental components such as carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and ash), ammonium nitrogen generated with the gas and transported by the leachates and the potential rates of methane and carbon dioxide generation. The model was calibrated by using the general tendency curves of the pollutants recorded in municipal solid waste landfills, fitting the first part of them to available landfill data. Although the results show some agreement, further work is being done to make MODUELO a useful tool for real landfill simulation.

  9. Renewable smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Zhai, Lindong; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-07-01

    The use of renewable materials is essential in future technologies to harmonize with our living environment. Renewable materials can maintain our resources from the environment so as to overcome degradation of natural environmental services and diminished productivity. This paper reviews recent advancement of renewable materials for smart material applications, including wood, cellulose, chitin, lignin, and their sensors, actuators and energy storage applications. To further improve functionality of renewable materials, hybrid composites of inorganic functional materials are introduced by incorporating carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide and tin oxide conducting polymers and ionic liquids. Since renewable materials have many advantages of biocompatible, sustainable, biodegradable, high mechanical strength and versatile modification behaviors, more research efforts need to be focused on the development of renewable smart materials.

  10. Reflectometric interference spectroscopy-based sensing for evaluating biodegradability of polymeric thin films.

    PubMed

    Ooya, Tooru; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Choi, Hyung Woo; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Enzymatic degradation of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) thin films was analyzed by reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS)-based sensing system, and validated by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) imaging. The degradation of the PCL thin film spin-coated on the silicon substrate on which 65-nm silicon nitride layer was deposited as an interference layer was easily monitored by shifting the peak bottom of reflectance spectra (Δλ) that is known to be proportional to the thickness of thin films. The Δλ values decreased with increasing the concentration of lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia, and the obtained sensorgrams were applied for kinetic analysis using a curve fitting software. ATR-IR spectra and imaging analysis on the surface of the PCL film revealed that carbonyl groups on the surface decreased with time, resulting from proceeding with the enzymatic hydrolysis, and importantly, extinction of the carbonyl group was declined with proportional to the decrease in the film thickness measured by the RIfS system. Consequently, the present RIfS-based label-free monitoring system can provide a simple and reliable way for evaluating biodegradability on synthetic materials. A RIfS-based sensing system in combination with ATR-IR measurements can be an analytical method for evaluation of biodegradability of polymeric thin films. This study demonstrates the utility of the RIfS-based sensing approach for analyzing the lipase-catalyzed degradation of PCL. Despite the RIfS is known as an inexpensive label-free detection method for biological interaction, the RIfS applications as monitoring methods for enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers had not been systematically explored. This study additionally demonstrated the capability of combined analysis of the biodegradation with ATR-IR spectra/imaging and RIfS measurements, which could be broadly applied towards evaluating biodegradability of various biodegradable polymers in environmental

  11. Biodegradation of polystyrene-graft-starch copolymers in three different types of soil.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Vladimir; Velickovic, Sava; Popovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Materials based on polystyrene and starch copolymers are used in food packaging, water pollution treatment, and textile industry, and their biodegradability is a desired characteristic. In order to examine the degradation patterns of modified, biodegradable derivates of polystyrene, which may keep its excellent technical features but be more environmentally friendly at the same time, polystyrene-graft-starch biomaterials obtained by emulsion polymerization in the presence of new type of initiator/activator pair (potassium persulfate/different amines) were subjected to 6-month biodegradation by burial method in three different types of commercially available soils: soil rich in humus and soil for cactus and orchid growing. Biodegradation was monitored by mass decrease, and the highest degradation rate was achieved in soil for cactus growing (81.30%). Statistical analysis proved that microorganisms in different soil samples have different ability of biodegradation, and there is a significant negative correlation between the share of polystyrene in copolymer and degree of biodegradation. Grafting of polystyrene on starch on one hand prevents complete degradation of starch that is present (with maximal percentage of degraded starch ranging from 55 to 93%), while on the other hand there is an upper limit of share of polystyrene in the copolymer (ranging from 37 to 77%) that is preventing biodegradation of degradable part of copolymers.

  12. Biodegradation of bilge waste from Patagonia with an indigenous microbial community.

    PubMed

    Nievas, M L; Commendatore, M G; Olivera, N L; Esteves, J L; Bucalá, V

    2006-12-01

    Oily residues that are generated in normal ship operation are considered hazardous wastes. A biodegradation assay with autochthonous microbiota of Bilge Waste Oily Phase (BWOP) was performed in a bioreactor under controlled conditions. Petroleum, diesel oil, and PAH degraders were isolated from bilge wastes. These bacteria belong to the genus Pseudomonas and are closely related to Pseudomonas stutzeri as shown by 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis. The indigenous microbial community of the bilge waste was capable of biodegrading the BWOP (1% v/v) with biodegradation efficiencies of 70% for hexane extractable material (HEM), 68% for total hydrocarbons (TH) and 90% for total aromatics hydrocarbons (TA) in 14 days. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was successfully applied to evaluate hydrocarbon evaporation in a control experiment and demonstrated a mass balance closure of 88%. The SPME and biodegradation results give useful information to improve and scale up the process for BWOP treatment.

  13. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives ofmore » this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.« less

  14. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates.

    PubMed

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic-complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and screws using Champy's principle. All the cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically for the type of fracture, need for the intermaxillary fixation (IMF) and its duration, duration of surgery, fixation at operation, state of reduction at operation, state of bone union after operation, anatomic reduction, paresthesia, occlusal discrepancies, soft tissue infection, immediate and late inflammatory reactions related to biodegradation process, and any need for the removal of the plates. Descriptives, Frequencies, and Chi-square test were used. In our study, the age group range was 5 to 55 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority of patients six, (46.2%). Postoperative occlusal discrepancies were found in seven patients as mild to moderate, which resolved with IMF for 1-8 weeks. There were minimal complications seen and only as soft tissue infection. Use of biodegradable osteosynthesis system is a reliable alternative method for the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures. The biodegradable system still needs to be refined in material quality and handling to match the stability achieved with metal system. Biodegradable plates and screws is an ideal system for pediatric fractures with favorable outcome.

  15. Flexible biodegradable citrate-based polymeric step-index optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Shan, Dingying; Zhang, Chenji; Kalaba, Surge; Mehta, Nikhil; Kim, Gloria B; Liu, Zhiwen; Yang, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Implanting fiber optical waveguides into tissue or organs for light delivery and collection is among the most effective ways to overcome the issue of tissue turbidity, a long-standing obstacle for biomedical optical technologies. Here, we report a citrate-based material platform with engineerable opto-mechano-biological properties and demonstrate a new type of biodegradable, biocompatible, and low-loss step-index optical fiber for organ-scale light delivery and collection. By leveraging the rich designability and processibility of citrate-based biodegradable polymers, two exemplary biodegradable elastomers with a fine refractive index difference and yet matched mechanical properties and biodegradation profiles were developed. Furthermore, we developed a two-step fabrication method to fabricate flexible and low-loss (0.4 db/cm) optical fibers, and performed systematic characterizations to study optical, spectroscopic, mechanical, and biodegradable properties. In addition, we demonstrated the proof of concept of image transmission through the citrate-based polymeric optical fibers and conducted in vivo deep tissue light delivery and fluorescence sensing in a Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat, laying the groundwork for realizing future implantable devices for long-term implantation where deep-tissue light delivery, sensing and imaging are desired, such as cell, tissue, and scaffold imaging in regenerative medicine and in vivo optogenetic stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, A; Turco, R

    1991-01-01

    The microbial processes that occur in the subsurface under a typical Midwest agricultural soil were studied. A 26-m bore was installed in November of 1988 at a site of the Purdue University Agronomy Research Center. Aseptic collections of soil materials were made at 17 different depths. Physical analysis indicated that the site contained up to 14 different strata. The site materials were primarily glacial tills with a high carbonate content. The N, P, and organic C contents of sediments tended to decrease with depth. Ambient water content was generally less than the water content, which corresponds to a -0.3-bar equivalent. No pesticides were detected in the samples, and degradation of added 14C-labeled pesticides (atrazine and metolachlor) was not detected in slurry incubations of up to 128 days. The sorption of atrazine and metolachlor was correlated with the clay content of the sediments. Microbial biomass (determined by direct microscopic count, viable count, and phospholipid assay) in the tills was lower than in either the surface materials or the aquifer located at 25 m. The biodegradation of glucose and phenol occurred rapidly and without a lag in samples from the aquifer capillary fringe, saturated zone, and surface soils. In contrast, lag periods and smaller biodegradation rates were found in the till samples. Subsurface sediments are rich in microbial numbers and activity. The most active strata appear to be transmissive layers in the saturated zone. This implies that the availability of water may limit activity in the profile. PMID:1768098

  17. Environmental Research Brief. ANAEROBIC BIODEGREDATION OF BTEX IN AQUIFER MATERIAL (EPA/600/S-97/003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the anaerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) in aquifer material from two petroleum-contaminated aquifers; Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SB) in Michigan and a site near Rocky Point, North Carolina (RP). T...

  18. External validation of structure-biodegradation relationship (SBR) models for predicting the biodegradability of xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Devillers, J; Pandard, P; Richard, B

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradation is an important mechanism for eliminating xenobiotics by biotransforming them into simple organic and inorganic products. Faced with the ever growing number of chemicals available on the market, structure-biodegradation relationship (SBR) and quantitative structure-biodegradation relationship (QSBR) models are increasingly used as surrogates of the biodegradation tests. Such models have great potential for a quick and cheap estimation of the biodegradation potential of chemicals. The Estimation Programs Interface (EPI) Suite™ includes different models for predicting the potential aerobic biodegradability of organic substances. They are based on different endpoints, methodologies and/or statistical approaches. Among them, Biowin 5 and 6 appeared the most robust, being derived from the largest biodegradation database with results obtained only from the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) test. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive performances of these two models from a set of 356 chemicals extracted from notification dossiers including compatible biodegradation data. Another set of molecules with no more than four carbon atoms and substituted by various heteroatoms and/or functional groups was also embodied in the validation exercise. Comparisons were made with the predictions obtained with START (Structural Alerts for Reactivity in Toxtree). Biowin 5 and Biowin 6 gave satisfactorily prediction results except for the prediction of readily degradable chemicals. A consensus model built with Biowin 1 allowed the diminution of this tendency.

  19. Biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethanes incorporating polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela T; Lee, Kyung Min; Qin, Haihu; Mather, Patrick T

    2008-09-01

    A new hybrid thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) system that incorporates an organic, biodegradable poly(D, L-lactide) soft block with a hard block bearing the inorganic polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) moiety is introduced and studied. Changes in the polyol composition made through variation of the hydrophilic initiator molecular weight show direct control of the final transition temperatures. Incorporating POSS into the hard segments allows for excellent elasticity above T(g), as evidenced with dynamic mechanical analysis, not seen in most other biodegradable materials. This elasticity is attributed to physical cross-links formed in the hard block through POSS crystallization, as revealed with wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Increasing the POSS incorporation level in the TPU hard block was observed to increase crystallinity and also the rigidity of the material. The highest incorporation, using a statistical average of three POSS units per hard block, demonstrated one-way shape memory with excellent shape fixing capabilities. In vitro degradation of this sample was also investigated during a two month period. Moderate water uptake and dramatic molecular weight decrease were immediately observed although large mass loss (approximately 20 wt %) was not observed until the two month time point.

  20. Covalent chemical functionalization enhances the biodegradation of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurapati, Rajendra; Bonachera, Fanny; Russier, Julie; Rajukrishnan Sureshbabu, Adukamparai; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Biodegradation of the graphene-based materials is an emerging issue due to their estimated widespread usage in different industries. Indeed, a few concerns have been raised about their biopersistence. Here, we propose the design of surface-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) with the capacity to degrade more effectively compared to unmodified GO using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). For this purpose, we have functionalized the surface of GO with two well-known substrates of HRP namely coumarin and catechol. The biodegradation of all conjugates has been followed by Raman, dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Molecular docking and gel electrophoresis have been carried out to gain more insights into the interaction between GO conjugates and HRP. Our studies have revealed better binding when GO is functionalized with coumarin or catechol compared to control GOs. All results prove that GO functionalized with coumarin and catechol moieties display a faster and more efficient biodegradation over GO.

  1. Modeling cutinase enzyme regulation in polyethylene terepthalate plastic biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apri, M.; Silmi, M.; Heryanto, T. E.; Moeis, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) is a plastic material that is commonly used in our daily life. The high production of PET and others plastics that can be up to three hundred million tons per year, is not matched by its degradation rate and hence leads to environmental pollution. To overcome this problem, we develop a biodegradation system. This system utilizes LC Cutinase enzyme produced by engineered escherichia coli bacteria to degrade PET. To make the system works efficaciously, it is important to understand the mechanism underlying its enzyme regulation. Therefore, we construct a mathematical model to describe the regulation of LC Cutinase production. The stability of the model is analyzed. We show that the designated biodegradation system can give an oscillatory behavior that is very important to control the amount of inclusion body (the miss-folded proteins that reduce the efficiency of the biodegradation system).

  2. Microfluidic etching and oxime-based tailoring of biodegradable polyketoesters.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Devin G; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2008-09-02

    A straightforward, flexible, and inexpensive method to etch biodegradable poly(1,2,6-hexanetriol alpha-ketoglutarate) films is reported. Microfluidic delivery of the etchant, a solution of NaOH, can create micron-scale channels through local hydrolysis of the polyester film. In addition, the presence of a ketone in the repeat unit allows for prior or post chemoselective modifications, enabling the design of functionalized microchannels. Delivery of oxyamine tethered ligands react with ketone groups on the polyketoester to generate covalent oxime linkages. By thermally sealing an etched film to a second flat surface, poly(1,2,6-hexanetriol alpha-ketoglutarate) can be used to create biodegradable microfluidic devices. In order to determine the versatility of the microfluidic etch technique, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) was etched with acetone. This strategy provides a facile method for the direct patterning of biodegradable materials, both through etching and chemoselective ligand immobilization.

  3. Modeling cutinase enzyme regulation in polyethylene terepthalate plastic biodegradation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Apri, M., E-mail: m.apri@math.itb.ac.id; Silmi, M.; Heryanto, T. E.

    PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) is a plastic material that is commonly used in our daily life. The high production of PET and others plastics that can be up to three hundred million tons per year, is not matched by its degradation rate and hence leads to environmental pollution. To overcome this problem, we develop a biodegradation system. This system utilizes LC Cutinase enzyme produced by engineered escherichia coli bacteria to degrade PET. To make the system works efficaciously, it is important to understand the mechanism underlying its enzyme regulation. Therefore, we construct a mathematical model to describe the regulation of LCmore » Cutinase production. The stability of the model is analyzed. We show that the designated biodegradation system can give an oscillatory behavior that is very important to control the amount of inclusion body (the miss-folded proteins that reduce the efficiency of the biodegradation system).« less

  4. Poly(Lactic Acid) Blends with Poly(Trimethylene Carbonate) as Biodegradable Medical Adhesive Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Li, Hongli; Yuan, Mingwei; Yuan, Minglong; Chen, Haiyun

    2017-01-01

    A novel medical adhesive was prepared by blending poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) in ethyl acetate, and the two materials were proven to be biodegradable and biocompatible. The medical adhesive was characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of this material was measured to be 7.13 g·cm−2·24 h−1. Its degree of comfortability was confirmed by the extensibility (E) and the permanent set (PS), which were approximately 7.83 N·cm−2 and 18.83%, respectively. In vivo tests regarding rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM), rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG), rabbit bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), rabbit interleukin 6 (IL-6), rabbit interleukin 10 (IL-10), rabbit tumor necrosis factor α(TNFα), glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (AST/GOT), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT/GPT), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) indicated that the PLA-PTMC medical adhesive was not harmful to the liver and kidneys. Finally, pathological sections indicated that PLA-PTMC was more effective than the control group. These data suggest that in addition to having a positive effect on hemostasis and no sensibility to wounds, PLA-PTMC can efficiently prevent infections and has great potential as a medical adhesive. PMID:28956808

  5. Are Biodegradable Osteosyntheses Still an Option for Midface Trauma? Longitudinal Evaluation of Three Different PLA-Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, Andreas; Köhnke, Robert; Saely, Christoph H.; Ploder, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate three different biodegradable polylactic acid- (PLA-) based osteosynthesis materials (OM). These OM (BioSorb, LactoSorb, and Delta) were used in 64 patients of whom 55 (85.9%) had fractures of the zygoma, five (7.8%) in the LeFort II level, two of the frontal bone (3.1%), and two of the maxillary sinus wall (3.1%). In addition to routine follow-up (FU) at 3, 6, and 12 months (m) (T1, T2, and T3) all patients were finally evaluated at a mean FU after 14.1 m for minor (e.g., nerve disturbances, swelling, and pain) and major (e.g., infections and occlusal disturbances) complications. Out of all 64 patients 38 presented with complications; of these 28 were minor (43.8%) and 10 major (15.6%) resulting in an overall rate of 59.4%. Differences in minor complications regarding sensibility disturbance at T1 and T3 were statistically significant (P = 0.04). Differences between the OM were not statistically significant. Apart from sufficient mechanical stability for clinical use of all tested OM complications mostly involved pain and swelling probably mainly related to the initial bulk reaction attributable to the drop of pH value during the degradation process. This paper includes a review of the current aspects of biodegradable OM. PMID:26491680

  6. Design, Materials, and Mechanobiology of Biodegradable Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Marco A.; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A.; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A.

    2015-01-01

    A review about design, manufacture, and mechanobiology of biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is given. First, fundamental aspects about bone tissue engineering and considerations related to scaffold design are established. Second, issues related to scaffold biomaterials and manufacturing processes are discussed. Finally, mechanobiology of bone tissue and computational models developed for simulating how bone healing occurs inside a scaffold are described. PMID:25883972

  7. Effects of cross-linking on mechanical, biological properties and biodegradation behavior of Nile tilapia skin collagen sponge as a biomedical material.

    PubMed

    Sun, Leilei; Li, Bafang; Yao, Di; Song, Wenkui; Hou, Hu

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the effects of dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) and glutaraldehyde (GTA) cross-linking on mechanical, biological properties and biodegradation behavior of Nile tilapia skin collagen sponge fabricated by freeze-drying technology. It was found that the GTA cross-linked collagen sponge exhibited a higher degree of cross-linking in comparison with DHT. The extent of increased tensile strength as well as hygroscopicity indicated that GTA cross-linking was superior to DHT in mechanical properties and liquid absorption, which was attributed to different cross-linking mechanisms. Hygroscopicity assay indicated that cross-linking could improve stability of collagen in solutions. No obvious changes in porosity and blood coagulation time were observed whether cross-linking or not. Results from collagenase biodegradation assay in vitro illustrated that GTA-treated collagen sponge was more resistant to collagenase biodegradation, while DHT exhibited negligible resistance. In addition, photochemical stability of collagen sponge was studied by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), which indicated that both cross-linking treatments could not change the backbone structure of collagen. Furthermore, the microstructure of collagen sponge was stable after cross-linking. The highly porous and interconnected structure of collagen sponge was helpful to the absorption of wound exudates, supplement of oxygen and cell proliferation, accompanied with good blood compatibility, which indicated that our fabricated collagen sponge could be applied in biomedical materials field as wound dressings. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Courant, T; Roullin, V G; Cadiou, C; Delavoie, F; Molinari, M; Andry, M C; Gafa, V; Chuburu, F

    2010-04-23

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  9. Biofilm growth in response to various concentrations of biodegradable material in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Schaule, Gabriela; Moschnitschka, Dania; Schulte, Simone; Tamachkiarow, Adriana; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2007-01-01

    Biological stability is one of the most important aspects of safe drinking water. It depends crucially on the availability of biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC). Measurement of BDOC is time-consuming and only performed if an increase is suspected. In this study, a fibre optical sensor (FOS) was used to detect changes in BDOC, detected as an increase in biofilm growth. The FOS consists of a sending and a receiving optical fibre, the latter connected to a detector. When material is deposited at the tip of the fibre, an increase of backscattered light is detected. In a system fed with drinking water, the signal was correlated to biofilm growth which was confirmed by independent surface colonisation determination. When 1 and 3mgL(-1) of BDOC respectively was added, the increment of the FOS signal over a period of 1 week could be distinguished. Interference by planktonic components and humic substances could be excluded. The biofilm on the FOS could be used as a means to detect changes in BDOC in drinking water and the signal has an early warning capacity.

  10. Phthalates biodegradation in the environment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P; He, Jianzhong

    2008-08-01

    Phthalates are synthesized in massive amounts to produce various plastics and have become widespread in environments following their release as a result of extensive usage and production. This has been of an environmental concern because phthalates are hepatotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic by nature. Numerous studies indicated that phthalates can be degraded by bacteria and fungi under aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic conditions. This paper gives a review on the biodegradation of phthalates and includes the following aspects: (1) the relationship between the chemical structure of phthalates and their biodegradability, (2) the biodegradation of phthalates by pure/mixed cultures, (3) the biodegradation of phthalates under various environments, and (4) the biodegradation pathways of phthalates.

  11. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cerna, Marie; Koecher, Martin, E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Valek, Vlastimil

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during amore » balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.« less

  12. Biodegradable lipids enabling rapidly eliminated lipid nanoparticles for systemic delivery of RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Martin A; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Matsuda, Shigeo; Liu, Ju; Barros, Scott; Querbes, William; Tam, Ying K; Ansell, Steven M; Kumar, Varun; Qin, June; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Qianfan; Panesar, Sue; Hutabarat, Renta; Carioto, Mary; Hettinger, Julia; Kandasamy, Pachamuthu; Butler, David; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Pang, Bo; Charisse, Klaus; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Mui, Barbara L; Du, Xinyao; Cullis, Pieter; Madden, Thomas D; Hope, Michael J; Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics, most notably with lipid nanoparticle-based delivery systems, have advanced into human clinical trials. The results from these early clinical trials suggest that lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), and the novel ionizable lipids that comprise them, will be important materials in this emerging field of medicine. A persistent theme in the use of materials for biomedical applications has been the incorporation of biodegradability as a means to improve biocompatibility and/or to facilitate elimination. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further advance the LNP platform through the development of novel, next-generation lipids that combine the excellent potency of the most advanced lipids currently available with biodegradable functionality. As a representative example of this novel class of biodegradable lipids, the lipid evaluated in this work displays rapid elimination from plasma and tissues, substantially improved tolerability in preclinical studies, while maintaining in vivo potency on par with that of the most advanced lipids currently available.

  13. Effect of biodegradation on the consolidation properties of a dewatered municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, Brendan C

    2008-01-01

    The effect of biodegradation on the consolidation characteristics of an anaerobically digested, dewatered municipal sewage sludge was studied. Maintained-load oedometer consolidation tests that included measurement of the pore fluid pressure response were conducted on moderately degraded sludge material and saturated bulk samples that had been stored under static conditions and allowed to anaerobically biodegrade further (simulating what would happen in an actual sewage sludge monofill or lagoon condition). Strongly degraded sludge material was produced after a storage period of 13 years at ambient temperatures of 5-15 degrees C, with the total volatile solids reducing from initially 70% to 55%. The sludge materials were highly compressible, although impermeable for practical purposes. Primary consolidation generally occurred very slowly, which was attributed to the microstructure of the solid phase, the composition and viscosity of the pore fluid, ongoing biodegradation and the high organic contents. The coefficient of primary consolidation values decreased from initially about 0.35m2/yr to 0.003-0.03m2/yr with increasing effective stress (sigmav'=3-100kPa). Initially, the strongly degraded sludge material was slightly more permeable, although both the moderately and strongly degraded materials became impermeable for practical purposes (k=10(-9)-10(-12)m/s) below about 650% and 450% water contents, respectively. Secondary compression became more dominant with increasing effective stress with a mean secondary compression index (Calphae) value of 0.9 measured for both the moderately and strongly degraded materials.

  14. Bioactivity of freeze-dried platelet-rich plasma in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yu; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Mito; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the necessity for the immediate preparation from patients' blood, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) limits its clinical applicability. To address this concern and respond to emergency care and other unpredictable uses, we have developed a freeze-dried PRP in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material (Polyglactin 910). On the polymer filaments of PRP mesh, which was prepared by coating the polymer mesh with human fresh PRP and subsequent freeze-drying, platelets were incorporated, and related growth factors were preserved at high levels. This new PRP mesh preparation significantly and reproducibly stimulated the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro and neovascularization in a chorioallantoic membrane assay. A full-thickness skin defect model in a diabetic mouse demonstrated the PRP mesh, although prepared from human blood, substantially facilitated angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization without inducing severe inflammation in vivo. These data demonstrate that our new PRP mesh preparation functions as a bioactive material to facilitate tissue repair/regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that this bioactive material, composed of allogeneic PRP, could be clinically used as a promising alternative in emergency care or at times when autologous PRP is not prepared immediately before application.

  15. External validation of EPIWIN biodegradation models.

    PubMed

    Posthumus, R; Traas, T P; Peijnenburg, W J G M; Hulzebos, E M

    2005-01-01

    The BIOWIN biodegradation models were evaluated for their suitability for regulatory purposes. BIOWIN includes the linear and non-linear BIODEG and MITI models for estimating the probability of rapid aerobic biodegradation and an expert survey model for primary and ultimate biodegradation estimation. Experimental biodegradation data for 110 newly notified substances were compared with the estimations of the different models. The models were applied separately and in combinations to determine which model(s) showed the best performance. The results of this study were compared with the results of other validation studies and other biodegradation models. The BIOWIN models predict not-readily biodegradable substances with high accuracy in contrast to ready biodegradability. In view of the high environmental concern of persistent chemicals and in view of the large number of not-readily biodegradable chemicals compared to the readily ones, a model is preferred that gives a minimum of false positives without a corresponding high percentage false negatives. A combination of the BIOWIN models (BIOWIN2 or BIOWIN6) showed the highest predictive value for not-readily biodegradability. However, the highest score for overall predictivity with lowest percentage false predictions was achieved by applying BIOWIN3 (pass level 2.75) and BIOWIN6.

  16. Concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dyreborg, S.; Arvin, E.; Broholm, K.

    The concomitant aerobic biodegradation of benzene and thiophene was investigated in microcosm experiments using a groundwater enrichment culture. Benzene was biodegraded within 1 d, whereas thiophene could not be biodegraded as the sole source of carbon and energy. Some interesting phenomena were observed when both benzene and thiophene were present. In most cases, removal of thiophene was observed, and the removal occurred concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene, suggesting that benzene was used as a primary substrate in the cometabolic biodegradation of thiophene. No biodegradation of the two compounds was observed for some combinations of concentrations, suggesting that thiophene couldmore » act as an inhibitor to benzene biodegradation. However, this effect could be overcome if more benzene was added to the microcosm. Residual concentrations of benzene and thiophene were observed in some microcosms and the data indicated that the biodegradation of the two compounds stopped when a critical threshold ratio between the concentrations of thiophene and benzene was reached. This ratio varied between 10 and 20. Results from modeling the biodegradation data suggested that thiophene was cometabolized concomitantly with the biodegradation of benzene and that the biodegradation may be described by a modified model based on a traditional model with an inhibition term incorporated.« less

  17. Fabrication of a Delaying Biodegradable Magnesium Alloy-Based Esophageal Stent via Coating Elastic Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tianwen; Yu, Jia; Cao, Jun; Gao, Fei; Zhu, Yueqi; Cheng, Yingsheng; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation can relieve esophageal stenosis and obstructions in benign esophageal strictures, and magnesium alloy stents are a good candidate because of biodegradation and biological safety. However, biodegradable esophageal stents show a poor corrosion resistance and a quick loss of mechanical support in vivo. In this study, we chose the elastic and biodegradable mixed polymer of Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the coated membrane on magnesium alloy stents for fabricating a fully biodegradable esophageal stent, which showed an ability to delay the degradation time and maintain mechanical performance in the long term. After 48 repeated compressions, the mechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL-PTMC-coated magnesium stents possess good flexibility and elasticity, and could provide enough support against lesion compression when used in vivo. According to the in vitro degradation evaluation, the PCL-PTMC membrane coated on magnesium was a good material combination for biodegradable stents. During the in vivo evaluation, the proliferation of the smooth muscle cells showed no signs of cell toxicity. Histological examination revealed the inflammation scores at four weeks in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group were similar to those in the control group (p > 0.05). The α-smooth muscle actin layer in the media was thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Both the epithelial and smooth muscle cell layers were significantly thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group. The stent insertion was feasible and provided reliable support for at least four weeks, without causing severe injury or collagen deposition. Thus, this stent provides a new stent for the treatment of benign esophageal stricture and a novel research path in the development of temporary stents in other cases of benign stricture. PMID:28773505

  18. Materials research at CMAM

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-18

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. Amore » detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.« less

  19. COLUMN STUDIES ON BTEX BIODEGRADATION UNDER MICROAEROPHILIC AND DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two column tests were conducted using aquifer material to simulate the nitrate field demonstration project carried out earlier at Traverse City, Michigan. The objectives were to better define the effect nitrate addition had on biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xyl...

  20. Biodegradable cellulose acetate nanofiber fabrication via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Theopisti; Doumanidis, Charalabos

    2010-09-01

    Nanofiber manufacturing is one of the key advancements in nanotechnology today. Over the past few years, there has been a tremendous growth of research activities to explore electrospinning for nanofiber formation from a rich variety of materials. This quite simple and cost effective process operates on the principle that the solution is extracted under the action of a high electric field. Once the voltage is sufficiently high, a charged jet is ejected following a complicated looping trajectory. During its travel, the solvent evaporates leaving behind randomly oriented nanofibers accumulated on the collector. The combination of their nanoscale dimensionality, high surface area, porosity, flexibility and superior strength makes the electrospun fibers suitable for several value-added applications, such as filters, protecting clothes, high performance structures and biomedical devices. In this study biodegradable cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibrous membranes were produced using electrospinning. The device utilized consisted of a syringe equipped with a metal needle, a microdialysis pump, a high voltage supply and a collector. The morphology of the yielded fibers was determined using SEM. The effect of various parameters, including electric field strength, tip-to-collector distance, solution feed rate and composition on the morphological features of the electrospun fibers was examined. The optimum operating conditions for the production of uniform, non-beaded fibers with submicron diameter were also explored. The biodegradable CA nanofiber membranes are suitable as tissue engineering scaffolds and as reinforcements of biopolymer matrix composites in foils by ultrasonic welding methods.

  1. Co-biodegradation of anthracene and naphthalene by the bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Xian M

    2018-04-16

    NAP (Naphthalene) and ANT (anthracene) usually co-exist in environment and possessed interactional effects on their biodegradation in environment. Presently, a strain of Acinetobacter johnsonii was employed to degrade NAP and ANT in single- and dual-substrate systems. NAP was utilized as prefer substrate by cells to accelerate ANT biodegradation. As much as 200 mg L -1 ANT could be entirely degraded with 1,500 mg L -1 NAP, which was beyond bacterial potential in single substrate system. Especially, the shortest biodegradation period (103 h) for ANT was observed with the presence of 50 mg L -1 NAP. By contrast, ANT showed strong inhibition on NAP degradation, while the peak biodegradation of 1,950 mg L -1 NAP with 50 mg L -1 ANT could still proceed. By introducing an inhibition constant parameter to fit the inhibition on cells, modeling indicated the substrate inhibition for NAP and ANT over the concentrations of 174 and 49 mg L -1 , respectively. Furthermore, enzyme assay revealed the pathway of meta fission in NAP biodegradation due to the appearance of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity, and low-level lipase excretion was also found in both NAP and ANT biodegradation, but hardly affect NAP and ANT biodegradation in the present study. To research the interplay of NAP and ANT is conducive to targeted decontamination.

  2. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Merrettig-Bruns, Ute; Jelen, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Detergent surfactants can be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have strictly anaerobic conditions. This review gives an overview on anaerobic biodegradation processes, the methods for testing anaerobic biodegradability, and the anaerobic biodegradability of different detergent surfactant types (anionic, nonionic, cationic, amphoteric surfactants).

  3. Does bioavailability limit biodegradation? A comparison of hydrocarbon biodegradation and desorption rates in aged soils.

    PubMed

    Huesemann, Michael H; Hausmann, Tom S; Fortman, Tim J

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine whether bioavailability limits the biodegradability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged soils, both the biodegradation and abiotic desorption rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were measured at various time points in six different aged soils undergoing slurry bioremediation treatment. Alkane biodegradation rates were always much greater than the respective desorption rates, indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons apparently do not need to be dissolved into the aqueous phase prior to metabolism by soil microorganisms. The biodegradation of PAHs was generally not mass-transfer rate limited during the initial phase, while it often became so at the end of the treatment period when biodegradation rates equaled abiotic desorption rates. However, in all cases where PAH biodegradation was not observed or PAH removal temporarily stalled, bioavailability limitations were not deemed responsible for this recalcitrance since these PAHs desorbed rapidly from the soil into the aqueous phase. Consequently, aged PAHs that are often thought to be recalcitrant due to bioavailability limitations may not be so and therefore may pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  4. Does Bioavailability Limit Biodegradability? A Comparison of Hydrocarbon Biodegradation and Desorption Rates in Aged Soils

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    In order to determine whether bioavailability limits the biodegradability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged soils, both the biodegradation and abiotic desorption rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were measured at various time points in six different aged soils undergoing slurry bioremediation treatment. Alkane biodegradation rates were always much greater than the respective desorption rates, indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons do not need to be transferred into the aqueous phase prior to metabolism by soil microorganisms. The biodegradation of PAHs was generally not mass-transfer rate limited during the initial phase, while it often became so at the end of the treatment periodmore » when biodegradation rates equaled abiotic desorption rates. However, in all cases where PAH biodegradation was not observed or PAH removal temporarily stalled, bioavailability limitations were not deemed responsible for this recalcitrance since these PAHs desorbed rapidly from the soil into the aqueous phase. Consequently, aged PAHs that are often thought to be recalcitrant due to bioavailability limitations may not be so and therefore may pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.« less

  5. Assessing the biodegradability of microparticles disposed down the drain.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Kathleen; Itrich, Nina; Casteel, Kenneth; Menzies, Jennifer; Williams, Tom; Krivos, Kady; Price, Jason

    2017-05-01

    Microparticles made from naturally occurring materials or biodegradable plastics such as poly(3-hydroxy butyrate)-co-(3-hydroxy valerate), PHBV, are being evaluated as alternatives to microplastics in personal care product applications but limited data is available on their ultimate biodegradability (mineralization) in down the drain environmental compartments. An OECD 301B Ready Biodegradation Test was used to quantify ultimate biodegradability of microparticles made of PHBV foam, jojoba wax, beeswax, rice bran wax, stearyl stearate, blueberry seeds and walnut shells. PHBV polymer was ready biodegradable reaching 65.4 ± 4.1% evolved CO 2 in 5 d and 90.5 ± 3.1% evolved CO 2 in 80 d. PHBV foam microparticles (125-500 μm) were mineralized extensively with >66% CO 2 evolution in 28 d and >82% CO 2 evolution in 80 d. PHBV foam microparticles were mineralized at a similar rate and extent as microparticles made of jojoba wax, beeswax, rice bran wax, and stearyl stearate which reached 84.8  ± 4.8, 84.9  ± 2.2, 82.7  ± 4.7, and 86.4 ± 3.2% CO 2 evolution respectively in 80 d. Blueberry seeds and walnut shells mineralized more slowly only reaching 39.3  ± 6.9 and 5.1 ± 2.8% CO 2 evolution in 80 d respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring of the aerobe biodegradation of chlorinated organic solvents by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Anikó; Futó, István; Palcsu, László

    2014-05-01

    Our chemical-biological basic research aims to eliminate chlorinated environmental contaminants from aquifers around industrial areas in the frame of research program supported by the European Social Fund (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0043). The most careful and simplest way includes the in situ biodegradation with the help of cultured and compound specific strains. Numerous members of Pseudomonas bacteria are famous about function of bioremediation. They can metabolism the environmental hazardous chemicals like gas oils, dyes, and organic solvents. Our research based on the Pseudomonas putida F1 strain, because its ability to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene. Several methods were investigated to estimate the rate of biodegradation, such as the measurement of the concentration of the pollutant along the contamination pathway, the microcosm's studies or the compound specific stable isotope analysis. In this area in the Transcarpathian basin we are pioneers in the stable isotope monitoring of biodegradation. The main goal is to find stable isotope fractionation factors by stable isotope analysis, which can help us to estimate the rate and effectiveness of the biodegradation. The subsequent research period includes the investigation of the method, testing its feasibility and adaptation in the environment. Last but not least, the research gives an opportunity to identify the producer of the contaminant based on the stable isotope composition of the contaminant.

  7. BIODEGRADATION PROBABILITY PROGRAM (BIODEG)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Biodegradation Probability Program (BIODEG) calculates the probability that a chemical under aerobic conditions with mixed cultures of microorganisms will biodegrade rapidly or slowly. It uses fragment constants developed using multiple linear and non-linear regressions and d...

  8. New insights into polyurethane biodegradation and realistic prospects for the development of a sustainable waste recycling process.

    PubMed

    Cregut, Mickael; Bedas, M; Durand, M-J; Thouand, G

    2013-12-01

    Polyurethanes are polymeric plastics that were first used as substitutes for traditional polymers suspected to release volatile organic hazardous substances. The limitless conformations and formulations of polyurethanes enabled their use in a wide variety of applications. Because approximately 10 Mt of polyurethanes is produced each year, environmental concern over their considerable contribution to landfill waste accumulation appeared in the 1990s. To date, no recycling processes allow for the efficient reuse of polyurethane waste due to their high resistance to (a)biotic disturbances. To find alternatives to systematic accumulation or incineration of polyurethanes, a bibliographic analysis was performed on major scientific advances in the polyurethane (bio)degradation field to identify opportunities for the development of new technologies to recondition this material. Until polymers exhibiting oxo- or hydro-biodegradative traits are generated, conventional polyurethanes that are known to be only slightly biodegradable are of great concern. The research focused on polyurethane biodegradation highlights recent attempts to reprocess conventional industrial polyurethanes via microbial or enzymatic degradation. This review describes several wonderful opportunities for the establishment of new processes for polyurethane recycling. Meeting these new challenges could lead to the development of sustainable management processes involving polymer recycling or reuse as environmentally safe options for industries. The ability to upgrade polyurethane wastes to chemical compounds with a higher added value would be especially attractive. © 2013.

  9. Production of biodegradable plastic by polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulating bacteria using low cost agricultural waste material.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Anteneh; Woldesenbet, Fantahun

    2016-12-12

    Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are macromolecules synthesized by bacteria. They are inclusion bodies accumulated as reserve materials when the bacteria grow under different stress conditions. Because of their fast degradability under natural environmental conditions, PHBs are selected as alternatives for production of biodegradable plastics. The aim of this work was to isolate potential PHB producing bacteria, evaluate PHB production using agro-residues as carbon sources. Among fifty bacterial strains isolated from different localities, ten PHB accumulating strains were selected and compared for their ability to accumulate PHB granules inside their cells. Isolate Arba Minch Waste Water (AWW) identified as Bacillus spp was found to be the best producer. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation period for best PHB production by the isolate were 7, 37 °C, and 48 h respectively at 150 rpm. PHB production was best with glucose as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source. The strain was able to accumulate 55.6, 51.6, 37.4 and 25% PHB when pretreated sugar cane bagasse, corn cob, teff straw (Eragrostis tef) and banana peel were used as carbon sources respectively. Fourier transform-infrared authentication results of the extracted and purified PHB identified its functional units as C-H, CH 2 , C=O and C-O groups. UV-Vis spectrophotometric analysis and biodegradability test confirmed the similarity of the extract with standard PHB and its suitability for bioplastic production. The isolated Bacillus sp can be used for feasible production of PHB using agro-residues especially sugarcane bagasse which can reduce the production cost in addition to reducing the disposal problem of these substrates. The yield of PHB can further be boosted by optimization of production parameters as substrates.

  10. Biodegradation of plastics.

    PubMed

    Shimao, M

    2001-06-01

    Widespread studies on the biodegradation of plastics have been carried out in order to overcome the environmental problems associated with synthetic plastic waste. Recent work has included studies of the distribution of synthetic polymer-degrading microorganisms in the environment, the isolation of new microorganisms for biodegradation, the discovery of new degradation enzymes, and the cloning of genes for synthetic polymer-degrading enzymes.

  11. Biodegradation of Para Amino Acetanilide by Halomonas sp. TBZ3

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Nader; Sefidi Heris, Youssof; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Vallipour, Javad; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Golabi, Sayyed Mahdi; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aromatic compounds are known as a group of highly persistent environmental pollutants. Halomonas sp. TBZ3 was isolated from the highly salty Urmia Lake of Iran. In this study, characterization of a new Halomonas isolate called Halomonas sp. TBZ3 and its employment for biodegradation of para-amino acetanilide (PAA), as an aromatic environmental pollutant, is described. Objectives: This study aimed to characterize the TBZ3 isolate and to elucidate its ability as a biodegradative agent that decomposes PAA. Materials and Methods: Primarily, DNA-DNA hybridization between TBZ3, Halomonas denitrificans DSM18045T and Halomonas saccharevitans LMG 23976T was carried out. Para-amino acetanilide biodegradation was assessed using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Parameters effective on biodegradation of PAA were optimized by the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Results: The DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between isolate TBZ3, H. denitrificans and H. saccharevitans revealed relatedness levels of 57% and 65%, respectively. According to GC-MS results, TBZ3 degrades PAA to benzene, hexyl butanoate, 3-methyl-1-heptanol and hexyl hexanoate. Temperature 32.92°C, pH 6.76, and salinity 14% are the optimum conditions for biodegradation with a confidence level of 95% (at level α = 0.05). Conclusions: According to our results, Halomonas sp. TBZ3 could be considered as a biological agent for bioremediation of PAA and possibly other similar aromatic compounds. PMID:26495103

  12. The effectiveness of the biodegradation of raw and processed polystyrene by mealworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leluk, Karol; Hanus-Lorenz, Beata; Rybak, Justyna; Bożek, Magdalena

    2017-11-01

    In our studies biodegradation of four variants of polystyrene was performed. We tested: raw material (PS), processed polystyrene (PSr), building insulation material (EPS) and food packaging boxes (PSp). Materials were characterized by means melt flow ratio (MFR), shore hardness and gloss. The biochemical assessment of macromolecules (proteins, lipids and sugars) in the mealworms organisms fed with tested forms of polystyrene allowed us to set how efficient and beneficial the biodegradation of types of polystyrene is. We also evaluated the variability of bacterial community in larval guts by the use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on the bacterial DNA of 16S rRNA genes amplified in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results suggest that EPS and PSp polystyrene are the most digestible for T. molitor larvae. The metabolic degradation of polystyrene is probably strictly connected with the changes in biodiversity of gut bacteria.

  13. Optimizing the vermicomposting of organic wastes amended with inorganic materials for production of nutrient-rich organic fertilizers: a review.

    PubMed

    Mupambwa, Hupenyu Allan; Mnkeni, Pearson Nyari Stephano

    2018-04-01

    Vermicomposting is a bio-oxidative process that involves the action of mainly epigeic earthworm species and different micro-organisms to accelerate the biodegradation and stabilization of organic materials. There has been a growing realization that the process of vermicomposting can be used to greatly improve the fertilizer value of different organic materials, thus, creating an opportunity for their enhanced use as organic fertilizers in agriculture. The link between earthworms and micro-organisms creates a window of opportunity to optimize the vermi-degradation process for effective waste biodegradation, stabilization, and nutrient mineralization. In this review, we look at up-to-date research work that has been done on vermicomposting with the intention of highlighting research gaps on how further research can optimize vermi-degradation. Though several researchers have studied the vermicomposting process, critical parameters that drive this earthworm-microbe-driven process which are C/N and C/P ratios; substrate biodegradation fraction, earthworm species, and stocking density have yet to be adequately optimized. This review highlights that optimizing the vermicomposting process of composts amended with nutrient-rich inorganic materials such as fly ash and rock phosphate and inoculated with microbial inoculants can enable the development of commercially acceptable organic fertilizers, thus, improving their utilization in agriculture.

  14. Biodegradable and biocompatible high elastic chitosan scaffold is cell-friendly both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xianfeng; Yang, Lin; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhengke; Shan, Zhi; Li, Shengyun; Wang, Jiying; Fan, Shunwu; Hu, Qiaoling

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable and biocompatible macromolecule chitosan has been favored for a variety of clinical applications. We reported herein the fabrication of a novel chitosan scaffold with high elasticity. This scaffold can be easily compressed and thus enable the insertion of such scaffold into surgical lesions during minimal invasive surgeries. In addition, this novel scaffold can restore its shape when released. We evidenced that this high elastic scaffold has better biocompatibility than traditional chitosan scaffold. Therefore, this new chitosan material might lead to the manufacture of a variety of novel biodegradable biomedical materials and devices. PMID:28103580

  15. Biodegradation of Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Their Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene (GRA), and their derivatives are promising materials for a wide range of applications such as pollutant removal, enzyme immobilization, bioimaging, biosensors, and drug delivery and are rapidly increasing in use and increasingly mass produced. The biodegradation of carbon nanomaterials by microbes and enzymes is now of great importance for both reducing their toxicity to living organisms and removing them from the environment. Here we review recent progress in the biodegradation field from the point of view of the primary microbes and enzymes that can degrade these nanomaterials, along with experimental and molecular simulation methods for the exploration of nanomaterial degradation. Further efforts should primarily aim toward expanding the repertoire of microbes and enzymes and exploring optimal conditions for the degradation of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Activated sludge is a potential source for production of biodegradable plastics from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khardenavis, A; Guha, P K; Kumar, M S; Mudliar, S N; Chakrabarti, T

    2005-05-01

    Increased utilization of synthetic plastics caused severe environmental pollution due to their non-biodegradable nature. In the search for environmentally friendly materials to substitute for conventional plastics, different biodegradable plastics have been developed by microbial fermentations. However, limitations of these materials still exist due to high cost. This study aims at minimization of cost for the production of biodegradable plastics P(3HB) and minimization of environmental pollution. The waste biological sludge generated at wastewater treatment plants is used for the production of P(3HB) and wastewater is used as carbon source. Activated sludge was induced by controlling the carbon: nitrogen ratio to accumulate storage polymer. Initially polymer accumulation was studied by using different carbon and nitrogen sources. Maximum accumulation of polymer was observed with carbon source acetic acid and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAHP) as nitrogen source. Further studies were carried out to optimize the carbon: nitrogen ratios using acetic acid and DAHP. A maximum of 65.84% (w/w) P(3HB) production was obtained at C/N ratio of 50 within 96 hours of incubation.

  17. Surface microstructure and in vitro analysis of nanostructured akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) coating on biodegradable magnesium alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Hashemi Beni, Batoul; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys, owing to their biodegradability and good mechanical properties, have potential applications as biodegradable orthopedic implants. However, several poor properties including low corrosion resistance, mechanical stability and cytocompatibility have prevented their clinical application, as these properties may result in the sudden failure of the implants during the bone healing. In this research, nanostructured akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) powder was coated on the AZ91 Mg alloy through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) assisted micro arc oxidation (MAO) method to modify the properties of the alloy. The surface microstructure of coating, corrosion resistance, mechanical stability and cytocompatibility of the samples were characterized with different techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrochemical corrosion test, immersion test, compression test and cell culture test. The results showed that the nanostructured akermanite coating can improve the corrosion resistance, mechanical stability and cytocompatibility of the biodegradable Mg alloy making it a promising material to be used as biodegradable bone implants for orthopedic applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Using DDGS in industrial materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adding biological materials as fillers to plastics can enhance any existing biodegradability or provide biodegradability where none had previously existed. One potential biofiller is DDGS. In fact, several studies have been conducted recently that have investigated the use of DDGS in various plast...

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  20. Biodegradation and Osteosarcoma Cell Cultivation on Poly(aspartic acid) Based Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Juriga, Dávid; Nagy, Krisztina; Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Perczel-Kovách, Katalin; Chen, Yong Mei; Varga, Gábor; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2016-09-14

    Development of novel biodegradable and biocompatible scaffold materials with optimal characteristics is important for both preclinical and clinical applications. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biodegradability of poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels, and to test their usability as scaffolds for MG-63 osteoblast-like cells. Poly(aspartic acid) was fabricated from poly(succinimide) and hydrogels were prepared using natural amines as cross-linkers (diaminobutane and cystamine). Disulfide bridges were cleaved to thiol groups and the polymer backbone was further modified with RGD sequence. Biodegradability of the hydrogels was evaluated by experiments on the base of enzymes and cell culture medium. Poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels possessing only disulfide bridges as cross-links proved to be degradable by collagenase I. The MG-63 cells showed healthy, fibroblast-like morphology on the double cross-linked and RGD modified hydrogels. Thiolated poly(aspartic acid) based hydrogels provide ideal conditions for adhesion, survival, proliferation, and migration of osteoblast-like cells. The highest viability was found on the thiolated PASP gels while the RGD motif had influence on compacted cluster formation of the cells. These biodegradable and biocompatible poly(aspartic acid)-based hydrogels are promising scaffolds for cell cultivation.

  1. Environmental performance of bio-based and biodegradable plastics: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Scott; Wagner, Martin

    2017-11-13

    Future plastic materials will be very different from those that are used today. The increasing importance of sustainability promotes the development of bio-based and biodegradable polymers, sometimes misleadingly referred to as 'bioplastics'. Because both terms imply "green" sources and "clean" removal, this paper aims at critically discussing the sometimes-conflicting terminology as well as renewable sources with a special focus on the degradation of these polymers in natural environments. With regard to the former we review innovations in feedstock development (e.g. microalgae and food wastes). In terms of the latter, we highlight the effects that polymer structure, additives, and environmental variables have on plastic biodegradability. We argue that the 'biodegradable' end-product does not necessarily degrade once emitted to the environment because chemical additives used to make them fit for purpose will increase the longevity. In the future, this trend may continue as the plastics industry also is expected to be a major user of nanocomposites. Overall, there is a need to assess the performance of polymer innovations in terms of their biodegradability especially under realistic waste management and environmental conditions, to avoid the unwanted release of plastic degradation products in receiving environments.

  2. [Application of biodegradable plastic film to reduce plastic film residual pollution in Chinese agriculture].

    PubMed

    Yan, Changrong; He, Wenqing; Xue, Yinghao; Liu, Enke; Liu, Qin

    2016-06-25

    Plastic film has become an important agriculture production material in recent years. Over the past three decades, the amount and application area of plastic film have increased steadily, and in 2014, which are 1.4 million tons and more than 180 million hm² respectively. It plays a key role for ensuring the supply of agricultural goods in China. Meanwhile, plastic film residual pollution becomes more and more serious, and in some regions, the amount of plastic film residues has reached over 250 kg/hm². In part of the Northwest region, soil structure of farmland has been destroyed by plastic film residues and then crop growth and farming operations were suppressed. It is recognized as a good choice to replace plastic film with biodegradable plastic film, an effective measure to solve the plastic film residue pollution. Now, it is in a critical stage of study and assessment of biodegradable plastic film in China and fortunately some biodegradable plastic films show effects in the production of potatoes, peanuts and tobacco. Overall, a series of challenges has still been faced by the biodegradable plastic film, mainly including improving the quality of biodegradable plastic products, such as tensile strength, flexibility, improving the controllability of rupture and degradation, enhancing the ability of increasing soil temperature and preserving soil moisture, and to satisfy the demand of crops production with mulching. In addition, it is essential to reduce the cost of the biodegradable film and promote the application of biodegradable film on large-scale. With the development of biodegradable plastic technology and agricultural production environment, the application of the biodegradable film will have a good future.

  3. Anaerobic Biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. The objective of this study was to investigate anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and petrodiesel blends in a sulfate-reducing environment, which is a prevalent condition in anaerobic sediments.

  4. Recent state-of-the-art of biodegradable scale inhibitors for cooling-water treatment applications (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, K. I.; Kovaleva, N. E.; Rudakova, G. Ya.; Kombarova, S. P.; Larchenko, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Scale formation is a challenge worldwide. Recently, scale inhibitors represent the best solution of this problem. The polyaminocarboxylic acids have been the first to be successfully applied in the field, although their efficacy was rather low. The next generation was developed on the grounds of polyphosphonic acids. The main disadvantage of these is associated with low biodegradation level. Polyacrylate-based phosphorous free inhibitors proposed as an alternative to phosphonates all also had low biodegradability. Thus, the main trend of recent R&D is the development of a new generation: environmentally friendly biodegradable scale inhibitors. The recent state of the word and domestic scale inhibitors markets is considered, the main industrial inhibitors manufacturers and marketed substances, as well as the general trends of R&D in the field, are characterized. It is demonstrated that most research is focused on biodegradable polymers and on phosponates with low phosphorus content, as well as on implementation of biodegradable fragments into polyacrylate matrixes for biodegradability enhancement. The problem of research results comparability is indicated along with domestic-made inhibitors quality and the gaps in scale inhibition mechanism. The actuality of fluorescent indicator fragment implementation into the scale inhibitor molecule for the better reagent monitoring in a cooling water system is specially emphasized.

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Soybean Biodiesel and Diesel ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads were studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20 petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water. The objective of this study was to investigate the anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel blends under methanogenic conditions. Biological methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted in serum bottles to determine the anaerobic biodegradation kinetics of biodiesel in the absence and presence of different concentrations of petrod

  6. Synthesis and bioimaging of biodegradable red fluorescent organic nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission characteristics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dazhuang; Zou, Hui; Liu, Meiying; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Hongye; Wan, Qing; Dai, Yanfeng; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-12-15

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) features have recently emerged as promising fluorescent probes for biomedical applications owing to their excellent optical properties, designability and biocompatibility. Significant progress has been made recently for synthesis and biomedical applications of these AIE-active FONs. However, only very limited reports have demonstrated the fabrication of biodegradable AIE-active FONs with red fluorescence emission. In this study, a novel strategy has been developed for the preparation of biodegradable AIE-active polyurethanes (PUs) through a two-step polymerization, in which the diisocyanate-terminated polyethylene glycol (NCO-PEG-NCO) was synthesized and subsequently conjugated with diamine-containing AIE dye (NH 2 -Phe-NH 2 ). The successful synthesis of AIE-active Phe-PEG 2000 PUs is evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. Because of the formation of AIE-active amphiphilic PUs, the final copolymers can self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles, which exhibit strong luminescence and high water dispersion. The biological evaluation results suggest that the AIE-active Phe-PEG 2000 FONs possess low toxicity and desirable cell permeability. Therefore, we anticipate that these AIE-active FONs with biodegradable potential will trigger much research enthusiasm and effort toward the creation of new AIE-active materials with improved properties for various biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical interpretation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for biodegradation of N-heterocycles: a complementary approach to predict biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Bodo; Hoff, Malte; Germa, Florence; Schink, Bernhard; Beimborn, Dieter; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2007-02-15

    Prediction of the biodegradability of organic compounds is an ecologically desirable and economically feasible tool for estimating the environmental fate of chemicals. We combined quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) with the systematic collection of biochemical knowledge to establish rules for the prediction of aerobic biodegradation of N-heterocycles. Validated biodegradation data of 194 N-heterocyclic compounds were analyzed using the MULTICASE-method which delivered two QSAR models based on 17 activating (OSAR 1) and on 16 inactivating molecular fragments (GSAR 2), which were statistically significantly linked to efficient or poor biodegradability, respectively. The percentages of correct classifications were over 99% for both models, and cross-validation resulted in 67.9% (GSAR 1) and 70.4% (OSAR 2) correct predictions. Biochemical interpretation of the activating and inactivating characteristics of the molecular fragments delivered plausible mechanistic interpretations and enabled us to establish the following biodegradation rules: (1) Target sites for amidohydrolases and for cytochrome P450 monooxygenases enhance biodegradation of nonaromatic N-heterocycles. (2) Target sites for molybdenum hydroxylases enhance biodegradation of aromatic N-heterocycles. (3) Target sites for hydratation by an urocanase-like mechanism enhance biodegradation of imidazoles. Our complementary approach represents a feasible strategy for generating concrete rules for the prediction of biodegradability of organic compounds.

  8. Synthesis of biodegradable and electroactive multiblock polylactide and aniline pentamer copolymer for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihong; Zhuang, Xiuli; Hu, Jun; Lang, Le; Zhang, Peibiao; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xuesi; Wei, Yen; Jing, Xiabin

    2008-03-01

    To obtain one biodegradable and electroactive polymer as the scaffold for tissue engineering, the multiblock copolymer PLAAP was designed and synthesized with the condensation polymerization of hydroxyl-capped poly( l-lactide) (PLA) and carboxyl-capped aniline pentamer (AP). The PLAAP copolymer exhibited excellent electroactivity, solubility, and biodegradability. At the same time, as one scaffold material, PLAAP copolymer possesses certain mechanical properties with the tensile strength of 3 MPa, tensile Young 's modulus of 32 MPa, and breaking elongation rate of 95%. We systematically studied the compatibility of PLAAP copolymer in vitro and proved that the electroactive PLAAP copolymer was innocuous, biocompatible, and helpful for the adhesion and proliferation of rat C6 cells. Moreover, the PLAAP copolymer stimulated by electrical signals was demonstrated as accelerating the differentiation of rat neuronal pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells. This biodegradable and electroactive PLAAP copolymer thus possessed the properties in favor of the long-time application in vivo as nerve repair scaffold materials in tissue engineering.

  9. Real-time Analysis of the Enzymatic Biodegradation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Thin Films Using Microfabricated Polymer Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfaus, Stephen; Latuga, Brian M.; Morse, Clinton; McCarney, Evan R.; Rossini, Connie J.; Augustine, Brian H.; Flythe, Michael D.; Rowe, Sean; Baron, Stephen F.; Dennis, Douglas E.

    2003-11-01

    In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the real-time acquisition and analysis of materials undergoing biological and chemical alterations. A co-polymer blend of poly 3-hydroxybutyrate / poly 3-hydroxyvalerate P(3HB-3HV) were spun-cast onto glass slides to create thin films with film thickness of 40 nm. This polymer is naturally biodegradable by a variety of bacterially produced enzymes. In this study, these materials were degraded by an untyped and concentrated Strptomyces sp. enzyme produced from soil. Using liquid-cell AFM in contact mode, we were able to observe biodegradation uniformly across the surface of the P(3HB-3HV) films beginning within 2 min of introduction of the enzyme. Height standards have been developed using microcontact printing of self assembled monolayers and selective dewetting to produce P(3HB-3HV) structures with dimensions as small as 10 mm. We will discuss the use of microfabricated height standards to measure biodegradation kinetics in these polymers.

  10. In vitro investigations of a novel wound dressing concept based on biodegradable polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmar, Markus; Richter, Michael; Mäder, Xenia; Grieder, Kathrin; Nuss, Katja; Karol, Agnieszka; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Zimmermann, Erika; Buser, Stephan; Dobmann, Andreas; Blume, Jessica; Bruinink, Arie

    2015-06-01

    Non-healing and partially healing wounds are an important problem not only for the patient but also for the public health care system. Current treatment solutions are far from optimal regarding the chosen material properties as well as price and source. Biodegradable polyurethane (PUR) scaffolds have shown great promise for in vivo tissue engineering approaches, but accomplishment of the goal of scaffold degradation and new tissue formation developing in parallel has not been observed so far in skin wound repair. In this study, the mechanical properties and degradation behavior as well as the biocompatibility of a low-cost synthetic, pathogen-free, biocompatible and biodegradable extracellular matrix mimicking a PUR scaffold was evaluated in vitro. The novel PUR scaffolds were found to meet all the requirements for optimal scaffolds and wound dressings. These three-dimensional scaffolds are soft, highly porous, and form-stable and can be easily cut into any shape desired. All the material formulations investigated were found to be nontoxic. One formulation was able to be defined that supported both good fibroblast cell attachment and cell proliferation to colonize the scaffold. Tunable biodegradation velocity of the materials could be observed, and the results additionally indicated that calcium plays a crucial role in PUR degradation. Our results suggest that the PUR materials evaluated in this study are promising candidates for next-generation wound treatment systems and support the concept of using foam scaffolds for improved in vivo tissue engineering and regeneration.

  11. Solid recovered fuel production from biodegradable waste in grain processing industry.

    PubMed

    Kliopova, Irina; Staniskis, Jurgis Kazimieras; Petraskiene, Violeta

    2013-04-01

    Management of biodegradable waste is one of the most important environmental problems in the grain-processing industry since this waste cannot be dumped anymore due to legal requirements. Biodegradable waste is generated in each stage of grain processing, including the waste-water and air emissions treatment processes. Their management causes some environmental and financial problems. The majority of Lithuanian grain-processing enterprises own and operate composting sites, but in Lithuania the demand for compost is not given. This study focused on the analysis of the possibility of using biodegradable waste for the production of solid recovered fuel, as a local renewable fuel with the purpose of increasing environmental performance and decreasing the direct costs of grain processing. Experimental research with regard to a pilot grain-processing plant has proven that alternative fuel production will lead to minimizing of the volume of biodegradable waste by 75% and the volume of natural gas for heat energy production by 62%. Environmental indicators of grain processing, laboratory analysis of the chemical and physical characteristics of biodegradable waste, mass and energy balances of the solid recovered fuel production, environmental and economical benefits of the project are presented and discussed herein.

  12. Alkaline biodegradable implants for osteoporotic bone defects--importance of microenvironment pH.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wang, T; Yang, C; Darvell, B W; Wu, J; Lin, K; Chang, J; Pan, H; Lu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Change of microenvironment pH by biodegradable implants may ameliorate unbalanced osteoporotic bone remodeling. The present work demonstrated that a weak alkaline condition stimulated osteoblasts differentiation while suppressed osteoclast generation. In vivo, implants with an alkaline microenvironment pH (monitored by a pH microelectrode) exhibited a promising healing effect for the repair of osteoporotic bone defects. Under osteoporotic conditions, the response of the bone microenvironment to an endosseous implant is significantly impaired, and this substantially increases the risk of fracture, non-union and aseptic implant loosening. Acid-base equilibrium is an important factor influencing bone cell behaviour. The present purpose was to study the effect of a series of alkaline biodegradable implant materials on regeneration of osteoporotic bone defect, monitoring the microenvironment pH (μe-pH) over time. The proliferation and differentiation potential of osteoporotic rat bone marrow stromal cells and RAW 264.7 cells were examined under various pH conditions. Ovariectomized rat bone defects were filled with specific biodegradable materials, and μe-pH was measured by pH microelectrode. New osteoid and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclast-like cells were examined by Goldner's trichrome and TRAP staining, respectively. The intermediate layer between implants and new bone were studied using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) linear scanning. In vitro, weak alkaline conditions stimulated osteoporotic rat bone marrow stromal cells (oBMSC) differentiation, while inhibiting the formation of osteoclasts. In vivo, μe-pH differs from that of the homogeneous peripheral blood and exhibits variations over time particular to each material. Higher initial μe-pH was associated with more new bone formation, late response of TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells and the development of an intermediate 'apatitic' layer in vivo. EDX suggested that

  13. Peroxidase-mediated Biodegradation of Carbon Nanotubes in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Zhao, Yong; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    As a result of their unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been implemented in therapeutic and imaging applications. In an idealized situation, CNTs would be disposed of after they transport their theranostic payloads. Biodegradation represents an attractive pathway for the eliminating of CNT carriers post-delivery and may be integral in catalyzing the release of the cargo from the delivery vehicle. Accordingly, recent research efforts have focused on peroxidase-driven biodegradation of CNTs. In this review, we not only summarize recent efforts to biodegrade CNTs in the test tube, in vitro, and in vivo, but also attempt to explore the fundamental parameters underlying degradation. Encouraged by the in vivo results obtained to date, we envision a future, where carbon-based nano-containers, which are specifically designed to target organs/cells, deliver their cargo, and biodegrade via peroxidase-driven mechanism, will represent an attractive therapeutic delivery option in nanomedicine. PMID:23856412

  14. Bioglass 45S5 transformation and molding material in the processing of biodegradable poly-DL-lactide scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Sara

    When bone is damaged, a scaffold can temporarily replace it in the site of injury and incite bone tissue to repair itself. A biodegradable scaffold resorbs into the body, generating non-toxic degradation products as new tissue reforms; a bioactive scaffold encourages the surrounding tissue to regenerate. In the present study, we make composite biodegradable and bioactive scaffolds using poly-DL-lactide (PDLLA), a biodegradable polymer, and incorporate Bioglass 45S5 (BG) to stimulate scaffold bioactivity. BG has an interesting trait when immersed in body fluid, a layer of hydroxycarbonate apatite, similar to the inorganic component of bone, forms on its surface. It is of utmost importance to understand the fate of BG throughout the scaffold’s processing in order to assess the scaffold’s bioactivity. In this study, the established different stages of BG reactivity have been verified by monitoring pH during BG dissolution experiments and by conducting an elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The composite scaffolds are synthesized by the solvent casting and particulate leaching technique and their morphology assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To understand the transformations occurred in BG during scaffold synthesis, BG as received, as well BG treated in acetone and water (the fluids involved in scaffold processing) are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results are then compared with BG extracted from scaffolds after processing. BG has been determined to start reacting during the scaffold processing. In addition, its reactivity is influenced by BG particle size. The study suggests that the presence of the polymer provides a reactive environment for BG due to pH effects. Teflon molds in scaffold fabrication are inert and biocompatibile, but their stiffness presents a challenge during de-molding. Silicone-based and polyurethane molds

  15. Comparison of biodegradation performance of OECD test guideline 301C with that of other ready biodegradability tests.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Takakazu; Taruki, Masanori; Katagiri, Kazuomi; Nabeoka, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Tsuji, Toshiaki

    2014-02-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operatoin and development (OECD) Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals list 7 types of tests for determining the ready biodegradability of chemical compounds (301A-F and 310). The present study compares the biodegradation performance of test guideline 301C, which is applied in Japan's Chemical Substances Control Law, with the performance of the other 6 ready biodegradability tests (RBTs) listed in the guidelines. Test guideline 301C specifies use of activated sludge precultured with synthetic sewage containing glucose and peptone (301C sludge) as a test inoculum; in the other RBTs, however, activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP sludge) is frequently employed. Analysis based on percentage of biodegradation and pass levels revealed that the biodegradation intensity of test guideline 301C is relatively weak compared with the intensities of RBTs using WWTP sludge, and the following chemical compounds are probably not biodegraded under test guideline 301C conditions: phosphorus compounds; secondary, tertiary, and quaternary amines; and branched quaternary carbon compounds. The relatively weak biodegradation intensity of test guideline 301C may be related to the markedly different activities of the 301C and WWTP sludges. These findings will be valuable for evaluating RBT data in relation to Japan's Chemical Substances Control Law. © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Biocorrosion behavior of biodegradable nanocomposite fibers coated layer-by-layer on AM50 magnesium implant.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hasan, Anwarul; Kim, Yu-Kyoung; Yu-Kyoung; Lee, Min-Ho; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of hybrid nanofibers to improve the biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of AM50 magnesium alloy. Biodegradable hybrid membrane fiber layers containing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) particles and poly(lactide)(PLA) nanofibers were coated layer-by-layer (LbL) on AM50 coupons using a facile single-step air jet spinning (AJS) approach. The corrosion performance of coated and uncoated coupon samples was investigated by means of electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the AJS 3D membrane fiber layers, particularly the hybrid membrane layers containing a small amount of nHA (3 wt.%), induce a higher biocorrosion resistance and effectively decrease the initial degradation rate compared with the neat AM50 coupon samples. The adhesion strength improved highly due to the presence of nHA particles in the AJS layer. Furthermore, the long biodegradation rates of AM50 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were significantly controlled by the AJS-coatings. The results showed a higher cytocompatibility for AJS-coatings compared to that for neat Mg alloys. The nanostructured nHA embedded hybrid PLA nanofiber coating can therefore be a suitable coating material for Mg alloy as a potential material for biodegradable metallic orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bio-based and biodegradable plastics for use in crop production.

    PubMed

    Riggi, Ezio; Santagata, Gabriella; Malinconico, Mario

    2011-01-01

    The production and management of crops uses plastics for many applications (e.g., low tunnels, high tunnels, greenhouses, mulching, silage bags, hay bales, pheromone traps, coatings of fertilizers or pesticides or hormones or seeds, and nursery pots and containers for growing transplants). All these applications have led some authors to adopt the term "plasticulture" when discussing the use of plastic materials in agriculture and related industries. Unfortunately, the sustainability of this use of plastics is low, and renewability and degradability have become key words in the debate over sustainable production and utilization of plastic. Recently, researchers and the plastics industry have made strong efforts (i) to identify new biopolymers and natural additives from renewable sources that can be used in plastics production and (ii) to enhance the degradability (biological or physical) of the new ecologically sustainable materials. In the present review, we describe the main research results, current applications, patents that have been applied for in the last two decades, and future perspectives on sustainable use of plastics to support crop production. The article presents some promising patents on bio-based and biodegradable plastics for use in crop production.

  18. Comparison of biodegradation of low-weight hydroentangled raw cotton nonwoven fabric and that of commonly used disposable nonwoven fabrics in the aerobic Captina silt loam soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increasing use of disposable nonwovens made of petroleum-based materials generates a large amount of non-biodegradable, solid waste in the environment. As an effort to enhance the usage of biodegradable cotton in nonwovens, this study analyzed the biodegradability of mechanically pre-cleaned gr...

  19. Prevention of arterial graft spasm in rats using a vasodilator-eluting biodegradable nano-scaled fibre†

    PubMed Central

    Yagami, Kei; Yamawaki-Ogata, Aika; Satake, Makoto; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Oshima, Hideki; Usui, Akihiko; Ueda, Yuichi; Narita, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Arterial graft spasm occasionally causes circulatory collapse immediately following coronary artery bypass graft. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of our developed materials, which were composed of milrinone (phosphodiesterase III inhibitor) or diltiazem (calcium-channel blocker), with nano-scaled fibre made of biodegradable polymer to prevent arterial spasm. METHODS Milrinone- or diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibres were fabricated by an electrospinning procedure. In vivo milrinone- or diltiazem-releasing tests were performed to confirm the sustained release of the drugs. An in vivo arterial spasm model was established by subcutaneous injection of noradrenalin around the rat femoral artery. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as follows: those that received 5 mg of milrinone-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre (group M, n = 14); 5 mg of diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre (group D, n = 12); or those that received fibre without drugs (as a control; group C, n = 14) implanted into the rat femoral artery. In the fourth group, sham operation was performed (group S, n = 10). One day after the implantation, noradrenalin was injected in all groups. The femoral arterial blood flow was measured continuously before and after noradrenalin injection. The maximum blood flow before noradrenalin injection and minimum blood flow after noradrenalin injection were measured. RESULTS In vivo drug-releasing test revealed that milrinone-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre released 78% of milrinone and diltiazem-releasing biodegradable nano-scaled fibre released 50% diltiazem on the first day. The ratios of rat femoral artery blood flow after/before noradrenalin injection in groups M (0.74 ± 0.16) and D (0.72 ± 0.05) were significantly higher than those of groups C (0.54 ± 0.09) and S (0.55 ± 0.16) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Noradrenalin-induced rat femoral artery spasm was inhibited by the implantation of

  20. Improving ready biodegradability testing of fatty amine derivatives.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, C G; Gancet, C; Hirschen, M; Galobardes, M; Lemaire, Ph; Rosenblom, J

    2008-09-01

    This study assesses the biodegradation potential of a number of fatty amine derivatives in tests following the OECD guidelines for ready biodegradability. A number of methods are used to reduce toxicity and improve the bioavailability of the fatty amine derivatives in these tests. Alkyl-1,3-diaminopropanes and octadecyltrimethylammonium chloride are toxic to microorganisms at concentrations used in OECD ready biodegradability tests. The concentration of these fatty amine derivatives in the aqueous phase can be reduced by reacting humic, or lignosulphonic acids with the derivatives or through the addition of silica gel to the test bottles. Using these non-biodegradable substances, ready biodegradability test results were obtained with tallow-1,3-diaminopropane and octadecyltrimethylammonium chloride. Demonstration of the ready biodegradability of the water-insoluble dioctadecylamine under the prescribed standard conditions is almost impossible due to the limited bioavailability of this compound. However, ready biodegradability results were achieved by using very low initial test substance concentrations and by introducing an organic phase. The contents of the bottles used to assess the biodegradability of dioctadecylamine were always mixed. False negative biodegradability results obtained with the fatty amine derivatives studied are the result of toxic effects and/or limited bioavailability. The aids investigated therefore improve ready biodegradability testing.

  1. Systemic approaches to biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Almudena; Valencia, Alfonso; Cases, Ildefonso

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation, the ability of microorganisms to remove complex chemicals from the environment, is a multifaceted process in which many biotic and abiotic factors are implicated. The recent accumulation of knowledge about the biochemistry and genetics of the biodegradation process, and its categorization and formalization in structured databases, has recently opened the door to systems biology approaches, where the interactions of the involved parts are the main subject of study, and the system is analysed as a whole. The global analysis of the biodegradation metabolic network is beginning to produce knowledge about its structure, behaviour and evolution, such as its free-scale structure or its intrinsic robustness. Moreover, these approaches are also developing into useful tools such as predictors for compounds' degradability or the assisted design of artificial pathways. However, it is the environmental application of high-throughput technologies from the genomics, metagenomics, proteomics and metabolomics that harbours the most promising opportunities to understand the biodegradation process, and at the same time poses tremendous challenges from the data management and data mining point of view.

  2. Biodegradation performance of environmentally-friendly insulating oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; He, Yan; Cai, Shengwei; Chen, Cheng; Wen, Gang; Wang, Feipeng; Fan, Fan; Wan, Chunxiang; Wu, Liya; Liu, Ruitong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, biodegradation performance of rapeseed insulating oil (RDB) and FR3 insulating oil (FR3) was studied by means of ready biodegradation method which was performed with Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 301B. For comparison, the biodegradation behaviour of 25# mineral insulating oil was also characterized with the same method. The testing results shown that the biodegradation degree of rapeseed insulating oil, FR3 insulating oil and 25# mineral insulating oil was 95.8%, 98.9% and 38.4% respectively. Following the “new chemical risk assessment guidelines” (HJ/T 154 - 2004), which illustrates the methods used to identify and assess the process safety hazards inherent. The guidelines can draw that the two vegetable insulating oils, i.e. rapeseed insulating oil and FR3 insulating oil are easily biodegradable. Therefore, the both can be classified as environmentally-friendly insulating oil. As expected, 25# mineral insulating oil is hardly biodegradable. The main reason is that 25# mineral insulating oil consists of isoalkanes, cyclanes and a few arenes, which has few unsaturated bonds. Biodegradation of rapeseed insulating oil and FR3 insulating oil also remain some difference. Biodegradation mechanism of vegetable insulating oil was revealed from the perspective of hydrolysis kinetics.

  3. Biodegradability of organic nanoparticles in the aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Menz, Jakob; Schubert, Thomas; Thielemans, Wim

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles have already been detected in the aquatic environment. Therefore, knowledge on their biodegradability is of utmost importance for risk assessment but such information is currently not available. Therefore, the biodegradability of fullerenes, single, double, multi-walled as well as COOH functionalized carbon nanotubes and cellulose and starch nanocrystals in aqueous environment has been investigated according to OECD standards. The biodegradability of starch and cellulose nanoparticles was also compared with the biodegradability of their macroscopic counterparts. Fullerenes and all carbon nanotubes did not biodegrade at all, while starch and cellulose nanoparticles biodegrade to similar levels as their macroscopic counterparts. However, neither comfortably met the criterion for ready biodegradability (60% after 28 days). The cellulose and starch nanoparticles were also found to degrade faster than their macroscopic counterparts due to their higher surface area. These findings are the first report of biodegradability of organic nanoparticles in the aquatic environment, an important accumulation environment for manmade compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodegradable soy wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Results from a guinea pig burn model.

    PubMed

    Egozi, Dana; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Ullmann, Yehuda; Gilhar, Amos; Keren, Aviad; Matanes, Elias; Berdicevsky, Israela; Krivoy, Norberto; Zilberman, Meital

    2015-11-01

    There is growing interest in the development of biodegradable materials from renewable biopolymers, such as soy protein, for biomedical applications. Soy protein is a major fraction of natural soybean and has the advantages of being economically competitive, biodegradable and biocompatible. It presents good water resistance as well as storage stability. In the current study, homogenous antibiotic-loaded soy protein films were cast from aqueous solutions. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the films in order to inhibit bacterial growth, and thus prevent or combat infection, upon its controlled release to the surrounding tissue. The current in vivo study of the dressing material in contaminated deep second-degree burn wounds in guinea pigs (n=20) demonstrated its ability to accelerate epithelialization with 71% epithelial coverage compared to an unloaded format of the soy material (62%) and a significant improved epithelial coverage as compared to the conventional dressing material (55%). Our new platform of antibiotic-eluting wound dressings is advantageous over currently used popular dressing materials that provide controlled release of silver ions, due to its gentamicin release profile, which is safer. Another advantage of our novel concept is that it is based on a biodegradable natural polymer and therefore does not require bandage changes and offers a potentially valuable and economic approach for treating burn-related infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the potential of novel PCL-PPDX biodegradable scaffolds as support materials for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chaim, Isaac A; Sabino, Marcos A; Mendt, Mayela; Müller, Alejandro J; Ajami, Diana

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage is a specialized tissue represented by a group of particular cells (the chondrocytes) and an abundant extracellular matrix. Because of the reduced regenerative capacity of this tissue, cartilage injuries are often difficult to handle. Nowadays tissue engineering has emerged as a very promising discipline, and biodegradable polymeric scaffolds are widely used as tissue supports. In cartilage injuries, the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation from non-affected cartilage zones has emerged as a very interesting technique, where chondrocytes are expanded in order to obtain a greater number of cells. Nevertheless, it has been reported that chondrocytes in bidimensional cultures suffer a dedifferentiation process. The present study sought, in the first place, to standardize a novel protocol in order to obtain primary cultures of chondrocytes from newborn rabbit hyaline cartilage from the xiphoid process. Second, the potential of porous three-dimensional (3D) biodegradable polymeric matrices as support materials for chondrocytes was evaluated: a novel poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(p-dioxanone) (PCL-PPDX) blend in a 90:10 w:w ratio and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). After achieving the standardization, a typical round-shaped chondrocyte morphology and the expression of collagen type II and aggrecan, evaluated by RT-PCR, were observed. Second-passage chondrocytes adhered effectively to these scaffolds, although cell growth at 7 days in culture was significantly less in the PCL-PPDX blend. After 3 weeks of culture on PCL-PPDX or PCL, the cells expressed collagen type II. The present study demonstrates the potential, unknown until now, of PCL-PPDX blend scaffolds in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Biodegradation of paint stripper solvents in a modified gas lift loop bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Vanderberg-Twary, L; Steenhoudt, K; Travis, B J; Hanners, J L; Foreman, T M; Brainard, J R

    1997-07-05

    Paint stripping wastes generated during the decontamination and decommissioning of former nuclear facilities contain paint stripping organics (dichloromethane, 2-propanol, and methanol) and bulk materials containing paint pigments. It is desirable to degrade the organic residues as part of an integrated chemical-biological treatment system. We have developed a modified gas lift loop bioreactor employing a defined consortium of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain OFS and Hyphomicrobium sp. DM-2 that degrades paint stripper organics. Mass transfer coefficients and kinetic constants for biodegradation in the system were determined. It was found that transfer of organic substrates from surrogate waste into the air and further into the liquid medium in the bioreactor were rapid processes, occurring within minutes. Monod kinetics was employed to model the biodegradation of paint stripping organics. Analysis of the bioreactor process was accomplished with BIOLAB, a mathematical code that simulates coupled mass transfer and biodegradation processes. This code was used to fit experimental data to Monod kinetics and to determine kinetic parameters. The BIOLAB code was also employed to compare activities in the bioreactor of individual microbial cultures to the activities of combined cultures in the bioreactor. This code is of benefit for further optimization and scale-up of the bioreactor for treatment of paint stripping and other volatile organic wastes in bulk materials.

  7. Biodegradability Evaluation of Polymers by ISO 14855-2

    PubMed Central

    Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi; Kunioka, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradabilities of polymers and their composites in a controlled compost were described. Polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were employed as biodegradable polymers. Biodegradabilities of PCL and PLA samples in a controlled compost were measured using a Microbial Oxidative Degradation Analyzer (MODA) according to ISO 14855-2. Sample preparation method for biodegradation test according to ISO/DIS 10210 was also described. Effects of sizes and shapes of samples on biodegradability were studied. Reproducibility of biodegradation test of ISO 14855-2 by MODA was confirmed. Validity of sample preparation method for polymer pellets, polymer film, and polymer products of ISO/DIS 10210 for ISO 14855-2 was confirmed. PMID:20111676

  8. Advances in the field of high‐molecular‐weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A.; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-01-01

    Summary Interest in understanding prokaryotic biotransformation of high‐molecular‐weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW PAHs) has continued to grow and the scientific literature shows that studies in this field are originating from research groups from many different locations throughout the world. In the last 10 years, research in regard to HMW PAH biodegradation by bacteria has been further advanced through the documentation of new isolates that represent diverse bacterial types that have been isolated from different environments and that possess different metabolic capabilities. This has occurred in addition to the continuation of in‐depth comprehensive characterizations of previously isolated organisms, such as Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR‐1. New metabolites derived from prokaryotic biodegradation of four‐ and five‐ring PAHs have been characterized, our knowledge of the enzymes involved in these transformations has been advanced and HMW PAH biodegradation pathways have been further developed, expanded upon and refined. At the same time, investigation of prokaryotic consortia has furthered our understanding of the capabilities of microorganisms functioning as communities during HMW PAH biodegradation. PMID:21255317

  9. Ethanolic extract of propolis for biodegradable films packaging enhanced with chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. I.; Roslan, A.; Saari, N. S.; Hashim, K. H.; Kalamullah, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The use of industrial organic waste which are chitosan and propolis as materials for the development of biodegradable and active packaging is economical and environmentally appealing. Processing of propolis-chitosan film can minimize waste, and produce low-cost added value biopolymer packaging films for targeted applications. This aims of this research is to develop and characterize a biodegradable films by incorporating chitosan with propolis extract to enhance the functional properties for potential use as active food packaging. The film's moisture content, solubility and antimicrobial activity increase due to increasing volume of propolis extract which are 0 ml, 1.2 ml and 2.4 ml of propolis extract. Propolis-chitosan film with 2.4 ml of propolis extract is more soluble in water compared to propolis-chitosan film with 0 ml of propolis extract and 1.2 ml of propolis extract. The higher the volume of the propolis extract used, the higher the solubility of film in the water. The moisture content also will increase when higher volume of propolis extract used. Characterization of moisture content, solubility and antimicrobial activities revealed the benefits of adding propolis extract into chitosan films and the potential of using the developed film as active food packaging.

  10. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.; Maness, Pin-Ching

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  11. Biodegradable starch-based polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, Anna I.; Tyukova, Irina S.; Trufanova, Elena I.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight additives, temperature and mechanical action on the structure and properties of starch are discussed. Special attention is given to mixtures of starch with synthetic polymers, e.g., co-polymers of ethylene with vinyl acetate, vinyl alcohol, acrylic acid, cellulose derivatives and other natural polymers. These mixtures can be used in the development of novel environmentally safe materials (films, coatings, packaging materials) and various articles for short-term use. The bibliography includes 105 references.

  12. Formulation of microbial cocktails for BTEX biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Karthiga; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2015-02-01

    BTEX biodegradation by a mixed community of micro-organisms offers a promising approach in terms of cost-effectiveness and elimination of secondary pollution. Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 were chosen to formulate synthetic consortia based on their ability to biodegrade the mono-aromatic compounds. Benzene and toluene supported the growth of both the strains; while ethyl benzene and o-xylene were only utilized as growth substrates by P. putida F1 and P. stutzeri OX1, respectively. In a mixed substrate system, P. putida F1 exhibited incomplete removal of o-xylene while P. stutzeri OX1 displayed cometabolic removal of ethyl benzene with dark coloration of the growth medium. The biodegradation potential of the two Pseudomonas species complemented each other and offered opportunities to explore their performance as a co-culture for enhanced BTEX biodegradation. Several microbial formulations were concocted and their BTEX biodegradation characteristics were evaluated. Mixed culture biodegradation ascertained the advantages of the co-culture over the individual Pseudomonas species. This study also emphasized the significance of inoculum density and species proportion while concocting preselected micro-organisms for enhanced BTEX biodegradation.

  13. Effect of antioxidants on enzyme-catalysed biodegradation of carbon nanotubes†

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gaugler, James A.; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2013-01-01

    The growing applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) inevitably increase the risk of exposure to this potentially toxic nanomaterial. In an attempt to address this issue, research has been implemented to study the biodegradation of CNTs. In particular, myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme expressed by inflammatory cells of animals including humans, catalyse the degradation of oxidized carbon nanomaterials. While reactive intermediates generated by MPO efficiently degrade oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (o-SWCNTs); the exact mechanism of enzyme-catalysed biodegradation remains ambiguous. In this work, we tried to explain enzymatic oxidation in terms of redox potentials by employing competitive substrates for MPO such as chloride, which is oxidized by MPO to form a strong oxidant (hypochlorite), and antioxidants that have lower redox potentials than CNTs. Employing transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the addition of antioxidants, L-ascorbic acid and L-glutathione, with or without chloride significantly mitigates MPO-catalysed biodegradation of o-SWCNTs. This study focuses on a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of enzymatic biodegradation of CNTs and the impact of antioxidants on these pathways. PMID:23626907

  14. Evaluating the primary and ready biodegradability of dianilinodithiophosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weixiong; Sun, Shuiyu; Xu, Pingting; Dai, Yongkang; Ren, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Dianilinodithiophosphoric acid (DDA) is widely used as sulfide mineral flotation collector in China. It is necessary to investigate the biodegradability of DDA to provide the fundamental knowledge to assess the environmental fate in the risk assessment of DDA and to design and operate the DDA flotation wastewater biological treatment plant. In the present study, the primary and ready aerobic biodegradations of DDA were studied and the primary biodegradation kinetic model of DDA was developed. The results show that DDA displays a good primary biodegradability and its biodegradation ratio reaches 99.8 % in 7 days. In contrast, DDA is not easily ready biodegradable; hence, it is a partially biodegradable organic compound. The primary aerobic biodegradation kinetics can be described using the first-order reaction kinetics equation: C = 19.72191e(-0.01513t).

  15. Polylactide-based renewable composites from natural products residues by encapsulated film bag: characterization and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the biodegradability, morphology, and mechanical properties of composite materials consisting of acrylic acid-grafted polylactide (PLA-g-AA) and natural products residues (corn starch, CS) were evaluated. Composites containing acrylic acid-grafted PLA (PLA-g-AA/CS) exhibited noticeably superior mechanical properties due to their greater compatibility with CS compared with PLA/CS. The feasibility of using PLA-g-AA/CS as a film bag material to facilitate the controlled release of an encapsulated phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) Burkholderia cepacia as a fertilizer use promoter was then evaluated. For purposes of comparison and accurate characterization, a PLA film bag was also assessed. The results showed that the bacterium completely degraded both the PLA and the PLA-g-AA/CS composite film bags, resulting in cell release. The PLA-g-AA/CS (20 wt%) film bags were more biodegradable than those made of PLA, and displayed a higher loss of molecular weight and intrinsic viscosity, indicating a strong connection between these characteristics and biodegradability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic observations of 'fractured' biodegradable plates and screws.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Masaaki; Uemura, Fumiko; Tomemori, Shoko; Kamiishi, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    We encountered two out of 100 cases in which implanted biodegradable plates and screws had fractured within 1 month postoperatively. Failure of the material was confirmed through clinical symptoms, radiographs or CT findings. In addition, four specimens obtained from these two cases were examined with regard to their ultrastructure using scanning electron microscopy. Several principal patterns of the fractured surface were found: (1) gradual cracking, i.e. 'circular stair' and, (2) tortuous threads, i.e. a wavy line. It is conceivable that the material may not have been hit by major sudden forces but a disproportion between the thread configuration and the drilled hole may have led to screw loosening and torsion. Subsequently, the threads were deformed in a 'wavy' manner, finally leading to cracking and fracture of plates and screws. Fractures of plates and screws due to these instabilities are thought to be distinguishable from material resorption. In the application of biodegradable materials, more than two screws per single bone segment should be used as a principle of plate-fixation technique in order to avoid a stability-compromising situation, particularly in the stress-bearing areas of the maxillofacial region. Moreover, three-dimensional fixation using more than two plates is recommended in the facial skeleton e.g. zygomatic tripod. Intermaxillary fixation should also be considered to reinforce initial stability in stress-bearing areas.

  17. EFFECTS OF MICROCOSM PREPARATION ON RATES OF TOLUENE BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosms were prepared with subsurface material from two aquifers to examine the effects of preparation methods on rates of toluene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. In both cases, the data fit a zero-order kinetics plot. However, rates of removal were generally pro...

  18. Competitive substrate biodegradation during surfactant-enhanced remediation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Goudar, C.; Strevett, K.; Grego, J.

    The impact of synthetic surfactants on the aqueous phase biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTpX) was studied using two anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and two nonionic surfactants, POE(20) sorbitan monooleate (T-maz-80) and octyl-phenolpoly(ethyleneoxy) ethanol (CA-620). Batch biodegradation experiments were performed to evaluate surfactant biodegradability using two different microbial cultures. Of the four surfactants used in this study, SDS and T-maz-80 were readily degraded by a microbial consortium obtained from an activated sludge treatment system, whereas only SDS was degraded by a microbial culture that was acclimated to BTpX. Biodegradation kinetic parametersmore » associated with SDS and T-maz-80 degradation by the activated sludge consortium were estimated using respirometric data in conjunction with a nonlinear parameter estimation technique as {mu}{sub max} = 0.93 h{sup {minus}1}, K{sub s}= 96.18 mg/L and {mu}{sub max} = 0.41 h{sup {minus}1}, K{sub s} = 31.92 mg/L, respectively. When both BTpX and surfactant were present in the reactor along with BTpX-acclimated microorganisms, two distinct biodegradation patterns were seen. SDS was preferentially utilized inhibiting hydrocarbon biodegradation, whereas, the other three surfactants had no impact on BTpX biodegradation. None of the four surfactants were toxic to the microbial cultures used in this study. Readily biodegradable surfactants are not very effective for subsurface remediation applications as they are rapidly consumed, and also because of their potential inhibitory effects on intrinsic hydrocarbon biodegradation. This greatly increases treatment costs as surfactant recovery and reuse are adversely affected.« less

  19. High-performance green semiconductor devices: materials, designs, and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yei Hwan; Zhang, Huilong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2017-06-01

    From large industrial computers to non-portable home appliances and finally to light-weight portable gadgets, the rapid evolution of electronics has facilitated our daily pursuits and increased our life comforts. However, these rapid advances have led to a significant decrease in the lifetime of consumer electronics. The serious environmental threat that comes from electronic waste not only involves materials like plastics and heavy metals, but also includes toxic materials like mercury, cadmium, arsenic, and lead, which can leak into the ground and contaminate the water we drink, the food we eat, and the animals that live around us. Furthermore, most electronics are comprised of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, and potentially toxic materials. Difficulties in recycling the increasing amount of electronic waste could eventually lead to permanent environmental pollution. As such, discarded electronics that can naturally degrade over time would reduce recycling challenges and minimize their threat to the environment. This review provides a snapshot of the current developments and challenges of green electronics at the semiconductor device level. It looks at the developments that have been made in an effort to help reduce the accumulation of electronic waste by utilizing unconventional, biodegradable materials as components. While many semiconductors are classified as non-biodegradable, a few biodegradable semiconducting materials exist and are used as electrical components. This review begins with a discussion of biodegradable materials for electronics, followed by designs and processes for the manufacturing of green electronics using different techniques and designs. In the later sections of the review, various examples of biodegradable electrical components, such as sensors, circuits, and batteries, that together can form a functional electronic device, are discussed and new applications using green electronics are reviewed.

  20. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  1. Biodegradation of polyether-polyol-based polyurethane elastomeric films: influence of partial replacement of polyether polyol by biopolymers of renewable origin.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Marova, Ivana; Vojtova, Lucy

    2011-07-01

    In this work we investigated the degradation process ofpolyether-polyol-based polyurethane (PUR) elastomeric films in the presence of a mixed thermophilic culture as a model of a natural bacterial consortium. The presence of PUR material in cultivation medium resulted in delayed but intensive growth of the bacterial culture. The unusually long lag phase was caused by the release of unreacted polyether polyol and tin catalyst from the material. The lag phase was significantly shortened and the biodegradability of PUR materials was enhanced by partial replacement (10%) of polyether polyol with biopolymers (carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, acetyl cellulose and actylated starch). The process of material degradation consisted of two steps. First, the materials were mechanically disrupted and, second, the bacterial culture was able to utilize abiotic degradation products, which resulted in supported bacterial growth. Direct utilization of PUR by the bacterial culture was observed as well, but the bacterial culture contributed only slightly to the total mass losses. The only exception was PUR material modified by acetyl cellulose. In this case, direct biodegradation represented the major mechanism of material decomposition. Moreover, PUR material modified by acetyl cellulose did not tend to undergo abiotic degradation. In conclusion, the modification of PUR by proper biopolymers is a promising strategy for reducing potential negative effects of waste PUR materials on the environment and enhancing their biodegradability.

  2. Hydrogenated cottonseed oil as raw material for biobased materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been a lot of recent interest in using vegetable oils as biodegradable and renewable raw materials for the syntheses of various biobased materials. Although most of the attention has been paid to soybean oil thus far, cottonseed oil is a viable alternative. An advantage of cottonseed oil...

  3. Biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated fungi in solid waste medium.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Sahebnazar; Abbas, Shojaosadati Seyed; Mahsa, Mohammad-Taheri; Mohsen, Nosrati

    2010-03-01

    In this study, biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated landfill-source fungi was evaluated in a controlled solid waste medium. The fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus and Fusarium solani, were isolated from samples taken from an aerobic aged municipal landfill in Tehran. These fungi could degrade LDPE via the formation of a biofilm in a submerged medium. In the sterilized solid waste medium, LPDE films were buried for 100 days in a 1-L flask containing 400 g sterile solid waste raw materials at 28 degrees C. Each fungus was added to a separate flask. The moisture content and pH of the media were maintained at the optimal levels for each fungus. Photo-oxidation (25 days under UV-irradiation) was used as a pretreatment of the LDPE samples. The progress of the process was monitored by measurement of total organic carbon (TOC), pH, temperature and moisture. The results obtained from monitoring the process using isolated fungi under sterile conditions indicate that these fungi are able to grow in solid waste medium. The results of FT-IR and SEM analyses show that A. terreus and A. fumigatus, despite the availability of other organic carbon of materials, could utilize LDPE as carbon source. While there has been much research in the field of LDPE biodegradation under solid conditions, this is the first report of degradation of LDPE by A. fumigatus. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated fungi in solid waste medium

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zahra, Sahebnazar; Abbas, Shojaosadati Seyed, E-mail: sa_shoja@modares.ac.i; Mahsa, Mohammad-Taheri

    In this study, biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated landfill-source fungi was evaluated in a controlled solid waste medium. The fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus and Fusarium solani, were isolated from samples taken from an aerobic aged municipal landfill in Tehran. These fungi could degrade LDPE via the formation of a biofilm in a submerged medium. In the sterilized solid waste medium, LPDE films were buried for 100 days in a 1-L flask containing 400 g sterile solid waste raw materials at 28 deg. C. Each fungus was added to a separate flask. The moisture content and pHmore » of the media were maintained at the optimal levels for each fungus. Photo-oxidation (25 days under UV-irradiation) was used as a pretreatment of the LDPE samples. The progress of the process was monitored by measurement of total organic carbon (TOC), pH, temperature and moisture. The results obtained from monitoring the process using isolated fungi under sterile conditions indicate that these fungi are able to grow in solid waste medium. The results of FT-IR and SEM analyses show that A. terreus and A. fumigatus, despite the availability of other organic carbon of materials, could utilize LDPE as carbon source. While there has been much research in the field of LDPE biodegradation under solid conditions, this is the first report of degradation of LDPE by A. fumigatus.« less

  5. Biodegradability standards for carrier bags and plastic films in aquatic environments: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jesse P; Boardman, Carl; O'Callaghan, Kenneth; Delort, Anne-Marie; Song, Jim

    2018-05-01

    Plastic litter is encountered in aquatic ecosystems across the globe, including polar environments and the deep sea. To mitigate the adverse societal and ecological impacts of this waste, there has been debate on whether 'biodegradable' materials should be granted exemptions from plastic bag bans and levies. However, great care must be exercised when attempting to define this term, due to the broad and complex range of physical and chemical conditions encountered within natural ecosystems. Here, we review existing international industry standards and regional test methods for evaluating the biodegradability of plastics within aquatic environments (wastewater, unmanaged freshwater and marine habitats). We argue that current standards and test methods are insufficient in their ability to realistically predict the biodegradability of carrier bags in these environments, due to several shortcomings in experimental procedures and a paucity of information in the scientific literature. Moreover, existing biodegradability standards and test methods for aquatic environments do not involve toxicity testing or account for the potentially adverse ecological impacts of carrier bags, plastic additives, polymer degradation products or small (microscopic) plastic particles that can arise via fragmentation. Successfully addressing these knowledge gaps is a key requirement for developing new biodegradability standard(s) for lightweight carrier bags.

  6. Biodegradability standards for carrier bags and plastic films in aquatic environments: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Carl; O'Callaghan, Kenneth; Delort, Anne-Marie; Song, Jim

    2018-01-01

    Plastic litter is encountered in aquatic ecosystems across the globe, including polar environments and the deep sea. To mitigate the adverse societal and ecological impacts of this waste, there has been debate on whether ‘biodegradable' materials should be granted exemptions from plastic bag bans and levies. However, great care must be exercised when attempting to define this term, due to the broad and complex range of physical and chemical conditions encountered within natural ecosystems. Here, we review existing international industry standards and regional test methods for evaluating the biodegradability of plastics within aquatic environments (wastewater, unmanaged freshwater and marine habitats). We argue that current standards and test methods are insufficient in their ability to realistically predict the biodegradability of carrier bags in these environments, due to several shortcomings in experimental procedures and a paucity of information in the scientific literature. Moreover, existing biodegradability standards and test methods for aquatic environments do not involve toxicity testing or account for the potentially adverse ecological impacts of carrier bags, plastic additives, polymer degradation products or small (microscopic) plastic particles that can arise via fragmentation. Successfully addressing these knowledge gaps is a key requirement for developing new biodegradability standard(s) for lightweight carrier bags. PMID:29892374

  7. Cell encapsulation in biodegradable hydrogels for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Nicodemus, Garret D; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2008-06-01

    Encapsulating cells in biodegradable hydrogels offers numerous attractive features for tissue engineering, including ease of handling, a highly hydrated tissue-like environment for cell and tissue growth, and the ability to form in vivo. Many properties important to the design of a hydrogel scaffold, such as swelling, mechanical properties, degradation, and diffusion, are closely linked to the crosslinked structure of the hydrogel, which is controlled through a variety of different processing conditions. Degradation may be tuned by incorporating hydrolytically or enzymatically labile segments into the hydrogel or by using natural biopolymers that are susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Because cells are present during the gelation process, the number of suitable chemistries and formulations are limited. In this review, we describe important considerations for designing biodegradable hydrogels for cell encapsulation and highlight recent advances in material design and their applications in tissue engineering.

  8. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials Part IV: Case study of oxo-biodegradable polyethylene commercial bag - Aging in biotic and abiotic environment.

    PubMed

    Musioł, Marta; Rydz, Joanna; Janeczek, Henryk; Radecka, Iza; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2017-06-01

    The public awareness of the quality of environment stimulates the endeavor to safe polymeric materials and their degradation products. The aim of the forensic engineering case study presented in this paper is to evaluate the aging process of commercial oxo-degradable polyethylene bag under real industrial composting conditions and in distilled water at 70°C, for comparison. Partial degradation of the investigated material was monitored by changes in molecular weight, thermal properties and Keto Carbonyl Bond Index and Vinyl Bond Index, which were calculated from the FTIR spectra. The results indicate that such an oxo-degradable product offered in markets degrades slowly under industrial composting conditions. Even fragmentation is slow, and it is dubious that biological mineralization of this material would occur within a year under industrial composting conditions. The slow degradation and fragmentation is most likely due to partially crosslinking after long time of degradation, which results in the limitation of low molecular weight residues for assimilation. The work suggests that these materials should not be labeled as biodegradable, and should be further analyzed in order to avoid the spread of persistent artificial materials in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Platelet adhesion and human umbilical vein endothelial cell cytocompatibility of biodegradable segmented polyurethanes prepared with 4,4'-methylene bis(cyclohexyl isocyanate), poly(caprolactone) diol and butanediol or dithioerythritol as chain extenders.

    PubMed

    Chan-Chan, L H; Vargas-Coronado, R F; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Cauich-Rodríguez, J V; Rath, R; Phelps, E A; García, A J; San Román Del Barrio, J; Parra, J; Merhi, Y; Tabrizian, M

    2013-08-01

    Biodegradable segmented polyurethanes were prepared with poly(caprolactone) diol as a soft segment, 4,4'-methylene bis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (HMDI) and either butanediol or dithioerythritol as chain extenders. Platelet adhesion was similar in all segmented polyurethanes studied and not different from Tecoflex® although an early stage of activation was observed on biodegradable segmented polyurethane prepared with dithioerythritol. Relative viability was higher than 80% on human umbilical vein endothelial cells in contact with biodegradable segmented polyurethane extracts after 1, 2 and 7 days. Furthermore, both biodegradable segmented polyurethane materials supported human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion, spreading, and viability similar to Tecoflex® medical-grade polyurethane. These biodegradable segmented polyurethanes represent promising materials for cardiovascular applications.

  10. Model of heterogeneous material dissolution in simulated biological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A. G.; Gutmanas, E. Y.

    2015-11-01

    In orthopedic research, increasing attention is being paid to bioresorbable/biodegradable implants as an alternative to permanent metallic bone healing devices. Biodegradable metal based implants possessing high strength and ductility potentially can be used in load bearing sites. Biodegradable Mg and Fe are ductile and Fe possess high strength, but Mg degrades too fast and Fe degrades too slow, Ag is a noble metal and should cause galvanic corrosion of the more active metallic iron - thus, corrosion of Fe can be increased. Nanostructuring should results in higher strength and can result in higher rate of dissolution/degradation from grain boundaries. In this work, a simple dissolution model of heterogeneous three phase nanocomposite material is considered - two phases being metal Fe and Ag and the third - nanopores. Analytical solution for the model is presented. Calculations demonstrate that the changes in the relative amount of each phase depend on mass exchange and diffusion coefficients. Theoretical results agree with preliminary experimental results.

  11. Carbon-rich wastes as feedstocks for biodegradable polymer (polyhydroxyalkanoate) production using bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Guzik, Maciej; Kenny, Shane T; Babu, Ramesh; Werker, Alan; O Connor, Kevin E

    2013-01-01

    Research into the production of biodegradable polymers has been driven by vision for the most part from changes in policy, in Europe and America. These policies have their origins in the Brundtland Report of 1987, which provides a platform for a more sustainable society. Biodegradable polymers are part of the emerging portfolio of renewable raw materials seeking to deliver environmental, social, and economic benefits. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are naturally-occurring biodegradable-polyesters accumulated by bacteria usually in response to inorganic nutrient limitation in the presence of excess carbon. Most of the early research into PHA accumulation and technology development for industrial-scale production was undertaken using virgin starting materials. For example, polyhydroxybutyrate and copolymers such as polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate are produced today at industrial scale from corn-derived glucose. However, in recent years, research has been undertaken to convert domestic and industrial wastes to PHA. These wastes in today's context are residuals seen by a growing body of stakeholders as platform resources for a biobased society. In the present review, we consider residuals from food, plastic, forest and lignocellulosic, and biodiesel manufacturing (glycerol). Thus, this review seeks to gain perspective of opportunities from literature reporting the production of PHA from carbon-rich residuals as feedstocks. A discussion on approaches and context for PHA production with reference to pure- and mixed-culture technologies is provided. Literature reports advocate results of the promise of waste conversion to PHA. However, the vast majority of studies on waste to PHA is at laboratory scale. The questions of surmounting the technical and political hurdles to industrialization are generally left unanswered. There are a limited number of studies that have progressed into fermentors and a dearth of pilot-scale demonstration. A number of fermentation studies show

  12. Evaluation of the river die-away biodegradation test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, Glenn D.; Jones, John R.; Johnson, B. Thomas

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the river die-away (RDA) test for establishing the biodegradability of chemicals was assessed. Reproducibility of biodegradation in the RDA test was analyzed under conditions in which the test is commonly done. Biodegradation results were not reproducible for di-2-ethylexyl phthalate (DEHP) and phthalic acid in replicated RDA tests using Missouri River water. Chemical and biological changes during the RDA tests probably reflected relative laboratory conditions. Initial suspended solids and subsequent DEHP biodegradation were directly related. Interpretation of RDA test results is enhanced by replicating experiments and comparing biodegradation of the test compound with a compound whose degradation properties are known. However, biodegradation measured with the RDA test is too variable and too dependent on laboratory treatment of samples to apply results directly to the aquatic environment.

  13. High-performance green flexible electronics based on biodegradable cellulose nanofibril paper

    Treesearch

    Yei Hwan Jung; Tzu-Hsuan Chang; Huilong Zhang; Chunhua Yao; Qifeng Zheng; Vina W. Yang; Hongyi Mi; Munho Kim; Sang June Cho; Dong-Wook Park; Hao Jiang; Juhwan Lee; Yijie Qiu; Weidong Zhou; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong; Zhenqiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Today’s consumer electronics, such as cell phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices, are typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, and sometimes potentially toxic (for example, gallium arsenide) materials. These consumer electronics are frequently upgraded or discarded, leading to serious environmental contamination. Thus, electronic systems...

  14. Processing and characterization of solid and microcellular biobased and biodegradable PHBV-based polymer blends and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Alireza

    Petroleum-based polymers have made a significant contribution to human society due to their extraordinary adaptability and processability. However, due to the wide-spread application of plastics over the past few decades, there are growing concerns over depleting fossil resources and the undesirable environmental impact of plastics. Most of the petroleum-based plastics are non-biodegradable and thus will be disposed in landfills. Inappropriate disposal of plastics may also become a potential threat to the environment. Many approaches, such as efficient plastics waste management and replacing petroleum-based plastics with biodegradable materials obtained from renewable resources, have been put forth to overcome these problems. Plastics waste management is at its beginning stages of development which is also more expensive than expected. Thus, there is a growing interest in developing sustainable biobased and biodegradable materials produced from renewable resources such as plants and crops, which can offer comparable performance with additional advantages, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, and reducing the carbon footprint. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) is one of the most promising biobased and biodegradable polymers, In fact many petroleum based polymers such as poly(propylene) (PP) can be potentially replaced by PHBV because of the similarity in their properties. Despite PHBV's attractive properties, there are many drawbacks such as high cost, brittleness, and thermal instability, which hamper the widespread usage of this specific polymer. The goals of this study are to investigate various strategies to address these drawbacks, including blending with other biodegradable polymers such as poly (butylene adipate-coterephthalate) (PBAT) or fillers (e.g., coir fiber, recycled wood fiber, and nanofillers) and use of novel processing technologies such as microcellular injection molding technique. Microcellular injection molding technique

  15. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable poly (ethylene glycol) and poly (caprolactone diol) end capped poly (propylene fumarate) cross linked amphiphilic hydrogel as tissue engineering scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Lekshmi; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2009-12-01

    Biodegradable poly (caprolactone diol-co-propylene fumarate-co-ethylene glycol) amphiphilic polymer with poly (ethylene glycol) and poly (caprolactone diol) chain ends (PCL-PPF-PEG) was prepared. PCL-PPF-PEG undergoes fast setting with acrylamide (aqueous solution) by free radical polymerization and produces a crosslinked hydrogel. The cross linked and freeze-dried amphiphilic material has porous and interconnected network. It undergoes higher degree of swelling and water absorption to form hydrogel with hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains at the surface and appreciable tensile strength. The present hydrogel is compatible with L929 fibroblast cells. PCL-PPF-PEG/acrylamide hydrogel is a candidate scaffold material for tissue engineering applications.

  16. Biodegradability and platelets adhesion assessment of magnesium-based alloys using a microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lumei; Koo, Youngmi; Collins, Boyce; Xu, Zhigang; Sankar, Jagannathan

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg)-based stents are extensively explored to alleviate atherosclerosis due to their biodegradability and relative hemocompatibility. To ensure the quality, safety and cost-efficacy of bioresorbable scaffolds and full utilization of the material tunability afforded by alloying, it is critical to access degradability and thrombosis potential of Mg-based alloys using improved in vitro models that mimic as closely as possible the in vivo microenvironment. In this study, we investigated biodegradation and initial thrombogenic behavior of Mg-based alloys at the interface between Mg alloys’ surface and simulated physiological environment using a microfluidic system. The degradation properties of Mg-based alloys WE43, AZ31, ZWEK-L, and ZWEK-C were evaluated in complete culture medium and their thrombosis potentials in platelet rich plasma, respectively. The results show that 1) physiological shear stress increased the corrosion rate and decreased platelets adhesion rate as compared to static immersion; 2) secondary phases and impurities in material composition induced galvanic corrosion, resulting in higher corrosion resistance and platelet adhesion rate; 3) Mg-based alloys with higher corrosion rate showed higher platelets adhesion rate. We conclude that a microfluidic-based in vitro system allows evaluation of biodegradation behaviors and platelets responses of Mg-based alloys under specific shear stress, and degradability is related to platelets adhesion. PMID:28797069

  17. Novel characteristics of sophorolipids, yeast glycolipid biosurfactants, as biodegradable low-foaming surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshihiko; Ryu, Mizuyuki; Oda, Yuka; Igarashi, Keisuke; Nagatsuka, Asami; Furuta, Taro; Sugiura, Masaki

    2009-08-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs) are a family of glycolipid type biosurfactants, which are largely produced by the non-pathogenic yeast, Candida bombicola. In order to investigate the possibility of SLs for industrial use, here we examined the interfacial activities, cytotoxicity and biodegradability of SLs, and compared these properties with those of two lipopeptide type biosurfactants (surfactin and arthrofactin), sodium laurate (soap, SP) and four kinds of chemically synthesized surfactants including two block-copolymer nonionic surfactants (BPs), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (AE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). It was indicated that SLs had extremely low-foaming properties and high detergency comparable with commercially available low-foaming BPs. These interfacial activities of SLs were maintained under 100 ppm water hardness. Cytotoxicity of SLs on human keratinocytes was the same as surfactin, which has already been commercialized as cosmetic material, but higher than BPs. Moreover, biodegradability of SLs using the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals (301C, Modified MITI Test) displayed that SLs can be classified as "readily" biodegradable chemicals, which are defined as chemicals that are degraded 60% within 28 days under specified test methods. We observed 61% degradation of SLs on the eighth day of cultivation. Our results indicate that SLs are low-foaming surfactants with high detergency, which also exhibit both low cytotoxicity and readily biodegradable properties.

  18. Biodegradability relationships among propylene glycol substances in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development ready- and seawater biodegradability tests.

    PubMed

    West, Robert J; Davis, John W; Pottenger, Lynn H; Banton, Marcy I; Graham, Cynthia

    2007-05-01

    Eight propylene glycol substances, ranging from 1,2-propanediol to a poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) having number-average molecular weight (M(n)) of 2,700 (i.e., PPG 2700), were evaluated in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) ready- and seawater biodegradability tests. Uniformity in test parameters, such as inoculum source/density and test substance concentrations, combined with frequent measurements of O2 consumption and CO2 evolution, revealed unexpected biodegradability trends across this family of substances. Biodegradability in both tests decreased with increased number of oxy-propylene repeating units (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) of the oligomeric propylene glycols (PGs). However, this trend was reversed for the PPG polymers, and increased biodegradability was observed with increases of average n to seven, 17, and 34 (M(n) = 425, 1,000, and 2,000, respectively). This relationship between molecular weight and biodegradability was reversed again when average n was incremented from 34 (PPG 2000) to 46 (PPG 2700). Six of the tested substances (n = 1, 2, 3, 7, 17, and 34) met the OECD-specified criteria for "ready biodegradability," whereas the tetrapropylene glycol (n = 4) and PPG 2700 substances failed to meet these criteria. Biodegradation half-lives for these eight substances ranged from 3.8 d (PPG 2000) to 33.2 d (PPG 2700) in the ready test, and from 13.6 (PG) to 410 d (PPG 2700) in seawater. Biodegradation half-lives in seawater were significantly correlated with half-lives determined in the ready test. However, half-lives in both tests were correlated poorly with molecular weight, water solubility, and log K(ow). It is speculated that the molecular conformation of these substances, perhaps more so than these other physicochemical properties, has an important role in influencing biodegradability of the propylene glycol substances.

  19. BTEX biodegradation by bacteria from effluents of petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Dânia Elisa Christofoletti; Levy, Carlos Emílio; de Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2010-09-15

    Groundwater contamination with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) has been increasing, thus requiring an urgent development of methodologies that are able to remove or minimize the damages these compounds can cause to the environment. The biodegradation process using microorganisms has been regarded as an efficient technology to treat places contaminated with hydrocarbons, since they are able to biotransform and/or biodegrade target pollutants. To prove the efficiency of this process, besides chemical analysis, the use of biological assessments has been indicated. This work identified and selected BTEX-biodegrading microorganisms present in effluents from petroleum refinery, and evaluated the efficiency of microorganism biodegradation process for reducing genotoxic and mutagenic BTEX damage through two test-systems: Allium cepa and hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells. Five different non-biodegraded BTEX concentrations were evaluated in relation to biodegraded concentrations. The biodegradation process was performed in a BOD Trak Apparatus (HACH) for 20 days, using microorganisms pre-selected through enrichment. Although the biodegradation usually occurs by a consortium of different microorganisms, the consortium in this study was composed exclusively of five bacteria species and the bacteria Pseudomonas putida was held responsible for the BTEX biodegradation. The chemical analyses showed that BTEX was reduced in the biodegraded concentrations. The results obtained with genotoxicity assays, carried out with both A. cepa and HTC cells, showed that the biodegradation process was able to decrease the genotoxic damages of BTEX. By mutagenic tests, we observed a decrease in damage only to the A. cepa organism. Although no decrease in mutagenicity was observed for HTC cells, no increase of this effect after the biodegradation process was observed either. The application of pre-selected bacteria in biodegradation processes can represent a reliable and

  20. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in Biodegradation of Multiple Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2017-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil and groundwater containing multiple contaminants remains a challenge in environmental science and engineering because complete biodegradation of all components is necessary but very difficult to accomplish in practice. This presentation provides a brief overview on advances in biodegradation of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including chlorinated ethylenes, benzene, toluene and dichloromethane (DCM). Case studies on aerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene and DCM, and integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation of 7 contaminants, specifically, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), DCM, benzene and toluene will be provided. Recent findings based on systematic laboratory experiments indicated that aerobic toluene degradation can be enhanced by co-existence of benzene. Propioniferax, not a known benzene, toluene and DCM degrader can be a key microorganism that involves in biodegradation when the three contaminants co-exist. Integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation is capable of completely degrading the seven VOCs with initial concentrations less than 30 mg/L. Dehalococcoides sp., generally considered sensitive to oxygen, can survive aerobic conditions for at least 28 days, and can be activated during the subsequent anaerobic biodegradation. This presentation may provide a systematic information about biodegradation of multiple VOCs, and a scientific basis for the complete bioremediation of multiple contaminants in situ.

  2. MONITORING POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) BIODEGRADATION USING CONTINUOUS-FLOW ISOTOPE RATIO MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in some cases can be removed from the environment by biodegradation. Aerobic and anaerobic biological processes have been determined in previous research to be capable of degrading PCBs. During the aerobic and anaerobic d...

  3. Porous biodegradable lumbar interbody fusion cage design and fabrication using integrated global-local topology optimization with laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heesuk; Hollister, Scott J; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable cages have received increasing attention for their use in spinal procedures involving interbody fusion to resolve complications associated with the use of nondegradable cages, such as stress shielding and long-term foreign body reaction. However, the relatively weak initial material strength compared to permanent materials and subsequent reduction due to degradation may be problematic. To design a porous biodegradable interbody fusion cage for a preclinical large animal study that can withstand physiological loads while possessing sufficient interconnected porosity for bony bridging and fusion, we developed a multiscale topology optimization technique. Topology optimization at the macroscopic scale provides optimal structural layout that ensures mechanical strength, while optimally designed microstructures, which replace the macroscopic material layout, ensure maximum permeability. Optimally designed cages were fabricated using solid, freeform fabrication of poly(ε-caprolactone) mixed with hydroxyapatite. Compression tests revealed that the yield strength of optimized fusion cages was two times that of typical human lumbar spine loads. Computational analysis further confirmed the mechanical integrity within the human lumbar spine, although the pore structure locally underwent higher stress than yield stress. This optimization technique may be utilized to balance the complex requirements of load-bearing, stress shielding, and interconnected porosity when using biodegradable materials for fusion cages.

  4. Eco-Friendly and Biodegradable Biopolymer Chitosan/Y₂O₃ Composite Materials in Flexible Organic Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Du, Bo-Wei; Hu, Shao-Ying; Singh, Ranjodh; Tsai, Tsung-Tso; Lin, Ching-Chang; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2017-09-03

    The waste from semiconductor manufacturing processes causes serious pollution to the environment. In this work, a non-toxic material was developed under room temperature conditions for the fabrication of green electronics. Flexible organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) on plastic substrates are increasingly in demand due to their high visible transmission and small size for use as displays and wearable devices. This work investigates and analyzes the structured formation of aqueous solutions of the non-toxic and biodegradable biopolymer, chitosan, blended with high-k-value, non-toxic, and biocompatible Y₂O₃ nanoparticles. Chitosan thin films blended with Y₂O₃ nanoparticles were adopted as the gate dielectric thin film in OTFTs, and an improvement in the dielectric properties and pinholes was observed. Meanwhile, the on/off current ratio was increased by 100 times, and a low leakage current was observed. In general, the blended chitosan/Y₂O₃ thin films used as the gate dielectric of OTFTs are non-toxic, environmentally friendly, and operate at low voltages. These OTFTs can be used on surfaces with different curvature radii because of their flexibility.

  5. Seasonal changes in the chemical quality and biodegradability of dissolved organic matter exported from soils to streams in coastal temperate rainforest watersheds

    Treesearch

    Jason B. Fellman; Eran Hood; David V. D' Amore; Richard T. Edwards; Dan White

    2009-01-01

    The composition and biodegradability of streamwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) varies with source material and degree of transformation. We combined PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation-emission spectroscopy and biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) incubations to investigate seasonal changes in the lability of DOM along a soil-stream continuum in...

  6. Recent developments in broadly applicable structure-biodegradability relationships.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Boethling, Robert S; Howard, Philip H

    2003-08-01

    Biodegradation is one of the most important processes influencing concentration of a chemical substance after its release to the environment. It is the main process for removal of many chemicals from the environment and therefore is an important factor in risk assessments. This article reviews available methods and models for predicting biodegradability of organic chemicals from structure. The first section of the article briefly discusses current needs for biodegradability estimation methods related to new and existing chemicals and in the context of multimedia exposure models. Following sections include biodegradation test methods and endpoints used in modeling, with special attention given to the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry test; a primer on modeling, describing the various approaches that have been used in the structure/biodegradability relationship work, and contrasting statistical and mechanistic approaches; and recent developments in structure/biodegradability relationships, divided into group contribution, chemometric, and artificial intelligence approaches.

  7. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol biodegradation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Goudar, C.T.; Ganji, S.H.; Pujar, B.G.

    Phenol biodegradation was studied in batch experiments using an acclimated inoculum and initial phenol concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.3 g/L. Phenol depletion an associated microbial growth were monitored over time to provide information that was used to estimate the kinetics of phenol biodegradation. Phenol inhibited biodegradation at high concentrations, and a generalized substrate inhibition model based on statistical thermodynamics was used to describe the dynamics of microbial growth in phenol. For experimental data obtained in this study, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form that is analogous to the Andrews equation, and the biokinetic parameters {micro}{sub max},more » maximum specific growth; K{sub s}, saturation constant; and K{sub i}, inhibition constant were estimated as 0.251 h{sup {minus}1}, 0.011 g/L, and 0.348 g/L, respectively, using a nonlinear least squares technique. Given the wide variability in substrate inhibition models used to describe phenol biodegradation, an attempt was made to justify selection of particular model based on theoretical considerations. Phenol biodegradation data from nine previously published studies were used in the generalized substrate inhibition model to determine the appropriate form of the substrate inhibition model. In all nine cases, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form analogous to the Andrews equation suggesting the suitability of the Andrews equation to describe phenol biodegradation data.« less

  8. Kinetics of monomer biodegradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Michela; Sezenna, Elena; Saponaro, Sabrina; Innocenti, Francesco Degli; Tosin, Maurizio; Bonomo, Luca; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    In modern intensive agriculture, plastics are used in several applications (i.e. mulch films, drip irrigation tubes, string, clips, pots, etc.). Interest towards applying biodegradable plastics to replace the conventional plastics is promising. Ten monomers, which can be applied in the synthesis of potentially biodegradable polyesters, were tested according to ASTM 5988-96 (standard respirometric test to evaluate aerobic biodegradation in soil by measuring the carbon dioxide evolution): adipic acid, azelaic acid, 1,4-butanediol, 1,2-ethanediol, 1,6-hexanediol, lactic acid, glucose, sebacic acid, succinic acid and terephthalic acid. Eight replicates were carried out for each monomer for 27-45 days. The numerical code AQUASIM was applied to process the CO₂ experimental data in order to estimate values for the parameters describing the different mechanisms occurring to the monomers in soil: i) the first order solubilization kinetic constant, K(sol) (d⁻¹); ii) the first order biodegradation kinetic constant, K(b) (d⁻¹); iii) the lag time in biodegradation, t(lag) (d); and iv) the carbon fraction biodegraded but not transformed into CO₂, Y (-). The following range of values were obtained: [0.006 d⁻¹, 6.9 d⁻¹] for K(sol), [0.1 d⁻¹, 1.2 d⁻¹] for K(b), and [0.32-0.58] for Y; t(lag) was observed for azelaic acid, 1,2-ethanediol, and terephthalic acid, with estimated values between 3.0 e 4.9 d. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Wet air oxidation induced enhanced biodegradability of distillery effluent.

    PubMed

    Malik, S N; Saratchandra, T; Tembhekar, P D; Padoley, K V; Mudliar, S L; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a pretreatment option for enhanced biodegradation of complex distillery effluent. Initially, the distillery effluent was pretreated by WAO at different process conditions (pressure, temperature and time) to facilitate enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI = BOD5: COD ratio). The biodegradability of WAO pretreated effluent was evaluated by subjecting it to aerobic biodegradation and anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation. Aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability index (BI = 0.4-0.8) showed enhanced COD reduction of up to 67.7%, whereas the untreated effluent (BI = 0.17) indicated poor COD reduction of only 22.5%. Anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent has shown up to 87.9% COD reduction, while the untreated effluent has shown only 43.1% COD reduction. Bio-kinetic parameters also confirmed the increased rate of bio-oxidation at enhanced BIs. The results indicate that the WAO pretreatment facilitates enhanced bio-oxidation/bio-degradation of complex effluents like the distillery spent wash. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced alkaline hydrolysis and biodegradability studies of nitrocellulose-bearing missile propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidhoum, Mohammed; Christodoulatos, Christos; Su, Tsan-Liang; Redis, Mercurios

    1995-01-01

    Large amounts of energetic materials which have been accumulated over the years in various manufacturing and military installations must be disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Historically, the method of choice for destruction of obsolete or aging energetic materials has been open burning or open detonation (OB/OD). This destruction approach has become undesirable due to air pollution problems. Therefore, there is a need for new technologies which will effectively and economically deal with the disposal of energetic materials. Along those lines, we have investigated a chemical/biological process for the safe destruction and disposal of a double base solid rocket propellant (AHH), which was used in several 8 inch projectile systems. The solid propellant is made of nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin as energetic components, two lead salts which act as ballistic modifiers, triacetin as a plasticizer and 2-Nitrodiphenylamine (2-NDPA) as a stabilizer. A process train is being developed to convert the organic components of the propellant to biodegradable products and remove the lead from the process stream. The solid propellant is first hydrolyzed through an enhanced alkaline hydrolysis process step. Following lead removal and neutralization, the digested liquor rich in nitrates and nitrites is found to be easily biodegradable. The digestion rate of the intact ground propellant as well as the release of nitrite and nitrate groups were substantially increased when ultrasound were supplied to the alkaline reaction medium compared to the conventional alkaline hydrolysis. The effects of reaction time, temperature, sodium hydroxide concentration and other relevant parameters on the digestion efficiency and biodegradability have been studied. The present work indicates that the AHH propellant can be disposed of safely with a combination of physiochemical and biological processes.

  11. Structural Characteristics and Corrosion Behavior of Bio-Degradable Zn-Li Alloys in Stent Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shan

    Zinc has begun to be studied as a bio-degradable material in recent years due to its excellent corrosion rate and optimal biocompatibility. Unfortunately, pure Zn's intrinsic ultimate tensile strength (UTS; below 120 MPa) is lower than the benchmark (about 300 MPa) for cardiovascular stent materials, raising concerns about sufficient strength to support the blood vessel. Thus, modifying pure Zn to improve its mechanical properties is an important research topic. In this dissertation project, a new Zn-Li alloy has been developed to retain the outstanding corrosion behavior from Zn while improving the mechanical characteristics and uniform biodegradation once it is implanted into the artery of Sprague-Dawley rats. The completed work includes: Manufactured Zn-Li alloy ingots and sheets via induction vacuum casting, melt spinning, hot rolling deformation, and wire electro discharge machining (wire EDM) technique; processed alloy samples using cross sectioning, mounting, etching and polishing technique; • Characterized alloy ingots, sheets and wires using hardness and tensile test, XRD, BEI imaging, SEM, ESEM, FTIR, ICP-OES and electrochemical test; then selected the optimum composition for in vitro and in vivo experiments; • Mimicked the degradation behavior of the Zn-Li alloy in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF) and explored the relations between corrosion rate, corrosion products and surface morphology with changing compositions; • Explanted the Zn-Li alloy wire in abdominal aorta of rat over 12 months and studied its degradation mechanism, rate of bioabsorption, cytotoxicity and corrosion product migration from histological analysis.

  12. Synthesis, Properties and Applications of Biodegradable Polymers Derived from Diols and Dicarboxylic Acids: From Polyesters to Poly(ester amide)s

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Angélica; Katsarava, Ramaz; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Poly(alkylene dicarboxylate)s constitute a family of biodegradable polymers with increasing interest for both commodity and speciality applications. Most of these polymers can be prepared from biobased diols and dicarboxylic acids such as 1,4-butanediol, succinic acid and carbohydrates. This review provides a current status report concerning synthesis, biodegradation and applications of a series of polymers that cover a wide range of properties, namely, materials from elastomeric to rigid characteristics that are suitable for applications such as hydrogels, soft tissue engineering, drug delivery systems and liquid crystals. Finally, the incorporation of aromatic units and α-amino acids is considered since stiffness of molecular chains and intermolecular interactions can be drastically changed. In fact, poly(ester amide)s derived from naturally occurring amino acids offer great possibilities as biodegradable materials for biomedical applications which are also extensively discussed. PMID:24776758

  13. Biodegradation of nonionic and anionic surfactants in domestic wastewater under simulated sewer conditions.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Jennifer Z; McDonough, Kathleen; McAvoy, Drew; Federle, Thomas W

    2017-02-01

    The ultimate disposition of chemicals discarded down the drain can be substantially impacted by their fate in the sewer, but to date limited data have been published on the biodegradability of chemicals in sewer systems. The recently established OECD 314 guideline (Simulation tests to assess the biodegradability of chemicals discharged in wastewater, 2008) contains a simulation method (314A) for evaluating the biodegradation of chemicals in sewage under simulated sewer conditions. This research used the OECD 314A method to evaluate the rates and pathways of primary and ultimate biodegradation of a suite of 14 C-labeled homologues representing four classes of high volume surfactants including nonionic alkyl ethoxylates (AE), and anionic alkyl ethoxysulfates (AES), alkyl sulfate (AS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS). All the tested homologues exhibited >97 % loss of parent, formation of metabolites, and some level (16-94 %) of CO 2 production after being incubated 96-100 h in raw domestic wastewater. Comparison of C 12 E 3 , C 14 E 3 , and C 16 E 3 showed that the first order biodegradation rate was affected by alkyl chain length with rates ranging from 6.8 h -1 for C 12 E 3 to 0.49 h -1 for C 16 E 3 . Conversely, comparison of C 14 E 1 , C 14 E 3 , and C 14 E 9 showed that the number of ethoxy units did not impact the biodegradation rate. AES and AS degraded quickly with first order kinetic rates of 1.9-3.7 and 41 h -1 respectively. LAS did not exhibit first order decay kinetics and primary degradation was slow. Biodegradation pathways were also determined. This work shows that biodegradation in the sewer has a substantial impact on levels of surfactants and surfactant metabolites that ultimately reach wastewater treatment plants.

  14. Effects of biochars and MWNTs on biodegradation behavior of atrazine by Acinetobacter lwoffii DNS32.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Jiang, Qun; Zhu, Moran; Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-15

    Whether the biodegradation of atrazine by Acinetobacter lwoffii DNS32 can have a difference in the presence of two representative carbon materials (CMs), namely, biochars (BCs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is explored, through investigating the influence of CMs on the biodegradation rate, the viability of bacteria and the expression of atrazine genes in aqueous medium. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), biochars resulted from corn straws (C-BCs) and that made from banana peels (B-BCs) were chosen as the examples. Compared to the control in the absence of C-BCs, B-BCs and MWNTs, the biodegradation efficiencies decrease from 95.3%, 101.8% and 94.8% to 82.6%, 41.8% and 31.1% as the concentrations of these materials increase from 10 to 100mg/L, indicating that BCs have relatively lower toxicity on the biodegradation of atrazine than CNTs, which are agreement with the results of bacterial viability. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of Acinetobacter lwoffii DNS32 cells exposure to CMs at 50mg/L show that the cell membrane can be destroyed at different levels after being exposed to various CMs, suggesting that the damage to the cell membrane induced by CMs is a substantial factor leading to the inactivation of bacteria, further decreasing the degradation rate and efficiency of bacteria. The enhanced bacterial growth and the up-regulation of degradation genes can stimulate the degradation rate to pre-adsorbed atrazine on the CMs. This study suggests that biodegradation of atrazine associated with CMs may depend on the carbon composition, structure and CM concentrations. The innovation point of this report is to compare the effects of biochars and CNTs on the degradation rate and activity of Acinetobacter lwoffii DNS32 and may help to further understand the environment effects of CMs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodegradation and surfactant-mediated biodegradation of diesel fuel by 218 microbial consortia are not correlated to cell surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Szulc, Alicja; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Cyplik, Paweł; Bogacki, Mariusz; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we elucidated the role of cell surface hydrophobicity (microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons method, MATH) and the effect of anionic rhamnolipids and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants on biodegradation of diesel fuel employing 218 microbial consortia isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils. Applied enrichment procedure with floating diesel fuel as a sole carbon source in liquid cultures resulted in consortia of varying biodegradation potential and diametrically different cell surface properties, suggesting that cell surface hydrophobicity is a conserved parameter. Surprisingly, no correlations between cell surface hydrophobicity and biodegradation of diesel fuel were found. Nevertheless, both surfactants altered cell surface hydrophobicity of the consortia in similar manner: increased for the hydrophilic and decreased for the hydrophobic cultures. In addition to this, the surfactants exhibited similar influence on diesel fuel biodegradation: Increase was observed for initially slow-degrading cultures and the opposite for fast degraders. This indicates that in the surfactant-mediated biodegradation, effectiveness of surfactants depends on the specification of microorganisms and not on the type of surfactant. In contrary to what was previously reported for pure strains, cell surface hydrophobicity, as determined by MATH, is not a good descriptor of biodegrading potential for mixed cultures.

  16. Geospatial Hydrochemical and Microbiological Implications on the Occurrence of Crude Oil Biodegradation and Methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, J.; McIntosh, J. C.; Warwick, P.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Technologies that serve as a bridge between renewable energy and fossil fuels are needed to meet growing energy demands and to mitigate climate change. Many reservoirs contain difficult to produce residual and/or heavily biodegraded (i.e., geochemically altered) crude oil, which remains a relatively untapped resource. Production of this residual crude oil via unconventional methods, such as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), has offset some of the decline in conventional oil production. EOR is not efficient enough to recover all of the original oil in place, and some methods are not effective for very heavy crude oils. Stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to convert the residual crude oil to natural gas (i.e., microbial methane) is one promising strategy to "extract" residual and /or heavy crude oil. Although the hydrogeochemical conditions necessary for the occurrence of both crude oil biodegradation and microbial methanogenesis in various reservoirs have been studied, there are still gaps in research. Many hydrogeochemical factors have been researched individually (not as part of a multifactor or lithologically similar system) and little work has assessed the microbiological limitations of both processes. Our goal is to determine the hydrogeochemical and microbiological conditions required for maximum crude oil biodegradation and microbial methanogenesis across a lithologically similar unit. Produced water, oil, gas, and microbial biomass samples were collected from wells completed in the Paleocene—Eocene Wilcox Group in central Louisiana. Initial results indicate potential relationships between the amount of crude oil biodegradation, indicators of microbial methanogenesis, and aqueous geochemistry. For example, produced waters with the lowest salinity had the highest crude oil biodegradation, and wells exhibiting the most microbial methane generation produce waters with hydrogeochemical conditions most fit for methanogenesis to occur. In sampled wells displaying

  17. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  18. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  19. An adsorption-release-biodegradation system for simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Hu; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ren, Rui-Peng; Lv, Yong-Kang

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater was evaluated in a reusable system, which contained macroporous adsorption resin and Alcaligenes faecalis strain WY-01. In the system, up to 6000mg/L phenol could be completely degraded by WY-01; meanwhile, 99.03±3.95% of ammonium was removed from the initial concentration of 384mg/L. This is the first study to show the capability of single strain in simultaneous removal of ammonium and phenol in wastewater containing such high concentrations of phenol. Moreover, the resin was regenerated during the biodegradation process without any additional manipulations, indicating the system was reusable. Furthermore, enzyme assay, gene expression patterns, HPLC-MS and gas chromatography analysis confirmed that phenol biodegradation accompanied with aerobic nitrifier denitrification process. Results imply that the reusable system provides a novel strategy for more efficient biodegradation of phenol and ammonium contained in some particular industrial wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical dispersants: Oil biodegradation friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Rahsepar, Shokouh; Smit, Martijn P J; Murk, Albertinka J; Rijnaarts, Huub H M; Langenhoff, Alette A M

    2016-07-15

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodegradation by alkane and/or aromatic degrading bacterial culture in artificial seawater at different dispersant to oil ratios (DORs). Our results show that dispersant addition did not enhance oil biodegradation. At DOR 1:20, biodegradation was inhibited, especially when only the alkane degrading culture was present. With a combination of cultures, this inhibition was overcome after 10days. This indicates that initial inhibition of oil biodegradation can be overcome when different bacteria are present in the environment. We conclude that the observed inhibition is related to the enhanced dissolution of aromatic compounds into the water, inhibiting the alkane degrading bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical performance of biodegradable films intended for antimicrobial food packaging.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Begonya; Aymerich, Teresa; Monfort, Josep M; Garriga, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial films were prepared by including enterocins to alginate, polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH), and zein films. The physical performance of the films was assessed by measuring color, microstructure (SEM), water vapor permeability (WVP), and tensile properties. All studied biopolymers showed poor WVP and limited tensile properties. PVOH showed the best performance exhibiting the lowest WVP values, higher tensile properties, and flexibility among studied biopolymers. SEM of antimicrobial films showed increased presence of voids and pores as a consequence of enterocin addition. However, changes in microstructure did not disturb WVP of films. Moreover, enterocin-containing films showed slight improvement compared to control films. Addition of enterocins to PVOH films had a plasticizing effect, by reducing its tensile strength and increasing the strain at break. The presence of enterocins had an important effect on tensile properties of zein films by significantly reducing its brittleness. Addition of enterocins, thus, proved not to disturb the physical performance of studied biopolymers. Development of new antimicrobial biodegradable packaging materials may contribute to improving food safety while reducing environmental impact derived from packaging waste. Practical Application: Development of new antimicrobial biodegradable packaging materials may contribute to improving food safety while reducing environmental impact derived from packaging waste.

  2. 25 years monitoring of PAHs and petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Joop; Rietra, René P J J

    2018-05-10

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in sediment and soil has been monitored on seven experimental fields during periods up to 25 years. With this unique dataset, we investigated long-term very slow biodegradation under field conditions. . The data show that three biodegradation rates can be distinguished for PAHs: 1) rapid degradation during the first year, 2) slow degradation during the following 6 years and 3), subject of this paper, a very slow degradation after 7 years until at least 25 years. Beside 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs, also 5- and 6-ring PAHs (aromatic rings) were degraded, all at the same rate during very slow degradation. In the period of very slow degradation, 6% yr -1 of the PAHs present were removed in five fields and 2% yr -1 in two other fields, while in the same period no very slow degradation of TPH could be observed. The remaining petroleum hydrocarbons were high boiling and non-toxic. Using the calculated degradation rates and the independently measured bioavailability of the PAHs (Tenax-method), the PAHs degradation curves of all seven monitored fields could be modelled. Applying the model and data obtained with the Tenax-method for fresh contaminated material, results of long-term biodegradation can be predicted, which can support the use of bioremediation in order to obtain a legally acceptable residual concentration. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. An injection molding process for manufacturing highly porous and interconnected biodegradable polymer matrices for use as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kramschuster, Adam; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2010-02-01

    In this research, injection molding was combined with a novel material combination, supercritical fluid processing, and particulate leaching techniques to produce highly porous and interconnected structures that have the potential to act as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. The foamed structures, molded with polylactide (PLA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) with salt as the particulate, were processed without the aid of organic solvents, which can be detrimental to tissue growth. The pore size in the scaffolds is controlled by salt particulates and interconnectivity is achieved by the co-continuous blending morphology of biodegradable PLA matrix with water-soluble PVOH. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) at the supercritical state is used to serve as a plasticizer, thereby imparting moldability of blends even with an ultra high salt particulate content, and allows the use of low processing temperatures, which are desirable for temperature-sensitive biodegradable polymers. Interconnected pores of approximately 200 microm in diameter and porosities of approximately 75% are reported and discussed.

  4. The abundance and distribution of diamondoids in biodegraded oils from the San Joaquin Valley: Implications for biodegradation of diamondoids in petroleum reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Peters, K.E.; Wang, Y.; Xiang, W.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradability of diamondoids was investigated using a collection of crude oil samples from the San Joaquin Valley, California, that had been biodegraded to varying extent in the reservoir. Our results show that diamondoids are subjected to biodegradation, which is selective as well as stepwise. Adamantanes are generally more susceptible to biodegradation than other diamondoids, such as diamantanes and triamantanes. We report a possible pathway for the microbial degradation of adamantane. This cage hydrocarbon possibly breaks down to a metabolic intermediate through the action of microbes at higher levels of biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs. Microbial alteration has only a minor effect on diamondoid abundance in oil at low levels of biodegradation. Our results suggest that most diamondoids (with the exception of adamantane) are resistant to biodegradation, like the polycyclic terpanes (e.g. C19-C24 tricyclic terpanes, hopanes, gammacerane, oleananes, Ts, Tm, C29 Ts), steranes and diasteranes. Microbial alteration of diamondoids has a negligible impact on the quantification of oil cracking achieved using the diamondoid-biomarker method. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bio-treatment of oily sludge: the contribution of amendment material to the content of target contaminants, and the biodegradation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kriipsalu, Mait; Marques, Marcia; Nammari, Diauddin R; Hogland, William

    2007-09-30

    The objective was to investigate the aerobic biodegradation of oily sludge generated by a flotation-flocculation unit (FFU) of an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant. Four 1m(3) pilot bioreactors with controlled air-flow were filled with FFU sludge mixed with one of the following amendments: sand (M1); matured oil compost (M2); kitchen waste compost (M3) and shredded waste wood (M4). The variables monitored were: pH, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total carbon (C(tot)), total nitrogen (N(tot)) and total phosphorus (P(tot)). The reduction of TPH based on mass balance in M1, M2, M3 and M4 after 373 days of treatment was 62, 51, 74 and 49%; the reduction of PAHs was 97%, +13% (increase), 92 and 88%, respectively. The following mechanisms alone or in combination might explain the results: (i) most organics added with amendments biodegrade faster than most petroleum hydrocarbons, resulting in a relative increase in concentration of these recalcitrant contaminants; (ii) some amendments result in increased amounts of TPH and PAHs to be degraded in the mixture; (iii) sorption-desorption mechanisms involving hydrophobic compounds in the organic matrix reduce bioavailability, biodegradability and eventually extractability; (iv) mixture heterogeneity affecting sampling. Total contaminant mass reduction seems to be a better parameter than concentration to assess degradation efficiency in mixtures with high content of biodegradable amendments.

  6. Bio-based biodegradable film to replace the standard polyethylene cover for silage conservation.

    PubMed

    Borreani, Giorgio; Tabacco, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The research was aimed at studying whether the polyethylene (PE) film currently used to cover maize silage could be replaced with bio-based biodegradable films, and at determining the effects on the fermentative and microbiological quality of the resulting silages in laboratory silo conditions. Biodegradable plastic film made in 2 different formulations, MB1 and MB2, was compared with a conventional 120-μm-thick PE film. A whole maize crop was chopped; ensiled in MB1, MB2, and PE plastic bags, 12.5kg of fresh weight per bag; and opened after 170d of conservation. At silo opening, the microbial and fermentative quality of the silage was analyzed in the uppermost layer (0 to 50mm from the surface) and in the whole mass of the silo. All the silages were well fermented with little differences in fermentative quality between the treatments, although differences in the mold count and aerobic stability were observed in trial 1 for the MB1 silage. These results have shown the possibility of successfully developing a biodegradable cover for silage for up to 6mo after ensiling. The MB2 film allowed a good silage quality to be obtained even in the uppermost part of the silage close to the plastic film up to 170d of conservation, with similar results to those obtained with the PE film. The promising results of this experiment indicate that the development of new degradable materials to cover silage till 6mo after ensiling could be possible. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of proteins involved in biodegradation of crop biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kamau; Trotman, Audrey

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of crop biomass for re-use in crop production is part of the bioregenerative life support concept proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long duration, manned space exploration. The current research was conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the use of electrophoretic analysis as a means of rapidly assaying for constitutive and induced proteins associated with the bacterial degradation of crop residue. The proteins involved in crop biomass biodegradation are either constitutive or induced. As a result, effluent and cultures were examined to investigate the potential of using electrophoretic techniques as a means of monitoring the biodegradation process. Protein concentration for optimum banding patterns was determined using the Bio-Rad Protein Assay kit. Four bacterial soil isolates were obtained from the G.W. Carver research Farm at Tuskegee University and used in the decomposition of components of plant biomass. The culture, WDSt3A was inoculated into 500 mL of either Tryptic Soy Broth or Nutrient Broth. Incubation, with shaking of each flask was for 96 hours at 30 C. The cultures consistently gave unique banding patterns under denaturing protein electrophoresis conditions, The associated extracellular enzymes also yielded characteristic banding patterns over a 14-day period, when native electrophoresis techniques were used to examine effluent from batch culture bioreactors. The current study evaluated sample preparation and staining protocols to determine the ease of use, reproducibility and reliability, as well as the potential for automation.

  8. Accelerating Quinoline Biodegradation and Oxidation with Endogenous Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qi; Yang, Lihui; Li, Rongjie; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-10-06

    Quinoline, a recalcitrant heterocyclic compound, is biodegraded by a series of reactions that begin with mono-oxygenations, which require an intracellular electron donor. Photolysis of quinoline can generate readily biodegradable products, such as oxalate, whose bio-oxidation can generate endogenous electron donors that ought to accelerate quinoline biodegradation and, ultimately, mineralization. To test this hypothesis, we compared three protocols for the biodegradation of quinoline: direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis of 1 h (P1h+B) or 2 h (P2h+B), and biodegradation by adding oxalate commensurate to the amount generated from photolysis of 1 h (O1+B) or 2 h (O2+B). The experimental results show that P1h+B and P2h+B accelerated quinoline biodegradation by 19% and 50%, respectively, compared to B. Protocols O1+B and O2+B also gave 19% and 50% increases, respectively. During quinoline biodegradation, its first intermediate, 2-hydroxyquinoline, accumulated gradually in parallel to quinoline loss but declined once quinoline was depleted. Mono-oxygenation of 2-hydroxyquinoline competed with mono-oxygenation of quinoline, but the inhibition was relieved when extra electrons donors were added from oxalate, whether formed by UV photolysis or added exogenously. Rapid oxalate oxidation stimulated both mono-oxygenations, which accelerated the overall quinoline oxidation that provided the bulk of the electron donor.

  9. Progresses in Polystyrene Biodegradation and Prospects for Solutions to Plastic Waste Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. S.; Brandon, A. M.; Xing, D. F.; Yang, J.; Pang, J. W.; Criddle, C. S.; Ren, N. Q.; Wu, W. M.

    2018-05-01

    Petroleum-based plastic pollution has been a global environmental concern for decades. The obvious contrast between the remarkable durability of the plastics and their short service time leads to the increasing accumulation of plastic wastes in the environment. A cost-effective, sustainable strategy to solve the problem should focus on source control and clean up. Polystyrene (PS) wastes, a recalcitrant plastic polymer, are among the wide spread man-made plastic pollutants. Destruction of PS wastes can be achieved using various abiotic methods such as incineration but such methods release potential air pollution and generation of hazardous by-products. Biodegradation and bioremediation has been proposed for years. Since the 1970’s, the microbial biodegradation of plastics, including PS, has been evaluated with mixed and isolated cultures from different sources such as activated sludge, trash, soil, and manure. To date, PS biodegradation by these microbial cultures is still quite slow. Recently, the larvae of yellow mealworms (Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus) have demonstrated promising PS biodegradation performance. Mealworms have demonstrated the ability to chew and ingest PS foam as food and are capable of degrading and mineralizing PS into CO2 via microbe-dependent activities within the gut in less than the 12-15 hrs gut retention time. These research results have revealed a potential for microbial biodegradation and bioremediation of plastic pollutants.

  10. Improvement of β-TCP/PLLA biodegradable material by surface modification with stearic acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengcang; Chen, Sai; Liu, Ping; Geng, Fang; Li, Wei; Liu, Xinkuan; He, Daihua; Pan, Deng

    2016-05-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer and used widely. Incorporation of beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) into PLLA can enhance its osteoinductive properties. But the interfacial layer between β-TCP particles with PLLA matrix is easy to be destroyed due to inferior interfacial compatibility of the organic/inorganic material. In this work, a method of β-TCP surface modification with stearic acid was investigated to improve the β-TCP/PLLA biomaterial. The effects of surface modification on the β-TCP were investigated by FTIR, XPS, TGA and CA. It was found that the stearic acid reacted with β-TCP and oxhydryl was formed during the surface modification. Hydrophilicity of untreated or modified β-TCP/PLLA composite was increased by the addition of 10 wt.% β-TCP, but it decreased as the addition amount increased from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. Two models were suggested to describe the effect of β-TCP concentration on CA of the composites. Mechanical properties of β-TCP/PLLA composites were tested by bending and tensile tests. Fractures of the composites after mechanical test were observed by SEM. It was found that surface modification with stearic acid improved bending and tensile strengths of the β-TCP/PLLA composites obviously. The SEM results indicated that surface modification decreased the probability of interface debonding between fillers and matrix under load. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Decomposition and biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater using a combination of electron beam irradiation and activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, Norlirubayah; Teo Ming, Ting; Ahmadun, Fakhru'l-Razi; Sobri, Shafreeza

    2010-01-01

    The research conducted a study on decomposition and biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater using a combination of electron beam irradiation and activated sludge process. The purposes of this research are to remove pollutant through decomposition and to enhance the biodegradability of textile wastewater. The wastewater is treated using electron beam irradiation as a pre-treatment before undergo an activated sludge process. As a result, for non-irradiated wastewater, the COD removal was achieved to be between 70% and 79% after activated sludge process. The improvement of COD removal efficiency increased to 94% after irradiation of treated effluent at the dose of 50 kGy. Meanwhile, the BOD(5) removal efficiencies of non-irradiated and irradiated textile wastewater were reported to be between 80 and 87%, and 82 and 99.2%, respectively. The maximum BOD(5) removal efficiency was achieved at day 1 (HRT 5 days) of the process of an irradiated textile wastewater which is 99.2%. The biodegradability ratio of non-irradiated wastewater was reported to be between 0.34 and 0.61, while the value of biodegradability ratio of an irradiated wastewater increased to be between 0.87 and 0.96. The biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater is increased with increasing the doses. Therefore, an electron beam radiation holds a greatest application of removing pollutants and also on enhancing the biodegradability of textile wastewater.

  12. Formation of biodegradated polymers as components of future composite materials on the basis of shape memory alloy of medical appointment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasakina, E. O.; Baikin, A. S.; Sergiyenko, K. V.; Kaplan, M. A.; Konushkin, S. V.; Yakubov, A. D.; Izvin, A. V.; Sudarchikova, M. A.; Sevost’yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.

    2018-04-01

    The processes of formation of polymer polylactide or polyglycylidactide films for the subsequent creation of a layered composite with a biodegradable layer on the basis of a nickel-free shape memory alloy TiNbTaZr are studied. The structure of the samples was determined using an SEM. The correspondence of morphology of surfaces of and the substrate itself is noted. High adhesion of the polymer to the future basis of the developed composite material is supposed. The formed films is homogeneous and amorphous throughout the polymer volume. By varying the volume of solutions, it is possible to obtain films of a given thickness for any type of polymer, its molecular weight, and the solution concentration of the polymer in chloroform. Poly (glycolide-lactide) should be more plastic than polylactide.

  13. Residual toxicity after biodegradation: interactions among benzene, toluene, and chloroform.

    PubMed

    da Silva Nunes-Halldorson, Vânia; Steiner, Robert L; Smith, Geoffrey B

    2004-02-01

    A microbial enrichment originating from a pristine aquifer was found to aerobically biodegrade benzene and toluene, but not chloroform. This enrichment culture was used to study changes in pollutant toxicity as affected by biodegradative activity. Two assays for toxicity were used: (1) a 48-h acute toxicity test using the freshwater invertebrate Ceriodaphnia dubia and (2) microbial biodegradation activity as affected by the presence of mixed pollutants. At 20-ppm concentrations, toluene was significantly more toxic (99% mortality) to C. dubia than benzene (48% mortality) or chloroform (40% mortality). Also at 20-ppm concentrations, but before biodegradation, toluene was significantly more toxic (88% mortality) to C. dubia than benzene (33% mortality). After biodegradation of 98% of toluene and benzene, significant residual toxicity still remained in the bacterial supernatant: toluene-degraded supernatant caused 33% mortality in C. dubia and benzene-degraded supernatant caused 24% mortality. In the second toxicity assay, examining the effect of mixed pollutants on biodegradation activity, the presence of benzene slowed the biodegradation of toluene, but chloroform had no effect on either benzene or toluene biodegradation. Results indicate that significant toxicity remain after biodegradation and that halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons may have little or no effect on aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation at sites impacted by mixed pollutants.

  14. Wood biodegradation in laboratory-scale landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M; De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this research was to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of major wood products in municipal waste by measuring methane yields, decay rates, the extent of carbohydrate decomposition, carbon storage, and leachate toxicity. Tests were conducted in triplicate 8 L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane yields for red oak, eucalyptus, spruce, radiata pine, plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB) from hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW), particleboard (PB) and medium-density fiberboard (MDF) were 32.5, 0, 7.5, 0.5, 6.3, 84.5, 0, 5.6, and 4.6 mL CH(4) dry g(-1), respectively. The red oak, a HW, exhibited greater decomposition than either SW (spruce and radiata), a trend that was also measured for the OSB-HW relative to OSB-SW. However, the eucalyptus (HW) exhibited toxicity. Thus, wood species have unique methane yields that should be considered in the development of national inventories of methane production and carbon storage. The current assumption of uniform biodegradability is not appropriate. The ammonia release from urea formaldehyde as present in PB and MDF could contribute to ammonia in landfill leachate. Using the extent of carbon conversion measured in this research, 0-19.9%, predicted methane production from a wood mixture using the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change waste model is only 7.9% of that predicted using the 50% carbon conversion default.

  15. Free-Standing Biodegradable Poly(lactic acid) Nanosheet for Sealing Operations in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yosuke; Kabata, Koki; Kinoshita, Manabu; Saitoh, Daizoh; Takeoka, Shinji

    2009-11-20

    A free-standing biodegradable nanosheet composed of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was shown to have excellent sealing efficacy for a gastric incision as a novel wound dressing material that did not require adhesive agents, and the PLLA nanosheet-induced wound repair showed neither scars nor tissue adhesion. This material may, therefore, be an ideal alternative to conventional tissue repairing procedures using suture/ligation in surgery. Copyright © 2009 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Environmental fate and effect of biodegradable electro-spun scaffolds (biomaterial)-a case study.

    PubMed

    Irizar, A; Amorim, M J B; Fuller, K P; Zeugolis, D I; Scott-Fordsmand, J J

    2018-04-30

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) based medical devices are increasingly produced and thus, their presence in the environment is likely to increase. The present study analysed the biodegradation of PCL electro-spun scaffolds (alone) and PCL electro-spun scaffolds coated with human recombinant (hR) collagen and Bovine Achilles tendon (BAT) collagen in sewage sludge and in soil. Additionally, an eco-toxicological test with the model organism Enchytraeus crypticus was performed to assess environmental hazard of the produced materials in soils. The electro-spun scaffolds were exposed to activated sludge and three different soils for various time periods (0-7-14-21-28-56-180 days); subsequently the degradation was determined by weight loss and microscopical analysis. Although no toxicity occurred in terms of Enchytraeus crypticus reproduction, our data indicate that biodegradation was dependent on the coating of the material and exposure condition. Further, only partial PCL decomposition was possible in sewage treatment plants. Collectively, these data indicate that electro-spun PCL scaffolds are transferred to amended soils.

  17. Analysis, toxicity, occurrence and biodegradation of nonylphenol isomers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Gan, Jay

    2014-12-01

    Over the last two decades, nonylphenols (NPs) have become to be known as a priority hazardous substance due primarily to its estrogenicity and ubiquitous occurrence in the environment. Nonylphenols are commonly treated as a single compound in the evaluation of their environmental occurrence, fate and transport, treatment or toxicity. However, technical nonylphenols (tNPs) are in fact a mixture of more than 100 isomers and congeners. Recent studies showed that some of these isomers behaved significantly differently in occurrence, estrogenicity and biodegradability. The most estrogenic isomer was about 2 to 4 times more active than tNP. Moreover, the half lives of the most recalcitrant isomers were about 3 to 4 times as long as those of readily-biodegradable isomers. Negligence of NP's isomer specificity may result in inaccurate assessment of its ecological and health effects. In this review, we summarized the recent publications on the analysis, occurrence, toxicity and biodegradation of NP at the isomer level and highlighted future research needs to improve our understanding of isomer-specificity of NP. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Senior Projects in Materials Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Richard

    1999-01-01

    A program in a materials/prototyping lab provided the structure for a year-long research activity. Students could test physical properties of a specific material or explore the use of a material in a new application. (Author/JOW)

  19. Nanocellulosic materials as bioinks for 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Piras, Carmen C; Fernández-Prieto, Susana; De Borggraeve, Wim M

    2017-09-26

    3D bioprinting is a new developing technology with lots of promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Being biocompatible, biodegradable, renewable and cost-effective, cellulosic nanomaterials have recently captured the attention of researchers due to their applicability as inks for 3D bioprinting. Although a number of cellulose-based bioinks have been reported, the potential of cellulose nanofibrils and nanocrystals has not been fully explored yet. This minireview aims at highlighting the use of nanocellulosic materials for 3D bioprinting as an emerging, promising, new research field.

  20. Biodegradation of organic sulfur compounds in crude oils from Oman

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Koopmans, M.P.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1996-10-01

    Five closely related crude oils from Oman, showing various degrees of biodegradation ranging from non-biodegraded to severely biodegraded, were quantitatively investigated for free and sulfur-bound hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbons sequestered in the alkylsulfide fraction and the polar fraction were analysed after Raney Ni desulfurisation and subsequent hydrogenation. With increasing degree of biodegradation, pristane (Pr), phytane (Ph) and a series of mid-chain methyl alkanes are enriched relative to the n-alkanes, as evidenced by increased Pr/n-C{sub 17} and Ph/n-C{sub 18} ratios. In the severely biodegraded oil no free n-alkanes, mid-chain alkanes or isoprenoid alkanes could be detected. Sterane and hopane distributions, however, remain unchangedmore » throughout the biodegradation series. Hydrocarbons sequestered in the alkylsulfide fraction (i.e. n-alkanes, mid-chain methyl alkanes, Pr and Ph) are biodegraded at lower rates than the corresponding hydrocarbons in the saturated hydrocarbon fraction. Similar hydrocarbons sequestered in the polar fraction are biodegraded at even lower rates. These results suggest that hydrocarbons bound by a higher amount of sulfur links are biodegraded at a lower rate.« less

  1. Advanced bredigite-containing magnesium-matrix composites for biodegradable bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Sina Naddaf; Huan, Zhiguang; Mol, Arjan; Leeflang, Sander; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The present research was aimed at developing magnesium-matrix composites that could allow effective control over their physiochemical and mechanical responses when in contact with physiological solutions. A biodegradable, bioactive ceramic - bredigite was chosen as the reinforcing phase in the composites, based on the hypothesis that the silicon- and magnesium-containing ceramic could protect magnesium from fast corrosion and at the same time stimulate cell proliferation. Methods to prepare composites with integrated microstructures - a prerequisite to achieve controlled biodegradation were developed. A systematic experimental approach was taken in order to elucidate the in vitro biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of the composites. It was found that the composites with 20-40% homogenously dispersed bredigite particles, prepared from powders, could indeed significantly decrease the degradation rate of magnesium by up to 24 times. Slow degradation of the composites resulted in the retention of the mechanical integrity of the composites within the strength range of cortical bone after 12days of immersion in a cell culture medium. Cell attachment, cytotoxicity and bioactivity tests confirmed the stimulatory effects of bredigite embedded in the composites on the attachment, viability and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. Thus, the multiple benefits of adding bredigite to magnesium in enhancing degradation behavior, mechanical properties, biocompatibility and bioactivity were obtained. The results from this research showed the excellent potential of the bredigite-containing composites for bone implant applications, thus warranting further in vitro and in vivo research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodegradation studies of selected hydrocarbons from diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Sepic, E; Trier, C; Leskovsek, H

    1996-10-01

    In-vitro biodegradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons present in diesel oil by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Texaco was studied in an aqueous medium. Small aliquots of diesel oil and its aromatic fraction were incubated aerobically for periods of up to seven months and analysed by GC-MS. Biotic losses proved to be greater for aliphatic than aromatic compounds. Most biodegradation occurred within the first 20 d of incubation. The most rapid biodegradation, up to 65% in 8 d, was observed for n-alkanes (C14-C18). The same compounds were also shown to be less affected by abiotic losses. Biodegradation of n-alkanes from diesel oil and diesel oil itself showed first order kinetics for the initial incubation period. Aromatic compounds proved to be resistant to biodegradation and only phenanthrene had been degraded (30%) within 6 months.

  3. Determination of the Activation Energy of the Enzymatic Biodegradation Process in Microfabricated Polyhydroxyalkanoate Thin Films Using In-Situ, Real Time Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Clinton; Latuga, Brian M.; Delfaus, Stephen; Devore, Thomas C.; Augustine, Brian H.; Hughes, W. Christopher; Warne, Paul G.

    2003-11-01

    Using the liquid cell capability of the atomic force microscope (AFM), we report the determination of the activation energy of the biodegradation process of the enzymatic biodegradation of poly 3-hydroxybutyrate / poly 3-hydroxyvalerate [P(3HB-HV)] thin films. We have prepared P(3HB-3HV) copolymer microstructures by the selective dewetting of soft lithographically patterned gold substrates with features sizes down to 10 mm. These have been then used as an internal height standard to measure the volume of material as a function of biodegradation time. Biodegradation is measured in-situ and real time using contact mode AFM in an enzymatic solution produced from Streptomyces sp. bacteria. The temperature dependent biodegradation has been measured over a temperature range from 23oC to 40oC. We will discuss the calculation of the activation energy of this process as well as a physical model to describe three distinct regions in the biodegradation process that have been observed.

  4. Degradation of Oxo-Biodegradable Plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Paes, Sirlaine Albino; Nunes, Mateus Dias; da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV) or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W) plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate. PMID:23967057

  5. Degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Paes, Sirlaine Albino; Nunes, Mateus Dias; da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV) or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W) plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate.

  6. The effect of biodegradation on gammacerane in crude oils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiping

    2017-08-01

    Gammacerane is one of the major biomarkers widely used in depositional environment diagnosis, oil family classification, and oil-source correlation. It is generally accepted that gammacerane is more resistant to biodegradation than regular hopanes. However, whether it is biodegradable as well has not been reported in literatures. In order to investigate the effect of biodegradation on gammacerane in crude oils, 69 core samples from two biodegraded petroleum accumulations were geochemically characterized by quantitative GC-MS analysis. All samples are originated from lacustrine source rocks in China and have experienced at least level 8 degree of biodegradation on the scale of Peters and Moldowan (The biomarker guide: interpreting molecular fossils in petroleum and ancient sediments, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1993). Both case histories showed the concentration of gammacerane decrease with increasing severity of biodegradation, indicating the destruction of gammacerane by biodegradation. A whole series of 25-norhopanes paralleling the 17α,21β-hopanes (up to C 34 ), together with C 28 18-α-25,30-bisnorneohopane, C 29 25-nordiahopane and C 29 25-norgammacerane, is found in the Liaohe sample suite but C 33 , C 34 25-norhopane and 25-norgammacerane are almost undetectable in the Junggar case. The gammacerane in the Liaohe case study appear to be altered simultaneously with hopanes, although the rate of gammacerane alteration is slower. Its susceptibility to biodegradation is similar to 18α(H)-22,29,30-trisnorneohopane (Ts) and 17α(H)-22,29,30-trisnorhopane (Tm) but more vulnerable than 18α-30-norneohopane (C 29 Ts), 15α-methyl-17α(H)-27-norhopane (C 30 diahopane) and pregnanes. The gammacerane in the Junggar oils appear to be less biodegradable than the Liaohe case history. It was altered simultaneously with pregnanes and C 29 Ts but faster than C 30 diahopane. The present data suggest that biodegradation sequence is not universal since the relative rates

  7. Materials Research in Microgravity 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, R. (Editor); Bojarevis, V. (Editor); Downey, J.; Henein, H. (Editor); Matson, D.; Seidel, A. (Editor); Voss, D. (Editor); SanSoucie, M. (Compiler)

    2012-01-01

    Reducing gravitational effects such as thermal and solutal buoyancy enables investigation of a large range of different phenomena in materials science. The Symposium on Materials Research in Microgravity involved 6 sessions composed of 39 presentations and 14 posters with contributions from more than 14 countries. The sessions concentrated on four different categories of topics related to ongoing reduced-gravity research. Highlights from this symposium will be featured in the September 2012 issue of JOM. The TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division, Process Technology and Modeling Committee and Solidification Committee sponsored the symposium.

  8. Biodegradable Polymers Influence the Effect of Atorvastatin on Human Coronary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohbach, Anne; Begunk, Robert; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan B.; Sternberg, Katrin; Busch, Raila

    2016-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have reduced in-stent-restenosis drastically. Yet, the stent surface material directly interacts with cascades of biological processes leading to an activation of cellular defense mechanisms. To prevent adverse clinical implications, to date almost every patient with a coronary artery disease is treated with statins. Besides their clinical benefit, statins exert a number of pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells (ECs). Since maintenance of EC function and reduction of uncontrolled smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation represents a challenge for new generation DES, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on human coronary artery cells grown on biodegradable polymers. Our results show a cell type-dependent effect of ATOR on ECs and SMCs. We observed polymer-dependent changes in IC50 values and an altered ATOR-uptake leading to an attenuation of statin-mediated effects on SMC growth. We conclude that the selected biodegradable polymers negatively influence the anti-proliferative effect of ATOR on SMCs. Hence, the process of developing new polymers for DES coating should involve the characterization of material-related changes in mechanisms of drug actions. PMID:26805825

  9. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  10. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  11. Fatigue and quasi-static mechanical behavior of bio-degradable porous biomaterials based on magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Ahmadi, S M; Lietaert, K; Tümer, N; Li, Y; Amin Yavari, S; Zadpoor, A A

    2018-07-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have the intrinsic capability of degrading over time in vivo without leaving toxic degradation products. They are therefore suitable for use as biodegradable scaffolds that are replaced by the regenerated tissues. One of the main concerns for such applications, particularly in load-bearing areas, is the sufficient mechanical integrity of the scaffold before sufficient volumes of de novo tissue is generated. In the majority of the previous studies on the effects of biodegradation on the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials, the change in the elastic modulus has been studied. In this study, variations in the static and fatigue mechanical behavior of porous structures made of two different Mg alloys (AZ63 and M2) over different dissolution times ( 6, 12, and 24 h) have been investigated. The results showed an increase in the mechanical properties obtained from stress-strain curve (elastic modulus, yield stress, plateau stress, and energy absorption) after 6-12 h and a sharp decrease after 24 h. The initial increase in the mechanical properties may be attributed to the accumulation of corrosion products in the pores of the porous structure before degradation has considerably proceeded. The effects of mineral deposition was more pronounced for the elastic modulus as compared to other mechanical properties. That may be due to insufficient integration of the deposited particles in the structure of the magnesium alloys. While the bonding of the parts being combined in a composite-like material is of great importance in determining its yield stress, the effects of bonding strength of both parts is much lower in determining the elastic modulus. The results of the current study also showed that the dissolution rates of the studied Mg alloys were too high for direct use in human body. © 2018 Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1798-1811, 2018. © 2018

  12. Microbial colonization and degradation of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic bags in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Nauendorf, Alice; Krause, Stefan; Bigalke, Nikolaus K; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Haeckel, Matthias; Wahl, Martin; Treude, Tina

    2016-02-15

    To date, the longevity of plastic litter at the sea floor is poorly constrained. The present study compares colonization and biodegradation of plastic bags by aerobic and anaerobic benthic microbes in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic carrier bags were incubated in natural oxic and anoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) for 98 days. Analyses included (1) microbial colonization rates on the bags, (2) examination of the surface structure, wettability, and chemistry, and (3) mass loss of the samples during incubation. On average, biodegradable plastic bags were colonized five times higher by aerobic and eight times higher by anaerobic microbes than polyethylene bags. Both types of bags showed no sign of biodegradation during this study. Therefore, marine sediment in temperate coastal zones may represent a long-term sink for plastic litter and also supposedly compostable material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MSRR Rack Materials Science Research Rack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRR is managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The MSRR facility subsystems were manufactured by Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) and integrated with the ESA/EADS-Astrium developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) at the MSFC Space Station Integration and Test Facility (SSITF) as part of the Systems Development Operations Support (SDOS) contract. MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U. S. Destiny Laboratory Module on the ISS. Materials science is an integral part of developing new, safer, stronger, more durable materials for use throughout everyday life. The goal of studying materials processing in space is to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved, and how they differ in the microgravity environment of space. To that end, the MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment of the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials

  14. Bacterial biodegradation and bioconversion of industrial lignocellulosic streams.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Stephanie L; Pawlak, Joel; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulose is a term for plant materials that are composed of matrices of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignocellulose is a renewable feedstock for many industries. Lignocellulosic materials are used for the production of paper, fuels, and chemicals. Typically, industry focuses on transforming the polysaccharides present in lignocellulose into products resulting in the incomplete use of this resource. The materials that are not completely used make up the underutilized streams of materials that contain cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. These underutilized streams have potential for conversion into valuable products. Treatment of these lignocellulosic streams with bacteria, which specifically degrade lignocellulose through the action of enzymes, offers a low-energy and low-cost method for biodegradation and bioconversion. This review describes lignocellulosic streams and summarizes different aspects of biological treatments including the bacteria isolated from lignocellulose-containing environments and enzymes which may be used for bioconversion. The chemicals produced during bioconversion can be used for a variety of products including adhesives, plastics, resins, food additives, and petrochemical replacements.

  15. Numerical study on injection parameters optimization of thin wall and biodegradable polymers parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C.; Mendes, A.; Carreira, P.; Mateus, A.; Malça, C.

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the molds industry searches new markets, with diversified and added value products. The concept associated to the production of thin walled and biodegradable parts mostly manufactured by injection process has assumed a relevant importance due to environmental and economic factors. The growth of a global consciousness about the harmful effects of the conventional polymers in our life quality associated with the legislation imposed, become key factors for the choice of a particular product by the consumer. The target of this work is to provide an integrated solution for the injection of parts with thin walls and manufactured using biodegradable materials. This integrated solution includes the design and manufacture processes of the mold as well as to find the optimum values for the injection parameters in order to become the process effective and competitive. For this, the Moldflow software was used. It was demonstrated that this computational tool provides an effective responsiveness and it can constitute an important tool in supporting the injection molding of thin-walled and biodegradable parts.

  16. Laser transmission welding of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and biodegradable poly(ethylene terephthalate) - Based blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, Annamaria; Veniali, Francesco; Barletta, Massimiliano; Tagliaferri, Vincenzo; Vesco, Silvia

    2017-03-01

    Joining of Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) PET and its biodegradable derivatives is of high relevance to ensure good productive rate, low cost and operational safety for fabrication of medical and electronic devices, sport equipments as well as for manufacturing of food and drug packaging solutions. In the present investigation, granules of PET and PETs modified by organic additives, which promote biodegradation of the polymeric chains, were prepared by extrusion compounding. The achieved granules were subsequently re-extruded to shape thin (330 μm) flat sheets. Substrates cut from these sheets were joined by Laser Transmission Welding (LTW) with a continuous wave High Power Diode Laser (cw-HPDL). First, based on a qualitative evaluation of the welded joints, the most suitable operational windows for PETs laser joining were identified. Second, characterization of the mechanical properties of the welded joints was performed by tensile tests. Accordingly, Young's modulus of PET and biodegradable PET blends was studied by Takayanagi's model and, based on the experimental results, a novel predicting analytical model derived from the mixture rule was developed. Lastly, material degradation of the polymeric joints was evaluated by FT-IR analysis, thus allowing to identify the main routes to thermal degradation of PET and, especially, of biodegradable PET blends during laser processing.

  17. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon cuts used for diesel oil formulation.

    PubMed

    Penet, Sophie; Marchal, Rémy; Sghir, Abdelghani; Monot, Frédéric

    2004-11-01

    The biodegradability of various types of diesel oil (DO), such as straight-run DO, light-cycle DO, hydrocracking DO, Fischer-Tropsch DO and commercial DO, was investigated in biodegradation tests performed in closed-batch systems using two microflorae. The first microflora was an activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant as commonly used in biodegradability tests of commercial products and the second was a microflora from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil with possible specific capacities for hydrocarbon degradation. Kinetics of CO(2) production and extent of DO biodegradation were obtained by chromatographic procedures. Under optimised conditions, the polluted-soil microflora was found to extensively degrade all the DO types tested, the degradation efficiencies being higher than 88%. For all the DOs tested, the biodegradation capacities of the soil microflora were significantly higher than those of the activated sludge. Using both microflora, the extent of biodegradation was highly dependent upon the type of DO used, especially its hydrocarbon composition. Linear alkanes were completely degraded in each test, whereas identifiable branched alkanes such as farnesane, pristane or phytane were degraded to variable extents. Among the aromatics, substituted mono-aromatics were also variably biodegraded.

  18. Biodegradation of polyethylene by the thermophilic bacterium Brevibacillus borstelensis.

    PubMed

    Hadad, D; Geresh, S; Sivan, A

    2005-01-01

    To select a polyethylene-degrading micro-organism and to study the factors affecting its biodegrading activity. A thermophilic bacterium Brevibaccillus borstelensis strain 707 (isolated from soil) utilized branched low-density polyethylene as the sole carbon source and degraded it. Incubation of polyethylene with B. borstelensis (30 days, 50 degrees C) reduced its gravimetric and molecular weights by 11 and 30% respectively. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded polyethylene in the presence of mannitol. Biodegradation of u.v. photo-oxidized polyethylene increased with increasing irradiation time. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) analysis of photo-oxidized polyethylene revealed a reduction in carbonyl groups after incubation with the bacteria. This study demonstrates that polyethylene--considered to be inert--can be biodegraded if the right microbial strain is isolated. Enrichment culture methods were effective for isolating a thermophilic bacterium capable of utilizing polyethylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Maximal biodegradation was obtained in combination with photo-oxidation, which showed that carbonyl residues formed by photo-oxidation play a role in biodegradation. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded the CH2 backbone of nonirradiated polyethylene. Biodegradation of polyethylene by a single bacterial strain contributes to our understanding of the process and the factors affecting polyethylene biodegradation.

  19. How UV photolysis accelerates the biodegradation and mineralization of sulfadiazine (SD).

    PubMed

    Pan, Shihui; Yan, Ning; Liu, Xinyue; Wang, Wenbing; Zhang, Yongming; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Sulfadiazine (SD), one of broad-spectrum antibiotics, exhibits limited biodegradation in wastewater treatment due to its chemical structure, which requires initial mono-oxygenation reactions to initiate its biodegradation. Intimately coupling UV photolysis with biodegradation, realized with the internal loop photobiodegradation reactor, accelerated SD biodegradation and mineralization by 35 and 71 %, respectively. The main organic products from photolysis were 2-aminopyrimidine (2-AP), p-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ABS), and aniline (An), and an SD-photolysis pathway could be identified using C, N, and S balances. Adding An or ABS (but not 2-AP) into the SD solution during biodegradation experiments (no UV photolysis) gave SD removal and mineralization rates similar to intimately coupled photolysis and biodegradation. An SD biodegradation pathway, based on a diverse set of the experimental results, explains how the mineralization of ABS and An (but not 2-AP) provided internal electron carriers that accelerated the initial mono-oxygenation reactions of SD biodegradation. Thus, multiple lines of evidence support that the mechanism by which intimately coupled photolysis and biodegradation accelerated SD removal and mineralization was through producing co-substrates whose oxidation produced electron equivalents that stimulated the initial mono-oxygenation reactions for SD biodegradation.

  20. Strategic Research Directions In Microgravity Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.; Wargo, Michael J.; Marzwell, Neville L.; Sanders, Gerald; Schlagheck, Ron; Semmes, Ed; Bassler, Julie; Cook, Beth

    2004-01-01

    The Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) is moving aggressively to align programs, projects, and products with the vision for space exploration. Research in advanced materials is a critical element in meeting exploration goals. Research in low gravity materials science in OBPR is being focused on top priority needs in support of exploration: 1) Space Radiation Shielding; 2) In Situ Resource Utilization; 3) In Situ Fabrication and Repair; 4) Materials Science for Spacecraft and Propulsion Systems; 5) Materials Science for Advanced Life Support Systems. Roles and responsibilities in low gravity materials research for exploration between OBPR and the Office of Exploration Systems are evolving.

  1. SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING SOLUTIONS BASED ON BIODEGRADABLE PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Packaging is one of the largest market segments for the polymer industry. Food packaging industry is currently dominated by crude oil-derived, non-biodegradable polyolefin and polyesters. Due to their environmental persistence (non-biodegradability) leading to accumulatio...

  2. Cornell Center for Materials Research - An NSF MRSEC

    Science.gov Websites

    Cornell Center for Materials Research Cornell Center for Materials Research | An NSF MRSEC Search Research Atomic Membranes for 3D Systems Structured Materials for Strong Light-Matter Interactions Mechanisms, Materials, and Devices for Spin Manipulation Seed Projects - Exploratory Research Acknowledging

  3. Characterization of biodegradation intermediates of nonionic surfactants by MALDI-MS. 2. Oxidative biodegradation profiles of uniform octylphenol polyethoxylate in 18O-labeled water.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroaki; Shibata, Atsushi; Wang, Yang; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the characterization of the biodegradation intermediates of octylphenol octaethoxylate (OP(8)EO) by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The biodegradation test study was carried out in a pure culture (Pseudomonas putida S-5) under aerobic conditions using OP(8)EO as the sole carbon source and (18)O-labeled water as an incubation medium. In the MALDI-MS spectra of biodegraded samples, a series of OP(n)EO molecules with n = 2-8 EO units and their corresponding carboxylic acid products (OP(n)EC) were observed. The use of purified OP(8)EO enabled one to distinguish the shortened OPEO molecules as biodegradation intermediates. Furthermore, the formation of OP(8)EC (the oxidized product of OP(8)EO) supported the notion that terminal oxidation is a step in the biodegradation process. When biodegradation study was carried out in (18)O-labeled water, incorporation of (18)O atoms into the carboxyl group was observed for OPEC, while no incorporation was observed for the shortened OPEO products. These results could provide some rationale to the biodegradation mechanism of alkylphenol polyethoxylates.

  4. Conventional and improved cytotoxicity test methods of newly developed biodegradable magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Yu-Chan; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Kim, Young-Yul

    2015-11-01

    Unique biodegradable property of magnesium has spawned countless studies to develop ideal biodegradable orthopedic implant materials in the last decade. However, due to the rapid pH change and extensive amount of hydrogen gas generated during biocorrosion, it is extremely difficult to determine the accurate cytotoxicity of newly developed magnesium alloys using the existing methods. Herein, we report a new method to accurately determine the cytotoxicity of magnesium alloys with varying corrosion rate while taking in-vivo condition into the consideration. For conventional method, extract quantities of each metal ion were determined using ICP-MS and the result showed that the cytotoxicity due to pH change caused by corrosion affected the cell viability rather than the intrinsic cytotoxicity of magnesium alloy. In physiological environment, pH is regulated and adjusted within normal pH (˜7.4) range by homeostasis. Two new methods using pH buffered extracts were proposed and performed to show that environmental buffering effect of pH, dilution of the extract, and the regulation of eluate surface area must be taken into consideration for accurate cytotoxicity measurement of biodegradable magnesium alloys.

  5. SUMMARY OF WORKSHOP ON BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE FEBRUARY 1-3, 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    A workshop on biodegradation of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) contaminated soils and groundwater was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 1-2, 2000, and was sponsored by the USEPA's NRMRL and the American Petroleum Institute. Researchers in academia, industry, and government were ...

  6. Biodegradation of coal-related model compounds. [C. versicolor

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Campbell, J.A.; Stewart, D.L.; McCulloch, M.

    1988-01-01

    The details of the specific reactions of lignin biodegradation, and the biochemistry involved, have been primarily based on the use of low molecular weight compounds representing specific substructures rather than the complex, polymeric lignin material. The authors have studied the reactions of model compounds having coal-related functionalities (ester linkages, ether linkages, PAH) with the intact organisms, cell-free filtrate, and cell-free enzyme of C. versicolor to better understand the process of biosolubilization. Many of the degradation products have been identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results are discussed.

  7. Biodegradation of Phenolic Contaminants: Current Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Wu, Qi; Ma, Aijin

    2018-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, a class of toxic pollutants in water, come mainly from a variety of industrial processes. The industrial application for biodegradation has become an important topic in recent years. In this review, we discuss the present situation, properties, and pollution characteristics of phenolic contaminants, factors affecting the degradation of phenols, microbial species and biodegradation methods. The challenges and opportunities in developing biodegradation processes of phenolic contaminants are also discussed.

  8. Fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a biodegradable battery for transient electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edupuganti, Vineet; Solanki, Raj

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally, emphasis has been placed on durable, long-lasting electronics. However, electronics that are meant to intentionally degrade over time can actually have significant practical applications. Biodegradable, or transient, electronics would open up opportunities in the field of medical implants, where the need for surgical removal of devices could be eliminated. Environmental sensors and, eventually, consumer electronics would also greatly benefit from this technology. An essential component of transient electronics is the battery, which serves as a biodegradable power source. This work involves the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a magnesium-based biodegradable battery. Galvanostatic discharge tests show that an anode material of magnesium alloy AZ31 extends battery lifetime by over six times, as compared to pure magnesium. With AZ31, the maximum power and capacity of the fabricated device are 67 μW and 5.2 mAh, respectively, though the anode area is just 0.8 cm2. The development of an equivalent circuit model provided insight into the battery's behavior by extracting fitting parameters from experimental data. The model can accurately simulate device behavior, taking into account its intentional degradation. The size of the device and the power it produces are in accordance with typical levels for low-power transient systems.

  9. "Rational" management of dichlorophenols biodegradation by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2013-01-01

    The microalga Scenedesmus obliquus exhibited the ability to biodegrade dichlorophenols (dcps) under specific autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. According to their biodegradability, the dichlorophenols used can be separated into three distinct groups. Group I (2,4-dcp and 2,6 dcp - no meta-substitution) consisted of quite easily degraded dichlorophenols, since both chloride substituents are in less energetically demanding positions. Group II (2,3-dcp, 2,5-dcp and 3,4-dcp - one meta-chloride) was less susceptible to biodegradation, since one of the two substituents, the meta one, required higher energy for C-Cl-bond cleavage. Group III (3,5-dcp - two meta-chlorides) could not be biodegraded, since both chlorides possessed the most energy demanding positions. In general, when the dcp-toxicity exceeded a certain threshold, the microalga increased the energy offered for biodegradation and decreased the energy invested for biomass production. As a result, the biodegradation per cell volume of group II (higher toxicity) was higher, than group I (lower toxicity) and the biodegradation of dichlorophenols (higher toxicity) was higher than the corresponding monochlorophenols (lower toxicity). The participation of the photosynthetic apparatus and the respiratory mechanism of microalga to biodegrade the group I and the group II, highlighted different bioenergetic strategies for optimal management of the balance between dcp-toxicity, dcp-biodegradability and culture growth. Additionally, we took into consideration the possibility that the intermediates of each dcp-biodegradation pathway could influence differently the whole biodegradation procedures. For this reason, we tested all possible combinations of phenolic intermediates to check cometabolic interactions. The present contribution bring out the possibility of microalgae to operate as "smart" bioenergetic "machines", that have the ability to continuously "calculate" the energy reserves and "use" the most energetically

  10. Adsorption-synergic biodegradation of diesel oil in synthetic seawater by acclimated strains immobilized on multifunctional materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Xuejiang; Liu, Mian; Bu, Yunjie; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Jie; Zhao, Jianfu

    2015-03-15

    Using enrichment culture technique, three isolates marked as ODB-1, ODB-2 and ODB-3, were selected from oil contaminated seawater. 16S rDNA gene sequencing indicated that ODB-1 affiliated with Pseudomonas sp. while ODB-2 and ODB-3 affiliated with Brevundimonas sp. Subsequently, the bacterial cells were immobilized on the surface of expanded graphite (EG), expanded perlite (EP) and bamboo charcoal (BC). Among the three isolates, ODB-1 showed a strong binding to the bio-carriers through extracellular polysaccharides, while ODB-2 and ODB-3 made the adhesion to bio-carrier through direct physical adsorption. The immobilized bacteria exhibited good salinity tolerance compared with the planktonic bacteria. Their total diesel oil removal rates were more than 85% after 6 days' incubation. Adsorption-biodegradation process played an important role in the oil-pollution remediation. EG-bacteria system was treated as a promising remediation method, which achieved nearly 100% removal of diesel oil. Thereinto, over 83% removal of diesel oil owed to biodegradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative evaluation of cyanide removal by adsorption, biodegradation, and simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB) process using Bacillus cereus and almond shell.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Naveen; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Mondal, Prasenji

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the removal efficiency of cyanide from contaminated water by adsorption, biodegradation and simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB) process individually in a batch reactor. Adsorption was achieved by using almond shell granules and biodegradation was conducted with suspended cultures of Bacillus cereus, whereas SAB process was carried out using Bacillus cereus and almond shell in a batch reactor. The effect of agitation time, pH, and initial cyanide concentration on the % removal of cyanide has been discussed. Under experimental conditions, optimum removal was obtained at pH 7 with agitation time of 48 hrs and temperature of 35 degrees C. Cyanide was utilized by bacteria as sole source of nitrogen for growth. The removal efficiencies of cyanide by adsorption, biodegradation, and SAB were found to be 91.38%, 95.87%, and 99.63%, respectively, at initial cyanide concentration of 100 mg l(-1). The removal efficiency of SAB was found to be better as compared to that of biodegradation and adsorption alone.

  12. Research and Development on Enhanced Degradable Plastics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    whether chitin-derived polymers could serve as ingestible, fully biodegradable and/or water soluble materials for use as packaging films. Such films will...PolyQef in Starched-Filled Biodegradable .. . Cext.rdsion Tensile Test Thermoplastic " 19 AB RACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...Readily Biodegradable Synthetic Polymers _ 3 1 4.2.1 Deterioration of Polyethylene-Polycaprolactone Blonds Under Mai ne Exposure Conditions __ 31 4.2.2

  13. Ionic liquid biodegradability depends on specific wastewater microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kathryn M; Aiello, Steven W; Buehler, Barbara K; Jones, Stuart E; Szymczyna, Blair R; Walker, Katherine A

    2015-10-01

    Complete biodegradation of a newly-synthesized chemical in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) eliminates the potential for novel environmental pollutants. However, differences within- and between-WWTP microbial communities may alter expectations for biodegradation. WWTP communities can also serve as a source of unique consortia that, when enriched, can metabolize chemicals that tend to resist degradation, but are otherwise promising green alternatives. We tested the biodegradability of three ionic liquids (ILs): 1-octyl-3-methylpyridinium bromide (OMP), 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium bromide (BMP) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM). We performed tests using communities from two WWTPs at three time points. Site-specific and temporal variation both influenced community composition, which impacted the success of OMP biodegradability. Neither BMP nor BMIM degraded in any test, suggesting that these ILs are unlikely to be removed by traditional treatment. Following standard biodegradation assays, we enriched for three consortia that were capable of quickly degrading OMP, BMP and BMIM. Our results indicate WWTPs are not functionally redundant with regard to biodegradation of specific ionic liquids. However, consortia can be enriched to degrade chemicals that fail biodegradability assays. This information can be used to prepare pre-treatment procedures and prevent environmental release of novel pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel non-cytotoxic, bioactive and biodegradable hybrid materials based on polyurethanes/TiO2 for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    González-García, Dulce M; Téllez Jurado, L; Jiménez-Gallegos, R; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Luis M

    2017-06-01

    Titanium compounds have demonstrated great interfacial properties with biological tissues whereas a wide variety of polyurethanes have also been successfully probed in medical applications. However, studies about hybrids based on polyurethanes/TiO 2 for medical applications are scarce. The aim of this work is to design novel biodegradable hybrid materials based on polyurethanes/TiO 2 (80% organic-20% inorganic) and to perform a preliminary study of the potential applications in bone regeneration. The hybrids have been prepared by a sol-gel reaction using titanium isopropoxide as precursor of the inorganic component and polyurethane as the organic one. A series of polyurethanes has been prepared using different polyesters glycol succinate as soft segment, and 1,6-diisocyanatohexane (HDI) and butanediol (BD) as linear hard segment. The spectroscopy techniques used allow to confirm the formation of the required polyurethanes by the identification of bands related to carboxylic groups (COOH), and the amine groups (NH), and also the TiOH bonds and the bonds related to the interconnected network between the inorganic and the organic components from hybrids. The results from SEM/EDS show a homogeneous distribution of the inorganic component into the organic matrix. The nontoxic character of the hybrid (H400) was probed using MG-63 cell line with over 90% of cell viability. Finally, the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer in the material surface after 21days of soaking in SBF shows the bioactive character. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodegradability of fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol using different microbial consortiums.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Yolanda Flores; Nacheva, Petia Mijaylova

    2017-03-01

    The biodegradation of fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol using ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing consortium, nitrite-oxidizing consortium, and heterotrophic biomass was evaluated in batch tests applying different retention times. The ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing consortium presented the highest biodegradation percentages for mefenamic acid and metoprolol, of 85 and 64% respectively. This consortium was also capable to biodegrade 79% of fluoxetine. The heterotrophic consortium showed the highest ability to biodegrade fluoxetine reaching 85%, and it also had a high potential for biodegrading mefenamic acid and metoprolol, of 66 and 58% respectively. The nitrite-oxidizing consortium presented the lowest biodegradation of the three pharmaceuticals, of less than 48%. The determination of the selected pharmaceuticals in the dissolved phase and in the biomass indicated that biodegradation was the major removal mechanism of the three compounds. Based on the obtained results, the biodegradation kinetics was adjusted to pseudo-first-order for the three pharmaceuticals. The values of k biol for fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol determined with the three consortiums indicated that ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing and heterotrophic biomass allow a partial biodegradation of the compounds, while no substantial biodegradation can be expected using nitrite-oxidizing consortium. Metoprolol was the less biodegradable compound. The sorption of fluoxetine and mefenamic acid onto biomass had a significant contribution for their removal (6-14%). The lowest sorption coefficients were obtained for metoprolol indicating that the sorption onto biomass is poor (3-4%), and the contribution of this process to the global removal can be neglected.

  16. Role of Thiobacillus thioparus in the biodegradation of carbon disulfide in a biofilter packed with a recycled organic pelletized material.

    PubMed

    Prenafeta-Boldú, Francesc X; Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Guivernau, Miriam; Viñas, Marc; Elías, Ana

    2014-07-01

    This study reports the biodegradation of carbon disulfide (CS2) in air biofilters packed with a pelletized mixture of composted manure and sawdust. Experiments were carried out in two lab-scale (1.2 L) biofiltration units. Biofilter B was seeded with activated sludge enriched previously on CS2-degrading biomass under batch conditions, while biofilter A was left as a negative inoculation control. This inoculum was characterized by an acidic pH and sulfate accumulation, and contained Achromobacter xylosoxidans as the main putative CS2 biodegrading bacterium. Biofilter operation start-up was unsuccessfully attempted under xerophilic conditions and significant CS2 elimination was only achieved in biofilter A upon the implementation of an intermittent irrigation regime. Sustained removal efficiencies of 90-100 % at an inlet load of up to 12 g CS2 m(-3) h(-1) were reached. The CS2 removal in this biofilter was linked to the presence of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus, known among the relatively small number of species with a reported capacity of growing on CS2 as the sole energy source. DGGE molecular profiles confirmed that this microbe had become dominant in biofilter A while it was not detected in samples from biofilter B. Conventional biofilters packed with inexpensive organic materials are suited for the treatment of low-strength CS2 polluted gases (IL <12 g CS2 m(-3) h(-1)), provided that the development of the adequate microorganisms is favored, either upon enrichment or by inoculation. The importance of applying culture-independent techniques for microbial community analysis as a diagnostic tool in the biofiltration of recalcitrant compounds has been highlighted.

  17. Biodegradability of commercial and weathered diesel oils

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; de Franceschi de Angelis, Dejanira; Pirôllo, Maria Paula Santos; Contiero, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the capability of different microorganisms to degrade commercial diesel oil in comparison to a weathered diesel oil collected from the groundwater at a petrol station. Two microbiological methods were used for the biodegradability assessment: the technique based on the redox indicator 2,6 -dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) and soil respirometric experiments using biometer flasks. In the former we tested the bacterial cultures Staphylococcus hominis, Kocuria palustris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBI, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Bacillus cereus, a commercial inoculum, consortia obtained from soil and groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons and a consortium from an uncontaminated area. In the respirometric experiments it was evaluated the capability of the native microorganisms present in the soil from a petrol station to biodegrade the diesel oils. The redox indicator experiments showed that only the consortia, even that from an uncontaminated area, were able to biodegrade the weathered diesel. In 48 days, the removal of the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the respirometric experiments was approximately 2.5 times greater when the commercial diesel oil was used. This difference was caused by the consumption of labile hydrocarbons, present in greater quantities in the commercial diesel oil, as demonstrated by gas chromatographic analyses. Thus, results indicate that biodegradability studies that do not consider the weathering effect of the pollutants may over estimate biodegradation rates and when the bioaugmentation is necessary, the best strategy would be that one based on injection of consortia, because even cultures with recognised capability of biodegrading hydrocarbons may fail when applied isolated. PMID:24031193

  18. Materials research at Stanford University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Information briefly describing the total research activity related to the science of materials is reported. Emphasis is placed on physical and mechanical properties of composite materials, energy transportation, superconductors, microwave electronics, and solid state electrochemistry.

  19. Bacterial polyesters: biosynthesis, biodegradable plastics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Robert W; Marchessault, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    The discovery and chemical identification, in the 1920s, of the aliphatic polyester: poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB, as a granular component in bacterial cells proceeded without any of the controversies which marked the recognition of macromolecules by Staudinger. Some thirty years after its discovery, PHB was recognized as the prototypical biodegradable thermoplastic to solve the waste disposal challenge. The development effort led by Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., encouraged interdisciplinary research from genetic engineering and biotechnology to the study of enzymes involved in biosynthesis and biodegradation. From the simple PHB homopolyester discovered by Maurice Lemoigne in the mid-twenties, a family of over 100 different aliphatic polyesters of the same general structure has been discovered. Depending on bacterial species and substrates, these high molecular weight stereoregular polyesters have emerged as a new family of natural polymers ranking with nucleic acids, polyamides, polyisoprenoids, polyphenols, polyphosphates, and polysaccharides. In this historical review, the chemical, biochemical and microbial highlights are linked to personalities and locations involved with the events covering a discovery timespan of 75 years.

  20. Photo-crosslinked Biodegradable Elastomers for Controlled Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Kibbe, Melina R.; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of nitric oxide (NO) has important applications in medicine, especially for procedures that involve the vasculature. We report photo-curable biodegradable poly(diol citrate) elastomers capable of slow release of NO. A methacrylated poly(diol citrate) macromonomer was prepared by polycondensation of citric acid with 1, 8-octanediol or 1, 12-dodecanediol followed by functionalization with 2-aminoethyl methacrylate. A miscible NO donor, diazeniumdiolated N, N-diethyldiethylenetriamine, was synthesized and incorporated into the polymer matrix. An elastomeric network was obtained via photo-polymerization of macromonomers upon UV irradiation within three minutes. Films and tubes of the NO-releasing crosslinked macromonomers exhibited strong tensile strength and radial compressive strength, respectively. They also exhibited cell compatibility and biodegradability in vitro. Sustained NO release under physiological conditions was achieved for at least one week. NO release enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells but inhibited the proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells. Photo-polymerizable NO-releasing materials provide a new approach for the localized and sustained delivery of NO to treat thrombosis and restenosis in the vasculature. PMID:24707352

  1. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  2. Biodegradable Poly(polyol sebacate) Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Joost P.; de Bruin, Berend-Jan; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a family of synthetic biodegradable polymers that are composed of structural units endogenous to the human metabolism, designated poly(polyol sebacates) (PPS) polymers. Material properties of PPS polymers can be tuned by altering the polyol monomer and reacting stiochiometric ratio of sebacic acid. These thermoset networks exhibited tensile Young’s moduli ranging from 0.37 ± 0.08 to 378 ± 33 MPa with maximum elongations at break from 10.90 ± 1.37 to 205.16 ± 55.76%, and glass-transition temperatures ranged from ~7 to 46 °C. In vitro degradation under physiological conditions was slower than in vivo degradation rates observed for some PPS polymers. PPS polymers demonstrated similar in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility compared to poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). PMID:18824260

  3. Fire-Resistant Materials: Research Overview

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the research being conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop fire safe cabin materials for commercial aircraft. The objective of the Fire-Resistant Materials program is to eliminate burning ...

  4. Progress of applied superconductivity research at Materials Research Laboratories, ITRI (Taiwan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R. S.; Wang, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    A status report based on the applied high temperature superconductivity (HTS) research at Materials Research Laboratories (MRL), Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) is given. The aim is to develop fabrication technologies for the high-TC materials appropriate to the industrial application requirements. To date, the majorities of works have been undertaken in the areas of new materials, wires/tapes with long length, prototypes of magnets, large-area thin films, SQUID's and microwave applications.

  5. Enhanced Biodegradability of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Young; Lee, O-Mi; Kim, Tae-Hun; Yu, Seungho

    2015-04-01

    The radiolytic degradation of antibiotic compounds, including lincomycin (LMC), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and tetracycline (TCN), and the change of biodegradability of the radiation-treated target compounds were evaluated. As a result, the degradation of target antibiotics by hydrolysis, biodegradation, and gamma irradiation showed a compound-dependent manner. However, the biodegradability of all target compounds was enhanced by the gamma irradiation. The enhanced biodegradability after gamma irradiation (2 kGy) followed the trend of LMC (18.89%)biodegradable. Consequently, the effective degradation of nonbiodegradable antibiotics can be accomplished by ionizing radiation followed by biodegradation. This result indicated that ionizing radiation technology would be useful to enhance biodegradability of the recalcitrant pollutants and can facilitate further degradation of residuals or intermediates in the effluent when discharged into surface water.

  6. Oxidation and biodegradation of polyethylene films containing pro-oxidantadditives: Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation on the oxidation and biodegradation of linear low density poly (ethylene) PE-LLD films containing pro-oxidant were examined. To achieve oxidation and degradation, films were first exposed to the sunlight for 93 days du...

  7. Characterization of selected municipal solid waste components to estimate their biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Bayard, R; Benbelkacem, H; Gourdon, R; Buffière, P

    2018-06-15

    Biological treatments of Residual Municipal Solid Waste (RMSW) allow to divert biodegradable materials from landfilling and recover valuable alternative resources. The biodegradability of the waste components needs however to be assessed in order to design the bioprocesses properly. The present study investigated complementary approaches to aerobic and anaerobic biotests for a more rapid evaluation. A representative sample of residual MSW was collected from a Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) plant and sorted out into 13 fractions according to the French standard procedure MODECOM™. The different fractions were analyzed for organic matter content, leaching behavior, contents in biochemical constituents (determined by Van Soest's acid detergent fiber method), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Bio-Methane Potential (BMP). Experimental data were statistically treated by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Cumulative oxygen consumption from BOD tests and cumulative methane production from BMP tests were found to be positively correlated in all waste fractions. No correlation was observed between the results from BOD or BMP bioassays and the contents in cellulose-like, hemicelluloses-like or labile organic compounds. No correlation was observed either with the results from leaching tests (Soluble COD). The contents in lignin-like compounds, evaluated as the non-extracted RES fraction in Van Soest's method, was found however to impact negatively the biodegradability assessed by BOD or BMP tests. Since cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are the polymers responsible for the structuration of lignocellulosic complexes, it was concluded that the structural organization of the organic matter in the different waste fractions was more determinant on biodegradability than the respective contents in individual biopolymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption and biodegradation of antidiabetic pharmaceuticals in soils.

    PubMed

    Mrozik, Wojciech; Stefańska, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants in the natural environment. Most studies of the environmental fate of these chemicals focus on their behavior in wastewater treatment processes and in sewage sludge. Little is known about their behavior in soils. In this study adsorption and biodegradation of four antidiabetic pharmaceuticals - glimepiride, glibenclamide, gliclazide and metformin - were examined in three natural soils. The sorption of sulfonylurea derivatives was high (higher than sulfonylurea herbicides for example), whereas metformin showed high mobility. Desorption rates were highest for metformin. Sorption isotherms in two of three soils fitted best to the Freundlich model. Despite their high affinity to for soil surfaces, biodegradation studies revealed that transformation of the drugs occurred. Biodegradation results were described by pseudo-first order kinetics with half-life values from 5 to over 120 d (under aerobic conditions) and indicate that none of the tested drugs can be classified as quickly biodegradable. Biodegradation under anoxic conditions was much slower; often degrading by less than 50% during time of the experiment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily isolated from plant surfaces, displayed strong degradation activity on films made from poly-butylene succinate or poly-butylene succinate-co-adipate. Strains of P. antarctica isolated from leaves and husks of paddy rice displayed strong degradation activity on these films at 30°C. The type strain, P. antarctica JCM 10317, and Pseudozyma spp. strains from phyllosphere secreted a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme with a molecular mass of about 22 kDa. Reliable source of biodegradable plastic-degrading microorganisms are now in our hands. PMID:22126328

  10. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Tago, Kanako; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Tsushima, Seiya

    2011-11-29

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily isolated from plant surfaces, displayed strong degradation activity on films made from poly-butylene succinate or poly-butylene succinate-co-adipate. Strains of P. antarctica isolated from leaves and husks of paddy rice displayed strong degradation activity on these films at 30°C. The type strain, P. antarctica JCM 10317, and Pseudozyma spp. strains from phyllosphere secreted a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme with a molecular mass of about 22 kDa. Reliable source of biodegradable plastic-degrading microorganisms are now in our hands.

  11. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT

  12. Saponification of fatty slaughterhouse wastes for enhancing anaerobic biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Battimelli, Audrey; Carrère, Hélène; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe

    2009-08-01

    The thermochemical pretreatment by saponification of two kinds of fatty slaughterhouse waste--aeroflotation fats and flesh fats from animal carcasses--was studied in order to improve the waste's anaerobic degradation. The effect of an easily biodegradable compound, ethanol, on raw waste biodegradation was also examined. The aims of the study were to enhance the methanisation of fatty waste and also to show a link between biodegradability and bio-availability. The anaerobic digestion of raw waste, saponified waste and waste with a co-substrate was carried out in batch mode under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The results showed little increase in the total volume of biogas, indicating a good biodegradability of the raw wastes. Mean biogas volume reached 1200 mL/g VS which represented more than 90% of the maximal theoretical biogas potential. Raw fatty wastes were slowly biodegraded whereas pretreated wastes showed improved initial reaction kinetics, indicating a better initial bio-availability, particularly for mesophilic runs. The effects observed for raw wastes with ethanol as co-substrate depended on the process temperature: in mesophilic conditions, an initial improvement was observed whereas in thermophilic conditions a significant decrease in biodegradability was observed.

  13. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  14. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a) Introduction—(1) Purpose. (i) This Guideline is designed to develop... biodegradability of a series of functionally or structurally related chemicals, media from all inoculum flasks may..., and control system should be analyzed at time zero and at a minimum of four other times from time zero...

  15. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a) Introduction—(1) Purpose. (i) This Guideline is designed to develop... biodegradability of a series of functionally or structurally related chemicals, media from all inoculum flasks may..., and control system should be analyzed at time zero and at a minimum of four other times from time zero...

  16. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a) Introduction—(1) Purpose. (i) This Guideline is designed to develop... biodegradability of a series of functionally or structurally related chemicals, media from all inoculum flasks may..., and control system should be analyzed at time zero and at a minimum of four other times from time zero...

  17. Engineering biodegradable polyester elastomers with antioxidant properties to attenuate oxidative stress in tissues

    PubMed Central

    van Lith, R.; Gregory, E.K.; Yang, J.; Kibbe, M.R.; Ameer, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the limited biological compatibility of many biomaterials due to inflammation, as well as in various pathologies including atherosclerosis and restenosis as a result of vascular interventions. Engineering antioxidant properties into a material is therefore a potential avenue to improve the biocompatibility of materials, as well as to locally attenuate oxidative stress-related pathologies. Moreover, biodegradable polymers that have antioxidant properties built into their backbone structure have high relative antioxidant content and may provide prolonged, continuous attenuation of oxidative stress while the polymer or its degradation products are present. In this report, we describe the synthesis of poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate-co-ascorbate) (POCA), a citric-acid based biodegradable elastomer with native, intrinsic antioxidant properties. The in vitro antioxidant activity of POCA as well as its effects on vascular cells in vitro and in vivo were studied. Antioxidant properties investigated included scavenging of free radicals, iron chelation and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. POCA reduced reactive oxygen species generation in cells after an oxidative challenge and protected cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. Importantly, POCA antioxidant properties remained present upon degradation. Vascular cells cultured on POCA showed high viability, and POCA selectively inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation, while supporting endothelial cell proliferation. Finally, preliminary data on POCA-coated ePTFE grafts showed reduced intimal hyperplasia when compared to standard ePTFE grafts. This biodegradable, intrinsically antioxidant polymer may be useful for tissue engineering application where oxidative stress is a concern. PMID:24976244

  18. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Small, Ward; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Maitland, Duncan J; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Low density shape memory polymer foams hold significant interest in the biomaterials community for their potential use in minimally invasive embolic biomedical applications. The unique shape memory behavior of these foams allows them to be compressed to a miniaturized form, which can be delivered to an anatomical site via a transcatheter process, and thereafter actuated to embolize the desired area. Previous work in this field has described the use of a highly covalently crosslinked polymer structure for maintaining excellent mechanical and shape memory properties at the application-specific ultra low densities. This work is aimed at further expanding the utility of these biomaterials, as implantable low density shape memory polymer foams, by introducing controlled biodegradability. A highly covalently crosslinked network structure was maintained by use of low molecular weight, symmetrical and polyfunctional hydroxyl monomers such as Polycaprolactone triol (PCL-t, Mn 900 g), N,N,N0,N0-Tetrakis (hydroxypropyl) ethylenediamine (HPED), and Tris (2-hydroxyethyl) amine (TEA). Control over the degradation rate of the materials was achieved by changing the concentration of the degradable PCL-t monomer, and by varying the material hydrophobicity. These porous SMP materials exhibit a uniform cell morphology and excellent shape recovery, along with controllable actuation temperature and degradation rate. We believe that they form a new class of low density biodegradable SMP scaffolds that can potentially be used as “smart” non-permanent implants in multiple minimally invasive biomedical applications. PMID:24090987

  19. Biodegradable ceramic-polymer composites for biomedical applications: A review.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Michal; Stodolak-Zych, Ewa; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna

    2017-02-01

    The present work focuses on the state-of-the-art of biodegradable ceramic-polymer composites with particular emphasis on influence of various types of ceramic fillers on properties of the composites. First, the general needs to create composite materials for medical applications are briefly introduced. Second, various types of polymeric materials used as matrices of ceramic-containing composites and their properties are reviewed. Third, silica nanocomposites and their material as well as biological characteristics are presented. Fourth, different types of glass fillers including silicate, borate and phosphate glasses and their effect on a number of properties of the composites are described. Fifth, wollastonite as a composite modifier and its effect on composite characteristics are discussed. Sixth, composites containing calcium phosphate ceramics, namely hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate and biphasic calcium phosphate are presented. Finally, general possibilities for control of properties of composite materials are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A facile synthesis of lipid stabilized gold nanoparticles: a step towards biodegradable biosensors.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sinoj; Narine, Suresh S

    2011-08-01

    A new class of polylactone was successfully synthesized and utilized for the encapsulation and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Core/shell nanoparticle architecture, in which a layer of this polymer surrounds the nanoparticle core have been investigated both as a means to improve the stability and surface chemistry and as a way of accessing unique physical properties that are not possible from one nano-material alone. Given the fact that only few systems has so far been developed for the encapsulation of nanoparticles, our success in using a new biodegradable biopolymer with inbuilt functionality reveals the robustness of this work. The biodegradability of this polylactone was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology and stability of these gold-polymer hybrids were evaluated by using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-VIS spectroscopy.

  1. BIOB: a mathematical model for the biodegradation of low solubility hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Personna, Yves R; Lee, Ken; Tsao, David; Demicco, Erik D

    2014-06-15

    Modeling oil biodegradation is an important step in predicting the long term fate of oil on beaches. Unfortunately, existing models do not account mechanistically for environmental factors, such as pore water nutrient concentration, affecting oil biodegradation, rather in an empirical way. We present herein a numerical model, BIOB, to simulate the biodegradation of insoluble attached hydrocarbon. The model was used to simulate an experimental oil spill on a sand beach. The biodegradation kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting the model to the experimental data of alkanes and aromatics. It was found that parameter values are comparable to their counterparts for the biodegradation of dissolved organic matter. The biodegradation of aromatics was highly affected by the decay of aromatic biomass, probably due to its low growth rate. Numerical simulations revealed that the biodegradation rate increases by 3-4 folds when the nutrient concentration is increased from 0.2 to 2.0 mg N/L. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Biodegradation of subsurface oil in a tidally influenced sand beach: Impact of hydraulics and interaction with pore water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; Abrams, Stewart; Suidan, Makram

    2015-05-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of oil in tidally influenced beaches was investigated numerically in this work using realistic beach and tide conditions. A numerical model BIOMARUN, coupling a multiple-Monod kinetic model BIOB to a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model 2-D MARUN, was used to simulate the biodegradation of low-solubility hydrocarbon and transport processes of associated solute species (i.e., oxygen and nitrogen) in a tidally influenced beach environment. It was found that different limiting factors affect different portions of the beach. In the upper intertidal zone, where the inland incoming nutrient concentration was large (1.2 mg N/L), oil biodegradation occurred deeper in the beach (i.e., 0.3 m below the surface). In the midintertidal zone, a reversal was noted where the biodegradation was fast at shallow locations (i.e., 0.1 m below the surface), and it was due to the decrease of oxygen with depth due to consumption, which made oxygen the limiting factor for biodegradation. Oxygen concentration in the midintertidal zone exhibited two peaks as a function of time. One peak was associated with the high tide, when dissolved oxygen laden seawater filled the beach and a second oxygen peak was observed during low tides, and it was due to pore oxygen replenishment from the atmosphere. The effect of the capillary fringe (CF) height was investigated, and it was found that there is an optimal CF for the maximum biodegradation of oil in the beach. Too large a CF (i.e., very fine material) would attenuate oxygen replenishment (either from seawater or the atmosphere), while too small a CF (i.e., very coarse material) would reduce the interaction between microorganisms and oil in the upper intertidal zone due to rapid reduction in the soil moisture at low tide. This article was corrected on 22 JUN 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. Biodegradable materials containing recycled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzorova, M. V.; Tertyshnaya, Yu V.; Popov, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The work is devoted to study the effects of different environmental factors such as water, oxygen and, light composition based on polylactide and polyethylene of low density with the addition of oxidized polyethylene, as an analog of recycled materials. Established that in the composition polylactide – polyethylene at the first stage the significant impact of moisture and UV light. The influence of UV radiation on polylactide destruction was proved by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is found that polylactic acid is oxidized slower than polyethylene.

  4. BioSurfDB: knowledge and algorithms to support biosurfactants and biodegradation studies

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jorge S.; Araújo, Wydemberg; Lopes Sales, Ana Isabela; de Brito Guerra, Alaine; da Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.; Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil extraction, transportation and use provoke the contamination of countless ecosystems. Therefore, bioremediation through surfactants mobilization or biodegradation is an important subject, both economically and environmentally. Bioremediation research had a great boost with the recent advances in Metagenomics, as it enabled the sequencing of uncultured microorganisms providing new insights on surfactant-producing and/or oil-degrading bacteria. Many research studies are making available genomic data from unknown organisms obtained from metagenomics analysis of oil-contaminated environmental samples. These new datasets are presently demanding the development of new tools and data repositories tailored for the biological analysis in a context of bioremediation data analysis. This work presents BioSurfDB, www.biosurfdb.org, a curated relational information system integrating data from: (i) metagenomes; (ii) organisms; (iii) biodegradation relevant genes; proteins and their metabolic pathways; (iv) bioremediation experiments results, with specific pollutants treatment efficiencies by surfactant producing organisms; and (v) a biosurfactant-curated list, grouped by producing organism, surfactant name, class and reference. The main goal of this repository is to gather information on the characterization of biological compounds and mechanisms involved in biosurfactant production and/or biodegradation and make it available in a curated way and associated with a number of computational tools to support studies of genomic and metagenomic data. Database URL: www.biosurfdb.org PMID:25833955

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Ethylene Glycol within Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyob, K. M.; Mouser, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a commonly used organic additive in hydraulic fracturing fluids used for shale gas recovery. Under aerobic conditions, this compound readily biodegrades to acetate and CO2 or is oxidized through the glycerate pathway. In the absence of oxygen, organisms within genera Desulfovibrio, Acetobacterium, and others can transform EG to acetaldehyde, a flammable and suspected carcinogenic compound. Acetaldehyde can then be enzymatically degraded to ethanol or acetate and CO2. However, little is known on how EG degrades in the presence of other organic additives, particularly under anaerobic conditions representative of deep groundwater aquifers. To better understand the fate and attenuation of glycols within hydraulic fracturing fluids we are assessing their biodegradation potential and pathways in batch anaerobic microcosm treatments. Crushed Berea sandstone was inoculated with groundwater and incubated with either EG or a synthetic fracturing fluid (SFF) containing EG formulations. We tracked changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), EG, and its transformation products over several months. Approximately 41% of bulk DOC in SFF is degraded within 21 days, with 58% DOC still remaining after 63 days. By comparison, this same SFF degrades by 70% within 25 days when inoculated with sediment-groundwater microbial communities, suggesting that bulk DOC degradation occurs at a slower rate and to a lesser extent with bedrock. Aerobic biodegradation of EG occurs rapidly (3-7 days); however anaerobic degradation of EG is much slower, requiring several weeks for substantial DOC loss to be observed. Ongoing experiments are tracking the degradation pathways of EG alone and in the presence of SFF, with preliminary data showing incomplete glycol transformation within the complex hydraulic fracturing fluid mixture. This research will help to elucidate rates, processes, and pathways for EG biodegradation and identify key microbial taxa involved in its degradation.

  6. Recent global trends in structural materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hideyuki; Ohmura, Takahito; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    Structural materials support the basis of global society, such as infrastructure and transportation facilities, and are therefore essential for everyday life. The optimization of such materials allows people to overcome environmental, energy and resource depletion issues on a global scale. The creation and manufacture of structural materials make a large contribution to economies around the world every year. The use of strong, resistant materials can also have profound social effects, providing a better quality of life at both local and national levels. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused significant structural damage in the Tohoku and Kanto regions of Japan. On a global scale, accidents caused by the ageing and failure of structural materials occur on a daily basis. Therefore, the provision and inspection of structural reliability, safety of nuclear power facilities and construction of a secure and safe society hold primary importance for researchers and engineers across the world. Clearly, structural materials need to evolve further to address both existing problems and prepare for new challenges that may be faced in the future. With this in mind, the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) organized the 'NIMS Conference 2012' to host an extensive discussion on a variety of global issues related to the future development of structural materials. Ranging from reconstruction following natural disasters, verification of structural reliability, energy-saving materials to fundamental problems accompanying the development of materials for high safety standards, the conference covered many key issues in the materials industry today. All the above topics are reflected in this focus issue of STAM, which introduces recent global trends in structural materials research with contributions from world-leading researchers in this field. This issue covers the development of novel alloys, current methodologies in the characterization of structural

  7. Strategies to evaluate biodegradability: application to chlorinated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, S; Polo, A M; Tobajas, M; Rodriguez, J J; Mohedano, A F

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradability of nitrochlorinated (diuron and atrazine) and chlorophenoxy herbicides (2,4-D and MCPA) has been studied through several bioassays using different testing times and biomass/substrate ratios. A fast biodegradability test using unacclimated activated sludge yielded no biodegradation of the herbicides in 24 h. The inherent biodegradability test gave degradation percentages of around 20-30% for the nitrochlorinated herbicides and almost complete removal of the chlorophenoxy compounds. Long-term biodegradability assays were performed using sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and sequencing batch membrane bioreactor (SB-MBR). Fixed concentrations of each herbicide below the corresponding EC50 value for activated sludge were used (30 mg L(-1) for diuron and atrazine and 50 mg L(-1) for 2,4-D and MCPA). No signs of herbicide degradation appeared before 35 days in the case of diuron and atrazine and 21 days for 2,4-D, whereas MCPA was partially degraded since the early stages. Around 25-36% degradation of the nitrochlorinated herbicides and 53-77% of the chlorophenoxy ones was achieved after 180 and 135 days, respectively, in SBR, whereas complete disappearance of 2,4-D was reached after 80 days in SB-MBR.

  8. BTE-OX biodegradation kinetics with MTBE through bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Askar, K; Villarreal-Chiu, J F; Gracia-Lozano, M V; Garza-Gonzalez, M T; Chavez-Gomez, B; Rodriguez-Sanchez, I P; Barrera-Saldana, H A

    2004-01-01

    The biodegradation kinetics of BTE-oX and MTBE, mixed all together, in the presence of bioaugmented bacterial populations as high as 880 mg/L VSS was evaluated. The effect of soil in aqueous samples and the effect of Tergitol NP-10 on substrate biodegradation rates were also evaluated. Biodegradation kinetics was evaluated for 36 hours, every 6 hours. Benzene and o-xylene biodegradation followed a first-order one-phase kinetic model, whereas toluene and ethylbenzene biodegradation was well described by a first-order two-phase kinetic model in all samples. MTBE followed a zero-order removal kinetic model in all samples. The presence of soil in aqueous samples retarded BTE-oX removal rates, with the highest negative effect on o-xylene. The presence of soil enhanced MTBE removal rate. The addition of Tergitol NP-10 to aqueous samples containing soil had a positive effect on substrate removal rate in all samples. Substrate percent removals ranged from 95.4-99.7% for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene. O-xylene and MTBE percent removals ranged from 55.9-90.1% and 15.6-30.1%, respectively.

  9. Citric-Acid-Derived Photo-cross-Linked Biodegradable Elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Tran, Richard T.; Guleserian, Kristine J.; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Citric-acid-derived thermally cross-linked biodegradable elastomers (CABEs) have recently received significant attention in various biomedical applications, including tissue-engineering orthopedic devices, bioimaging and implant coatings. However, citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers are rarely reported. Herein, we report a novel photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomer, referred to as poly(octamethylene maleate citrate) (POMC), which preserves pendant hydroxyl and carboxylic functionalities after cross-linking for the potential conjugation of biologically active molecules. POMC is a low-molecular-mass pre-polymer with a molecular mass average between 701 and 1291 Da. POMC networks are soft and elastic with an initial modulus of 0.07 to 1.3 MPa and an elongation at break between 38 and 382%. FT-IR–ATR results confirmed the successful surface immobilization of type-I collagen onto POMC films, which enhanced in vitro cellular attachment and proliferation. Photo-polymerized POMC films implanted subcutaneously into Sprague–Dawley rats demonstrated minimal in vivo inflammatory responses. The development of POMC enriches the family of citric-acid-derived biodegradable elastomers and expands the available biodegradable polymers for versatile needs in biomedical applications. PMID:20557687

  10. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  11. [Current status of bio-based materials industry in China].

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiaoqian; Weng, Yunxuan; Huang, Zhigang; Yang, Nan; Wang, Xiyuan; Zhang, Min; Jin, Yujuan

    2016-06-25

    In recent years, bio-based materials are becoming a new dominant industry leading the scientific and technological innovation, and economic development of the world. We reviewed the new development of bio-based materials industry in China, analyzed the entire market of bio-based materials products comprehensively, and also stated the industry status of bio-based chemicals, such as lactic acid, 1,3-propanediol, and succinic acid; biodegradable bio-based polymers, such as co-polyester of diacid and diol, polylactic acid, carbon dioxide based copolymer, polyhydroxyalknoates, polycaprolactone, and thermoplastic bio-based plastics; non-biodegradable bio-based polymers, such as bio-based polyamide, polytrimethylene terephthalate, bio-based polyurethane, and bio-based fibers.

  12. “Rational” Management of Dichlorophenols Biodegradation by the Microalga Scenedesmus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2013-01-01

    The microalga Scenedesmus obliquus exhibited the ability to biodegrade dichlorophenols (dcps) under specific autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. According to their biodegradability, the dichlorophenols used can be separated into three distinct groups. Group I (2,4-dcp and 2,6 dcp – no meta-substitution) consisted of quite easily degraded dichlorophenols, since both chloride substituents are in less energetically demanding positions. Group II (2,3-dcp, 2,5-dcp and 3,4-dcp – one meta-chloride) was less susceptible to biodegradation, since one of the two substituents, the meta one, required higher energy for C-Cl-bond cleavage. Group III (3,5-dcp – two meta-chlorides) could not be biodegraded, since both chlorides possessed the most energy demanding positions. In general, when the dcp-toxicity exceeded a certain threshold, the microalga increased the energy offered for biodegradation and decreased the energy invested for biomass production. As a result, the biodegradation per cell volume of group II (higher toxicity) was higher, than group I (lower toxicity) and the biodegradation of dichlorophenols (higher toxicity) was higher than the corresponding monochlorophenols (lower toxicity). The participation of the photosynthetic apparatus and the respiratory mechanism of microalga to biodegrade the group I and the group II, highlighted different bioenergetic strategies for optimal management of the balance between dcp-toxicity, dcp-biodegradability and culture growth. Additionally, we took into consideration the possibility that the intermediates of each dcp-biodegradation pathway could influence differently the whole biodegradation procedures. For this reason, we tested all possible combinations of phenolic intermediates to check cometabolic interactions. The present contribution bring out the possibility of microalgae to operate as “smart” bioenergetic “machines”, that have the ability to continuously “calculate” the energy reserves and

  13. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium †

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  14. Materials Research and Technology Initiatives

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-11-01

    This report is the departments first report on current and planned research and technology efforts in advanced materials. The report was published in support of the Administration's initiative to establish an integrated program of research designed t...

  15. Biodegradable Photonic Melanoidin for Theranostic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Changho; Jung, Ho Sang; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Ki Su; Yun, Seok Hyun; Kim, Chulhong; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-01-26

    Light-absorbing nanoparticles for localized heat generation in tissues have various biomedical applications in diagnostic imaging, surgery, and therapies. Although numerous plasmonic and carbon-based nanoparticles with strong optical absorption have been developed, their clearance, potential cytotoxicity, and long-term safety issues remain unresolved. Here, we show that "generally regarded as safe (GRAS)" melanoidins prepared from glucose and amino acid offer a high light-to-heat conversion efficiency, biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonmutagenicity, and efficient renal clearance, as well as a low cost for synthesis. We exhibit a wide range of biomedical photonic applications of melanoidins, including in vivo photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, photoacoustic tracking of gastrointestinal tracts, photothermal cancer therapy, and photothermal lipolysis. The biodegradation rate and renal clearance of melanoidins are controllable by design. Our results confirm the feasibility of biodegradable melanoidins for various photonic applications to theranostic nanomedicines.

  16. Biodegradable-Polymer-Blend-Based Surgical Sealant with Body-Temperature-Mediated Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Lee, Nora G; Casey, Brendan J; Srinivasan, Priya; Sikorski, Michael J; Daristotle, John L; Sandler, Anthony D; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The development of practical and efficient surgical sealants has the propensity to improve operational outcomes. A biodegradable polymer blend is fabricated as a nonwoven fiber mat in situ. After direct deposition onto the tissue of interest, the material transitions from a fiber mat to a film. This transition promotes polymer-substrate interfacial interactions leading to improved adhesion and surgical sealant performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Green and biodegradable composite films with novel antimicrobial performance based on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuehan; Luo, Xiaogang; Li, Wei; Song, Rong; Li, Jing; Li, Yan; Li, Bin; Liu, Shilin

    2016-04-15

    In order to obtain a safe and biodegradable material with antimicrobial properties from cellulose for food packaging, we presented a facile way to graft chitosan onto the oxidized cellulose films. The obtained films had a high transparent property of above 80% transmittance, excellent barrier properties against oxygen and antimicrobial properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial properties, mechanical properties, and water vapor permeability of composites are essential characteristics in determining their applicability as food-packaging materials. Moreover, using a sausage model, it was shown that the composites exhibited better performance than traditional polyethylene packaging material and demonstrated good potential as food packaging materials. The results presented a new insight into the development of green materials for food packaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A new biodegradable sisal fiber-starch packing composite with nest structure.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Li, Fangyi; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Liming; Li, Yanle; Zhang, Chuanwei; Xu, Jie; Chen, Shuai

    2018-06-01

    A new completely biodegradable sisal fiber-starch packing composite was proposed. The effects of fiber content and alkaline treatment on the cushioning property of the composites were studied from energy absorption efficiency, cellular microstructure and compatibility between fiber and starch. With increasing fiber content, the nest structure of composites becomes dense first and then loosens, resulting in initial enhancement and subsequent weakening of the cushioning property of the composites. The composite with 4:13 mass ratio of fiber and thermoplastic starch (TPS) exhibit the optimal cushioning property. Alkaline treatment increases the compatibility between sisal fiber and TPS, promotes the formation of dense nest structure, thereby enhances the cushioning property of the composites. After biodegradability tests for 28 days, the weight loss of the composites was 62.36%. It's found that the composites are a promising replacement for expandable polystyrene (EPS) as packing material, especially under large compression load (0.7-6 MPa). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improving material and energy recovery from the sewage sludge and biomass residues.

    PubMed

    Kliopova, Irina; Makarskienė, Kristina

    2015-02-01

    Sewage sludge management is a big problem all over the world because of its large quantities and harmful impact on the environment. Energy conversion through fermentation, compost production from treated sludge for agriculture, especially for growing energetic plants, and treated sludge use for soil remediation are widely used alternatives of sewage sludge management. Recently, in many EU countries the popularity of these methods has decreased due to the sewage sludge content (heavy metals, organic pollutions and other hazards materials). This paper presents research results where the possibility of solid recovered fuel (SRF) production from the separate fraction (10-40 mm) of pre-composted materials--sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment plant and biomass residues has been evaluated. The remaining fractions of pre-composted materials can be successfully used for compost or fertiliser production, as the concentration of heavy metals in the analysed composition is reduced in comparison with sewage sludge. During the experiment presented in this paper the volume of analysed biodegradable waste was reduced by 96%: about 20% of input biodegradable waste was recovered to SRF in the form of pellets with 14.25 MJ kg(-1) of the net calorific value, about 23% were composted, the rest--evaporated and discharged in a wastewater. The methods of material-energy balances and comparison analysis of experiment data have been chosen for the environmental impact assessment of this biodegradable waste management alternative. Results of the efficiency of energy recovery from sewage sludge by SRF production and burning, comparison analysis with widely used bio-fuel-sawdust and conclusions made are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradability of regenerated cellulose films in soil

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, H.; Zheng, L.

    1996-12-01

    Regenerated cellulose films and a water-resistant film coated with thin Tung oil were prepared by using a cellulose cuoxam solution from pulps of cotton linter, cotton stalk, and wheat straw. They were buried in the soil to test biodegradability. The results showed that viscosity average molecular weight M{sub {eta}}, tensile strength {sigma}{sub b}, and the weight of the degraded films decreased sharply with the progress of degradation time, and the kinetics of decay were discussed. The degradation half-lives t{sub 1/2} of the films in soil at 10--20 C were given to be 30--42 days, and after 2 months the filmsmore » were decomposed into CO{sub 2} and water. The {alpha}-cellulose in soil was more readily biodegraded than hemicellulose, and regenerated cellulose film was more readily biodegraded than kraft paper. Nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning electron micrographs indicated that the biodegradation process of the films was performed through random breakdown of bonds of cellulose macromolecules resulting from the microorganism cleavage.« less

  1. Lewis Researcher in the Materials and Stresses Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1952-12-21

    A materials researcher at the NACA’s Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory examines a surface crack detection apparatus in the Materials and Stresses Building during December 1952. Materials research was an important aspect of propulsion technology. Advanced engine systems relied upon alloys, and later composites, that were strong, lightweight, and impervious to high temperatures. Jet engines which became increasingly popular in the late 1940s, produced much higher temperatures than piston engines. These higher temperatures stressed engine components, particularly turbines. Although Lewis materials research began during World War II, the Materials and Thermodynamics Division was not created until 1949. Its primary laboratories were located in the Materials and Stresses Building. The group sought to create new, improved materials and to improve engine design through increased understanding of materials. The Lewis materials researchers of the 1950s made contributions to nickel-aluminum alloys, cermet blades, metal matrix composites, oxide dispersion strengthened superalloys, and universal slopes.

  2. Studies on gamma irradiated rubber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, I. B.; Stelescu, M. D.; Cutrubinis, M.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the increase in use and production of polymer materials, there is a constant pressure of finding a solution to more environmental friendly composites. Beside the constant effort of recycling used materials, it seems more appropriate to manufacture and use biodegradable and renewable row materials. Natural polymers like starch, cellulose, lignin etc are ideal for preparing biodegradable composites. Some of the dynamic markets that use polymer materials are the food and pharmaceutical industries. Because of their desinfastation and sometimes sterility requirements, different treatment processes are applied, one of it being radiation treatment. The scope of this paper is to analyze the mechanical behaviour of rubber based materials irradiated with gamma rays at four medium doses, 30.1 kGy, 60.6 kGy, 91 kGy and 121.8 kGy. The objectives are the following: to identify the optimum radiation dose in order to obtain a good mechanical behaviour and to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material when adding different quantities of natural filler (20 phr, 60 phr and 100 phr).

  3. Effects of carbon nanotubes on atrazine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Liu, Na

    2015-04-28

    The environmental risks of engineered nanoparticles have attracted attention. However, little is known regarding the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the biodegradation and persistence of organic contaminants in water. We investigated the impacts of pristine and oxidized multiwalled CNTs on the atrazine biodegradation rate and efficiency using Arthrobacter sp. At a concentration of 25mg/L, the CNTs enhanced the biodegradation rate by up to 20%; however, at a concentration of 100mg/L, the CNTs decreased the biodegradation rate by up to 50%. The stimulation effects resulted from enhanced bacterial growth and the overexpression of degradation genes. The inhibitory effects resulted from the toxicity of the CNTs at high concentrations. The differences between the two CNTs at tested concentrations were not significant. The biodegradation efficiency was not impacted by adsorption, and the pre-adsorbed atrazine on the CNTs was fully biodegraded when the CNT concentration was ≤25mg/L. This finding was consistent with the lack of observable desorption hysteresis for atrazine on the tested CNTs. Our results indicate that CNTs can enhance or inhibit biodegradation through a balance of two effects: the toxic effects on microbial activity and the effects of the changing bioavailability that result from adsorption and desorption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A case study on the method-induced difference in the chemical properties and biodegradability of soil water extractable organic carbon of a granitic forest soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) plays important roles in soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) research. In the present study, we have detected the chemical properties and biodegradability of WEOC obtained from one granitic forest soil with four commonly used or suggested extraction methods, to study the potential methodological influence in soil DOM research. Results showed great difference in both chemical properties and biodegradation of WEOC from various methods. For the chosen soil, compared to that from fresh soil, WEOC from dried soil contained large proportion of HIN, Base fractions and labile O-alkyl components which might be derived from microbial cell lysis, and showed low fluorescence characteristics, exhibiting great biodegradability. Similarly, WEOC extracted under low temperature and short time conditions showed low fluorescence characteristics and exhibited considerable biodegradability. Conversely, WEOC, which might be potentially subjected to decomposition and loss during extraction, contained higher percentages of HOA fractions and aromatic alkyl and aryl components, and showed high fluorescence characteristics, exhibiting low biodegradability. WEOC extracted in moderate time and temperature showed moderate biodegradability. These method-induced differences implied the direct comparison of the results from similar works is difficult, as we considered here a specific forest soil and other authors other soil types and uses. However, the complexity in comparison reminds that the methodological influence be paid more attention in future soil WEOC researches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Mata, D; Amaral, M; Fernandes, A J S; Colaço, B; Gama, A; Paiva, M C; Gomes, P S; Silva, R F; Fernandes, M H

    2015-01-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.

  6. Using Biowin, Bayes, and batteries to predict ready biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Boethling, Robert S; Lynch, David G; Jaworska, Joanna S; Tunkel, Jay L; Thom, Gary C; Webb, Simon

    2004-04-01

    Whether or not a given chemical substance is readily biodegradable is an important piece of information in risk screening for both new and existing chemicals. Despite the relatively low cost of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development tests, data are often unavailable and biodegradability must be estimated. In this paper, we focus on the predictive value of selected Biowin models and model batteries using Bayesian analysis. Posterior probabilities, calculated based on performance with the model training sets using Bayes' theorem, were closely matched by actual performance with an expanded set of 374 premanufacture notice (PMN) substances. Further analysis suggested that a simple battery consisting of Biowin3 (survey ultimate biodegradation model) and Biowin5 (Ministry of International Trade and Industry [MITI] linear model) would have enhanced predictive power in comparison to individual models. Application of the battery to PMN substances showed that performance matched expectation. This approach significantly reduced both false positives for ready biodegradability and the overall misclassification rate. Similar results were obtained for a set of 63 pharmaceuticals using a battery consisting of Biowin3 and Biowin6 (MITI nonlinear model). Biodegradation data for PMNs tested in multiple ready tests or both inherent and ready biodegradation tests yielded additional insights that may be useful in risk screening.

  7. Biodegradation: Updating the concepts of control for microbial cleanup in contaminated aquifers.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, Rainer U; Elsner, Martin; Griebler, Christian; Lueders, Tillmann; Stumpp, Christine; Aamand, Jens; Agathos, Spiros N; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bastiaens, Leen; Bjerg, Poul L; Boon, Nico; Dejonghe, Winnie; Huang, Wei E; Schmidt, Susanne I; Smolders, Erik; Sørensen, Sebastian R; Springael, Dirk; van Breukelen, Boris M

    2015-06-16

    Biodegradation is one of the most favored and sustainable means of removing organic pollutants from contaminated aquifers but the major steering factors are still surprisingly poorly understood. Growing evidence questions some of the established concepts for control of biodegradation. Here, we critically discuss classical concepts such as the thermodynamic redox zonation, or the use of steady state transport scenarios for assessing biodegradation rates. Furthermore, we discuss if the absence of specific degrader populations can explain poor biodegradation. We propose updated perspectives on the controls of biodegradation in contaminant plumes. These include the plume fringe concept, transport limitations, and transient conditions as currently underestimated processes affecting biodegradation.

  8. Effect of degumming time on silkworm silk fibre for biodegradable polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mei-po; Wang, Hao; Lau, Kin-tak

    2012-02-01

    Recently, many studies have been conducted on exploitation of natural materials for modern product development and bioengineering applications. Apart from plant-based materials (such as sisal, hemp, jute, bamboo and palm fibre), animal-based fibre is a kind of sustainable natural materials for making novel composites. Silkworm silk fibre extracted from cocoon has been well recognized as a promising material for bio-medical engineering applications because of its superior mechanical and bioresorbable properties. However, when producing silk fibre reinforced biodegradable/bioresorbable polymer composites, hydrophilic sericin has been found to cause poor interfacial bonding with most polymers and thus, it results in affecting the resultant properties of the composites. Besides, sericin layers on fibroin surface may also cause an adverse effect towards biocompatibility and hypersensitivity to silk for implant applications. Therefore, a proper pre-treatment should be done for sericin removal. Degumming is a surface modification process which allows a wide control of the silk fibre's properties, making the silk fibre possible to be used for the development and production of novel bio-composites with unique/specific mechanical and biodegradable properties. In this paper, a cleaner and environmentally friendly surface modification technique for tussah silk in polymer based composites is proposed. The effectiveness of different degumming parameters including degumming time and temperature on tussah silk is discussed through the analyses of their mechanical and morphological properties. Based on results obtained, it was found that the mechanical properties of tussah silk are affected by the degumming time due to the change of the fibre structure and fibroin alignment.

  9. Scale up of diesel oil biodegradation in a baffled roller bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nikakhtari, Hossein; Song, Wanning; Kumar, Pardeep; Nemati, Mehdi; Hill, Gordon A

    2010-05-01

    Diesel oil is a suitable substance to represent petroleum contamination from accidental spills in operating and transportation facilities. Using a microbial culture enriched from a petroleum contaminated soil, biodegradation of diesel oil was carried out in 2.2, 55, and 220 L roller baffled bioreactors. The effects of bioreactor rotation speed (from 5 to 45 rpm) and liquid loading (from 18% to 73% of total volume) on the biodegradation of diesel oil were studied. In the small scale bioreactor (2.2L), the maximum rotation speed of 45 rpm resulted in the highest biodegradation rate with a first order biodegradation kinetic constant of 0.095 d(-1). In the larger scale bioreactors, rotation speed did not affect the biodegradation rate. Liquid loadings higher than 64% resulted in reduced biodegradation rates in the small scale bioreactor; however, in the larger roller bioreactors liquid loading did not affect the biodegradation rate. Biodegradation of diesel oil at 5 rpm and 73% loading is recommended for operating large scale roller baffled bioreactors. Under these conditions, high diesel oil concentrations up to 50 gL(-1) can be bioremediated at a rate of 1.61 gL(-1)d(-1). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2015-12-15

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads was studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biodegradable sizing agents from soy protein via controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement for remediation of textile effluents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiping; Xu, Helan; Hou, Xiuliang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yiqi

    2017-03-01

    Fully biodegradable textile sizes with satisfactory performance properties were developed from soy protein with controlled hydrolysis and dis-entanglement to tackle the intractable environmental issues associated with the non-biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in textile effluents. PVA derived from petroleum is the primary sizing agent due to its excellent sizing performance on polyester-containing yarns, especially in increasingly prevailing high-speed weaving. However, due to the poor biodegradability, PVA causes serious environmental pollution, and thus, should be substituted with more environmentally friendly polymers. Soy protein treated with high amount of triethanolamine was found with acceptable sizing properties. However, triethanolamine is also non-biodegradable and originated from petroleum, therefore, is not an ideal additive. In this research, soy sizes were developed from soy protein treated with glycerol, the biodegradable triol that could also be obtained from soy. The soy sizes had good film properties, adhesion to polyester and abrasion resistance close to PVA, rendering them qualified for sizing applications. Regarding desizing, consumption of water and energy for removal of soy size could be remarkably decreased, comparing to removal of PVA. Moreover, with satisfactory degradability, the wastewater containing soy sizes was readily dischargeable after treated in activated sludge for two days. In summary, the fully biodegradable soy sizes had potential to substitute PVA for sustainable textile processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using gas permeable mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    We report high-resolution (150 nm) nanopatterning of biodegradable polylactide by thermal nanoimprint lithography using dichloromethane as a volatile solvent for improving the liquidity and a porous cyclodextrin-based gas-permeable mold. This study demonstrates the high-resolution patterning of polylactic acid and other non-liquid functional materials with poor fluidity by thermal nanoimprinting. Such a patterning is expected to expand the utility of thermal nanoimprint lithography and fabricate non-liquid functional materials suitable for eco-friendly and biomedical applications.

  13. Chemical structure-based predictive model for methanogenic anaerobic biodegradation potential.

    PubMed

    Meylan, William; Boethling, Robert; Aronson, Dallas; Howard, Philip; Tunkel, Jay

    2007-09-01

    Many screening-level models exist for predicting aerobic biodegradation potential from chemical structure, but anaerobic biodegradation generally has been ignored by modelers. We used a fragment contribution approach to develop a model for predicting biodegradation potential under methanogenic anaerobic conditions. The new model has 37 fragments (substructures) and classifies a substance as either fast or slow, relative to the potential to be biodegraded in the "serum bottle" anaerobic biodegradation screening test (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Guideline 311). The model correctly classified 90, 77, and 91% of the chemicals in the training set (n = 169) and two independent validation sets (n = 35 and 23), respectively. Accuracy of predictions of fast and slow degradation was equal for training-set chemicals, but fast-degradation predictions were less accurate than slow-degradation predictions for the validation sets. Analysis of the signs of the fragment coefficients for this and the other (aerobic) Biowin models suggests that in the context of simple group contribution models, the majority of positive and negative structural influences on ultimate degradation are the same for aerobic and methanogenic anaerobic biodegradation.

  14. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon in the Vadose Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are two major impediments to a better understanding of the influence of biodegradation on the risk of intrusion of petroleum vapors. We describe the contribution of biodegradation as an attenuation factor between the source and the receptor. The use of attenuation factors...

  15. Factors limiting sulfolane biodegradation in contaminated subarctic aquifer substrate.

    PubMed

    Kasanke, Christopher P; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2017-01-01

    Sulfolane, a water-soluble organosulfur compound, is used industrially worldwide and is associated with one of the largest contaminated groundwater plumes in the state of Alaska. Despite being widely used, little is understood about the degradation of sulfolane in the environment, especially in cold regions. We conducted aerobic and anaerobic microcosm studies to assess the biological and abiotic sulfolane degradation potential of contaminated subarctic aquifer groundwater and sediment from Interior Alaska. We also investigated the impacts of nutrient limitations and hydrocarbon co-contamination on sulfolane degradation. We found that sulfolane underwent biodegradation aerobically but not anaerobically under nitrate, sulfate, or iron-reducing conditions. No abiotic degradation activity was detectable under either oxic or anoxic conditions. Nutrient addition stimulated sulfolane biodegradation in sediment slurries at high sulfolane concentrations (100 mg L-1), but not at low sulfolane concentrations (500 μg L-1), and nutrient amendments were necessary to stimulate sulfolane biodegradation in incubations containing groundwater only. Hydrocarbon co-contamination retarded aerobic sulfolane biodegradation rates by ~30%. Our study is the first to investigate the sulfolane biodegradation potential of subarctic aquifer substrate and identifies several important factors limiting biodegradation rates. We concluded that oxygen is an important factor limiting natural attenuation of this sulfolane plume, and that nutrient amendments are unlikely to accelerate biodegradation within in the plume, although they may biostimulate degradation in ex situ groundwater treatment applications. Future work should be directed at elucidating the identity of indigenous sulfolane-degrading microorganisms and determining their distribution and potential activity in the environment.

  16. Factors limiting sulfolane biodegradation in contaminated subarctic aquifer substrate

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sulfolane, a water-soluble organosulfur compound, is used industrially worldwide and is associated with one of the largest contaminated groundwater plumes in the state of Alaska. Despite being widely used, little is understood about the degradation of sulfolane in the environment, especially in cold regions. We conducted aerobic and anaerobic microcosm studies to assess the biological and abiotic sulfolane degradation potential of contaminated subarctic aquifer groundwater and sediment from Interior Alaska. We also investigated the impacts of nutrient limitations and hydrocarbon co-contamination on sulfolane degradation. We found that sulfolane underwent biodegradation aerobically but not anaerobically under nitrate, sulfate, or iron-reducing conditions. No abiotic degradation activity was detectable under either oxic or anoxic conditions. Nutrient addition stimulated sulfolane biodegradation in sediment slurries at high sulfolane concentrations (100 mg L-1), but not at low sulfolane concentrations (500 μg L-1), and nutrient amendments were necessary to stimulate sulfolane biodegradation in incubations containing groundwater only. Hydrocarbon co-contamination retarded aerobic sulfolane biodegradation rates by ~30%. Our study is the first to investigate the sulfolane biodegradation potential of subarctic aquifer substrate and identifies several important factors limiting biodegradation rates. We concluded that oxygen is an important factor limiting natural attenuation of this sulfolane plume, and that nutrient amendments are unlikely to accelerate biodegradation within in the plume, although they may biostimulate degradation in ex situ groundwater treatment applications. Future work should be directed at elucidating the identity of indigenous sulfolane-degrading microorganisms and determining their distribution and potential activity in the environment. PMID:28727811

  17. Molecularly organic/inorganic hybrid hollow mesoporous organosilica nanocapsules with tumor-specific biodegradability and enhanced chemotherapeutic functionality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Lin, Han; Yu, Luodan; Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Liying; Zhu, Yufang; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-05-01

    Based on the intrinsic features of high stability and unique multifunctionality, inorganic nanoparticles have shown remarkable potentials in combating cancer, but their biodegradability and biocompatibility are still under debate. As a paradigm, this work successfully demonstrates that framework organic-inorganic hybridization can endow the inorganic mesoporous silica nanocarriers with unique tumor-sensitive biodegradability and high biocompatibility. Based on a "chemical homology" mechanism, molecularly organic-inorganic hybridized hollow mesoporous organosilica nanocapsules (HMONs) with high dispersity and sub-50 nm particle dimension were constructed in mass production. A physiologically active disulfide bond (SS) was directly incorporated into the silica framework, which could break up upon contacting the reducing microenvironment of tumor tissue and biodegrade accordingly. Such a tumor-specific biodegradability is also responsible for the tumor-responsive drug releasing by the fast biodegradation and disintegration of the framework. The ultrasmall particle size of HMONs guarantees their high accumulation into tumor tissue, thus causing the high chemotherapeutic outcome. This research provides a paradigm that framework organic-inorganic hybridization can endow the inorganic nanocarrier with unique biological effects suitable for biomedical application, benefiting the development of novel nanosystems with the unique bio-functionality and performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Biodegradable catheters and urinary stents. When?

    PubMed

    Soria, F; Morcillo, E; López de Alda, A; Pastor, T; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-10-01

    One of the main wishes in the field of urinary catheters and stents is to arm them with biodegradable characteristics because we consider a failure of these devices the need for retrieval, the forgotten catheter syndrome as well as the adverse effects permanent devices cause after fulfilling their aim. The efforts focused in new designs, coatings and biomaterials aim to increase the biocompatibility of theses internal devices. Lately, there have been correct advances to answer the main challenges regarding biodegradable ureteral devices. Thus, modulation of the rate of degradation has been achieved thanks to new biomaterials and the use of copolymers that enable to choose the time of permanence as it is programmed with conventional double J catheters. Biocompatibility has improved with the use of new polymers that adapt better to the urine. Finally, one of the main problems is elimination of degraded fragments and experimentally it has be demonstrated that new designs elicit controlled degradation, from distal to proximal; using stranding and combination of copolymers degradation may be caused by dilution, reducing fragmentation to the last stages of life of the prosthesis. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that biodegradable catheters potentially may cause less urinary tract infection, less encrustation and predictably they will diminish catheter morbidity, since their degradation process reduces adverse effects. Regarding the development of biodegradable urethral stents, it is necessary to find biomaterials that enable maintaining their biomechanical properties in the long term, keeping open the urethral lumen both in patients with BPH and urethral stenosis. Modulation of the time of degradation of the prosthesis has been achieved, but the appearance of urothelial hyperplasia is still a constant in the initial phases after implantation. The development of drug eluting stents, anti-proliferative or anti-inflammatory, as well as biodegradable stents biocoated is a

  19. Biodegradable composite scaffolds: a strategy to modulate stem cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Armentano, Ilaria; Fortunati, Elena; Mattioli, Samantha; Rescignano, Nicolatta; Kenny, José M

    2013-04-01

    The application of new biomaterial technologies offers the potential to direct the stem cell fate, targeting the delivery of cells and reducing immune rejection, thereby supporting the development of regenerative medicine. Cells respond to their surrounding structure and with nanostructures exhibit unique proliferative and differentiation properties. This review presents the relevance, the promising perspectives and challenges of current biodegradable composite scaffolds in terms of material properties, processing technology and surface modification, focusing on significant recent patents in these fields. It has been reported how biodegradable porous composite scaffolds can be engineered with initial properties that reproduce the anisotropy, viscoelasticity, tension-compression non-linearity of different tissues by introducing specific nanostructures. Moreover the modulation of electrical, morphological, surface and topographic scaffold properties enables specific stem cell response. Recent advances in nanotechnology have allowed to engineer novel biomaterials with these complexity levels. Understanding the specific biological response triggered by various aspects of the fibrous environment is important in guiding the design and engineering of novel substrates that mimic the native cell matrix interactions in vivo.

  20. Materials library collections as tools for interdisciplinary research

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper examines how materials libraries are used as tools for interdisciplinary collaboration in 3 research projects that inhabit a disciplinary triangle between materials research, design and user needs: PhysFeel, which explores how materials collections can be used in psychological therapies; Light.Touch.Matters, a design-led project to develop new smart materials; and Hands of X, which uses materials collections to develop a bespoke prosthetics service. The paper analyses and contrasts these case studies to better understand the affordances and limitations of materials collections when used as research, translational and design tools. We conclude that in collaborations between materials researchers, designers and end users, tensions arise as a result of the primacy that each partner gives to creativity, the development of new knowledge and to solving societal problems. The use of a materials library addresses many of these issues but is not a panacea for all the problems associated with interdisciplinary working. PMID:29576803

  1. Materials library collections as tools for interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, S E; Miodownik, M A

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines how materials libraries are used as tools for interdisciplinary collaboration in 3 research projects that inhabit a disciplinary triangle between materials research, design and user needs: PhysFeel , which explores how materials collections can be used in psychological therapies; Light.Touch.Matters , a design-led project to develop new smart materials; and Hands of X , which uses materials collections to develop a bespoke prosthetics service. The paper analyses and contrasts these case studies to better understand the affordances and limitations of materials collections when used as research, translational and design tools. We conclude that in collaborations between materials researchers, designers and end users, tensions arise as a result of the primacy that each partner gives to creativity, the development of new knowledge and to solving societal problems. The use of a materials library addresses many of these issues but is not a panacea for all the problems associated with interdisciplinary working.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOPLUME4 MODEL FOR FUELS AND CHLORINATED SOLVENT BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bioplume model has been in development and use for modeling biodegradation and natural attenuation since the late 80's. Bioplume I focused on aerobic biodegradation of BTEX. Bioplume II simulated oxygen and hydrocarbons and simulated biodegradation using an instantaneous re...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOPLUME 4 MODEL FOR FUELS AND CHLORINATED SOLVENT BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bioplume model has been in development and use for modeling biodegradation and natural attenuation since the late 1980s. Bioplume 1 focused on aerobic biodegradation of BTEX. Bioplume II simulated oxygen and hydrocarbons and simulated biodegradation using an instantaneous r...

  4. Naphthalene biodegradation in temperate and arctic marine microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagi, Andrea; Pampanin, Daniela M; Lanzén, Anders; Bilstad, Torleiv; Kommedal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Naphthalene, the smallest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is found in abundance in crude oil, its major source in marine environments. PAH removal occurs via biodegradation, a key process determining their fate in the sea. Adequate estimation of PAH biodegradation rates is essential for environmental risk assessment and response planning using numerical models such as the oil spill contingency and response (OSCAR) model. Using naphthalene as a model compound, biodegradation rate, temperature response and bacterial community composition of seawaters from two climatically different areas (North Sea and Arctic Ocean) were studied and compared. Naphthalene degradation was followed by measuring oxygen consumption in closed bottles using the OxiTop(®) system. Microbial communities of untreated and naphthalene exposed samples were analysed by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and pyrosequencing. Three times higher naphthalene degradation rate coefficients were observed in arctic seawater samples compared to temperate, at all incubation temperatures. Rate coefficients at in situ temperatures were however, similar (0.048 day(-1) for temperate and 0.068 day(-1) for arctic). Naphthalene biodegradation rates decreased with similar Q10 ratios (3.3 and 3.5) in both seawaters. Using the temperature compensation method implemented in the OSCAR model, Q10 = 2, biodegradation in arctic seawater was underestimated when calculated from the measured temperate k1 value, showing that temperature difference alone could not predict biodegradation rates adequately. Temperate and arctic untreated seawater communities were different as revealed by pyrosequencing. Geographic origin of seawater affected the community composition of exposed samples.

  5. Characterizations of biodegradable epoxy-coated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) thin film for flexible microwave applications

    Treesearch

    Hongyi Mi; Chien-Hao Liu; Tzu-Husan Chang; Jung-Hun Seo; Huilong Zhang; Sang June Cho; Nader Behdad; Zhenqiang Ma; Chunhua Yao; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong

    2016-01-01

    Wood pulp cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) thin film is a novel recyclable and biodegradable material. We investigated the microwave dielectric properties of the epoxy coated-CNF thin film for potential broad applications in flexible high speed electronics. The characterizations of dielectric properties were carried out in a frequency range of 1–10 GHz. The dielectric...

  6. [Preface for special issue on bio-based materials (2016)].

    PubMed

    Weng, Yunxuan

    2016-06-25

    Bio-based materials are new materials or chemicals with renewable biomass as raw materials such as grain, legume, straw, bamboo and wood powder. This class of materials includes bio-based polymer, biobased fiber, glycotechnology products, biobased rubber and plastics produced by biomass thermoplastic processing and basic biobased chemicals, for instance, bio-alcohols, organic acids, alkanes, and alkenes, obtained by bio-synthesis, bio-processing and bio-refinery. Owing to its environmental friendly and resource conservation, bio-based materials are becoming a new dominant industry taking the lead in the world scientific and technological innovation and economic development. An overview of bio-based materials development is reported in this special issue, and the industrial status and research progress of the following aspects, including biobased fiber, polyhydroxyalkanoates, biodegradable mulching film, bio-based polyamide, protein based biomedical materials, bio-based polyurethane, and modification and processing of poly(lactic acid), are introduced.

  7. Electrospinning of Biodegradable and Biocompatible Nanofiber Patches from Solutions of ``Green'' Materials for Plant Protection against Fungi Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sett, Soumyadip; Lee, Minwook; Yarin, Alexander; Moghadam, S. M. Alavi; Meinke, Matthias; Schroeder, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable and biocompatible soy protein/petroleum-derived polymer monolithic fibers containing adhesives were electrospun on commercial rayon pads. The polymers used, PVA and PCL, are widely used in the biomedical industry, including such applications as drug delivery and scaffold manufacturing. Soy protein is an abundant waste of SoyDiesel production, and is widely used as a nutrient. The soy content in our fibers was as high as 40% w/w. Four different adhesives, including ordinary wood glue, repositionable glue and FDA-approved pressure-sensitive glue were used for electrospinning and electrospraying. The normal and shear adhesive strengths of the patches developed in this work were measured and compared. The adhesive strength was sufficient enough to withstand normal atmospheric conditions. These biodegradable and biocompatible nano-textured patches are ready to be used on prune locations without being carried away by wind and will protect plants against fungi attack at these locations, preventing diseases like Vine Decline.

  8. Impact of formation water geochemistry and crude oil biodegradation on microbial methanogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow wells (393–442 m depth) contained highly biodegraded oils associated with low extent of methanogenesis, while the deepest (> 1208 m) wells contained minimally degraded oils and produced fluids suggesting a low extent of methanogenesis. Mid-depth wells (666–857 m) in the central field had the highest indicators of methanogenesis and contained moderately biodegraded oils. Little correlation existed between extents of crude oil biodegradation and methanogenesis across the whole transect (avg.R2 = 0.13). However, when wells with the greatest extent of crude oil biodegradation were eliminated (3 of 6 oilfields), better correlation between extent of methanogenesis and biodegradation (avg. R2 = 0.53) was observed. The results suggest that oil quality and salinity impact methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. Reservoirs indicating moderate extent of crude oil biodegradation and high extent of methanogenesis, such as the central field, would be good candidates for attempting to enhance methanogenic crude oil biodegradation as a result of the observations from the study.

  9. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  10. A new iron calcium phosphate material to improve the osteoconductive properties of a biodegradable ceramic: a study in rabbit calvaria.

    PubMed

    Manchón, Angel; Hamdan Alkhraisat, Mohammad; Rueda-Rodriguez, Carmen; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Torres, Jesús; Lucas-Aparicio, Julia; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; López-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2015-10-20

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive and biodegradable material used in bone regeneration procedures, while iron has been suggested as a tool to improve the biological performance of calcium phosphate-based materials. However, the mechanisms of interaction between these materials and human cells are not fully understood. In order to clarify this relationship, we have studied the iron role in β-TCP ceramics. Iron-containing β-TCPs were prepared by replacing CaCO3 with C6H5FeO7 at different molar ratios. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the occurrence of β-TCP as the sole phase in the pure β-TCP and iron-containing ceramics. The incorporation of iron ions in the β-TCP lattice decreased the specific surface area as the pore size was shifted toward meso- and/or macropores. Furthermore, the human osteoblastlike cell line MG-63 was cultured onto the ceramics to determine cell proliferation and viability, and it was observed that the iron-β-TCP ceramics have better cytocompatibility than pure β-TCP. Finally, in vivo assays were performed using rabbit calvaria as a bone model. The scaffolds were implanted for 8 and 12 weeks in the defects created in the skullcap with pure β-TCP as the control. The in vivo behavior, in terms of new bone formed, degradation, and residual graft material were investigated using sequential histological evaluations and histomorphometric analysis. The in vivo implantation of the ceramics showed enhanced bone tissue formation and scaffold degradation for iron-β-TCPs. Thus, iron appears to be a useful tool to enhance the osteoconductive properties of calcium phosphate ceramics.

  11. Biodegradation of 4-nitroaniline by plant-growth promoting Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 and toxicological analysis of its biodegradation metabolites.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, Sivagnanam; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2016-01-25

    4-nitroaniline (4-NA) is one of the major priority pollutants generated from industrial productions and pesticide transformation; however very limited biodegradation details have been reported. This work is the first to report 4-NA biodegradation kinetics and toxicity reduction using a newly isolated plant-growth promoting bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2. The 4-NA-dependent growth kinetics parameters: μmax, Ks and Ki, were determined to be 0.039 h(-1), 6.623 mg L(-1) and 25.57 mg L(-1), respectively using Haldane inhibition model, while the maximum biodegradation rate (Vmax) of 4-NA was at 0.541 mg L(-1) h(-1) and 0.551 mg L(-1) h(-1), following Michaelis-Menten and Hanes-Woolf models, respectively. Biodegradation pathway of 4-NA by Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 was proposed, and successfully led to the reduction of 4-NA toxicity according to the following toxicity assessments: microbial toxicity using Escherichia coli DH5α, phytotoxicity with Vigna radiata and Crotalaria juncea, and cytogenotoxicity with Allium cepa root-tip cells. In addition, Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2 possess important plant-growth promoting traits, both in the presence and absence of 4-NA. This study has provided a new insight into 4-NA biodegradation ability and concurrent plant-growth promoting activities of Acinetobacter sp. AVLB2, which may indicate its potential role for rhizoremediation, while sustaining crop production even under 4-NA stressed environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of chronic pollution and water flow intermittency on stream biofilms biodegradation capacity.

    PubMed

    Rožman, Marko; Acuña, Vicenç; Petrović, Mira

    2018-02-01

    A mesocosm case study was conducted to gain understanding and practical knowledge on biofilm emerging contaminants biodegradation capacity under stressor and multiple stressor conditions. Two real life scenarios: I) biodegradation in a pristine intermittent stream experiencing acute pollution and II) biodegradation in a chronically polluted intermittent stream, were examined via a multifactorial experiment using an artificial stream facility. Stream biofilms were exposed to different water flow conditions i.e. permanent and intermittent water flow. Venlafaxine, a readily biodegradable pharmaceutical was used as a measure of biodegradation capacity while pollution was simulated by a mixture of four emerging contaminants (erythromycin, sulfisoxazole, diclofenac and imidacloprid in addition to venlafaxine) in environmentally relevant concentrations. Biodegradation kinetics monitored via LC-MS/MS was established, statistically evaluated, and used to link biodegradation with stress events. The results suggest that the effects of intermittent flow do not hinder and may even stimulate pristine biofilm biodegradation capacity. Chronic pollution completely reduced biodegradation in permanent water flow experimental treatments while no change in intermittent streams was observed. A combined effect of water flow conditions and emerging contaminants exposure on biodegradation was found. The decrease in biodegradation due to exposure to emerging contaminants is significantly greater in streams with permanent water flow suggesting that the short and medium term biodegradation capacity in intermittent systems may be preserved or even greater than in perennial streams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. User’s Guide for Biodegradation Reactions in TMVOCBio

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Jung, Yoojin; Battistelli, Alfredo

    TMVOCBio is an extended version of the TMVOC numerical reservoir simulator, with the capability of simulating multiple biodegradation reactions mediated by different microbial populations or based on different redox reactions, thus involving different electron acceptors. This modeling feature is implemented within the existing TMVOC module in iTOUGH2. TMVOCBio, originally developed by Battistelli (2003; 2004), uses a general modified form of the Monod kinetic rate equation to simulate biodegradation reactions, which effectively simulates the uptake of a substrate while accounting for various limiting factors (i.e., the limitation by substrate, electron acceptor, or nutrients). Two approaches are included: 1) a multiple Monodmore » kinetic rate equation, which assumes all the limiting factors simultaneously affect the substrate uptake rate, and 2) a minimum Monod model, which assumes that the substrate uptake rate is controlled by the most limiting factor among those acting for the specific substrate. As the limiting factors, biomass growth inhibition, toxicity effects, as well as competitive and non-competitive inhibition effects are included. The temperature and moisture dependence of biodegradation reactions is also considered. This report provides mathematical formulations and assumptions used for modeling the biodegradation reactions, and describes additional modeling capabilities. Detailed description of input format for biodegradation reactions is presented along with sample problems.« less

  14. [Biodegradable fixation systems in pediatric craniofacial surgery: 10-year experience with 324 patients].

    PubMed

    Yasonov, S A; Lopatin, A V; Bel'chenko, V A; Vasil'ev, I G

    Over the past 15 years, resorbable materials have been successfully used for osteosynthesis, but their high cost prevents widespread application. However, the use of resorbable systems could be a method of choice, especially in treatment of children in the active growth period. Obviously, biodegradable materials not only are highly competitive with known metal constructs in terms of fixation rigidity, biocompatibility, and a low risk of infection but also have an undeniable advantage, such as gradual resorption allowing quick return of damaged bones to the physiological conditions of functioning. A special feature of bioresorbable systems is that they can be assembled using ultrasonic welding, which greatly facilitates the fixation process and also provides necessary rigidity, even in cases of joining very thin bones when reliable fixation with screws is impossible. Over the past 10 years, we have used biodegradable systems in 324 patients. In 244 of them, we used traditional (plate/screw) systems; in 80 cases, an ultrasonic welding system was chosen for osteosynthesis. In the present work, we discuss, based on clinical evidence, the advantages and disadvantages of both fixation systems for reconstructive craniofacial surgery in children.

  15. Lignin biodegradation by the ascomycete Chrysonilia sitophila.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Ferraz, A; Nogueira, R F; Ferrer, I; Esposito, E; Durán, N

    1997-01-01

    The lignin biodegradation process has an important role in the carbon cycle of the biosphere. The study of this natural process has developed mainly with the use of basidiomycetes in laboratory investigations. This has been a logical approach since most of the microorganisms involved in lignocellulosic degradation belong to this class of fungi. However, other microorganisms such as ascomycetes and also some bacteria, are involved in the lignin decaying process. This work focuses on lignin biodegradation by a microorganism belonging to the ascomycete class, Chrysonilia sitophila. Lignin peroxidase production and characterization, mechanisms of lignin degradation (lignin model compounds and lignin in wood matrix) and biosynthesis of veratryl alcohol are outstanding. Applications of C. sitophila for effluent treatment, wood biodegradation and single-cell protein production are also discussed.

  16. Materials Research With Neutrons at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, R. L.; Glinka, C. J.; Krueger, S.; Lindstrom, R. A.; Lynn, J. W.; Prask, H. J.; Prince, E.; Rush, J. J.; Rowe, J. M.; Satija, S. K.; Toby, B. H.; Tsai, A.; Udovic, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory works with industry, standards bodies, universities, and other government laboratories to improve the nation’s measurements and standards infrastructure for materials. An increasingly important component of this effort is carried out at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), at present the most productive center of its kind in the United States. This article gives a brief historical account of the growth and activities of the Center with examples of its work in major materials research areas and describes the key role the Center can expect to play in future developments. PMID:27500021

  17. The impacts of ozonation on oil sands process-affected water biodegradability and biofilm formation characteristics in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geelsu; Dong, Tao; Islam, Md Sahinoor; Sheng, Zhiya; Pérez-Estrada, Leónidas A; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of the ozonation process (as an oxidation treatment for water and wastewater treatment applications) on microbial biofilm formation and biodegradability of organic compounds present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), biofilm reactors were operated continuously for 6weeks. Two types of biofilm substrate materials: polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC), and two types of OSPW-fresh and ozonated OSPWs-were tested. Endogenous microorganisms, in OSPW, quickly formed biofilms in the reactors. Without ozonation, the bioreactor (using endogenous microorganisms) removed 13.8% of the total acid-extractable organics (TAO) and 18.5% of the parent naphthenic acids (NAs) from fresh OSPW. The combined ozonation and biodegradation process removed 87.2% of the OSPW TAO and over 99% of the OSPW parent NAs. Further UPLC/HRMS analysis showed that NA biodegradability decreased as the NA cyclization number increased. Microbial biofilm formation was found to depend on the biofilm substrate type. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Field evidence of biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in groundwater with incidental and active recycled water recharge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quanlin; McCraven, Sally; Garcia, Julio; Gasca, Monica; Johnson, Theodore A; Motzer, William E

    2009-02-01

    Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) has been found through laboratory incubation in unsaturated and saturated soil samples under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. However, direct field evidence of in situ biodegradation in groundwater is very limited. This research aimed to evaluate biodegradation of NDMA in a large-scale groundwater system receiving recycled water as incidental and active recharge. NDMA concentrations in 32 monitoring and production wells with different screen intervals were monitored over a period of seven years. Groundwater monitoring was used to characterize changes in the magnitude and extent of NDMA in groundwater in response to seasonal hydrogeologic conditions and, more importantly, to significant concentration variations in effluent from water reclamation plants (associated with treatment-process changes). Extensive monitoring of NDMA concentrations and flow rates at effluent discharge locations and surface-water stations was also conducted to reasonably estimate mass loading through unlined river reaches to underlying groundwater. Monitoring results indicate that significant biodegradation of NDMA occurred in groundwater, accounting for an estimated 90% mass reduction over the seven-year monitoring period. In addition, a discrete effluent-discharge and groundwater-extraction event was extensively monitored in a well-characterized, localized groundwater subsystem for 626 days. Analysis of the associated NDMA fate and transport in the subsystem indicated that an estimated 80% of the recharged mass was biodegraded. The observed field evidence of NDMA biodegradation is supported by groundwater transport modeling accounting for various dilution mechanisms and first-order decay for biodegradation, and by a previous laboratory study on soil samples collected from the study site [Bradley, P.M., Carr, S.A., Baird, R.B., Chapelle, F.H., 2005. Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in soil from a water reclamation facility

  19. Differential regulation of phenanthrene biodegradation process by kaolinite and quartz and the underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gong, Beini; Wu, Pingxiao; Ruan, Bo; Zhang, Yating; Lai, Xiaolin; Yu, Langfeng; Li, Yongtao; Dang, Zhi

    2018-05-05

    Natural and cost-effective materials such as minerals can serve as supportive matrices to enhance biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study we evaluated and compared the regulatory role of two common soil minerals, i.e. kaolinite and quartz in phenanthrene (a model PAH) degradation by a PAH degrader Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and investigated the underlying mechanism. Overall kaolinite was more effective than quartz in promoting phenanthrene degradation and bacterial growth. And it was revealed that a more intimate association was established between GY2B and kaolinite. Si and O atoms on mineral surface were demonstrated to be involved in GY2B-mineral interaction. There was an higher polysaccharide/lipid content in the EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) secreted by GY2B on kaolinite than on quartz. Altogether, these results showed that differential bacterial growth, enzymatic activity, EPS composition as well as the interface interaction may explain the effects minerals have on PAH biodegradation. It was implicated that different interface interaction between different minerals and bacteria can affect microbial behavior, which ultimately results in different biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradation of crude oil saturated fraction supported on clays.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Jones, Martin D; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-02-01

    The role of clay minerals in crude oil saturated hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/saturated hydrocarbon microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clay minerals used for this study were montmorillonite, palygorskite, saponite and kaolinite. The clay mineral samples were treated with hydrochloric acid and didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce acid activated- and organoclays respectively which were used in this study. The production of organoclay was restricted to only montmorillonite and saponite because of their relative high CEC. The study indicated that acid activated clays, organoclays and unmodified kaolinite, were inhibitory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. Unmodified saponite was neutral to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. However, unmodified palygorskite and montmorillonite were stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturated fraction and appears to do so as a result of the clays' ability to provide high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients such that the nutrients were within the 'vicinity' of the microbes. Adsorption of the saturated hydrocarbons was not significant during biodegradation.

  1. Deterioration pattern of six biodegradable, potentially low-environmental impact mulches in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Marta M; González-Mora, Sara; Villena, Jaime; Campos, Juan A; Moreno, Carmen

    2017-09-15

    Polyethylene plastic mulches are widely used in agriculture due to the countless advantages they have. However, the environmental problems associated with their use have led us to look for alternative mulch materials which degrade naturally and quickly, impact the environment less and function satisfactorily. To this end, biodegradable plastics and paper mulches are being used, but aspects related to their degradation should be studied more in-depth. This work provides the deterioration pattern of six biodegradable mulch materials (i.e. vegetable starch, polylactic acid plastic films or paper mulches) in horticultural crop in the edaphoclimatic conditions of Central Spain in two situations: over the lifetime of the mulches and after being incorporated into the soil. In the first situation, the deterioration levels were evaluated by recording the puncture resistance, weight and area covered in the above-soil and the in-soil part, and after soil incorporation by the number of fragments, their surfaces and weight. In the above-soil part, biodegradable plastics experienced further deterioration, particularly with no crop, while the paper mulch remained practically intact. However, the in-soil paper experienced complete and rapid degradation. At 200 days after soil incorporation, mulch residues were scarce, with the environmental effects it entails. These findings offer practical implications regarding the type of crop. The measurement of the surface covered, rather than the weight, was shown to be a more reliable indicator of the degradation of mulches. Furthermore, visual estimation was found to underestimate the functionality of mulches in comparison to that of the measurement of the surface covered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multisubstrate biodegradation kinetics of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene mixtures

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Guha, S.; Peters, C.A.; Jaffe, P.R.

    Biodegradation kinetics of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene were studied in sole-substrate systems, and in binary and ternary mixtures to examine substrate interactions. The experiments were conducted in aerobic batch aqueous systems inoculated with a mixed culture that had been isolated from soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monod kinetic parameters and yield coefficients for the individual parameters and yield coefficients for the individual compounds were estimated from substrate depletion and CO{sub 2} evolution rate data in sole-substrate experiments. In all three binary mixture experiments, biodegradation kinetics were comparable to the sole-substrate kinetics. In the ternary mixture, biodegradation of naphthalenemore » was inhibited and the biodegradation rates of phenanthrene and pyrene were enhanced. A multisubstrate form of the Monod kinetic model was found to adequately predict substrate interactions in the binary and ternary mixtures using only the parameters derived from sole-substrate experiments. Numerical simulations of biomass growth kinetics explain the observed range of behaviors in PAH mixtures. In general, the biodegradation rates of the more degradable and abundant compounds are reduced due to competitive inhibition, but enhanced biodegradation of the more recalcitrant PAHs occurs due to simultaneous biomass growth on multiple substrates. In PAH-contaminated environments, substrate interactions may be very large due to additive effects from the large number of compounds present.« less

  3. Organic pollutant loading and biodegradability of firefighting foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Zhong; Bao, Zhi-ming; Hu, Cheng; Li-Shuai, Jing; Chen, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Firefighting foam has been widely used as the high-performance extinguishing agent in extinguishing the liquid poor fire. It was concerned for its environmental impacts due to its massive usage. In this study, the organic loading level and the biodegradability of 18 firefighting foams commonly used in China were evaluated and compared. The COD and TOC of firefighting foam concentrates are extremely high. Furthermore, those of foam solutions are also much higher than regular wastewater. The COD/TOC ratio of synthetic foams are higher than protein foams. The 28-day biodegradation rates of 18 firefighting foams are all over 60%, indicating that they are all ready biodegradable. Protein foams (P, FP and FFFP) have the higher organic loading and lower 28-day biodegradation rates compared to the synthetic foams (Class A foam, AFFF and S). The short and long-term impact of protein foams on the environment are larger than synthetic foams.

  4. A new bioseed for determination of wastewater biodegradability: analysis of the experimental procedure.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros Martín, M M; Esteban García, B; Ortega-Gómez, E; Sánchez Pérez, J A

    2014-01-01

    A new bioassay proposed in the patent P201300029 was applied to a pre-treated wastewater containing a mixture of commercial pesticides to simulate a recalcitrant industrial wastewater in order to determine its biodegradability. The test uses a mixture of standardized inoculum of the lyophilized bacteria Pseudomonas putida with the proper proportion of salts and minerals. The results highlight that biodegradation efficiency can be calculated using a gross parameter (chemical oxygen demand (COD)) which facilitates the biodegradability determination for routine water biodegradability analysis. The same trend was observed throughout the assay with the dehydrated and fresh inoculums, and only a difference of 5% in biodegradation efficiency (E f) was observed. The obtained results showed that the P. putida biodegradability assay can be used as a commercial test with a lyophilized inoculum in order to monitor the ready biodegradability of an organic pollutant or a WWTP influent. Moreover, a combination of the BOD5/COD ratio and the P. putida biodegradability test is an attractive alternative in order to evaluate the biodegradability enhancement in water pre-treated with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs).

  5. An Investigation Into The Viability Of Nanocrystalline Cellulose As A Packaging Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John

    The focus of this proposal is to identify unexplored areas of research in the field of packaging science, specifically related to the incorporation of Nanocrystalline Cellulose (NCC) as a functional material in fiber based packaging, as well as to highlight some of potential risks and unknowns in the product lifecycle. This research hypothesizes that incorporating NCC into wood fiber-based c-flute corrugated packaging medium will show a sufficient performance improvement to justify additional research. Nanomaterials, as a whole, are still being understood, including those using naturally occurring bases such as NCC. Further incremental testing with NCC will help provide a performance and safety baseline for the necessary future research prior to mass production. NCC holds great promise for the future: a commonly available, naturally occurring material that's easily recyclable and biodegradable, yet has the strength of steel. Due diligence is required for this material to come to market in a safe and sustainable manner.

  6. Biodegradation of vapor-phase toluene in unsaturated porous media: Column experiments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali M; Wick, Lukas Y; Harms, Hauke; Thullner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradation of organic chemicals in the vapor phase of soils and vertical flow filters has gained attention as promising approach to clean up volatile organic compounds (VOC). The drivers of VOC biodegradation in unsaturated systems however still remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the processes controlling aerobic VOC biodegradation in a laboratory setup mimicking the unsaturated zone above a shallow aquifer. The setup allowed for diffusive vapor-phase transport and biodegradation of three VOC: non-deuterated and deuterated toluene as two compounds of highly differing biodegradability but (nearly) identical physical and chemical properties, and MTBE as (at the applied experimental conditions) non-biodegradable tracer and internal control. Our results showed for toluene an effective microbial degradation within centimeter VOC transport distances despite high gas-phase diffusivity. Degradation rates were controlled by the reactivity of the compounds while oxic conditions were found everywhere in the system. This confirms hypotheses that vadose zone biodegradation rates can be extremely high and are able to prevent the outgassing of VOC to the atmosphere within a centimeter range if compound properties and site conditions allow for sufficiently high degradation rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzymatic oxidative biodegradation of nanoparticles: Mechanisms, significance and applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Vlasova, Irina I.

    Biopersistence of carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide (GO) and several other types of carbonaceous nanomaterials is an essential determinant of their health effects. Successful biodegradation is one of the major factors defining the life span and biological responses to nanoparticles. Here, we review the role and contribution of different oxidative enzymes of inflammatory cells – myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, hemoglobin, and xanthine oxidase – to the reactions of nanoparticle biodegradation. We further focus on interactions of nanomaterials with hemoproteins dependent on the specific features of their physico-chemical and structural characteristics. Mechanistically, we highlight the significance of immobilized peroxidase reactive intermediates vsmore » diffusible small molecule oxidants (hypochlorous and hypobromous acids) for the overall oxidative biodegradation process in neutrophils and eosinophils. We also accentuate the importance of peroxynitrite-driven pathways realized in macrophages via the engagement of NADPH oxidase- and NO synthase-triggered oxidative mechanisms. We consider possible involvement of oxidative machinery of other professional phagocytes such as microglial cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the context of biodegradation relevant to targeted drug delivery. We evaluate the importance of genetic factors and their manipulations for the enzymatic biodegradation in vivo. Finally, we emphasize a novel type of biodegradation realized via the activation of the “dormant” peroxidase activity of hemoproteins by the nano-surface. This is exemplified by the binding of GO to cyt c causing the unfolding and ‘unmasking’ of the peroxidase activity of the latter. We conclude with the strategies leading to safe by design carbonaceous nanoparticles with optimized characteristics for mechanism-based targeted delivery and regulatable life-span of drugs in circulation. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles can be degraded

  8. Comparison of Sampling Methods to Determine the Impact of Aerobic Biodegradation on Benzene Concentrations at UST Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This material will be interesting to regulators and contractors who collect samples of soil gas to estimate the potential for vapor intrusion of buildings. In the absence of biodegradation, transport of vapors through the unsaturated zone is expected to be by diffusion, and t...

  9. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    PubMed

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-05

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacterial biodegradation of melamine-contaminated aged soil: influence of different pre-culture media or addition of activation material.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Takashi; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biodegrading potential of Arthrobacter sp. MCO, Arthrobacter sp. CSP, and Nocardioides sp. ATD6 in melamine-contaminated upland soil (melamine: approx. 10.5 mg/kg dry weight) after 30 days of incubation. The soil sample used in this study had undergone annual treatment of lime nitrogen, which included melamine; it was aged for more than 10 years in field. When R2A broth was used as the pre-culture medium, Arthrobacter sp. MCO could degrade 55 % of melamine after 30 days of incubation, but the other strains could hardly degrade melamine (approximately 25 %). The addition of trimethylglycine (betaine) in soil as an activation material enhanced the degradation rate of melamine by each strain; more than 50 % of melamine was degraded by all strains after 30 days of incubation. In particular, strain MCO could degrade 72 % of melamine. When the strains were pre-cultured in R2A broth containing melamine, the degradation rate of melamine in soil increased remarkably. The highest (72 %) melamine degradation rate was noted when strain MCO was used with betaine addition.

  12. Predicting ready biodegradability of premanufacture notice chemicals.

    PubMed

    Boethling, Robert S; Lynch, David G; Thom, Gary C

    2003-04-01

    Chemical substances other than pesticides, drugs, and food additives are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), but the United States does not require that new substances be tested automatically for such critical properties as biodegradability. The resulting lack of submitted data has fostered the development of estimation methods, and the BioWIN models for predicting biodegradability from chemical structure have played a prominent role in premanufacture notice (PMN) review. Until now, validation efforts have used only the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) test data and have not included all models. To assess BioWIN performance with PMN substances, we assembled a database of PMNs for which ready biodegradation data had been submitted over the period 1995 through 2001. The 305 PMN structures are highly varied and pose major challenges to chemical property estimation. Despite the variability of ready biodegradation tests, the use of at least six different test methods, and widely varying quality of submitted data, accuracy of four of six BioWIN models (MITI linear, MITI nonlinear, survey ultimate, survey primary) was in the 80+% range for predicting ready biodegradability. Greater accuracy (>90%) can be achieved by using model estimates only when the four models agree (true for 3/4 of the PMNs). The BioWIN linear and nonlinear probability models did not perform as well even when classification criteria were optimized. The results suggest that the MITI and survey BioWIN models are suitable for use in screening-level applications.

  13. Biodegradation of dimethylsilanediol in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, C L; Carpenter, J C; Leib, T K; Spivack, J L

    1996-01-01

    The biodegradation potential of [14C]dimethylsilanediol, the monomer unit of polydimethylsiloxane, in soils was investigated. Dimethylsilanediol was found to be biodegraded in all of the tested soils, as monitored by the production of 14CO2. When 2-propanol was added to the soil as a carbon source in addition to [14C]dimethylsilanediol, the production of 14CO2 increased. A method for the selection of primary substrates that support cometabolic degradation of a target compound was developed. By this method, the activity observed in the soils was successfully transferred to liquid culture. A fungus, Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtendahl, and a bacterium, an Arthrobacter species, were isolated from two different soils, and both microorganisms were able to cometabolize [14C]dimethylsilanediol to 14CO2 in liquid culture. In addition, the Arthrobacter sp. that was isolated grew on dimethylsulfone, and we believe that this is the first reported instance of a microorganism using dimethylsulfone as its primary carbon source. Previous evidence has shown that polydimethylsiloxane is hydrolyzed in soil to the monomer, dimethylsilanediol. Now, biodegradation of dimethylsilanediol in soil has been demonstrated. PMID:8953708

  14. In vitro biodegradation of steranes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chosson, P.; Connan, J.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report reproducible results on the in vitro biodegradation of steranes in various crude oils. 73 pure strains including Pseudomonadacea (33) and Actinomycetaceae (40) have been screened in order to test their capability to degrade steranes contained in total alkanes isolated from various crudes. Biodegradation of steranes has been observed with 7 strains belonging to Nocardia and Arthrobacter genera. 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) and 5{alpha}(H), 14{beta}(H), 17{beta}(H) Steranes with the 20R configuration were degraded under reproducible laboratory conditions. Biodegradation of the sterane mixtures isolated from crude oils followed W. Seiferts rules established on the basismore » of geological observations. 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) C{sub 27}-Steranes with the 20R configuration are degraded first and ends with the 5{alpha}(H), 14{alpha}(H), 17{alpha}(H) C{sub 29}steranes. Then 5{alpha}9h0, 14{beta}(H), and 17{beta}(H) steranes are attacked starting with the 20R configuration. Limited alteration of Tm and Ts terpane has also been observed.« less

  15. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  16. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Macrophages through Respiratory Burst Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jie; Wan, Bin; Yang, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Min; Guo, Liang-Hong; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may be one of major determinants of the toxic outcomes in exposed individuals. In this study, we employed a macrophage/monocyte model, Raw264.7, to investigate the feasibility of regulating the biodegradation of three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (pristine, ox-, and OH-SWCNTs) by respiratory burst modulation. An artificial fluid mimicking the enzymatic reactions of respiratory burst was constituted to reveal the role of respiratory burst played in SWCNT biodegradation. The biodegradation of SWCNTs were characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed significantly accelerated biodegradation of ox-SWCNTs and OH-SWCNTs in macrophages activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which could be prevented by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), whereas p-SWCNTs were resistant to biodegradation. Similar tendencies were observed by using the in vitro enzymatic system, and the degradation rates of these SWCNTs are in the order of OH-SWCNTs > ox-SWCNTs >> p-SWCNTs, suggesting a pivotal role of respiratory burst in accelerating the biodegradation of SWCNTs and that defect sites on SWCNTs might be a prerequisite for the biodegradation to occur. Our findings might provide invaluable clues on the development of intervention measurements for relieving the side effects of SWCNTs and would help to design safer SWCNT products with higher biodegradability and less toxicity. PMID:27011169

  17. Sirolimus-eluting Biodegradable Poly-l-Lactic Acid Stent to Suppress Granulation Tissue Formation in the Rat Urethra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Yung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Do Hoon; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Son, Woo-Chan; Kang, Sung-Gwon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Song, Ho-Young

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the use of sirolimus-eluting biodegradable stents (SEBSs) to suppress granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a rat urethral model. Materials and Methods All experiments were approved by the animal research committee. A total of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three equal groups after biodegradable stent placement. Group A received control biodegradable stents. Groups B and C received stents coated with 90 µg/cm 2 and 450 µg/cm 2 sirolimus, respectively. Six rats in each group were sacrificed after 4 weeks; the remaining rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The therapeutic effectiveness of SEBSs was assessed by comparing the results of retrograde urethrography and histologic examination. Analysis of variance with post hoc comparisons was used to evaluate statistical differences. Results SEBS placement was technically successful in all rats. Urethrographic and histologic examinations revealed significantly less granulation tissue formation at both time points in the rats receiving SEBSs (groups B and C) compared with those that received control stents (group A) (P < .05 for all). There were no significant differences in urethrographic and histologic findings between groups B and C (P > .05 for all). However, the mean number of epithelial layers in group B was higher than that in group C at 4 weeks after stent placement (P < .001). Apoptosis increased in group C compared with groups A and B (P < .05 for all). Conclusion The use of SEBSs suppressed granulation tissue formation secondary to stent placement in a rat urethral model; local therapy with SEBSs may be used to decrease stent-related granulation tissue formation. © RSNA, 2017.

  18. Can you escape the beat? Modelling spatiotemporal biodegradation dynamics during periodic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Sara; Worrich, Anja; Wick, Lukas Y.; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias; Thullner, Martin; Centler, Florian; Banitz, Thomas; Frank, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradation of organic compounds in soil is an important microbial ecosystem service. Soil ecosystems are constantly exposed to disturbances of different spatial configurations and frequencies, challenging their ability to recover the biodegradation function. Thus, the response to these disturbances is crucial for the soil systems' biodegradation performance. The influence of spatial aspects of the disturbance regimes on long-term biodegradation dynamics under periodic disturbances has not been examined, yet. We applied a numerical simulation model considering bacterial growth, degradation, and dispersal to analyze the spatiotemporal biodegradation dynamics under disturbances occuring with different frequencies and with different spatial configurations. We found biodegradation performance decreasing in response to periodic disturbances but on average approaching a new quasi steady state. This mean performance of the disturbed systems increases with both, the interval length between disturbance events and the fragmentation of the spatial disturbance patterns. A detailed spatiotemporal analysis of degradation activity reveals that under highly fragmented disturbance patterns, biodegradation still takes place in the entire disturbed area. For moderately fragmented disturbance patterns, parts of the disturbed area become completely inactive. However, areas with high degradation activity emerge at the interface between disturbed and undisturbed areas, allowing the systems to maintain a relatively high degradation performance. Further decreasing the disturbance patterns' fragmentation, fewer interfaces between disturbed and undisturbed area and, thus, fewer active habitats occur, which reduces biodegradation performances. In additional simulations, we found that bacterial dispersal networks, as for example provided by fungal hyphae, usually increase the areas of high degradation activity and, thus, the biodegradation performance in presence of periodic disturbances

  19. Biodegradation of dissolved humic substances by fungi.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Oulego, Paula; Suárez-Iglesias, Octavio; Díaz, Mario

    2018-04-01

    Humic and fulvic acids constitute humic substances, a complex mixture of many different acids containing carboxyl and phenolate groups, which are not only the principal soil fertility factors but also the main pollutants present in landfill leachates or natural organic matter in water. Due to their low bacterial biodegradability, fungal biodegradation processes are key for their removal. The present study compiles and comments all the available literature on decomposition of aqueous humic substances by fungi or by their extracellular enzymes alone, focusing on the influence of the reaction conditions. The biodegradation extent mainly depends on the characteristics and concentration of the humic compounds, the type of microorganisms selected, the inoculation mode, the C and N sources, the presence of certain chemicals in the medium, the availability of oxygen, the temperature, and the pH.

  20. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  1. Polydisulfide Manganese(II) Complexes as Non-Gadolinium Biodegradable Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhen; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wu, Xueming; Tan, Mingqian; Yin, Shouyu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop safe and effective manganese(II) based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. Materials and Methods In this study, we synthesized and characterized two polydisulfide manganese(II) complexes, Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers and Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers, as new biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. The contrast enhancement of the two manganese based contrast agents were evaluated in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma xenografts, in comparison with MnCl2. Results The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 4.74 and 10.38 mM−1s−1 per manganese at 3T for Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers (Mn=30.50 kDa) and 6.41 and 9.72 mM−1s−1 for Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers (Mn= 61.80 kDa). Both polydisulfide Mn(II) complexes showed significant liver, myocardium and tumor enhancement. Conclusion The manganese based polydisulfide contrast agents have a potential to be developed as alternative non-gadolinium contrast agents for MR cancer and myocardium imaging. PMID:22031457

  2. Biodegradability of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites under aerobic mixed culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Phan, Duc C; Goodwin, David G; Frank, Benjamin P; Bouwer, Edward J; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2018-10-15

    The properties and commercial viability of biodegradable polymers can be significantly enhanced by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The environmental impact and persistence of these carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites (CNT/PNCs) after disposal will be strongly influenced by their microbial interactions, including their biodegradation rates. At the end of consumer use, CNT/PNCs will encounter diverse communities of microorganisms in landfills, surface waters, and wastewater treatment plants. To explore CNT/PNC biodegradation under realistic environmental conditions, the effect of multi-wall CNT (MWCNT) incorporation on the biodegradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) was investigated using a mixed culture of microorganisms from wastewater. Relative to unfilled PHA (0% w/w), the MWCNT loading (0.5-10% w/w) had no statistically significant effect on the rate of PHA matrix biodegradation. Independent of the MWCNT loading, the extent of CNT/PNC mass remaining closely corresponded to the initial mass of CNTs in the matrix suggesting a lack of CNT release. CNT/PNC biodegradation was complete in approximately 20 days and resulted in the formation of a compressed CNT mat that retained the shape of the initial CNT/PNC. This study suggests that although CNTs have been shown to be cytotoxic towards a range of different microorganisms, this does not necessarily impact the biodegradation of the surrounding polymer matrix in mixed culture, particularly in situations where the polymer type and/or microbial population favor rapid polymer biodegradation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Types, production and assessment of biobased food packaging materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food packaging performs an essential function, but packaging materials can have a negative impact on the environment. This book describes the latest advances in bio-based food packaging materials. Book provides a comprehensive review on bio-based, biodegradable and recycled materials and discusses t...

  4. Best conditions for biodegradation of diesel oil by chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Héberger, Károly; Kemény, Sándor; Olszanowski, Andrzej; Voelkel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Diesel oil biodegradation by different bacteria-yeast-rhamnolipids consortia was tested. Chromatographic analysis of post-biodegradation residue was completed with chemometric tools (ANOVA, and a novel ranking procedure based on the sum of ranking differences). These tools were used in the selection of the most effective systems. The best results of aliphatic fractions of diesel oil biodegradation were observed for a yeast consortia with Aeromonas hydrophila KR4. For these systems the positive effect of rhamnolipids on hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed. However, rhamnolipids addition did not always have a positive influence on the biodegradation process (e.g. in case of yeast consortia with Stenotrophomonas maltophila KR7). Moreover, particular differences in the degradation pattern were observed for lower and higher alkanes than in the case with C22. Normally, the best conditions for "lower" alkanes are Aeromonas hydrophila KR4 + emulsifier independently from yeasts and e.g. Pseudomonas stutzeri KR7 for C24 alkane.

  5. Enhanced dimethyl phthalate biodegradation by accelerating phthalic acid di-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingxia; Zhang, Yongming; Jiang, Ling; Yang, Chao; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2017-12-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) is initiated with two hydrolysis reactions that generate an intermediate, phthalic acid (PA), that is further biodegraded through a two-step di-oxygenation reaction. DMP biodegradation is inhibited when PA accumulates, but DMP's biodegradation can be enhanced by adding an exogenous electron donor. We evaluated the effect of adding succinate, acetate, or formate as an exogenous electron donor. PA removal rates were increased by 15 and 30% for initial PA concentrations of 0.3 and 0.6 mM when 0.15 and 0.30 mM succinate, respectively, were added as exogenous electron donor. The same electron-equivalent additions of acetate and formate had the same acceleration impacts on PA removal. Consequently, the DMP-removal rate, even PA coexisting with DMP simultaneously, was accelerated by 37% by simultaneous addition of 0.3 mM succinate. Thus, lowering the accumulation of PA by addition of an electron increased the rate of DMP biodegradation.

  6. Best conditions for biodegradation of diesel oil by chemometric tools

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Héberger, Károly; Kemény, Sándor; Olszanowski, Andrzej; Voelkel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Diesel oil biodegradation by different bacteria-yeast-rhamnolipids consortia was tested. Chromatographic analysis of post-biodegradation residue was completed with chemometric tools (ANOVA, and a novel ranking procedure based on the sum of ranking differences). These tools were used in the selection of the most effective systems. The best results of aliphatic fractions of diesel oil biodegradation were observed for a yeast consortia with Aeromonas hydrophila KR4. For these systems the positive effect of rhamnolipids on hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed. However, rhamnolipids addition did not always have a positive influence on the biodegradation process (e.g. in case of yeast consortia with Stenotrophomonas maltophila KR7). Moreover, particular differences in the degradation pattern were observed for lower and higher alkanes than in the case with C22. Normally, the best conditions for “lower” alkanes are Aeromonas hydrophila KR4 + emulsifier independently from yeasts and e.g. Pseudomonas stutzeri KR7 for C24 alkane. PMID:24948922

  7. Improving material and energy recovery from the sewage sludge and biomass residues

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kliopova, Irina, E-mail: irina.kliopova@ktu.lt; Makarskienė, Kristina

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • SRF production from 10–40 mm fraction of pre-composted sludge and biomass residues. • The material and energy balance of compost and SRF production. • Characteristics of raw materials and classification of produced SRF. • Results of the efficiency of energy recovery, comparison analysis with – sawdust. - Abstract: Sewage sludge management is a big problem all over the world because of its large quantities and harmful impact on the environment. Energy conversion through fermentation, compost production from treated sludge for agriculture, especially for growing energetic plants, and treated sludge use for soil remediation are widely used alternatives ofmore » sewage sludge management. Recently, in many EU countries the popularity of these methods has decreased due to the sewage sludge content (heavy metals, organic pollutions and other hazards materials). This paper presents research results where the possibility of solid recovered fuel (SRF) production from the separate fraction (10–40 mm) of pre-composted materials – sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment plant and biomass residues has been evaluated. The remaining fractions of pre-composted materials can be successfully used for compost or fertiliser production, as the concentration of heavy metals in the analysed composition is reduced in comparison with sewage sludge. During the experiment presented in this paper the volume of analysed biodegradable waste was reduced by 96%: about 20% of input biodegradable waste was recovered to SRF in the form of pellets with 14.25 MJ kg{sup −1} of the net calorific value, about 23% were composted, the rest – evaporated and discharged in a wastewater. The methods of material-energy balances and comparison analysis of experiment data have been chosen for the environmental impact assessment of this biodegradable waste management alternative. Results of the efficiency of energy recovery from sewage sludge by SRF production and

  8. Implications of fullerene-60 upon in-vitro LDPE biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sah, Aditi; Kapri, Anil; Zaidi, M G H; Negi, Harshita; Goel, Reeta

    2010-05-01

    Fullerene-60 nanoparticles were used for studying their influence upon the LDPE biodegradation efficiency of two potential polymer-degrading consortia comprising of three bacterial strains each. At a concentration of 0.01% (w/v) in minimal broth lacking dextrose, fullerene did not have any negative influence upon the consortial growth. However, fullerene was found to be detrimental for bacterial growth at higher concentrations (viz. 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%). Although, addition of 0.01% fullerene into the biodegradation assays containing 5 mg/ml LDPE subsided growth-curves significantly, but subsequent analysis of degraded products revealed enhanced biodegradation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) revealed breakage and formation of chemical bonds along with introduction of nu C-O frequencies into hydrocarbon backbone of LDPE. Further, simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTG-DTA) revealed higher number of decomposition steps along with a 1,000-fold decrease in the heat of reactions (DeltaH) in fullerene-assisted biodegraded LDPE suggesting probable formation of multiple, macromolecular by-products. This is the first report whereby fullerene-60, which is otherwise considered toxic, has helped to alleviate polymer biodegradation process of bacterial consortia.

  9. Biodegradation of imidazolium ionic liquids by activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Maton, Cedric; Stevens, Christian V

    2015-11-01

    Biological properties of ionic liquids (ILs) have been usually tested with the help of standard biodegradation or ecotoxicity tests. So far, several articles on the identification of intermediate metabolites of microbiological decay of ILs have been published. Simultaneously, the number of novel ILs with unrecognized characteristics regarding biodegradability and effect on organisms and environment is still increasing. In this work, seven imidazolium ionic liquids of different chemical structure were studied. Three of them are 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromides, while the other four are tetra- or completely substituted imidazolium iodides. This study focused on the identification of intermediate metabolites of the aforementioned ionic liquids subjected to biodegradation in a laboratory activated sludge system. Both fully substituted ionic liquids and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide were barely biodegradable. In the case of two of them, no biotransformation products were detected. The elongation of the alkyl side chain made the IL more susceptible for microbiological decomposition. 1-Decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide was biotransformed most easily. Its primary biodegradation up to 100 % could be achieved. Nevertheless, the cleavage of the imidazolium ring has not been observed.

  10. Structure-biodegradability relationship of nonylphenol isomers during biological wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixia; Li, Jianbing; Zhou, Yuwen; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Zhang, Yi

    2009-05-01

    The relationship between nonylphenol (NP) isomer structure and its biodegradability within the wastewater treatment process of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated. The GC-MS method was used for detecting the NP isomers existing in the SBR influent, activated sludge and effluent. Fifteen NP isomers were detected in the influent, with significant biodegradability variations being observed among these isomers. It was found that the NP isomers associated with retention time of 10.553, 10.646, 10.774, and 10.906 min in the GC-MS analysis showed higher biodegradability, while the isomers with retention time of 10.475, 10.800, and 10.857 min illustrated lower biodegradability. Through analyzing the mass spectrograms, the chemical structures of four selected NP isomers in the wastewater were further deduced. The higher correlation coefficients of 0.9421 and 0.9085 were observed between the NP isomer biodegradation rates and the molecular connectivity indexes with the order of two and four, respectively. Such correlation analysis indicated that a more complex side branch structure (such as a larger side carbon-chain branch or more branches in the nonyl) of NP isomer would lead to lower biodegradability, and a longer nonyl chain of the isomer would result in a higher biodegradability.

  11. 7 CFR 3406.17 - Program application materials-research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Program application materials-research. 3406.17... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Research Proposal § 3406.17 Program application materials—research. Program application materials in an application...

  12. 7 CFR 3406.17 - Program application materials-research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Program application materials-research. 3406.17... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Research Proposal § 3406.17 Program application materials—research. Program application materials in an application...

  13. 7 CFR 3406.17 - Program application materials-research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Research Proposal § 3406.17 Program application materials—research. Program application materials in an application... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program application materials-research. 3406.17...

  14. Comparison of biodegradation of poly(ethylene glycol)s and poly(propylene glycol)s.

    PubMed

    Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Grześkowiak, Tomasz; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Łukaszewski, Zenon

    2006-07-01

    The biodegradation of poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) and poly(propylene glycol)s (PPGs), both being major by-products of non-ionic surfactants biodegradation, was studied under the conditions of the River Water Die-Away Test. PEGs were isolated from a water matrix using solid-phase extraction with graphitized carbon black sorbent, then derivatized with phenyl isocyanate and determined by HPLC with UV detection. PPGs were isolated from a water matrix by liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform, then derivatized with naphthyl isocyanate and determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The primary biodegradation of both PEGs and PPGs reached approximately 99% during the test. The tests show different biodegradation pathways of PEG and PPG. During PEG biodegradation, their chains are shortened leading to the formation of ethylene glycol and diethylene glycol. During PPG biodegradation, no short-chained biodegradation products were found.

  15. The effect of mechanical loads on the degradation of aliphatic biodegradable polyesters.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Chu, Zhaowei; Li, Xiaoming; Ding, Xili; Guo, Meng; Zhao, Haoran; Yao, Jie; Wang, Lizhen; Cai, Qiang; Fan, Yubo

    2017-06-01

    Aliphatic biodegradable polyesters have been the most widely used synthetic polymers for developing biodegradable devices as alternatives for the currently used permanent medical devices. The performances during biodegradation process play crucial roles for final realization of their functions. Because physiological and biochemical environment in vivo significantly affects biodegradation process, large numbers of studies on effects of mechanical loads on the degradation of aliphatic biodegradable polyesters have been launched during last decades. In this review article, we discussed the mechanism of biodegradation and several different mechanical loads that have been reported to affect the biodegradation process. Other physiological and biochemical factors related to mechanical loads were also discussed. The mechanical load could change the conformational strain energy and morphology to weaken the stability of the polymer. Besides, the load and pattern could accelerate the loss of intrinsic mechanical properties of polymers. This indicated that investigations into effects of mechanical loads on the degradation should be indispensable. More combination condition of mechanical loads and multiple factors should be considered in order to keep the degradation rate controllable and evaluate the degradation process in vivo accurately. Only then can the degradable devise achieve the desired effects and further expand the special applications of aliphatic biodegradable polyesters.

  16. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials.

    PubMed

    Cho, B H; Chino, H; Tsuji, H; Kunito, T; Nagaoka, K; Otsuka, S; Yamashita, K; Matsumoto, S; Oyaizu, H

    1997-10-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out. Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of materials (baked diatomite, microporous glass, coconut charcoal, an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture (Formula X from Oppenheimer, Inc.), and eight kinds of surfactants) were applied to accelerate the biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons. 15% to 33% of the contaminated oil was decomposed during 43 weeks' incubation. Among the materials tested, coconut charcoal enhanced the biodegradation. On the contrary, the addition of an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture impeded the biodegradation. The effects of the other materials were very slight. The toxicity of the biodegraded compounds was estimated by the Ames test and the tea pollen tube growth test. Both of the hydrophobic (dichloromethane extracts) and hydrophilic (methanol extracts) fractions showed a very slight toxicity in the Ames test. In the tea pollen tube growth test, the hydrophobic fraction was not toxic and enhanced the growth of pollen tubes.

  17. Study of the degradation of mulch materials in vegetable crops for organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Moreno, Marta; Mancebo, Ignacio; Moreno, Carmen; Villena, Jaime; Meco, Ramón

    2014-05-01

    Mulching is the most common technique used worldwide by vegetable growers in protected cultivation. For this purpose, several plastic materials have been used, with polyethylene (PE) being the most widespread. However, PE is produced from petroleum derivatives, it is not degradable, and thus pollutes the environment for periods much longer than the crop duration (Martín-Closas and Pelacho, 2011), which are very important negative aspects especially for organic farmers. A large portion of plastic films is left on the field or burnt uncontrollably by the farmers, with the associated negative consequences to the environment (Moreno and Moreno, 2008). Therefore, the best solution is to find a material with a lifetime similar to the crop duration time that can be later incorporated by the agricultural system through a biodegradation process (Martín-Closas and Pelacho, 2011). In this context, various biodegradable materials have been considered as alternatives in the last few years, including oxo-biodegradable films, biopolymer mulches, different types of papers, and crop residues (Kasirajan and Ngouajio, 2012). In this work we evaluate the evolution of different properties related to mulch degradation in both the buried and the superficial (exposed) part of mulch materials of different composition (standard black PE, papers and black biodegradable plastics) in summer vegetable crops under organic management in Castilla-La Mancha (Central Spain). As results, it is remarkable the early deterioration suffered by the buried part of the papers, disappearing completely in the soil at the end of the crop cycles and therefore indicating the total incorporation of these materials to the soil once the crop has finished. In the case of the degradation of the exposed mulch, small differences between crops were observed. In general, all the materials were less degraded under the plants than when receiving directly the solar radiation. As conclusion, biodegradable mulches degrade

  18. Comparison of clinical outcomes of three different packing materials in the treatment of severe acute otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Demir, D; Yılmaz, M S; Güven, M; Kara, A; Elden, H; Erkorkmaz, Ü

    2018-06-13

    To analyse the clinical outcomes of biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam versus ribbon gauze and ear wick in the treatment of severe acute otitis externa. Ninety-two adults with severe acute otitis externa were randomly assigned to groups receiving ear wick (n = 28), ribbon gauze (n = 34) or biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam (n = 30). Clinical efficacy, in terms of otalgia, oedema, erythema and tenderness of the external auditory canal, was assessed before packing was applied and at follow up on the 3rd and 7th days of presentation. All packing materials were associated with improved otalgia and oedema on the 3rd day; however, there were significant differences between biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam and the other packing materials, and there was no significant reduction in tenderness in the biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam group on the 3rd day. In the ribbon gauze and ear wick groups, improvements in all clinical efficacy scores were statistically significant for all pairwise comparisons. The three packing materials were all quite effective in treating severe acute otitis externa, but ear wick and ribbon gauze were superior to biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam for relieving signs and symptoms, especially on the 3rd day.

  19. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, Shawn E.; Lehman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.

    2014-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a highly automated facility developed in a joint venture/partnership between NASA and ESA center dot Allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses onboard the International Space Station (ISS) center dot Multi-user facility for high temperature materials science research center dot Launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module ?Research goals center dot Provide means of studying materials processing in space to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved center dot Benefit materials science research via the microgravity environment of space where the researcher can better isolate the effects of gravity during solidification on the properties of materials center dot Use the knowledge gained from experiments to make reliable predictions about conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials

  20. Resistance to moist conditions of whey protein isolate and pea starch biodegradable films and low density polyethylene nondegradable films: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehyar, G. F.; Bawab, A. Al

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable packaging materials are degraded under the natural environmental conditions. Therefore using them could alleviate the problem of plastics accumulation in nature. For effective replacement of plastics, with biodegradable materials, biodegradable packages should keep their properties under the high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Therefore the objectives of the study were to develop biodegradable packaging material based on whey protein isolate (WPI) and pea starch (PS). To study their mechanical, oxygen barrier and solubility properties under different RHs compared with those of low density polyethylene (LDPE), the most used plastic in packaging. Films of WPI and PS were prepared separately and conditioned at different RH (30-90%) then their properties were studied. At low RHs (<50%), WPI films had 2-3 times lower elongation at break (E or stretchability) than PS and LDPE. Increasing RH to 90% significantly (P<0.01) increased the elongation of PS but not WPI and LDPE films. LDPE and WPI films kept significantly (P<0.01) higher tensile strength (TS) than PS films at high RH (90%). Oxygen permeability (OP) of all films was very low (<0.5 cm3 μm m-2 d-1 kPa-1) below 40% RH but increased for PS films and became significantly (P<0.01) different than that of LDPE and WPI at > 40% RH. Oxygen permeability of WPI and LDPE did no